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Sample records for age-dependent pharmacokinetic study

  1. The effect of age on digoxin pharmacokinetics in Fischer-344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.L.; Owens, S.M.; Ruch, S.; Kennedy, R.H.; Seifen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Digoxin protein binding and pharmacokinetics were studied in 4-, 14-, and 25-month-old male Fischer-344 rats to determine if there were age-dependent changes in digoxin disposition. Serum protein binding did not differ among age groups. The average percentage unbound digoxin for all animals was 61.3 ± 5.3% (means ± SD, n = 15). For pharmacokinetic studies, [ 3 H]digoxin and 1 mg/kg unlabeled digoxin were administered as an intravenous bolus dose to animals from each age group. The [ 3 H]digoxin terminal elimination half-life was 2.0, 2.3, and 2.5 hr, respectively. The steady-state volume of distribution in the three age groups was 1.51, 1.49, and 1.27 liters/kg, respectively. Total body clearance for the three age groups was 14.2, 12.1, and 7.5 ml/min/kg, respectively. Analysis of variance of these data followed by Duncan's multiple range test indicated a significant decrease in clearance in the aged rats (25-month-old, p less than 0.05). This age-dependent decrease in clearance suggested that digoxin pharmacokinetics could be a significant factor in age-related alterations in digoxin cardiotoxicity in the rat, as it is in humans, and that the Fischer-344 rat could be a useful model for studies of digoxin pharmacokinetic changes with age

  2. An Age-Dependent Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model for the Organophosphorus Insecticide Chlorpyrifos in the Preweanling Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.

    2007-08-01

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon) and trichloropyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. In the current study, a modified physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model incorporating age-dependent changes in CYP450, PON-1, and tissue ChE levels for rats was developed. In this model, age was used as a dependent function to estimate body weight which was then used to allometrically scale both metabolism and tissue ChE levels. Model simulations suggest that preweanling rats are particularly sensitive to CPF toxicity, with levels of CPF-oxon in blood and brain disproportionately increasing, relative to the response in adult rats. This age-dependent non-linear increase in CPF-oxon concentration may potentially result from the depletion of non-target B-esterases, and a lower PON-1 metabolic capacity in younger animals. These results indicate that the PBPK/PD model behaves consistently with the general understanding of CPF toxicity, pharmacokinetics and tissue ChE inhibition in neonatal and adult rats. Hence, this model represents an important starting point for developing a computational model to assess the neurotoxic potential of environmentally relevant organophosphate exposures in infants and children.

  3. Time-dependent pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone and its efficacy in human breast cancer xenograft mice: a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qing-Yu; Liu, Sheng-Jun; Tian, Xiu-Yun; Hao, Chun-Yi; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-Yan

    2018-03-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is the substrate of CYP3A. However, the activity of CYP3A could be induced by DEX when DEX was persistently administered, resulting in auto-induction and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with time-dependent clearance) of DEX. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic profiles of DEX after single or multiple doses in human breast cancer xenograft nude mice and established a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for characterizing the time-dependent PK of DEX as well as its anti-cancer effect. The mice were orally given a single or multiple doses (8 mg/kg) of DEX, and the plasma concentrations of DEX were assessed using LC-MS/MS. Tumor volumes were recorded daily. Based on the experimental data, a two-compartment model with first order absorption and time-dependent clearance was established, and the time-dependence of clearance was modeled by a sigmoid E max equation. Moreover, a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model was developed, in which the auto-induction effect of DEX on its metabolizing enzyme CYP3A was integrated and drug potency was described using an E max equation. The PK/PD model was further used to predict the drug efficacy when the auto-induction effect was or was not considered, which further revealed the necessity of adding the auto-induction effect into the final PK/PD model. This study established a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model for characterizing the time-dependent pharmacokinetics of DEX and its anti-cancer effect in breast cancer xenograft mice. The model may serve as a reference for DEX dose adjustments or optimization in future preclinical or clinical studies.

  4. Dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics of apigenin trimethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Mai Gamal; Lin, Hai-Shu

    2018-06-15

    Apigenin trimethyl ether (5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone, ATE), one of the key polymethoxyflavones present in black ginger (rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora) possesses various health-promoting activities. To optimize its medicinal application, the pharmacokinetics of ATE was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats with emphases to identify the impacts from dose and repeated dosing on its major pharmacokinetic parameters. Plasma ATE levels were monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Upon single intravenous administration (2 mg/kg), plasma levels of ATE declined through an apparent first-order process while dose-escalation to 4 and 8 mg/kg led to its non-linear disposition, which could be described by the Michaelis-Menten model. Similarly, dose-dependent oral pharmacokinetics was confirmed and when the dose was escalated from 5 to 15 and 45 mg/kg, much longer mean residence time (MRT 0→last ), higher dose-normalized maximal plasma concentration (C max /Dose) and exposure (AUC/Dose) were observed at 15 and/or 45 mg/kg. One-week daily oral administration of ATE at 15 mg/kg caused its accelerated elimination and the plasma exposure (AUC) after intravenous (2 mg/kg) and oral administration (15 mg/kg) dropped ~40 and 60%, respectively. As ATE displayed both dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics, caution is needed in the medicinal applications of ATE and/or black ginger. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: Xiaoxia.Yang@fda.hhs.gov; Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys.

  6. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys

  7. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael

    2005-01-01

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats

  8. Understanding alterations in drug handling with aging: a focus on the pharmacokinetics of maintenance immunosuppressants in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Tullius, Stefan G; Krenzien, Felix

    2015-08-01

    This review presents current knowledge of the impact of age on the pharmacokinetics of maintenance immunosuppressants. Over the past decade, there has been a steady increase in older patients on organ transplant waiting lists. As a result, the average age of transplant recipients has significantly increased. The survival and quality-of-life benefits of transplantation in the elderly population have been demonstrated. Advancing age is associated with changes in immune responses, as well as changes in drug handling. Immunosenescence is a physiological part of aging and is linked to reduced rejection rates, but also higher rates of diabetes, infections and malignancies. Physiologic changes associated with age can have a significant impact on the pharmacokinetics of the maintenance immunosuppressive agents. Taken together, these age-related changes impact older transplant candidates and may have significant implications for managing immunosuppression in the elderly. Despite the lack of formal efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetic studies of individual immunosuppressants in the elderly transplant population, there are enough data available for practitioners to be able to adequately manage their older patients. A proficient understanding of the factors that impact the pharmacokinetics of the immunosuppressants in the elderly is essential to managing these patients successfully.

  9. Pharmacokinetics: curiosity or cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    What is the fate of a drug from the time of its introduction into the body to the end of its duration. Pharmacokinetic studies are often designed to provide an answer to this question. But this question may be asked of any drug and research that is limited to answering it will remain empirical. Pharmacokinetic studies can provide answers to many other drug-related questions. In doing so pharmacokinetic research has the potential of improving drug therapy as well as the design and evaluation of drugs. While significant contributions can be cited, the future of pharmacokinetics depends upon its increased impact on clinical practice and drug design. How can a molecule be tailored for site specificity. Can chemical modification selectively alter absorption, distribution, metabolism, binding or excretion. In what new ways can pharmacokinetic information increase the predictability of drug therapy. Such questions, to which pharmacokinetics should provide answers, are numerous and easily identified. But the definitive studies are difficult both to create and conduct. Whether or not pharmacokinetics can achieve its full potential will depend upon the extent to which it can provide answers to these currently unanswered questions

  10. Perioperative pharmacokinetics of methadone in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshuman; Tallchief, Danielle; Blood, Jane; Kim, Thomas; London, Amy; Kharasch, Evan D

    2011-12-01

    Methadone is frequently administered to adults experiencing anesthesia and receiving pain treatment. Methadone pharmacokinetics in adults are well characterized, including the perioperative period. Methadone is also used in children. There is, however, no information on methadone pharmacokinetics in children of any age. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the pharmacokinetics of intravenous methadone in children undergoing surgery. Perioperative opioid-sparing effects were also assessed. Eligible subjects were children 5-18 yr undergoing general anesthesia and surgery, with an anticipated postoperative inpatient stay exceeding 3 days. Three groups of 10 to 11 patients each received intravenous methadone hydrochloride after anesthetic induction in ascending dose groups of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg (up to 20 mg). Anesthetic care was not otherwise changed. Venous blood was obtained for 4 days, for stereoselective determination of methadone and metabolites. Pain assessments were made each morning. Daily and total opioid consumption was determined. Perioperative opioid consumption and pain was determined in a second cohort, which was matched to age, sex, race, ethnicity, surgical procedure, and length of stay, but not receiving methadone. The final methadone study cohort was 31 adolescents (14 ± 2 yr, range 10-18) undergoing major spine surgery for a diagnosis of scoliosis. Methadone pharmacokinetics were linear over the dose range 0.1-0.3 mg/kg. Disposition was stereoselective. Methadone administration did not dose-dependently affect postoperative pain scores, and did not dose-dependently decrease daily or total postoperative opioid consumption in spinal fusion patients. Methadone enantiomer disposition in adolescents undergoing surgery was similar to that in healthy adults.

  11. Guaifenesin Pharmacokinetics Following Single‐Dose Oral Administration in Children Aged 2 to 17 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary A.; Solomon, Gail; Albrecht, Helmut H.; Reitberg, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study characterized guaifenesin pharmacokinetics in children aged 2 to 17 years (n = 40) who received a single oral dose of guaifenesin (age‐based doses of 100‐400 mg) 2 hours after breakfast. Plasma samples were obtained before and for 8 hours after dosing and analyzed for guaifenesin using liquid chromatography‐tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using noncompartmental methods, relationships with age were assessed using linear regression, and dose proportionality was assessed on 95% confidence intervals. Based on the upper dose recommended in the monograph (for both children and adolescents), area under the curve from time zero to infinity and maximum plasma concentration both increased with age. However, when comparing the upper dose for children aged 2 to 11 years with the lower dose for adolescents aged 12 to 17 years, similar systemic exposure was observed. As expected due to increasing body size, oral clearance (CLo) and terminal volume of distribution (Vz/F) increased with age. Due to a larger increase in Vz/F than CLo, an increase in terminal exponential half‐life was also observed. Allometric scaling indicated no maturation‐related changes in CLo and Vz/F. PMID:26632082

  12. Pharmacokinetic study of gallocatechin-7-gallate from Pithecellobium clypearia Benth. in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetic profile of gallocatechin-7-gallate (J10688 was studied in rats after intravenous administration. Male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD rats received 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg (i.v. of J10688 and plasma drug concentrations were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC–MS method. The pharmacokinetic software Data Analysis System (Version 3.0 was used to calculate the pharmacokinetic parameters. For different i.v. doses of J10688, the mean peak plasma concentration (C0 values ranged from 11.26 to 50.82 mg/L, and mean area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0–t values ranged from 1.75 to 11.80 (mg·h/L. J10688 lacked dose-dependent pharmacokinetic properties within doses between 1 and 10 mg/kg, based on the power model. The method developed in this study was sensitive, precise, and stable. The pharmacokinetic properties of J10688 in SD rats were shown to have rapid distribution and clearance values. These pharmacokinetic results may contribute to an improved understanding of the pharmacological actions of J10688.

  13. Acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Brian J; van Lingen, Richard A; Hansen, Tom G

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens.......The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens....

  14. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents: Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viby-Mogensen, J.; Østergaard, D.; Donati, F.

    2000-01-01

    Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design......Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design...

  15. Effect of age on the pharmacokinetics of polymorphic nimodipine in rats after oral administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenli; Wang, Xiaona; Chen, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    The previous investigation has proved that their existed pharmacokinetic difference between the different crystal forms of the polymorphic drugs after oral administration. However, no systemic investigations have been made on the change of this pharmacokinetic difference, resulted either from...... and 3.06 in 9-month-old rats. Since age difference could result in unparallelled change of the absorption and bioavailability of the polymorphic drugs, the results in this experiment are of value for further investigation of crystal form selection in clinical trials and rational clinical application...

  16. [A study of population pharmacokinetics of linezolid in Chinese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Bai, N; Liu, Y N; Wang, R

    2016-12-12

    Objective: To study the population pharmacokinetic (PPK) profiles of linezolid in Chinese healthy volunteers and infected patients. Methods: Linezolid 600 mg was administered to 31 Chinese healthy volunteers with a single dose and to 57 infected patients every 12 h for at least 5 doses. High performance liquid chromatography was applied to determine the plasma concentration of linezolid. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling method was applied to analyze the PPK profiles. Results: For healthy volunteers with single dose of linezolid, 2-compartment with linear elimination model was the most appropriate structural pharmacokinetic model. The population typical value of apparent volume of central compartment was 26.99 L, volume of peripheral compartment was 22.22 L, apparent clearance of central compartment was 7.99 L/h, and clearance of peripheral compartment was 101.28 L/h. For each 1 kg deviation of weight from the mean value, 0.62 L of volume of peripheral compartment was correlated. For Chinese infected patients with multiple doses of linezolid, 1-compartment with linear elimination model was the most appropriate structural pharmacokinetic model. The population typical value of apparent volume was 38.85 L, and apparent clearance was 4.70 L/h. For each 1 kg deviation of weight from the mean value, 0.79 L of volume, as well as 0.04 L/h of clearance were correlated. For each 1 year deviation of age from the mean value, -0.045 L/h of clearance was correlated. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic profiles of linezolid in Chinese simulate a 2-compartment with linear elimination model when single dose is administrated, and the weight is linearly positive-correlated to volume. While a 1-compartment with linear elimination model is appropriate when multiple doses are administrated, and the weight is linearly positive-correlated to volume and clearance, but the age is linearly negative-correlated to clearance.

  17. Patient acceptability and practical implications of pharmacokinetic studies in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, N A; Twelves, C J; Ramirez, A J; Towlson, K E; Gregory, W M; Richards, M A

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the practical implications and acceptability to patients of pharmacokinetic studies in 34 women receiving anthracyclines for advanced breast cancer. The following parameters were recorded: age, ECOG performance status, psychological state (Rotterdam Symptom Checklist), cytotoxic drug and dose, number of venepunctures for treatment and sampling, and time when the sampling cannula was removed. Immediately after finishing pharmacokinetic sampling, patients completed a questionnaire which revealed that (i) all patients understood sampling was for research, (ii) 35% of patients experienced problems with sampling, (iii) benefits from participation were perceived by 56% of patients. Of 20 patients later questioned after completion of their treatment course, 40% recalled difficulties with blood sampling. Factors identifying in advance those patients who tolerate pharmacokinetic studies poorly were not identified but the number of venepunctures should be minimised. Patients may also perceive benefits from 'non-therapeutic' research.

  18. Age-related P-glycoprotein expression in the intestine and affecting the pharmacokinetics of orally administered enrofloxacin in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengjie; Bughio, Shamsuddin; Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Lingling; Dai, Xiaohua; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is the most important factor for the efficacy of any drug and it is determined by P- glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Confirmation of P-gp expression during ontogeny is needed for understanding the differences in therapeutic efficacy of any drug in juvenile and adult animals. In this study, Abcb1 mRNA levels in the liver and intestine of broilers during ontogeny were analysed by RT qPCR. Cellular distribution of P-gp was detected by immunohistochemstry. Age-related differences of enrofloxacin pharmacokinetics were also studied. It was found that broilers aged 4 week-old expressed significantly (P0.05) age-related difference in the duodenum. Furthermore, the highest and lowest levels of Abcb1 mRNA expression were observed in the jejunum, and duodenum, respectively. P-gp immunoreactivity was detected on the apical surface of the enterocytes and in the bile canalicular membranes of the hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the 8 week-old broilers, when orally administrated enrofloxacin, exhibited significantly higher Cmax (1.97 vs. 0.98 μg • ml(-1), P=0.009), AUC(14.54 vs. 9.35 μg • ml(-1) • h, P=0.005) and Ka (1.38 vs. 0.43 h(-1), P=0.032), as well as lower Tpeak (1.78 vs. 3.28 h, P=0.048) and T1/2 ka (0.6 vs. 1.64 h, P=0.012) than the 4 week-old broilers. The bioavailability of enrofloxacin in 8 week-old broilers was increased by 15.9%, compared with that in 4 week-old birds. Interestingly, combining verapamil, a P-gp modulator, significantly improved pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin in all birds. The results indicate juvenile broilers had a higher expression of P-gp in the intestine, affecting the pharmacokinetics and reducing the bioavailability of oral enrofloxacin in broilers. On the basis of our results, it is recommended that alternative dose regimes are necessary for different ages of broilers for effective therapy.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin, by intravenous or by inhalation route in opioid-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, Elisabeth J.; van Ree, Jan M.; van den Brink, Wim; Hillebrand, Michel J. X.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Hendriks, Vincent M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2006-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study was performed in opioid-dependent patients in the Netherlands, who were currently treated with high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin on medical prescription. Besides intravenous heroin, heroin was prescribed for inhalation by "chasing the dragon"

  20. Mycophenolic Acid Pharmacokinetics and Relapse in Children with Steroid–Dependent Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Stéphanie; Dallocchio, Aymeric; Guigonis, Vincent; Saint-Marcoux, Frank; Llanas, Brigitte; Ichay, Lydia; Bandin, Flavio; Godron, Astrid; Morin, Denis; Brochard, Karine; Gandia, Peggy; Bouchet, Stéphane; Marquet, Pierre; Decramer, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Therapeutic drug monitoring of mycophenolic acid can improve clinical outcome in organ transplantation and lupus, but data are scarce in idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. The aim of our study was to investigate whether mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics are associated with disease control in children receiving mycophenolate mofetil for the treatment of steroid–dependent nephrotic syndrome. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a retrospective multicenter study including 95 children with steroid–dependent nephrotic syndrome treated with mycophenolate mofetil with or without steroids. Area under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid was determined in all children on the basis of sampling times at 20, 60, and 180 minutes postdose, using Bayesian estimation. The association between a threshold value of the area under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid and the relapse rate was assessed using a negative binomial model. Results In total, 140 areas under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid were analyzed. The findings indicate individual dose adaptation in 53 patients (38%) to achieve an area under the concentration-time curve target of 30–60 mg·h/L. In a multivariable negative binomial model including sex, age at disease onset, time to start of mycophenolate mofetil, previous immunomodulatory treatment, and concomitant prednisone dose, a level of area under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid >45 mg·h/L was significantly associated with a lower relapse rate (rate ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 0.89; P=0.01). Conclusions Therapeutic drug monitoring leading to individualized dosing may improve the efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil in steroid–dependent nephrotic syndrome. Additional prospective studies are warranted to determine the optimal target for area under the concentration-time curve of mycophenolic acid in this population. PMID:27445161

  1. Age at onset typology in opioid dependent men: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Biswajit; Mattoo, Surendra K; Basu, Debasish

    2002-04-01

    This study attempted to apply age at onset typology in ICD-10 diagnosed opioid dependence. The sample comprised 80 men seeking treatment at an addiction clinic. The measures included socio-demographic and clinical profile, Severity of Opioid Dependence Questionnaire, Modified Sensation Seeking Scale, Multiphasic Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) and Family History Assessment Module. A cut-off age of 20/21 years for an early-onset late-onset typology of opioid dependence was obtained using two methods - the modal age at onset method and one-third sample by age at onset method. The early onset group showed significant differences in terms of it being more often younger, urban, unmarried, wage earning or students, using oral opioids (not heroin or injectables), showing higher lifetime use and dependence of sedatives, earlier onset of use and dependence of sedatives and tobacco, and higher global psychopathology in terms of MPQ. The early onset group also showed statistically insignificant trends for lesser use and dependence of alcohol, higher severity of opioid dependence, more legal and less social complications, higher sensation seeking (except boredom susceptibility), and more frequent substance dependence in first degree relatives. The age at onset typology in opioid dependence appears to be feasible and having some similarities to similar typology in alcoholism.

  2. Diclofenac pharmacokinetic meta-analysis and dose recommendations for surgical pain in children aged 1-12 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Joseph F; Tibboel, Dick; Korpela, Reijo; Olkkola, Klaus T

    2011-03-01

    Diclofenac is an effective, opiate-sparing analgesic for acute pain in children, which is commonly used in pediatric surgical units. Recently, a Cochrane review concluded the major knowledge gap in diclofenac use is dosing information. A pharmacokinetic meta-analysis has been undertaken with the aim of recommending a dose for children aged 1-12 years. Studies containing diclofenac pharmacokinetic data were identified during a Cochrane systematic review, and authors were asked to provide raw data. A pooled population analysis was undertaken in NONMEM to define the pharmacokinetics of intravenous, oral, and rectal diclofenac in children. Simulations were performed to recommend a dose yielding an equivalent area under diclofenac concentration-time curve (AUC) to a 50-mg dispersible tablet in adults. Data from 111 children aged 1-14 years consisting of 375 samples following intravenous, oral suspension, and suppositories were used. Adult dispersible tablet and suspension data were added to provide a reference AUC and support the absorption modeling, respectively. A three-compartment model described disposition, a dual-absorption compartment model was used for suspension and dispersible tablet data, and single-absorption compartment model for suppositories. The estimate of clearance was 16.5 l·h(-1) ·70 kg(-1) and bioavailabilities were 0.36, 0.63, and 0.35 for suspension, suppository, and dispersible tablets, respectively. Single doses of 0.3 mg·kg(-1) for intravenous, 0.5 mg·kg(-1) for suppositories, and 1 mg·kg(-1) for oral diclofenac in children aged 1-12 years are recommended as they yield a similar AUC to 50 mg in adults. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Risk evaluations of aging: Procedures guide for an age-dependent PSA with emphasis on prioritization and sensitivity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Based on the previous work which has been performed in the project, a procedures guide is being developed for carrying out an age-dependent probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for evaluating the core damage frequency with aging effects explicitly treated. A PSA is basically a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The emphasis of the guide is on prioritization and sensitivity studies. Focus is also on active components although consideration of aging effects in passive components is also treated. The guide is intended to become a NUREG/CR and is the first of three volumes which are being developed. The following topics with demonstrations and applications are described in the presentation: (1) the age-dependent PSA versus the standard PSA; (2) component reliability models used in an age-dependent PSA; (3) approaches for transforming a PSA into an age-dependent PSA; (4) application of an age-dependent PSA; (5) using a PSA to evaluate the risk effects from aging passive components; (6) evaluation of the risk importance of passive components; (7) prioritizations of aging contributors; (8) evaluations of test and maintenance effectiveness; and (9) sensitivity studies and uncertainty analyses of aging effects

  4. Development of a paediatric population-based model of the pharmacokinetics of rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Stefan; Becker, Corina; Burghaus, Rolf; Coboeken, Katrin; Edginton, Andrea; Lippert, Jörg; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Thelen, Kirstin; Mück, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism has been increasingly recognised as a clinical problem in the paediatric population. Guideline recommendations for antithrombotic therapy in paediatric patients are based mainly on extrapolation from adult clinical trial data, owing to the limited number of clinical trials in paediatric populations. The oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban has been approved in adult patients for several thromboembolic disorders, and its well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and efficacy and safety profiles in adults warrant further investigation of this agent in the paediatric population. The objective of this study was to develop and qualify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for rivaroxaban doses of 10 and 20 mg in adults and to scale this model to the paediatric population (0-18 years) to inform the dosing regimen for a clinical study of rivaroxaban in paediatric patients. Experimental data sets from phase I studies supported the development and qualification of an adult PBPK model. This adult PBPK model was then scaled to the paediatric population by including anthropometric and physiological information, age-dependent clearance and age-dependent protein binding. The pharmacokinetic properties of rivaroxaban in virtual populations of children were simulated for two body weight-related dosing regimens equivalent to 10 and 20 mg once daily in adults. The quality of the model was judged by means of a visual predictive check. Subsequently, paediatric simulations of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum (peak) plasma drug concentration (C max) and concentration in plasma after 24 h (C 24h) were compared with the adult reference simulations. Simulations for AUC, C max and C 24h throughout the investigated age range largely overlapped with values obtained for the corresponding dose in the adult reference simulation for both body weight-related dosing regimens. However

  5. Incorporating pharmacokinetic differences between children and adults in assessing children's risks to environmental toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, Gary; Hattis, Dale; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2004-01-01

    Children's risks from environmental toxicant exposure can be affected by pharmacokinetic factors that affect the internal dose of parent chemical or active metabolite. There are numerous physiologic differences between neonates and adults that affect pharmacokinetics including size of lipid, and tissue compartments, organ blood flows, protein binding capacity, and immature function of renal and hepatic systems. These factors combine to decrease the clearance of many therapeutic drugs, which can also be expected to occur with environmental toxicants in neonates. The net effect may be greater or lesser internal dose of active toxicant depending upon how the agent is distributed, metabolized, and eliminated. Child/adult pharmacokinetic differences decrease with increasing postnatal age, but these factors should still be considered in any children's age group, birth through adolescence, for which there is toxicant exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can simulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics in both children and adults, allowing for a direct comparison of internal dose and risk across age groups. This review provides special focus on the development of hepatic cytochrome P-450 enzymes (CYPs) in early life and how this information, along with many factors unique to children, can be applied to PBPK models for this receptor population. This review describes a case study involving the development of neonatal PBPK models for the CYP1A2 substrates caffeine and theophylline. These models were calibrated with pharmacokinetic data in neonates and used to help understand key metabolic differences between neonates and adults across these two drugs

  6. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Amenamevir in Healthy Subjects: Analysis of Four Randomized Phase 1 Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusawake, Tomohiro; Keirns, James J; Kowalski, Donna; den Adel, Martin; Groenendaal-van de Meent, Dorien; Takada, Akitsugu; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Katashima, Masataka

    2017-12-01

    Amenamevir (ASP2151) is a nonnucleoside antiherpesvirus compound available for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. In this article we summarize the findings of four phase 1 studies in healthy participants. Four randomized phase 1 studies investigated the safety and pharmacokinetics of single and multiple doses of amenamevir, including the assessment of age group effect (nonelderly vs elderly), food effect, and the relative bioavailability of two formulations. Amenamevir was administered orally at various doses as a single dose (5-2400 mg) or daily (300 or 600 mg/day) for 7 days. Following single and multiple oral doses, amenamevir demonstrated a less than dose proportional increase in the pharmacokinetic parameters area under the plasma drug concentration versus time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC inf ) and C max . After single and multiple oral 300-mg doses of amenamevir, no apparent differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between nonelderly and elderly participants. In contrast, with the amenamevir 600-mg dose both the area under the plasma drug concentration versus time curve from time zero to 24 h and C max were slightly increased and renal clearance was decreased in elderly participants. The pharmacokinetics of amenamevir was affected by food, with AUC inf increased by about 90%. In the bioavailability study, AUC inf and C max were slightly lower following tablet versus capsule administration (decreased by 14 and 12%, respectively), with relative bioavailability of 86%. The different amenamevir doses and formulations were safe and well tolerated; no deaths or serious adverse events were reported. Amenamevir had less than dose proportional pharmacokinetic characteristics. Age may have an influence on amenamevir pharmacokinetics; however, the effect was considered minimal. The pharmacokinetics of amenamevir were affected by food, with AUC inf almost doubling when amenamevir was administered with food. The concentration versus

  7. A Phase I study evaluating the effect of age and weight on the pharmacokinetics of an injectable formulation of diclofenac solubilized with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldwater R

    2016-12-01

    in the weight-based cohort. Regression analysis on pooled data from the age- and weight-based cohorts revealed that increasing body weight was associated with a significant increase in diclofenac clearance (CL, suggesting decreased exposure in high-weight patients. Analysis of the pooled population also demonstrated an inverse relationship between age and elimination half-life (t1/2, likely due to a decrease in the volume of distribution (Vz with increased age, not a change in CL. There were no deaths, serious adverse events, or adverse events that led to discontinuation. Conclusion: This study suggests that the CL of diclofenac is not dependent on age in elderly subjects receiving HPβCD-diclofenac but indicates that diclofenac CL increases with increasing body weight. Keywords: analgesia, pain control, pharmacokinetics, obesity, elderly, NSAID

  8. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  9. New Modified UPLC/Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for Determination of Risperidone and Its Active Metabolite 9-Hydroxyrisperidone in Plasma: Application to Dose-Dependent Pharmacokinetic Study in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Ezzeldin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive and specific liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS assay has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of risperidone (RIS and its active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OH-RIS in rat plasma using olanzapine (OLA as internal standard (IS. Pharmacokinetics of risperidone and its active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone was compared across different doses (0.3, 1.0, and 6.0 mg/kg. Serial blood sample was collected over a time of 48 hours and analyzed for risperidone and its active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone. The pharmacokinetics parameters including Cmax, tmax, and AUC were determined for risperidone and its active ingredient. The method was linear in the concentration range of 0.2–500 ng/mL for risperidone and 9-OH-risperidone, with coefficients of determination greater than 0.998 and lower limit of quantitation of 0.2 ng/mL. Blood levels of risperidone and its active metabolite were roughly dose-proportional. The method developed herein is simple and rapid and was successfully applied for dose-dependent pharmacokinetic study.

  10. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of pravastatin in children with familial hypercholesterolaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Heleen E.; Wiegman, Albert; Koopmans, Richard P.; Bakker, Henk D.; Kastelein, John J. P.; van Boxtel, Chris J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine pharmacokinetic data for pravastatin in children, since current data are insufficient in this age group. Subjects and methods: A 2-week, multiple-dose, steady-state pharmacokinetic study was carried out with pravastatin 20mg daily in 24 children with familial

  11. Epidural anaesthesia with levobupivacaine and ropivacaine : effects of age on the pharmacokinetics, neural blockade and haemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, Mischa J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Epidural neural blockade results from processes after the administration of a local anaesthetic in the epidural space until the uptake in neural tissue. The pharmacokinetics, neural blockade and haemodynamics after epidural anaesthesia may be influenced by several factors, with age as the most

  12. A human life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model for chlorpyrifos: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Hinderliter, Paul M; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, Michael J; Poet, Torka S

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to some chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to predict disposition of chlorpyrifos and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, previously measured age-dependent metabolism of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon were integrated into age-related descriptions of human anatomy and physiology. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ⩾0.6mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (100- to 1000-fold higher than environmental exposure levels), 6months old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent doses. At lower doses more relevant to environmental exposures, simulations predict that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict chlorpyrifos disposition and biological response over various postnatal life stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen extrapolated from in vivo animal pharmacokinetics using in vitro human hepatic clearances and simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for radio-labeled microdose clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kunikane, Eriko; Nishiyama, Sayako; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Chiba, Koji; Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics of drug substances orally administered in humans from rat pharmacokinetic data using tolbutamide and acetaminophen as model compounds. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from rat studies based on reported plasma concentrations were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors. In this extrapolation, in vitro metabolic clearance data were obtained using liver preparations. Rates of tolbutamide elimination were roughly similar in rat and human liver microsome experiments, but acetaminophen elimination by rat liver microsomes and cytosolic preparations showed a tendency to be faster than those in humans. Using a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, estimated human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen were consistent with reported concentrations. Tolbutamide cleared in a roughly similar manner in humans and rats, but medical-dose levels of acetaminophen cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in rats. The data presented here illustrate how pharmacokinetic data in combination with a simple PBPK model can be used to assist evaluations of the pharmacological/toxicological potential of new drug substances and for estimating human radiation exposures from radio-labeled drugs when planning human studies. (author)

  14. [Impact of ECMO on drugs pharmacokinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasni, Nesrine; Lemaitre, Florian; Fernandez, Christine; Combes, Alain; Farinotti, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system used in the treatment of patients of all ages with severe respiratory or cardiorespiratory failure. Despite the intensive use of drugs in the treatment of patients on ECMO, few studies have been conducted to determine the impact of this device on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Publications in this field have shown pharmacokinetics changes resulting in an increase in volume of distribution of drugs and/or decreased clearance with consequent increase of their half-life. Reduced plasma concentrations of some drugs due to their adsorption on the different components of the circuit further complicates the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of patients treated by ECMO. The literature published up to now on the pharmacokinetic changes associated with ECMO provide preliminary support for dosage adjustment. However, more research is needed to identify dosage strategies for this patient population. © 2011 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  15. [Dependence of the pharmacokinetics of captopril on the type of adaptation reactions in the organism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udut, V V; Khazanov, V A; Gurto, R V; Borodulina, E V; Postnikova, Iu E

    2007-01-01

    The dependence of the pharmacokinetic profiles (PhP) of captopril in the phase of adaptation reactions in the organism has been studied within the framework of randomized, comparative, double cross research of bioeqivalency of captopril (Aspharma Co, Anzhero-Sudzhensk) and capoten (Bristol Myers Squibb Co.; official Russian producer, Akrikhin KhimFarmKombinat). It is established that the maximum bioaccessibility and high concentration of captopril in the blood plasma is determined on the background of physiologically optimum reactions of training and in the zone of quiet activation. These characteristics decrease during the reactions of general adaptation syndrome according to the type of increased activation and reactivation.

  16. Pediatric Obesity: Pharmacokinetic Alterations and Effects on Antimicrobial Dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Stephanie; Bradley, John; Nguyen, William Huy; Tran, Tri; Ny, Pamela; La, Kirsten; Vivian, Eva; Le, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Limited data exist for appropriate drug dosing in obese children. This comprehensive review summarizes pharmacokinetic (PK) alterations that occur with age and obesity, and these effects on antimicrobial dosing. A thorough comparison of different measures of body weight and specific antimicrobial agents including cefazolin, cefepime, ceftazidime, daptomycin, doripenem, gentamicin, linezolid, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, tobramycin, vancomycin, and voriconazole is presented. PubMed (1966-July 2015) and Cochrane Library searches were performed using these key terms: children, pharmacokinetic, obesity, overweight, body mass index, ideal body weight, lean body weight, body composition, and specific antimicrobial drugs. PK studies in obese children and, if necessary, data from adult studies were summarized. Knowledge of PK alterations stemming from physiologic changes that occur with age from the neonate to adolescent, as well as those that result from increased body fat, become an essential first step toward optimizing drug dosing in obese children. Excessive amounts of adipose tissue contribute significantly to body size, total body water content, and organ size and function that may modify drug distribution and clearance. PK studies that evaluated antimicrobial dosing primarily used total (or actual) body weight (TBW) for loading doses and TBW or adjusted body weight for maintenance doses, depending on the drugs' properties and dosing units. PK studies in obese children are imperative to elucidate drug distribution, clearance, and, consequently, the dose required for effective therapy in these children. Future studies should evaluate the effects of both age and obesity on drug dosing because the incidence of obesity is increasing in pediatric patients. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  17. [Discussion about traditional Chinese medicine pharmacokinetics study based on first botanical drug approved by FDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fanghua

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics study is one of main components of pharmaceuticals development. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Veregen as the first botanical drug in 2006. This article introduced FDA's requirement on pharmacokinetics study of botanical drug and pharmacokinetics studies of Veregen, summarized current requirement and status quo of pharmacokinetics study on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural medicine in China, and discussed about pharmacokinetics study strategy for TCM and natural medicine.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of BMEDA after Intravenous Administration in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsien Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of N,N-bis(2-mercapatoethly-N',N'-diethylenediamine (BMEDA, a molecule that can form a chelate with rhenium-188 (188Re to produce the 188Re-BMEDA-liposomes, was studied. In this work, beagles received a single injection of BMEDA, at doses of 1, 2, or 5 mg/kg; the concentration of BMEDA in the beagles’ plasma was then analyzed and determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Based on the pharmacokinetic parameters of BMEDA, we found that male and female animals shared similar patterns indicating that the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA is independent of gender differences. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA was seen to be non-linear because the increase of mean AUC0–t and AUC0–∞ values tend to be greater than dose proportional while the mean Vss and CL values of BMEDA appeared to be dose dependent. The information on the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA generated from this study will serve as a basis to design appropriate pharmacology and toxicology studies for future human use.

  19. Observational infant exploratory [14C]-paracetamol pharmacokinetic microdose/therapeutic dose study with accelerator mass spectrometry bioanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Colin R; Park, Kevin B; French, Neil S; Earnshaw, Caroline; Schipani, Alessandro; Selby, Andrew M; Byrne, Lindsay; Siner, Sarah; Crawley, Francis P; Vaes, Wouter H J; van Duijn, Esther; deLigt, Rianne; Varendi, Heili; Lass, Jane; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Maruszak, Wioletta; Turner, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study were to compare [14C]-paracetamol ([14C]-PARA) paediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) after administration mixed in a therapeutic dose or an isolated microdose and to develop further and validate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) bioanalysis in the 0–2 year old age group. Methods [14C]-PARA concentrations in 10–15 µl plasma samples were measured after enteral or i.v. administration of a single [14C]-PARA microdose or mixed in with therapeutic dose in infants receiving PARA as part of their therapeutic regimen. Results Thirty-four infants were included in the PARA PK analysis for this study: oral microdose (n = 4), i.v. microdose (n = 6), oral therapeutic (n = 6) and i.v. therapeutic (n = 18). The respective mean clearance (CL) values (SDs in parentheses) for these dosed groups were 1.46 (1.00) l h–1, 1.76 (1.07) l h–1, 2.93 (2.08) l h–1 and 2.72 (3.10) l h–1, t1/2 values 2.65 h, 2.55 h, 8.36 h and 7.16 h and dose normalized AUC(0-t) (mg l–1 h) values were 0.90 (0.43), 0.84 (0.57), 0.7 (0.79) and 0.54 (0.26). Conclusions All necessary ethical, scientific, clinical and regulatory procedures were put in place to conduct PK studies using enteral and systemic microdosing in two European centres. The pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic dose (mg kg–1) and a microdose (ng kg–1) in babies between 35 to 127 weeks post-menstrual age. [14C]-PARA pharmacokinetic parameters were within a two-fold range after a therapeutic dose or a microdose. Exploratory studies using doses significantly less than therapeutic doses may offer ethical and safety advantages with increased bionalytical sensitivity in selected exploratory paediatric pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:25619398

  20. Observational infant exploratory [(14)C]-paracetamol pharmacokinetic microdose/therapeutic dose study with accelerator mass spectrometry bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Colin R; Park, Kevin B; French, Neil S; Earnshaw, Caroline; Schipani, Alessandro; Selby, Andrew M; Byrne, Lindsay; Siner, Sarah; Crawley, Francis P; Vaes, Wouter H J; van Duijn, Esther; deLigt, Rianne; Varendi, Heili; Lass, Jane; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Maruszak, Wioletta; Turner, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    The aims of the study were to compare [(14)C]-paracetamol ([(14)C]-PARA) paediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) after administration mixed in a therapeutic dose or an isolated microdose and to develop further and validate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) bioanalysis in the 0-2 year old age group. [(14)C]-PARA concentrations in 10-15 µl plasma samples were measured after enteral or i.v. administration of a single [(14)C]-PARA microdose or mixed in with therapeutic dose in infants receiving PARA as part of their therapeutic regimen. Thirty-four infants were included in the PARA PK analysis for this study: oral microdose (n = 4), i.v. microdose (n = 6), oral therapeutic (n = 6) and i.v. therapeutic (n = 18). The respective mean clearance (CL) values (SDs in parentheses) for these dosed groups were 1.46 (1.00) l h(-1), 1.76 (1.07) l h(-1), 2.93 (2.08) l h(-1) and 2.72 (3.10) l h(-1), t(1/2) values 2.65 h, 2.55 h, 8.36 h and 7.16 h and dose normalized AUC(0-t) (mg l(-1) h) values were 0.90 (0.43), 0.84 (0.57), 0.7 (0.79) and 0.54 (0.26). All necessary ethical, scientific, clinical and regulatory procedures were put in place to conduct PK studies using enteral and systemic microdosing in two European centres. The pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic dose (mg kg(-1)) and a microdose (ng kg(-1)) in babies between 35 to 127 weeks post-menstrual age. [(14)C]-PARA pharmacokinetic parameters were within a two-fold range after a therapeutic dose or a microdose. Exploratory studies using doses significantly less than therapeutic doses may offer ethical and safety advantages with increased bionalytical sensitivity in selected exploratory paediatric pharmacokinetic studies. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of repeated sodium salicylate administration to laying hens: evidence for time dependent increase in drug elimination from plasma and eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażej Poźniak

    Full Text Available Salicylates were the first non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs to be used in any species and are still widely used in humans and livestock. However, the data on their pharmacokinetics in animals is limited, especially after repeated administration. Evidence exist that in chickens (Gallus gallus salicylate (SA may induce its own elimination. The aim of this study was to investigate salicylate pharmacokinetics and egg residues during repeated administration of sodium salicylate (SS to laying hens. Pharmacokinetics of SA was assessed during 14 d oral administration of SS at daily doses of 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg body weight to laying hens. On the 1st, 7th and 14th d a 24 h-long pharmacokinetic study was carried out, whereas eggs were collected daily. Salicylate concentrations in plasma and eggs were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and pharmacokinetic variables were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Mean residence time (MRT, minimal plasma concentration (Cmin, C16h and elimination half-life (T1/2el of SA showed gradual decrease in layers administered with a lower dose. Total body clearance (ClB increased. Layers administered with the higher dose showed a decrease only in the T1/2el. In the low dose group, SA was found only in the egg white and was low throughout the experiment. Egg whites from the higher dose group showed initially high SA levels which significantly decreased during the experiment. Yolk SA levels were lower and showed longer periods of accumulation and elimination. Repeated administration of SS induces SA elimination, although this effect may differ depending on the dose and production type of a chicken. Decreased plasma drug concentration may have clinical implications during prolonged SS treatment.

  2. Age-Dependence and Aging-Dependence: Neuronal Loss and Lifespan in a C. elegans Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfeld, Javier; Fontana, Walter

    2017-12-23

    It is often assumed, but not established, that the major neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, are not just age-dependent (their incidence changes with time) but actually aging-dependent (their incidence is coupled to the process that determines lifespan). To determine a dependence on the aging process requires the joint probability distribution of disease onset and lifespan. For human Parkinson's disease, such a joint distribution is not available, because the disease cuts lifespan short. To acquire a joint distribution, we resorted to an established C. elegans model of Parkinson's disease in which the loss of dopaminergic neurons is not fatal. We find that lifespan is not correlated with the loss of individual neurons. Therefore, neuronal loss is age-dependent and aging-independent. We also find that a lifespan-extending intervention into insulin/IGF1 signaling accelerates the loss of specific dopaminergic neurons, while leaving death and neuronal loss times uncorrelated. This suggests that distinct and compartmentalized instances of the same genetically encoded insulin/IGF1 signaling machinery act independently to control neurodegeneration and lifespan in C. elegans . Although the human context might well be different, our study calls attention to the need to maintain a rigorous distinction between age-dependence and aging-dependence.

  3. The impact of age on lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine kinetics: a historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Ilse; Wilhelm, Abraham J; Sander, Josemir W; Lindhout, Dick

    2013-10-01

    Age as well as estrogen levels may have an impact on the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine (LTG) and monohydroxycarbazepine (MHD), the active metabolite of oxcarbazepine (OXC). To assess the effects of age and menopause, we evaluated retrospectively a therapeutic drug-monitoring database. Samples from 507 women and 302 men taking LTG and 464 women and 319 men taking OXC were used to develop a population pharmacokinetic model. Data were analyzed using NONMEM software and were compared with a population pharmacokinetic model based on samples of 1705 women and 1771 men taking carbamazepine (CBZ). Age was a significant factor contributing to pharmacokinetic variability in individuals using LTG, OXC, and CBZ with increasing clearance as a function of bioavailability (Cl/F) over age 18, a maximum Cl/F at 33years (CBZ) and 36 years (LTG and OXC), and a gradual decrease of Cl/F towards older age. We found no effect of perimenopausal age range on LTG and MHD clearance. © 2013.

  4. Plasma paracetamol concentrations and pharmacokinetics following rectal administration in neonates and young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; O'Brien, K; Morton, N S

    1999-01-01

    Despite widespread use in children pharmacokinetic data about paracetamol are relatively scarce, not the least in the youngest age groups. This study aimed to describe plasma paracetamol concentrations and pharmacokinetics of a single rectal paracetamol dose in neonates and young infants....

  5. Observational infant exploratory [14C]-paracetamol pharmacokinetic microdose/therapeutic dose study with accelerator mass spectrometry bioanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garner, C.R.; Park, K.B.; French, N.S.; Earnshaw, C.; Schipani, A.; Selby, A.M.; Byrne, L.; Siner, S.; Crawley, F.P.; Vaes, W.H.J.; Duijn, E. van; ligt, R. de; Varendi, H.; Lass, J.; Grynkiewicz, G.; Maruszak, W.; Turner, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study were to compare [14C]-paracetamol ([14C]-PARA) paediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) after administration mixed in a therapeutic dose or an isolated microdose and to develop further and validate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) bioanalysis in the 0-2 year old age group.

  6. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    was performed in PubMed and Embase databases. The pharmacokinetic variables included maximal plasma/serum concentration (Cmax), time to maximal plasma/serum concentration (Tmax), elimination half-life (T1/2), area-under-the-curve plasma/serum concentrations (AUC), clearance (Cl), volume of distribution (VD......) and 1602 L (4 mg, oral). Bioavailability of oral melatonin ranged from 9 to 33%. Pharmacokinetics was affected by age, caffeine, smoking, oral contraceptives, feeding status, and fluvoxamine. Critically ill patients displayed accelerated absorption and compromised elimination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite...

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mivacurium in young adult and elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Doris; Viby-Mogensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers......age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers...

  8. Pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir in infants under the age of 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Rashmi; Matthews, Slade; Khandaker, Gulam; Walker, Karen; Festa, Marino; Booy, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Oseltamivir is the only antiviral treatment recommended for influenza in young children over the age of 1 year. There is scant data on oseltamivir pharmacokinetics (PK) in infants clearance in infants time points afterwards, to calculate Cmax (ng/mL), Tmax (h), AUC0-t (ng h/mL) and time for AUC (h). Four children with influenza A received oral oseltamivir, 2.35-3 mg/kg/dose. This dose range produced a target oseltamivir carboxylate plasma concentration in excess of the proposed 12-h target AUC of 3800 ng h/mL, selected from earlier studies to avert resistance. One patient developed GIT adverse event: dry retching. Oseltamivir was well tolerated at a dose of 2.35-3 mg/kg/dose twice a day in infants under the age of 1 year. In general agreement with earlier data, these doses produced a target oseltamivir carboxylate plasma exposure in excess of the proposed 12-h target exposure of AUC equal to 3800 ng h/mL in two patients. The limited plasma concentration data in the remaining two patients were not inconsistent with the target exposure being reached.

  9. [Study on differences between pharmacokinetics and chromatopharmacodynamics for Chinese materia medica formulae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuyuan; Deng, Kaiwen; Zou, Huan; Qiu, Yun; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Honghao

    2011-01-01

    To study on the differences between chromatopharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with fingerprint chromatography) and chromatopharmacodynamics (pharmacodynamics with fingerprint chromatography) of Chinese materia medica formulae to answer the question whether the pharmacokinetic parameters of multiple composites can be utilized to guide the medication of multiple composites. On the base of established four chromatopharmacology (pharmacology with chromatographic fingerprint), the pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics were analyzed comparably on their mathematical model and parameter definition. On the basis of quantitative pharmacology, the function expressions and total statistical parameters, such as total zero moment, total first moment, total second moment of the pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics were analyzed to the common expressions and elucidated results for single and multiple components in Chinese materia medica formulae. Total quantitative pharmacokinetic, i.e., chromatopharmacokinetic parameter were decided by each component pharmacokinetic parameters, whereas the total quantitative pharmacodynamic, i.e., chromatopharmacodynamic parameter were decided by both of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of each components. The pharmacokinetic parameters were corresponded to pharmacodynamic parameters with an existing stable effective coefficient when the constitutive ratio of each composite was a constant. The effects of Chinese materia medica were all controlled by pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic coefficient. It is a special case that the pharmacokinetic parameter could independently guide the clinical medication for single component whereas the chromatopharmacokinetic parameters are not applied to the multiple drug combination system, and not be used to solve problems of chromatopharmacokinetic of Chinese materia medica formulae.

  10. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpulainen, Elina; Välitalo, Pyry; Kokki, Merja; Lehtonen, Marko; Hooker, Andrew; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    AIMS This study was designed to characterize paediatric pharmacokinetics and central nervous system exposure of flurbiprofen. METHODS The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen were studied in 64 healthy children aged 3 months to 13 years, undergoing surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Children were administered preoperatively a single dose of flurbiprofen intravenously as prodrug (n = 27) or by mouth as syrup (n = 37). A single cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample (n = 60) was collected at the induction of anaesthesia, and plasma samples (n = 304) before, during and after the operation (up to 20 h after administration). A population pharmacokinetic model was built using the NONMEM software package. RESULTS Flurbiprofen concentrations in plasma were well described by a three compartment model. The apparent bioavailability of oral flurbiprofen syrup was 81%. The estimated clearance (CL) was 0.96 l h−1 70 kg−1. Age did not affect the clearance after weight had been included as a covariate. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was 8.1 l 70 kg−1. Flurbiprofen permeated into the CSF, reaching concentrations that were seven-fold higher compared with unbound plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics can be described using only weight as a covariate in children above 6 months, while more research is needed in neonates and in younger infants. PMID:20840447

  11. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 μg d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Völkel et al., 2002). Völkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Völkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: ► A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. ► The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. ► The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. ► Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. ► Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  12. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  13. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) on the ... assayed using a sensitive and validated reverse phase high performance liquid ..... factors may contribute to these variations. [17].

  14. Population pharmacokinetics and relationship between demographic and clinical variables and pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, L M L; Degraeuwe, P L J; Nieman, F H M; de Wolf, M C; de Boer, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346

    Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates were calculated from 725 routine plasma gentamicin concentrations obtained in 177 neonates of 24 to 42 weeks' gestational age in their first week of life. Kel increases and V/W decreases with increasing gestational age. Almost identical results were

  15. Critical Age-Dependent Branching Markov Processes and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper studies: (i) the long-time behaviour of the empirical distribution of age and normalized position of an age-dependent critical branching Markov process conditioned on non-extinction; and (ii) the super-process limit of a sequence of age-dependent critical branching Brownian motions.

  16. Pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic study of hyperoside ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on its pharmacokinetic (PK) properties revealed that it is a stable compound ... attention in drug discovery and food supplement research ... neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cAMP response element ... antidepressant effect of hyperoside is mediated through .... Saposhnikovia divaricata by high performance counter-.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic variability of heroin and its metabolites: review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, Elisabeth J.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of heroin after intravenous, oral, intranasal, intramuscular and rectal application and after inhalation in humans, with a special focus on heroin maintenance therapy in heroin dependent patients. In heroin maintenance therapy high doses pharmaceutically

  18. The Old-Age Healthy Dependency Ratio in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszyńska, Magdalena M; Rau, Roland

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to answer the question of whether improvements in the health of the elderly in European countries could compensate for population ageing on the supply side of the labour market. We propose a state-of-health-specific (additive) decomposition of the old-age dependency ratio into an old-age healthy dependency ratio and an old-age unhealthy dependency ratio in order to participate in a discussion of the significance of changes in population health to compensate for the ageing of the labour force. Applying the proposed indicators to the Eurostat's population projection for the years 2010-2050, and assuming there will be equal improvements in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy at birth, we discuss various scenarios concerning future of the European labour force. While improvements in population health are anticipated during the years 2010-2050, the growth in the number of elderly people in Europe may be expected to lead to a rise in both healthy and unhealthy dependency ratios. The healthy dependency ratio is, however, projected to make up the greater part of the old-age dependency ratio. In the European countries in 2006, the value of the old-age dependency ratio was 25. But in the year 2050, with a positive migration balance over the years 2010-2050, there would be 18 elderly people in poor health plus 34 in good health per 100 people in the current working age range of 15-64. In the scenarios developed in this study, we demonstrate that improvements in health and progress in preventing disability will not, by themselves, compensate for the ageing of the workforce. However, coupled with a positive migration balance, at the level and with the age structure assumed in the Eurostat's population projections, these developments could ease the effect of population ageing on the supply side of the European labour market.

  19. USE OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR CHLOROFORM IN RATS TO DETERMINE AGE-RELATED TOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    USE OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR CHLOROFORM IN RATS TO DETERMINE AGE-RELATED TOXICITY.CR Eklund, MV Evans, and JE Simmons. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD,PKB, Research Triangle Park, NC. Chloroform (CHCl3) is a disinfec...

  20. Requirements for pharmacokinetic evaluation of antibiotics in phase I studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, T

    1986-01-01

    Initial pharmacokinetic studies usually include healthy volunteers to minimize variation generated by diseases. Ethical aspects of initial studies are paramount. The guidelines of the Helsinki Declaration should be followed or even extended. Thorough toxicologic screening in animals is a prerequisite. The use of radioisotopes for pharmacokinetic studies should be limited. The basic design of studies includes cross-over administration of intravenous and oral doses of several sizes. Bioavailability, total area under the serum concentration curve, serum half-life, amount eliminated in urine as active drug, and metabolism are the most important data. The fate of the parent compound and of its possible metabolites in both healthy persons and ill individuals (including those with renal or hepatic dysfunction) should be monitored. Diet may have consequences with regard to recommended dosage schedules. When possible, tissue penetration of antibiotics should be assessed, preferably through the analysis of peripheral human lymph and of suction-blister and peritoneal fluids. Theoretical dosage schedules based on pharmacokinetic assessments in healthy persons should be tested in patients with infectious disease, particularly in those with reduced renal and/or hepatic function.

  1. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of colon-specific pH and time-dependent flurbiprofen tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sateesh Kumar; Veerareddy, Prabhakar Reddy; Devadasu, Venkat Ratnam

    2015-09-01

    Present research deals with the development of compression-coated flurbiprofen colon-targeted tablets to retard the drug release in the upper gastro intestinal system, but progressively release the drug in the colon. Flurbiprofen core tablets were prepared by direct compression method and were compression coated using sodium alginate and Eudragit S100. The formulation is optimized based on the in vitro drug release study and further evaluated by X-ray imaging and pharmacokinetic studies in healthy humans for colonic delivery. The optimized formulation showed negligible drug release (4.33 ± 0.06 %) in the initial lag period followed by progressive release (100.78 ± 0.64 %) for 24 h. The X-ray imaging in human volunteers showed that the tablets reached the colon without disintegrating in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The C max of colon-targeted tablets was 12,374.67 ng/ml at T max 10 h, where as in case of immediate release tablets the C max was 15,677.52 ng/ml at T max 3 h, that signifies the ability of compression-coated tablets to target the colon. Development of compression-coated tablets using combination of time-dependent and pH-sensitive approaches was suitable to target the flurbiprofen to colon.

  3. A comprehensive review of recent studies on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicines (2014-2017) and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiying; Lin, Xinhua; Yao, Hong

    2018-05-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have a long history for safely treating human diseases. Unlike western medicine, TCMs usually contain multiple components synergistically and holistically acting on the diseases. It remains a big challenge to represent rationally the in vivo process of multiple components of TCMs for understanding the relationship between administration and therapeutic effects. For years, efforts were always made to face the challenge, and the achievements were obvious. Here, we give an comprehensive overview of the recent investigation progress (from 2015 to 2017, except the part of 'integrated pharmacokinetics of TCMs' from 2014 to 2017 and the part of 'reverse pharmacokinetics in drug discovery from natural medicines' in 2014) on pharmacokinetics of TCMs, mainly referring to the following six aspects: (1) classical pharmacokinetic studies on TCMs; (2) absorbed components and metabolites identification of TCMs; (3) pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions and herb-herb interactions with TCMs; (4) integrated pharmacokinetics of TCMs; (5) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic combination studies to dissect the action mechanisms of TCMs; and (6) reverse pharmacokinetics in drug discovery from natural medicines. Finally, based on the insights from the recent progress and our latest efforts, we propose new perspectives on the integrated pharmacokinetics of TCMs.

  4. Pharmacokinetic Study of Piracetam in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Pankaj; Dash, Debabrata; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2018-04-01

    Cerebral ischemia affects hepatic enzymes and brain permeability extensively. Piracetam was investigated up to phase III of clinical trials and there is lack of data on brain penetration in cerebral ischemic condition. Thus, knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of piracetam during ischemic condition would aid to improve pharmacotherapeutics in ischemic stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h in male Wistar rats followed by reperfusion. After 24 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion or 22 h of reperfusion, piracetam was administered for pharmacokinetic, brain penetration, and pharmacological experiments. In pharmacokinetic study, blood samples were collected at different time points after 200-mg/kg (oral) and 75-mg/kg (intravenous) administration of piracetam through right external jugular vein cannulation. In brain penetration study, the cerebrospinal fluid, systemic blood, portal blood, and brain samples were collected at pre-designated time points after 200-mg/kg oral administration of piracetam. In a separate experiment, the pharmacological effect of the single oral dose of piracetam in middle cerebral artery occlusion was assessed at a dose of 200 mg/kg. All the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam including area under curve (AUC 0-24 ), maximum plasma concentration (C max ), time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (t max ), elimination half-life (t 1/2 ), volume of distribution (V z ), total body clearance, mean residence time, and bioavailability were found to be similar in ischemic stroke condition except for brain penetration. Piracetam exposure (AUC 0-2 ) in brain and CSF were found to be 2.4- and 3.1-fold higher, respectively, in ischemic stroke compared to control rats. Piracetam significantly reduced infarct volume by 35.77% caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no change in the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam in the ischemic stroke model except for

  5. Prediction of clearance, volume of distribution and half-life by allometric scaling and by use of plasma concentrations predicted from pharmacokinetic constants: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, I

    1999-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, CL, volume of distribution in the central compartment, VdC, and elimination half-life, t1/2beta) predicted by an empirical allometric approach have been compared with parameters predicted from plasma concentrations calculated by use of the pharmacokinetic constants A, B, alpha and beta, where A and B are the intercepts on the Y axis of the plot of plasma concentration against time and alpha and beta are the rate constants, both pairs of constants being for the distribution and elimination phases, respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters of cefpiramide, actisomide, troglitazone, procaterol, moxalactam and ciprofloxacin were scaled from animal data obtained from the literature. Three methods were used to generate plots for the prediction of clearance in man: dependence of clearance on body weight (simple allometric equation); dependence of the product of clearance and maximum life-span potential (MLP) on body weight; and dependence of the product of clearance and brain weight on body weight. Plasma concentrations of the drugs were predicted in man by use of A, B, alpha and beta obtained from animal data. The predicted plasma concentrations were then used to calculate CL, VdC and t1/2beta. The pharmacokinetic parameters predicted by use of both approaches were compared with measured values. The results indicate that simple allometry did not predict clearance satisfactorily for actisomide, troglitazone, procaterol and ciprofloxacin. Use of MLP or the product of clearance and brain weight improved the prediction of clearance for these four drugs. Except for troglitazone, VdC and t1/2beta predicted for man by use of the allometric approach were comparable with measured values for the drugs studied. CL, VdC and t1/2beta predicted by use of pharmacokinetic constants were comparable with values predicted by simple allometry. Thus, if simple allometry failed to predict clearance of a drug, so did the pharmacokinetic constant

  6. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Huixin; van Erp, Nielka; Bins, Sander; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Huitema, Alwin D R

    Background and Objective: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. Methods: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  7. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, H.; Erp, N. van; Bins, S.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Schellens, J.H.; Beijnen, J.H.; Steeghs, N.; Huitema, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. METHODS: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  8. Estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters from non-compartmental variables using Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansirikul, Chantaratsamon; Choi, Malcolm; Duffull, Stephen B

    2005-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a method, termed 'back analysis (BA)', for converting non-compartmental variables to compartment model dependent pharmacokinetic parameters for both one- and two-compartment models. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet was implemented with the use of Solver and visual basic functions. The performance of the BA method in estimating pharmacokinetic parameter values was evaluated by comparing the parameter values obtained to a standard modelling software program, NONMEM, using simulated data. The results show that the BA method was reasonably precise and provided low bias in estimating fixed and random effect parameters for both one- and two-compartment models. The pharmacokinetic parameters estimated from the BA method were similar to those of NONMEM estimation.

  9. Population pharmacokinetics and dosing regimen design of milrinone in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisis, Mary; Jiang, Xuemin; McLachlan, Andrew J; Evans, Nick; Kluckow, Martin; Osborn, David

    2007-01-01

    Aims To define the pharmacokinetics of milrinone in very preterm infants and determine an optimal dose regimen to prevent low systemic blood flow in the first 12 h after birth. Methods A prospective open‐labelled, dose‐escalation pharmacokinetic study was undertaken in two stages. In stage one, infants received milrinone at 0.25 μg/kg/min (n = 8) and 0.5 μg/kg/min (n = 11) infused from 3 to 24 h of age. Infants contributed 4–5 blood samples for concentration–time data which were analysed using a population modelling approach. A simulation study was used to explore the optimal dosing regimen to achieve target milrinone concentrations (180–300 ng/ml). This milrinone regimen was evaluated in stage two (n = 10). Results Infants (n = 29) born before 29 weeks gestation were enrolled. Milrinone pharmacokinetics were described using a one‐compartment model with first‐order elimination rate, with a population mean clearance (CV%) of 35 ml/h (24%) and volume of distribution of 512 ml (21%) and estimated half‐life of 10 h. The 0.25 and 0.5 μg/kg/min dosage regimens did not achieve optimal milrinone concentration‐time profiles to prevent early low systemic blood flow. Simulation studies predicted a loading infusion (0.75 μg/kg/min for 3 h) followed by maintenance infusion (0.2 μg/kg/min until 18 h of age) would provide an optimal milrinone concentration profile. This was confirmed in stage two of the study. Conclusion Population pharmacokinetic modelling in the preterm infant has established an optimal dose regimen for milrinone that increases the likelihood of achieving therapeutic aims and highlights the importance of pharmacokinetic studies in neonatal clinical pharmacology. PMID:16690639

  10. Pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a population pharmacokinetic modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, Amélie; Brevaut-Malaty, Véronique; Vialet, Renaud; Boulamery, Audrey; Bruguerolle, Bernard; Simon, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Phenobarbital is widely used for treatment of neonatal seizures. Its optimal use in neonates and young infants requires information regarding pharmacokinetics. The objective of this study is to characterize the absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a pharmacokinetic parameter which has not yet been investigated. Routine clinical pharmacokinetic data were retrospectively collected from 48 neonates and infants (weight: 0.7-10 kg; patient's postnatal age: 0-206 days; GA: 27-42 weeks) treated with phenobarbital, who were administered as intravenous or suspension by oral routes and hospitalized in a paediatric intensive care unit. Total mean dose of 4.6 mg/kg (3.1-10.6 mg/kg) per day was administered by 30-min infusion or by oral route. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a nonlinear mixed-effect population model software). Data were modelled with an allometric pharmacokinetic model, using three-fourths scaling exponent for clearance (CL). The population typical mean [per cent relative standard error (%RSE)] values for CL, apparent volume of distribution (Vd ) and bioavailability (F) were 0.0054 L/H/kg (7%), 0.64 L/kg (15%) and 48.9% (22%), respectively. The interindividual variability of CL, Vd , F (%RSE) and residual variability (%RSE) was 17% (31%), 50% (27%), 39% (27%) and 7.2 mg/L (29%), respectively. The absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and infants was estimated. The dose should be increased when switching from intravenous to oral administration. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with neonatal encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellhaas, Renée A; Ng, Chee M; Dillon, Christina H; Barks, John D E; Bhatt-Mehta, Varsha

    2013-02-01

    Phenobarbital is the first-line treatment for neonatal seizures. Many neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are treated with therapeutic hypothermia, and about 40% have clinical seizures. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy who undergo therapeutic hypothermia. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics, taking into account maturational changes. Level 3 neonatal ICU. Infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and suspected seizures, all treated with phenobarbital. Some of these infants also received treatment with therapeutic hypothermia. None. A retrospective cohort study of 39 infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with phenobarbital (20 were treated with therapeutic hypothermia and 19 were not). Data on phenobarbital plasma concentrations were collected in 39 subjects with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with or without therapeutic hypothermia. Using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital were developed with a total of 164 plasma concentrations. A one-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics. The clearance of phenobarbital was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age with a maturation half-life of 22.1 days. Therapeutic hypothermia did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenobarbital. Therapeutic hypothermia does not influence the clearance of phenobarbital after accounting for weight and age. Standard phenobarbital dosing is appropriate for the initial treatment of seizures in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride in paediatric patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Tatami, Shinji; Yamamura, Norio; Tadayasu, Yusuke; Sarashina, Akiko; Liesenfeld, Karl-Heinz; Staab, Alexander; Schäfer, Hans-Günter; Ieiri, Ichiro; Higuchi, Shun

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The main objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride (HCl) in paediatric patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic bladder. A secondary objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics in paediatric patients and adults. METHODS Tamsulosin HCl plasma concentrations in 1082 plasma samples from 189 paediatric patients (age range 2–16 years) were analyzed with NONMEM, applying a one compartment model with first-order absorption. Based on the principles of allometry, body weight was incorporated in the base model, along with fixed allometric exponents. Covariate analysis was performed by means of a stepwise forward inclusion and backward elimination procedure. Simulations based on the final model were used to compare the pharmacokinetics with those in adults. RESULTS Beside the priori-implemented body weight, only α1-acid glycoprotein had an effect on both apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution. No other investigated covariates, including gender, age, race, patient population and concomitant therapy with anti-cholinergics, significantly affected the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin HCl (P tamsulosin HCl in paediatric patients was established and it described the data well. There was no major difference in the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin HCl between paediatric patients (age range 2–16 years) and adults when the effect of body weight was taken into consideration. PMID:20642551

  13. Age dependence of tritium metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Jiro

    1983-01-01

    3 H metabolism in vivo was studied by HTO administration to rats of varying ages for examination of the age dependence of 3 H metabolism in humans. When 1 μCi/g body weight of HTO was administered, the time-course changes of urine 3 H showed definite age dependence; the younger the rat, more rapidly did the 3 H concentration decrease. The biological half-life of whole body residues was about 2 days in nursing offsprings and about 4 days in mature rats. Tissue-bound 3 H showed high and rapid distribution to the liver, whereas it was slow in the brain and muscle, and this tendency was more prominent in younger rats. Compared with 3 H in tissue water, the concentration of bound 3 H was relatively high, being prominent in younger rats. The time-course changes of 3 H concentration from both origins also showed age dependence. The in vivo exposure dose after administration of 1 μCi/g body weight of HTO- 3 H was generally smaller in younger rats, the exposure at ages 10 and 25 days being about a half of that of mature rats. Supposing that human metabolism is similar, the estimated dose in one-year-olds after ingestion of 1 μCi/kg body weight of 3 H in the form of HTO is about 3 times that in adults, and that after 1 μCi/kg body weight of 3 H in infants, about a half of that in adults. (Chiba, N.)

  14. A Pharmacokinetics, Efficacy, and Safety Study of Gadoterate Meglumine in Pediatric Subjects Aged Younger Than 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Mario; Koob, Meriam; de Buttet, Sophie; Bourrinet, Philippe; Felices, Mathieu; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta

    2018-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of gadoterate meglumine in pediatric patients younger than 2 years; the secondary objectives were to document its efficacy and safety. This was a Phase IV open-label, prospective study conducted in 9 centers (4 countries). Forty-five patients younger than 2 years with normal estimated glomerular filtration rate and scheduled to undergo routine gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of any organ were included and received a single intravenous injection of gadoterate meglumine (0.1 mmol/kg). To perform the population pharmacokinetics analysis, 3 blood samples per subject were drawn during 3 time windows at time points allocated by randomization. Gadoterate meglumine concentrations were best fitted using a 2-compartmental model with linear elimination from central compartment. The median total clearance adjusted to body weight was estimated at 0.06 L/h per kg and increased with estimated glomerular filtration rate according to a power model. The median volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) adjusted to body weight was estimated at 0.047 L/kg. Estimated median terminal half-life (t1/2β) was 1.35 h, and the median systemic exposure (area under the curve) was 1591 μmol h/L. Efficacy was assessed by comparing precontrast +postcontrast images to precontrast images in a subset of 28 subjects who underwent an MRI examination of brain, spine, and associated tissues. A total of 28 lesions were identified and analyzed in 15 subjects with precontrast images versus 30 lesions in 16 subjects with precontrast + postcontrast images. Lesion visualization was improved with a mean (SD) increase in scores at subject level of 0.7 (1.0) for lesion border delineation, 0.9 (1.6) for internal morphology, and 3.1 (3.2) for contrast enhancement. Twenty-six adverse events occurred postinjection in 13 subjects (28.9%), including 3 serious reported in 1 subject (2.2%). One subject (2

  15. In vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies on methylone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Just; Petersen, Trine Hedebrink; Linnet, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of the stimulant designer drug methylone (methylenedioxymethcathinone) has been documented in most parts of the world. As with many of the new designer drugs that continuously appear in the illicit drug market, little is known about the pharmacokinetics of methylone. Using in vitro studies...

  16. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of oxaliplatin in adults and children identifies important covariates for dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikanjam, Mina; Stewart, Clinton F; Takimoto, Chris H; Synold, Timothy W; Beaty, Orren; Fouladi, Maryam; Capparelli, Edmund V

    2015-03-01

    To characterize the determinants of variability for oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics including age, renal function, and hepatic function in children and adults. Oxaliplatin pharmacokinetic data were combined from phase I and II clinical trials: three pediatric trials (Peds1-3) and two adult NCI organ dysfunction studies (Hepatic and Renal). A population pharmacokinetic model was developed utilizing platinum ultrafiltrate concentrations to characterize changes in oxaliplatin disposition with age and organ dysfunction along with other potential sources of oxaliplatin pharmacokinetic variability. A total of 1,508 concentrations from 186 children and adults were used in the study. The data were well described by a three-compartment model. Serum creatinine (SCR) was an independent predictor of clearance (CL) while age was an independent predictor of volume of distribution. Although age was a significant covariate on CL in the univariate analysis, age effects on CL were entirely accounted for by SCR. Gender, hepatic function, and race had no effect on CL or volume of distribution. Median CL values were 0.58 (Hepatic), 0.34 (Renal), 0.78 (Peds1), 0.74 (Peds2), and 0.81 (Peds3) (L/h/kg(0.75)). Monte Carlo simulations of the final model with 130 mg/m(2) yielded median AUC values of: 14.2 (2-6 years), 16.8 (6-12 years), 16.5 (12-18 years), and 17.3 (>18 years) (µg h/mL). Renal function had the greatest effect on CL with a small age effect seen on the distribution of oxaliplatin. Young pediatric patients had higher CL values than adults as a result of better renal function.

  17. [Role of food interaction pharmacokinetic studies in drug development. Food interaction studies of theophylline and nifedipine retard and buspirone tablets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabant, S; Klebovich, I; Gachályi, B; Renczes, G; Farsang, C

    1998-09-01

    Due to several mechanism, meals may modify the pharmacokinetics of drug products, thereby eliciting to clinically significant food interaction. Food interactions with the drug substance and with the drug formulation should be distinguished. Food interaction of different drug products containing the same active ingredient can be various depending on the pharmaceutical formulation technology. Particularly, in the case of modified release products, the food/formulation interaction can play an important role in the development of food interaction. Well known example, that bioavailability of theophylline can be influenced in different way (either increased, decreased or unchanged) by concomitant intake of food in the case of different sustained release products. The role and methods of food interaction studies in the different kinds of drug development (new chemical entity, modified release products, generics) are reviewed. Prediction of food effect response on the basis of the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drug molecule or formulations is discussed. The results of three food interaction studies carried out the products of EGIS Pharmaceuticals Ltd. are also reviewed. The pharmacokinetic parameters of theophyllin 400 mg retard tablet were practically the same in both fasting condition and administration after consumption of a high fat containing standard breakfast. The ingestion of a high fat containing breakfast, increased the AUC of nifedipine from 259.0 +/- 101.2 ng h/ml to 326.7 +/- 122.5 ng h/ml and Cmax from 34.5 +/- 15.9 ng/ml to 74.3 +/- 23.9 ng/ml in case of nifedipine 20 mg retard tablet, in agreement with the data of literature. The statistical evaluation indicated significant differences between the pharmacokinetic parameters in the case of two administrations (before and after meal). The effect of a high fat containing breakfast for a generic version of buspiron 10 mg tablet and the bioequivalence after food consumption were

  18. Age-dependent complex noise fluctuations in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mareš, Jan; Vyšata, Oldřich; Procházka, Aleš; Vališ, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the parameters of colored noise in EEG data of 17 722 professional drivers aged 18–70. The whole study is based upon experiments showing that biological neural networks may operate in the vicinity of the critical point and that the balance between excitation and inhibition in the human brain is important for the transfer of information. This paper is devoted to the study of EEG power spectrum which can be described best by a power function with 1/f λ distribution and colored noise corresponding to the critical point in the EEG signal has the value of λ = 1 (purple noise). The slow accumulation of energy and its quick release is a universal property of the 1/f distribution. The physiological mechanism causing energy dissipation in the brain seems to depend on the number and strength of the connections between clusters of neurons. With ageing, the number of connections between the neurons decreases. Learning ability and intellectual performance also decrease. Therefore, age-related changes in the λ coefficient can be anticipated. We found that absolute values of λ coefficients decrease significantly with increasing age. Deviations from this rule are related to age-dependent slowing of the dominant frequency in the alpha band. Age-dependent change in the parameter and colored noise may be indicative of age-related changes in the self-organization of brain activity. Results obtained include (i) the age-dependent decrease of the absolute values of the average λ coefficient with the regression coefficient 0.005 1/year, (ii) distribution of λ value changes related to EEG frequency bands and to localization of electrodes on the scalp, and (iii) relation of age-dependent changes of colored noise and EEG energy in separate frequency bands. (paper)

  19. Implications for risk assessment of host factors causing large pharmacokinetic variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesell, E.S.

    1985-12-01

    Normal human subjects vary widely in their capacity to eliminate many drugs and environmental chemicals. These variations range in magnitude from fourfold to fortyfold depending on the drug and the population studied. Pharmacogenetics deals with only one of many host factors responsible for these large pharmacokinetic differences. Age, sex, diet and exposure to other drugs and chemicals, including oral contraceptives, ethanol and cigarette smoking, can alter the genetically determined rate at which a particular subject eliminates drugs and environmental chemicals. These elimination rates, therefore, are dynamic and change even in the same subject with time and condition. Regulatory legislation has only recently begun to recognize this very broad spectrum of human susceptibility and the existence of multiple special subgroups of particularly sensitive subjects. In setting standards for environmental chemicals, EPA and NIOSH have attempted to protect the most sensitive humans and should be encouraged to continue this policy. For some drugs and environmental chemicals, the commonly used safety factor of 100 may be too low; for these chemicals large, interindividual pharmacokinetic variations produced by pharmacogenetic and other host factors may make a safety factor of 400 or 500 more adequate.

  20. Extensive metabolism and route-dependent pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in neonatal mice following oral or subcutaneous administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganov, Dragomir I.; Markham, Dan A.; Beyer, Dieter; Waechter, John M.; Dimond, Stephen S.; Budinsky, Robert A.; Shiotsuka, Ronald N.; Snyder, Stephanie A.; Ehman, Kimberly D.; Hentges, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Orally administered bisphenol A (BPA) undergoes efficient first-pass metabolism to produce the inactive conjugates BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G) and BPA-sulfate (BPA-S). This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of BPA, BPA-G and BPA-S in neonatal mice following the administration of a single oral or subcutaneous (SC) dose. This study consisted of 3 phases: (1) mass-balance phase in which effective dose delivery procedures for oral or SC administration of 3 H-BPA to postnatal day three (PND3) mice were developed; (2) pharmacokinetic phase during which systemic exposure to total 3 H-BPA-derived radioactivity in female PND3 mice was established; and (3) metabolite profiling phase in which 50 female PND3 pups received either a single oral or SC dose of 3 H-BPA. Blood was collected from 5 pups/route/time-point at various times post-dosing, the blood plasma samples were pooled by group, and time-point and samples were profiled by HPLC with fraction collection. Fractions were analyzed for total radioactivity and data used to reconstruct radiochromatograms and to integrate individual peaks. The identity of the BPA, BPA-G, and BPA-S peaks was confirmed using authentic standards and LC–MS/MS analysis. The result of this study revealed that female PND3 mice have the capacity to metabolize BPA to BPA-G, BPA-S and other metabolites after both routes of administration. Systemic exposure to free BPA is route-dependent as the plasma concentrations were lower following oral administration compared to SC injection

  1. A randomised cross-over pharmacokinetic bioavailability study of synthetic versus kiwifruit-derived vitamin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Anitra C; Bozonet, Stephanie M; Vissers, Margreet C M

    2013-11-11

    Kiwifruit are a rich source of vitamin C and also contain numerous phytochemicals, such as flavonoids, which may influence the bioavailability of kiwifruit-derived vitamin C. The aim of this study was to compare the relative bioavailability of synthetic versus kiwifruit-derived vitamin C using a randomised cross-over pharmacokinetic study design. Nine non-smoking males (aged 18-35 years) received either a chewable tablet (200 mg vitamin C) or the equivalent dose from gold kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis var. Sungold). Fasting blood and urine were collected half hourly to hourly over the eight hours following intervention. The ascorbate content of the plasma and urine was determined using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Plasma ascorbate levels increased from 0.5 h after the intervention (P = 0.008). No significant differences in the plasma time-concentration curves were observed between the two interventions (P = 0.645). An estimate of the total increase in plasma ascorbate indicated complete uptake of the ingested vitamin C tablet and kiwifruit-derived vitamin C. There was an increase in urinary ascorbate excretion, relative to urinary creatinine, from two hours post intervention (P vitamin C tablet and kiwifruit arms, respectively. Overall, our pharmacokinetic study has shown comparable relative bioavailability of kiwifruit-derived vitamin C and synthetic vitamin C.

  2. Old age and gender influence the pharmacokinetics of inhaled manganese sulfate and manganese phosphate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorman, David C.; McManus, Brian E.; Marshall, Marianne W.; James, R. Arden; Struve, Melanie F.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether gender or age influences the pharmacokinetics of manganese sulfate (MnSO 4 ) or manganese phosphate (as the mineral form hureaulite). Young male and female rats and aged male rats (16 months old) were exposed 6 h day -1 for 5 days week -1 to air, MnSO 4 (at 0.01, 0.1, or 0.5 mg Mn m -3 ), or hureaulite (0.1 mg Mn m -3 ). Tissue manganese concentrations were determined in all groups at the end of the 90-day exposure and 45 days later. Tissue manganese concentrations were also determined in young male rats following 32 exposure days and 91 days after the 90-day exposure. Intravenous 54 Mn tracer studies were also performed in all groups immediately after the 90-day inhalation to assess whole-body manganese clearance rates. Gender and age did not affect manganese delivery to the striatum, a known target site for neurotoxicity in humans, but did influence manganese concentrations in other tissues. End-of-exposure olfactory bulb, lung, and blood manganese concentrations were higher in young male rats than in female or aged male rats and may reflect a portal-of-entry effect. Old male rats had higher testis but lower pancreas manganese concentrations when compared with young males. Young male and female rats exposed to MnSO 4 at 0.5 mg Mn m -3 had increased 54 Mn clearance rates when compared with air-exposed controls, while senescent males did not develop higher 54 Mn clearance rates. Data from this study should prove useful in developing dosimetry models for manganese that consider age or gender as potential sensitivity factors

  3. Determination and pharmacokinetic study of catechin in rat plasma by HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of catechin in rat plasma and its pharmacokinetic study after intragastric administration of Catechu and Xiongdanjiangre Wan into SD rats. Plasma samples were prepared by protein precipitation using methanol–5% aqueous zinc sulfate (70:30, v/v as precipitant. Chromatographic separation was achieved on Hypersil C18 column (250 mm×4.6 mm, 10 μm with acetonitrile–water–triethylamine (6:94:0.3, v/v/v, pH 4.0±0.1, adjusted with phosphoric acid as mobile phase, followed by a UV detection at 207 nm. Good linearity was obtained over the range of 0.143–7.15 mg/L of catechin, with correlation coefficient of 0.9992. The method was simple, sensitive, accurate and reproducible and has been successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of catechin in rat plasma. Keywords: HPLC, Determination, Pharmacokinetic, Catechin, Rat, Plasma

  4. Computational Analysis of Pharmacokinetic Behavior of Ampicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Ďurišová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available orrespondence: Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic. Phone + 42-1254775928; Fax +421254775928; E-mail: maria.durisova@savba.sk 84 RESEARCH ARTICLE The objective of this study was to perform a computational analysis of the pharmacokinetic behavior of ampicillin, using data from the literature. A method based on the theory of dynamic systems was used for modeling purposes. The method used has been introduced to pharmacokinetics with the aim to contribute to the knowledge base in pharmacokinetics by including the modeling method which enables researchers to develop mathematical models of various pharmacokinetic processes in an identical way, using identical model structures. A few examples of a successful use of the modeling method considered here in pharmacokinetics can be found in full texts articles available free of charge at the website of the author, and in the example given in the this study. The modeling method employed in this study can be used to develop a mathematical model of the pharmacokinetic behavior of any drug, under the condition that the pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug under study can be at least partially approximated using linear models.

  5. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. 48.302 Section 48.302 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Designation of Beneficiaries § 48.302 Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. At...

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics study of rhein treating renal fibrosis based on metabonomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Luo, Guangwen; Xiang, Zheng; Cai, Xiaojun; Chen, Dahui

    2016-12-01

    The selection of effect indicators in the pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic study of complex diseases to describe the relationship between plasma concentration and effect indicators is difficult. Three effect indicators of renal fibrosis were successfully determined. The relationship between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rhein in rhubarb was elucidated. The study was a metabolomics analysis of rat plasma and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics of rhein. A sensitive and simple ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was applied to determine the rhein plasma concentration in the rat model of renal fibrosis and rat sham-operated group after the administration of rhubarb decoction. Then, the ultra performance liquid chromatography-Micromass quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS) metabolomics method was used to screen biomarkers of renal fibrosis in rat plasma. Furthermore, the relationship between the plasma concentration of rhein and the concentration of three biomarkers directly related to renal fibrosis were analyzed. The three screened biomarkers could represent the effect of rhein treatment on renal fibrosis. Increasing the plasma concentration of rhein tended to restore the concentration of the three biomarkers in the model group compared with that in the sham-operated group. Evident differences in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of rhein were also observed under different pathological states. The results provide valuable information for the clinical application of rhubarb. Rhein intervention could recover the physiological balance in living organisms from the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic levels. New information on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study of complex diseases is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Vascular risk factor burden, atherosclerosis, and functional dependence in old age: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; Liang, Yajun; Angleman, Sara; Santoni, Giola; Yan, Zhongrui; Cai, Chuanzhu; Qiu, Chengxuan

    2014-08-01

    Vascular risk factors such as hypertension and obesity have been associated with physical limitations among older adults. The purpose of this study is to examine whether individual and aggregated vascular risk factors (VRFs) are associated with functional dependence and to what extent carotid atherosclerosis (CAS) or peripheral artery disease (PAD) may mediate the possible associations of aggregated VRFs with functional dependence. This cross-sectional study included 1,451 community-living participants aged ≥60 years in the Confucius Hometown Aging Project of China. Data on demographic features, hypertension, high total cholesterol, obesity, smoking, physical inactivity, diabetes, CAS, PAD, and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) were collected through an interview, a clinical examination, and laboratory tests. Functional dependence was defined as being dependent in at least one activity in the personal or instrumental activities of daily living. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic models controlling for potential confounders. We used the mediation model to explore the potential mediating effect of CAS and PAD on the associations of aggregated VRFs with functional dependence. Of the 1,451 participants, 222 (15.3%) had functional dependence. The likelihood of functional dependence increased linearly with increasing number of VRFs (hypertension, high total cholesterol, abdominal obesity, and physical inactivity) (p for trend dependence with clustering VRFs was mediated by CAS and PAD. Aggregation of multiple VRFs is associated with an increased likelihood of functional dependence among Chinese older adults; the association is partially mediated by carotid and peripheral artery atherosclerosis independently of CVDs.

  8. A pharmacokinetic study of diclofenac sodium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Ma, He; Cen, Nannan; Zhou, Ai; Tao, Hengxun

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous injection (i.v.) and oral administration (p.o.) of diclofenac sodium (DIC) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Twelve male SD rats were divided into 2 groups (n=6 per group); one group was injected intravenously with 2 mg/kg DIC, whereas the other group was lavaged with 2 mg/kg DIC. Blood samples were collected prior to DIC delivery (0 h) and 0.033, 0.083, 0.167, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h post-administration. Blood plasma samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) following pretreatment to induce protein precipitation. Pharmacokinetics software was applied to calculate relevant pharmacokinetic parameters using a non-compartmental model. Following i.v. administration of DIC, the terminal elimination rate constant (λ z ), apparent terminal elimination half-life (t ½ ), area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 extrapolated to infinity (AUC0 -∞ ), clearance (CL), apparent volume of distribution (V z ), mean residence time (MRT), and apparent volume of distribution at steady state (V ss ) were 0.57±0.05 l/h, 1.22±0.11 h, 3356±238 h × ng/ml, 0.60±0.04 l/h, 1.05±0.10 l, 1.05±0.07 h and 0.63±0.07 l, respectively. Following p.o. administration of DIC, the λ z , t ½ , C max , t max , AUC 0-∞ , CL, V z , MRT were: 0.63±0.12 l/h, 1.12±0.18 h, 1272±112 ng/ml, 0.19±0.04 h, 2501±303 h × ng/ml, 0.81±0.10 l/h, 1.29±0.12 l, and 2.70±0.18 h, respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters of i.v. and p.o. DIC in rats show that the drug is rapidly absorbed, distributed, and eliminated.

  9. Morphometric study on age-dependent pulmonary lesions in rats exposed to nitrogen dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyono, H.; Kawai, K.

    1982-01-01

    Electronmicroscopic morphometry was performed on lung of 1, 3, 12 and 21 months-old rats exposed to 0.1, 0.5, 3 and 10 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) continuously for one month. The rats used in this experiment were all supplied at one time from one colony and kept under a barrier system until exposure. Effects of aging on the responses of lungs to NO/sub 2/ were studied by comparing the dose-effect reaction patterns among the age groups. A trend of dose-dependent increase of arithmetic mean thickness of air-blood barrier was found in all age groups examined. The response of lung to NO/sub 2/ exposure showed age-related differences. Based on the morphometric index, the response declines from 1 to 12 months, but increases again in 21-months-old rats. The compartmental components of alveolar wall tissue such as type I epithelial cells, type II epithelial cells, interstitial cells, interstitial matrix and capillary endothelium appeared to have various degrees of response due to both age at onset of exposure and NO/sub 2/ concentration, resulting in the appearance of varying stages in impairment or repair. Accordingly, the response of each compartmental component of lung to the concentrations of NO/sub 2/ did not always exhibit a simple dose-dependent increase or decrease but sometimes indicated a multiphasic reaction pattern.

  10. Is late-life dependency increasing or not? A comparison of the Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies (CFAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Andrew; Wohland, Pia; Wittenberg, Raphael; Robinson, Louise; Brayne, Carol; Matthews, Fiona E; Jagger, Carol

    2017-10-07

    Little is known about how the proportions of dependency states have changed between generational cohorts of older people. We aimed to estimate years lived in different dependency states at age 65 years in 1991 and 2011, and new projections of future demand for care. In this population-based study, we compared two Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies (CFAS I and CFAS II) of older people (aged ≥65 years) who were permanently registered with a general practice in three defined geographical areas (Cambridgeshire, Newcastle, and Nottingham; UK). These studies were done two decades apart (1991 and 2011). General practices provided lists of individuals to be contacted and were asked to exclude those who had died or might die over the next month. Baseline interviews were done in the community and care homes. Participants were stratified by age, and interviews occurred only after written informed consent was obtained. Information collected included basic sociodemographics, cognitive status, urinary incontinence, and self-reported ability to do activities of daily living. CFAS I was assigned as the 1991 cohort and CFAS II as the 2011 cohort, and both studies provided prevalence estimates of dependency in four states: high dependency (24-h care), medium dependency (daily care), low dependency (less than daily), and independent. Years in each dependency state were calculated by Sullivan's method. To project future demands for social care, the proportions in each dependency state (by age group and sex) were applied to the 2014 UK [corrected] population projections. Between 1991 and 2011, there were significant increases in years lived from age 65 years with low dependency (1·7 years [95% CI 1·0-2·4] for men and 2·4 years [1·8-3·1] for women) and increases with high dependency (0·9 years [0·2-1·7] for men and 1·3 years [0·5-2·1] for women). The majority of men's extra years of life were spent independent (36·3%) or with low dependency (36·3%) whereas for women

  11. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients' compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box-Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box-Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry® film to produce pulsatile tablet of

  12. Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal irinotecan (IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Huali Wu,1 Jeffrey R Infante,2 Vicki L Keedy,3 Suzanne F Jones,2 Emily Chan,3 Johanna C Bendell,2 Wooin Lee,4 Whitney P Kirschbrown,1 Beth A Zamboni,5 Satoshi Ikeda,6 Hiroshi Kodaira,6 Mace L Rothenberg,3 Howard A Burris III,2 William C Zamboni1,7–9 1UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2Sarah Cannon Research Institute/Tennessee Oncology, PLLC, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 5Department of Mathematics, Carlow University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Yakult Honsha Co., Ltd., Medical Development Department, Tokyo, Japan; 7UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, 8UNC Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, 9Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechology Excellence, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: IHL-305 is a PEGylated liposomal formulation of irinotecan (CPT-11. The objective of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors. IHL-305 was administered intravenously once every 4 weeks as part of a Phase I study. Pharmacokinetic studies of the liposomal sum total CPT-11, released CPT-11, SN-38, SN-38G, 7-ethyl-10-[4-N-(5-aminopentanoic acid-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin, and 7-ethyl-10-[4-amino-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin in plasma were performed. Noncompartmental and compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were conducted using pharmacokinetic data for sum total CPT-11. The pharmacokinetic variability of IHL-305 is associated with linear and nonlinear clearance. Patients whose age and body composition (ratio of total body weight to ideal body weight [TBW/IBW] were greater than the median age and TBW/IBW of the study had a 1.7-fold to 2.6-fold higher ratio of released CPT-11 area under the concentration versus time

  13. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of .... dependency or drug abuse, known allergy to ... HPLC analysis of glipizide ... months when stored at 4 0C, protected from .... plasma and urine.

  14. Comparative Pharmacokinetics Study of Icariin and Icariside II in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To explore the pharmacokinetic properties of icariin (ICA and icariside II (ICA II following intragastric and intravenous administration in rats, a rapid and sensitive method by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS/MS was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of ICA and ICA II in rat plasma. The quantification was performed by using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions m/z 677.1/531.1 for ICA, 515.1/369.1 for ICA II and 463.1/301.1 for diosmetin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (IS. The assay showed linearity over the concentration range of 1.03–1032 ng/mL, with correlation coefficients of 0.9983 and 0.9977. Intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy were within 15%. The lower limit of quantification for both ICA and ICA II was 1.03 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery of ICA and ICA II was more than 86.2%. The LC-MS/MS method has been successfully used in the pharmacokinetic studies of ICA and ICA II in rats. The results indicated that 91.2% of ICA was transformed into ICA II after oral administration by rats, whereas only 0.4% of ICA was transformed into ICA II after intravenous administration. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of ICA and ICA II after oral administration revealed that the Cmax and AUC0–t of ICA II were 3.8 and 13.0 times higher, respectively, than those of ICA. However, after intravenous administration, the Cmax and AUC0–t of ICA II were about only 12.1% and 4.2% of those of ICA. These results suggest that ICA and ICA II have distinct pharmacokinetic properties, and the insights obtained facilitate future pharmacological action studies.

  15. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Feins, Richard; Johnstone, David W.; Watson, Thomas; Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m 2 , 20 mg/m 2 , and 25 mg/m 2 were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m 2 ), II (20 mg/m 2 ), and III (25 mg/m 2 ), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 ± 0.06 μmol/l, 0.32 ± 0.05 μmol/l, and 0.52 ± 0.14 μmol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 ± 0.09 μmol/l, 0.61 ± 0.1 μmol/l, and 0.96 ± 0.23 μmol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 μmol/l (t > 0.05 μmol/l) was 1.6 ± 0.3 h, 1.9 ± 0.2 h, and 3.0 ± 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 μmol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization

  16. Pharmacokinetics and Bioavailability of Inhaled Esketamine in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Kelly; Duma, Andreas; Olofsen, Erik; Henthorn, Thomas; van Velzen, Monique; Mooren, René; Siebers, Liesbeth; van den Beukel, Jojanneke; Aarts, Leon; Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Esketamine is traditionally administered via intravenous or intramuscular routes. In this study we developed a pharmacokinetic model of inhalation of nebulized esketamine with special emphasis on pulmonary absorption and bioavailability. Three increasing doses of inhaled esketamine (dose escalation from 25 to 100 mg) were applied followed by a single intravenous dose (20 mg) in 19 healthy volunteers using a nebulizer system and arterial concentrations of esketamine and esnorketamine were obtained. A multicompartmental pharmacokinetic model was developed using population nonlinear mixed-effects analyses. The pharmacokinetic model consisted of three esketamine, two esnorketamine disposition and three metabolism compartments. The inhalation data were best described by adding two absorption pathways, an immediate and a slower pathway, with rate constant 0.05 ± 0.01 min (median ± SE of the estimate). The amount of esketamine inhaled was reduced due to dose-independent and dose-dependent reduced bioavailability. The former was 70% ± 5%, and the latter was described by a sigmoid EMAX model characterized by the plasma concentration at which absorption was impaired by 50% (406 ± 46 ng/ml). Over the concentration range tested, up to 50% of inhaled esketamine is lost due to the reduced dose-independent and dose-dependent bioavailability. We successfully modeled the inhalation of nebulized esketamine in healthy volunteers. Nebulized esketamine is inhaled with a substantial reduction in bioavailability. Although the reduction in dose-independent bioavailability is best explained by retention of drug and particle exhalation, the reduction in dose-dependent bioavailability is probably due to sedation-related loss of drug into the air.

  17. Application of a loading dose of colistin methanesulfonate in critically ill patients: population pharmacokinetics, protein binding, and prediction of bacterial kill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ami F; Karaiskos, Ilias; Plachouras, Diamantis; Karvanen, Matti; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Jansson, Britt; Papadomichelakis, Evangelos; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Giamarellou, Helen; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Cars, Otto; Friberg, Lena E

    2012-08-01

    A previous pharmacokinetic study on dosing of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) at 240 mg (3 million units [MU]) every 8 h indicated that colistin has a long half-life, resulting in insufficient concentrations for the first 12 to 48 h after initiation of treatment. A loading dose would therefore be beneficial. The aim of this study was to evaluate CMS and colistin pharmacokinetics following a 480-mg (6-MU) loading dose in critically ill patients and to explore the bacterial kill following the use of different dosing regimens obtained by predictions from a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model developed from an in vitro study on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The unbound fractions of colistin A and colistin B were determined using equilibrium dialysis and considered in the predictions. Ten critically ill patients (6 males; mean age, 54 years; mean creatinine clearance, 82 ml/min) with infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria were enrolled in the study. The pharmacokinetic data collected after the first and eighth doses were analyzed simultaneously with the data from the previous study (total, 28 patients) in the NONMEM program. For CMS, a two-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics, and the half-lives of the two phases were estimated to be 0.026 and 2.2 h, respectively. For colistin, a one-compartment model was sufficient and the estimated half-life was 18.5 h. The unbound fractions of colistin in the patients were 26 to 41% at clinical concentrations. Colistin A, but not colistin B, had a concentration-dependent binding. The predictions suggested that the time to 3-log-unit bacterial kill for a 480-mg loading dose was reduced to half of that for the dose of 240 mg.

  18. [Occlusion treatment for amblyopia. Age dependence and dose-response relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronius, M

    2016-04-01

    Based on clinical experience and studies on animal models the age of 6-7 years was regarded as the limit for treatment of amblyopia, although functional improvement was also occasionally reported in older patients. New technical developments as well as insights from clinical studies and the neurosciences have attracted considerable attention to this topic. Various aspects of the age dependence of amblyopia treatment are discussed in this article, e. g. prescription, electronic monitoring of occlusion dosage, calculation of indicators for age-dependent plasticity of the visual system, and novel, alternative treatment approaches. Besides a discussion of the recent literature, results of studies by our "Child Vision Research Unit" in Frankfurt are presented: results of a questionnaire about prescription habits concerning age limits of patching, electronic recording of occlusion in patients beyond the conventional treatment age, calculation of dose-response function and efficiency of patching and their age dependence. The results of the questionnaire illustrate the uncertainty about age limits of prescription with significant deviations from the guideline of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG). Electronic recording of occlusion allowed the quantification of declining dose-response function and treatment efficiency between 5 and 16 years of age. Reports about successful treatment with conventional and novel methods in adults are at variance with the notion of a rigid adult visual system lacking plasticity. Electronic recording of patching allowed new insights into the age-dependent susceptibility of the visual system and contributes to a more evidence-based treatment of amblyopia. Alternative approaches for adults challenge established notions about age limits of amblyopia therapy. Further studies comparing different treatment options are urgently needed.

  19. A simple microfluidic platform to study age-dependent protein abundance and localization changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Cabrera

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae divides asymmetrically, with a smaller daughter cell emerging from its larger mother cell. While the daughter lineage is immortal, mother cells age with each cell division and have a finite lifespan. The replicative ageing of the yeast mother cell has been used as a model to study the ageing of mitotically active human cells. Several microfluidic platforms, which use fluid flow to selectively remove daughter cells, have recently been developed that can monitor cell physiology as mother cells age. However, these platforms are not trivial to set up and users often require many hours of training. In this study, we have developed a simple system, which combines a commercially available microfluidic platform (the CellASIC ONIX Microfluidic Platform and a genetic tool to prevent the proliferation of daughter cells (the Mother Enrichment Program, to monitor protein abundance and localization changes during approximately the first half of the yeast replicative lifespan. We validated our system by observing known age-dependent changes, such as decreased Sir2 abundance, and have identified a protein with a previously unknown age-dependent change in localization.

  20. Safety and Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Repeated-Dose Micafungin in Children and Adolescents Treated for Invasive Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Daniel K.; Deville, Jaime G.; Azie, Nkechi; Kovanda, Laura; Roy, Mike; Wu, Chunzhang; Arrieta, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background Micafungin is an echinocandin with proven efficacy against a broad range of fungal infections, including those caused by Candida species. Objective To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of once-daily 3 mg/kg and 4.5 mg/kg micafungin in children with proven, probable, or suspected invasive candidiasis. Methods Micafungin safety and pharmacokinetics were assessed in two Phase I, open-label, repeat-dose trials. In Study 2101, children aged 2–16 years were grouped by weight to receive 3 mg/kg (≥25 kg) or 4.5 mg/kg (<25 kg) intravenous micafungin for 10–14 days. In Study 2102, children aged 4 months to <2 years received 4.5 mg/kg micafungin. Study protocols were otherwise identical. Results Safety was analyzed in seventy-eight and nine children in Studies 2101 and 2102, respectively. Although adverse events were experienced by most children (2101: n = 62; 2102: n = 9), micafungin-related adverse events were less common (2101: n = 28; 2102: n = 1), and the number of patients discontinuing due to adverse events was low (2101: n = 4; 2102: n = 1). The most common micafungin-related adverse events were infusion-associated symptoms, pyrexia, and hypomagnesemia (Study 2101), and liver function abnormalities (Study 2102). The micafungin pharmacokinetic profile was similar to that seen in other studies conducted in children, but different than that observed in adults. Conclusions In this small cohort of children, once-daily doses of 3 mg/kg and 4.5 mg/kg micafungin were well tolerated. Pharmacokinetic data will be combined in a population pharmacokinetic analysis to support U.S. dosing recommendations in children. PMID:23958810

  1. Age-dependent dosimetry and metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The release of radionuclides into the environment following the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 created an urgent need for internationally acceptable dose coefficients for calculating the doses delivered to all members of the public, from conception to old age. Organ masses and the kinetics of distribution and retention of elements in humans generally vary with age and often not in simple linear relationship to body weight. Unless variations are considered calculated radiation doses to children may be seriously underestimated. The International Commission on Radiological Protection created in 1987 a Task Group on Age-dependent Doses to Members of the Public from Intake of Radionuclides (AGDOS). The work of AGDOS and the general problems encountered in deriving age-dependent dose coefficients will be discussed in this paper. The first two AGDOS reports, ICRP Publication 56 Parts 1 and 2, provide dose coefficients for the ages 3 months, 1, 5, 10, 15 years and for adults for the 21 elements considered to be of most immediate importance for radiation protection. To develop these dose coefficients, the ICRP Publication 30 dosimetric and biokinetic models were reevaluated and extended. The basic dosimetric model is retained but equivalent dose is now integrated from age at intake to 70 years and the new ICRP Publication 60 tissue weighting factors are incorporated. The development of age-dependent biokinetic models is complicated by the lack of age-related human, or even animal data for the majority of the elements. Thus in formulating the models it has been necessary to use all the available information, biokinetic, physiological chemical and biochemical, and to adopt a number of new approaches including the development of generic biokinetic models for chemically related families of elements such as the actinides and the alkaline earth elements. (author)

  2. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakulsrichai S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Satariya Trakulsrichai,1,2 Korbtham Sathirakul,3,4 Saranya Auparakkitanon,5 Jatupon Krongvorakul,5 Jetjamnong Sueajai,5 Nantida Noumjad,5 Chonlaphat Sukasem,5 Winai Wananukul2,6 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 2Ramathibodi Poison Center, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 3Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Center for Drug Research Discovery and Development, Thammasat Univerisity, Prathumthani, Thailand; 5Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 6Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth., is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users.Methods: Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results: Ten male subjects completed

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Posaconazole in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Fekade B; Stuart, Janine; Butler, Jenie; Starr, Therese; Wallis, Steven C; Pandey, Saurabh; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2018-06-01

    To date, there is no information on the intravenous (i.v.) posaconazole pharmacokinetics for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. This prospective observational study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of i.v. posaconazole in critically ill patients. Patients with no history of allergy to triazole antifungals and requiring systemic antifungal therapy were enrolled if they were aged ≥18 years, central venous access was available, they were not pregnant, and they had not received prior posaconazole or drugs interacting with posaconazole. A single dose of 300 mg posaconazole was administered over 90 min. Total plasma concentrations were measured from serial plasma samples collected over 48 h, using a validated chromatographic method. The pharmacokinetic data set was analyzed by noncompartmental methods. Eight patients (7 male) were enrolled with the following characteristics: median age, 46 years (interquartile range [IQR], 40 to 51 years); median weight, 68 kg (IQR, 65 to 82 kg); and median albumin concentration, 20 g/liter (IQR, 18 to 24 g/liter). Median (IQR) pharmacokinetic parameter estimates were as follows: observed maximum concentration during sampling period ( C max ), 1,702 ng/ml (1,352 to 2,141 ng/ml); area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC 0-∞ ), 17,932 ng · h/ml (13,823 to 27,905 ng · h/ml); clearance (CL), 16.8 liters/h (11.1 to 21.7 liters/h); and volume of distribution ( V ), 529.1 liters (352.2 to 720.6 liters). The V and CL were greater than 2-fold and the AUC 0-∞ was 39% of the values reported for heathy volunteers. The AUC 0-∞ was only 52% of the steady-state AUC 0-24 reported for hematology patients. The median of estimated average steady-state concentrations was 747 ng/ml (IQR, 576 to 1,163 ng/ml), which is within but close to the lower end of the previously recommended therapeutic range of 500 to 2,500 ng/ml. In conclusion, we observed different pharmacokinetics of i.v. posaconazole in

  4. A pilot study on the serum pharmacokinetics of nattokinase in humans following a single, oral, daily dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ero, Michael Penfield; Ng, Connie M; Mihailovski, Tamara; Harvey, Nathaniel R; Lewis, Brad Howard

    2013-01-01

    Nattokinase is a serine protease and is derived from natto, a traditional Japanese, fermented, soybean food meal. Multiple authors have described the significant fibrinolytic, antithrombotic, and antihypertensive effects of natto. Nattokinase has been growing in popularity for use as a dietary supplement for the benefit of cardiovascular health. Little is known regarding the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of this enzyme, and the bioavailability of nattokinase is currently unknown. This study intended to (1) detect nattokinase directly and immunologically, (2) show that nattokinase and/or its metabolites were detectable in human blood following ingestion of a commercial preparation, and (3) chart a pharmacokinetic dosing effect for nattokinase. The research team designed the pilot study as an in vivo, human clinical trial. Healthy human subjects responded to an advertisement and were screened. Subjects who satisfied both inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled into the study. Subjects were then instructed to orally ingest a single capsule containing a known concentration of nattokinase immediately following a baseline blood draw. Subsequent blood draws occurred over a 24-h period. This study was conducted in Oakland, California, at a clinical reference laboratory and was performed with the approval of an institutional review board (IRB) to ensure that appropriate ethical standards were met. Eleven healthy participants (five male, six female, ages 21-65), who met eligibility criteria, were enrolled. Administration of nattokinase occurred orally with the ingestion of a single daily dose (2000 FU) of nattokinase. Capsules, each containing approximately 100 mg of nattokinase, in softgel form (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory, Osaka, Japan), were used in the study. Baseline blood samples were collected, and participants were observed swallowing a single capsule of the nattokinase supplement before returning at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h post

  5. Evaluation and optimisation of current milrinone prescribing for the treatment and prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery using a physiology-based pharmacokinetic drug-disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    Milrinone is the drug of choice for the treatment and prevention of low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) in paediatric patients after open heart surgery across Europe. Discrepancies, however, among prescribing guidance, clinical studies and practice pattern require clarification to ensure safe and effective prescribing. However, the clearance prediction equations derived from classical pharmacokinetic modelling provide limited support as they have recently failed a clinical practice evaluation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate current milrinone dosing using physiology-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling and simulation to complement the existing pharmacokinetic knowledge and propose optimised dosing regimens as a basis for improving the standard of care for paediatric patients. A PBPK drug-disease model using a population approach was developed in three steps from healthy young adults to adult patients and paediatric patients with and without LCOS after open heart surgery. Pre- and postoperative organ function values from adult and paediatric patients were collected from literature and integrated into a disease model as factorial changes from the reference values in healthy adults aged 20-40 years. The disease model was combined with the PBPK drug model and evaluated against existing pharmacokinetic data. Model robustness was assessed by parametric sensitivity analysis. In the next step, virtual patient populations were created, each with 1,000 subjects reflecting the average adult and paediatric patient characteristics with regard to age, sex, bodyweight and height. They were integrated into the PBPK drug-disease model to evaluate the effectiveness of current milrinone dosing in achieving the therapeutic target range of 100-300 ng/mL milrinone in plasma. Optimised dosing regimens were subsequently developed. The pharmacokinetics of milrinone in healthy young adults as well as adult and paediatric patients were accurately described with an

  6. Population pharmacokinetic study of benznidazole in pediatric Chagas disease suggests efficacy despite lower plasma concentrations than in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Altcheh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, can lead to long term cardiac morbidity. Treatment of children with benznidazole is effective, but no pediatric pharmacokinetics data are available and clinical pharmacology information on the drug is scarce.Prospective population pharmacokinetic (PK cohort study in children 2-12 years old with Chagas disease treated with oral benznidazole 5-8 mg/kg/day BID for 60 days. (clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00699387.Forty children were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 7.3 years. A total of 117 samples were obtained from 38 patients for PK analysis. A one compartment model best fit the data. Weight-corrected clearance rate (CL/F showed a good correlation with age, with younger patients having a significantly higher CL/F than older children and adults. Simulated median steady-state benznidazole concentrations, based on model parameters, were lower for children in our study than for adults and lowest for children under 7 years of age. Treatment was efficacious in the 37 patients who completed the treatment course, and well tolerated, with few, and mild, adverse drug reactions (ADRs.Observed benznidazole plasma concentrations in children were markedly lower than those previously reported in adults (treated with comparable mg/kg doses, possibly due to a higher CL/F in smaller children. These lower blood concentrations were nevertheless associated to a high therapeutic response in our cohort. Unlike adults, children have few adverse reactions to the drug, suggesting that there may be a direct correlation between drug concentrations and incidence of ADRs. Our results suggest that studies with lower doses in adults may be warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00699387.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Botanical Drugs and Plant Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez More, Gina Paola; Cardenas, Paola Andrea; Costa, Geison M; Simoes, Claudia M O; Aragon, Diana Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Botanical drugs contain plant extracts, which are complex mixtures of compounds. As with conventional drugs, it is necessary to validate their efficacy and safety through preclinical and clinical studies. However, pharmacokinetic studies for active constituents or characteristic markers in botanical drugs are rare. The objective of this review was to investigate the global state of the art in pharmacokinetic studies of active ingredients present in plant extracts and botanical drugs. A review of pharmacokinetics studies of chemical constituents of plant extracts and botanical drugs was performed, with a total of 135 studies published between January 2004 and February 2015 available in recognized scientific databases. Botanical preparations were mainly found in the form of aqueous extracts of roots and rhizomes. The most widely studied species was Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, and the compound most frequently used as a pharmacokinetic marker was berberine. Most studies were performed using the Sprague Dawley rat model, and the preparations were mainly administered orally in a single dose. Quantification of plasma concentrations of pharmacokinetic markers was performed mainly by liquid-liquid extraction, followed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detector. In conclusion, in recent years there has been an increasing interest among researchers worldwide in the study of pharmacokinetics of bioactive compounds in botanical drugs and plant extracts, especially those from the Traditional Chinese Medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Elucidation of the pharmacokinetics of prednisone and prednisolone: elimination and the effect of estrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavson, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    Several aspects of the pharmacokinetics of the interconvertible glucocorticoids prednisone and prednisolone have been studied. The pharmacokinetics of prednisolone were examined in postmenopausal women taking conjugated estrogens and age-matched control women. The subjects received iv bolus doses of 0.14 and 0.55 mg/kg prednisolone. Expected increases in clearance and volume of distribution with increasing dose were observed for total prednisolone in all subjects. At both doses, significant decreases in total and unbound prednisolone clearance were observed in the women taking estrogen compared to the controls. Volume of distribution was unchanged. The decreases in clearance are smaller than those observed in young women taking oral contraceptives indicating that factors other than estrogen administration may influence prednisolone clearance in oral contraceptive users. While the protein binding of prednisolone is well characterized, little is known about the protein binding of prednisone. Equilibrium dialysis employing [ 3 H]prednisone was used to study the binding of prednisone in human plasma containing endogenous hydrocortisone. Plasma was obtained from volunteers with normal and elevated transcortin binding capacities (CAP/sub T/). Prednisolone binding exhibits marked concentration dependence and sensitivity to CAP/sub T/. In contrast, prednisone binding is independent of concentration and CAP/sub T/

  9. Pharmacokinetic bioequivalence studies of a fixed-dose combination of tamsulosin and dutasteride in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossler, Michael J; Collins, David A; Thompson, Meg M; Nino, Antonio; Bianco, Joseph J; Chetty, Dushen

    2014-05-01

    The combination of dutasteride and tamsulosin may be more effective for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia than either treatment alone. We report the results of three pharmacokinetics and tolerability studies, which used a dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl (0.5 mg/0.2 mg) fixed-dose combination (FDC) capsules containing a small dutasteride soft gelatin capsule (smaller than commercial Avodart™) and modified-release tamsulosin pellets that have different amounts of enteric coating. These studies compared the test products to commercial Avodart™ (dutasteride 0.5 mg) and two different commercial tamsulosin HCl 0.2 mg products, Harnal™ Capsules or Harnal-D™ Tablets, which are reportedly bioequivalent to each other. All three studies were randomized single-dose studies in healthy male adults. Study 1 [N = 86 (NCT01254071)] was a two-period crossover study of a dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl FDC versus coadministered Avodart™ and Harnal-D™ Tablets. The pharmacokinetics of both dutasteride and tamsulosin were studied. Study 2 [N = 27 (NCT01471678)] was a four-period crossover study of dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl FDC formulations versus Avodart™ and Harnal™ Capsules or Harnal-D™ Tablets. Only the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin were studied. Study 3 [N = 40 (NCT01495026)] was a two-period study of dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl FDC formulations versus coadministered Avodart™ and Harnal-D™ Tablets. In this study, only the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin were studied. Study 2 assessed fed-state pharmacokinetics. Studies 1 and 3 assessed fed- and fasted-state pharmacokinetics. All dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl FDC formulations and coadministered treatments were well-tolerated. In Study 1, the FDC dutasteride was bioequivalent to Avodart™ coadministered with tamsulosin under fed and fasted conditions. In Study 1, the FDC tamsulosin had a slower release than commercial Harnal-D™ Tablets coadministered with dutasteride (fed and fasted

  10. Clinical trial: single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of polyethylene glycol (PEG-3350) in healthy young and elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelham, R W; Nix, L C; Chavira, R E; Cleveland, M Vb; Stetson, P

    2008-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics of polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG-3350) have not been fully described because of lack of a sufficiently sensitive analytical method. To describe the pharmacokinetics of PEG-3350 in humans. A highly sensitive, high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) method was developed for PEG-3350 in urine, plasma and faeces with quantification limits of 30 ng/mL, 100 ng/mL and 500 microg/g respectively. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetics methods were used and the effects of gender, age, renal status and dosing frequency were examined after the oral administration of 17 g to healthy volunteers. Peak PEG-3350 plasma concentrations occurred at 2-4 h and declined to nonquantifiable levels usually within 18 h after single and multiple doses, with a half-life of about 4-6 h. Steady state was reached within 5 days of dosing. Mean urinary excretion of the administered dose ranged from 0.19% to 0.25%. Age, gender or mild kidney impairment did not alter the pharmacokinetics of PEG-3350. Mean faecal excretion of the administered dose was 93% in young subjects. For the first time, a highly sensitive assay allowed comprehensive pharmacokinetics studies of PEG-3350 in humans. These studies confirmed that orally administered PEG-3350 is minimally absorbed, rapidly excreted and primarily eliminated via faeces.

  11. Preparation and analysis of deuterium-labeled aspirin: application to pharmacokinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, A.K.; FitzGerald, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Inhibition of endogenous prostacyclin and thromboxane biosynthesis by aspirin is critically dose-dependent in humans. Gastrointestinal and hepatic hydrolysis may limit systemic availability of aspirin, especially in low doses, perhaps contributing to the biochemical selectivity of aspirin. Existing analytical methods do not permit determination of systemic bioavailability when low (less than 100 mg) doses of aspirin are administered. Deuterium-labeled aspirin (2-acetoxy[3,4,5,6- 2 H4]benzoic acid) was synthesized from salicylic acid by catalytic exchange and subsequent acetylation. Analysis of the compounds as benzyl esters by GC-MS followed extractive alkylation from plasma. Heptadeuterated compounds were used as internal standards. Simultaneous administration of tetradeuterated aspirin intravenously with native aspirin orally to anesthetized dogs permitted kinetic studies of both aspirin and salicylic acid. The sensitivity of the method is superior to published methods using HPLC and, thus, more applicable to studies of low dose aspirin. Pulse administration of stable isotope-labeled aspirin permits detailed and repeated studies of dose-related aspirin pharmacokinetics in humans

  12. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors....... of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  13. Pharmacokinetics study of bio-adhesive tablet of Panax notoginseng saponins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Hanzhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Panax notoginseng saponin (PNS is the main active gradient of Chinese traditional medicine Panax notoginseng. Although its prominent therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated by various researchers, the broader application is restricted by the low bioavailability of PNS. This article aims to discuss PNS's plasma pharmacokinetics after oral administration of bio-adhesive tablet of PNS to beagle dogs and improve its bioavailability in comparison with normal tablet. The bio-adhesive tablet was prepared according to our previous patent, using chitosan as main excipient. A simple and sensitive LC-MS/MS combined with solid-phase extraction (SPE method for the analysis of PNS in dog's plasma was developed in our previous study, and was validated to apply in the pharmacokinetics study in this work. Three ingredients: Notoginsenoside R1 (R1, Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1 and Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1 (Figure 1, were chosen as indicators of PNS to analyze it in vivo. Statistically significant increase (P

  14. Pharmacokinetics of a once-daily extended-release formulation of pramipexole in healthy male volunteers: three studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Peter; Könen-Bergmann, Michael; Schepers, Cornelia; Haertter, Sebastian

    2009-11-01

    Pramipexole is a dopamine agonist used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The currently available immediate-release (IR) formulation is taken orally 3 times daily. These studies were conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties of a variety of prototypes for a once-daily extended-release (ER) formulation of pramipexole and to further characterize the prototype whose pharmacokinetics best matched those of the IR formulation. Three Phase I studies were conducted, all in healthy adult men aged food effect. In the third study, steady-state pharmacokinetics of the optimal ER formulation were assessed across a range of pramipexole doses (0.375-4.5 mg/d), including investigation of the food effect at steady state for the highest dose. Tolerability was assessed throughout all studies based on physical examinations, laboratory measurements, and adverse events (AEs). The 3 studies included 18, 15, and 39 subjects, respectively. Among the ER prototypes tested at 0.75 mg once daily in study 1, a matrix tablet had the optimal pharmacokinetic resemblance to IR pramipexole 0.25 mg TID, with a geometric mean AUC(0-24h,ss) of 17.4 ng.h/mL (vs 16.0 ng.h/mL for the IR formulation), C(max,ss) of 0.967 ng/mL (vs 1.09 ng/mL), and C(min,ss) of 0.455 ng/mL (vs 0.383 ng/mL). For single-dose ER 0.375 mg administered in the fasted state in study 2, in vivo bioavailability was predictable from in vitro dissolution data, with internal mean absolute percent prediction errors of 3.18% for AUC(0-30h) and 4.87% for C(max), and external mean absolute prediction errors of 6.61% and 3.34%, respectively, satisfying current guidelines for a level A IVIVC. For single-dose ER 0.375 mg administered in the fed state, the upper bound of the 90% CI for fed:fasted values was 119.8 for AUC(0-30h) (within the bioequivalence limits of 80%-125%) and 134.1 for C(max). At steady state in study 3 (subjects' 5th treatment day), dosing at 0.375 to 4.5 mg in the fasted state was associated with a linear

  15. Studies on the age-dependent proliferation kinetics of the epithelium of the rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranz, D.; Dietze, F.; Laue, R.; Fuhrmann, I.

    1980-01-01

    The small intestine of 244 Wistar rats, aged 6 days, 6 weeks, 6, 12, 23, and 28 months, respectively. were investigated autoradiographically as to their age-dependent cell proliferation kinetics of the mucosal epithelial cells. There were age-dependent differences concerning the hourly regeneration ratio of the crypt cells and the migration velocity of the enterocytes. Both parameters became greater while the existing non growth fraction became smaller with increasing age. The non growth fraction seems to be a reserve being involved into the proliferating pool if required

  16. [Pharmacokinetic study of six aconitine alkaloids in aconiti lateralis radix praeparata in beagle dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ri-Ping; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Yai; Yu, Liang-Wen; Zhu, Yue-Lan; Li, Geng

    2014-02-01

    To study the pharmacokinetics characteristics of six Aconitum alkaloids aconitine (AC), mesaconitine (MA), hypaconitine (HA), benzoylaconine (BAC), benzoylmesaconine (BMA) and benzoylhypaconine (BHA) in beagle dogs. An ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for simultaneous quantitation of six Aconitum alkaloids in beagle dog plasma after oral administration of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata decoction. UPLC/MS/MS system coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source was performed in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Sample preparation was performed with solid-phase extraction(SPE) on a 3 mL HLB cartridge before the analysis. The separation was applied on a Waters C8 column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 microm) and a gradient elution of methanol and 0.2% formic acid-water was used as mobile phase. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by the results of the analysis through the DAS 2. 1 software (Drug and Statistics for Windows). The results showed that the fitting model for the six Aconitum alkaloids was the one-compartment model pharmacokinetics. The method is successfully used for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of the six Aconitum alkaloids in beagle dog plasma, it can help monitor the ADME/Tox process when taking Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata by observing the pharmacokinetic process. The results provide a good reference for clinical treatment and safe application of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata.

  17. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Penicillins, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides in the Neonate: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are common in the neonates and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Sixty percent of preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units received at least one antibiotic during the first week of life. Penicillins, aminoglycosides and cephalosporins comprised 53, 43 and 16%, respectively. Kinetic parameters such as the half-life (t1/2, clearance (Cl, and volume of distribution (Vd change with development, so the kinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides need to be studied in order to optimise therapy with these drugs. The aim of this study is to review the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate in a single article in order to provide a critical analysis of the literature and thus provide a useful tool in the hands of physicians. The bibliographic search was performed electronically using PubMed, as the search engine, until February 2nd, 2010. Medline search terms were as follows: pharmacokinetics AND (penicillins OR cephalosporins OR aminoglycosides AND infant, newborn, limiting to humans. Penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides are fairly water soluble and are mainly eliminated by the kidneys. The maturation of the kidneys governs the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate. The renal excretory function is reduced in preterms compared to term infants and Cl of these drugs is reduced in premature infants. Gestational and postnatal ages are important factors in the maturation of the neonate and, as these ages proceed, Cl of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides increases. Cl and t1/2 are influenced by development and this must be taken into consideration when planning a dosage regimen with these drugs. More pharmacokinetic studies are required to ensure that the dose recommended for the treatment of sepsis in the neonate is evidence based.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Suchaya Sanhajariya; Stephen B. Duffull; Geoffrey K. Isbister

    2018-01-01

    Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present) and Medline (1946–present). For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, ...

  19. Individualized Hydrocodone Therapy Based on Phenotype, Pharmacogenetics, and Pharmacokinetic Dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Oscar A; Fudin, Jeffrey; Daly, Annemarie L; Boston, Raymond C

    2015-12-01

    (1) To quantify hydrocodone (HC) and hydromorphone (HM) metabolite pharmacokinetics with pharmacogenetics in CYP2D6 ultra-rapid metabolizer (UM), extensive metabolizer (EM), and poor metabolizer (PM) metabolizer phenotypes. (2) To develop an HC phenotype-specific dosing strategy for HC that accounts for HM production using clinical pharmacokinetics integrated with pharmacogenetics for patient safety. In silico clinical trial simulation. Healthy white men and women without comorbidities or history of opioid, or any other drug or nutraceutical use, age 26.3±5.7 years (mean±SD; range, 19 to 36 y) and weight 71.9±16.8 kg (range, 50 to 108 kg). CYP2D6 phenotype-specific HC clinical pharmacokinetic parameter estimates and phenotype-specific percentages of HM formed from HC. PMs had lower indices of HC disposition compared with UMs and EMs. Clearance was reduced by nearly 60% and the t1/2 was increased by about 68% compared with EMs. The canonical order for HC clearance was UM>EM>PM. HC elimination mainly by the liver, represented by ke, was reduced about 70% in PM. However, HC's apparent Vd was not significantly different among UMs, EMs, and PM. The canonical order of predicted plasma HM concentrations was UM>EM>PM. For each of the CYP2D6 phenotypes, the mean predicted HM levels were within HM's therapeutic range, which indicates HC has significant phenotype-dependent pro-drug effects. Our results demonstrate that pharmacogenetics afford clinicians an opportunity to individualize HC dosing, while adding enhanced opportunity to account for its conversion to HM in the body.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of lysine clonixinate in children in postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martin, G; Cattan, C; Zuñiga, S

    1996-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of 2 doses of intravenous lysine clonixinate (4 and 6 mg x kg-1) were studied in 10 children (age 4-10 years) under postoperative care. A single dose of the drug was injected in a forearm vein. Blood samples were collected at regular intervals for 3 hours. Serum clonixin concentrations (expressed as clonixin) were analyzed using a high pressure liquid chromatography method. Pharmacokinetic values were estimated by a nonlinear computer program. The distribution volume was similar in both groups of children (1.288 +/- 0.829 1 and 1. 139 +/- 0.667 1, respectively). There were no differences between the values of total plasma clearance and the administered doses (0.026 +/- 0.017 ml x min-1 and 0.017 +/- 0.008 ml x min-1, t = 1.07, p = 0.76). The elimination half-life was longer in children who received 6 mg x kg-1 (44.26 +/- 6.34 min vs 38.63 +/- 10.93 min) but this difference was not statistically significant (t = 0.99, p < 0.34). The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated in these children were different from those found by other authors in adults and experimental animals.

  1. [Pharmacokinetics of digoxin in hyperthyroidism. Effect of methimazole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicka, Maria; Gasińska, Teresa; Dec, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities may be the only manifestations of overt hyperthyroidism. In patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation digoxin can be beneficial in controlling the symptoms and signs, but hyperthyroid patients show an impaired response or even resistance to digoxin treatment. The aim of the study is to establish: 1. Are there any differences in the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin between hypertyroid and euthyroid patients? 2. Does simultaneous administration of digoxin and methimazole affect the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of dogoxin? 3. Does methimazole-induced euthyroidism change the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin? The subject of the study were 28 patients with hyperthyroidism and 15 healthy persons. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin. Moreover we evaluated pharmacokinetics of a single dose of digoxin after simultaneous administration of digoxin and methimazole in 12 patients and 12 methimazole treated patients werere-assessed once they had become euthyroid. Hyperthyroid patients showed significantly lower serum digoxin concentrations, shorter T1/2 beta and a significantly smaller area under the concentration curve (AUC) that the control group. Administration of methimazole did not affect digoxin pharmacokinetics. In hyperthyroid patients: 1. the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin does differ from that observed in healthy subjects. 2.methimazole do not alter digoxin pharmacokinetics.

  2. Effect of co-medication on the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenobarbital in asphyxiated newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šíma, M; Pokorná, P; Hronová, K; Slanař, O

    2015-01-01

    Phenobarbital is an anticonvulsive drug widely used in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The objective of our study was to describe possible effect of frequently co-administered medications (dopamine, dobutamine, norepinephrine, furosemide, phenytoin, and analgesics) on the phenobarbital pharmacokinetics in full term newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Phenobarbital pharmacokinetic parameters (standardized intravenous loading dose was 10-20 mg/kg, maintenance dose 2-6 mg/kg/day) were computed using non-compartmental analysis. Co-medication was evaluated throughout the whole treatment period up to 5 days. Volume of distribution, clearance, and half-life median values (95 % CI) for phenobarbital in the whole study population (n=37) were 0.48 (0.41-0.56) l/kg, 0.0034 (0.0028-0.0040) l/h/kg, and 93.7 (88.1-99.2) h, respectively. Phenobarbital pharmacokinetic parameters were not significantly affected by vasoactive drugs (dopamine, dobutamine, and norepinephrine), furosemide, phenytoin, or analgesics. Furthermore, no dose-dependent alteration of phenobarbital pharmacokinetic parameters was noted for vasoactive medication at doses equivalent to cumulative vasoactive-inotropic score (area under the curve in a plot of vasoactive-inotropic score against time) 143.2-8473.6, furosemide at cumulative doses of 0.2-42.9 mg/kg, or phenytoin at cumulative doses of 10.3-46.2 mg/kg. Phenobarbital pharmacokinetics was not affected by investigated co-administered drugs used in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in real clinical settings.

  3. Phase I clinical studies of the advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-breaker TRC4186: safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Kumar P; Shiwalkar, Ajay; Kotecha, Jignesh; Thakkar, Purav; Srivastava, Ambrish; Chauthaiwale, Vijay; Sharma, Sanjay K; Cross, Maurice R; Dutt, Chaitanya

    2009-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications through a variety of mechanisms including endothelial dysfunction and structural abnormalities in the vasculature and myocardium. Reducing the AGEs burden and their ensuing pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant effect with associated dysfunctional proteins in various target tissues may retard the progression of and even reverse diabetic macro- and microvascular complications. Pyridinium, 3-[[2-(methylsulfonyl) hydrazino] carbonyl]-1-[2-oxo-2-2-thienyl) ethyl]-chloride (TRC4186) has demonstrated AGE-breaking activities in in vitro experiments and improvement in the endothelial and myocardial function in animal models of diabetes mellitus with reduction of AGEs accumulation in tissues over time. The safety of TRC4186 has been established in in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies. Thus, this drug is being developed for the treatment of complications associated with diabetes. This investigation set out to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of TRC4186 in healthy human subjects after single and multiple ascending doses, fixed doses in elderly male and female subjects, and with food and different formulations of the compound. Four studies were conducted during phase I clinical development of TRC4186. These were: (i) a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, dose-ascending study in healthy male subjects with doses of TRC4186 ranging from 250 to 2500 mg administered as an oral solution (total six doses); (ii) a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-ascending study in healthy male subjects with three doses of TRC4186 ranging from 500 to 2000 mg twice daily for 6 days with a final single dose on day 7; (iii) a randomized, open-label, three-way crossover study to assess the effect of food (fasted vs fed) and formulation (solution vs tablet) with TRC4186 500 mg; (iv) a randomized, double

  4. A clinical pharmacokinetic microdosing study of docetaxel with Japanese patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-ichi; Yoshino, Etsuko; Kawara, Kaori; Maeda, Kazuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Taro; Kaneta, Toshikado; Ishida, Hiroo; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2015-10-01

    Whether microdosing studies can be used to evaluate the human pharmacokinetics of new anticancer drugs remains unclear. The disposition of docetaxel in cancer patients is linear in terms of dose proportionality. We examined whether the pharmacokinetics of docetaxel in a clinically relevant therapeutic dose could be predicted from the pharmacokinetics of a microdose of docetaxel in Japanese patients with cancer. A microdose of docetaxel (100 μg/patient) was given by 5-min intravenous infusion on day 1, followed by a therapeutic dose of docetaxel (60-75 mg m(-2)), given by 1-h intravenous infusion on day 8. Plasma docetaxel was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to calculate the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0-inf). Nine patients received both a microdose and therapeutic dose of docetaxel. The AUC0-inf after microdosing was 3640 ± 1150 ng h L(-1), while that after therapeutic dosing adjusted to 100 mg/patient was 2230 ± 757 µg h L(-1). The ratio of docetaxel clearance in therapeutic dose to that in microdose was 1.8 (P = 0.0041). Plasma α1-acid glycoprotein concentrations negatively correlated with docetaxel clearance at therapeutic dose, whereas the trend was weak at microdose. Docetaxel clearance showed marginal nonlinearity between microdose and therapeutic dose, presumably because of saturation of plasma protein binding; however, the magnitude was within twofold, allowing practically acceptable extrapolation.

  5. Developmental pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in preterm and term neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elisabet I; Sandström, Marie; Honoré, Per Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    0-45 days) were enrolled in the study. In total, 894 serum gentamicin samples were included in the analysis. The concentration-time profile was described using a three-compartment model. Gentamicin clearance increased with the GA and PNA (included in a nonlinear fashion). The GA was also identified...... in this patient population. METHODS: Data were collected in a prospective study performed in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Population pharmacokinetic modelling was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling (NONMEM) software. Bodyweight...... was included as the primary covariate according to an allometric power model. Other evaluated covariates were age (postmenstrual age, gestational age [GA], postnatal age [PNA]), markers for renal function (serum creatinine, serum cystatin C) and concomitant medication with cefuroxime, vancomycin or indometacin...

  6. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Kuehn, Sven; Kuster, Niels [Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in Society (IT' IS), Zeughausstr. 43, 8004 Zuerich (Switzerland); Christopoulou, Maria [National Technical University of Athens, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Str., 15780 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: christ@itis.ethz.ch

    2010-04-07

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  7. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Kuehn, Sven; Kuster, Niels; Christopoulou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  8. A first-in-human phase I and pharmacokinetic study of CP-4126 (CO-101), a nucleoside analogue, in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, B; Awada, A; Evans, T R J; Dueland, S; Hendlisz, A; Rasch, W; Hernes, K; Hagen, S; Aamdal, S

    2015-10-01

    CP-4126 (gemcitabine elaidate, previously CO-101) is a lipid-drug conjugate of gemcitabine designed to circumvent human equilibrative nucleoside transporter1-related resistance to gemcitabine. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of CP-4126, and to describe its pharmacokinetic profile. Eligible patients with advanced refractory solid tumours, and adequate performance status, haematological, renal and hepatic function, were treated with one of escalating doses of CP-4126 administered by a 30-min intravenous infusion on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Blood and urine samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of CP-4126. Forty-three patients, median age 59 years (range 18-76; male = 27, female = 16), received one of ten dose levels (30-1600 mg/m(2)). Dose-limiting toxicities included grade 3 anaemia, grade 3 fatigue and grade 3 elevation of transaminases. The MTD and RP2D were 1250 mg/m(2) on basis of the toxicity and PK data. CP-4126 followed dose-dependent kinetics and maximum plasma concentrations occurred at the end of CP-4126 infusion. Seven patients achieved stable disease sustained for ≥3 months, including two patients with pancreatic cancer who had progressed on or after gemcitabine exposure. CP-4126 was well tolerated with comparable toxicity profile to gemcitabine. Future studies are required to determine its anti-tumour efficacy, either alone or in combination with other cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens.

  9. Practical concept of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in the management of skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Federico

    2016-04-01

    This article gives an overview of the practical concept of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles useful for clinicians in the management of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Recent studies suggest that distinguishing between bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity when choosing an antimicrobial for the treatment of severe infections could probably be clinically irrelevant. Conversely, what could help clinicians in maximizing the therapeutic efficacy of the various drugs in routine practice is taking care of some pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles. Concentration-dependent agents may exhibit more rapid bacterial killing than observed with time-dependent agents. Serum concentrations may not always adequately predict tissue exposure in patients with SSTIs, and measuring concentrations at the infection site is preferable. Hydrophilic antimicrobials showed generally lower penetration rates than the lipophilic ones and might require alternative dosing approaches in the presence of severe sepsis or septic shock. Conversely, tissue penetration of lipophilic antimicrobials is often unaffected by the pathophysiological status. Real-time therapeutic drug monitoring may be a very helpful tool for optimizing therapy of severe infections. Taking care of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles deriving from the most recent findings may help clinicians in maximizing treatment of SSTIs with antimicrobials in every situation.

  10. PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACOKINETIC DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP OF ROCURONIUM BROMIDE IN HUMANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; PROOST, JH; SCHIERE, S; HOMMES, FDM

    The existing human pharmacokinetic studies have been reviewed and compared with data derived from animals. The earliest study confirms the similarity of rocuronium to vecuronium with respect to the variables derived from the plasma concentration decay curves and the proportion excreted renally.

  11. A pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence study of Contiflo ICON 400 µg tablets in healthy Indian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monif, T; Arora, V; Madan, S; Arora, R; Balaji, A; Jha, D; Thudi, N R

    2010-12-01

    Tamsulosin, an alpha1 adrenoceptor blocking agent, exhibits selectivity for alpha1 receptors in human prostate. Blockade of these adrenoceptors can cause smooth muscles in the bladder neck and prostate to relax, resulting in an improvement in urine flow rate and a reduction in symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy. A new formulation Contiflo ICON 400 µg has been developed by Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited, India similar to Flomaxtra XL 400 µg of Astellas Pharma Limited, United Kingdom. This product is specifically designed to achieve a more consistent plasma concentration over a period of 24-h, a lower maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and an independence of pharmacokinetics (PKs) on food intake. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of the new formulation Contiflo ICON 400 µg of Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited, India and Flomaxtra XL 400 µg prolonged release tablets (containing tamsulosin hydrochloride prolonged release 400 µg) of Astellas Pharma Limited, United Kingdom. Study was conducted as an open label, balanced, randomized, two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence, cross over, single-dose bioequivalence study in 32 adult male human subjects under fed conditions. The mean (range) age, weight and height of the study subjects were 27.03 years (19 - 40 years), 57.19 kg (48 - 72 kg) and 166.81 cm (154 - 181 cm) respectively. Blood samples were collected at pre-dose and at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5, 5, 5.5, 6, 6.5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 16, 20, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 h post dose in each period. Plasma samples were analyzed for tamsulosin by using validated liquid chromatographic mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. The Mean ± SD of pharmacokinetic parameters tmax, Cmax, AUC24, AUClast and AUCinf for Tamsulosin were 11.741 ± 4.7201 and 12.155 ± 6.3077 h, 10.7614 ± 4.76709 and 10.4954 ± 5.08979 ng/ml, 171.4674 ± 77.39695 and 160.6738 ± 77.98628 ng.h/ml, 262.7771 ± 150.21432 and 250.6854 ± 156.75581 ng

  12. Pharmacokinetic study of mycophenolic acid in Iranian kidney transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Rezaee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetic parameters of mycophenolic acid (MPA in Iranian kidney transplant patients. Methods: Plasma MPA concentration of mycophenolate mofetile (MMF 1 gram two times a day was measured in 21 Iranian kidney transplant recipients receiving treatment. Patients who entered the study had been transplanted for more than 3 months and their drug level was supposed to be at steady state. MMF concentration was measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results: The plasma MPA concentration-time curve was characterized by an early sharp peak at about 1 hour postdose. The mean Area Under Curve (AUC, Cmax and Tmax were 47.0±18.3 µg.h/ml, 18.6±8.5 µg/ml and 1.0±0.5 hours respectively. Conclusion: The plasma MPA concentration-time curve pattern of Iranian patients was similar and consistent with previously reported profiles in other populations taking the same dose. Keywords: Mycophenolate mofetil, Mycophenolic acid, Pharmacokinetics, Area Under Curve, Kidney transplantation

  13. The Pharmacokinetics of Second-Generation Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics: Limitations of Monograph Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lik Hang N; Choi, Charles; Collier, Abby C; Barr, Alasdair M; Honer, William G; Procyshyn, Ric M

    2015-12-01

    Product monographs (also known by terms such as Summary of Product Characteristics and Highlights of Prescribing Information, depending on the jurisdiction) provide essential information to ensure the safe and effective use of a drug. Medical practitioners often rely on these monographs for guidance on matters related to pharmacokinetics as well as indications, contraindications, clinical pharmacology, and adverse reactions. The clinical and scientific information found within these documents, forming the basis for decision making, are presumed to be derived from well-designed studies. The objective of this review is to examine the source and validity of the pharmacokinetic data used in establishing the half-lives and times to steady-state reported in the product monographs of second-generation long-acting injectable antipsychotics. Thus, we have critically evaluated the clinical trials from which the pharmacokinetic parameters listed in the product monographs were determined. In many cases, the pharmacokinetic information presented in product monographs is of limited use to clinicians wishing to optimize the effectiveness and tolerability of second-generation long-acting injectable antipsychotics. Under such circumstances, off-label prescribing practices may actually produce better clinical outcomes than if decisions were made based on the product monographs alone.

  14. A Preclinical Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Anti-CD20/CD3 T-Cell-Dependent Bispecific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Gregory Z; Reyes, Arthur; Sun, Liping L; Cheu, Melissa; Oldendorp, Amy; Ramanujan, Saroja; Stefanich, Eric G

    2018-05-01

    CD20 is a cell-surface receptor expressed by healthy and neoplastic B cells and is a well-established target for biologics used to treat B-cell malignancies. Pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data for the anti-CD20/CD3 T-cell-dependent bispecific antibody BTCT4465A were collected in transgenic mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) studies. Pronounced nonlinearity in drug elimination was observed in the murine studies, and time-varying, nonlinear PK was observed in NHPs, where three empirical drug elimination terms were identified using a mixed-effects modeling approach: i) a constant nonsaturable linear clearance term (7 mL/day/kg); ii) a rapidly decaying time-varying, linear clearance term (t ½  = 1.6 h); and iii) a slowly decaying time-varying, nonlinear clearance term (t ½  = 4.8 days). The two time-varying drug elimination terms approximately track with time scales of B-cell depletion and T-cell migration/expansion within the central blood compartment. The mixed-effects NHP model was scaled to human and prospective clinical simulations were generated. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  15. A clinical study to examine the potential effect of lansoprazole on the pharmacokinetics of bosutinib when administered concomitantly to healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Richat; Leister, Cathie; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2013-08-01

    Bosutinib is an orally bioavailable, dual Src and Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved in the USA for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia following development of resistance or intolerance to prior therapy. In vitro studies demonstrated that bosutinib displays pH-dependent aqueous solubility, suggesting that concomitant administration of agents that alter gastric pH could affect bosutinib absorption. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of lansoprazole, a gastric proton pump inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics and safety of bosutinib. This open-label, non-randomized, phase I study involved inpatients and outpatients at a single site. The study participants were healthy men or women of non-childbearing potential aged 18-50 years. Each subject received bosutinib 400 mg on Day 1, lansoprazole 60 mg on Day 14, and bosutinib 400 mg co-administered with lansoprazole 60 mg on Day 15 under fasting conditions. The main outcome measure was the effect of multiple doses of lansoprazole on the pharmacokinetic profile of a single oral dose of bosutinib. A total of 24 healthy male subjects were enrolled. Co-administration with lansoprazole decreased the mean maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of bosutinib from 70.2 to 42.9 ng/mL, and the total area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 1,940 to 1,470 ng·h/mL. Log-transformed bosutinib pharmacokinetic parameters indicated significant between-treatment differences; the least squares geometric mean ratio for C(max) was 54 % (95 % CI 42-70) and for AUC was 74 % (95 % CI 60-90). Mean apparent total body clearance from plasma after oral administration increased from 237 to 330 L/h, and the median time to reach Cmax increased from 5 to 6 h, although this change may be related to decreased bosutinib absorption when combined with lansoprazole. When co-administered with lansoprazole, bosutinib maintained an acceptable safety profile, which was primarily

  16. Pharmacokinetic study of isatin in dog plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, A; Wang, Q; Fang, Z; Gao, M; Wang, H; Zhang, J; Xu, W; Yue, W; Yin, L; Liu, Z; Li, X; Ding, B

    2015-12-01

    A sensitive and selective method was developed and validated to study the pharmacokinetics of isatin. The blood samples were pretreated by protein precipitation method using methanol. Quetiapine was used as an internal standard. After pretreatment, the samples were assayed by LC/MS/MS method and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by WinNonlin 5.2 using non-compartment model. The separation was performed on a Venusil XBP PH column (5 µm, 2.0×100 mm) with an isocratic mobile phase consisted of methanol-water (containing 50 mM ammonium formate) (65:35, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. The Agilent G6410B triple quadrupole LC/MS system was operated under the multiple reactions monitoring mode (MRM) using the electrospray ionization technique in positive mode. The lower limits of quantification (LLOQ) of the analyte of the method was 10 ng/mL. The method was linear with correlation coefficient >0.995. The intraday and interday accuracy and precision of the assay were acceptable. This method has been applied successfully to a pharmacokinetic study involving the oral and intravenous administration of isatin to beagle dogs.

  17. Pharmacokinetic Studies of Chinese Medicinal Herbs Using an Automated Blood Sampling System and Liquid Chromatography-mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tse Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of herbal products is one of the major concerns for the modernization of traditional Chinese medicine, and pharmacokinetic data of medicinal herbs guide us to design the rational use of the herbal formula. This article reviews the advantages of the automated blood sampling (ABS systems for pharmacokinetic studies. In addition, three commonly used sample preparative methods, protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction and solid-phase extraction, are introduced. Furthermore, the definition, causes and evaluation of matrix effects in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS analysis are demonstrated. Finally, we present our previous works as practical examples of the application of ABS systems and LC/MS for the pharmacokinetic studies of Chinese medicinal herbs.

  18. Enrofloxacin: pharmacokinetics and metabolism in domestic animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cadenas, Cristina; Sierra-Vega, Matilde; García-Vieitez, Juan J; Diez-Liébana, M José; Sahagún-Prieto, Ana; Fernández-Martínez, Nélida

    2013-12-01

    Enrofloxacin is a fluorquinolone exclusively developed for use in veterinary medicine (1980). The kinetics of enrofloxacin are characterized, in general terms, by high bioavailability in most species and rapid absorption after IM, SC or oral administration. However, several studies reported that enrofloxacin showed low bioavailability after oral administration in ruminants. This drug has a broad distribution in the organism, excellent tissue penetration and long serum half-life. Also, enrofloxacin is characterized by a low host toxicity, a broad antibacterial spectrum and high bactericidal activity against major pathogenic bacteria (both Gram-positive and Gram-negative), and intracellular organisms found in diseased animals. The kinetics vary according to the route of administration, formulation, animal species, age, body condition, and physiological status, all of which contribute to differences in drug efficacy. The pharmacokinetic properties of drugs are closely related to their pharmacological efficiency, so it is important to know their behavior in each species that is used. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin in several domestic animal species.

  19. Comparing the pharmacokinetics of a fourth generation cephalosporin in three different age groups of New Forest ponies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smiet, E.; Haritova, A.; Heil, B.A.; Fink-Gremmels, J.; Wijnberg, I.D.

    2012-01-01

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY To compare the pharmacokinetics of the fourth generation cephalosporin, cefquinome, in neonatal foals, 6-week-old foals and mature New Forest ponies in order to recommend appropriate dosage regimens for use of this drug. METHODS Cefquinome was administered i.v. at 1

  20. Pharmacokinetic profile of dextromethorphan hydrobromide in a syrup formulation in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenin, Eric; Armogida, Marianna; Riff, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DM) is a widely used antitussive. This study determined, for the first time, the basic pharmacokinetic profile of DM and its active metabolite, dextrorphan (DP) in children and adolescents. Thirty-eight male and female subjects at risk for developing an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), or symptomatic with cough due to URTI, were enrolled in this single-dose, open-label study: ages 2-5 years (Group A, n = 8), 6-11 years (Group B, n = 17), 12-17 years (Group C, n = 13). Subjects were genotyped for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 polymorphisms and characterized as poor (PM) or non-poor metabolizers (non-PM). Groups A and B were dosed using an age-weight dosing schedule (DM range 7.5-24.75 mg); a 30-mg dose was used for Group C. Average exposures to total DP increased as age group increased, and average exposure to DM was highest in the adolescent group. One subject in that group was a PM. The terminal half-life (t ½) values were longer in the adolescent group due in part to the single PM subject. No relationship between body weight and pharmacokinetic parameters was noted. This is the first evaluation of the pharmacokinetic characteristics of DM in children and adolescents. A single dose of DM in this population was safe, and well tolerated at all doses tested. The data are used to model and compare pediatric DM exposures with those of adults.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of pregabalin controlled-release in healthy volunteers: effect of food in five single-dose, randomized, clinical pharmacology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Marci L; Plotka, Anna; Alvey, Christine W; Pitman, Verne W; Alebic-Kolbah, Tanja; Scavone, Joseph M; Bockbrader, Howard N

    2014-09-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of the immediate-release (IR) and the recently developed controlled-release (CR) formulation of pregabalin are dose proportional. Pregabalin IR can be taken with or without food. This analysis characterizes the effect of food on pregabalin CR. The objectives of this analysis were: (1) to evaluate the effect of administration time and fat or caloric content of an accompanying meal on the pharmacokinetic properties of a single dose of pregabalin CR (330 mg) relative to a single dose of pregabalin IR (300 mg); (2) to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties of a single dose of pregabalin CR administered fasted relative to a single dose of pregabalin CR administered immediately after food; and (3) to determine the safety and tolerability of single-dose administration of pregabalin CR and IR with and without food. The effect of food on the pharmacokinetic properties of pregabalin CR was determined in five phase I, open-label, single-dose, crossover studies (24-28 participants/study). Caloric and fat content of meals were varied and treatments were administered in the morning, at midday, or in the evening. Blood samples were collected up to 48 h post-dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated from plasma concentration-time data using standard noncompartmental methods. Adverse events were monitored throughout all studies. One hundred and twenty-eight healthy participants (19-54 years of age) received pregabalin. Peak plasma concentrations (C max) were lower for CR than the respective pregabalin IR doses, and time to C max occurred later. When pregabalin CR was administered with food at midday or in the evening, total exposures [area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero extrapolated to infinite time (AUC∞)] were equivalent for pregabalin CR and IR formulations regardless of fat or caloric content. When pregabalin CR was administered with an 800-1,000 calorie medium-fat breakfast, AUC∞ was equivalent for

  2. One should avoid retro-orbital pharmacokinetic sample collections for intranasal dosing in rats: Illustration of spurious pharmacokinetics generated for anti-migraine drugs zolmitriptan and eletriptan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harilal; Patel, Prakash; Modi, Nirav; Shah, Shaival; Ghoghari, Ashok; Variya, Bhavesh; Laddha, Ritu; Baradia, Dipesh; Dobaria, Nitin; Mehta, Pavak; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2017-08-30

    Because of the avoidance of first pass metabolic effects due to direct and rapid absorption with improved permeability, intranasal route represents a good alternative for extravascular drug administration. The aim of the study was to investigate the intranasal pharmacokinetics of two anti-migraine drugs (zolmitriptan and eletriptan), using retro-orbital sinus and jugular vein sites sampling. In a parallel study design, healthy male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats aged between 8 and 12weeks were divided into groups (n=4 or 5/group). The animals of individual groups were dosed intranasal (~1.0mg/kg) and oral doses of 2.1mg/kg of either zolmitriptan or eletriptan. Serial blood sampling was performed from jugular vein or retro-orbital site and plasma samples were analyzed for drug concentrations using LC-MS/MS assay. Standard pharmacokinetics parameters such as T max , C max , AUC last , AUC 0-inf and T 1/2 were calculated and statistics of derived parameters was performed using unpaired t-test. After intranasal dosing, the mean pharmacokinetic parameters C max and AUC inf of zolmitriptan/eletriptan showed about 17-fold and 3-5-fold higher values for retro-orbital sampling as compared to the jugular vein sampling site. Whereas after oral administration such parameters derived for both drugs were largely comparable between the two sampling sites and statistically non-significant. In conclusion, the assessment of plasma levels after intranasal administration with retro-orbital sampling would result in spurious and misleading pharmacokinetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of B{sub 1}-inhomogeneity on pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Bun Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Se [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-08-01

    To simulate the B1-inhomogeneity-induced variation of pharmacokinetic parameters on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). B1-inhomogeneity-induced flip angle (FA) variation was estimated in a phantom study. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to assess the FA-deviation-induced measurement error of the pre-contrast R1, contrast-enhancement ratio, Gd-concentration, and two-compartment pharmacokinetic parameters (Ktrans, ve, and vp). B1-inhomogeneity resulted in −23–5% fluctuations (95% confidence interval [CI] of % error) of FA. The 95% CIs of FA-dependent % errors in the gray matter and blood were as follows: −16.7–61.8% and −16.7–61.8% for the pre-contrast R1, −1.0–0.3% and −5.2–1.3% for the contrast-enhancement ratio, and −14.2–58.1% and −14.1–57.8% for the Gd-concentration, respectively. These resulted in −43.1–48.4% error for Ktrans, −32.3–48.6% error for the ve, and −43.2–48.6% error for vp. The pre-contrast R1 was more vulnerable to FA error than the contrast-enhancement ratio, and was therefore a significant cause of the Gd-concentration error. For example, a −10% FA error led to a 23.6% deviation in the pre-contrast R1, −0.4% in the contrast-enhancement ratio, and 23.6% in the Gd-concentration. In a simulated condition with a 3% FA error in a target lesion and a −10% FA error in a feeding vessel, the % errors of the pharmacokinetic parameters were −23.7% for Ktrans, −23.7% for ve, and −23.7% for vp. Even a small degree of B1-inhomogeneity can cause a significant error in the measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters on DCE-MRI, while the vulnerability of the pre-contrast R1 calculations to FA deviations is a significant cause of the miscalculation.

  4. A Preliminary Pharmacokinetic Study of Betulin, the Main Pentacyclic Triterpene from Extract of Outer Bark of Birch (Betulae alba cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie N. Laszczyk

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades triterpenes have attracted attention because of their pharmacological potential. Triterpene extract (TE from outer bark of birch consisting mainly of betulin is able to form an oleogel which was successfully tested in the treatment of actinic keratosis. Some aspects of TE in vitro pharmacology are already known. Now we show preliminary pharmacokinetics of betulin and results of a subchronic toxicity study of TE in rats and dogs. Because of poor aqueous solubility of the TE-triterpenes (< 0.1 μg/mL respectively, for pharmacokinetic studies it was suspended in sesame oil (rats, i.p. and PEG 400 / 0.9 % NaCl (dogs, s.c.. I.p. administered, betulin, the main component of TE, shows time dependency over a period of 4 h and reaches a dose-independent serum level of 0.13 μg/mL. Dose dependency was observed with s.c. administration. At 300 mg/kg a maximum plasma concentration of 0.33 μg/mL betulin was detected after 28 daily applications. The subchronic toxicity study showed no toxicity of TE in rats (i.p. and dogs (s.c.. In conclusion, triterpene extract from birch bark is safe, its betulin is bioavailable and in addition to published triterpene biological activities TE provides high potential for further pharmaceutical and pharmacological research.

  5. The role of age, gender, mood states and exercise frequency on exercise dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sebastiano; Hausenblas, Heather A; Oliva, Patrizia; Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Larcan, Rosalba

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to explore the prevalence, and the role of mood, exercise frequency, age, and gender differences of exercise dependence. Regular exercisers (N = 409) completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Exercise Dependence Scale, and the Profile of Mood States. For data analyses, the participants were stratified for sex and age (age ranges = young adults: 18-24 years, adults: 25-44 years, and middle-aged adults: 45-64 years). We found that: (a) 4.4% of the participants were classified as at-risk for exercise dependence; (b) the men and the two younger groups (i.e., young adults and adults) had higher exercise dependence scores; and (c) age, gender, exercise frequency, and mood state were related to exercise dependence. Our results support previous research on the prevalence of exercise dependence and reveal that adulthood may be the critical age for developing exercise dependence. These findings have practical implication for identifying individuals at-risk for exercise dependence symptoms, and may aid in targeting and guiding the implementation of prevention program for adults.

  6. Clinical pharmacokinetics of nisoldipine coat-core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, R

    1998-09-01

    Nisoldipine, a calcium antagonist of the dihydropyridine type, is the active ingredient of the controlled release nisoldipine coat-core (CC) formulation. In humans, the absorption from nisoldipine CC occurs across the entire gastrointestinal tract with an increase in bioavailability in the colon because of the lower concentrations of metabolising enzymes in the distal gut wall. Although nisoldipine is almost completely absorbed, its absolute bioavailability from the CC tablet is only 5.5%, as a result of significant first-pass metabolism in the gut and liver. Nisoldipine is a high-clearance drug with substantial interindividual and relatively lower intraindividual variability in pharmacokinetics, dependent on liver blood flow. Nisoldipine is highly (> 99%) protein bound. Its elimination is almost exclusively via the metabolic route and renal excretion of metabolites dominates over excretion in the faeces. Although nisoldipine is administered as a racemic mixture, its plasma concentrations are almost entirely caused by the eutomer as a result of highly stereoselective intrinsic clearance. Nisoldipine CC demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics in the therapeutic dose range and its steady-state pharmacokinetics are predictable from single dose data. Steady-state is reached with the second dose when the drug is given once daily and the peak-trough fluctuations in plasma concentration is minimal. Plasma-concentrations of nisoldipine increase with age. Careful dose titration according to individual clinical response is recommended in the elderly. Nisoldipine CC should not be used in patients with liver cirrhosis, though dosage adjustments in patients with renal impairment are not necessary. Inter-ethnic differences in its pharmacokinetics are not evident. Owing to inhibition of metabolising enzymes, a small dosage adjustment decrement for nisoldipine CC may be required when it is given in combination with cimetidine. Concomitant ingestion of nisoldipine with grapefruit

  7. Age Spreads and the Temperature Dependence of Age Estimates in Upper Sco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Qiliang; Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yiheyuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, 100871 Beijing (China); Rizzuto, Aaron [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    Past estimates for the age of the Upper Sco Association are typically 11–13 Myr for intermediate-mass stars and 4–5 Myr for low-mass stars. In this study, we simulate populations of young stars to investigate whether this apparent dependence of estimated age on spectral type may be explained by the star formation history of the association. Solar and intermediate mass stars begin their pre-main sequence evolution on the Hayashi track, with fully convective interiors and cool photospheres. Intermediate-mass stars quickly heat up and transition onto the radiative Henyey track. As a consequence, for clusters in which star formation occurs on a timescale similar to that of the transition from a convective to a radiative interior, discrepancies in ages will arise when ages are calculated as a function of temperature instead of mass. Simple simulations of a cluster with constant star formation over several Myr may explain about half of the difference in inferred ages versus photospheric temperature; speculative constructions that consist of a constant star formation followed by a large supernova-driven burst could fully explain the differences, including those between F and G stars where evolutionary tracks may be more accurate. The age spreads of low-mass stars predicted from these prescriptions for star formation are consistent with the observed luminosity spread of Upper Sco. The conclusion that a lengthy star formation history will yield a temperature dependence in ages is expected from the basic physics of pre-main sequence evolution, and is qualitatively robust to the large uncertainties in pre-main sequence evolutionary models.

  8. How does age affect the care dependency risk one year after stroke? A study based on claims data from a German health insurance fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Susanne; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf; Kohler, Martin; Peschke, Dirk; Kuhlmey, Adelheid; Schenk, Liane

    2015-10-23

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age on care dependency risk 1 year after stroke. Two research questions are addressed: (1) How strong is the association between age and care dependency risk 1 year after stroke and (2) can this association be explained by burden of disease? The study is based on claims data from a German statutory health insurance fund. The study population was drawn from all continuously insured members with principal diagnoses of ischaemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or transient ischaemic attack in 2007 who survived for 1 year after stroke and who were not dependent on care before their first stroke (n = 2864). Data were collected over a 1-year period. People are considered to be dependent on care if they, due to a physical, mental or psychological illness or disability, require substantial assistance in carrying out activities of daily living for a period of at least 6 months. Burden of disease was assessed by stroke subtype, history of stroke, comorbidities as well as geriatric multimorbidity. Regression models were used for data analysis. 21.6 % of patients became care dependent during the observation period. Post-stroke care dependency risk was significantly associated with age. Relative to the reference group (0-65 years), the odds ratio of care dependency was 11.30 (95 % CI: 7.82-16.34) in patients aged 86+ years and 5.10 (95 % CI: 3.88-6.71) in patients aged 76-85 years. These associations were not explained by burden of disease. On the contrary, age effects became stronger when burden of disease was included in the regression model (by between 1.1 and 28 %). Our results show that age has an effect on care dependency risk that cannot be explained by burden of disease. Thus, there must be other underlying age-dependent factors that account for the remaining age effects (e.g., social conditions). Further studies are needed to explore the causes of the strong age effects observed.

  9. [Pharmacokinetic studies of flomoxef in the neonatal field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, K; Miyano, T; Shimomura, H

    1991-11-01

    Flomoxef (FMOX), a new broad spectrum oxacephem antibiotic, was studied in the neonatal field and the pharmacokinetic results obtained are summarized below. 1. Serum concentrations of FMOX after dosages of 20 mg/kg via 1 hour drip infusion were 21.8 +/- 7.59 micrograms/ml, 15.4 +/- 4.35 micrograms/ml, 4.3 +/- 2.88 micrograms/ml at 1, 2 and 5 hours after administration, respectively, and T 2/1 (beta)'s averaged 2.08 +/- 1.01 hours. 2. Urinary excretion rates were 53.38 +/- 16.94% in the first 7 hours after administration.

  10. Can the observed association between serum perfluoroalkyl substances and delayed menarche be explained on the basis of puberty-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huali; Yoon, Miyoung; Verner, Marc-André; Xue, Jianping; Luo, Man; Andersen, Melvin E; Longnecker, Matthew P; Clewell, Harvey J

    2015-09-01

    An association between serum levels of two perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and delayed age at menarche was reported in a cross-sectional study of adolescents. Because perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have half-lives of years, growth dilution and the development of a new route of excretion (menstruation) could account for some or all of the reported association. To assess how much of the epidemiologic association between PFAS and delayed menarche can be explained by the correlation of growth and maturation with PFAS body burden. We developed a Monte Carlo (MC) physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of PFAS to simulate plasma PFAS levels in a hypothetical female population aged 2 to 20years old. Realistic distributions of physiological parameters as well as timing of growth spurts and menarche were incorporated in the model. The association between PFAS level and delayed menarche in the simulated data was compared with the reported association. The prevalence of menarche, distributions of age-dependent physiological parameters, and quartiles of serum PFAS concentrations in the simulated subjects were comparable to those reported in the epidemiologic study. The delay of menarche in days per natural log increase in PFAS concentrations in the simulated data were about one third as large as the observed values. The reported relationship between PFAS and age at menarche appears to be at least partly explained by pharmacokinetics rather than a toxic effect of these substances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Research progress on current pharmacokinetic evaluation of Chinese herbal medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guofu; Zhao, Haoru; Yang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    In order to prove safety and efficacy, herbal medicines must undergo the rigorous scientific researches such as pharmacokinetic and bioavailability, before they are put on the market in the foreign countries. Botanical Drug Products promulgated by the US FDA could guide industry sponsors to develop herbal drugs, which was also an important reference for investigating Chinese herbal medicines. This paper reviews and discusses novel approaches for how to assess systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic of Chinese herbal medicines, which were in line with FDA guidance. This mainly focus on identifying pharmacokinetic markers of botanical products, integral pharmacokinetic study of multiple components, Biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system, and population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study in herb-drug interaction.

  12. Atorvastatin calcium loaded chitosan nanoparticles: in vitro evaluation and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Baquee Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we prepared atorvastatin calcium (AVST loaded chitosan nanoparticles to improve the oral bioavailability of the drug. Nanoparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation technique and evaluated for its particle size, entrapment efficiency, zeta potential, in vitro release and surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of AVST from the optimized formulation (FT5 was compared with marketed immediate release formulation (Atorva(r in rabbits. Particle size of prepared nanoparticles was ranged between 179.3 ± 7.12 to 256.8 ± 8.24 nm with a low polydispersity index (PI value. Zeta potential study showed that the particles are stable with positive values between 13.03 ± 0.32 to 46.90 ± 0.49 mV. FT-IR studies confirmed the absence of incompatibility of AVST with excipient used in the formulations. In vitro release study showed that the drug release was sustained for 48 h. Results of pharmacokinetics study showed significant changes in the pharmacokinetic parameter (2.2 fold increase in AUC of the optimized formulation as compared to marketed formulation (Atorva(r. Thus, the developed nanoparticles evidenced the improvement of oral bioavailability of AVST in rabbit model.

  13. Once-daily dosing of saquinavir and low-dose ritonavir in HIV-1-infected individuals: a pharmacokinetic pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heeswijk, R. P.; Veldkamp, A. I.; Mulder, J. W.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Lange, J. M.; Beijnen, J. H.; Hoetelmans, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of a once-daily dosing regimen of saquinavir soft gelatin capsules in combination with a low dose of ritonavir in HIV-1-infected individuals. Open-label, multi-dose, pharmacokinetic pilot study. Seven HIV-1-infected individuals who were treated with

  14. Time to reach tacrolimus maximum blood concentration,mean residence time, and acute renal allograft rejection: an open-label, prospective, pharmacokinetic study in adult recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, Dirk R J; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2004-11-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether disposition-related pharmacokinetic parameters such as T(max) and mean residence time (MRT) could be used as predictors of clinical efficacy of tacrolimus in renal transplant recipients, and to what extent these parameters would be influenced by clinical variables. We previously demonstrated, in a prospective pharmacokinetic study in de novo renal allograft recipients, that patients who experienced early acute rejection did not differ from patients free from rejection in terms of tacrolimus pharmacokinetic exposure parameters (dose interval AUC, preadministration trough blood concentration, C(max), dose). However, recipients with acute rejection reached mean (SD) tacrolimus T(max) significantly faster than those who were free from rejection (0.96 [0.56] hour vs 1.77 [1.06] hours; P clearance nor T(1/2) could explain this unusual finding, we used data from the previous study to calculate MRT from the concentration-time curves. As part of the previous study, 100 patients (59 male, 41 female; mean [SD] age, 51.4 [13.8] years;age range, 20-75 years) were enrolled in the study The calculated MRT was significantly shorter in recipients with acute allograft rejection (11.32 [031] hours vs 11.52 [028] hours; P = 0.02), just like T(max) was an independent risk factor for acute rejection in a multivariate logistic regression model (odds ratio, 0.092 [95% CI, 0.014-0.629]; P = 0.01). Analyzing the impact of demographic, transplantation-related, and biochemical variables on MRT, we found that increasing serum albumin and hematocrit concentrations were associated with a prolonged MRT (P calculated MRT were associated with a higher incidence of early acute graft rejection. These findings suggest that a shorter transit time of tacrolimus in certain tissue compartments, rather than failure to obtain a maximum absolute tacrolimus blood concentration, might lead to inadequate immunosuppression early after transplantation.

  15. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance has been noticed in both clinical observation and laboratory studies. Evidence shows that many molecular and cellular events that play essential roles in opioid analgesia and tolerance are actually age-dependent. For example, the expression and functions of endogenous opioid peptides, multiple types of opioid receptors, G protein subunits that couple to opioid receptors, and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins change with development and age. Other signaling systems that are critical to opioid tolerance development, such as N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors, also undergo age-related changes. It is plausible that the age-dependent expression and functions of molecules within and related to the opioid signaling pathways, as well as age-dependent cellular activity such as agonist-induced opioid receptor internalization and desensitization, eventually lead to significant age-dependent changes in opioid analgesia and tolerance development.

  16. A Prospective Study of Age-dependent Changes in Propofol-induced Electroencephalogram Oscillations in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Johanna M; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Terzakis, Kristina; Pavone, Kara J; Deng, Hao; Houle, Timothy T; Firth, Paul G; Shank, Erik S; Brown, Emery N; Purdon, Patrick L

    2017-08-01

    In adults, frontal electroencephalogram patterns observed during propofol-induced unconsciousness consist of slow oscillations (0.1 to 1 Hz) and coherent alpha oscillations (8 to 13 Hz). Given that the nervous system undergoes significant changes during development, anesthesia-induced electroencephalogram oscillations in children may differ from those observed in adults. Therefore, we investigated age-related changes in frontal electroencephalogram power spectra and coherence during propofol-induced unconsciousness. We analyzed electroencephalogram data recorded during propofol-induced unconsciousness in patients between 0 and 21 yr of age (n = 97), using multitaper spectral and coherence methods. We characterized power and coherence as a function of age using multiple linear regression analysis and within four age groups: 4 months to 1 yr old (n = 4), greater than 1 to 7 yr old (n = 16), greater than 7 to 14 yr old (n = 30), and greater than 14 to 21 yr old (n = 47). Total electroencephalogram power (0.1 to 40 Hz) peaked at approximately 8 yr old and subsequently declined with increasing age. For patients greater than 1 yr old, the propofol-induced electroencephalogram structure was qualitatively similar regardless of age, featuring slow and coherent alpha oscillations. For patients under 1 yr of age, frontal alpha oscillations were not coherent. Neurodevelopmental processes that occur throughout childhood, including thalamocortical development, may underlie age-dependent changes in electroencephalogram power and coherence during anesthesia. These age-dependent anesthesia-induced electroencephalogram oscillations suggest a more principled approach to monitoring brain states in pediatric patients.

  17. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...way it adapts is by upregulating another hormone receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which may compensate for diminished AR activity. The

  18. Pharmacokinetics of combined treatment with praziquantel and albendazole in neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Hector H; Lescano, Andres G; Lanchote, Vera L; Pretell, E Javier; Gonzales, Isidro; Bustos, Javier A; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Bonato, Pierina S; Horton, John; Saavedra, Herbert; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    AIMS Neurocysticercosis is the most common cause of acquired epilepsy in the world. Antiparasitic treatment of viable brain cysts is of clinical benefit, but current antiparasitic regimes provide incomplete parasiticidal efficacy. Combined use of two antiparasitic drugs may improve clearance of brain parasites. Albendazole (ABZ) has been used together with praziquantel (PZQ) before for geohelminths, echinococcosis and cysticercosis, but their combined use is not yet formally recommended and only scarce, discrepant data exist on their pharmacokinetics when given together. We assessed the pharmacokinetics of their combined use for the treatment of neurocysticercosis. METHODS A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of ABZ and PZQ in 32 patients with neurocysticercosis was carried out. Patients received their usual concomitant medications including an antiepileptic drug, dexamethasone, and ranitidine. Randomization was stratified by antiepileptic drug (phenytoin or carbamazepine). Subjects had sequential blood samples taken after the first dose of antiparasitic drugs and again after 9 days of treatment, and were followed for 3 months after dosing. RESULTS Twenty-one men and 11 women, aged 16 to 55 (mean age 28) years were included. Albendazole sulfoxide concentrations were increased in the combination group compared with the ABZ alone group, both in patients taking phenytoin and patients taking carbamazepine. PZQ concentrations were also increased by the end of therapy. There were no significant side effects in this study group. CONCLUSIONS Combined ABZ + PZQ is associated with increased albendazole sulfoxide plasma concentrations. These increased concentrations could independently contribute to increased cysticidal efficacy by themselves or in addition to a possible synergistic effect. PMID:21332573

  19. Assessment of veterinary drugs in plants using pharmacokinetic approaches: The absorption, distribution and elimination of tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole in ephemeral vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Ru; Rairat, Tirawat; Loh, Shih-Hurng; Wu, Yu-Chieh; Vickroy, Thomas W.

    2017-01-01

    The present study was carried out to demonstrate novel use of pharmacokinetic approaches to characterize drug behaviors/movements in the vegetables with implications to food safety. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and most importantly, the elimination of tetracycline (TC) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) in edible plants Brassica rapa chinensis and Ipomoea aquatica grown hydroponically were demonstrated and studied using non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. The results revealed drug-dependent and vegetable-dependent pharmacokinetic differences and indicated that ephemeral vegetables could have high capacity accumulating antibiotics (up to 160 μg g-1 for TC and 38 μg g-1 for SMX) within hours. TC concentration in the root (Cmax) could reach 11 times higher than that in the cultivation fluid and 3–28 times higher than the petioles/stems. Based on the volume of distribution (Vss), SMX was 3–6 times more extensively distributed than TC. Both antibiotics showed evident, albeit slow elimination phase with elimination half-lives ranging from 22 to 88 hours. For the first time drug elimination through the roots of a plant was demonstrated, and by viewing the root as a central compartment and continuous infusion without a loading dose as drug administration mode, it is possible to pharmacokinetically monitor the movement of antibiotics and their fate in the vegetables with more detailed information not previously available. Phyto-pharmacokinetic could be a new area worth developing new models for the assessment of veterinary drugs in edible plants. PMID:28797073

  20. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 is controversial because of the potential for endocrine disruption, particularly during perinatal development, as suggested by in vitro, experimental animal, and epidemiological studies. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys by oral (PND 5, 35, 70) and intravenous injection (PND 77) routes using d6-BPA to avoid sample contamination. The concentration-time profiles observed in adult monkeys following oral administration of 100 μg/kg bw were remarkably similar to those previously reported in human volunteers given a similar dose; moreover, minimal pharmacokinetic differences were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys for the receptor-active aglycone form of BPA. Circulating concentrations of BPA aglycone were quite low following oral administration (< 1% of total), which reflects the redundancy of active UDP-glucuronosyl transferase isoforms in both gut and liver. No age-related changes were seen in internal exposure metrics for aglycone BPA in monkeys, a result clearly different from developing rats where significant inverse age-related changes, based on immaturity of Phase II metabolism and renal excretion, were recently reported. These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.

  1. The pharmacokinetics of morphine and lidocaine in nine severe trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenstadt, H; Mayan, H; Segal, E; Rotenberg, M; Almog, S; Perel, A; Ezra, D

    1999-12-01

    To study the pharmacokinetic parameters of morphine and lidocaine after a single intravenous (i.v.) bolus in severe trauma patients. Clinical case study. Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care of a university hospital. Nine patients, ages 24 to 91 years (mean 54.4 yrs), admitted to the hospital with severe trauma (Injury Severity Score > 20) were included in the study. After initial evaluation and stabilization, a single i.v. dose of morphine 0.025 mg/kg and lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg was given separately, and blood samples were drawn for each drug serum concentration. Morphine pharmacokinetics was studied in eight patients, lidocaine pharmacokinetics in seven patients, and both drugs were studied in six patients. Morphine clearance 2.5 to 10 ml/kg/min (6 +/- 2.6, mean +/- SD) and volume of distribution 0.28 to 3.30 L/kg (1.4 +/- 1.0) were found to be lower than values described previously for healthy volunteers (33.5 +/- 9 ml/kg/min and 5.16 +/- 1.40 L/kg, respectively), and are similar to those described in trauma patients (5 +/- 2.9 ml/kg/min and 0.9 +/- 0.2 L/kg, respectively). In contrast, lidocaine clearance 4.5 to 9.4 ml/kg/min (6.7 +/- 1.7) and volume of distribution 0.39 to 1.20 L/kg (0.72 +/- 0.28) were similar to the value described in healthy volunteers (10 ml/kg/min and 1.32 L/kg, respectively). Changes in pharmacokinetics of drugs eliminated by the liver may occur in patients with severe trauma. The preserved lidocaine clearance indicates an almost normal hepatic blood flow and suggests that other mechanisms may be involved in the lower morphine clearance. The findings may have applications for the treatment of severe trauma patients and suggest that drug monitoring might be needed in some instances so as to avoid toxicity.

  2. Pharmacokinetic study of benfotiamine and the bioavailability assessment compared to thiamine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feifan; Cheng, Zeneng; Li, Sanwang; Liu, Xingling; Guo, Xin; Yu, Peng; Gu, Zhenkun

    2014-06-01

    Benfotiamine is a lipid-soluble thiamine precursor which can transform to thiamine in vivo and subsequently be metabolized to thiamine monophosphate (TMP) and thiamine diphosphate (TDP). This study investigated the pharmacokinetic profiles of thiamine and its phosphorylated metabolites after single- and multiple-dose administration of benfotiamine in healthy Chinese volunteers, and assessed the bioavailability of orally benfotiamine administration compared to thiamine hydrochloride. In addition, concentration of hippuric acid in urine which is produced in the transformation process of benfotiamine was determined. The results showed that thiamine and its phosphorylated metabolites exhibited different pharmacokinetic characteristics in plasma, blood and erythrocyte, and one-compartment model provided the best fit for pharmacokinetic profiles of thiamine. The transformation process of benfotiamine to thiamine produced large amount of hippuric acid. No accumulation of hippuric acid was observed after multiple-dose of benfotiamine. Compared to thiamine hydrochloride, the bioavailability of thiamine in plasma and TDP in erythrocyte after oral administration of benfotiamine were 1147.3 ± 490.3% and 195.8 ± 33.8%, respectively. The absorption rate and extent of benfotiamine systemic availability of thiamine were significantly increased indicating higher bioavailability of thiamine from oral dose of benfotiamine compared to oral dose of thiamine hydrochloride. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  3. A Comparative Study of the Pharmacokinetics of Conventional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: To examine the pharmacokinetics of a formulated aceclofenac sustained release ... over 24 h and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). .... The response factor .... slower drug disposition and prolonged effect.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine administered to patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, W; Zhang, Y; Zhang, M-Z; Huang, X-H; Li, Y; Li, R; Liu, Q-W

    2018-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine in patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism with those in normal individuals. Fifteen patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism (Renal-failure Group) and 8 patients with normal renal and parathyroid gland function (Control Group) received intravenous 0.6 μg/kg dexmedetomidine for 10 minutes before anaesthesia induction. Arterial blood samples for plasma dexmedetomidine concentration analysis were drawn at regular intervals after the infusion was stopped. The pharmacokinetics were analysed using a nonlinear mixed-effect model with NONMEM software. The statistical significance of covariates was examined using the objective function (-2 log likelihood). In the forward inclusion and backward deletion, covariates (age, weight, sex, height, lean body mass [LBM], body surface area [BSA], body mass index [BMI], plasma albumin and grouping factor [renal failure or not]) were tested for significant effects on pharmacokinetic parameters. The validity of our population model was also evaluated using bootstrap simulations. The dexmedetomidine concentration-time curves fitted best with the principles of a two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model. No covariate of systemic clearance further improved the model. The final pharmacokinetic parameter values were as follows: V 1  = 60.6 L, V 2  = 222 L, Cl 1  = 0.825 L/min and Cl 2  = 4.48 L/min. There was no influence of age, weight, sex, height, LBM, BSA, BMI, plasma albumin and grouping factor (renal failure or not) on pharmacokinetic parameters. Although the plasma albumin concentrations (35.46 ± 4.13 vs 44.10 ± 1.12 mmol/L, respectively, P Renal-failure Group than in the Control Group (81.68 ± 18.08 vs 63.07 ± 13.45 μg/kg/min, respectively, P renal failure and hyperparathyroidism were similar to those in patients with normal renal function. Further

  5. A distributed delay approach for modeling delayed outcomes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuhua; Dunlavey, Michael; Guzy, Serge; Teuscher, Nathan

    2018-04-01

    A distributed delay approach was proposed in this paper to model delayed outcomes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies. This approach was shown to be general enough to incorporate a wide array of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models as special cases including transit compartment models, effect compartment models, typical absorption models (either zero-order or first-order absorption), and a number of atypical (or irregular) absorption models (e.g., parallel first-order, mixed first-order and zero-order, inverse Gaussian, and Weibull absorption models). Real-life examples were given to demonstrate how to implement distributed delays in Phoenix ® NLME™ 8.0, and to numerically show the advantages of the distributed delay approach over the traditional methods.

  6. Meta-Analysis of Clinical Studies Supports the Pharmacokinetic Variability Hypothesis for Acquired Drug Resistance and Failure of Antituberculosis Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pasipanodya, Jotam G.; Srivastava, Shashikant; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory studies have questioned nonadherence as a cause of antituberculosis drug failure and propose that between-patient pharmacokinetic variability may be the cause. This meta-analysis provides clinical evidence that pharmacokinetic variability of isoniazid alone leads to worse microbiological failure, relapse, and acquired drug resistance.

  7. Effect of fluoxetine on the pharmacokinetics of lansoprazole: a two-treatment period study in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlase, Laurian; Popa, Adina; Neag, Maria; Muntean, Dana; Leucuta, Sorin E

    2011-10-01

    Fluoxetine is an inhibitor of the main metabolizing enzymes of lansoprazole and could influence the pharmacokinetics of lansoprazole. The changes in lansoprazole pharmacokinetics could have clinical significance concerning the safety of the therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic interaction between fluoxetine and lansoprazole in healthy subjects. A dose of lansoprazole 30 mg, alone or in combination with fluoxetine 60 mg, was administered to 18 healthy male subjects in a two-treatment study design, separated by an 8-day period in which fluoxetine alone was administered as a single oral daily dose. Plasma concentrations of lansoprazole were determined during a 12-hour period following drug administration. Lansoprazole plasma concentrations were determined by a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of lansoprazole were calculated using non-compartmental analysis. In the two periods of treatment, the mean maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) values were 817 ng/mL (lansoprazole alone) and 1370 ng/mL (lansoprazole in combination with fluoxetine after pre-treatment with fluoxetine for 8 days) [p lansoprazole and suggest that the observed interaction may be clinically significant, although its clinical relevance has yet to be confirmed.

  8. Age-dependent mixing of deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.; Maggaard, L.; Pope, R.H.; DeMaster, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Rates of bioturbation measured in deep-sea sediments commonly are tracer dependent; in particular, shorter lived radiotracers (such as 234 Th) often yield markedly higher diffusive mixing coefficients than their longer-lived counterparts (e.g., 210 Pb). At a single station in the 1,240-m deep Santa Catalina Basin, the authors document a strong negative correlation between bioturbation rate and tracer half-life. Sediment profiles of 234 Th (half-life = 24 days) yield an average mixing coefficient (60 cm 2 y -1 ) two orders of magnitude greater than that for 210 Pb (half-life = 22 y, mean mixing coefficient = 0.4 cm 2 y -1 ). A similar negative relationship between mixing rate and tracer time scale is observed at thirteen other deep-sea sites in which multiple radiotracers have been used to assess diffusive mixing rates. This relationship holds across a variety of radiotracer types and time scales. The authors hypothesize that this negative relationship results from age-dependent mixing, a process in which recently sedimented, food-rich particles are ingested and mixed at higher rates by deposit feeders than are older, food-poor particles. Results from an age-dependent mixing model demonstrate that this process indeed can yield the bioturbation-rate vs. tracer-time-scale correlations observed in deep-sea sediments. Field data on mixing rates of recently sedimented particles, as well as the radiotracer activity of deep-sea deposit feeders, provide strong support for the age-dependent mixing model. The presence of age-dependent mixing in deep-sea sediments may have major implications for diagenetic modeling, requiring a match between the characteristic time scales of mixing tracers and modeled reactants. 102 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine in combined lumbar and sciatic nerve block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljebari, Hanene; Jebabli, Nadia; Salouage, Issam; Gaies, Emna; Lakhal, Mohamed; Boussofara, Mehdi; Klouz, Anis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to establish the population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of bupivacaine after combined lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve blocks and secondary aim is to assess the effect of patient's characteristics including age, body weight and sex on pharmacokinetic parameters. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 patients scheduled for elective lower extremity surgery with combined lumbar and sciatic nerve block using plain bupivacaine 0.5% were included. The total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were measured before injection and after two blocks placement and at selected time points. Monitoring of bupivacaine was made by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection. Non-linear mixed effects modeling was used to analyze the PPK of bupivacaine. Results: One compartment model with first order absorption, two input compartments and a central elimination was selected. The Shapiro-Wilks test of normality for normalized prediction distribution errors for this model (P = 0.156) showed this as a valid model. The selected model predicts a population clearance of 930 ml/min (residual standard error [RSE] = 15.48%, IC 95% = 930 ± 282.24) with inter individual variability of 75.29%. The central volume of distribution was 134 l (RSE = 12.76%, IC = 134 ± 33.51 L) with inter individual variability of 63.40%. The absorption of bupivacaine in two sites Ka1 and Ka2 were 0.00462/min for the lumbar site and 0.292/min for the sciatic site. Age, body weight and sex have no effect on the bupivacaine pharmacokinetics in this studied population. Conclusion: The developed model helps us to assess the systemic absorption of bupivacaine at two injections sites. PMID:24741194

  10. Clinical pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in the neonate: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2009-04-01

    Sepsis is common in neonates and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Sixty percent of preterm neonates receive at least one antibiotic, and 43% of the antibiotics administered to these neonates are aminoglycosides. The clearance (Cl), serum half-life (t(1/2)), and volume of distribution (Vd) of aminoglycosides change during the neonatal life, and the pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides need to be studied in neonates in order to optimise therapy with these drugs. The aim of this work is to review the published data on the pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in order to provide a critical analysis of the literature that can be a useful tool in the hands of physicians. The bibliographic search was performed electronically using PubMed, as the search engine, through July 11th, 2008. Firstly, a Medline search was performed with the keywords "pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in neonates" with the limit of "human". Other Medline searches were performed with the keywords "pharmacokinetics of ... in neonates" followed by the name of the aminoglycosides: amikacin, gentamicin, netilmicin and tobramycin. In addition, the book Neofax: A Manual of Drugs Used in Neonatal Care by Young and Mangum (Thomson Healthcare, 2007) was consulted. The aminoglycosides are mainly eliminated by the kidney, and their elimination rates are reduced at birth. As a consequence Cl is reduced and t(1/2) is prolonged in the neonate as compared to more mature infants. The high body-water content of the neonate results in a large Vd of aminoglycosides as these drugs are fairly water soluble. Postnatal development is an important factor in the maturation of the neonate, and as postnatal age proceeds, Cl of aminoglycosides increases. The maturation of the kidney governs the pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in the infant. Cl and t(1/2) are influenced by development, and this must be taken into consideration when planning a dosage regimen with aminoglycosides in the neonate. Aminoglycosides

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of olprinone in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunisawa T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Hidefumi Kasai,2 Makoto Suda,2 Manabu Yoshimura,3 Ami Sugawara,3 Yuki Izumi,3 Takafumi Iida,3 Atsushi Kurosawa,3 Hiroshi Iwasaki3 1Surgical Operation Department, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan; 2Clinical Study Management Division, Bell Medical Solutions Inc, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan Background: Olprinone decreases the cardiac preload and/or afterload because of its vasodilatory effect and increases myocardial contractility by inhibiting phosphodiesterase III. Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of olprinone after a single continuous infusion in healthy male volunteers. Methods: We used 500 plasma concentration data points collected from nine healthy male volunteers for the study. The population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the nonlinear mixed effect model (NONMEM® software. Results: The time course of plasma concentration of olprinone was best described using a two-compartment model. The final pharmacokinetic parameters were total clearance (7.37 mL/minute/kg, distribution volume of the central compartment (134 mL/kg, intercompartmental clearance (7.75 mL/minute/kg, and distribution volume of the peripheral compartment (275 mL/kg. The interindividual variability in the total clearance was 12.4%, and the residual error variability (exponential and additive were 22.2% and 0.129 (standard deviation. The final pharmacokinetic model was assessed using a bootstrap method and visual predictive check. Conclusion: We developed a population pharmacokinetic model of olprinone in healthy male adults. The bootstrap method and visual predictive check showed that this model was appropriate. Our results might be used to develop the population pharmacokinetic model in patients. Keywords: phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, men, pharmacokinetic model

  12. A phase I study evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of an antibody-based tissue factor antagonist in subjects with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Peter E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue factor (TF-dependent extrinsic pathway has been suggested to be a central mechanism by which the coagulation cascade is locally activated in the lungs of patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS and thus represents an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. This study was designed to determine the pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of ALT-836, an anti-TF antibody, in patients with ALI/ARDS. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial in adult patients who had suspected or proven infection, were receiving mechanical ventilation and had ALI/ARDS (PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 300 mm. Eighteen patients (6 per cohort were randomized in a 5:1 ratio to receive ALT-836 or placebo, and were treated within 48 hours after meeting screening criteria. Cohorts of patients were administered a single intravenously dose of 0.06, 0.08 or 0.1 mg/kg ALT-836 or placebo. Blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic and immunogenicity measurements. Safety was assessed by adverse events, vital signs, ECGs, laboratory, coagulation and pulmonary function parameters. Results Pharmacokinetic analysis showed a dose dependent exposure to ALT-836 across the infusion range of 0.06 to 0.1 mg/kg. No anti-ALT-836 antibody response was observed in the study population during the trial. No major bleeding episodes were reported in the ALT-836 treated patients. The most frequent adverse events were anemia, observed in both placebo and ALT-836 treated patients, and ALT-836 dose dependent, self-resolved hematuria, which suggested 0.08 mg/kg as an acceptable dose level of ALT-836 in this patient population. Conclusions Overall, this study showed that ALT-836 could be safely administered to patients with sepsis-induced ALI/ARDS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01438853

  13. Excipient-drug pharmacokinetic interactions: Effect of disintegrants on efflux across excised pig intestinal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Gerber

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical excipients were designed originally to be pharmacologically inert. However, certain excipients were found to have altering effects on drug pharmacodynamics and/or pharmacokinetics. Pharmacokinetic interactions may be caused by modulation of efflux transporter proteins, intercellular tight junctions and/or metabolic enzyme amongst others. In this study, five disintegrants from different chemical classes were evaluated for P-glycoprotein (P-gp related inhibition and tight junction modulation effects. Bi-directional transport studies of the model compound, Rhodamine 123 (R123 were conducted in the absence (control group and presence (experimental groups of four concentrations of each selected disintegrant across excised pig jejunum tissue. The results showed that some of the selected disintegrants (e.g. Ac-di-sol® and Kollidon® CL-M increased R123 absorptive transport due to inhibition of P-gp related efflux, while another disintegrant (e.g. sodium alginate changed R123 transport due to inhibition of P-gp in conjunction with a transient opening of the tight junctions in a concentration dependent way. It may be concluded that the co-application of some disintegrants to the intestinal epithelium may lead to pharmacokinetic interactions with drugs that are susceptible to P-gp related efflux. However, the clinical significance of these in vitro permeation findings should be confirmed by means of in vivo studies. Keywords: Disintegrants, Excipient, Ex vivo, P-glycoprotein, Pharmacokinetic interactions, Rhodamine 123

  14. Using Dried Blood Spot Sampling to Improve Data Quality and Reduce Animal Use in Mouse Pharmacokinetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J

    2015-01-01

    Traditional pharmacokinetic analysis in nonclinical studies is based on the concentration of a test compound in plasma and requires approximately 100 to 200 µL blood collected per time point. However, the total blood volume of mice limits the number of samples that can be collected from an individual animal—often to a single collection per mouse—thus necessitating dosing multiple mice to generate a pharmacokinetic profile in a sparse-sampling design. Compared with traditional methods, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis requires smaller volumes of blood (15 to 20 µL), thus supporting serial blood sampling and the generation of a complete pharmacokinetic profile from a single mouse. Here we compare plasma-derived data with DBS-derived data, explain how to adopt DBS sampling to support discovery mouse studies, and describe how to generate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from a single mouse. Executing novel study designs that use DBS enhances the ability to identify and streamline better drug candidates during drug discovery. Implementing DBS sampling can reduce the number of mice needed in a drug discovery program. In addition, the simplicity of DBS sampling and the smaller numbers of mice needed translate to decreased study costs. Overall, DBS sampling is consistent with 3Rs principles by achieving reductions in the number of animals used, decreased restraint-associated stress, improved data quality, direct comparison of interanimal variability, and the generation of multiple endpoints from a single study. PMID:25836959

  15. Therapeutic drug monitoring for the individualization of docetaxel dosing: a randomized pharmacokinetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, Frederike K.; Loos, Walter J.; van der Bol, Jessica M.; de Bruijn, Peter; Mathijssen, Ron H. J.; Verweij, Jaap; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Docetaxel pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, notably clearance and exposure (AUC), are characterized by large interindividual variability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of PK-guided [area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) targeted], individualized docetaxel

  16. Pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab after topical and intravitreal administration in human eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Moisseiev, Elad; Waisbourd, Michael; Ben-Artsi, Elad; Levinger, Eliya; Barak, Adiel; Daniels, Tad; Csaky, Karl; Loewenstein, Anat; Barequet, Irina S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical bevacizumab is a potential treatment modality for corneal neovascularization, and several recent studies have demonstrated its efficacy. No previous study of the pharmacokinetics of topical bevacizumab has been performed in human eyes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the pharmacokinetics of topical administration of bevacizumab in human eyes, and also to compare the pharmacokinetics of intravitreal bevacizumab injections with previously reported data. Methods Tw...

  17. [The enantioselective pharmacokinetic study of desvenlafaxine sustained release tablet in Chinese healthy male volunteers after oral administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-xia; Du, Jiang-bo; Zhang, Yi-fan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Zhong, Da-fang

    2015-04-01

    A chiral LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous analysis of desvenlafaxine (DVS) enantiomers in human plasma was developed and applied to a pharmacokinetic study on 12 Chinese healthy volunteers. d6-Desvenlafaxine was used as internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on the Astec Chirobiotic V chiral column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 μm). The assay was linear over the concentration range of 0.500-150 ng x mL(-1) for both enantiomers (r2 > 0.99). The method was successfully applied to a stereoselective pharmacokinetic study of 100 mg desvenlafaxine sustained release tablets on 12 Chinese healthy volunteers under fasting conditions. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to both enantiomers in Chinese healthy volunteers. The AUC(0-t), and C(max) of the two enantiomers were about 1.5 times higher than those of blacks and whites reported in the literature.

  18. Age dependencies in the modelling of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A.M.; GSF, Neuherberg; Barclay, D.

    1992-01-01

    Models for the dose and age dependence of radiation induced cancer have been based primarily on the follow-up of the atomic bomb survivors. Two different concepts have been deduced for leukaemias and for other cancers. The excess leukaemias appear in a distinct temporal wave with a maximum 5 to 10 years after radiation exposure; the distribution is more narrow for younger ages, but there is little dependence of the total attributable risk on age at exposure. For other cancers the latent periods are longer and, according to the current interpretation, the excess rates are then proportional to the age specific spontaneous rates, so that most excess cases would arise at old age. The factors of proportionality, and thus the attributable risks, are assumed to be markedly higher for young ages at exposure. It is argued here, that there is no firm support for this interpretation. (author)

  19. Pediatric Pharmacokinetic Data: Implications for Environmental Risk Assessment for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharmacology and toxicology share a common interest in pharmacokinetic data, especially as it is available in pediatric populations. These data have been critical to the clinical pharmacologist for many years in designing age-specific dosing regimens. Now they are being used incr...

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread clinical application of melatonin, several unanswered questions remain regarding the pharmacokinetics of this drug. This lack of knowledge may contribute to the inconsistency of results in previous clinical studies. Currently, a t max value of 30-45 min and a t ½elimination of ...

  1. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosten, Astrid W; Abrantes, João A; Jönsson, Siv; de Bruijn, Peter; Kuip, Evelien J M; Falcão, Amílcar; van der Rijt, Carin C D; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2016-04-01

    Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl. Furthermore, we evaluated rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route. Fifty-two patients treated with subcutaneous and/or transdermal fentanyl for moderate to severe cancer-related pain participated. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated using non-linear mixed-effects modelling. For rotations from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, a 1:1 dose conversion ratio was used while the subcutaneous infusion was continued for 12 h (with a 50 % tapering after 6 h). A 6-h scheme with 50 % tapering after 3 h was simulated using the final model. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and separate first-order absorption processes for each route adequately described the data. The estimated apparent clearance of fentanyl was 49.6 L/h; the absorption rate constant for subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl was 0.0358 and 0.0135 h(-1), respectively. Moderate to large inter-individual and inter-occasion variability was found. Around rotation from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, measured and simulated plasma fentanyl concentrations rose and increasing side effects were observed. We describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl in one patient cohort and report several findings that are relevant for clinical practice. Further research is warranted to study the optimal scheme for rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route.

  2. Determination of ifenprodil by LC–MS/MS and its application to a pharmacokinetic study in healthy Chinese volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the development and validation of an assay for ifenprodil based on liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS and its application to a pharmacokinetic study involving single and multiple intravenous infusions to healthy Chinese volunteers. After sample preparation of plasma by liquid–liquid extraction with ethyl acetate, the analyte and internal standard, urapidil, were separated by reversed phase chromatography in a run time of 4 min and detected by positive ion electrospray ionization followed by multiple reaction monitoring of the precursor-to-product ion transitions at m/z 326.2→308.1 for ifenprodil and m/z 388.4→205.3 for IS. The assay was linear in the concentration range 0.2–50.0 ng/mL with recovery >76.4%. In the pharmacokinetic study of single intravenous infusions of 5, 10 and 15 mg ifenprodil, peak plasma concentrations and areas under the plasma concentration–time curve were both linearly related to dose. In the pharmacokinetic study of multiple once daily intravenous infusions of 10 mg ifenprodil for 7 days, pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to those after the single dose showing that ifenprodil does not accumulate on repeated administration.

  3. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers.

  4. Absolute quantification of pharmacokinetic distribution of RES colloids in individuals with normal liver function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, H.; Spohr, G.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Estimates of the radiation dose resulting from liver-spleen scintigraphy 99 TCsup(m)-labelled colloids are based on pharmacokinetic data mainly determined in animals. The aim of this study was to check the pharmacokinetic data by direct, absolute in vivo quantification in man. Liver and spleen activities were directly measured using a double-energy window technique. Activities in other organs were quantified by conjugate whole-body scans. All measurement procedures were checked using the whole-body Alderson phantom. Pharmacokinetic data for sulphur colloid, tin colloid, human serum albumin (HSA) millimicrospheres, and phytate were obtained in 13 to 20 normal subjects for each type of colloid. Depending on the colloid type liver uptake was between 54 and 75% of the total administered dose (TAD) and spleen uptake was 3.5 to 21% TAD. Activity measured in blood, urine, lung and thyroid proved to be far from negligible. The results of this work suggest a correction of the animal-based data of colloid distribution and radiation dose on the basis of the direct measurement of absolute uptake in man. (author)

  5. Anti-cancer, pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies of cremophor el free alternative paclitaxel formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Subheet K; Utreja, Puneet; Tiwary, Ashok K; Mahajan, Mohit; Kumar, Nikhil; Roy, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to determine the in vivo potential of previously developed and optimized Cremophor EL free paclitaxel (CF-PTX) formulation consisting of soya phosphatidylcholine and biosurfactant sodium deoxycholate. CF-PTX was found to have drug loading of 6 mg/ml similar to Cremophor EL based marketed paclitaxel formulation. In the present study, intracellular uptake, repeated dose 28 days sub-acute toxicity, anti-cancer activity, biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine in vivo performance of CF-PTX formulation in comparison to marketed paclitaxel formulation. Intracellular uptake of CF-PTX was studied using A549 cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting assay (FACS) and fluorescence microscopy. In vivo anti-cancer activity of CF-PTX was evaluated using Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) model in mice followed by biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies. FACS investigation showed that fluorescence marker acridine orange (AO) solution showed only 19.8±1.1% intracellular uptake where as significantly higher uptake was observed in the case of AO loaded CF-PTX formulation (85.4±2.3%). The percentage reduction in tumor volume for CF-PTX (72.5±2.3%) in EAC bearing mice was found to be significantly (p<0.05) higher than marketed formulation (58.6±2.8%) on 14th day of treatment. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies showed sustained plasma concentration of paclitaxel depicted by higher mean residence time (MRT; 18.2±1.8 h) and elimination half life (12.8±0.6 h) with CF-PTX formulation as compared to marketed formulation which showed 4.4±0.2 h MRT and 3.6±0.4 h half life. The results of the present study demonstrated better in vivo performance of CF-PTX and this formulation appears to be a promising carrier for sustained and targeted delivery of paclitaxel.

  6. Age differences in empathy: Multidirectional and context-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, Cornelia; Kunzmann, Ute

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated age differences in empathy, focusing on empathic accuracy (the ability to perceive another's emotions accurately), emotional congruence (the capacity to share another's emotions), and sympathy. Participants, 101 younger (Mage = 24 years) and 101 older (Mage = 69 years) women, viewed 6 film clips, each portraying a younger or an older woman reliving and thinking aloud about an autobiographical memory. The emotional quality (anger, sadness, happiness) and the age relevance (young, old) of the memorized events were systematically varied. In comparison to their younger counterparts, older women were less accurate in perceiving the protagonists' emotions, but they reported similar levels of emotional congruence and greater sympathy. In addition, age deficits in empathic accuracy were moderated by the age relevance of the task, that is, younger and older women's empathic accuracy did not differ if the protagonists' memorized personal experience was of high relevance to older adults. These findings speak for multidirectional and context-dependent age differences in empathy. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of QRS-prolongation by flecainide: heart rate-dependent effects during sinus rhythm in conscious telemetered dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sällström, Johan; Al-Saffar, Ahmad; Pehrson, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    The duration of the QRS interval is determined by the ion currents involved in cardiac depolarization. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs reduce cardiac excitability and conduction by inhibiting Nav1.5 channels responsible for I(Na), thus increasing the QRS interval. Previous studies in humans as well as in animal models have demonstrated a more pronounced effect on QRS-prolongation during higher heart rates. In the present study, the effects of the Nav1.5 inhibitor flecainide on cardiovascular parameters, were studied in the telemetered beagle dog under normal autonomic control. The heart rate dependency of QRS prolongation was characterized using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling. Four male telemetered beagle dogs were administered placebo or flecainide (100, 150 and 200 mg) in a Latin square design. The QRS interval and heart rate were recorded, and blood samples were taken. Plasma concentrations of flecainide were fitted to a one compartment oral model and the intrapolated plasma concentrations were fitted to QRS and heart rate data sampled during 5 h after dosing. Flecainide increased the QRS interval in all dogs, whereas there were no effects on heart rate. Using the PKPD model, a statistically significant heart rate-dependent QRS prolongation was linked to individual concentration-time profiles of flecainide. PKPD analysis of QRS interval data from unrestrained dogs with sinus rhythm can elucidate mechanisms previously only described during controlled heart rhythm. Specific questions can therefore be addressed in generically designed cardiovascular telemetry safety studies and different types of relationships between parameters can be uncovered. In addition, the present approach can be used to better characterize drug-induced QRS effects in cardiovascular dog models. © 2013.

  8. Stability analysis for a general age-dependent vaccination model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Doma, M.

    1995-05-01

    An SIR epidemic model of a general age-dependent vaccination model is investigated when the fertility, mortality and removal rates depends on age. We give threshold criteria of the existence of equilibriums and perform stability analysis. Furthermore a critical vaccination coverage that is sufficient to eradicate the disease is determined. (author). 12 refs

  9. Role of Mitochondrial Complex IV in Age-Dependent Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Soro-Arnaiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with progressive white adipose tissue (WAT enlargement initiated early in life, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. Here we show that mitochondrial complex IV (CIV activity and assembly are already repressed in white adipocytes of middle-aged mice and involve a HIF1A-dependent decline of essential CIV components such as COX5B. At the molecular level, HIF1A binds to the Cox5b proximal promoter and represses its expression. Silencing of Cox5b decreased fatty acid oxidation and promoted intracellular lipid accumulation. Moreover, local in vivo Cox5b silencing in WAT of young mice increased the size of adipocytes, whereas restoration of COX5B expression in aging mice counteracted adipocyte enlargement. An age-dependent reduction in COX5B gene expression was also found in human visceral adipose tissue. Collectively, our findings establish a pivotal role for CIV dysfunction in progressive white adipocyte enlargement during aging, which can be restored to alleviate age-dependent WAT expansion.

  10. Pharmacokinetic variability of long-acting stimulants in the treatment of children and adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermer, James C; Adeyi, Ben A; Pucci, Michael L

    2010-12-01

    Methylphenidate- and amfetamine-based stimulants are first-line pharmacotherapies for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, a common neurobehavioural disorder in children and adults. A number of long-acting stimulant formulations have been developed with the aim of providing once-daily dosing, employing various means to extend duration of action, including a transdermal delivery system, an osmotic-release oral system, capsules with a mixture of immediate- and delayed-release beads, and prodrug technology. Coefficients of variance of pharmacokinetic measures can estimate the levels of pharmacokinetic variability based on the measurable variance between different individuals receiving the same dose of stimulant (interindividual variability) and within the same individual over multiple administrations (intraindividual variability). Differences in formulation clearly impact pharmacokinetic profiles. Many medications exhibit wide interindividual variability in clinical response. Stimulants with low levels of inter- and intraindividual variability may be better suited to provide consistent levels of medication to patients. The pharmacokinetic profile of stimulants using pH-dependent bead technology can vary depending on food consumption or concomitant administration of medications that alter gastric pH. While delivery of methylphenidate with the transdermal delivery system would be unaffected by gastrointestinal factors, intersubject variability is nonetheless substantial. Unlike the beaded formulations and, to some extent (when considering total exposure) the osmotic-release formulation, systemic exposure to amfetamine with the prodrug stimulant lisdexamfetamine dimesylate appears largely unaffected by such factors, likely owing to its dependence on systemic enzymatic cleavage of the precursor molecule, which occurs primarily in the blood involving red blood cells. The high capacity but as yet unidentified enzymatic system for conversion of lisdexamfetamine

  11. Influence of Renal Impairment on the Pharmacokinetics of Afatinib: An Open-Label, Single-Dose Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Sabrina; Schnell, David; Külzer, Raimund; Gansser, Dietmar; Weber, Anne; Wallenstein, Gudrun; Halabi, Atef; Conrad, Anja; Wind, Sven

    2017-06-01

    Afatinib is an oral irreversible ErbB-Family Blocker indicated for treatment of patients with EGFR mutation positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer. This trial assessed whether renal impairment influences the pharmacokinetics and safety of afatinib. This was an open-label, single-dose study. Pharmacokinetic parameters after afatinib 40 mg were investigated in subjects with moderate (n = 8) or severe (n = 8) renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate 30-59 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively) and healthy matched controls (n = 14). Plasma and urine samples were collected before and up to 14 days after dosing for pharmacokinetic and plasma protein-binding assessment. Primary endpoints were area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the last quantifiable concentration (AUC last ) and maximum plasma concentration (C max ) between subjects with renal impairment and healthy matched controls. Pharmacokinetic profiles and plasma protein binding were similar in all groups. The extent of exposure, as indicated by AUC last and C max , was generally similar between the matched treatment groups, with the exception of the geometric mean ratio of AUC last for subjects with severe renal impairment, which showed a trend towards a higher value compared with matched healthy subjects (150.0 % [90 % CI 105.3-213.7]) Inter-individual variability was moderate (geometric mean coefficient of variation 28-39 % for moderate impairment, 34-42 % for severe impairment). Afatinib was well tolerated and urinary excretion was minimal. Moderate-to-severe renal impairment had a minor influence on the pharmacokinetics of afatinib that was within the observed inter-individual variability, suggesting that afatinib treatment can be considered in this patient population. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT02096718.

  12. Metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies of scutellarin in rat plasma, urine, and feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jian-feng; You, Hai-sheng; Dong, Ya-lin; Lu, Jun; Chen, Si-ying; Zhu, Hui-fang; Dong, Qian; Wang, Mao-yi; Dong, Wei-hua

    2011-05-01

    To study the metabolic and pharmacokinetic profile of scutellarin, an active component from the medical plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand-Mazz, and to investigate the mechanisms underlying the low bioavailability of scutellarin though oral or intravenous administration in rats. HPLC method was developed for simultaneous detection of scutellarin and scutellarein (the aglycone of scutellarin) in rat plasma, urine and feces. The in vitro metabolic stability study was carried out in rat liver microsomes from different genders. After a single oral dose of scutellarin (400 mg/kg), the plasma concentrations of scutellarin and scutellarein in female rats were significantly higher than in male ones. Between the female and male rats, significant differences in AUC, t(max2) and C(max2) for scutellarin were found. The pharmacokinetic parameters of scutellarin in the urine also showed significant gender differences. After a single oral dose of scutellarin (400 mg/kg), the total percentage excretion of scutellarein in male and female rats was 16.5% and 8.61%, respectively. The total percentage excretion of scutellarin and scutellarein in the feces was higher with oral administration than with intravenous administration. The in vitro t(1/2) and CL(int) value for scutellarin in male rats was significantly higher than that in female rats. The results suggest that a large amount of ingested scutellarin was metabolized into scutellarein in the gastrointestinal tract and then excreted with the feces, leading to the extremely low oral bioavailability of scutellarin. The gender differences of pharmacokinetic parameters of scutellarin and scutellarein are due to the higher CL(int) and lower absorption in male rats.

  13. Pharmacokinetically guided sunitinib dosing: a feasibility study in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankheet, N.; Kloth, J.S.; Gadellaa-van Hooijdonk, C.G.M.; Cirkel, G.A.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Lolkema, M.P.; Schellens, J.H.; Voest, E.E.; Sleijfer, S.; Jonge, M.J. de; Haanen, J.B.; Beijnen, J.H.; Huitema, A.D.; Steeghs, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background:Plasma exposure of sunitinib shows large inter-individual variation. Therefore, a pharmacokinetic (PK) study was performed to determine safety and feasibility of sunitinib dosing based on PK levels.Methods:Patients were treated with sunitinib 37.5 mg once daily. At days 15 and 29 of

  14. Therapeutic drug monitoring to individualize the dosing of pazopanib: a pharmacokinetic feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, D. de; Erp, N. van; Hartigh, J. den; Wolterbeek, R..; Hollander-van Deursen, M. den; Labots, M.; Guchelaar (LUMC), H.J.; Verheul, H.M.; Gelderblom, H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients treated with the standard dose of pazopanib show a large interpatient variability in drug exposure defined as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-24h). The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of pharmacokinetics (PK)-guided

  15. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose intravenous melatonin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    This crossover study investigated the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of high-dose intravenous melatonin. Volunteers participated in 3 identical study sessions, receiving an intravenous bolus of 10 mg melatonin, 100 mg melatonin, and placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0, 60......, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Quantitative determination of plasma melatonin concentrations was performed using a radioimmunoassay technique. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. Adverse effects included assessments...... of sedation and registration of other symptoms. Sedation, evaluated as simple reaction times, was measured at baseline and 120, 180, 300, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Median (IQR) Cmax after the bolus injections of 10 mg and 100 mg of melatonin were 221...

  16. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence study of a fixed dose combination of rabeprazole and itopride in healthy Indian volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Bijay Kumar; Das, Ayan; Agarwal, Sangita; Bhaumik, Uttam; Bose, Anirbandeep; Ghosh, Debotri; Roy, Bikash; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of rabeprazole (CAS 117976-89-3) and itopride (CAS 122898-67-3) after oral administration of a rabeprazole (20 mg)-itopride (150 mg) fixed dose combination (FDC) in healthy human volunteers. The bioequivalence of two formulations (test and reference) was determined in 12 healthy Indian male volunteers (age: 25.25 +/- 4.69 years; weight: 60.50 +/- 5.04 kg) in a randomized, single-dose, two-period, two-treatment crossover study. Both formulations were administered orally as a single dose, with the treatments separated by a washout period of 1 week. Rabeprazole and itopride plasma levels were determined by a validated HPLC method using UV detection. The formulations were compared using the pharmacokinetic parameters area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-t)), area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) and peak plasma concentration (Cmax). General linear model (GLM) procedures were used in which sources of variation were subject, treatment and period. The results indicated that there were no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between the logarithmically transformed AUC(0-infinity) and Cmax values between test and reference formulation. The 90% confidence interval for the ratio of the logarithmically transformed AUC(0-t), AUC(0-infinity) and Cmax were within the bioequivalence limits of 0.8-1.25 and the relative bioavailability of rabeprazole and itopride test and reference formulations was 98.24 and 93.65%, respectively.

  17. ZD0473 pharmacokinetics in Japanese patients: a Phase I dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Tamura, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, N; Ueda, Y; Shimoyama, T; Saijo, N

    2002-12-01

    ZD0473 is new platinum agent that was rationally designed to circumvent platinum resistance and reduce the potential for nephro-and neurotoxicity. This Phase I dose-escalating study investigated the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and efficacy of ZD0473 in Japanese patients with solid, refractory tumours. ZD0473 was administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks. Nine patients received a total of 16 cycles of ZD0473 (median 1 cycle/patient), with 3 patients treated at each of 3 doses (60, 90, 120 mg/m2). The maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and the area under the concentration-time curve to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) increased with dose in a linear fashion for both total platinum and ZD0473 in plasma ultrafiltrate, suggesting that the pharmacokinetics of ZD0473 are linear. Haematological and non-haematological toxicities such as nausea and vomiting were mild (grade 1 or 2) and transient. No clinically significant nephro-, oto- or neurotoxicity was observed. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was not observed and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not identified. ZD0473 treatment showed evidence of disease stabilisation in 3 patients (33%). In conclusion, ZD0473 appears to have linear pharmacokinetics, and an acceptable tolerability profile at doses up to 120 mg/m2 in Japanese patients with refractory solid malignancies. Following evaluation of the data from all the Western trials, the ZD0473 development programme changed and this Japanese trial was stopped.

  18. Age-dependent decay in the landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    The picture of the 'multiverse' arising in diverse cosmological scenarios involves transitions between metastable vacuum states. It was pointed out by Krauss and Dent that the transition rates decrease at very late times, leading to a dependence of the transition probability between vacua on the age of each vacuum region. I investigate the implications of this non-Markovian, age-dependent decay on the global structure of the spacetime in landscape scenarios. I show that the fractal dimension of the eternally inflating domain is precisely equal to 3, instead of being slightly below 3, which is the case in scenarios with purely Markovian, age-independent decay. I develop a complete description of a non-Markovian landscape in terms of a nonlocal master equation. Using this description I demonstrate by an explicit calculation that, under some technical assumptions about the landscape, the probabilistic predictions of our position in the landscape are essentially unchanged, regardless of the measure used to extract these predictions. I briefly discuss the physical plausibility of realizing non-Markovian vacuum decay in cosmology in view of the possible decoherence of the metastable quantum state.

  19. Replacing carbamazepine slow-release tablets with carbamazepine suppositories: a pharmacokinetic and clinical study in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, J; Nilsson, H L; Sandstedt, P; Steinwall, G; Tonnby, B; Flesch, G

    1995-03-01

    A suppository for rectal administration of carbamazepine has been developed for situations in which it is unsuitable to use the oral route of administration. In an open, controlled, within-patient study, the pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, and tolerability of carbamazepine slow-release tablets were compared with those of carbamazepine suppositories in children with epilepsy. The pharmacokinetic part of the study comprised 22 children, and an additional nine children were included in the clinical part of the study. Treatment with slow-release tablets was replaced for 7 days with carbamazepine suppositories in bioequivalent dosage. Clinical factors such as the rate of seizures and the local tolerability were studied, and an overall assessment of efficacy was made. In the pharmacokinetic part, 24-hour plasma concentration curves for carbamazepine and carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide were recorded. The plasma concentration profiles (minimum, maximum, and mean concentrations, fluctuation index, and area under the curve) for carbamazepine and the other metabolites did not show any significant differences between oral and rectal administration when the suppository dose was increased by 25% compared to the tablets. No increase in seizure frequency was detected, and the overall assessment was very good to good in 25 of the 29 epileptic children. Increased flatulence during treatment with suppositories was noted in two children, one had anal irritation, and one had nausea/vomiting. Treatment with carbamazepine slow-release tablets in children with epilepsy can be replaced by carbamazepine suppositories in 25% higher dosage, with good clinical effect and appropriate pharmacokinetic values, when it is unsuitable to use the common oral route of administration.

  20. Sequential updating of a new dynamic pharmacokinetic model for caffeine in premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Sandrine; Amzal, Billy; Bach, Véronique; Chardon, Karen; Tourneux, Pierre; Bois, Frédéric Y

    2007-01-01

    Caffeine treatment is widely used in nursing care to reduce the risk of apnoea in premature neonates. To check the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment against apnoea, caffeine concentration in blood is an important indicator. The present study was aimed at building a pharmacokinetic model as a basis for a medical decision support tool. In the proposed model, time dependence of physiological parameters is introduced to describe rapid growth of neonates. To take into account the large variability in the population, the pharmacokinetic model is embedded in a population structure. The whole model is inferred within a Bayesian framework. To update caffeine concentration predictions as data of an incoming patient are collected, we propose a fast method that can be used in a medical context. This involves the sequential updating of model parameters (at individual and population levels) via a stochastic particle algorithm. Our model provides better predictions than the ones obtained with models previously published. We show, through an example, that sequential updating improves predictions of caffeine concentration in blood (reduce bias and length of credibility intervals). The update of the pharmacokinetic model using body mass and caffeine concentration data is studied. It shows how informative caffeine concentration data are in contrast to body mass data. This study provides the methodological basis to predict caffeine concentration in blood, after a given treatment if data are collected on the treated neonate.

  1. Population pharmacokinetics of intravenous Erwinia asparaginase in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Sebastiaan D T; Mathôt, Ron A A; Pieters, Rob; Kloos, Robin Q H; de Haas, Valérie; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; van den Bos, Cor; Tissing, Wim J E; Te Loo, Maroeska; Bierings, Marc B; Kollen, Wouter J W; Zwaan, Christian M; van der Sluis, Inge M

    2017-03-01

    Erwinia asparaginase is an important component in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A large variability in serum concentrations has been observed after intravenous Erwinia asparaginase. Currently, Dutch Childhood Oncology Group protocols dose alterations are based on trough concentrations to ensure adequate asparaginase activity (≥100 IU/L). The aim of this study was to describe the population pharmacokinetics of intravenous Erwinia asparaginase to quantify and gather insight into inter-individual and inter-occasion variability. The starting dose was evaluated on the basis of the derived population pharmacokinetic parameters. In a multicenter prospective observational study, a total of 714 blood samples were collected from 51 children (age 1-17 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The starting dose was 20,000 IU/m 2 three times a week and adjusted according to trough levels from week three onwards. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed using NONMEM ® A 2-compartment linear model with allometric scaling best described the data. Inter-individual and inter-occasion variability of clearance were 33% and 13%, respectively. Clearance in the first month of treatment was 14% higher ( P <0.01). Monte Carlo simulations with our pharmacokinetic model demonstrated that patients with a low weight might require higher doses to achieve similar concentrations compared to patients with high weight. The current starting dose of 20,000 IU/m 2 might result in inadequate concentrations, especially for smaller, lower weight patients, hence dose adjustments based on individual clearance are recommended. The protocols were approved by the institutional review boards. (Registered at NTR 3379 Dutch Trial Register; www.trialregister.nl). Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. Cardiopulmonary bypass alters the pharmacokinetics of propranolol in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J.C. Carmona

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of propranolol may be altered by hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, resulting in unpredictable postoperative hemodynamic responses to usual doses. The objective of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of propranolol in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG by CPB under moderate hypothermia. We evaluated 11 patients, 4 women and 7 men (mean age 57 ± 8 years, mean weight 75.4 ± 11.9 kg and mean body surface area 1.83 ± 0.19 m², receiving propranolol before surgery (80-240 mg a day and postoperatively (10 mg a day. Plasma propranolol levels were measured before and after CPB by high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic Solutions 2.0 software was used to estimate the pharmacokinetic parameters after administration of the drug pre- and postoperatively. There was an increase of biological half-life from 4.5 (95% CI = 3.9-6.9 to 10.6 h (95% CI = 8.2-14.7; P < 0.01 and an increase in volume of distribution from 4.9 (95% CI = 3.2-14.3 to 8.3 l/kg (95% CI = 6.5-32.1; P < 0.05, while total clearance remained unchanged 9.2 (95% CI = 7.7-24.6 vs 10.7 ml min-1 kg-1 (95% CI = 7.7-26.6; NS after surgery. In conclusion, increases in drug distribution could be explained in part by hemodilution during CPB. On the other hand, the increase of biological half-life can be attributed to changes in hepatic metabolism induced by CPB under moderate hypothermia. These alterations in the pharmacokinetics of propranolol after CABG with hypothermic CPB might induce a greater myocardial depression in response to propranolol than would be expected with an equivalent dose during the postoperative period.

  3. Biosynthesis, natural sources, dietary intake, pharmacokinetic properties, and biological activities of hydroxycinnamic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seedi, Hesham R; El-Said, Asmaa M A; Khalifa, Shaden A M; Göransson, Ulf; Bohlin, Lars; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Verpoorte, Rob

    2012-11-07

    Hydroxycinnamic acids are the most widely distributed phenolic acids in plants. Broadly speaking, they can be defined as compounds derived from cinnamic acid. They are present at high concentrations in many food products, including fruits, vegetables, tea, cocoa, and wine. A diet rich in hydroxycinnamic acids is thought to be associated with beneficial health effects such as a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. The impact of hydroxycinnamic acids on health depends on their intake and pharmacokinetic properties. This review discusses their chemistry, biosynthesis, natural sources, dietary intake, and pharmacokinetic properties.

  4. Age dependent mortality in the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert E.; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; Holbert, William H.; Churn, Severn B.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is an acute neurological emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Age has been shown to be a critical factor in determining outcome after SE. Understanding the causes of this increased mortality with aging by developing an animal model to study this condition would play a major role in studying mechanisms to limit the mortality due to SE. Here we employed pilocarpine to induce SE in rats aged between 5 to 28 weeks. Similar to clinical studies in man, we observed that age was a significant predictor of mortality following SE. While no deaths were observed in 5-week old animals, mortality due to SE increased progressively with age and reached 90% in 28-week old animals. There was no correlation between the age of animals and severity of SE. With increasing age mortality occurred earlier after the onset of SE. These results indicate that pilocarpine-induced SE in the rat provides a useful model to study age-dependent SE-induced mortality and indicates the importance of using animal models to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to SE-induced mortality and the development of novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SE-induced death. PMID:19429042

  5. Age-dependent mortality in the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert E; Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Holbert, William H; Churn, Severn B; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2009-04-10

    Status epilepticus (SE) is an acute neurological emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Age has been shown to be a critical factor in determining outcome after SE. Understanding the causes of this increased mortality with aging by developing an animal model to study this condition would play a major role in studying mechanisms to limit the mortality due to SE. Here we employed pilocarpine to induce SE in rats aged between 5 and 28 weeks. Similar to clinical studies in man, we observed that age was a significant predictor of mortality following SE. While no deaths were observed in 5-week-old animals, mortality due to SE increased progressively with age and reached 90% in 28-week-old animals. There was no correlation between the age of animals and severity of SE. With increasing age mortality occurred earlier after the onset of SE. These results indicate that pilocarpine-induced SE in the rat provides a useful model to study age-dependent SE-induced mortality and indicates the importance of using animal models to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to SE-induced mortality and the development of novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SE-induced death.

  6. Comparison of pharmacokinetics and toxicity after high-dose methotrexate treatments in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csordas, Katalin; Hegyi, Marta; Eipel, Oliver T; Muller, Judit; Erdelyi, Daniel J; Kovacs, Gabor T

    2013-02-01

    We carried out a detailed comparative study of the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of methotrexate (MTX) and 7-hydroxy-methotrexate (7-OH-MTX) after high-dose intravenous methotrexate (HD-MTX) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Overall, 65 children were treated with 5 g/m2/24 h MTX and 88 children were treated with 2 g/m2/24 h MTX according to ALL-BFM 95 and ALL IC-BFM 2002 protocols (mean age: 6.4 years, range 1.0-17.9 years). A total of 583 HD-MTX courses were analyzed. Serum MTX and 7-OH-MTX levels were measured at 24, 36, and 48 h, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MTX levels were determined 24 h after the initiation of the infusion. The area under the concentration-time curve was calculated. Hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and bone marrow toxicity were estimated by routine laboratory tests. We investigated pharmacokinetics and toxicity in distinct age groups ( 14 years). 5 g/m2/24 h treatments resulted in higher serum and CSF MTX and 7-OH-MTX levels (P treatments did not alter MTX or 7-OH-MTX levels. 7-OH-MTX levels were correlated with nephrotoxicity (r = 0.36, P children aged older than 14 years (P treatments. To predict the development of toxicity, monitoring of the level of the 7-OH-MTX is useful. Monitoring of pharmacokinetics is essential to prevent the development of severe adverse events in adolescents.

  7. Pharmacokinetic study of medicinal polymers: models based on dextrans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, V.N.; Pimenova, G.N.; Matveev, V.A.; Sedov, V.V.; Vasil'ev, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors study the pharmacokinetics of dextrans with various molecular masses modified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) using a radioisotope method. The radionuclide 125 I was selectively bound to a FITC residue attached to the polysaccharide by electrochemical iodination under potentiostatic conditions. In the experiments, dextrans modified by FITC were labeled with 125 I (DF- 125 I) by electrochemical iodination. The separation of DF- 125 I and FITC from ionic forms of the radionuclide not bound to the polymer was carried out. The properties of the samples obtained are presented. The radioactivity accumulated in the rate organs and urine studied are shown. The features of DF- 125 I behavior in the blood and liver are examined

  8. A recalculation of the age dependent dose-effect-relationship of the life span study of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottbauer, M.M.; Fleck, C.M.; Schoellnberger, H.

    1996-01-01

    The basis of the presented model is the multistage process of carcinogenesis as a biological effect. It provides simultaneously the age-dependent mortality of spontaneous and radiation induced solid tumors and dose-effect relationships at any age after exposure. The model has been used to describe the solid cancer mortality rates of the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It has characteristics of both relative and absolute risk projections depending on the age of exposure. (author)

  9. Pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of phenobarbital in asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia: a thermopharmacological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M P H; Groenendaal, F; Toet, M C; van Straaten, H L M; van Hasselt, J G C; Huitema, A D R; de Vries, L S; Egberts, A C G; Rademaker, C M A

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the discipline which is called thermopharmacology. We studied the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in asphyxiated neonates, and the clinical efficacy and the effect of phenobarbital on the continuous amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) in a prospective study. Data were obtained from the prospective SHIVER study, performed in two of the ten Dutch level III neonatal intensive care units. Phenobarbital data were collected between 2008 and 2010. Newborns were eligible for inclusion if they had a gestational age of at least 36 weeks and presented with perinatal asphyxia and encephalopathy. According to protocol in both hospitals an intravenous (repeated) loading dose of phenobarbital 20 mg/kg divided in 1-2 doses was administered if seizures occurred or were suspected before or during the hypothermic phase. Phenobarbital plasma concentrations were measured in plasma using a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. aEEG was monitored continuously. A one-compartmental population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed using a multi-level Markov transition model. No (clinically relevant) effect of moderate therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics could be identified. The observed responsiveness was 66%. While we still advise an initial loading dose of 20 mg/kg, clinicians should not be reluctant to administer an additional dose of 10-20 mg/kg. An additional dose should be given before switching to a second-line anticonvulsant drug. Based on our pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model, administration of phenobarbital under hypothermia seems to reduce the transition rate from a continuous normal voltage (CNV) to discontinuous normal voltage aEEG background level in hypothermic asphyxiated newborns, which may be attributed to the additional neuroprotection of phenobarbital in infants with a CNV pattern.

  10. Age dependency of myocardial triglyceride content. A 3T high-field 1H-MR spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petritsch, B.; Gassenmaier, T.; Kunz, A.S.; Donhauser, J.; Bley, T.A.; Horn, M.; Goltz, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    The role of myocardial triglyceride (mTG) content in the aging human heart is not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to measure concentrations of mTG content from healthy volunteers and to determine the association between age, mTG content and systolic heart function. Furthermore, the technical stability of the 1 H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) and the reliability of peak evaluation at 3 T were evaluated. The total study population of 47 healthy volunteers was divided into 4 age classes, according to the age of the subjects (1 st cohort 20-29 years (yrs.), n=20; 2 nd cohort 30-39 yrs., n=10; 3 rd cohort 40-49 yrs., n=9; 4 th cohort 50-60 yrs., n=8). Cardiac MRI and double triggered 1 H-MRS of the myocardium were consecutively performed using a 3 T scanner. Each participant underwent spectroscopic measurements twice in the same investigation. mTG content increases with age. The correlation of age and mTG is minimal (r=0.48; p<0.001). The following age-averaged mTG content values expressed as % of mTG signal compared to the water signal were determined for each cohort: 1 st cohort 0.25 % (± 0.17); 2 nd cohort 0.48 % (± 0.30); 3 rd cohort 0.48 % (± 0.18); 4 th cohort 0.77 % (± 0.70). There was no significant correlation (r=0.04; p=n.s.) between LV mass and mTG content in healthy volunteers. Within our cohorts, no effects of age or mTG content on systolic heart function were seen (r=-0.01; p=n.s.). The intraclass correlation coefficient of spectroscopic measurements was high (r=0.965; p<0.001). Myocardial TG content increases with age. The normal age-dependent concentration ranges of myocardial lipid metabolites reported in this study may be helpful for the correction of acquired 1 H-MRS data in patients when evaluating metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in future magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies.

  11. Impact of radiobiological considerations on epidemiological inferences of age-dependent radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford-Brown, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Current epidemiological studies of the age-dependent risk of radiogenic carcinomas are based on populations still in the early stages of cancer expression. The result is a set of logical uncertainties concerning the manner in which inferences may be drawn from the existing data. These uncertainties may be formalized and examined through the application of various radiobiological principles developed from more fundamental experimental data. Chief amongst these considerations are the time course of tumor expression, the role of relative and absolute risk models, the distribution of effects between initiation and promotion, the age-dependent fraction of time a critical cell remains in radiosensitive stages and the combinatorics of the critical cellular subpopulations. Each of these and the combinatorics of the critical cellular subpopulations. Each of these principles are examined in light of their impact on the structuring of epidemiologic data and the drawing of inferences concerning age-dependent radiogenic risk. The data on atomic bomb survivors are employed as a relevant example

  12. Pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine: evaluation of a microdose and assessment of absolute oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Graham; Shishikura, Yoko; Jochemsen, Roeline; Weaver, Richard John; Gesson, Charlotte; Houston, Brian; Oosterhuis, Berend; Bjerrum, Ole J; Rowland, Malcolm; Garner, Colin

    2010-05-12

    A human pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess the ability of a microdose to predict the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic dose of fexofenadine and to determine its absolute oral bioavailability. Fexofenadine was chosen to represent an unmetabolized transporter substrate (P-gP and OATP). Fexofenadine was administered to 6 healthy male volunteers in a three way cross-over design. A microdose (100microg) of (14)C-drug was administered orally (period 1) and intravenously by 30min infusion (period 2). In period 3 an intravenous tracer dose (100microg) of (14)C-drug was administered simultaneously with an oral unlabelled therapeutic dose (120mg). Plasma was collected from all 3 periods and analysed for both total (14)C content and parent drug by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). For period 3, plasma samples were also analysed using HPLC-fluorescence to determine total drug concentration. Urine was collected and analysed for total (14)C. Good concordance between the microdose and therapeutic dose pharmacokinetics was observed. Microdose: CL 13L/h, CL(R) 4.1L/h, V(ss) 54L, t(1/2) 16h; therapeutic dose: CL 16L/h, CL(R) 6.2L/h, V(ss) 64L, t(1/2) 12h. The absolute oral bioavailability of fexofenadine was 0.35 (microdose 0.41, therapeutic dose 0.30). Despite a 1200-fold difference in dose of fexofenadine, the microdose predicted well the pharmacokinetic parameters following a therapeutic dose for this transporter dependent compound.

  13. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  14. Modelling delays in pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Z.H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear system analysis has come to form the backbone of pharmacokinetics. Natural systems usually involve time delays, thus models incorporating them would be an order closer approximation to the real world compared to those that do not. Delays may be modelled in several ways. The approach considered in this study is to have a discrete-time delay dependent rate with the delay respresenting the duration between the entry of a drug into a compartment and its release in some form (may be as a metabolite) from the compartment. Such a delay may be because of one or more of several physiological reasons, like, formation of a reservoir, slow metabolism, or receptor binding. The mathematical structure this gives rise to is a system of delay-differential equations. Examples are given of simple one and two compartment systems with drugs like bumetanide, carbamazepine, and quinolone-caffeine interaction. In these examples generally a good fit is obtained and the suggested models form a good approximation. 21 refs., 6 figs

  15. Age-dependent terminal declines in reproductive output in a wild bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Hammers

    Full Text Available In many iteroparous species individual fitness components, such as reproductive output, first increase with age and then decline during late-life. However, individuals differ greatly in reproductive lifespan, but reproductive declines may only occur in the period just before their death as a result of an age-independent decline in physiological condition. To fully understand reproductive senescence it is important to investigate to what extent declines in late-life reproduction can be explained by age, time until death, or both. However, the study of late-life fitness performance in natural populations is challenging as the exact birth and death dates of individuals are often not known, and most individuals succumb to extrinsic mortality before reaching old age. Here, we used an exceptional long-term longitudinal dataset of individuals from a natural, closed, and predator-free population of the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis to investigate reproductive output, both in relation to age and to the time until the death of an individual (reverse-age approach. We observed an initial age-dependent increase in reproductive output that was followed by a decline in old age. However, we found no significant decline in reproductive output in the years directly preceding death. Although post-peak reproductive output declined with age, this pattern differed between terminal and non-terminal reproductive attempts, and the age-dependence of the terminal breeding attempt explained much of the variation in age-specific reproductive output. In fact, terminal declines in reproductive output were steeper in very old individuals. These results indicate that not only age-dependent, but also age-independent factors, such as physiological condition, need to be considered to understand reproductive senescence in wild-living animals.

  16. Age-dependent metabolic model of radionuclides in Human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Changqing

    1986-01-01

    Age-dependent metabolic model of radionuclides in human body was introduced briefly. These data are necessary in setting up the secondary dose limit of internal exposure of the general public. For the gastro-intestinal tract model, it was shown that the dose of various sections of GI tract caused by unsoluble radioactive materials were influenced by the mass of section and mean residence time, both of which are age-dependent, but the absorption fraction f 1 through gastro-intestinal tract should be corrected only for the infant less than 1 year of age. For the lung model, it was indicated that the fraction of deposition or clearance of particles in the different compartments of lung were related to age. The doses of tracheobronchial and pulmonary compartment of adult for 222 Rn or 220 Rn with their decay products were one third of that of 6-years old child who received the maximum dose in comparison with other ages. The age-dependent metabolic models in organ and/or body of Tritium, Iodine-131, Caesium-137, radioactive Strontium, Radium and Plutonium were reported. A generalized approach for estimating the effect of age on deposition fractions and retention half-time were presented. Calculated results indicated that younger ages were characterized by increased deposition fraction and decreased half-time for retention. Representative examples were provided for 21 elements of current interest in health physics

  17. Pharmacokinetic behavior of marbofloxacin in plasma from chickens at different seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Francisca Urzúa Pizarro1,

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in the disposition and plasma pharmacokinetic behavior of marbofloxacin (MAR in broiler chickens at different seasons. Chicken broilers (n = 345 were used, in lots of 5 individuals, divided into 6 groups depending on the way of administration, intravenous or oral (dose 2 mg/kg and the test period. Post-administration plasma samples were obtained at different times, intravenously (0.08 to 24 hours and orally (0.25 to 120 hours. A liquid-liquid extraction of MAR was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with a fluorescent detector. The plasma concentrations obtained at the different sampling times of each season, were analyzed with ANOVA and pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted with the PK Solution 2.0 software. The concentration of marbofloxacin in plasma was significantly lower in winter and summer than in spring, with MAR being detected in winter up to 72 hours post-application, coinciding with the differences in MAR pharmacokinetics parameters with increase in the average residence time (MRT is 9.4 hours in winter. Increased clearance MAR in summer (7.5 ml/min/kg coincides with MRT 6.3 hours. Finally, the oral bioavailability of MAR is lower in summer and winter (86 ± 1.7% and 78 ± 3.1% than in spring (94 ± 5.2 %. There are differences in the disposition and plasma pharmacokinetic behavior of MAR applied orally in broiler chickens, coinciding with the physiological changes in the thermoregulation of birds, considering its correct therapeutic management and contributing to provide safe food for human consumption.

  18. Application of in Vitro Biotransformation Data and Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse biological effects of toxic substances are dependent upon the exposure concentration and the duration of exposure. Pharmacokinetic models can quantitatively relate the external concentration of a toxicant in the environment to the internal dose of the toxicant in the ...

  19. [Pharmacokinetic and clinical studies of flomoxef in the perinatal period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, S; Hirayama, H; Oh, K; Tamate, K; Sengoku, K; Ishikawa, M; Shimizu, T; Haga, H; Hasegawa, T; Takada, H

    1993-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic and clinical studies on flomoxef (FMOX) in the perinatal period were carried out and following results were obtained 1. The pharmacokinetic parameter T1/2's of FMOX in maternal serum, umbilical cord serum and amniotic fluid in mothers after single intravenous injection of 1 g (n = 46) and 2 g (n = 34) were 1.11, 9.24, 9.24 hours and 2.54, 12.49, 12.49 hours, respectively. Cmax's and Tmax's of umbilical cord serum and amniotic fluid were 12.71, 11.77 micrograms/ml and 0.57, 3.35 hours upon single dose of 1 g i.v., and 35.17, 12.37 micrograms/ml and 0.32, 3.42 hours upon single dose of 2 g i.v., respectively. 2. Clinical usefulness were evaluated in 93 cases including were various infections in pregnancy and puerperal period. In pregnancy cases, clinical efficacy rate was 95.5% (21/22), and 100% in puerperal period. Bacteriological response rate was 84.6% (eradicated: 29, decreased: 4, unchanged: 2, replaced: 4 and unknown: 8 cases). No severe side effects nor clinical laboratory test results were observed in any cases. From above basic and clinical results, we conclude that FMOX is a useful and safe agent for various infections in pregnancy and puerperal period.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacokinetics, Dose Proportionality, and Bioavailability of Bazedoxifene in Healthy Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeand, William

    2017-09-01

    Bazedoxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that has estrogen agonist effects on bone and lipid metabolism while having neutral or estrogen antagonist effects on the breast and endometrium. The present report describes findings from 3 Phase I clinical studies that evaluated the single-dose pharmacokinetics (study 1; n = 84), multiple-dose pharmacokinetics (study 2; n = 23), and absolute bioavailability (study 3; n = 18) of bazedoxifene. All 3 studies enrolled healthy postmenopausal women who were either naturally postmenopausal or had undergone bilateral oophorectomy at least 6 months before the start of the study. Study 1 showed that unconjugated and total (unconjugated and conjugated) bazedoxifene levels increased proportionally with ascending oral doses of bazedoxifene (through the dose range of 5-120 mg). Evaluation with or without food intake was conducted at the 10-mg dose, with no clinically relevant effect on pharmacokinetic parameters. Study 2 showed that bazedoxifene achieved steady state in 1 week and exhibited linear pharmacokinetics in doses of 5 to 40 mg with no unexpected accumulation over the dose range. In accordance with a linear pharmacokinetic profile, mean maximum plasma concentration values increased with increasing dose, with values of 1.6, 6.2, and 12.5 ng/mL for the 5-, 20-, and 40-mg doses, respectively. In study 3, tablet and capsule formulations of bazedoxifene formulations had an estimated oral bioavailability of ~6%. The clearance of bazedoxifene was 0.4 (0.1) L/h/kg based on intravenous administration. The oral formulations had comparable exposure profiles with respect to AUC and AUC0-t, and the 90% CIs for these values were within the bioequivalence limits of 80% to 125%. Bazedoxifene was safe and well tolerated in all 3 studies. These pharmacokinetic evaluations in healthy postmenopausal women found that bazedoxifene displayed linear pharmacokinetics with doses ranging from 5 to 40 mg, with no unexpected accumulation

  2. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 suggests ubiquitous and frequent exposure. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats by oral and injection routes. Deuterated BPA was used to avoid issues of background contamination. Linear pharmacokinetics were observed in adult rats treated orally in the range of 0-200 μg/kg bw. Evidence for enterohepatic recirculation of conjugated, but not aglycone, BPA was observed in adult rats. Significant inverse relationships were observed between postnatal age and measures of internal exposures to aglycone BPA and its elimination. In neonatal rats treated orally, internal exposures to aglycone BPA were substantially lower than from subcutaneous injection. The results reinforce the critical role for first-pass Phase II metabolism of BPA in gut and liver after oral exposure that attenuates internal exposure to the aglycone form in rats of all ages. The internal exposures to aglycone BPA observed in adult and neonatal rats following a single oral dose of 100 μg/kg bw are inconsistent with effects mediated by classical estrogen receptors based on binding affinities. However, an impact on alternative estrogen signaling pathways that have higher receptor affinity cannot be excluded in neonatal rats. These findings emphasize the importance of matching aglycone BPA internal dosimetry with receptor affinities in experimental animal studies reporting toxicity.

  3. Age-dependent reliability model considering effects of maintenance and working conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martorell, Sebastian; Sanchez, Ana; Serradell, Vicente

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays, there is some doubt about building new nuclear power plants (NPPs). Instead, there is a growing interest in analyzing the possibility to extend current NPP operation, where life management programs play an important role. The evolution of the NPP safety depends on the evolution of the reliability of its safety components, which, in turn, is a function of their age along the NPP operational life. In this paper, a new age-dependent reliability model is presented, which includes parameters related to surveillance and maintenance effectiveness and working conditions of the equipment, both environmental and operational. This model may be used to support NPP life management and life extension programs, by improving or optimizing surveillance and maintenance tasks using risk and cost models based on such an age-dependent reliability model. The results of the sensitivity study in the example application show that the selection of the most appropriate maintenance strategy would directly depend on the previous parameters. Then, very important differences are expected to appear under certain circumstances, particularly, in comparison with other models that do not consider maintenance effectiveness and working conditions simultaneously

  4. How aging affects sleep-dependent memory consolidation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eHarand

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sleep plays multiple functions among which energy conservation or recuperative processes. Besides, growing evidence indicate that sleep plays also a major role in memory consolidation, a process by which recently acquired and labile memory traces are progressively strengthened into more permanent and/or enhanced forms. Indeed, memories are not stored as they were initially encoded but rather undergo a gradual reorganization process, which is favoured by the neurochemical environment and the electrophysiological activity observed during sleep. Two putative, probably not exclusive, models (hippocampo-neocortical dialogue and synaptic homeostasis hypothesis have been proposed to explain the beneficial effect of sleep on memory processes. It is worth noting that all data gathered until now emerged from studies conducted in young subjects. The investigation of the relationships between sleep and memory in older adults has sparked off little interest until recently. Though, aging is characterized by memory impairment, changes in sleep architecture, as well as brain and neurochemical alterations. All these elements suggest that sleep-dependent memory consolidation may be impaired or occurs differently in older adults.Here, we give an overview of the mechanisms governing sleep-dependent memory consolidation, and the crucial points of this complex process that may dysfunction and result in impaired memory consolidation in aging.

  5. Analytical Techniques and Pharmacokinetics of Gastrodia elata Blume and Its Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinyi; Wu, Bingchu; Tang, Chunlan; Zhao, Jinshun

    2017-07-08

    Gastrodia elata Blume ( G. elata ), commonly called Tianma in Chinese, is an important and notable traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), which has been used in China as an anticonvulsant, analgesic, sedative, anti-asthma, anti-immune drug since ancient times. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the abundant efforts of scientists in developing analytical techniques and performing pharmacokinetic studies of G. elata and its constituents, including sample pretreatment methods, analytical techniques, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME) and influence factors to its pharmacokinetics. Based on the reported pharmacokinetic property data of G. elata and its constituents, it is hoped that more studies will focus on the development of rapid and sensitive analytical techniques, discovering new therapeutic uses and understanding the specific in vivo mechanisms of action of G. elata and its constituents from the pharmacokinetic viewpoint in the near future. The present review discusses analytical techniques and pharmacokinetics of G. elata and its constituents reported from 1985 onwards.

  6. Performance of target-controlled infusion of propofol using two different pharmacokinetic models in open heart surgery - a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, P J; Sailam, S; Sivasailam, R; Thingnum, S K S; Puri, G D

    2016-01-01

    We compared the performance of a propofol target-controlled infusion (TCI) using Marsh versus PGIMER models in patients undergoing open heart surgery, in terms of measured plasma levels of propofol and objective pharmacodynamic effect. Twenty-three, ASA II/III adult patients aged 18-65 years and scheduled for elective open heart surgery received Marsh or PGIMER (Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research) pharmacokinetic models of TCI for the induction and maintenance of anaesthesia with propofol in a randomized, active-controlled, non-inferiority trial. The plasma levels of propofol were measured at specified time points before, during and after bypass. The performances of both the models were similar, as determined by the error (%) in maintaining the target plasma concentrations: MDPE of -5.0 (-12.0, 5.0) in the PGIMER group vs -6.4 (-7.7 to 0.5) in the Marsh group and MDAPE of 9.1 (5, 15) in the PGIMER group vs 8 (6.7, 10.1) in the Marsh group. These values indicate that both models over-predicted the plasma propofol concentration. The new pharmacokinetic model based on data from Indian patients is comparable in performance to the commercially available Marsh pharmacokinetic model. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. A phase 1 randomized study evaluating the effect of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist, revexepride (SSP-002358), in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, David; Corcoran, Mary; Velinova, Maria; Hossack, Stuart; Hoppenbrouwers, Mieke; Martin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background About 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease continue to experience symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonist revexepride (SSP-002358) is a novel prokinetic that stimulates gastrointestinal motility, which has been suggested as a continued cause of symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether revexepride pharmacokinetics were affected by co-administration of omeprazole, in preparation for a proof-of-concept evaluation of revexepride added to proton pump inhibitor treatment. Methods In this phase 1, open-label, randomized, two-period crossover study, healthy adults aged 18–55 years were given a single dose of revexepride 1 mg or revexepride 1 mg + omeprazole 40 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed for up to 48 hours after administration of the investigational product. Adverse events, clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, electrocardiograms, and vital signs were monitored. Results In total, 42 participants were enrolled and 40 completed the study. The median age was 24 years (18–54 years), 55% were women and 93% were white. The pharmacokinetic parameters of revexepride were similar without or with omeprazole co-administration. The mean area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞) was 23.3 ng · h/mL (standard deviation [SD]: 6.33 ng · h/mL) versus 24.6 ng · h/mL (SD: 6.31 ng · h/mL), and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) were 3.89 ng/mL (SD: 1.30 ng/mL) and 4.12 ng/mL (SD: 1.29 ng/mL) in participants without and with omeprazole, respectively. For AUC0–∞ and Cmax, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of geometric least-squares means (with:without omeprazole) were fully contained within the pre-defined equivalence limits of 0.80–1.25. Mean apparent terminal phase half-life was 9.95 hours (SD: 2.06 hours) without omeprazole, and 11.0 hours (SD: 3.25 hours) with omeprazole. Conclusion

  8. Two-dose-level confirmatory study of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jappe Annette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This phase I, randomized, multicenter, open-label study investigated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of the oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods A total of 24 patients with advanced breast cancer (n = 6, gastric cancer (n = 6, non-small cell lung cancer (n = 6, or renal cell carcinoma (n = 6 who were refractory to/unsuitable for standard therapy were randomized 1:1 to oral everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day. Primary end points were pharmacokinetic parameters and safety and tolerability. Pharmacokinetic 24-h profiles were measured on day 15; trough level was measured on days 2, 8, 15, 16, and 22. Tolerability was assessed continuously. This final analysis was performed after all patients had received 6 months of study drug or had discontinued. Results Everolimus was absorbed rapidly; median Tmax was 3 h (range, 1-4 and 2 h (range, 0.9-6 in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Pharmacokinetic parameters increased dose proportionally from the 5 and 10 mg/day doses. Steady-state levels were achieved by day 8 or earlier. The most common adverse events suspected to be related to everolimus therapy were increased blood glucose (16.7% and 41.7% and fatigue (16.7% and 33.3% in the everolimus 5 and 10 mg/day dose cohorts, respectively. Best tumor response was stable disease in 10 (83% and 6 (50% patients in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Conclusions Everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day was well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. The observed safety and pharmacokinetic profile of everolimus from this study were consistent with previous studies. Trial registration Chinese Health Authorities 2008L09346

  9. Atomoxetine pharmacogenetics: associations with pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacob T; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Atomoxetine is indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and is predominantly metabolized by the CYP2D6 enzyme. Differences in pharmacokinetic parameters as well as clinical treatment outcomes across CYP2D6 genotype groups have resulted in dosing recommendations within the product label, but clinical studies supporting the use of genotype guided dosing are currently lacking. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic and clinical studies have primarily focused on extensive as compared with poor metabolizers, with little information known about other metabolizer categories as well as genes involved in the pharmacodynamics of atomoxetine. This review describes the pharmacogenetic associations with atomoxetine pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability with considerations for the clinical utility of this information.

  10. Peripheral surgical wounding and age-dependent neuroinflammation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Xu

    Full Text Available Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation, CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients.

  11. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Paclitaxel Monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore B; Bergmann, Troels K; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2018-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anticancer agent efficacious in the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer. Due to a strong link between the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel, we reviewed the literature on paclitaxel pharmacokinetics. Systematic data mining was performed to extract ...

  12. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Christiansen-Jucht

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a “standard” model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors.

  13. The acoustical significance of age-dependent ear elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    , corresponding to what is reported in the literature. For female ears, virtually no acoustical effect was found. For male ears directional dependent effects in the range up to 5 dB on average was found for certain directions and frequencies. Implications on age dependent hearing loss (presbycusis...

  14. Age-dependent male mating investment in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Dhole

    Full Text Available Male mating investment can strongly influence fitness gained from a mating. Yet, male mating investment often changes with age. Life history theory predicts that mating investment should increase with age, and males should become less discriminatory about their mate as they age. Understanding age-dependent changes in male behavior and their effects on fitness is important for understanding how selection acts in age-structured populations. Although the independent effects of male or female age have been studied in many species, how these interact to influence male mating investment and fitness is less well understood. We mated Drosophila pseudoobscura males of five different age classes (4-, 8-, 11-, 15-, 19-day old to either young (4-day or old (11-day females, and measured copulation duration and early post-mating fecundity. Along with their independent effects, we found a strong interaction between the effects of male and female ages on male mating investment and fitness from individual matings. Male mating investment increased with male age, but this increase was more prominent in matings with young females. Male D. pseudoobscura made smaller investments when mating with old females. The level of such discrimination based on female age, however, also changed with male age. Intermediate aged males were most discriminatory, while the youngest and the oldest males did not discriminate between females of different ages. We also found that larger male mating investments resulted in higher fitness payoffs. Our results show that male and female ages interact to form a complex pattern of age-specific male mating investment and fitness.

  15. Targeted Local Support Vector Machine for Age-Dependent Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianle; Wang, Yuanjia; Chen, Huaihou; Marder, Karen; Zeng, Donglin

    2014-09-01

    We develop methods to accurately predict whether pre-symptomatic individuals are at risk of a disease based on their various marker profiles, which offers an opportunity for early intervention well before definitive clinical diagnosis. For many diseases, existing clinical literature may suggest the risk of disease varies with some markers of biological and etiological importance, for example age. To identify effective prediction rules using nonparametric decision functions, standard statistical learning approaches treat markers with clear biological importance (e.g., age) and other markers without prior knowledge on disease etiology interchangeably as input variables. Therefore, these approaches may be inadequate in singling out and preserving the effects from the biologically important variables, especially in the presence of potential noise markers. Using age as an example of a salient marker to receive special care in the analysis, we propose a local smoothing large margin classifier implemented with support vector machine (SVM) to construct effective age-dependent classification rules. The method adaptively adjusts age effect and separately tunes age and other markers to achieve optimal performance. We derive the asymptotic risk bound of the local smoothing SVM, and perform extensive simulation studies to compare with standard approaches. We apply the proposed method to two studies of premanifest Huntington's disease (HD) subjects and controls to construct age-sensitive predictive scores for the risk of HD and risk of receiving HD diagnosis during the study period.

  16. Assessing age-dependent susceptibility to measles in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Ryo; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2017-06-05

    Routine vaccination against measles in Japan started in 1978. Whereas measles elimination was verified in 2015, multiple chains of measles transmission were observed in 2016. We aimed to reconstruct the age-dependent susceptibility to measles in Japan so that future vaccination strategies can be elucidated. An epidemiological model was used to quantify the age-dependent immune fraction using datasets of vaccination coverage and seroepidemiological survey. The second dose was interpreted in two different scenarios, i.e., booster and random shots. The effective reproduction number, the average number of secondary cases generated by a single infected individual, and the age at infection were explored using the age-dependent transmission model and the next generation matrix. While the herd immunity threshold of measles likely ranges from 90% to 95%, assuming that the basic reproductive number ranges from 10 to 20, the estimated immune fraction in Japan was below those thresholds in 2016, despite the fact that the estimates were above 80% for all ages. If the second dose completely acted as the booster shot, a proportion immune above 90% was achieved only among those aged 5years or below in 2016. Alternatively, if the second dose was randomly distributed regardless of primary vaccination status, a proportion immune over 90% was achieved among those aged below 25years. The effective reproduction number was estimated to range from 1.50 to 3.01 and from 1.50 to 3.00, respectively, for scenarios 1 and 2 in 2016; if the current vaccination schedule were continued, the reproduction number is projected to range from 1.50 to 3.01 and 1.39 to 2.78, respectively, in 2025. Japan continues to be prone to imported cases of measles. Supplementary vaccination among adults aged 20-49years would be effective if the chains of transmission continue to be observed in that age group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [11]Cocaine: PET studies of cocaine pharmacokinetics, dopamine transporter availability and dopamine transporter occupancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Gatley, S. John; Logan, Jean

    2001-01-01

    Cocaine was initially labeled with carbon-11 in order to track the distribution and pharmacokinetics of this powerful stimulant and drug of abuse in the human brain and body. It was soon discovered that [ 11 C]cocaine was not only useful for measuring cocaine pharmacokinetics and its relationship to behavior but that it is also a sensitive radiotracer for dopamine transporter (DAT) availability. Measures of DAT availability were facilitated by the development of a graphical analysis method (Logan Plot) for reversible systems which streamlined kinetic analysis. This expanded the applications of [ 11 C]cocaine to studies of DAT availability in the human brain and allowed the first comparative measures of the degree of DAT occupancy by cocaine and another stimulant drug methylphenidate. This article will summarize preclinical and clinical research with [ 11 C]cocaine

  18. A phase 1 randomized study evaluating the effect of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist, revexepride (SSP-002358, in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available David Pierce,1 Mary Corcoran,2 Maria Velinova,3 Stuart Hossack,4 Mieke Hoppenbrouwers,5 Patrick Martin,21Shire, Basingstoke, UK; 2Shire, Wayne, PA, USA; 3PRA International, Zuidlaren, the Netherlands; 4Covance, Leeds, UK; 5Shire-Movetis NV, Turnhout, BelgiumBackground: About 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease continue to experience symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonist revexepride (SSP-002358 is a novel prokinetic that stimulates gastrointestinal motility, which has been suggested as a continued cause of symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether revexepride pharmacokinetics were affected by co-administration of omeprazole, in preparation for a proof-of-concept evaluation of revexepride added to proton pump inhibitor treatment.Methods: In this phase 1, open-label, randomized, two-period crossover study, healthy adults aged 18–55 years were given a single dose of revexepride 1 mg or revexepride 1 mg + omeprazole 40 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed for up to 48 hours after administration of the investigational product. Adverse events, clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, electrocardiograms, and vital signs were monitored.Results: In total, 42 participants were enrolled and 40 completed the study. The median age was 24 years (18–54 years, 55% were women and 93% were white. The pharmacokinetic parameters of revexepride were similar without or with omeprazole co-administration. The mean area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞ was 23.3 ng · h/mL (standard deviation [SD]: 6.33 ng · h/mL versus 24.6 ng · h/mL (SD: 6.31 ng · h/mL, and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax were 3.89 ng/mL (SD: 1.30 ng/mL and 4.12 ng/mL (SD: 1.29 ng/mL in participants without and with omeprazole, respectively. For AUC0–∞ and Cmax, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of geometric least

  19. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point.

  20. Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Keumhan; Bae, Kyoungjin; Min, Bokyoung; Kim, Eunyoung; Kwon, Kwang-il; Jeong, Taecheon; Kang, Wonku

    2010-02-01

    Racemic sibutramine is widely used to treat obesity owing to its inhibition of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake in synapses. Although the enantioselective effects of sibutramine and its two active desmethyl-metabolites, monodesmethylsibutramine (MDS) and didesmethylsibutramine (DDS), on anorexia and energy expenditure have been elucidated, the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine are still unclear. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and its metabolites in plasma and urine following an intravenous and a single oral administration of sibutramine in rats. The absolute bioavailability of sibutramine was only about 7%. The pharmacologically less effective S-isomer of DDS was predominant in the plasma: the C ( max ) and the AUC ( inf ) were 28 and 30 times higher than those of the R-isomer, respectively (psibutramine metabolites MDS and DDS were present at lower concentrations, owing to their rapid biotransformation to hydroxylated and/or carbamoylglucuronized forms and their faster excretion in the urine. The present study is the first to elucidate the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine in rats.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous melatonin in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Werner, Mads Utke; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of oral and iv melatonin in healthy volunteers. METHODS: The study was performed as a cohort crossover study. The volunteers received either 10 mg oral melatonin or 10 mg intravenous melatonin on two separate study days. Blood samples were...... collected at different time points following oral administration and short iv infusion, respectively. Plasma melatonin concentrations were determined by RIA technique. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed by "the method of residuals" and compartmental analysis. The pharmacokinetic variables: k a, t 1....../2 absorption, t max, C max, t 1/2 elimination, AUC 0-∞, and bioavailability were determined for oral melatonin. C max, t 1/2 elimination, V d, CL and AUC 0-∞ were determined for intravenous melatonin. RESULTS: Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Baseline melatonin plasma levels did not differ...

  2. Drugs in space: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Johannes; Yu, Yichao; Seubert, Christoph N; Wotring, Virginia E; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2017-11-15

    Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety. Most commonly, medications are administered during space missions to treat sleep disturbances, allergies, space motion sickness, pain, and sinus congestion. These medications are administered under the assumption that they act in a similar way as on Earth, an assumption that has not been investigated systematically yet. Few inflight pharmacokinetic data have been published, and pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies during spaceflight are also lacking. Therefore, bed-rest models are often used to simulate physiological changes observed during microgravity. In addition to pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes, decreased drug and formulation stability in space could also influence efficacy and safety of medications. These alterations along with physiological changes and their resulting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects must to be considered to determine their ultimate impact on medication efficacy and safety during spaceflight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating pulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of inhaled olodaterol in healthy volunteers using a population pharmacokinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghardt, Jens Markus; Weber, Benjamin; Staab, Alexander; Kunz, Christina; Formella, Stephan; Kloft, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    Olodaterol, a novel β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, is a long-acting, once-daily inhaled bronchodilator approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of the present study was to describe the plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of olodaterol after intravenous administration and oral inhalation in healthy volunteers by population pharmacokinetic modelling and thereby to infer its pulmonary fate. Plasma and urine data after intravenous administration (0.5-25 μg) and oral inhalation (2.5-70 μg via the Respimat® inhaler) were available from a total of 148 healthy volunteers (single and multiple dosing). A stepwise model building approach was applied, using population pharmacokinetic modelling. Systemic disposition parameters were fixed to estimates obtained from intravenous data when modelling data after inhalation. A pharmacokinetic model, including three depot compartments with associated parallel first-order absorption processes (pulmonary model) on top of a four-compartment body model (systemic disposition model), was found to describe the data the best. The dose reaching the lung (pulmonary bioavailable fraction) was estimated to be 49.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 46.1, 52.7%] of the dose released from the device. A large proportion of the pulmonary bioavailable fraction [70.1% (95% CI 66.8, 73.3%)] was absorbed with a half-life of 21.8 h (95% CI 19.7, 24.4 h). The plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of olodaterol after intravenous administration and oral inhalation in healthy volunteers were adequately described. The key finding was that a high proportion of the pulmonary bioavailable fraction had an extended pulmonary residence time. This finding was not expected based on the physicochemical properties of olodaterol. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Games of age-dependent prevention of chronic infections by social distancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reluga, Timothy C; Li, Jing

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiological games combine epidemic modelling with game theory to assess strategic choices in response to risks from infectious diseases. In most epidemiological games studied thus-far, the strategies of an individual are represented with a single choice parameter. There are many natural situations where strategies can not be represented by a single dimension, including situations where individuals can change their behavior as they age. To better understand how age-dependent variations in behavior can help individuals deal with infection risks, we study an epidemiological game in an SI model with two life-history stages where social distancing behaviors that reduce exposure rates are age-dependent. When considering a special case of the general model, we show that there is a unique Nash equilibrium when the infection pressure is a monotone function of aggregate exposure rates, but non-monotone effects can appear even in our special case. The non-monotone effects sometimes result in three Nash equilibria, two of which have local invasion potential simultaneously. Returning to a general case, we also describe a game with continuous age-structure using partial-differential equations, numerically identify some Nash equilibria, and conjecture about uniqueness.

  5. Pharmacokinetic Study of Intravenous Acetaminophen Administered to Critically Ill Multiple-Trauma Patients at the Usual Dosage and a New Proposal for Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-Lluch, Oscar; Zapater-Hernández, Pedro; Gerónimo-Pardo, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of intravenous acetaminophen administered to critically ill multiple-trauma patients was studied after 4 consecutive doses of 1 g every 6 hours. Eleven blood samples were taken (predose and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, and 360 minutes postdose), and urine was collected (during 6-hour intervals between doses) to determine serum and urine acetaminophen concentrations. These were used to calculate the following pharmacokinetic parameters: maximum and minimum concentrations, terminal half-life, area under serum concentration-time curve from 0 to 6 hours, mean residence time, volume of distribution, and serum and renal clearance of acetaminophen. Daily doses of acetaminophen required to obtain steady-state minimum (bolus dosing) and average plasma concentrations (continuous infusion) of 10 μg/mL were calculated (10 μg/mL is the presumed lower limit of the analgesic range). Data are expressed as median [interquartile range]. Twenty-two patients were studied, mostly young (age 44 [34-64] years) males (68%), not obese (weight 78 [70-84] kg). Acetaminophen concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters were these: maximum concentration 33.6 [25.7-38.7] μg/mL and minimum concentration 0.5 [0.2-2.3] μg/mL, all values below 10 μg/mL and 8 below the detection limit; half-life 1.2 [1.0-1.9] hours; area under the curve for 6 hours 34.7 [29.7-52.7] μg·h/mL; mean residence time 1.8 [1.3-2.6] hours; steady-state volume of distribution 50.8 [42.5-66.5] L; and serum and renal clearance 28.8 [18.9-33.7] L/h and 15 [11-19] mL/min, respectively. Theoretically, daily doses for a steady-state minimum concentration of 10 μg/mL would be 12.2 [7.8-16.4] g/day (166 [112-202] mg/[kg·day]); for an average steady-state concentration of 10 μg/mL, they would be 6.9 [4.5-8.1] g/day (91 [59-111] mg/[kg·day]). In conclusion, administration of acetaminophen at the recommended dosage of 1 g per 6 hours to critically ill multiple-trauma patients yields

  6. Pharmacokinetic Variability of Drugs Used for Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Ågesen, Frederik Nybye; Pavbro, Agniezka

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we evaluate the variability in the pharmacokinetics of 11 drugs with established prophylactic effects in migraine to facilitate 'personalized medicine' with these drugs. PubMed was searched for 'single-dose' and 'steady-state' pharmacokinetic studies of these 11 drugs. The maximum...

  7. Pharmacokinetics of clomipramine during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, P G J; Proost, J H; Smit, J P; Vries, M T; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Wilffert, B

    2015-01-01

    Clomipramine is one of the drugs for depression during pregnancy; however, pharmacokinetic data of clomipramine and its active metabolite desmethylclomipramine in this vulnerable period are lacking. In this study, we describe clomipramine and desmethylclomipramine concentrations including their

  8. Persistent cannabis dependence and alcohol dependence represent risks for midlife economic and social problems: A longitudinal cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdá, Magdalena; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Meier, Madeline H.; Harrington, HonaLee; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Hogan, Sean; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing legalization of cannabis, understanding the consequences of cannabis use is particularly timely. We examined the association between cannabis use and dependence, prospectively assessed between ages 18–38, and economic and social problems at age 38. We studied participants in the Dunedin Longitudinal Study, a cohort (n=1,037) followed from birth to age 38. Study members with regular cannabis use and persistent dependence experienced downward socioeconomic mobility, more financial difficulties, workplace problems, and relationship conflict in early midlife. Cannabis dependence was not linked to traffic-related convictions. Associations were not explained by socioeconomic adversity, childhood psychopathology, achievement orientation, or family structure; cannabis-related criminal convictions; early onset of cannabis dependence; or comorbid substance dependence. Cannabis dependence was associated with more financial difficulties than alcohol dependence; no difference was found in risks for other economic or social problems. Cannabis dependence is not associated with fewer harmful economic and social problems than alcohol dependence. PMID:28008372

  9. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic associations of ofatumumab, a human monoclonal CD20 antibody, in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: a phase 1-2 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coiffier, Bertrand; Losic, Nedjad; Rønn, Birgitte Biilmann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this phase 1-2 study was to investigate the association between the pharmacokinetic properties of ofatumumab, a human monoclonal CD20 antibody, and outcomes in 33 patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia receiving 4 weekly infusions of ofatumumab. The ofatumu...

  10. The role of HSP70 in mediating age-dependent mortality in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W.; Fox, Amy C.; Clark, Andrew T.; Chang, Nai-Yuan Nicholas; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Farris, Alton B.; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hunt, Clayton R.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is primarily a disease of the aged, with increased incidence and mortality occurring in aged hosts. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 plays an important role in both healthy aging and the stress response to injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of HSP70 in mediating mortality and the host inflammatory response in aged septic hosts. Sepsis was induced in both young (6–12week old) and aged (16–17 month old) HSP70−/− and wild type (WT) mice to determine if HSP70 modulated outcome in an age-dependent fashion. Young HSP70−/− and WT mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia or Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia had no differences in mortality, suggesting HSP70 does not mediate survival in young septic hosts. In contrast, mortality was higher in aged HSP70−/− mice than aged WT mice subjected to CLP (p=0.01), suggesting HSP70 mediates mortality in sepsis in an age-dependent fashion. Compared to WT mice, aged septic HSP70−/− mice had increased gut epithelial apoptosis and pulmonary inflammation. In addition, HSP70−/−mice had increased systemic levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1β compared to WT mice. These data demonstrate that HSP70 is a key determinant of mortality in aged but not young hosts in sepsis. HSP70 may play a protective role in an age-dependent response to sepsis by preventing excessive gut apoptosis and both pulmonary and systemic inflammation. PMID:21296977

  11. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of diclofenac in the presence and absence of glibenclamide in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Reyes, María R; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Ortiz, Mario I

    2008-01-01

    There are evidences that glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea antidiabetic agent, reduces the analgesic action of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids and neuromodulators in animal models. The purpose of this work was to examine in the rat if such interaction involves pharmacokinetic mechanisms or is solely limited to the pharmacodynamic level. All studies were carried out in female Wistar rats. Analgesia was assessed using the formalin test. Fifty microliters of diluted formalin was injected subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw. Nociceptive behavior was quantified as the number of flinches of the injected paw during 60 min after injection and a reduction in formalin-induced flinching was interpreted as an analgesic response. Rats were treated with oral diclofenac (3-18 mg/kg) in presence and the absence of oral glibenclamide (1-30 mg/kg). To evaluate the possibility of a pharmacokinetic interaction, the oral bioavailability of diclofenac (18 mg/kg) was studied in presence and the absence of glibenclamide (10 mg/kg). Oral administration of diclofenac produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in the formalin test. Coadministration of glibenclamide significantly reduced diclofenac-induced antinociception. Notwithstanding, the interaction does no appear to involve pharmacokinetic mechanisms, as oral glibenclamide failed to produce any significant alteration in oral diclofenac bioavailability. Concomitant systemic administration of glibenclamide and diclofenac results in a reduction of the analgesic effect of the NSAID in the formalin test in the rat. This interaction, however, appears due solely to a pharmacodynamic mechanisms as diclofenac pharmacokinetics are not altered.

  12. Pharmacokinetic study of atorvastain after single dose administration among pakistani population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqsood, I.; Najmi, M. H.; Mazhar, W.; Janjua, A.; Tayyaba, B.; Sabah, S.; Bader, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To obtain pharmacokinetic data of Orvastin, a newly launched formulation of atorvastatin, in healthy males of Pakistan. Study Design: It was quasi-experimental design. Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted at Centre for Research in Experimental and Applied Medicine (CREAM) Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and duration of study was about ten months. Material and Methods: Twenty-four healthy male subjects were taken conveniently from Pakistani population. Two tablets of Orvastin, each containing atorvastatin 40mg, were administered orally as a single dose. Multiple blood samples were taken with small gaps in between up to the period of 48hrs. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with UV-detector was used for quantification of atorvastatin in plasma; wavelength of UV-detector was adjusted at 247nm. Mobile phase was made up of 60 percent acetonitrile and 40 percent 0.05M sodium phosphate buffer. Flow rate of mobile phase was maintained at 1.5ml/min with 5.5 pH. Progesterone was used as an internal standard. Stock solutions of atorvastatin were made by dissolving it into methanol and acetonitrile was used for making stock solution of progesterone. Calibration curves were made for atorvastatin and internal standard from oncentration time data, values for time to achieve maximum plasma concentration. (Tmax) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) were directly calculated. Computer program (APO, MW PHARM, and Ver. 3.60) was used for calculation of pharmacokinetic profile of atorvastatin. Results: Atorvastatin was detected in plasma samples of all volunteers. The absorption rate constant (Ka) was 0.41 l/hr. Cmax was 26.69 ± 6.67 µg/l and Tmax was 3.33 ± 0.41 hrs. Apparent volume of distribution (Vd), of atorvastatin, was 3244.84 ± 1237.36 liters. The elimination rate constant was 0.15 l/hr. Elimination half-life of atorvastatin was 6.14 hours. Trapezoidal rule was used for calculation of AUC /sub 0-48/ and AUC /sub 0-∞/ and it was found

  13. Pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies of commercially available simvastatin tablets in healthy and moderately hyperlipidaemic human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.; Qamar-uz-Zaman, M.; Madni, A.; Usman, M.; Atif, M.; Akhtar, N.; Murtaza, G.

    2011-01-01

    Simvastatin, an analogue of Lovostatin, is a HMG.CoA reductase inhibitor. It is widely used in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia and coronary heart disease (CHD) with low incidence of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. As these diseases may alter the pharmacokinetics of drugs, the present study was aimed to elaborate the variation in the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of simvastatin in local healthy and moderately hyperlipidaemic population. Open, single dose and parallel design was applied to study. A total of 36 male volunteers were used for healthy and moderately hyperlipidaemic groups (n 18 for each) in this study on the basis of screening procedures, body chemistry and physical examination. Simvastatin 40 mg tablets (Saista 40, Bosch, Pakistan) were administered to over-night fasted volunteers. Blood samples were collected before dosing (zero time) and at regular intervals of time. The plasma samples were processed through a liquid-liquid extraction procedure and assayed by using HPLC consisting reversed phase C/sub 18/ column (ZORBAX, 4.6 x 150 mm, 5 mu m), UV detector set at 238 nm. The mobile phase consisted of the mixture of 0.025 M sodium dihydrogen phosphate (pH 4.5): acetonitrile (35: 65, v/v) which was pumped at a flow rate of 1.5 mL.min/sup -1/. The retention time of simvastatin was 7.5 minutes. The plasma drug concentration-time profiles of both groups were found significantly (P 0.05) difference between the values of following pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy and hyperlipidaemic volunteers i.e. C/sub max/, t/sub max/, AUC/sub 0-fi), AUMC/sub 0-enfinity), MRT, t/sub 1/2/, Cl/sub t /and K/sub e/. This study confirmed no significant (P > 0.05) difference in pharmacokinetics and bioavailability parameters after the administration of a single oral dose of 40 mg simvastatin (cholesterol lowering drug) to healthy and moderately hyperlipidaemic volunteers. (author)

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchaya Sanhajariya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present and Medline (1946–present. For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, the disposition of snake venom was described by a two-compartment model consisting of a rapid distribution phase and a slow elimination phase, with half-lives of 5 to 48 min and 0.8 to 28 h, respectively, following rapid intravenous injection of the venoms or toxins. When the venoms or toxins were administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously, an initial absorption phase and slow elimination phase were observed. The bioavailability of venoms or toxins ranged from 4 to 81.5% following intramuscular administration and 60% following subcutaneous administration. The volume of distribution and the clearance varied between snake species. For humans, 24 out of 666 initially identified publications contained sufficient information and timed venom concentrations in the absence of antivenom therapy for data extraction. The data were extracted and modelled in NONMEM. A one-compartment model provided the best fit, with an elimination half-life of 9.71 ± 1.29 h. It is intended that the quantitative information provided in this review will provide a useful basis for future studies that address the pharmacokinetics of snakebite in humans.

  15. A Comparative Pharmacokinetics Study of the Anti-Parkinsonian Drug Pramipexole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih S. I. Putri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare pharmacokinetic parameters of two pramipexole 0.25 mg formulations in order to show bioequivalence. The study was conducted in a randomized, open-label, two-period, two-sequence, and crossover design, involving 23 healthy volunteers. One of the 0.25 mg formulations of pramipexole evaluated in the study was manufactured by PT Dexa Medica, Palembang, Indonesia, the other, used as the reference, by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany. All eligible subjects were required to fast before each drug administration period, which was separated by a one-week washout period. Pramipexole concentrations in plasma were assayed using a validated ultra performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS detector. The evaluated pharmacokinetic parameters included the area under the plasma concentration curve from time zero to the last observed measurable concentration (AUC0-t, the area under the plasma concentration curve extrapolated to infinite time (AUC0-∞, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax, the time to reach Cmax (tmax, and the plasma concentration half-life (t1/2. To evaluate the bioequivalence of those two pramipexole formulations, 90% confidence intervals (CIs for geometric mean ratios of both formulations were calculated for AUC and Cmax parameters, while tmax and t1/2 differences were analyzed on the non-transformed data using Wilcoxon matched-pairs and a Student’s paired t-test, respectively. The 90% CIs for the geometric mean ratios of the two pramipexole formulations were 95.89% (90.73%–101.34%, 95.53% (89.75%–101.68%, and 92.11% (84.35%–100.58% for AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, and Cmax, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences for tmax and t1/2 between the two pramipexole formulations. It is concluded that two pramipexole formulations in this study were bioequivalent.

  16. A Comparative Pharmacokinetics Study of the Anti-Parkinsonian Drug Pramipexole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Ratih S I; Setiawati, Effi; Aziswan, Syifa A; Ong, Fenny; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Susanto, Liana W

    2016-11-18

    The present study aimed to compare pharmacokinetic parameters of two pramipexole 0.25 mg formulations in order to show bioequivalence. The study was conducted in a randomized, open-label, two-period, two-sequence, and crossover design, involving 23 healthy volunteers. One of the 0.25 mg formulations of pramipexole evaluated in the study was manufactured by PT Dexa Medica, Palembang, Indonesia, the other, used as the reference, by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany. All eligible subjects were required to fast before each drug administration period, which was separated by a one-week washout period. Pramipexole concentrations in plasma were assayed using a validated ultra performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) detector. The evaluated pharmacokinetic parameters included the area under the plasma concentration curve from time zero to the last observed measurable concentration (AUC 0-t ), the area under the plasma concentration curve extrapolated to infinite time (AUC 0-∞ ), the maximum plasma concentration (C max ), the time to reach C max (t max ), and the plasma concentration half-life (t 1/2 ). To evaluate the bioequivalence of those two pramipexole formulations, 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for geometric mean ratios of both formulations were calculated for AUC and C max parameters, while t max and t 1/2 differences were analyzed on the non-transformed data using Wilcoxon matched-pairs and a Student's paired t -test, respectively. The 90% CIs for the geometric mean ratios of the two pramipexole formulations were 95.89% (90.73%-101.34%), 95.53% (89.75%-101.68%), and 92.11% (84.35%-100.58%) for AUC 0-t , AUC 0-∞ , and C max , respectively. There were no statistically significant differences for t max and t 1/2 between the two pramipexole formulations. It is concluded that two pramipexole formulations in this study were bioequivalent.

  17. Evaluation of Isolated Fractions of Aloe vera Gel Materials on Indinavir Pharmacokinetics: In vitro and in vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Lonette; Malan, Maides; Gouws, Chrisna; Steyn, Dewald; Ellis, Suria; Abay, Efrem; Wiesner, Lubbe; Otto, Daniel P; Hamman, Josias

    2016-01-01

    Aloe vera is a plant with a long history of traditional medicinal use and is consumed in different products, sometimes in conjunction with prescribed medicines. A. vera gel has shown the ability to modulate drug absorption in vitro. The aim of this study was to fractionate the precipitated polysaccharide component of A. vera gel based on molecular weight and to compare their interactions with indinavir pharmacokinetics. Crude polysaccharides were precipitated from a solution of A. vera gel and was fractionated by means of centrifugal filtration through membranes with different molecular weight cut-off values (i.e. 300 KDa, 100 KDa and 30 KDa). Marker molecules were quantified in the aloe leaf materials by means of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the average molecular weight was determined by means of gel filtration chromatography linked to multi-angle-laser-light scattering and refractive index detection. The effect of the aloe leaf materials on the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of Caco-2 cell monolayers as well as indinavir metabolism in LS180 cells was measured. The bioavailability of indinavir in the presence and absence of the aloe leaf materials was determined in Sprague-Dawley rats. All the aloe leaf materials investigated in this study reduced the TEER of Caco-2 cell monolayers, inhibited indinavir metabolism in LS 180 cells to different extents and changed the bioavailability parameters of indinavir in rats compared to that of indinavir alone. These indinavir pharmacokinetic modulation effects were not dependent on the presence of aloverose and also not on the average molecular weight of the isolated fractions.

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of oral diclofenac for acute pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Joseph F; Howard, Richard F; Johnson, Atholl; Savage, Imogen; Wong, Ian C K

    2008-12-01

    To develop a population pharmacokinetic model for a new diclofenac suspension (50 mg 5 ml(-1)) in adult volunteers and paediatric patients, and recommend a dose for acute pain in children. Blood samples were drawn at the start and end of surgery, and on removal of the venous cannula from 70 children (aged 1 to 12 years, weight 9 to 37 kg) who received a preoperative oral 1 mg kg(-1) dose; these were pooled with rich (14 post-dose samples) data from 30 adult volunteers. Population pharmacokinetic modelling was undertaken with NONMEM. The optimum adult dose of diclofenac for acute pain is 50 mg. Simulation from the final model was performed to predict a paediatric dose to achieve a similar AUC to 50 mg in adults. A total of 558 serum diclofenac concentrations from 100 subjects was used in the pooled analysis. A single disposition compartment model with first order elimination and dual absorption compartments was used. The estimates of CL/F and V(D)/F were 53.98 l h(-1) 70 kg(-1) and 4.84 l 70 kg(-1) respectively. Allometric size models appeared to predict adequately changes in CL and V(D) with age. Of the simulated doses investigated, 1 mg kg(-1) gave paediatric AUC((0,12 h)) to adult 50 mg AUC((0,12 h)) ratios of 1.00, 1.08 and 1.18 for ages 1-3, 4-6 and 7-12 years respectively. This study has shown 1 mg kg(-1) diclofenac to produce similar exposure in children aged 1 to 12 years as 50 mg in adults, and is acceptable for clinical practice; patients are unlikely to obtain further benefit from higher doses.

  19. Single and Multiple Ascending-dose Studies of Oral Delafloxacin: Effects of Food, Sex, and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Randall; Hunt, Thomas; Benedict, Michael; Paulson, Susan K; Lawrence, Laura; Cammarata, Sue; Sun, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this report is describe the results of 2 studies that examined the pharmacokinetic parameters, safety profile, and tolerability of single and multiple ascending doses of oral delafloxacin and the effects of food, sex, and age on oral delafloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters, safety profile, and tolerability. The first study contained 3 parts and used unformulated delafloxacin in a capsule. Part 1 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single (50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1200, and 1600 mg) ascending-dose study of oral delafloxacin in healthy men. Part 2 was a single-dose crossover study in which 20 men received 250 mg delafloxacin with or without food. Part 2 also included a parallel group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 16 women and 16 elderly men and women who were randomized (3:1) to receive 250 mg delafloxacin or placebo. Part 3 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple (100, 200, 400, 800, 1200 mg once daily for 5 days) ascending-dose study of oral delafloxacin in healthy men. The second study was a single-dose, randomized, 3-period crossover study in which participants received 900 mg delafloxacin (2 × 450-mg tablets) under fasted conditions, with a high-fat meal, or fasted with a high-fat meal 2 hours after dosing. Serial blood samples were collected, and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters of delafloxacin were determined. Delafloxacin Cmax and AUC0-∞ increased with increasing oral dose over the dose range of 50 to 1600 mg. The increases in delafloxacin AUC0-∞ were dose proportional at doses of ≥200 mg. Steady state was reached by day 3 of dosing with minimal accumulation of delafloxacin. The Cmax of delafloxacin was decreased slightly in the presence of food. No sex difference in delafloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters was observed. In the elderly men and women, mean delafloxacin Cmax and AUC0-∞ were 35% higher than observed for young adults, which could be partially explained by a decrease in

  20. Age-dependent risk-based methodology and its application to prioritization of nuclear power plant components and to maintenance for managing aging using PRAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, I.S.; Vesely, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is based on a study to demonstrate several important ways that the age-dependent risk-based methodology developed by the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program may be applied to resolving important issues related to the aging of nuclear power plant systems, structures, and components (SSCs). The study was sponsored by the NPAR Program of the Division of Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Initiated on the basis of a Users Need Request, the age-dependent risk-based methodology has been under development by the NPAR Program for several years. In this methodology, the time-dependent change in a component's risk contribution is the product of two factors: (1) the risk importance of the component (e.g., the change in its risk contribution when it is assumed to be totally unavailable to perform its intended safety function) and (2) the change in its unavailability with time. This change in the component's unavailability with time is a function of the component's aging rate and plant inspection and maintenance practices. The methodology permits evaluations of the age-dependent risk contributions from both single- and multiple-components. Principal results and conclusions generated by the methodology demonstrations are discussed

  1. Plasma Pharmacokinetic and Heart Distribution Studies of Z-GP-EPI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    22, 44 µmol/kg) by intravenous injection and 70 mice (30 ... anticancer agents at the tumor site, where drug- converting ... at a temperature of 25 ± 2 °C and a relative humidity of 75 ± 5 ..... Jones G. Pharmacokinetics of vitamin D toxicity. Am J.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Repeated Melatonin Drug Administrations Prior to and After Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Kloster; Mielke, Louise Vennegaard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent clinical studies have documented the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and anxiolytic effects of exogenous melatonin. The pharmacokinetic properties of melatonin have primarily been investigated in experimental studies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate...... the pharmacokinetics of melatonin in patients undergoing surgery and general anesthesia. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective, two-phase cohort study. Patients were candidates for subpectoral breast augmentation surgery, and surgical procedures were performed by a single surgeon. The perioperative...... treatment protocol was standardized between patients. During the study, each patient received two separate oral administrations of melatonin 10 mg. Melatonin was administered 60 min before surgery, and at 9:00 p.m. the evening after surgery. The pharmacokinetic variables absorption half-life (t ½ absorption...

  3. A safety and pharmacokinetic dosing study of glucagon-like peptide 2 in infants with intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalet, David L; Brindle, Mary E; Boctor, Dana

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) analogues are approved for adults with intestinal failure (IF), but no studies have included infants. This study examined the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and nutritional effects of GLP-2 in infants with IF. METHODS: With parental consent (Health...

  4. Absorption and pharmacokinetics of grapefruit flavanones in beagles

    OpenAIRE

    Mata Bilbao, María de Lourdes; Andrés Lacueva, Ma. Cristina; Roura Carvajal, Elena; Jáuregui Pallarés, Olga; Escribano Ferrer, Elvira; Torre, Celina; Lamuela Raventós, Rosa Ma.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of three different grapefruit flavanone forms in dog plasma and demonstrated their absorption after an oral intake of a grapefruit extract; pharmacokinetic parameters of these forms were also determined. Ten healthy beagles were administered 70 mg citrus flavonoids as a grapefruit extract contained in capsules, while two additional dogs were used as controls and given an excipient. The grapefruit flavanone naringin, along with its metabolites n...

  5. Population pharmacokinetics model of THC used by pulmonary route in occasional cannabis smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, A; Audebert, C; Attolini, L; Lacarelle, B; Micallef, J; Blin, O

    Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in the world. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effect. Some studies have been carried out and showed significant variability in the described models as the values of the estimated pharmacokinetic parameters. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for THC in occasional cannabis smokers. Twelve male volunteers (age: 20-28years, body weight: 62.5-91.0kg), tobacco (3-8 cigarette per day) and cannabis occasional smokers were recruited from the local community. After ad libitum smoking cannabis cigarette according a standardized procedure, 16 blood samples up to 72h were collected. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed effects model, with NONMEM software. Demographic and biological data were investigated as covariates. A three-compartment model with first-order elimination fitted the data. The model was parameterized in terms of micro constants and central volume of distribution (V 1 ). Normal ALT concentration (6.0 to 45.0IU/l) demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with k 10 . The mean values (%Relative Standard Error (RSE)) for k 10 , k 12 , k 21 , k 23 , k 32 and V 1 were 0.408h -1 (48.8%), 4.070h -1 (21.4%), 0.022h -1 (27.0%), 1.070h -1 (14.3%), 1.060h -1 (16.7%) and 19.10L (39.7%), respectively. We have developed a population pharmacokinetic model able to describe the quantitative relationship between administration of inhaled doses of THC and the observed plasma concentrations after smoking cannabis. In addition, a linear relationship between ALT concentration and value of k 10 has been described and request further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A review of age dependent radioiodine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Age dependent models of radioiodine metabolism in humans have been described. These models have been used to calculate age dependent committed doses to the thyroid from intakes of radioiodines. A model of fetal iodine metabolism is also described and used to calculate fetal thyroid doses from intakes of radioiodines by the mother. These doses are calculated using model parameter values thought to be representative of average for North American/European populations. Considerable variability from these results can be expected for individuals. In addition, population with significant differences in stable iodine intake, and in body parameters, will have model parameters somewhat different than the ones described in this paper. These different model parameters will result in different doses from intakes of radioiodines, but it is doubtful if the differences in population would be as large as the variation between individuals. 25 refs.; 11 figs.; 1 table

  7. 78 FR 73199 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... exposure measures is suitable for documenting BE (e.g., transdermal delivery systems and certain rectal and... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-D-1464] Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted...

  8. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, A.W.; Abrantes, J.A.; Jonsson, S.; Bruijn, P. de; Kuip, E.J.M.; Falcao, A.; Rijt, C.C. van der; Mathijssen, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the

  9. Penetration of radionuclides across the skin. Rat age dependent promethium permeation through skin in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassai, Z.; Kassai, A.; Bauerova, K.; Koprda, V.; Harangozo, M.; Bendova, P.; Bujnova, A.

    2003-01-01

    The composition and the permeation properties of the skin are dependent on age. In the animal models for permation studies, age affects the mechanical as well as the permeation properties significantly. The time dependence of permeation of 147 Pm 3+ from aqueous solution was established by the animal skin model and the age dependence of promethium permeation through the skin was examined. The aim was to find the optimum rat skin age model for radionuclide permeation studies and to assess the relative importance of the main permeation pathways: transepidermal and transfollicular permeation. The skin from 5-day-old rats (5DR) was found to represent the optimum animal model to study transepidermal permeation of ions. The skin from 9-day-old rats (9DR) was selected to study transfollicular permeation of ions. Comparison of the permeated amounts of promethium through the skin without hairs (3 DR to 6 DR) and with hairs (7DR to 12DR) showed that the additional permation mode via follicles significantly contributed to the permeation rate and extent. (author)

  10. Total deposition of inhaled particles related to age: comparison with age-dependent model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquemin, M.H.; Bouchikhi, A.; Yu, C.P.; Roy, M.

    1991-01-01

    To compare experimental data with age-dependent model calculations, total airway deposition of polystyrene aerosols (1, 2.05 and 2.8 μm aerodynamic diameter) was measured in ten adults, twenty children aged 12 to 15 years, ten children aged 8 to 12, and eleven under 8 years old. Ventilation was controlled, and breathing patterns were appropriate for each age, either at rest or at light exercise. Individually, deposition percentages increased with particle size and also from rest to exercise, except in children under 12 years, in whom they decreased from 20-21.5 to 14-14.5 for 1 μm particles and from 36.8-36.9 to 32.2-33.1 for 2.05 μm particles. Comparisons with the age-dependent model showed that, at rest, the observed data concerning children agreed with those predicted and were close to the adults' values, when the latter were higher than predicted. At exercise, child data were lower than predicted and lower than adult experimental data, when the latter agreed fairly well with the model. (author)

  11. Clinical pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Graafland, O; Cranendonk, A; Vermeulen, R J; van Weissenbruch, M M

    2000-01-01

    Demographic and clinical pharmacokinetic data collected from term and preterm neonates who were treated with intravenous phenobarbital have been analysed to evaluate the role of patient characteristics in pharmacokinetic parameters. Significant relationships between total body weight (TBW) or body

  12. Pharmacokinetics, microbial response, and pulmonary outcomes of multidose intravenous azithromycin in preterm infants at risk for Ureaplasma respiratory colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan, L Marcela; Hassan, Hazem E; Terrin, Michael L; Waites, Ken B; Kaufman, David A; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Donohue, Pamela; Dulkerian, Susan J; Schelonka, Robert; Magder, Laurence S; Shukla, Sagar; Eddington, Natalie D; Viscardi, Rose M

    2015-01-01

    The study objectives were to refine the population pharmacokinetics (PK) model, determine microbial clearance, and assess short-term pulmonary outcomes of multiple-dose azithromycin treatment in preterm infants at risk for Ureaplasma respiratory colonization. Fifteen subjects (7 of whom were Ureaplasma positive) received intravenous azithromycin at 20 mg/kg of body weight every 24 h for 3 doses. Azithromycin concentrations were determined in plasma samples obtained up to 168 h post-first dose by using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Respiratory samples were obtained predose and at three time points post-last dose for Ureaplasma culture, PCR, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and cytokine concentration determinations. Pharmacokinetic data from these 15 subjects as well as 25 additional subjects (who received either a single 10-mg/kg dose [n = 12] or a single 20-mg/kg dose [n = 13]) were analyzed by using a nonlinear mixed-effect population modeling (NONMEM) approach. Pulmonary outcomes were assessed at 36 weeks post-menstrual age and 6 months adjusted age. A 2-compartment model with all PK parameters allometrically scaled on body weight best described the azithromycin pharmacokinetics in preterm neonates. The population pharmacokinetics parameter estimates for clearance, central volume of distribution, intercompartmental clearance, and peripheral volume of distribution were 0.15 liters/h · kg(0.75), 1.88 liters · kg, 1.79 liters/h · kg(0.75), and 13 liters · kg, respectively. The estimated area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h (AUC24)/MIC90 value was ∼ 4 h. All posttreatment cultures were negative, and there were no drug-related adverse events. One Ureaplasma-positive infant died at 4 months of age, but no survivors were hospitalized for respiratory etiologies during the first 6 months (adjusted age). Thus, a 3-day course of 20 mg/kg/day intravenous azithromycin shows preliminary efficacy in eradicating

  13. Uncertainty and Variability in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: Key Issues and Case Studies (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Uncertainty and Variability in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: Key Issues and Case Studies. This report summarizes some of the recent progress in characterizing uncertainty and variability in physi...

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Alternative Administration Routes of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D.; Andersen, L. P.H.; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melatonin is traditionally administered orally but has a poor and variable bioavailability. This study aims to present an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed...... and included experimental or clinical studies, investigating pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin in vivo. Alternative administration routes were defined as all administration routes except oral and intravenous. Results: 10 studies were included in the review. Intranasal....... Subcutaneous injection of melatonin displayed a rapid absorption rate compared to oral administration. Conclusion: Intranasal administration of melatonin has a large potential, and more research in humans is warranted. Transdermal application of melatonin has a possible use in a local application, due to slow...

  15. Anti-colchicine Fab fragments prevent lethal colchicine toxicity in a porcine model: a pharmacokinetic and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael; Fabresse, Nicolas; Thompson, Adrian; Al Abdulla, Ibrahim; Gregson, Rachael; King, Tim; Astier, Alain; Baud, Frederic J; Clutton, R Eddie; Alvarez, Jean-Claude

    2018-08-01

    Colchicine poisoning is commonly lethal. Colchicine-specific Fab fragments increase rat urinary colchicine clearance and have been associated with a good outcome in one patient. We aimed to develop a porcine model of colchicine toxicity to study the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of ovine Fab. A Göttingen minipig critical care model was established and serial blood samples taken for colchicine and Fab pharmacokinetics, clinical chemistry, and haematology. Animals were euthanised when the mean arterial pressure fell below 45 mmHg without response to vasopressor, or at study completion. Initial studies indicated that oral dosing produced variable pharmacokinetics and time-to-euthanasia. By contrast, intravenous infusion of 0.25 mg/kg colchicine over 1 h produced reproducible pharmacokinetics (AUC 0-20 343 [SD = 21] µg/L/h), acute multi-organ injury, and cardiotoxicity requiring euthanasia a mean of 22.5 (SD = 3.2) h after dosing. A full-neutralising equimolar Fab dose given 6 h after the infusion (50% first hour, 50% next 6 h [to reduce renal-loss of unbound Fab]) produced a 7.35-fold increase in plasma colchicine (AUC 0-20 2,522 [SD = 14] µg/L/h), and removed all free plasma colchicine, but did not prevent toxicity (euthanasia at 29.1 [SD = 3.4] h). Earlier administration over 1 h of the full-neutralising dose, 1 or 3 h after the colchicine, produced a 12.9-fold (AUC 0-20 4,433 [SD = 607] µg/L/h) and 6.0-fold (AUC 0-20 2,047 [SD = 51] µg/L/h) increase in plasma colchicine, respectively, absence of free plasma colchicine until 20 h, and survival to study end without marked cardiotoxicity. Colchicine-specific Fab given early, in equimolar dose, bound colchicine, eliciting its movement into the blood, and preventing severe toxicity. Clinical studies are now needed to determine how soon this antidote must be given to work in human poisoning.

  16. A study of dose-proportionality in the pharmacokinetics of the oral direct renin inhibitor aliskiren in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges, D; Dieterich, H A; Yeh, C-M; Vaidyanathan, S; Howard, D; Dole, W P

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the dose-proportionality of the pharmacokinetics of aliskiren, the first in a new class of orally active direct renin inhibitors approved for the treatment of hypertension. This was an open-label, single-center, single-dose, randomized, 4-period crossover study. Following a 21-day screening period, 32 healthy male or female subjects (ages 18 - 45 years) were randomized to 1 of 4 aliskiren dosing sequence groups (8 subjects per group): 75, 150, 300 and 600 mg. Blood samples were obtained for determination of plasma aliskiren concentrations (HPLC/MS/MS) for 96 h post dose. Log-transformed pharmacokinetic parameters AUC and C(max) were analyzed to determine dose-proportionality using the power model, parameter = A*(Dose)(beta), where A = intercept and beta = dose-proportionality coefficient. The predefined dose-proportionality criteria over the dose range 75 â 600 mg were 90% confidence intervals (CI) for beta contained within the range 0.89 - 1.11. AUC and Cmax values increased with increasing doses of aliskiren. Both AUC and C(max) were associated with high variability (coefficient of variation 55 - 64% for AUC and 59 - 117% for C(max)). The estimated proportionality coefficients (beta) for AUC(0-infiniti), AUC(0-t) and C(max) were 1.18 (90% CI 1.10, 1.25), 1.29 (90% CI 1.22, 1.36) and 1.42 (90% CI 1.31, 1.52), respectively. Dose-proportionality was, therefore, not demonstrated across the entire 8-fold dose range. For the clinical dose range of 150 â 300 mg, increases of 2.3- and 2.6-fold were observed for AUC and C(max), respectively. All doses of aliskiren were well tolerated. Exposure to aliskiren was greater than proportional over the dose range of 75 - 600 mg. Over the therapeutic dose range of 150 â 300 mg approved for the treatment of hypertension, AUC and Cmax increased by 2.3- and 2.6-fold, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of aliskiren show relatively high intersubject variability.

  17. Prevalence of Desloratadine Slow-metabolizer Phenotype and Food-dependent Pharmacokinetics of Desloratadine in Healthy Chinese Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Kun; Li, Tingting; He, Lin; Xie, Huiru; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2015-12-01

    Desloratadine, the major active metabolite of loratadine, is a non-sedating long-acting antihistamine that is widely used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of desloratadine slow-metabolizer (DSM) phenotype and the effects of food on the pharmacokinetics of desloratadine and its active metabolite 3-OH-desloratadine in healthy Chinese volunteers. A total of 46 healthy Chinese male volunteers were included in this investigation. All subjects received a single dose of a 5-mg desloratadine tablet under fasting or fed conditions and the plasma concentrations of desloratadine and 3-OH-desloratadine were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed using a non-compartmental method in the Phoenix WinNonlin program. The individuals with a 3-OH-desloratadine-to-desloratadine exposure ratio lower than 10 % or a desloratadine half-life (t 1/2) of ≥50 h were supposed to be DSM. There was only one DSM among the 46 volunteers, with a prevalence of 2.2 %. Moreover, administration in a fed state resulted in 34.07 and 32.06 % decreases in maximum plasma concentration and area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity for desloratadine and 47.26 and 48.46 % for 3-OH-desloratadine compared with those values under fasting conditions. Taken together, these results indicated that the incidence of the DSM phenotype in the Chinese population was low and that food intake could significantly decrease the absorption rate and extent of desloratadine.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of 450 mg ropivacaine with and without epinephrine for combined femoral and sciatic nerve block in lower extremity surgery. A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, K.P.; Vree, T.B.; Jack, N.T.; Bemt, B.J.F van den; Limbeek, J. van; Stienstra, R.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: No pharmacokinetic data exist on doses of ropivacaine larger than 300 mg for peripheral nerve block in man, although in clinical practice higher doses are frequently used. The purpose of the present study was to describe the pharmacokinetic profile in serum of 450 mg ropivacaine with and

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Rhodamine 110 and Its Organ Distribution in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shiau-Han; Cheng, Yung-Yi; Huo, Teh-Ia; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-09-06

    Rhodamine dyes have been banned as food additives due to their potential tumorigenicity. Rhodamine 110 is illegal as a food additive, although its pharmacokinetics have not been characterized, and no accurate bioanalytical methods are available to quantify rhodamine 110. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fast, stable, and sensitive method to quantify rhodamine 110 using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to assess its pharmacokinetics and organ distribution in awake rats. Rhodamine 110 exhibited linear pharmacokinetics and slow elimination after oral administration. Furthermore, its oral bioavailability was approximately 34-35%. The distribution in the liver and kidney suggests that these organs are primarily responsible for rhodamine 110 metabolism and elimination. Our investigation describes the pharmacokinetics and a quantification method for rhodamine 110, improving our understanding of the food safety of rhodamine dyes.

  20. Is infant exposure to antiretroviral drugs during breastfeeding quantitatively important? A systematic review and meta-analysis of pharmacokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitt, Catriona John; Garner, Paul; Bonnett, Laura Jayne; Khoo, Saye Hock; Else, Laura Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to summarize antiretroviral drug concentrations in breast milk (BM) and exposure of breast-fed infants. Methods This was a systematic review of pharmacokinetic studies of HIV-positive women taking antiretrovirals that measured drugs in BM. The quality of pharmacokinetic and laboratory methods was assessed using pre-defined criteria. Pooled ratios and 95% CIs were calculated using the generalized inverse variance method and heterogeneity was estimated by the I2 statistic. PubMed Central, SCOPUS and LactMed databases were searched. No date or language restrictions were applied. Searches were conducted up to 10 November 2014. Clinical relevance was estimated by comparing ingested dose with the recommended therapeutic dose for each drug. Results Twenty-four studies were included. There was substantial variability in the clinical and laboratory methods used and in reported results. Relative to maternal plasma (MP), NRTIs accumulate in BM, with BM : MP ratios (95% CI estimates) from 0.89 to 1.21 (14 studies, 1159 paired BM and MP samples). NNRTI estimates were from 0.71 to 0.94 (17 studies, 965 paired samples) and PI estimates were from 0.17 to 0.21 (8 studies, 477 paired samples). Relative to the recommended paediatric doses, a breast-fed infant may ingest 8.4% (95% CI 1.9–15.0), 12.5% (95% CI 2.6–22.3) and 1.1% (95% CI 0–3.6) of lamivudine, nevirapine and efavirenz, respectively, via BM. Conclusions Transfer to untreated infants appears quantitatively important for some NRTIs and NNRTIs. The pharmacokinetic methods varied widely and we propose standards for the design, analysis and reporting of future pharmacokinetic studies of drug transfer during breastfeeding. PMID:25858354

  1. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Steuer, Andrea E; Kraemer, Thomas; Rentsch, Katharina M; Hammann, Felix; Liechti, Matthias E

    2017-10-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is used recreationally and in clinical research. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics and exposure-response relationship of oral LSD. We analyzed pharmacokinetic data from two published placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over studies using oral administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg in 24 and 16 subjects, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of the 100-µg dose is shown for the first time and data for the 200-µg dose were reanalyzed and included. Plasma concentrations of LSD, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling. Concentration-effect relationships were described using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. Geometric mean (95% confidence interval) maximum plasma concentration values of 1.3 (1.2-1.9) and 3.1 (2.6-4.0) ng/mL were reached 1.4 and 1.5 h after administration of 100 and 200 µg LSD, respectively. The plasma half-life was 2.6 h (2.2-3.4 h). The subjective effects lasted (mean ± standard deviation) 8.2 ± 2.1 and 11.6 ± 1.7 h for the 100- and 200-µg LSD doses, respectively. Subjective peak effects were reached 2.8 and 2.5 h after administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg, respectively. A close relationship was observed between the LSD concentration and subjective response within subjects, with moderate counterclockwise hysteresis. Half-maximal effective concentration values were in the range of 1 ng/mL. No correlations were found between plasma LSD concentrations and the effects of LSD across subjects at or near maximum plasma concentration and within dose groups. The present pharmacokinetic data are important for the evaluation of clinical study findings (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging studies) and the interpretation of LSD intoxication. Oral LSD presented dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and first-order elimination up to 12 h. The effects of LSD were related

  2. Age-Dependent Cellular and Behavioral Deficits Induced by Molecularly Targeted Drugs Are Reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafidi, Joseph; Ritter, Jonathan; Talbot, Brooke M; Edwards, Jorge; Chew, Li-Jin; Gallo, Vittorio

    2018-04-15

    Newly developed targeted anticancer drugs inhibit signaling pathways commonly altered in adult and pediatric cancers. However, as these pathways are also essential for normal brain development, concerns have emerged of neurologic sequelae resulting specifically from their application in pediatric cancers. The neural substrates and age dependency of these drug-induced effects in vivo are unknown, and their long-term behavioral consequences have not been characterized. This study defines the age-dependent cellular and behavioral effects of these drugs on normally developing brains and determines their reversibility with post-drug intervention. Mice at different postnatal ages received short courses of molecularly targeted drugs in regimens analagous to clinical treatment. Analysis of rapidly developing brain structures important for sensorimotor and cognitive function showed that, while adult administration was without effect, earlier neonatal administration of targeted therapies attenuated white matter oligodendroglia and hippocampal neuronal development more profoundly than later administration, leading to long-lasting behavioral deficits. This functional impairment was reversed by rehabilitation with physical and cognitive enrichment. Our findings demonstrate age-dependent, reversible effects of these drugs on brain development, which are important considerations as treatment options expand for pediatric cancers. Significance: Targeted therapeutics elicit age-dependent long-term consequences on the developing brain that can be ameliorated with environmental enrichment. Cancer Res; 78(8); 2081-95. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and Dosimetry Studies for Optimization of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in CEA-Expressing Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eBodet-Milin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. A phase I pretargeted radioimmunotherapy trial (EudractCT 200800603096 was designed in patients with metastatic lung cancer expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA to optimize bispecific antibody and labelled peptide doses, as well as the delay between their injections.Methods. Three cohorts of 3 patients received the anti-CEA x anti-histamine-succinyl-glycine (HSG humanized trivalent bispecific antibody (TF2 and the IMP288 bivalent HSG-peptide. Patients underwent a pre-therapeutic imaging session S1 (44 or 88 nmol/m2 of TF2 followed by 4.4 nmol/m2, 185 MBq, of 111In-labelled IMP288, and, 1-2 weeks later, a therapy session S2 (240 or 480 nmol/m2 of TF2 followed by 24 nmol/m2, 1.1 GBq/m2, 177Lu-labeled IMP288. The pretargeting delay was 24 or 48 hours. The dose schedule was defined based on pre-clinical TF2 pharmacokinetic studies, on our previous clinical data using the previous anti-CEA pretargeting system and on clinical results observed in the first patients injected using the same system in the Netherlands.Results. TF2 pharmacokinetics (PK was represented by a two-compartment model in which the central compartment volume was linearly dependent on the patient's surface area. PK were remarkably similar, with a clearance of 0.33 +/- 0.03 L/h per m2. 111In- and 177Lu-IMP288 PK were also well represented by a two-compartment model. IMP288 PK were faster (clearance 1.4 to 3.3 l/h. The central compartment volume was proportional to body surface area and IMP288clearance depended on the molar ratio of injected IMP288 to circulating TF2 at the time of IMP288 injection. Modelling of image quantification confirmed the dependence of IMP288 kinetics on circulating TF2, but tumour activity PK were variable. Organ absorbed doses were not significantly different in the 3 cohorts, but the tumour dose was significantly higher with the higher molar doses of TF2 (p < 0.002. S1 imaging predicted absorbed doses calculated in S2. Conclusion. The best

  4. Distribution and pharmacokinetic analysis of angiostatin radioiodine labeled with high stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Hee; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Paik, Jin-Young; Koh, Bong-Ho; Bae, Joon-Sang; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Radiotracers of anticancer agents provide important information on its in vivo handling. Angiostatin (AST) is a promising anticancer drug with potent antiangiogenic effects, but reported AST radiotracers suffer from poor in vivo stability. In this study, we synthesized an AST probe radioiodinated via the Bolton-Hunter reagent ( 125 I-BH-AST) and investigated its stability and biokinetics in mice. Methods: 125 I-BH-AST and conventional direct radioiodinated 125 I-AST were evaluated for human endothelial cell binding characteristics. In vivo stability of the radiotracers was compared by biodistribution studies in normal ICR mice. Angiostatin pharmacokinetics was analyzed by serial blood sampling after intravenous injection of 125 I-BH-AST with varying AST concentrations in mice. Results: Both 125 I-AST and 125 I-BH-AST retained selective endothelial binding as demonstrated by dose-dependent inhibition by nonradiolabeled AST. 125 I-BH-AST was substantially more stable in mice than 125 I-AST, with 28- and 7-fold lower 24-h thyroid and blood activities, respectively (15.5±1.5 vs. 430.9±32.2 and 0.1±0.0 vs. 0.8±0.0 %ID/g; both P 125 I-BH-AST, we found that 24-h AST accumulation was highest in the kidneys, followed by the liver and lungs. Kinetic analysis of 125 I-BH-AST revealed AST to have linear pharmacokinetics with a T 1/2 of 5.8±2.6 h, volume of distribution (V d ) of 6.8±1.3 ml and clearance of 0.8±0.1 ml/h. Conclusion: Radioiodine-labeled AST prepared by the BH method provides a radioprobe with superior stability and improved in vivo biokinetics that is useful for distribution and pharmacokinetic studies

  5. Healthy brain ageing assessed with 18F-FDG PET and age-dependent recovery factors after partial volume effect correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonte, Stijn [IBiTech, Ghent, (Belgium); Ghent University, iMinds - Medical Image and Signal Processing (MEDISIP), Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent (Belgium); University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Vandemaele, Pieter; Deblaere, Karel; Goethals, Ingeborg [University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Verleden, Stijn; Audenaert, Kurt [University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Ghent (Belgium); Holen, Roel van [Ghent University, iMinds - Medical Image and Signal Processing (MEDISIP), Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-05-15

    The mechanisms of ageing of the healthy brain are not entirely clarified to date. In recent years several authors have tried to elucidate this topic by using {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography. However, when correcting for partial volume effects (PVE), divergent results were reported. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate these methods in the presence of atrophy due to ageing. In this paper we first evaluate the performance of two PVE correction techniques with a phantom study: the Rousset method and iterative deconvolution. We show that the ability of the latter method to recover the true activity in a small region decreases with increasing age due to brain atrophy. Next, we have calculated age-dependent recovery factors to correct for this incomplete recovery. These factors were applied to PVE-corrected {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans of healthy subjects for mapping the agedependent metabolism in the brain. Many regions in the brain show a reduced metabolism with ageing, especially in grey matter in the frontal and temporal lobe. An increased metabolism is found in grey matter of the cerebellum and thalamus. Our study resulted in age-dependent recovery factors which can be applied following standard PVE correction methods. Cancelling the effect of atrophy, we found regional changes in {sup 18}F-FDG metabolism with ageing. A decreasing trend is found in the frontal and temporal lobe, whereas an increasing metabolism with ageing is observed in the thalamus and cerebellum.

  6. Pharmacokinetic Study of Bioactive Flavonoids in the Traditional Japanese Medicine Keigairengyoto Exerting Antibacterial Effects against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsumoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that flavonoid glucuronides can be deconjugated to the active form aglycone by β-glucuronidase-expressing macrophages. Keigairengyoto (KRT is a flavonoid-rich traditional Japanese medicine reported to enhance bacterial clearance through immune modulation. Our aims are to examine the pharmacokinetics of KRT flavonoids and to identify active flavonoids contributing to the adjuvant effects of KRT. KRT was evaluated at pharmacokinetic analysis to quantify absorbed flavonoids, and cutaneous infection assay induced in mice by inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus. Preventive or therapeutic KRT administration reduced the number of bacteria in the infection site as well as macroscopic and microscopic lesion scores with efficacies similar to antibiotics. Pharmacokinetic study revealed low plasma levels of flavonoid aglycones after KRT administration; however, plasma concentrations were enhanced markedly by β-glucuronidase treatment, with baicalein the most abundant (Cmax, 1.32 µg/mL. In random screening assays, flavonoids such as bacalein, genistein, and apigenin enhanced bacteria phagocytosis by macrophages. Glucuronide bacalin was converted to aglycone baicalein by incubation with living macrophages, macrophage lysate, or skin homogenate. Taken together, the adjuvant effect of KRT may be due to some blood-absorbed flavonoids which enhance macrophage functions in host defense. Flavonoid-rich KRT may be a beneficial treatment for infectious skin inflammation.

  7. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid-induced thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Holford, Nicholas H G; Kasai, Hidefumi; Ogami, Chika; Heo, Young-A; Higashi, Yoshitsugu; Mizoguchi, Akiko; To, Hideto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro

    2017-08-01

    Thrombocytopenia is among the most important adverse effects of linezolid treatment. Linezolid-induced thrombocytopenia incidence varies considerably but has been associated with impaired renal function. We investigated the pharmacodynamic mechanism (myelosuppression or enhanced platelet destruction) and the role of impaired renal function (RF) in the development of thrombocytopenia. The pharmacokinetics of linezolid were described with a two-compartment distribution model with first-order absorption and elimination. RF was calculated using the expected creatinine clearance. The decrease platelets by linezolid exposure was assumed to occur by one of two mechanisms: inhibition of the formation of platelets (PDI) or stimulation of the elimination (PDS) of platelets. About 50% of elimination was found to be explained by renal clearance (normal RF). The population mean estimated plasma protein binding of linezolid was 18% [95% confidence interval (CI) 16%, 20%] and was independent of the observed concentrations. The estimated mixture model fraction of patients with a platelet count decreased due to PDI was 0.97 (95% CI 0.87, 1.00), so the fraction due to PDS was 0.03. RF had no influence on linezolid pharmacodynamics. We have described the influence of weight, renal function, age and plasma protein binding on the pharmacokinetics of linezolid. This combined pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and turnover model identified that the most common mechanism of thrombocytopenia associated with linezolid is PDI. Impaired RF increases thrombocytopenia by a pharmacokinetic mechanism. The linezolid dose should be reduced in RF. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Age dependency of myocardial triglyceride content. A 3T high-field {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petritsch, B.; Gassenmaier, T.; Kunz, A.S.; Donhauser, J.; Bley, T.A.; Horn, M. [University Hospital of Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Goltz, J.P. [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany). Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2015-11-15

    The role of myocardial triglyceride (mTG) content in the aging human heart is not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to measure concentrations of mTG content from healthy volunteers and to determine the association between age, mTG content and systolic heart function. Furthermore, the technical stability of the {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) and the reliability of peak evaluation at 3 T were evaluated. The total study population of 47 healthy volunteers was divided into 4 age classes, according to the age of the subjects (1{sup st} cohort 20-29 years (yrs.), n=20; 2{sup nd} cohort 30-39 yrs., n=10; 3{sup rd} cohort 40-49 yrs., n=9; 4{sup th} cohort 50-60 yrs., n=8). Cardiac MRI and double triggered {sup 1}H-MRS of the myocardium were consecutively performed using a 3 T scanner. Each participant underwent spectroscopic measurements twice in the same investigation. mTG content increases with age. The correlation of age and mTG is minimal (r=0.48; p<0.001). The following age-averaged mTG content values expressed as % of mTG signal compared to the water signal were determined for each cohort: 1{sup st} cohort 0.25 % (± 0.17); 2{sup nd} cohort 0.48 % (± 0.30); 3{sup rd} cohort 0.48 % (± 0.18); 4{sup th} cohort 0.77 % (± 0.70). There was no significant correlation (r=0.04; p=n.s.) between LV mass and mTG content in healthy volunteers. Within our cohorts, no effects of age or mTG content on systolic heart function were seen (r=-0.01; p=n.s.). The intraclass correlation coefficient of spectroscopic measurements was high (r=0.965; p<0.001). Myocardial TG content increases with age. The normal age-dependent concentration ranges of myocardial lipid metabolites reported in this study may be helpful for the correction of acquired {sup 1}H-MRS data in patients when evaluating metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in future magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies.

  9. Human pharmacokinetics of iohexol. A new nonionic contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, B.; Aulie, A.; Sveen, K.; Andrew, E.

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of iohexol, a new nonionic, water-soluble contrast medium, have been determined after intravenous injection in 20 healthy volunteers, at four different dose levels (125-500 mg I/kg). The apparent volume of distribution was 0.27 1/kg, indicating distribution in the extracellular water. The biologic half-life was 121 minutes, comparable with that of other intravascular contrast media. Iohexol was excreted completely unmetabolized in the urine, with a 100% recovery 24 hours after injection. A comparison of iohexol and chromium-51 ( 51 Cr)-EDTA clearances indicates that iohexol is mainly excreted by glomerular filtration. The 51 Cr-EDTA clearance was the same when injected separately and concomitantly with iohexol, indicating that glomerular filtration rate is not affected by iohexol. No dose dependency was observed in the investigated parameters t1/2 alpha, t1/2 beta, Vd, ClT or ClR. Iohexol pharmacokinetics are in correspondence with previously reported data on intravascular contrast media

  10. Proposed clinical trial studying the pharmacokinetics of B.S.H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, W.F.J.

    1988-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in BNCT at Oxford for several years, which has been facilitated by the proximity of the clinical Departments of Neurosurgery and Radiotherapy as well as the Radiobiology unit and the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell. Each unit has been collaborating over this time with the end objective of a therapeutic facility at Harwell. In the Department of Neurosurgery, they are about to embark on a clinical study of the pharmacokinetics of a boron compound. This is a non-therapeutic trial as they cannot offer a neutron facility at Harwell as yet. Full approval of the Ethical Committee has been granted

  11. Atomoxetine: A Review of Its Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacogenomics Relative to Drug Disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo; Li, Guo-Fu; Markowitz, John S

    2016-05-01

    Atomoxetine is a selective norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitor approved for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children (≥6 years of age), adolescents, and adults. Its metabolism and disposition are fairly complex, and primarily governed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 (CYP2D6), whose protein expression varies substantially from person to person, and by race and ethnicity because of genetic polymorphism. These differences can be substantial, resulting in 8-10-fold differences in atomoxetine exposure between CYP2D6 poor metabolizers and extensive metabolizers. In this review, we have attempted to revisit and analyze all published clinical pharmacokinetic data on atomoxetine inclusive of public access documents from the new drug application submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The present review focuses on atomoxetine metabolism, disposition, and genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6 as they specifically relate to atomoxetine, and provides an in-depth discussion of the fundamental pharmacokinetics of the drug including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in pediatric and adult populations. Further, a summary of relationships between genetic variants of CYP2D6 and to some degree, CYP2C19, are provided with respect to atomoxetine plasma concentrations, central nervous system (CNS) pharmacokinetics, and associated clinical implications for pharmacotherapy. Lastly, dosage adjustments based on pharmacokinetic principles are discussed.

  12. The Relationship between Childhood Maltreatment and Opiate Dependency in Adolescence and Middle Age

    OpenAIRE

    Naqavi, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadi, Masood; Salari, Vahid; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2011-01-01

    Background Child maltreatment is a global phenomenon with possible serious long-term consequences. The present study aimed to determine the relationship between childhood maltreatment and opiate dependency in older age. Methods In this study, 212 opiate dependent individuals and 216 control subjects were selected consecutively. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire which consisted of background variables, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), and Childhood Trauma Questionnair...

  13. Phenobarbital in intensive care unit pediatric population: predictive performances of population pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, Amélie; Michel, Fabrice; Chasseloup, Estelle; Paut, Olivier; Guilhaumou, Romain; Blin, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    An external evaluation of phenobarbital population pharmacokinetic model described by Marsot et al. was performed in pediatric intensive care unit. Model evaluation is an important issue for dose adjustment. This external evaluation should allow confirming the proposed dosage adaptation and extending these recommendations to the entire intensive care pediatric population. External evaluation of phenobarbital published population pharmacokinetic model of Marsot et al. was realized in a new retrospective dataset of 35 patients hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit. The published population pharmacokinetic model was implemented in nonmem 7.3. Predictive performance was assessed by quantifying bias and inaccuracy of model prediction. Normalized prediction distribution errors (NPDE) and visual predictive check (VPC) were also evaluated. A total of 35 infants were studied with a mean age of 33.5 weeks (range: 12 days-16 years) and a mean weight of 12.6 kg (range: 2.7-70.0 kg). The model predicted the observed phenobarbital concentrations with a reasonable bias and inaccuracy. The median prediction error was 3.03% (95% CI: -8.52 to 58.12%), and the median absolute prediction error was 26.20% (95% CI: 13.07-75.59%). No trends in NPDE and VPC were observed. The model previously proposed by Marsot et al. in neonates hospitalized in intensive care unit was externally validated for IV infusion administration. The model-based dosing regimen was extended in all pediatric intensive care unit to optimize treatment. Due to inter- and intravariability in pharmacokinetic model, this dosing regimen should be combined with therapeutic drug monitoring. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  14. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of tedizolid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Shawn; Fang, Edward; Muñoz, Kelly A; Minassian, Sonia L; Prokocimer, Philippe G

    2014-09-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel antibacterial under investigation for the treatment of gram-positive infections. This study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of intravenous tedizolid phosphate as well as the oral bioavailability of tedizolid phosphate. Double-blind, single-ascending dose, multiple-dose pharmacokinetics study, as well as tolerability and open-label crossover studies. Single center in the United States (Covance Clinical Research Unit, Madison, WI) between September 2009 and January 2010. Ninety healthy volunteers. Single intravenous (IV) doses of tedizolid phosphate 50 mg (lead-in) and 100-400 mg. Single oral and IV dose of tedizolid phosphate 200 mg in crossover fashion. Multiple IV doses of tedizolid phosphate 200 and 300 mg for up to 7 days. A dose-dependent increase was observed in the maximum plasma concentration (1.2-5.1 μg/ml) and the area under the concentration-time curve (17.4-58.7 μg × hr/ml) of tedizolid (the microbiologically active moiety of tedizolid phosphate) after single IV doses of tedizolid phosphate 100-400 mg. Administration of IV tedizolid phosphate 200 mg once/day for 7 days resulted in minimal (28%) tedizolid accumulation. The absolute oral bioavailability of tedizolid after a single 200-mg dose of tedizolid phosphate was 91%; pharmacokinetic parameters of tedizolid were similar with oral and IV administration. Treatment-related adverse events occurred in 41% of subjects. Most adverse events were related to infusion site and became more frequent with multiple dosing. In an additional 3-day tolerability study, IV tedizolid phosphate 200 mg and placebo were similarly tolerated, based on visual infusion phlebitis scores. These results from a population of healthy volunteers support once/day dosing of tedizolid phosphate 200 mg with both the oral and IV formulations, without the need for dose adjustment when switching administration routes. © 2014 Cubist Pharmaceuticals. Pharmacotherapy

  15. Bayesian Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK Approach for a Physiologically Realistic Characterization of Interindividual Variability in Clinically Relevant Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Krauss

    Full Text Available Interindividual variability in anatomical and physiological properties results in significant differences in drug pharmacokinetics. The consideration of such pharmacokinetic variability supports optimal drug efficacy and safety for each single individual, e.g. by identification of individual-specific dosings. One clear objective in clinical drug development is therefore a thorough characterization of the physiological sources of interindividual variability. In this work, we present a Bayesian population physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK approach for the mechanistically and physiologically realistic identification of interindividual variability. The consideration of a generic and highly detailed mechanistic PBPK model structure enables the integration of large amounts of prior physiological knowledge, which is then updated with new experimental data in a Bayesian framework. A covariate model integrates known relationships of physiological parameters to age, gender and body height. We further provide a framework for estimation of the a posteriori parameter dependency structure at the population level. The approach is demonstrated considering a cohort of healthy individuals and theophylline as an application example. The variability and co-variability of physiological parameters are specified within the population; respectively. Significant correlations are identified between population parameters and are applied for individual- and population-specific visual predictive checks of the pharmacokinetic behavior, which leads to improved results compared to present population approaches. In the future, the integration of a generic PBPK model into an hierarchical approach allows for extrapolations to other populations or drugs, while the Bayesian paradigm allows for an iterative application of the approach and thereby a continuous updating of physiological knowledge with new data. This will facilitate decision making e.g. from preclinical to

  16. Plasma and CSF pharmacokinetics of meropenem in neonates and young infants: results from the NeoMero studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germovsek, Eva; Lutsar, Irja; Kipper, Karin; Karlsson, Mats O; Planche, Tim; Chazallon, Corine; Meyer, Laurence; Trafojer, Ursula M T; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Fournier, Isabelle; Sharland, Mike; Heath, Paul; Standing, Joseph F

    2018-04-19

    Sepsis and bacterial meningitis are major causes of mortality and morbidity in neonates and infants. Meropenem, a broad-spectrum antibiotic, is not licensed for use in neonates and infants below 3 months of age and sufficient information on its plasma and CSF disposition and dosing in neonates and infants is lacking. To determine plasma and CSF pharmacokinetics of meropenem in neonates and young infants and the link between pharmacokinetics and clinical outcomes in babies with late-onset sepsis (LOS). Data were collected in two recently conducted studies, i.e. NeoMero-1 (neonatal LOS) and NeoMero-2 (neonatal meningitis). Optimally timed plasma samples (n = 401) from 167 patients and opportunistic CSF samples (n = 78) from 56 patients were analysed. A one-compartment model with allometric scaling and fixed maturation gave adequate fit to both plasma and CSF data; the CL and volume (standardized to 70 kg) were 16.7 (95% CI 14.7, 18.9) L/h and 38.6 (95% CI 34.9, 43.4) L, respectively. CSF penetration was low (8%), but rose with increasing CSF protein, with 40% penetration predicted at a protein concentration of 6 g/L. Increased infusion time improved plasma target attainment, but lowered CSF concentrations. For 24 patients with culture-proven Gram-negative LOS, pharmacodynamic target attainment was similar regardless of the test-of-cure visit outcome. Simulations showed that longer infusions increase plasma PTA but decrease CSF PTA. CSF penetration is worsened with long infusions so increasing dose frequency to achieve therapeutic targets should be considered.

  17. An age dependent model for radium metabolism in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J R

    1983-01-01

    The model developed by a Task Group of Committee 2 of ICRP to describe Alkaline Earth Metabolism in Adult Man (ICRP Publication 20) has been modified so that recycling is handled explicitly, and retention in mineral bone is represented by second compartments rather than by the product of a power function and an exponential. This model has been extended to include all ages from birth to adult man, and has been coupled with modified "ICRP" lung and G.I. tract models so that activity in organs can be calculated as functions of time during or after exposures. These activities, and age dependent "specific effective energy" factors, are then used to calculate age dependent dose rates, and dose commitments. This presentation describes this work, with emphasis on the model parameters and results obtained for radium.

  18. A general method to determine sampling windows for nonlinear mixed effects models with an application to population pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Lee Kien; McGree, James; Duffull, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Optimal design methods have been proposed to determine the best sampling times when sparse blood sampling is required in clinical pharmacokinetic studies. However, the optimal blood sampling time points may not be feasible in clinical practice. Sampling windows, a time interval for blood sample collection, have been proposed to provide flexibility in blood sampling times while preserving efficient parameter estimation. Because of the complexity of the population pharmacokinetic models, which are generally nonlinear mixed effects models, there is no analytical solution available to determine sampling windows. We propose a method for determination of sampling windows based on MCMC sampling techniques. The proposed method attains a stationary distribution rapidly and provides time-sensitive windows around the optimal design points. The proposed method is applicable to determine sampling windows for any nonlinear mixed effects model although our work focuses on an application to population pharmacokinetic models. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic-dynamic relationship between rapacuronium (Org 9487) and its 3-desacetyl metabolite (Org 9488)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiere, S; Proost, Hans; Schuringa, M; Wierda, J.MKH

    Rapacuronium (Org 9487) is a rapid-onset and short- to intermediate-acting muscle relaxant. Its 3-desacetyl metabolite, Org 9488, also exerts neuromuscular-blocking activity that. may became apparent after prolonged maintenance of relaxation with rapacuronium. In this study, the pharmacokinetic

  20. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and amodiaquine in African children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouedraogo Alphonse

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacokinetic (PK data on amodiaquine (AQ and artesunate (AS are limited in children, an important risk group for malaria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PK properties of a newly developed and registered fixed dose combination (FDC of artesunate and amodiaquine. Methods A prospective population pharmacokinetic study of AS and AQ was conducted in children aged six months to five years. Participants were randomized to receive the new artesunate and amodiaquine FDC or the same drugs given in separate tablets. Children were divided into two groups of 70 (35 in each treatment arm to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties of AS and AQ, respectively. Population pharmacokinetic models for dihydroartemisinin (DHA and desethylamodiaquine (DeAq, the principal pharmacologically active metabolites of AS and AQ, respectively, and total artemisinin anti-malarial activity, defined as the sum of the molar equivalent plasma concentrations of DHA and artesunate, were constructed using the non-linear mixed effects approach. Relative bioavailability between products was compared by estimating the ratios (and 95% CI between the areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC. Results The two regimens had similar PK properties in young children with acute malaria. The ratio of loose formulation to fixed co-formulation AUCs, was estimated as 1.043 (95% CI: 0.956 to 1.138 for DeAq. For DHA and total anti-malarial activity AUCs were estimated to be the same. Artesunate was rapidly absorbed, hydrolysed to DHA, and eliminated. Plasma concentrations were significantly higher following the first dose, when patients were acutely ill, than after subsequent doses when patients were usually afebrile and clinically improved. Amodiaquine was converted rapidly to DeAq, which was then eliminated with an estimated median (range elimination half-life of 9 (7 to 12 days. Efficacy was similar in the two treatments groups, with cure rates of 0

  1. PK/DB: database for pharmacokinetic properties and predictive in silico ADME models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Tiago L; Torres, Leonardo G; Carrara, Alexandre E; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-10-01

    The study of pharmacokinetic properties (PK) is of great importance in drug discovery and development. In the present work, PK/DB (a new freely available database for PK) was designed with the aim of creating robust databases for pharmacokinetic studies and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) prediction. Comprehensive, web-based and easy to access, PK/DB manages 1203 compounds which represent 2973 pharmacokinetic measurements, including five models for in silico ADME prediction (human intestinal absorption, human oral bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-brain barrier and water solubility). http://www.pkdb.ifsc.usp.br

  2. Microdosing clinical study: pharmacokinetic, pharmacogenomic (SLCO2B1), and interaction (grapefruit juice) profiles of celiprolol following the oral microdose and therapeutic dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieiri, Ichiro; Doi, Yohei; Maeda, Kazuya; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Kimura, Miyuki; Hirota, Takeshi; Chiyoda, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Mayuko; Irie, Shin; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2012-07-01

    The authors evaluated the contribution of the SLCO2B1 polymorphism to the pharmacokinetics of celiprolol at a microdose (MD) and therapeutic dose (TD) and compared pharmacokinetic proportionality between the 2 dose forms in 30 SLCO2B1 genotype-matched healthy volunteers. Three drugs (celiprolol, fexofenadine, and atenolol) were orally administered as a cassette dosing following the MD (totally 97.5 µg) and then a TD (100 mg) of celiprolol, with and without grapefruit juice. The mean AUC(0-24) of celiprolol was lower in SLCO2B1*3/*3 individuals (775 ng·h/mL) than in *1/*3 (1097 ng·h/mL) and *1/*1 (1547 ng·h/mL) individuals following the TD, and this was confirmed in population pharmacokinetic analysis with statistical significances; however, SLCO2B1 genotype-dependent differences disappeared following the MD. Dose-normalized AUC of celiprolol at the MD was much lower than that at the TD, explained by the saturation of the efflux transporter. Thus, the effect of SLCO2B1 polymorphism on the AUC of celiprolol clearly observed only at the TD may be due to the saturation of the efflux transport systems.

  3. A Phase 1, Single-center, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Study in Healthy Subjects to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, Clinical Effects, and Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics of Intravenous Cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonylmetomidate (ABP-700) after a Single Ascending Bolus Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struys, Michel M R F; Valk, Beatrijs I; Eleveld, Douglas J; Absalom, Anthony R; Meyer, Peter; Meier, Sascha; den Daas, Izaak; Chou, Thomas; van Amsterdam, Kai; Campagna, Jason A; Sweeney, Steven P

    2017-07-01

    Cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonylmetomidate (ABP-700) is a new "soft" etomidate analog. The primary objectives of this first-in-human study were to describe the safety and efficacy of ABP-700 and to determine its maximum tolerated dose. Secondary objectives were to characterize the pharmacokinetics of ABP-700 and its primary metabolite (cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonyl acid), to assess the clinical effects of ABP-700, and to investigate the dose-response and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. Sixty subjects were divided into 10 cohorts and received an increasing, single bolus of either ABP-700 or placebo. Safety was assessed by clinical laboratory evaluations, infusion-site reactions, continuous monitoring of vital signs, physical examination, adverse event monitoring, and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing. Clinical effects were assessed with modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation and Bispectral Index monitoring. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Stopping criteria were met at 1.00 mg/kg dose. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events were dose-dependent and comprised involuntary muscle movement, tachycardia, and ventilatory effects. Adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation evoked a physiologic cortisol response in all subjects, no different from placebo. Pharmacokinetics were dose-proportional. A three-compartment pharmacokinetic model described the data well. A rapid onset of anesthesia/sedation after bolus administration and also a rapid recovery were observed. A quantitative concentration-effect relationship was described for the modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation and Bispectral Index. This first-in-human study of ABP-700 shows that ABP-700 was safe and well tolerated after single-bolus injections up to 1.00 mg/kg. Bolus doses of 0.25 and 0.35 mg/kg were found to provide the most beneficial clinical effect versus side-effect profile.

  4. CLINICAL-PHARMACOLOGY OF ROCURONIUM (ORG-9426) - STUDY OF THE TIME-COURSE OF ACTION, DOSE REQUIREMENT, REVERSIBILITY, AND PHARMACOKINETICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBROEK, L; WIERDA, JMKH; SMEULERS, NJ; VANSANTEN, GJ; LECLERCQ, MGL; HENNIS, PJ

    1994-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the time course of action, dose requirement, reversibility, and pharmacokinetics of rocuronium (Org 9426) under 3 anesthetic techniques (nitrous oxide-fentanyl supplemented with propofol halothane, or isoflurane). Design: Prospective, randomized study. Setting: Operating

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Cefuroxime in Cortical and Cancellous Bone Obtained by Microdialysis - a Porcine Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Forsingdal Hardlei, Tore; Bendtsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    . As reference, free and total plasma concentrations were also measured. The animals received a bolus of 1500 mg cefuroxime over 30 min. No significant differences between key pharmacokinetic parameters for sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone were found. The mean area under the concentration...... (MD) technique for measurement of cefuroxime in bone, and to obtain pharmacokinetic profiles for the same drug in porcine cortical and cancellous bone. Measurements were conducted in bone-wax sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone, in drill holes in cancellous bone and in subcutaneous tissue...

  6. Age-dependent increase in green autofluorescence of blood ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Protective enzymes against oxidative ... School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India ... provide evidence for an age dependent increase in the GAF of blood erythrocytes that is accentuated by depletion of.

  7. Characterization of the disposition of fostamatinib in Japanese subjects including pharmacokinetic assessment in dry blood spots: results from two phase I clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul; Cheung, S Y Amy; Yen, Mark; Han, David; Gillen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to characterize the pharmacokinetics of fostamatinib in two phase I studies in healthy Japanese subjects after single- and multiple-dose administration, and to evaluate the utility of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling. In study A, 40 Japanese and 16 white subjects were randomized in a double-blind parallel group study consisting of seven cohorts, which received either placebo or a fostamatinib dose between 50 and 200 mg after single and multiple dosing. Pharmacokinetics of R406 (active metabolite of fostamatinib) in plasma and urine was assessed, and safety was intensively monitored. Study B was an open-label study that assessed fostamatinib 100 and 200 mg in 24 Japanese subjects. In addition to plasma and urine sampling (as for study A), pharmacokinetics was also assessed in blood. Mean maximum plasma concentration (C max) and area under total plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) increased with increasing dose in Japanese subjects. Steady state was achieved in 5–7 days for all doses. C max and AUC were both higher in Japanese subjects administered a 150-mg single dose than in white subjects. This difference was maintained for steady state exposure by day 10. Overall, R406 blood concentrations were consistent and ∼2.5-fold higher than in plasma. Minimal (blood cells, and DBS sampling was a useful method for assessing R406 pharmacokinetics.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of an oral extended-release formulation of doxycycline hyclate containing acrylic acid and polymethacrylate in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sara Melisa Arciniegas; Olvera, Lilia Gutiérrez; Chacón, Sara del Carmen Caballero; Estrada, Dinorah Vargas

    2015-04-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics of doxycycline hyclate administered orally in the form of experimental formulations with different proportions of acrylic acid-polymethacrylate-based matrices. 30 healthy adult dogs. In a crossover study, dogs were randomly assigned (in groups of 10) to receive a single oral dose (20 mg/kg) of doxycycline hyclate without excipients (control) or extended-release formulations (ERFs) containing doxycycline, acrylic acid polymer, and polymethacrylate in the following proportions: 1:0.5:0.0075 (ERF1) or 1:1:0.015 (ERF2). Serum concentrations of doxycycline were determined for pharmacokinetic analysis before and at several intervals after each treatment. Following oral administration to the study dogs, each ERF resulted in therapeutic serum doxycycline concentrations for 48 hours, whereas the control treatment resulted in therapeutic serum doxycycline concentrations for only 24 hours. All pharmacokinetic parameters for ERF1 and ERF2 were significantly different; however, findings for ERF1 did not differ significantly from those for the control treatment. Results indicated that both ERFs containing doxycycline, acrylic acid polymer, and polymethacrylate had an adequate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for a time-dependent drug and a longer release time than doxycycline alone following oral administration in dogs. Given the minimum effective serum doxycycline concentration of 0.26 μg/mL, a dose interval of 48 hours can be achieved for each tested ERF. This minimum inhibitory concentration has the potential to be effective against several susceptible bacteria involved in important infections in dogs. Treatment of dogs with either ERF may have several benefits over treatment with doxycycline alone.

  9. PHARMACOKINETIC RESEARCHES AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Belolipetskaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An article gives in a comprehensive manner the main idea of pharmacokinetics, as the science about rules of substances behavior in the internal environment of the organism, as well as of main parameters of pharmacokinetic researches. The article provides vivid and very  persuasive examples of high practical importance of this science both for creating new medical forms of drugs and for choosing the optimal of therapy regime.

  10. PHARMACOKINETIC RESEARCHES AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Belolipetskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An article gives in a comprehensive manner the main idea of pharmacokinetics, as the science about rules of substances behavior in the internal environment of the organism, as well as of main parameters of pharmacokinetic researches. The article provides vivid and very  persuasive examples of high practical importance of this science both for creating new medical forms of drugs and for choosing the optimal of therapy regime.

  11. Parameterization of the Age-Dependent Whole Brain Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Marion; Nägele, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The distribution of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the brain can be used to characterize age effects and pathological changes of the brain tissue. The aim of this study was the parameterization of the whole brain ADC histogram by an advanced model with influence of age considered. Methods. Whole brain ADC histograms were calculated for all data and for seven age groups between 10 and 80 years. Modeling of the histograms was performed for two parts of the histogram separately: the brain tissue part was modeled by two Gaussian curves, while the remaining part was fitted by the sum of a Gaussian curve, a biexponential decay, and a straight line. Results. A consistent fitting of the histograms of all age groups was possible with the proposed model. Conclusions. This study confirms the strong dependence of the whole brain ADC histograms on the age of the examined subjects. The proposed model can be used to characterize changes of the whole brain ADC histogram in certain diseases under consideration of age effects. PMID:26609526

  12. Parameterization of the Age-Dependent Whole Brain Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Klose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The distribution of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values in the brain can be used to characterize age effects and pathological changes of the brain tissue. The aim of this study was the parameterization of the whole brain ADC histogram by an advanced model with influence of age considered. Methods. Whole brain ADC histograms were calculated for all data and for seven age groups between 10 and 80 years. Modeling of the histograms was performed for two parts of the histogram separately: the brain tissue part was modeled by two Gaussian curves, while the remaining part was fitted by the sum of a Gaussian curve, a biexponential decay, and a straight line. Results. A consistent fitting of the histograms of all age groups was possible with the proposed model. Conclusions. This study confirms the strong dependence of the whole brain ADC histograms on the age of the examined subjects. The proposed model can be used to characterize changes of the whole brain ADC histogram in certain diseases under consideration of age effects.

  13. Age-dependent associations between androgenetic alopecia and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David C; Giles, Graham G; Sinclair, Rod; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Severi, Gianluca

    2013-02-01

    Both prostate cancer and androgenetic alopecia are strongly age-related conditions that are considered to be androgen dependent, but studies of the relationship between them have yielded inconsistent results. We aimed to assess whether androgenetic alopecia at ages 20 and 40 years are associated with risk of prostate cancer. At a follow-up of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, men were asked to assess their hair pattern at ages 20 and 40 years relative to eight categories in showcards. Cases were men notified to the Victorian Cancer Registry with prostate cancer diagnosed between cohort enrollment (1990-1994) and follow-up attendance (2003-2009). Flexible parametric survival models were used to estimate age-varying HRs and predicted cumulative probabilities of prostate cancer by androgenetic alopecia categories. Of 9,448 men that attended follow-up and provided data on androgenetic alopecia, we identified 476 prostate cancer cases during a median follow-up of 11 years four months. Cumulative probability of prostate cancer was greater at all ages up to 76 years, for men with vertex versus no androgenetic alopecia at age of 40 years. At age of 76 years, the estimated probabilities converged to 0.15. Vertex androgenetic alopecia at 40 years was also associated with younger age of diagnosis for prostate cancer cases. Vertex androgenetic alopecia at age of 40 years might be a marker of increased risk of early-onset prostate cancer. If confirmed, these results suggest that the apparently conflicting findings of previous studies might be explained by failure to adequately model the age-varying nature of the association between androgenetic alopecia and prostate cancer.

  14. Efavirenz, tenofovir and emtricitabine combined with first-line tuberculosis treatment in tuberculosis-HIV-coinfected Tanzanian patients: a pharmacokinetic and safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semvua, Hadija H; Mtabho, Charles M; Fillekes, Quirine; van den Boogaard, Jossy; Kisonga, Riziki M; Mleoh, Liberate; Ndaro, Arnold; Kisanga, Elton R; van der Ven, Andre; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Kibiki, Gibson S; Boeree, Martin J; Burger, David M

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of rifampicin-based tuberculosis (TB) treatment on the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine in a fixed-dose combination tablet, and vice versa, in Tanzanian TB-HIV-coinfected patients. This was a Phase II open-label multiple dose pharmacokinetic and safety study. This study was conducted in TB-HIV-coinfected Tanzanian patients who started TB treatment (rifampicin/isoniazid/pyrazinamide/ethambutol) at week 1 to week 8 and continued with rifampicin and isoniazid for another 16 weeks. Antiretroviral treatment (ART) of efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine in a fixed-dose combination tablet was started at week 4 after initiation of TB treatment. A 24-h pharmacokinetic sampling curve was recorded at week 8 (with TB treatment) and week 28 (ART alone). For TB drugs, blood samples at 2 and 5 h post-dose were taken at week 3 (TB treatment alone) and week 8 (with ART). A total of 25 patients (56% male) completed the study; 21 had evaluable pharmacokinetic profiles. The area under the concentration-time curve 0-24 h post-dose of efavirenz, tenofovir and emtricitabine were slightly higher when these drugs were coadministered with TB drugs; geometric mean ratios (90% CI) were 1.08 (0.90, 1.30), 1.13 (0.93, 1.38) and 1.05 (0.85, 1.29), respectively. For TB drugs, equivalence was suggested for peak plasma concentrations when administered with and without efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine. Adverse events were mostly mild and no serious adverse events or drug discontinuations were reported. Coadministration of efavirenz, tenofovir and emtricitabine with a standard first-line TB treatment regimen did not significantly alter the pharmacokinetic parameters of these drugs and was tolerated well by Tanzanian TB patients who are coinfected with HIV.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats: role of serum protein binding and tissue distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of serum protein binding and tissue distribution in the non-linear pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats. The first phase of the research was an attempt to elucidate the causes of intersubject differences in serum protein binding of warfarin in rats. It was found that the distribution of S-warfarin between blood and liver, kidneys, muscle, or fatty tissue was non-linear. Based on the tissue distribution data obtained, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was developed to describe the time course of S-warfarin concentrations in the serum and tissues of rats. The proposed model was able to display the dose-dependent pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats. Namely a lower clearance and a smaller apparent volume of distribution with increasing dose, which appear to be due to the presence of capacity-limited, high-affinity binding sites for warfarin in various tissues. To determine if the binding of warfarin to the high-affinity binding sites in the liver of rats is reversible, concentrations of S-warfarin in the liver and serum of rats were monitored for a very long time after an intravenous injection of a 1 mg/kg dose. In another study in rats, non-radioactive warfarin was found to be able to displace tissue-bound C 14 -warfarin which was administered about 200 hours before the i.v. injection of the non-radioactive warfarin, showing that the binding of warfarin to the high-affinity binding sites in the body is persistent and reversible

  16. Maternal care, mother-offspring aggregation and age-dependent coadaptation in the European earwig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Y; Kölliker, M

    2013-09-01

    Benefits and costs of parental care are expected to change with offspring development and lead to age-dependent coadaptation expressed as phenotypic (behavioural) matches between offspring age and parental reproductive stage. Parents and offspring interact repeatedly over time for the provision of parental care. Their behaviours should be accordingly adjusted to each other dynamically and adaptively, and the phenotypic match between offspring age and parental stage should stabilize the repeated behavioural interactions. In the European earwig (Forficula auricularia), maternal care is beneficial for offspring survival, but not vital, allowing us to investigate the extent to which the stability of mother-offspring aggregation is shaped by age-dependent coadaptation. In this study, we experimentally cross-fostered nymphs of different age classes (younger or older) between females in early or late reproductive stage to disrupt age-dependent coadaptation, thereby generating female-nymph dyads that were phenotypically matched or mismatched. The results revealed a higher stability in aggregation during the first larval instar when care is most intense, a steeper decline in aggregation tendency over developmental time and a reduced developmental rate in matched compared with mismatched families. Furthermore, nymph survival was positively correlated with female-nymph aggregation stability during the early stages when maternal care is most prevalent. These results support the hypothesis that age-related phenotypically plastic coadaptation affects family dynamics and offspring developmental rate. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  17. The Influence of the Brain on Overpopulation, Ageing and Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, Ronald D. T.

    1989-01-01

    With time, an increasing number in the world population is becoming old, and changes in the aging brain mean that a significant proportion of the aged are likely to be dependent on others. The devotion of resources to research into the aging brain could bring benefits far outweighing the investment. (Author/CW)

  18. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance study of intravitreal injection of dexamethasone-loaded nanoparticles in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hongfan

    2009-01-01

    Linhua Zhang1, Yue Li2, Chao Zhang1, Yusheng Wang2, Cunxian Song11Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Ophthalmology of Chinese PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, ChinaAbstract: The aim of the study was to investigate the tolerance and pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone (DEX)-loaded poly(lactic acid–co-glycolic acid) ...

  19. Disposition pathways and pharmacokinetics of herbal medicines in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S-M; Li, C G; Liu, J-P; Chan, E; Duan, W; Zhou, S-F

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies have become an integral part of modern drug development, but these studies are not regulatory needs for herbal remedies. This paper updates our current knowledge on the disposition pathways and pharmacokinetic properties of commonly used herbal medicines in humans. To retrieve relevant data, the authors have searched through computer-based literatures by full text search in Medline (via Pubmed), ScienceDirect, Current Contents Connect (ISI), Cochrance Library, CINAHL (EBSCO), CrossRef Search and Embase (all from inception to May 2010). Many herbal compounds undergo Phase I and/or Phase II metabolism in vivo, with cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) playing a major role. Some herbal ingredients are substrates of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) which is highly expressed in the intestine, liver, brain and kidney. As such, the activities of these drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters are determining factors for the in vivo bioavailability, disposition and distribution of herbal remedies. There are increasing pharmacokinetic studies of herbal remedies, but these studies are mainly focused on a small number of herbal remedies including St John's wort, milk thistle, sculcap, curcumin, echinacea, ginseng, ginkgo, and ginger. The pharmacokinetic data of a small number of purified herbal ingredients, including anthocyanins, berberine, catechins, curcumin, lutein and quercetin, are available. For the majority of herbal remedies used in folk medicines, data on their disposition and biological fate in humans are lacking or in paucity. For a herbal medicine, the pharmacological effect is achieved when the bioactive agents or the metabolites reach and sustain proper levels at their sites of action. Both the dose levels and fates of active components in the body govern their target-site concentrations after administration of an herbal remedy. In this regard, a safe and optimal use of herbal medicines requires a

  20. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chu-Han; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su; Huang, Yu-Wen; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine should be encouraged because patients are complex, and this complexity results from biological, medical (eg, demographics, genetics, polypharmacy, and multimorbidities), socioeconomic, and cultural factors. Levofloxacin (LVX) is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Awareness of personalized therapeutics for LVX seems to be poor in clinical practice, and is reflected in prescribing patterns. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies have raised concerns about suboptimal patient outcomes with the use of LVX for some Gram-negative infections. Meanwhile, new findings in LVX therapeutics have only been sporadically reported in recent years. Therefore, an updated review on personalized LVX treatment with a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns is necessary. Relevant literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1993 to December 2013. We included studies describing dosage adjustment and factors determining LVX pharmacokinetics, or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies exploring how best to prevent the emergence of resistance to LVX. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. In addition to limiting the use of fluoroquinolones, measures such as reducing the breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, choice of high-dose short-course of once-daily LVX regimen, and tailoring LVX dose in special patient populations help to achieve the validated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and combat the increasing LVX resistance. Obese individuals with normal renal function cleared LVX more efficiently than normal-weight individuals. Compared with the scenario in healthy subjects, standard 2-hour spacing of calcium formulations and oral LVX was insufficient to prevent a chelation interaction in cystic fibrosis patients. Inconsistent conclusions were derived from studies of the influence of sex on the pharmacokinetics of LVX, which might be

  1. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Michael Thurber

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design.

  2. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the cathepsin S inhibitor, LY3000328, in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christopher D; Deeg, Mark A; Chan, Melanie; Tan, Lai Hock; LaBell, Elizabeth Smith; Shen, Tong; DeBrota, David J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LY3000328 when administered as single escalating doses to healthy volunteers. This was a phase 1, placebo-controlled, dose escalation study with LY3000328 in 21 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were administered escalating LY3000328 doses up to 300 mg with food in this single dose study. Blood samples were collected at set times post-dose for the assessment of LY3000328 pharmacokinetics and the measurement of cathepsin S (CatS) activity, CatS mass and calculated CatS specific activity. All doses of LY3000328 were well tolerated, with linear pharmacokinetics up to the 300 mg dose. The pharmacodynamic activity of LY3000328 was measured ex vivo showing a biphasic response to LY3000328, where CatS activity declines, then returns to baseline, and then increases to a level above baseline. CatS mass was also assessed post-dose which increased in a dose-dependent manner, and continued to increase after LY3000328 had been cleared from the body. CatS specific activity was additionally calculated to normalize CatS activity for changes in CatS mass. This demonstrated the increase in CatS activity was attributable to the increase in CatS mass detected in plasma. A specific inhibitor of CatS which is cleared quickly from plasma may produce a transient decrease in plasma CatS activity which is followed by a more prolonged increase in plasma CatS mass which may have implications for the future clinical development of inhibitors of CatS. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Mutant alpha-synuclein causes age-dependent neuropathology in monkey brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weili; Wang, Guohao; Wang, Chuan-En; Guo, Xiangyu; Yin, Peng; Gao, Jinquan; Tu, Zhuchi; Wang, Zhengbo; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xintian; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-05-27

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that often occurs in those over age 60. Although rodents and small animals have been used widely to model PD and investigate its pathology, their short life span makes it difficult to assess the aging-related pathology that is likely to occur in PD patient brains. Here, we used brain tissues from rhesus monkeys at 2-3, 7-8, and >15 years of age to examine the expression of Parkin, PINK1, and α-synuclein, which are known to cause PD via loss- or gain-of-function mechanisms. We found that α-synuclein is increased in the older monkey brains, whereas Parkin and PINK1 are decreased or remain unchanged. Because of the gain of toxicity of α-synuclein, we performed stereotaxic injection of lentiviral vectors expressing mutant α-synuclein (A53T) into the substantia nigra of monkeys and found that aging also increases the accumulation of A53T in neurites and its associated neuropathology. A53T also causes more extensive reactive astrocytes and axonal degeneration in monkey brain than in mouse brain. Using monkey brain tissues, we found that A53T interacts with neurofascin, an adhesion molecule involved in axon subcellular targeting and neurite outgrowth. Aged monkey brain tissues show an increased interaction of neurofascin with A53T. Overexpression of A53T causes neuritic toxicity in cultured neuronal cells, which can be attenuated by transfected neurofascin. These findings from nonhuman primate brains reveal age-dependent pathological and molecular changes that could contribute to the age-dependent neuropathology in PD. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358345-14$15.00/0.

  5. Pharmacokinetic studies of active triterpenoid saponins and the total secondary saponin from Anemone raddeana Regel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Lei, Tianli; Lv, Chongning; Zhao, Huimin; Xu, Haiyan; Lu, Jincai

    2017-02-15

    The rhizome of Anemone raddeana Regel, a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) which has a robust history treating rheumatism and neuralgia. The total secondary saponin (TSS) from it has demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, a rapid and validated LC-MS/MS method was developed to simultaneously determine the active compounds (Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K). Analytes were separated on a reverse-phase C18 column with acetonitrile-water (5mmol/L ammonium acetate) as the mobile phase. This assay showed acceptable linearity (r>0.99) over the concentration range 5-1000 nmol/L for two analytes. The intra- and inter-day precision was within 8.06% and accuracy was ranged from -3.16% to 3.34% for two analytes. The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and IS from rat plasma were all more than 76.0%. Under the developed analytical conditions, the obtained values of main pharmacokinetic parameters (C max and AUC 0-t ) indicated that the pure compounds were more efficient than the TSS extract in Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K absorption. In addition, pharmacokinetic studies of two individual compounds demonstrated their poor oral absorption in rat ( a F%, 0.019-1.521). In the study of absorption and transportation of Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K in Caco-2 cell monolayer model, the uptake permeability was in 10 -6 cm/sec range suggesting poor absorption, which confirmed the previous pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo. Interestingly, the uptake ratio of them declined significantly when treated with phloridzin (SGLT1 inhibitor). It indicated that the absorption of Hederacolchiside A1 in intestine was mainly through positive transport and SGLT1 might participate in its active absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dosing antibiotics in neonates: review of the pharmacokinetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Chaparro, Nazario D; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Greenberg, Rachel G

    2017-09-01

    Antibiotics are often used in neonates despite the absence of relevant dosing information in drug labels. For neonatal dosing, clinicians must extrapolate data from studies for adults and older children, who have strikingly different physiologies. As a result, dosing extrapolation can lead to increased toxicity or efficacy failures in neonates. Driven by these differences and recent legislation mandating the study of drugs in children and neonates, an increasing number of pharmacokinetic studies of antibiotics are being performed in neonates. These studies have led to new dosing recommendations with particular consideration for neonate body size and maturation. Herein, we highlight the available pharmacokinetic data for commonly used systemic antibiotics in neonates.

  7. Early age-dependent impairments of context-dependent extinction learning, object recognition, and object-place learning occur in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiescholleck, Valentina; Emma André, Marion Agnès; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2014-03-01

    The hippocampus is vulnerable to age-dependent memory decline. Multiple forms of memory depend on adequate hippocampal function. Extinction learning comprises active inhibition of no longer relevant learned information concurrent with suppression of a previously learned reaction. It is highly dependent on context, and evidence exists that it requires hippocampal activation. In this study, we addressed whether context-based extinction as well as hippocampus-dependent tasks, such as object recognition and object-place recognition, are equally affected by moderate aging. Young (7-8 week old) and older (7-8 month old) Wistar rats were used. For the extinction study, animals learned that a particular floor context indicated that they should turn into one specific arm (e.g., left) to receive a food reward. On the day after reaching the learning criterion of 80% correct choices, the floor context was changed, no reward was given and animals were expected to extinguish the learned response. Both, young and older rats managed this first extinction trial in the new context with older rats showing a faster extinction performance. One day later, animals were returned to the T-maze with the original floor context and renewal effects were assessed. In this case, only young but not older rats showed the expected renewal effect (lower extinction ratio as compared to the day before). To assess general memory abilities, animals were tested in the standard object recognition and object-place memory tasks. Evaluations were made at 5 min, 1 h and 7 day intervals. Object recognition memory was poor at short-term and intermediate time-points in older but not young rats. Object-place memory performance was unaffected at 5 min, but impaired at 1 h in older but not young rats. Both groups were impaired at 7 days. These findings support that not only aspects of general memory, but also context-dependent extinction learning, are affected by moderate aging. This may reflect less flexibility in

  8. Pharmacokinetic properties and tolerability of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Paul J; Olugemo, Kemi; Solorio, Daniel; Young, Clarence L

    2015-02-01

    This study compared the pharmacokinetic properties and safety profile of low-dose (18- and 35-mg) diclofenac capsules manufactured using SoluMatrix Fine Particle Technology (Trademark of iCeutica Inc. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), and the technology is licensed to Iroko Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) for exclusive use in NSAIDs), which produces submicron-sized drug particles with enhanced dissolution properties, to those of diclofenac potassium immediate-release (IR) 50-mg tablets. This Phase 1, single-center, randomized, open-label, single-dose crossover study was conducted in 40 healthy volunteers. Subjects received, in randomized order, SoluMatrix diclofenac 18- or 35-mg capsules in the fasting condition, SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules under fed conditions, and diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets under fasting and fed conditions. Pharmacokinetic parameters (T(max), C(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞)) were calculated from the concentrations of diclofenac in the plasma. Absorption, food effect, and dose proportionality were determined using a mixed-model ANOVA for C(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞). Tolerability was assessed by recording adverse events, physical examination findings, vital sign measurements: clinical laboratory test results. Overall, 35 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 52 years completed the study. The mean age of the subjects was 33.4 years, and approximately half were men (47.5%). Median T(max) values were similar between the low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules and the diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets (both, ~1.0 hour). The mean maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) after the administration of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules was 26% lower than that with diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets under fasting conditions (868.72 vs 1194.21 ng/mL). The administration of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules was associated with a 23% lower overall systemic exposure compared with that of diclofenac

  9. Human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnider Thomas W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propofol is widely used for both short-term anesthesia and long-term sedation. It has unusual pharmacokinetics because of its high lipid solubility. The standard approach to describing the pharmacokinetics is by a multi-compartmental model. This paper presents the first detailed human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for propofol. Methods PKQuest, a freely distributed software routine http://www.pkquest.com, was used for all the calculations. The "standard human" PBPK parameters developed in previous applications is used. It is assumed that the blood and tissue binding is determined by simple partition into the tissue lipid, which is characterized by two previously determined set of parameters: 1 the value of the propofol oil/water partition coefficient; 2 the lipid fraction in the blood and tissues. The model was fit to the individual experimental data of Schnider et. al., Anesthesiology, 1998; 88:1170 in which an initial bolus dose was followed 60 minutes later by a one hour constant infusion. Results The PBPK model provides a good description of the experimental data over a large range of input dosage, subject age and fat fraction. Only one adjustable parameter (the liver clearance is required to describe the constant infusion phase for each individual subject. In order to fit the bolus injection phase, for 10 or the 24 subjects it was necessary to assume that a fraction of the bolus dose was sequestered and then slowly released from the lungs (characterized by two additional parameters. The average weighted residual error (WRE of the PBPK model fit to the both the bolus and infusion phases was 15%; similar to the WRE for just the constant infusion phase obtained by Schnider et. al. using a 6-parameter NONMEM compartmental model. Conclusion A PBPK model using standard human parameters and a simple description of tissue binding provides a good description of human propofol kinetics. The major advantage of a

  10. The role of heat shock protein 70 in mediating age-dependent mortality in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; Fox, Amy C; Clark, Andrew T; Chang, Nai-Yuan Nicholas; Dominguez, Jessica A; Farris, Alton B; Buchman, Timothy G; Hunt, Clayton R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-03-15

    Sepsis is primarily a disease of the aged, with increased incidence and mortality occurring in aged hosts. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 plays an important role in both healthy aging and the stress response to injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of HSP70 in mediating mortality and the host inflammatory response in aged septic hosts. Sepsis was induced in both young (6- to 12-wk-old) and aged (16- to 17-mo-old) HSP70(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice to determine whether HSP70 modulated outcome in an age-dependent fashion. Young HSP70(-/-) and WT mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia, or Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia had no differences in mortality, suggesting HSP70 does not mediate survival in young septic hosts. In contrast, mortality was higher in aged HSP70(-/-) mice than aged WT mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (p = 0.01), suggesting HSP70 mediates mortality in sepsis in an age-dependent fashion. Compared with WT mice, aged septic HSP70(-/-) mice had increased gut epithelial apoptosis and pulmonary inflammation. In addition, HSP70(-/-) mice had increased systemic levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1β compared with WT mice. These data demonstrate that HSP70 is a key determinant of mortality in aged, but not young hosts in sepsis. HSP70 may play a protective role in an age-dependent response to sepsis by preventing excessive gut apoptosis and both pulmonary and systemic inflammation.

  11. The pharmacokinetics of the interstitial space in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, David G

    2003-01-01

    Background The pharmacokinetics of extracellular solutes is determined by the blood-tissue exchange kinetics and the volume of distribution in the interstitial space in the different organs. This information can be used to develop a general physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model applicable to most extracellular solutes. Methods The human pharmacokinetic literature was surveyed to tabulate the steady state and equilibrium volume of distribution of the solutes mannitol, EDTA, morphi...

  12. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered low-dose rapamycin in healthy dogs: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jeanne C.; Allstadt, Sara D.; Fan, Timothy M.; Khanna, Chand; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina D.; LeBlanc, Amy K.; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacokinetics of orally administered rapamycin in healthy dogs. Animals 5 healthy purpose-bred hounds. Procedures The study consisted of 2 experiments. In experiment 1, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. In experiment 2, each dog received (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once daily for 5 days; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 3, 6, 24, 27, 30, 48, 51, 54, 72, 75, 78, 96, 96.5, 97, 98, 100, 102, 108, 120, 144, and 168 hours after the first dose. Blood rapamycin concentration was determined by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and non-compartmental analyses. Results Mean ± SD blood rapamycin terminal half-life, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 hours after dosing, and maximum concentration were 38.7 ± 12.7 h, 140 ± 23.9 ng•h/mL, and 8.39 ± 1.73 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 1, and 99.5 ± 89.5 h, 126 ± 27.1 ng•h/mL, and 5.49 ± 1.99 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 2. Pharmacokinetic parameters for rapamycin after administration of 5 daily doses differed significantly from those after administration of 1 dose. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated that oral administration of low-dose (0.1 mg/kg) rapamycin to healthy dogs achieved blood concentrations measured in ng/mL. The optimal dose and administration frequency of rapamcyin required to achieve therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing dogs, as well as toxicity after chronic dosing, needs to be determined. PMID:26709938

  13. Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of (R,R)-Methoxyfenoterol in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Siluk, Danuta; Mager, Donald E.; Kim, Hee Seung; Wang, Yan; Furimsky, Anna M.; Ta, Amy; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Green, Carol E.; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    (R,R)-Fenoterol (Fen), a β2-adrenoceptor agonist, is under clinical investigation in the treatment of congestive heart disease. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the 4-methoxyphenyl derivative of (R,R)-Fen, (R,R)-MFen, have been determined following intravenous and oral administration to the rat and compared with corresponding results obtained with (R,R)-Fen. Results of the study suggest that (R,R)-MFen can offer pharmacokinetic and metabolic advantages in comparison to an earlier (R,R)-...

  14. Instruments for radiation measurement in life sciences (4). VI. Use of Accelerator mass spectrometry in studies on drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2005-01-01

    Non-clinical and clinical uses of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are described mainly on studies of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics from a view of new drug development. AMS is applicable as a highly sensitive method to measure plasma drug concentrations. Measurement of 14 C-labeled compounds less than 1 dpm/sample or of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), in combination of AMS and radioimmunoassay without radioactive waste release is described as an example. Cases of measuring DNA-adduct are also described involving human studies using 14 C-mutagen (a quinoxaline derivative derived from burned amino acid, given in a microdose of 304 ng/kg, 4.3 μCi/body). Plasma concentration measurement, mass balance study and metabolite identification of 14 C-GI1817771 (a drug candidate) are a typical AMS application for a pharmacokinetic study in human in a microdose (121 Bq/body). Metabolites of 14 C-compound A in rat platelet are identified by the author. As above, AMS makes it possible to conduct the pharmacokinetic study in human at a microdose with no significant radiation exposure, which will promote the efficient new drug development. (N.I.)

  15. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary activity of the anti-IGF-1R antibody figitumumab (CP-751,871) in patients with sarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma: a phase 1 expansion cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, David; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Molife, L Rhoda; Okuno, Scott H; Schuetze, Scott M; Paccagnella, M Luisa; Batzel, Gretchen N; Yin, Donghua; Pritchard-Jones, Kathryn; Judson, Ian; Worden, Francis P; Gualberto, Antonio; Scurr, Michelle; de Bono, Johann S; Haluska, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Figitumumab is a fully human IgG2 monoclonal antibody targeting the insulin-like growth-factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Preclinical data suggest a dependence on insulin-like growth-factor signalling for sarcoma subtypes, including Ewing's sarcoma, and early reports show antitumour activity of IGF-1R-targeting drugs in these diseases. Between January, 2006, and August, 2008, patients with refractory, advanced sarcomas received figitumumab (20 mg/kg) in two single-stage expansion cohorts within a solid-tumour phase 1 trial. The first cohort (n=15) included patients with multiple sarcoma subtypes, age 18 years or older, and the second cohort (n=14) consisted of patients with refractory Ewing's sarcoma, age 9 years or older. The primary endpoint was to assess the safety and tolerability of figitumumab. Secondary endpoints included pharmacokinetic profiling and preliminary antitumour activity (best response by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours [RECIST]) in evaluable patients who received at least one dose of medication. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00474760. 29 patients, 16 of whom had Ewing's sarcoma, were enrolled and received a total of 177 cycles of treatment (median 2, mean 6.1, range 1-24). Grade 3 deep venous thrombosis, grade 3 back pain, and grade 3 vomiting were each noted once in individual patients; one patient had grade 3 increases in aspartate aminotransferase and gammaglutamyltransferase concentrations. This patient also had grade 4 increases in alanine aminotransferase concentrations. The only other grade 4 adverse event was raised concentrations of uric acid, noted in one patient. Pharmacokinetics were comparable between patients with sarcoma and those with other solid tumours. 28 patients were assessed for response; two patients, both with Ewing's sarcoma, had objective responses (one complete response and one partial response) and eight patients had disease stabilisation (six with Ewing's sarcoma, one with

  16. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of varenicline in healthy adolescent smokers: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faessel, Helene; Ravva, Patanjali; Williams, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Varenicline is approved as an aid to smoking cessation in adults aged > or =18 years. The goal of this study was to characterize the multiple-dose pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of varenicline in adolescent smokers. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study enrolled healthy 12- to 16-year-old smokers (> or =3 cigarettes daily) into high-body-weight (>55 kg) and low-body-weight (daily. The apparent renal clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) of varenicline and the effect of body weight on these parameters were estimated using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The high-body-weight group consisted of 35 subjects (65.7% male; 77.1% white; mean age, 15.2 years). The low-body-weight group consisted of 37 subjects (37.8% male; 48.6% white; mean age, 14.3 years). The pharmacokinetic parameters of varenicline were dose proportional over the dose range from 0.5 to 2 mg/d. The CL/F for a 70-kg adolescent was 10.4 L/h, comparable to that in a 70-kg adult. The estimated varenicline V/F was decreased in individuals of small body size, thus predicting a varenicline C(max) approximately 30% greater in low-body-weight subjects than in high-body-weight subjects. In high-body-weight subjects, steady-state varenicline exposure, as represented by the AUC(0-24), was 197.0 ng . h/mL for varenicline 1 mg BID and 95.7 ng . h/mL for varenicline 0.5 mg BID, consistent with values reported previously in adult smokers at the equivalent doses. In low-body-weight subjects, varenicline exposure was 126.3 ng . h/mL for varenicline 0.5 mg BID and 60.1 ng . h/mL for varenicline 0.5 mg once daily, values at the lower end of the range observed previously in adults at doses of 1 mg BID and 0.5 mg BID, respectively. Among high-body-weight subjects, adverse events (AEs) were reported by 57.1% of subjects in both the high- and low-dose varenicline groups and by 14.3% of subjects in the placebo group; among low-body-weight subjects, AEs

  17. The pharmacokinetics of enteral antituberculosis drugs in patients requiring intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegelenberg, C F N; Nortje, A; Lalla, U; Enslin, A; Irusen, E M; Rosenkranz, B; Seifart, H I; Bolliger, C T

    2013-04-05

    There is a paucity of data on the pharmacokinetics of fixed-dose combination enteral antituberculosis treatment in critically ill patients. To establish the pharmacokinetic profile of a fixed-dose combination of rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol given according to weight via a nasogastric tube to patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a prospective, observational study on 10 patients (mean age 32 years, 6 male) admitted to an ICU and treated for tuberculosis (TB). Serum concentrations of the drugs were determined at eight predetermined intervals over 24 hours by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. The therapeutic maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) for rifampicin at time to peak concentration was achieved in only 4 patients, whereas 2 did not achieve therapeutic Cmax for isoniazid. No patient reached sub-therapeutic Cmax for pyrazinamide (6 were within and 4 above therapeutic range). Three patients reached sub-therapeutic Cmax for ethambutol, and 6 patients were within and 1 above the therapeutic range. Patients with a sub-therapeutic rifampicin level had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score (p=0.03) and a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (p=0.03). A fixed-dose combination tablet, crushed and mixed with water, given according to weight via a nasogastric tube to patients with TB admitted to an ICU resulted in sub-therapeutic rifampicin plasma concentrations in the majority of patients, whereas the other drugs had a more favourable pharmacokinetic profile. Patients with a sub-therapeutic rifampicin concentration had a higher APACHE II score and a lower estimated GFR, which may contribute to suboptimal outcomes in critically ill patients. Studies in other settings have reported similar proportions of patients with 'sub-therapeutic' rifampicin concentrations.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in pigs after intravenous and intramuscular administration of a single dose of 8 mg/kg: dose proportionality, influence of the age of the animals and urinary elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M; Paulin, A; Dron, F; Woehrlé, F

    2014-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in pigs were evaluated as a function of dose and animal age following intravenous and intramuscular administration of a 16% solution (Forcyl(®) ). The absolute bioavailability of marbofloxacin as well as the dose proportionality was evaluated in 27-week-old fattening pigs. Blood PK and urinary excretion of marbofloxacin were evaluated after a single intramuscular dose of 8 mg/kg in 16-week-old male pigs. An additional group of 12-week-old weaned piglets was used for the evaluation of age-related kinetics. The plasma and urine concentration of marbofloxacin was determined using a HPLC method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental methods. After intravenous administration in 27-week-old fattening pigs, the total body clearance was 0.065 L/h·kg. After intramuscular administration to the same animals, the mean observed Cmax was 6.30 μg/mL, and the AUCINF was 115 μg·h/mL. The absolute bioavailability was 91.5%, and dose proportionality was shown within the dose range of 4-16 mg/kg. The renal clearance was about half of the value of the total clearance. The total systemic clearance values significantly decreased as a function of age, being 0.092 L/h·kg and 0.079 L/h·kg in pigs aged 12 and 16 weeks, respectively. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution of the Illegal Food Colorant Rhodamine B in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Yi; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-02-08

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) demonstrated rhodamine B as a potential carcinogen in 1978. Nevertheless, rhodamine B has been illegally used as a colorant in food in many countries. Few pharmacokinetic and toxicological investigations have been performed since the first pharmacokinetic study on rhodamine B in 1961. The aims of this study were to develop a simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for the quantitative detection of rhodamine B in the plasma and organs of rats and to estimate its pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. The results demonstrated that the oral bioavailabilities of rhodamine B were 28.3 and 9.8% for the low-dose and high-dose exposures, respectively. Furthermore, rhodamine B was highly accumulated in the liver and, to a lesser extent, the kidney, but was undetectable in the brain. These results provide useful information for improving the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of rhodamine B, supporting additional food safety evaluations.

  20. Plasma Pharmacokinetics of Polyphenols in a Traditional Japanese Medicine, Jumihaidokuto, Which Suppresses Propionibacterium acnes-Induced Dermatitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsumoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most orally administered polyphenols are metabolized, with very little absorbed as aglycones and/or unchanged forms. Metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies are therefore necessary to understand the pharmacological mechanisms of polyphenols. Jumihaidokuto (JHT, a traditional Japanese medicine, has been used for treatment of skin diseases including inflammatory acne. Because JHT contains various types of bioactive polyphenols, our aim was to clarify the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the polyphenols in JHT and identify active metabolites contributing to its antidermatitis effects. Orally administered JHT inhibited the increase in ear thickness in rats induced by intradermal injection of Propionibacterium acnes. Quantification by LC-MS/MS indicated that JHT contains various types of flavonoids and is also rich in hydrolysable tannins, such as 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl glucose. Pharmacokinetic and antioxidant analyses showed that some flavonoid conjugates, such as genistein 7-O-glucuronide and liquiritigenin 7-O-glucuronide, appeared in rat plasma and had an activity to inhibit hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation. Furthermore, 4-O-methylgallic acid, a metabolite of Gallic acid, appeared in rat plasma and inhibited the nitric oxide reaction. JHT has numerous polyphenols; it inhibited dermatitis probably via the antioxidant effect of its metabolites. Our study is beneficial for understanding in vivo actions of orally administered polyphenol drugs.

  1. The Lack of Effect of Food on the Pharmacokinetics of ZX008 (Fenfluramine Oral Solution): Results of a Single-dose, Two-period Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammaitoni, Arnold; Smith, Steven; Boyd, Brooks

    2018-06-22

    Fenfluramine is being developed as a low-dose adjunctive treatment for seizures in patients with Dravet syndrome and other epileptic encephalopathies, including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Most patients with Dravet syndrome receive multiple antiepileptic drugs, making it challenging for caregivers to track correct administration times. The present Phase I study was conducted to determine the effect of food on the pharmacokinetic properties of fenfluramine. Healthy nonsmoking subjects aged 18 to 50years were enrolled in an open-label, crossover, Phase I pharmacokinetic and safety profile study and received 2 single 0.8-mg/kg doses of ZX008 (fenfluramine hydrochloride oral solution), 1 after a 10-hour overnight fast and the other 30 minutes after the start of consumption of a high-fat breakfast, in a randomly assigned order. A washout period of at least 9days separated the 2 treatment periods. Venous blood samples were taken before each dose and periodically for 72hours after each dose for determination of concentrations of fenfluramine and its active metabolite norfenfluramine. Plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated for each subject by noncompartmental analysis. In the 13 subjects completing both treatment periods, food had no effect on the rate or extent of absorption and bioavailability of fenfluramine as assessed by fed vs fasted adjusted geometric mean observed plasma C max (59.1vs 56.7 ng/mL; NS) and AUC 0-∞ (1640vs 1600 ng · h/mL; NS). Additionally, there was no impact of food on systemic exposure of norfenfluramine. Seven subjects reported at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event; all treatment-emergent adverse events were mild in severity. The bioequivalence and tolerability of single 0.8-mg/kg oral doses of ZX008 in the fed and fasted states support ZX008 administration without regard to meals. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Econometric model for age- and population-dependent radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Rogers, V.C.

    1991-01-01

    The economic impact associated with ionizing radiation exposures in a given human population depends on numerous factors including the individual's mean economic status as a function age, the age distribution of the population, the future life expectancy at each age, and the latency period for the occurrence of radiation-induced health effects. A simple mathematical model has been developed that provides an analytical methodology for estimating the societal econometrics associated with radiation effects are to be assessed and compared for economic evaluation

  3. State-age-dependent maintenance policies for deteriorating systems with Erlang sojourn time distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates state-age-dependent maintenance policies for multistate deteriorating systems with Erlang sojourn time distributions. Since Erlang distributions are serial combinations of exponential phases, the deteriorating process can be modeled by a multi-phase Markovian model and hence easily analyzed. Based on the Markovian model, the optimal phase-dependent inspection and replacement policy can be obtained by using a policy improvement algorithm. However, since phases are fictitious and can not be identified by inspections, two procedures are developed to construct state-age-dependent policies based on the optimal phase-dependent policy. The properties of the constructed state-age-dependent policies are further investigated and the performance of the policy is evaluated through a numerical example

  4. Age- and Gene-Dosage–Dependent Cre-Induced Abnormalities in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lizhi; Marioutina, Mariya; Dunaief, Joshua L.; Marneros, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    To conditionally inactivate genes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transgenic mouse strains have been developed, in which Cre recombinase (Cre) expression is driven by an RPE-specific gene promoter. The RPE is a quiescent epithelium, and continuous expression of Cre could affect its function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that continuous postnatal Cre expression in the RPE may lead to cellular abnormalities, which may depend on both age and Cre gene dosage. We therefore examined the eyes of homozygous and heterozygous VMD2-Cre mice at various ages. In VMD2-Cre heterozygous mice variable progressive age-dependent RPE abnormalities were noticed, including attenuation of phalloidin and cytoplasmic active β-catenin staining, reduced cell size, and loss of the typical honeycomb pattern of RPE morphology in those RPE cells that stained for Cre. These morphological RPE abnormalities were not noticed in Cre-negative RPE cells in VMD2-Cre or age-matched control mice. In addition, an abnormal number and morphology of cell nuclei were noticed in a subset of Cre-expressing RPE cells in aged heterozygous VMD2-Cre mice, whereas more severe nuclear abnormalities were observed already in young homozygous VMD2-Cre mice. Thus, continuous postnatal expression of Cre causes abnormalities in the RPE in an age- and Cre gene dosage-dependent manner, which needs to be considered in the interpretation of gene targeting studies in the RPE. PMID:24854863

  5. Pharmacokinetic interaction between udenafil and dapoxetine: a randomized, open-labeled crossover study in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yo Han Kim,1 Hee Youn Choi,1 Shi Hyang Lee,1 Hae Sun Jeon,1 Hyeong-Seok Lim,1 Mi Young Bahng,2 Kyun-Seop Bae1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, 2Clinical Development Department, Dong-A ST Co, Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: “Udenafil” is a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor indicated for erectile dysfunction. “Dapoxetine” is a serotonin transport inhibitor indicated for premature ejaculation. The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the pharmacokinetic drug interaction between udenafil and dapoxetine in healthy male subjects. Methods: An open-label, three-treatment, six-sequence, three-period crossover study was performed in healthy male subjects. In varying sequences, each subjects received single oral doses of udenafil 200 mg, dapoxetine 60 mg, and both treatments. The periods were separated by a washout period of 7 days. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours after dosing. The plasma concentrations of udenafil and dapoxetine were determined using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by non-compartmental analysis. Tolerability was assessed throughout the study. Results: Twenty-three healthy subjects completed the study. The geometric mean ratios of the area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to last measurable time point and measured peak plasma concentration for udenafil were 0.923 (90% confidence interval [CI]: 0.863–0.987 and 0.864 (90% CI: 0.789–0.947, respectively. The geometric mean ratios of the area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to last measurable time point and measured peak plasma concentration for dapoxetine were 1.125 (90% CI: 1.044–1.213 and 0.837 (90% CI: 0.758–0.925, respectively. There were no serious adverse events reported, and none of the subjects dropped out due to adverse events

  6. Age and dosage-level dependence of radium retention in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, N.J.; Pool, R.R.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    Radium retention was measured over the lifespan of 46 beagles exposed by eight semimonthly injections at 60 to 160, 120 to 220, or 435 to 535 days of age. Injection dosage levels ranged from 0.37 to 10 μCi of 226 Ra/kg. The fractional retention of each animal is described in terms of a modified power function, R = [(t + d)/d] - /sup b/. Young adult beagles (approximately equal to 10 kg) injected at a mean age (A) of 485 days with 226 Ra at dosage levels of 10, 3.3, 1.11, and 0.37 μCi/kg had mean values for d and b of [0.897; 0.187], [2.015; 0.206], [2.778; 0.257], and [3.894; 0.274], respectively. Juvenile beagles injected with 10 μCi/kg at A = 110 days (average weight approximately equal to 6 kg) and at A = 170 days (average weight approximately equal to 10 kg) had mean values for d and b of [137; 0.277] and [5.53; 0.086], respectively. The d values are geometric means and the units are days; b values are arithmetic means. The formula for deriving the age-dependent retention function for dogs is given. The beagle results were correlated with human data in terms of age-to-equivalent fraction of adult body calcium content and were used to construct a similar age-dependent retention function for chronically exposed people. The correlation of age-dependent retention functions for beagles and humans is used to estimate scaling factors between the two species for the fraction of injected dosage associated with bone for various ages of exposure

  7. In vivo pharmacokinetic study comparing different methodologies for labelling of Annexin V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Josefina da Silva; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Couto, Renata Martinussi; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de Araujo

    2008-01-01

    In this work we preliminary results of the evaluation of the influence of the chelating in the pharmacokinetics of ANXA5 radiolabeled with technetium-99m in Swiss mice and using HYNIC and EC as bifunctional chelators are showed

  8. [Diagnostic value of quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters in breast lesions with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T T; Liu, W H; Zhang, Y Q; Li, L H; Wang, R; Ye, Y Y

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To explore the differential between the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative pharmacokinetic quantitative parameters in breast lesions. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 255 patients(262 breast lesions) who was obtained by clinical palpation , ultrasound or full-field digital mammography , and then all lessions were pathologically confirmed in Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University from May 2012 to May 2016. A 3.0 T MRI scanner was used to obtain the quantitative MR pharmacokinetic parameters: volume transfer constant (K(trans)), exchange rate constant (k(ep))and extravascular extracellular volume fraction (V(e)). And measured the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters of normal glands tissues which on the same side of the same level of the lesions; and then calculated the value of relative pharmacokinetic parameters: rK(rans)、rk(ep) and rV(e).To explore the diagnostic value of two pharmacokinetic parameters in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions using receiver operating curves and model of logistic regression. Results: (1)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in K(trans) and k(ep) ( t =15.489, 15.022, respectively, P 0.05). The areas under the ROC curve(AUC)of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) between malignant and benign lesions were 0.933, 0.948 and 0.387, the sensitivity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 77.1%, 85.0%, 51.0% , and the specificity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 96.3%, 93.6%, 60.8% for the differential diagnosis of breast lesions if taken the maximum Youden's index as cut-off. (2)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in rK(trans), rk(ep) and rV(e) ( t =14.177, 11.726, 2.477, respectively, P quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and the prediction probability of relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters( Z =0.867, P =0.195). Conclusion: There was no significant

  9. Isolation, characterization, and in rats plasma pharmacokinetic study of a new triterpenoid saponin from Dianthus superbus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yina; Xu, Xiaobao; Zhang, Qianlan; Lu, Yongzhuang; Li, Ximin; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2017-02-01

    One new oleanolic acid triterpenoid saponin, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl olean-11, 13(18)-diene-23,28-dioic acid, (hereafter referred to as DS-1) was isolated from the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Dianthus superbus (D. superbus). DS-1 plays an important role in the bioactivity of D. superbus. Thus, a sensitive, reliable and accurate reversed-phased liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in negative ion mode was developed and validated for the quantification and pharmacokinetic study of DS-1 in rats plasma. The pharmacokinetic profile showed that DS-1 was rapidly absorbed and eliminated in plasma, indicating that significant accumulation of the compound in biological specimen is unlikely. In addition, poor absorption into systemic circulation was observed after oral administration of DS-1, resulting in low absolute bioavailability (0.92 %).

  10. Dependence on age at intake of committed dose equivalents from radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, N.

    1981-01-01

    The dependence of committed dose equivalents on age at intake is needed to assess the significance of exposures of young persons among the general public resulting from inhaled or ingested radionuclides. The committed dose equivalents, evaluated using ICRP principles, depend on the body dimensions of the young person at the time of intake of a radionuclide and on subsequent body growth. Representation of growth by a series of exponential segments facilitates the derivation of general expressions for the age dependence of committed dose equivalents if metabolic models do not change with age. The additional assumption that intakes of radionuclides in air or food are proportional to a person's energy expenditure (implying age-independent dietary composition) enables the demonstration that the age of the most highly exposed 'critical groups' of the general public from these radionuclides is either about 1 year or 17 years. With the above assumptions the exposure of the critical group is less than three times the exposure of adult members of the general public. Approximate values of committed dose equivalents which avoid both underestimation and excessive overestimation are shown to be obtainable by simplified procedures. Modified procedures are suggested for use if metabolic models change with age. (author)

  11. uSIMPK. An Excel for Windows-based simulation program for instruction of basic pharmacokinetics principles to pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocks, Dion R

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacokinetics can be a challenging topic to teach due to the complex relationships inherent between physiological parameters, mathematical descriptors and equations, and their combined impact on shaping the blood fluid concentration vs. time curves of drugs. A computer program was developed within Microsoft Excel for Windows, designed to assist in the instruction of basic pharmacokinetics within an entry-to-practice pharmacy class environment. The program is composed of a series of spreadsheets (modules) linked by Visual Basic for Applications, intended to illustrate the relationships between pharmacokinetic and in some cases physiological parameters, doses and dose rates and the drug blood fluid concentration vs. time curves. Each module is accompanied by a simulation user's guide, prompting the user to change specific independent parameters and then observe the impact of the change(s) on the drug concentration vs. time curve and on other dependent parameters. "Slider" (or "scroll") bars can be selected to readily see the effects of repeated changes on the dependencies. Topics covered include one compartment single dose administration (iv bolus, oral, short infusion), intravenous infusion, repeated doses, renal and hepatic clearance, nonlinear elimination, two compartment model, plasma protein binding and the relationship between pharmacokinetics and drug effect. The program has been used in various forms in the classroom over a number of years, with positive ratings generally being received from students for its use in the classroom. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Injury-related hospital admissions of military dependents compared with similarly aged nonmilitary insured infants, children, and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Joyce C; Dawson, Patrick; Carpenter, Dustin J

    2012-10-01

    Military deployment of one or both parents is associated with declines in school performance, behavioral difficulties, and increases in reported mental health conditions, but less is known regarding injury risks in pediatric military dependents. Kid Health Care Cost and Utilization Project 2006 (KID) was used to identify military dependents aged 0.1 year to 17 years through expected insurance payer being CHAMPUS, Tricare, or CHAMPVA (n = 12,310) and similarly aged privately insured nonmilitary in CHAMPUS, Tricare, or CHAMPVA states (n = 730,065). Mental health diagnoses per 1,000 hospitalizations and mechanisms of injury per 1,000 injury-related hospitalizations are reported. Unweighted univariate analyses used Fisher's exact, χ(2), and analysis of variance tests for significance. Odds ratios are age and sex adjusted with 95% confidence intervals. Injury-related admissions were higher in military than in nonmilitary dependents (15.5% vs. 13.2%, p sex-adjusted motor vehicle occupant and pedestrian injuries were significantly lower in all-age military dependents but not in age-stratified categories. Very young military dependents had higher all-cause injury admissions (p < 0.0001), drowning/near drowning (p < 0.0001), and intracranial injury (p < 0.0001) and showed a tendency toward higher suffocation (p = 0.055) and crushing injury (p = 0.065). Military adolescents and teenagers had higher suicide/suicide attempts (p = 0.0001) and poisonings from medicinal substances (p = 0.0001). Mental health diagnoses were significantly higher in every age category of military dependents. All-cause in-hospital mortality tended to be greater in military than in nonmilitary dependents (p = 0.052). This study suggests that military dependents are a vulnerable population with special needs and provides clues to areas where injury prevention professionals might begin to address their needs. Prognostic/epidemiologic study, level II.

  13. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Voriconazole To Develop an Alternative Dosing Regimen in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastine, Silke; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Müller, Carsten; Farowski, Fedja; Bader, Peter; Ullmann-Moskovits, Judith; Cornely, Oliver A; Groll, Andreas H; Hempel, Georg

    2018-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic variability of voriconazole (VCZ) in immunocompromised children is high, and adequate exposure, particularly in the first days of therapy, is uncertain. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to explore VCZ exposure in plasma after alternative dosing regimens. Concentration data were obtained from a pediatric phase II study. Nonlinear mixed effects modeling was used to develop the model. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to test an array of three-times-daily (TID) intravenous dosing regimens in children 2 to 12 years of age. A two-compartment model with first-order absorption, nonlinear Michaelis-Menten elimination, and allometric scaling best described the data (maximal kinetic velocity for nonlinear Michaelis-Menten clearance [ V max ] = 51.5 mg/h/70 kg, central volume of distribution [ V 1 ] = 228 liters/70 kg, intercompartmental clearance [ Q ] = 21.9 liters/h/70 kg, peripheral volume of distribution [ V 2 ] = 1,430 liters/70 kg, bioavailability [ F ] = 59.4%, K m = fixed value of 1.15 mg/liter, absorption rate constant = fixed value of 1.19 h -1 ). Interindividual variabilities for V max , V 1 , Q , and F were 63.6%, 45.4%, 67%, and 1.34% on a logit scale, respectively, and residual variability was 37.8% (proportional error) and 0.0049 mg/liter (additive error). Monte Carlo simulations of a regimen of 9 mg/kg of body weight TID simulated for 24, 48, and 72 h followed by 8 mg/kg two times daily (BID) resulted in improved early target attainment relative to that with the currently recommended BID dosing regimen but no increased rate of accumulation thereafter. Pharmacokinetic modeling suggests that intravenous TID dosing at 9 mg/kg per dose for up to 3 days may result in a substantially higher percentage of children 2 to 12 years of age with adequate exposure to VCZ early during treatment. Before implementation of this regimen in patients, however, validation of exposure, safety, and tolerability in a carefully designed

  14. Extrinsic skin ageing in German, Chinese and Japanese women manifests differently in all three groups depending on ethnic background, age and anatomical site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierkötter, Andrea; Hüls, Anke; Yamamoto, Ai; Stolz, Sabine; Krämer, Ursula; Matsui, Mary S; Morita, Akimichi; Wang, Sijia; Li, Zhiwen; Jin, Li; Krutmann, Jean; Schikowski, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that extrinsic skin ageing manifests differently in Caucasians versus East Asians. In particular, from previous studies it was concluded that Caucasians are more prone to develop wrinkles, whereas pigment spot formation is the hallmark of extrinsic skin ageing in East Asians. However, these assumptions are based on a very limited number of studies which did not include different East Asian populations. We here compare the manifestation of extrinsic skin ageing signs in German, Japanese and Chinese women by specifically elucidating the age and anatomical site dependence of any potential ethnic difference. In the present study, we assessed skin ageing in N=902 German, N=165 Japanese and N=1260 Chinese women ranging from 30 to 90 years by means of SCINEXA™. Linear regression analysis was used to test for ethnic differences and their age and site dependence adjusted for educational level, sun exposure, smoking and sun protection behaviours. Pigment spots and wrinkles on the face were present among all three ethnic groups and differences were influenced by age and anatomical sites independently of further influencing factors. Pigment spots on the forehead were most pronounced over the whole age range in Chinese and German women and least developed in Japanese. Pigment spots on cheeks were a typical extrinsic skin an ageing sign in the two East Asian populations in all age groups. However, in older German women they reach the same level as observed in the two East Asian populations. In contrast, pigment spots on arms and hands were significantly more pronounced in German women ≥45years of age. Wrinkles were not exclusively a skin an ageing sign of German women, but were also very pronounced in Chinese women on forehead, between the eyebrows and in the crow's feet area. These results corroborate the previous notion that the occurrence of pigments spots and wrinkles is different between Caucasians and East Asians. In addition, this study shows

  15. Pharmacokinetic interaction between scutellarin and valsartan in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming-Yu; Tian, Chong-Chong; Ju, Ai-Xia; Zhang, Chun-Ting; Li, Qiu-Hong

    2013-04-01

    Scutellarin is the main effective constituent of breviscapine, a flavonoid mixture isolated from the dried whole plant of Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz, and valsartan is used as an antihypertensive drug. These two drugs have already been clinically used together to treat diabetic nephropathy (DN) in China, and the combined medications showed some enhanced protection against DN. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential pharmacokinetic interaction between scutellarin and valsartan in rats. Breviscapine injection (20 mg x kg(-1), i.v.) and valsartan (15 mg x kg-, i.g.), either alone or together were given to 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Concentrations of scutellarin and valsartan were quantified by HPLC, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental methods. We found that the pharmacokinetic parameters of scutellarin altered significantly after co-administration of oral valsartan. The plasma clearance (CL(p)) and the bile clearance (CL(b)) of scutellarin were reduced significantly in the presence of valsartan. After oral administration of valsartan with or without intravenous scutellarin, however, the pharmacokinetic parameters of valsartan were comparable. In conclusion, our data suggests that the concurrent use of valsartan reduces the biliary excretion of scutellarin, and this may be due to the inhibitory effect of valsartan on the biliary excretion of scutellarin mediated by Mrp2 (Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2).

  16. Autoradiographic investigation of age-dependent proliferation kinetics in the mucosa of rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranz, D.; Laue, R.; Fuhrmann, I.

    1980-01-01

    Aging of cells depends on mitotic activity which is particularly evident in multicellular organisms. The cell kinetics of the mucosa of the small intestine in a total of 244 Wistar rats aged 6 days, 6 weeks, 6, 12, 23 and 28 months, resp., were studied histoautoradiographically. It could be demonstrated that the regeneration rate of cells per hour in the crypts of the small intestine and the migration velocity of the enterocytes differ in young and old individuals, and that the intermitotic cells have age-dependent properties as well. In addition, it could be proved that intermitotic cells have a non growth fraction, too, which, at an advanced age, decreases only slightly although significantly in terms of statistics. For the easily vulnerable crypt epithelium it is a reserve capacity and ban be included in the proliferating pool if necessary. (author)

  17. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, interspecies scaling, and pharmacokinetics of a Phase I clinical trial of TTAC-0001, a fully human monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee WS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Weon Sup Lee,1 Sang Ryeol Shim,1 Seon Young Lee,1 Jin San Yoo,1 Sung Kweon Cho2 1PharmAbcine, Inc., Daejeon, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Health Sciences and Technology, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: VEGF is a highly selective mitogen that serves as the central regulator of tumor angiogenesis by mediating endothelial proliferation, permeability, and survival. Tanibirumab (TTAC-0001 is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody derived from a fully human naïve single-chain variable fragment (ScFv phage library that was developed to inhibit the effects of VEGF in the treatment of solid tumors, especially those of the brain. Methods: In the present study, we conducted intravenous pharmacokinetic studies of TTAC-0001 in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys. At the doses studied (3 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg, TTAC-0001 exhibited dose proportionality in mice and monkeys. At a dose of ~10 mg/kg, the clearance of TTAC-0001 from serum was 0.017 mL/h in mice, 0.35 mL/h in rats, and 2.19 mL/h in cynomolgus monkeys, and the terminal half-life ranged from 20–30 h among the three species. Pharmacokinetic data in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys were used to predict the pharmacokinetics of TTAC-0001 in humans using allometric scaling. The predicted serum clearance of TTAC-0001 in humans was 102.45 mL/h and the terminal half-life was 27.52 h. Results: The maximum life span-corrected clearance value was 72.92 mL/h. The observed clearance in humans was more similar to the predicted scaled clearance. Conclusion: We investigated the pharmacokinetics of TTAC-0001 in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys after intravenous administration. At the doses studied, TTAC-0001 exhibited dose proportionality in mice and monkeys. The scaled pharmacokinetics of TTAC-0001 reported here was useful for designing first-in-human studies. Allometric scaling in the therapeutic antibody is feasible. Keywords: VEGF2, tanibirumab, pharmacokinetics

  18. The pharmacokinetic study of rutin in rat plasma based on an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical method based on a directly electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO film coated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE was developed for the rapid and convenient determination of rutin in plasma. ERGO was modified on the surface of GCE by one-step electro-deposition method. Electrochemical behavior of rutin on ERGO/GCE indicated that rutin underwent a surface-controlled quasi-reversible process and the electrochemical parameters such as charge transfer coefficient (α, electron transfer number (n and electrode reaction standard rate constant (ks were 0.53, 2 and 3.4 s−1, respectively. The electrochemical sensor for rutin in plasma provided a wide linear response range of 4.70×10−7−1.25×10−5 M with the detection limit (s/n=3 of 1.84×10−8 M. The assay was successfully used to the pharmacokinetic study of rutin. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as elimination rate half-life (t1/2, area under curve (AUC, and plasma clearance (CL were calculated to be 3.345±0.647 min, 5750±656.0 µg min/mL, and 5.891±0.458 mL/min/kg, respectively. The proposed method utilized a small sample volume of 10 μL and had no complicated sample pretreatment (without deproteinization, which was simple, eco-friendly, and time- and cost-efficient for rutin pharmacokinetic studies.

  19. Accelerated Brain DCE-MRI Using Iterative Reconstruction With Total Generalized Variation Penalty for Quantitative Pharmacokinetic Analysis: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Kirkpatrick, John P; Chang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using undersampled k-space data and an iterative image reconstruction method with total generalized variation penalty in the quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis for clinical brain dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Eight brain dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scans were retrospectively studied. Two k-space sparse sampling strategies were designed to achieve a simulated image acquisition acceleration factor of 4. They are (1) a golden ratio-optimized 32-ray radial sampling profile and (2) a Cartesian-based random sampling profile with spatiotemporal-regularized sampling density constraints. The undersampled data were reconstructed to yield images using the investigated reconstruction technique. In quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the rate constant K trans in the extended Tofts model and blood flow F B and blood volume V B from the 2-compartment exchange model were analyzed. Finally, the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters calculated from the undersampled data were compared with the corresponding calculated values from the fully sampled data. To quantify each parameter's accuracy calculated using the undersampled data, error in volume mean, total relative error, and cross-correlation were calculated. The pharmacokinetic parameter maps generated from the undersampled data appeared comparable to the ones generated from the original full sampling data. Within the region of interest, most derived error in volume mean values in the region of interest was about 5% or lower, and the average error in volume mean of all parameter maps generated through either sampling strategy was about 3.54%. The average total relative error value of all parameter maps in region of interest was about 0.115, and the average cross-correlation of all parameter maps in region of interest was about 0.962. All investigated pharmacokinetic parameters had no significant differences between

  20. The pharmacokinetic behaviour of hypoxoside taken orally by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measured with a high-performance liquid chromatography . method. For the ... the South African Medicines Control Council to conduct a phase I pharmacokinetic and ... The significance of various factors that influence the pharmacokinetic ...

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interaction for a binary mixture of chlorpyrifos and diazinon in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchalk, C.; Poet, T.S.; Hinman, M.N.; Busby, A.L.; Kousba, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) are two commonly used organophosphorus (OP) insecticides and a potential exists for concurrent exposures. The primary neurotoxic effects from OP pesticide exposures result from the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic impact of acute binary exposures of rats to CPF and DZN was evaluated in this study. Rats were orally administered CPF, DZN, or a CPF/DZN mixture (0, 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg) and blood (plasma and RBC), and brain were collected at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h postdosing, urine was also collected at 24 h. Chlorpyrifos, DZN, and their respective metabolites, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMHP), were quantified in blood and/or urine and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition was measured in brain, RBC, and plasma. Coexposure to CPF/DZN at the low dose of 15/15 mg/kg did not alter the pharmacokinetics of CPF, DZN, or their metabolites in blood. A high binary dose of 60/60 mg/kg increased the C max and AUC and decreased the clearance for both parent compounds, likely due to competition between CPF and DZN for CYP450 metabolism. At lower doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental exposures, the pharmacokinetics were linear. A dose-dependent inhibition of ChE was noted in tissues for both the single and coexposures, and the extent of inhibition was plasma > RBC ≥ brain. The overall relative potency for ChE inhibition was CPF/DZN > CPF > DZN. A comparison of the ChE response at the low binary dose (15/15 mg/kg), where there were no apparent pharmacokinetic interactions, suggested that the overall ChE response was additive. These experiments represent important data concerning the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions for pesticide mixtures and will provide needed insight for assessing the potential cumulative risk associated with occupational or environmental exposures to these insecticides

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Naja sumatrana (equatorial spitting cobra venom and its major toxins in experimentally envenomed rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Khai Khun Yap

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of snakebite management and the use of antivenom depend greatly on the knowledge of the venom's composition as well as its pharmacokinetics. To date, however, pharmacokinetic reports on cobra venoms and their toxins are still relatively limited. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of Naja sumatrana (Equatorial spitting cobra venom and its major toxins (phospholipase A2, neurotoxin and cardiotoxin, following intravenous and intramuscular administration into rabbits.The serum antigen concentration-time profile of the N. sumatrana venom and its major toxins injected intravenously fitted a two-compartment model of pharmacokinetics. The systemic clearance (91.3 ml/h, terminal phase half-life (13.6 h and systemic bioavailability (41.9% of N. sumatrana venom injected intramuscularly were similar to those of N. sputatrix venom determined in an earlier study. The venom neurotoxin and cardiotoxin reached their peak concentrations within 30 min following intramuscular injection, relatively faster than the phospholipase A2 and whole venom (Tmax=2 h and 1 h, respectively. Rapid absorption of the neurotoxin and cardiotoxin from the injection site into systemic circulation indicates fast onsets of action of these principal toxins that are responsible for the early systemic manifestation of envenoming. The more prominent role of the neurotoxin in N. sumatrana systemic envenoming is further supported by its significantly higher intramuscular bioavailability (Fi.m.=81.5% compared to that of the phospholipase A2 (Fi.m.=68.6% or cardiotoxin (Fi.m.=45.6%. The incomplete absorption of the phospholipase A2 and cardiotoxin may infer the toxins' affinities for tissues at the injection site and their pathological roles in local tissue damages through synergistic interactions.Our results suggest that the venom neurotoxin is absorbed very rapidly and has the highest bioavailability following intramuscular injection, supporting its

  3. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  4. On the dynamics of the age structure, dependency, and consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effects of population aging due to declining fertility and rising elderly life expectancy on consumption possibilities in the presence of intergenerational transfers. Our analysis is based on a highly tractable continuous-time overlapping generations model in which the population is divided into three groups (youth dependents, workers, and elderly dependents) and lifecourse transitions take place in a probabilistic fashion. We show that the consumption-maximizing response to greater longevity in highly developed countries is an increase in fertility. However, with larger transfer payments, the actual fertility response will likely be the opposite, leading to further population aging. PMID:24353374

  5. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Fillastre, J P; Leroy, A; Humbert, G

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were investigated in 12 normal subjects and 21 uremic patients after the administration of a single oral 200-mg dose. An open three-compartment body model was used to calculate ofloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters. In healthy subjects, the peak plasma level averaged 2.24 +/- 0.90 micrograms/ml and was obtained at 0.83 +/- 0.31 h. The absorption rate constant was 4.22 +/- 1.64 h-1. The terminal half-life was 7.86 +/- 1.81 h. The apparent volume of distribution...

  6. Study on influence of piperine treatment on the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedada, Satish Kumar; Boga, Praveen Kumar; Kotakonda, Harish Kaushik

    2017-02-01

    1. Diclofenac sodium (DIC) is a widely used anti-inflammatory drug and its administration in humans receiving long-term therapy with herbal drugs containing piperine (PIP) may occur, which leads to drug-phytochemical interactions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of PIP treatment on the pharmacokinetics of DIC in healthy volunteers. 2. The open-label, two period, sequential study was conducted in 12 healthy volunteers. PIP 20 mg was administered once daily for 10 days during treatment phase. A single dose of DIC 100 mg was administered during control and after treatment phases under fasting conditions. The blood samples were collected after DIC dosing at predetermined time intervals and analyzed by HPLC. 3. Treatment with PIP significantly enhanced maximum plasma concentration (C max ) (2.24-3.68 μg/mL, p pharmacokinetics of DIC might be attributed to PIP mediated inhibition of CYP2C9 enzyme, which indicates the clinically significant interaction present between DIC and PIP. Therefore, the combination therapy of DIC along with PIP may represent a novel approach to reduce dosage and result in reduced incidence of gastrointestinal side effects seen with DIC alone at higher doses.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of cephalosporins in the neonate: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to review the published data on the pharmacokinetics of cephalosporins in neonates to provide a critical analysis of the literature as a useful tool for physicians. The bibliographic search was performed for articles published up to December 3, 2010, using PubMed. In addition, the book Neofax: A Manual of Drugs Used in Neonatal Care by Young and Mangum was consulted. The cephalosporins are mainly eliminated by the kidneys, and their elimination rates are reduced at birth. As a consequence, clearance is reduced and t1/2 is more prolonged in the neonate than in more mature infants. The neonate's substantial body water content creates a large volume of distribution (Vd of cephalosporins, as these drugs are fairly water soluble. Postnatal development is an important factor in the maturation of the neonate, and as postnatal age proceeds, the clearance of cephalosporins increases. The maturation of the kidney governs the pharmacokinetics of cephalosporins in the infant. Clearance and t1/2 are influenced by development, and this must be taken into consideration when planning a cephalosporin dosage regimen for the neonate.

  8. Proposed mechanistic description of dose-dependent BDE-47 urinary elimination in mice using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emond, Claude, E-mail: claude.emond@umontreal.ca [BioSimulation Consulting Inc., Newark, DE (United States); Departments of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medicine Faculty, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sanders, J. Michael, E-mail: sander10@mail.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wikoff, Daniele, E-mail: dwikoff@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Austin, TX (United States); Birnbaum, Linda S., E-mail: birnbaumls@niehs.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used in a wide variety of consumer applications as additive flame retardants. In North America, scientists have noted continuing increases in the levels of PBDE congeners measured in human serum. Some recent studies have found that PBDEs are associated with adverse health effects in humans, in experimental animals, and wildlife. This laboratory previously demonstrated that urinary elimination of 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is saturable at high doses in mice; however, this dose-dependent urinary elimination has not been observed in adult rats or immature mice. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to examine the mechanism of urinary elimination of BDE-47 in adult mice using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. To support this objective, additional laboratory data were collected to evaluate the predictions of the PBPK model using novel information from adult multi-drug resistance 1a/b knockout mice. Using the PBPK model, the roles of mouse major urinary protein (a blood protein carrier) and P-glycoprotein (an apical membrane transporter in proximal tubule cells in the kidneys, brain, intestines, and liver) were investigated in BDE-47 elimination. The resulting model and new data supported the major role of m-MUP in excretion of BDE-47 in the urine of adult mice, and a lesser role of P-gp as a transporter of BDE-47 in mice. This work expands the knowledge of BDE-47 kinetics between species and provides information for determining the relevancy of these data for human risk assessment purposes. - Highlights: • We report the first study on PBPK model on flame retardant in mice for BDE-47. • We examine mechanism of urinary elimination of BDE-47 in mice using a PBPK model. • We investigated roles of m-MUP and P-gp as transporters in urinary elimination.

  9. [Pharmacokinetic monitoring of 24-hour infusion of methotrexate in an adult population with non-Hodgkin lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Megía, M J; Alós Almiñana, M; Esquer Borrás, J

    2004-01-01

    To describe the behavior and variability of methotrexate (MTX) pharmacokinetic parameters in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and to suggest a monitoring system to optimize sample collection using a bayesian method. Two adult patient groups diagnosed with different NHL types were studied. Group I was made up of 9 patients aged 53 +/- 16 years who received MTX at a mean dose of 1.652 +/- 327 mg per course. Group II was made up of 7 patients aged 53 +/- 14 years who received MTX at a mean dose of 1.862 +/- 220 mg per course. No statistically significant differences between groups were seen. Serum MTX measurements were performed using polarized immunofluorescence (TDx system). The pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using Abbottbase Pharmacokinetics Systems (PKS) software, adjusting experimental data according to a bicompartmental linear model for intravenous delivery using non-linear regression in Group I and Bayesian estimates in Group II. By estimating mean square error and linear regression between predicted and experimental concentrations, the capability of the Bayesian method implemented in PKS to predict plasma MTX concentration at 48 hours post-infusion was evaluated. The safety of MTX therapy was assessed using patient medical histories and then scoring toxicity using the WHO scale. Pharmacokinetic parameters obtained for group I included: alpha (h(-1)) = 0.38 +/- 0.12; beta (h(-1)) = 0.07 +/- 0.03; K12 (h(-1)) = 0.02 +/- 0.02; K21 (h(-1)) = 0.09 +/- 0.09; K13 (h(-1)) = 0.34 +/- 0.12; Vc (l/kg) = 0.53 +/- 0.23; Vss (l/kg) = 0.62 +/- 0.26; Cl (l/kg.h) = 0.16 +/- 0.06. The error for the PKS population model in measuring plasma MTX concentration at 48 hours post-infusion in Group II was calculated in accordance with three sampling schemes -12 h, 24 h, and both. It was -14.58 x 10(-3), -15.70 x 10(-3) and -14.67 x 10(-3), respectively. Eqm was 9.58 x 10(-3), 2.39 x 10(-3), and 1.02 x 10(-3), respectively. An MTX monitoring scheme is suggested based on

  10. An interactive program for pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D R; Mao, F

    1993-05-01

    A computer program, PharmK, was developed for pharmacokinetic modeling of experimental data. The program was written in C computer language based on the high-level user-interface Macintosh operating system. The intention was to provide a user-friendly tool for users of Macintosh computers. An interactive algorithm based on the exponential stripping method is used for the initial parameter estimation. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic model fitting is based on the maximum likelihood estimation method and is performed by the Levenberg-Marquardt method based on chi 2 criterion. Several methods are available to aid the evaluation of the fitting results. Pharmacokinetic data sets have been examined with the PharmK program, and the results are comparable with those obtained with other programs that are currently available for IBM PC-compatible and other types of computers.

  11. Simultaneous determination of five components in rat plasma by UPLC-MS/MS and its application to a comparative pharmacokinetic study in Baihe Zhimu Tang and Zhimu extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guolong; Tang, Zhishu; Yang, Jie; Duan, Jinao; Qian, Dawei; Guo, Jianming; Zhu, Zhenhua; Liu, Hongbo

    2015-04-15

    Baihe Zhimu Tang (BZT) is a famous traditional Chinese medicine recipe to treat dry coughing due to yin deficiency and for moisturizing the lungs. Zhimu is an essential ingredient in BZT used to treat inflammation, fever and diabetes. The most important active components in Zhimu are flavonoids such as neomangiferin, mangiferin, and steroid saponins (e.g., timosaponin BII, anemarsaponin BIII, timosaponin AIII). The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of mangiferin, neomangiferin, timosaponin BII, anemarsaponin BIII and timosaponin AIII in rat plasma after oral administration of BZT and Zhimu extract (ZME). A sensitive, reliable and robust LC-MS/MS method to simultaneously determine steroid saponins and flavonoids in rat plasma was successfully validated. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the pharmacokinetic parameters of timosaponin BII, anemarsaponin BIII and timosaponin AIII between BZT and ZME. It was surmised that formula compatibility could significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of BZT and our study is the first to study the administration of BZT based on pharmacokinetic studies.

  12. Physical and mental health and social functioning in older alcohol-dependent inpatients: the role of age of onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Julia F.; Hermes, Jolanda S. J.; van den Brink, Wim; Blanken, Peter; Kist, Nicolien; Kok, Rob M.

    2014-01-01

    Age of onset is an important criterion to distinguish subgroups of alcohol-dependent patients. This study investigated physical and mental health and social functioning of older inpatients with early (age <25), late (25-44), and very late (≥45) onset of alcohol dependence. In a specialized

  13. Pharmacokinetic comparison of controlled-release and immediate-release oral formulations of simvastatin in healthy Korean subjects: a randomized, open-label, parallel-group, single- and multiple-dose study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seong Bok; Lee, Yoon Jung; Lim, Lay Ahyoung; Park, Kyung-Mi; Kwon, Bong-Ju; Woo, Jong Soo; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Min Soo; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Kyungsoo

    2010-01-01

    A controlled-release (CR) formulation of simvastatin was recently developed in Korea. The formulation is expected to yield a lower C(max) and similar AUC values compared with the immediate-release (IR) formulation. The goal of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of the new CR formulation and an IR formulation of simvastatin after single- and multiple-dose administration in healthy Korean subjects. This study was developed as part of a product development project at the request of the Korean regulatory agency. This was a randomized, open-label, parallelgroup, 2-part study. Eligible subjects were healthy male or female volunteers between the ages of 19 and 55 years and within 20% of their ideal weight. In part I, each subject received a single dose of the CR or IR formulation of simvastatin 40 mg orally (20 mg x 2 tablets) after fasting. In part II, each subject received the same dose of the CR or IR formulation for 8 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained for 48 hours after the dose in part I and after the first and the last dose in part II. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for both simvastatin (the inactive prodrug) and simvastatin acid (the active moiety). An adverse event (AE) was defined as any unfavorable sign (including an abnormal laboratory finding) or symptom, regardless of whether it had a causal relationship with the study medication. Serious AEs were defined as any events that are considered life threatening, require hospitalization or prolongation of existing hospitalization, cause persistent or significant disability or incapacity, or result in congenital abnormality, birth defect, or death. AEs were determined based on patient interviews and physical examinations. Twenty-four healthy subjects (17 men, 7 women; mean [SD] age, 29 [7] years; age range, 22-50 years) were enrolled in part I, and 29 subjects (17 men, 12 women; mean age, 33 [9] years; age range, 19-55 years) were enrolled in part II. For simvastatin acid, C

  14. Age-Dependent and Lineage-Dependent Speciation and Extinction in the Imbalance of Phylogenetic Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Eric W

    2017-11-01

    It is known that phylogenetic trees are more imbalanced than expected from a birth-death model with constant rates of speciation and extinction, and also that imbalance can be better fit by allowing the rate of speciation to decrease as the age of the parent species increases. If imbalance is measured in more detail, at nodes within trees as a function of the number of species descended from the nodes, age-dependent models predict levels of imbalance comparable to real trees for small numbers of descendent species, but predicted imbalance approaches an asymptote not found in real trees as the number of descendent species becomes large. Age-dependence must therefore be complemented by another process such as inheritance of different rates along different lineages, which is known to predict insufficient imbalance at nodes with few descendent species, but can predict increasing imbalance with increasing numbers of descendent species. [Crump-Mode-Jagers process; diversification; macroevolution; taxon sampling; tree of life.]. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics of Fentanyl in the Critically Ill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Leena; Ferrell, Benjamin A; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Heltsley, Rebecca; Ely, E Wesley; Stein, C Michael; Girard, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize fentanyl population pharmacokinetics in patients with critical illness and identify patient characteristics associated with altered fentanyl concentrations. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Medical and surgical ICUs in a large tertiary care hospital in the United States. Patients Patients with acute respiratory failure and/or shock who received fentanyl during the first five days of their ICU stay. Measurements and Main Results We collected clinical and hourly drug administration data and measured fentanyl concentrations in plasma collected once daily for up to five days after enrollment. Among 337 patients, the mean duration of infusion was 58 hours at a median rate of 100 µg/hr. Using a nonlinear mixed-effects model implemented by NONMEM, we found fentanyl pharmacokinetics were best described by a two-compartment model in which weight, severe liver disease, and congestive heart failure most affected fentanyl concentrations. For a patient population with a mean weight of 92 kg and no history of severe liver disease or congestive heart failure, the final model, which performed well in repeated 10-fold cross-validation, estimated total clearance (CL), intercompartmental clearance (Q), and volumes of distribution for the central (V1) and peripheral compartments (V2) to be 35 (95% confidence interval: 32 to 39) L/hr, 55 (42 to 68) L/hr, 203 (140 to 266) L, and 523 (428 to 618) L, respectively. Severity of illness was marginally associated with fentanyl pharmacokinetics but did not improve the model fit after liver and heart disease were included. Conclusions In this study, fentanyl pharmacokinetics during critical illness were strongly influenced by severe liver disease, congestive heart failure, and weight, factors that should be considered when dosing fentanyl in the ICU. Future studies are needed to determine if data-driven fentanyl dosing algorithms can improve outcomes for ICU patients. PMID:26491862

  17. Pharmacokinetics of oral terbinafine in adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younkin, T J; Davis, E G; Kukanich, B

    2017-08-01

    The primary study objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics of p.o. terbinafine alone to p.o. terbinafine administered with p.o. cimetidine in healthy adult horses. The second objective was to assess the pharmacokinetics of terbinafine when administered per rectum in two different suspensions at 30 mg/kg to adult horses. Six healthy adult horses were included in this crossover study. Plasma terbinafine concentrations were quantified with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The half-life (geometric mean) was 8.38 and 10.76 h, for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. The mean maximum plasma concentrations were 0.291 μg/mL at 1.54 h and 0.418 μg/mL at 1.28 h for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. Terbinafine with cimetidine had an average C MAX 44% higher and the relative F was 153% compared p.o. terbinafine alone, but was not statistically different (P > 0.05). Terbinafine was infrequently detected when administered per rectum in two different suspensions (water or olive oil). Minor adverse effects included oral irritation, fever, and colic. All resolved spontaneously. More pharmacokinetic studies are indicated assessing drug-drug interactions and using multiple dosing intervals to improve our knowledge of effective oral dosing, the potential for drug accumulation, and systemic adverse effect of terbinafine in horses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Does tinnitus distress depend on age of onset?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Schlee

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of any physical source of it. About 5-15% of the population report hearing such a tinnitus and about 1-2% suffer from their tinnitus leading to anxiety, sleep disorders or depression. It is currently not completely understood why some people feel distressed by their tinnitus, while others don't. Several studies indicate that the amount of tinnitus distress is associated with many factors including comorbid anxiety, comorbid depression, personality, the psychosocial situation, the amount of the related hearing loss and the loudness of the tinnitus. Furthermore, theoretical considerations suggest an impact of the age at tinnitus onset influencing tinnitus distress. METHODS: Based on a sample of 755 normal hearing tinnitus patients we tested this assumption. All participants answered a questionnaire on the amount of tinnitus distress together with a large variety of clinical and demographic data. RESULTS: Patients with an earlier onset of tinnitus suffer significantly less than patients with an onset later in life. Furthermore, patients with a later onset of tinnitus describe their course of tinnitus distress as more abrupt and distressing right from the beginning. CONCLUSION: We argue that a decline of compensatory brain plasticity in older age accounts for this age-dependent tinnitus decompensation.

  19. Does tinnitus distress depend on age of onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Winfried; Kleinjung, Tobias; Hiller, Wolfgang; Goebel, Gerhard; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Langguth, Berthold

    2011-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of any physical source of it. About 5-15% of the population report hearing such a tinnitus and about 1-2% suffer from their tinnitus leading to anxiety, sleep disorders or depression. It is currently not completely understood why some people feel distressed by their tinnitus, while others don't. Several studies indicate that the amount of tinnitus distress is associated with many factors including comorbid anxiety, comorbid depression, personality, the psychosocial situation, the amount of the related hearing loss and the loudness of the tinnitus. Furthermore, theoretical considerations suggest an impact of the age at tinnitus onset influencing tinnitus distress. Based on a sample of 755 normal hearing tinnitus patients we tested this assumption. All participants answered a questionnaire on the amount of tinnitus distress together with a large variety of clinical and demographic data. Patients with an earlier onset of tinnitus suffer significantly less than patients with an onset later in life. Furthermore, patients with a later onset of tinnitus describe their course of tinnitus distress as more abrupt and distressing right from the beginning. We argue that a decline of compensatory brain plasticity in older age accounts for this age-dependent tinnitus decompensation.

  20. Does Tinnitus Distress Depend on Age of Onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Winfried; Kleinjung, Tobias; Hiller, Wolfgang; Goebel, Gerhard; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Langguth, Berthold

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of any physical source of it. About 5–15% of the population report hearing such a tinnitus and about 1–2% suffer from their tinnitus leading to anxiety, sleep disorders or depression. It is currently not completely understood why some people feel distressed by their tinnitus, while others don't. Several studies indicate that the amount of tinnitus distress is associated with many factors including comorbid anxiety, comorbid depression, personality, the psychosocial situation, the amount of the related hearing loss and the loudness of the tinnitus. Furthermore, theoretical considerations suggest an impact of the age at tinnitus onset influencing tinnitus distress. Methods Based on a sample of 755 normal hearing tinnitus patients we tested this assumption. All participants answered a questionnaire on the amount of tinnitus distress together with a large variety of clinical and demographic data. Results Patients with an earlier onset of tinnitus suffer significantly less than patients with an onset later in life. Furthermore, patients with a later onset of tinnitus describe their course of tinnitus distress as more abrupt and distressing right from the beginning. Conclusion We argue that a decline of compensatory brain plasticity in older age accounts for this age-dependent tinnitus decompensation. PMID:22125612

  1. The association between etanercept serum concentration and psoriasis severity is highly age-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrez, Iris; Van Steen, Kristel; Segaert, Siegfried; Gils, Ann

    2017-06-01

    The association between etanercept serum concentration and psoriasis disease severity is poorly investigated, and currently etanercept serum concentration monitoring that is aiming to optimize the psoriasis treatment lacks evidence. In this prospective study, we investigated the relation between etanercept exposure and disease severity via measuring etanercept concentrations at five consecutive time points in 56 psoriasis patients. Disease severity assessments included the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), body surface area (BSA) and Physician Global Assessment (PGA), and etanercept and anti-etanercept antibody concentrations were determined every 3 months for a period of 1 year. The present study demonstrated that the association between etanercept concentration and psoriasis severity is age-dependent: when patients were stratified into three groups, patients in the youngest age group (-50 years) showed a lower PASI at a higher etanercept concentration (β = -0.26), whereas patients in the oldest age group (+59 years) showed the opposite trend (β =0.22). Similar age effects were observed in the relation of etanercept concentration with BSA ( P =0.02) and PGA ( P =0.02). The influence of age and length of time in therapy on the etanercept concentration-disease severity relation was unaffected by body mass index (BMI) or any other possible confounder. Incidence of anti-etanercept antibodies was low (2%). The age-dependent relation between etanercept serum concentrations is both unexpected and intriguing and needs further investigation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. LC determination and pharmacokinetic study of the main phenolic components of Portulaca oleracea L. extract in rat plasma after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhongzhe; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Wenjie; Du, Yang; Wang, Yunjiao; Zhai, Yanjun; Ying, Xixiang; Kang, Tingguo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the pharmacokinetics of hesperidin (HP), ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid (CA) in rat plasma after oral administration of Portulaca oleracea L. extract (POE). The plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC with vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside (VR) as internal standard. The calibration curves were linear over the range 0.1-5 µg mL(-1), 0.1-5 µg mL(-1)and 0.015-3 µg mL(-1) for HP, FA and CA, respectively. The validated method was suitable to the pharmacokinetic study of HP, FA and CA in rats after oral administration at a single dose of POE.

  3. The pharmacokinetics of a B-domain truncated recombinant factor VIII, turoctocog alfa (NovoEight®), in patients with hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Yuste, V; Lejniece, S; Klamroth, R; Suzuki, T; Santagostino, E; Karim, F A; Saugstrup, T; Møss, J

    2015-03-01

    Turoctocog alfa (NovoEight(®)) is a human recombinant coagulation factor VIII (rFVIII) for the treatment of patients with hemophilia A. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of turoctocog alfa in all age groups across clinical trials. Data from previously treated patients with severe hemophilia A (FVIII activity level of ≤ 1%) with no history of FVIII inhibitors, in a non-bleeding state, were included. The pharmacokinetics were assessed following a wash-out period and a subsequent single intravenous 50 IU kg(-1) dose of turoctocog alfa. Blood was sampled during a 48-h period postdose. Standard pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were estimated on the basis of plasma FVIII activity vs. time (PK profiles) with non-compartmental methods. Furthermore, a population PK analysis was conducted. Data from 76 patients (aged 1-60 years) enrolled globally across six clinical trials were included, totaling 105 turoctocog alfa PK profiles. Single-dose PK results 3-6 months after the first dose of turoctocog alfa were comparable with the results obtained after the first dose. Similar PK characteristics were shown for different lots and strengths of the drug product. Overall, area under the plasma concentration (activity) curve from administration to infinity (AUC) and t1(/2) tended to increase with increasing age, with lower AUC and shorter t(1/2) being seen in children than in adolescents and adults. The PK profiles of turoctocog alfa and other commercially available plasma-derived FVIII and rFVIII products were similar in all age groups. The PK characteristics of turoctocog alfa have been thoroughly studied, and shown to be consistent over time, reproducible between different lots and strengths of drug product, and similar to those observed for other FVIII products. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Association between current smoking and cognitive impairment depends on age: A cross-sectional study in Xi'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Shang, Suhang; Li, Pei; Deng, Meiying; Chen, Chen; Jiang, Yu; Dang, Liangjun; Qu, Qiumin

    2017-09-08

    Cigarette smoking is a modifiable risk factor for cognitive impairment, while the relationship between current smoking and cognitive impairment is not fully understood. The objectives were to identify a possible association between current smoking and cognitive impairment depending on age in the Chinese rural population. Data for the study consisted of 1,782 participants (40 years and older) who lived in a rural village in the vicinity of Xi'an, China. Data about smoking history and cognitive function were collected. Cognitive function was scored by the Mini-Mental State Examination. The effect of age on the relationship between current smoking and cognitive impairment was analyzed with interaction and stratified analysis by logistic regression models. Interaction analysis showed that current smoking is positively related with cognitive impairment (odds ratio [OR]=9.067; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.305-62.979; P=.026). However, the interaction term, age by current smoking, is negatively related with cognitive impairment (OR=0.969; 95%CI 0.939-0.999; P=.045). Stratified logistic regression showed that in the 40-65 years of age sublayer, OR of current smoking is 1.966 (P=.044), whereas in the>65 years of age sublayer, the OR is 0.470 (P=.130). This means that the association between current smoking and cognitive impairment with age might be positive (OR>1) in lower age sublayers, but no significant difference in higher age sublayers. In conclusion, current smoking might be positively associated with cognitive impairment in the middle-aged but the relationship declines with increasing age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Population pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate and its metabolite in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon-Andersen, Divya; Mondick, John T; Jayaraman, Bhuvana; Thompson, Patrick A; Blaney, Susan M; Bernstein, Mark; Bond, Mason; Champagne, Martin; Fossler, Michael J; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) is a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for use in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia in adults and children and in gastrointestinal stromal tumors in adults. Population pharmacokinetic (PPK) studies evaluating the effect of population covariates on the pharmacokinetics of imatinib and its active metabolite have been developed in adults with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). However, this still remains to be described in children. The objectives of the analysis were to develop a PPK model of imatinib and its active metabolite, CGP74588, to describe exposure in children and young adults and to identify covariates that are predictors of variability in disposition. Plasma concentrations from 26 subjects with Philadelphia (Ph+) leukemia (Phase I study) and 15 subjects with refractory solid tumors (Phase II study), who received oral imatinib at doses ranging from 260 to 570 mg/m(2), were available for the PPK analysis in NONMEM. Blood samples were drawn prior to dosing and over 24-48 h on days 1 and 8 of the studies. Covariates studied included weight, age, albumin, alanine aminotransferase and the study population. The pharmacokinetics of imatinib and CGP 74588 were well described by one and two compartment models, respectively. Total body weight was the only covariate found to significantly affect Cl/F and V/F. The final imatinib-CGP 74588 model is summarized as follows: CL/F (imatinib) (L/h) = 10.8 x (WT/70)(0.75), V/F (imatinib) (L) = 284 x (WT/70) and D1(duration of zero order absorption,imatinib) (h) = 1.67 and CL/F (CGP 74588) (L/h) = 9.65 x (WT/70)(0.75), V1/F (CGP 74588) (L) = 11.6 x (WT/70), Q (CGP 74588) (L/h) = 2.9 x (WT/70)(0.75) and V2/F (CGP 74588) (L) = 256*(WT/70). Model evaluation indicated that the final model was robust and satisfactory. Current imatinib dosing guidelines in pediatrics is based on the achievement of exposures consistent with doses known to be

  6. The pharmacokinetics of propofol in ICU patients undergoing long-term sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Wiczling, Paweł; Przybyłowski, Krzysztof; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Trojanowska, Iwona; Paterska, Marta; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Zenon; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Bienert, Agnieszka

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of propofol in ICU patients undergoing long-term sedation and to assess the influence of routinely collected covariates on the PK parameters. Propofol concentration-time profiles were collected from 29 patients. Non-linear mixed-effects modelling in NONMEM 7.2 was used to analyse the observed data. The propofol pharmacokinetics was best described with a three-compartment disposition model. Non-parametric bootstrap and a visual predictive check were used to evaluate the adequacy of the developed model to describe the observations. The typical value of the propofol clearance (1.46 l/min) approximated the hepatic blood flow. The volume of distribution at steady state was high and was equal to 955.1 l, which is consistent with other studies involving propofol in ICU patients. There was no statistically significant covariate relationship between PK parameters and opioid type, SOFA score on the day of admission, APACHE II, predicted death rate, reason for ICU admission (sepsis, trauma or surgery), gender, body weight, age, infusion duration and C-reactive protein concentration. The population PK model was developed successfully to describe the time-course of propofol concentration in ICU patients undergoing prolonged sedation. Despite a very heterogeneous group of patients, consistent PK profiles were observed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Effects of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid on the pharmacokinetics of valproic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SY

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Soo-Yun Lee,1 Wooseong Huh,2 Jin Ah Jung,3 Hye Min Yoo,2 Jae-Wook Ko,1,2 Jung-Ryul Kim2,4 1Department of Health Sciences and Technology, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Inje University, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan, 4Department of Clinical Research and Evaluation, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Abstract: Valproic acid (VPA is mainly metabolized via glucuronide, which is hydrolyzed by β-glucuronidase and undergoes enterohepatic circulation. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC administration leads to decreased levels of β-glucuronidase-producing bacteria, suggesting that these antibiotics could interrupt enterohepatic circulation and thereby alter the pharmacokinetics of VPA. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of AMC on the pharmacokinetics of VPA. This was an open-label, two-treatment, one-sequence study in 16 healthy volunteers. Two treatments were evaluated; treatment VPA, in which a single dose of VPA 500 mg was administered, and treatment AMC + VPA, in which multiple doses of AMC 500/125 mg were administered three times daily for 7 days and then a single dose of VPA was administered. Blood samples were collected up to 48 hours. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental methods. Fifteen subjects completed the study. Systemic exposures and peak concentrations of VPA were slightly lower with treatment AMC + VPA than with treatment VPA (AUClast, 851.0 h·mg/L vs 889.6 h·mg/L; Cmax, 52.1 mg/L vs 53.0 mg/L. There were no significant between-treatment effects on pharmacokinetics (95% confidence interval [CI] of AUClast and Cmax (95.7 [85.9–106.5] and 98.3 [91.6–105.6], respectively. Multiple doses of AMC had no significant effects on the pharmacokinetics of VPA; thus, no dose adjustment is necessary. Keywords: drug–drug interaction, pharmacokinetics

  8. Determination of Acyclovir in Human Plasma Samples by HPLC Method with UV Detection: Application to Single-Dose Pharmacokinetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragica Zendelovska

    2015-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Good precision, accuracy, simplicity, sensitivity and shorter time of analysis of the method makes it particularly useful for processing of multiple samples in a limited period of time for pharmacokinetic study of acyclovir.

  9. Penetration and pharmacokinetics of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rat prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Radhakrishnan, Jayashree; Radhakrishnan, Rajan

    2018-02-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) involves inflammation of the prostate and affects the quality of life of men of all ages. It is well reported in clinical studies that the treatment for CP/CPPS using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) produced favorable outcomes. However, currently, there are no guidelines on choice of the NSAIDs for the treatment of CP/CPPS. Therefore, in the current research study, we evaluated the prostate tissue penetration of four NSAIDs in rats to provide guidance on choice of NSAIDs for the treatment of CP/CPPS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered orally with four NSAIDs viz. celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen at 500 mg/kg dose. The animals were then sacrificed at various time points, and their prostate tissues were harvested. The NSAIDs were then extracted from the prostate tissues using liquid extraction technique, and their concentration in prostate tissue was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The prostate tissue penetration and related pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated by non-compartmental analysis. The HPLC method for quantifying NSAIDs in prostate tissue resulted in single, sharp peaks without any interference and all validation parameters were within limits. Celecoxib showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) [146.50 ± 2.75 μg/mL*h] of all NSAID's. A two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) with replication indicated an overall statistically significant difference in the pharmacokinetic parameters for celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen. This study for the first time reported the relative prostate tissue penetration of four NSAIDs. The pharmacokinetic data indicated that celecoxib has the highest penetration and retention in rat prostate tissues. Therefore, celecoxib may be considered as a better choice for the treatment CP/CPPS involving NSAIDs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Validation and use of microdialysis for determination of pharmacokinetic properties of the chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C - an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Olaf; Andersen, Anders; Olsen, Harald; Alexandr, Kristian; Ekstrøm, Per Olaf; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2010-01-01

    Mitomycin C is a chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of peritoneal surface malignancies, administered as hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy after cytoreductive surgery. Pharmacokinetic studies have been based on analyses of blood, urine and abdominal perfusate, but actual tissue concentrations of the drug have never been determined. Microdialysis is an established method for continuous monitoring of low-molecular substances in tissues, and in the present study microdialysis of mitomycin C was studied in vitro and in vivo. Using in vitro microdialysis, relative recovery was determined when varying drug concentration, temperature and perfusion flow rate. In vivo microdialysis was performed in rats to verify long-term stability of relative recovery in four compartments (vein, peritoneum, extraperitoneal space and hind leg muscle). Subsequently, intravenous and intraperitoneal bolus infusion experiments were performed and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. In vitro, compatibility of mitomycin C and microdialysis equipment was demonstrated, and relative recovery was stable over an adequate concentration range, moderately increased by raising medium temperature and increased when flow rate was reduced, all according to theory. In vivo, stable relative recovery was observed over seven hours. Mitomycin C exhibited fast and even distribution in rat tissues, and equal bioavailability was achieved by intravenous and intraperitoneal infusion. The half-life of mitomycin C calculated after intravenous infusion was 40 minutes. Mitomycin C concentration can be reliable monitored in vivo using microdialysis, suggesting that this technique can be used in pharmacokinetic studies of this drug during hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy

  11. The pharmacokinetics of xylazine hydrochloride: an interspecific study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Villar, R; Toutain, P L; Alvinerie, M; Ruckebusch, Y

    1981-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic disposition of xylazine hydrochloride is described after both intravenous and intramuscular injection of a single dose, in four domestic species: horse, cattle, sheep and dog, by an original high performance liquid chromatographic technique. Remarkably small interspecific differences are reported. After intravenous administration, systemic half-life (t1/2 beta) ranged between 22 min (sheep) and 50 min (horse) while the distribution phase is transient with half-life (t1/2 alpha) ranging from 1.2 min (cattle) to 5.9 min (horse). The peak level of drug concentration in the plasma is reached after 12-14 min in all the species studied following intramuscular administration. Xylazine bioavailability, as measured by the ratios of the areas under the intravenous and intramuscular plasma concentration versus time curves, ranged from 52% to 90% in dog, 17% to 73% in sheep and 40% to 48% in horse. The low dosage in cattle did not permit calculation. Kinetic data are correlated with clinical data and the origins of interspecific differences are discussed.

  12. Pharmacokinetic studies of the recombinant chicken interferon-α in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Yu, Hai-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Wang, Xing-Man; Li, Jin-Pei; Hu, Tao; Hu, Yong; Wang, Ming-Li; Shen, Yong-Zhou; Xu, Jing-Dong; Han, Guo-Xiang; Chen, Jason

    2017-02-14

    In this study, 24 male and female broiler chickens at 30-day-old were divided into three groups with 8 animals in each group. The animals were administered with recombinant chicken interferon-α (rChIFN-α) at a dose of 1.0 × 10 6 IU/kg intravenously, intramuscularly or subcutaneously, respectively. Serum samples were collected at different time points post administration, and the titers of rChIFN-α in the blood were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rChIFN-α by intramuscular injection and subcutaneous injection were fitted to one compartment open model, and the T max was 3.21 ± 0.79 hr and 3.95 ± 0.85 hr, respectively, and the elimination half-life (T 1/2 ) was 6.20 ± 2.77 hr and 5.03 ± 3.70 hr, respectively. In contrast, the pharmacokinetics of rChIFN-α via intravenous injection was in line with the open model of two-compartment and was eliminated in the first order, and the elimination half-life (T 1/2 ) was 4.61 ± 0.84 hr. In addition, compared with those in the intravenous group and the subcutaneous group, the bioavailability of rChIFN-α in the intramuscular group was 82.80%. In conclusion, rChIFN-α was rapidly absorbed and slowly eliminated after intramuscular administration of single dose of rChIFN-α aqueous formulations. Thus, rChIFN-α can be used as a commonly-used therapeutic agent.

  13. The influence of HIV infection on the age dependence of squamous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diminishes with ageing, which may contribute to the age-related increase in cancer incidence. In the present analysis, the age dependence of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (SCC) in the black African, coloured and white population groups of South. Africa (SA) was examined. The evidence that exposure to sunlight is ...

  14. Triprotic acid-base microequilibria and pharmacokinetic sequelae of cetirizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosi, Attila; Kovács, Zsuzsanna; Béni, Szabolcs; Kökösi, József; Noszál, Béla

    2009-06-28

    (1)H NMR-pH titrations of cetirizine, the widely used antihistamine and four related compounds were carried out and the related 11 macroscopic protonation constants were determined. The interactivity parameter between the two piperazine amine groups was obtained from two symmetric piperazine derivatives. Combining these two types of datasets, all the 12 microconstants and derived tautomeric constants of cetirizine were calculated. Upon this basis, the conflicting literature data of cetirizine microspeciation were clarified, and the pharmacokinetic absorption-distribution properties could be interpreted. The pH-dependent distribution of the microspecies is provided.

  15. Human pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ravn, P; Rønn, A

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites cycloguanil and p-chlorophenylbiguanide were studied in five healthy volunteers taking 200 mg orally for 14 days. A highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic assay was applied, clearly identifying all three compounds...

  16. SDSS-IV MaNGA: environmental dependence of stellar age and metallicity gradients in nearby galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Huiyuan; Ge, Junqiang; Mao, Shude; Li, Cheng; Li, Ran; Mo, Houjun; Goddard, Daniel; Bundy, Kevin; Li, Hongyu; Nair, Preethi; Lin, Lihwai; Long, R. J.; Riffel, Rogério; Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel R.; Zhang, Kai; Law, David R.; Drory, Niv; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Malanushenko, Olena

    2017-03-01

    We present a study on the stellar age and metallicity distributions for 1105 galaxies using the STARLIGHT software on MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO) integral field spectra. We derive age and metallicity gradients by fitting straight lines to the radial profiles, and explore their correlations with total stellar mass M*, NUV - r colour and environments, as identified by both the large-scale structure (LSS) type and the local density. We find that the mean age and metallicity gradients are close to zero but slightly negative, which is consistent with the inside-out formation scenario. Within our sample, we find that both the age and metallicity gradients show weak or no correlation with either the LSS type or local density environment. In addition, we also study the environmental dependence of age and metallicity values at the effective radii. The age and metallicity values are highly correlated with M* and NUV - r and are also dependent on LSS type as well as local density. Low-mass galaxies tend to be younger and have lower metallicity in low-density environments while high-mass galaxies are less affected by environment.

  17. The effects of age on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single oral doses of benazepril and enalapril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, N J; Sioufi, A; Howie, C A; Wade, J R; Elliott, H L

    1993-01-01

    1. Eighteen healthy, normotensive subjects (nine young and nine elderly) participated in a double-blind, 3-way, crossover study to compare aspects of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single oral doses of 10 mg benazepril, 10 mg enalapril and placebo. 2. The hypotensive effect was similar after both drugs but the absolute reductions were greater in the elderly who had higher initial levels of blood pressure. 3. The AUCs for both benazeprilat and enalaprilat were higher in the elderly but by a significantly greater amount for enalaprilat (+ 113% vs 40%; P benazepril are qualitatively similar to those with other ACE inhibitors. The clinical significance of the quantitative differences requires further investigation. PMID:9114905

  18. An Allometric Model of Remifentanil Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vereecke, Hugo; Absalom, Anthony R.; Olofsen, Erik; Vuyk, Jaap; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    Background: Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models are used to predict and explore drug infusion schemes and their resulting concentration profiles for clinical application. Our aim was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for remifentanil that is accurate in patients with a wide

  19. Time-Dependent Behavior of Shrinkage Strain for Early Age Concrete Affected by Temperature Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Yu; Yi, Zhijian; Wang, Weina; Wang, Di

    2017-01-01

    Shrinkage has been proven to be an important property of early age concrete. The shrinkage strain leads to inherent engineering problems, such as cracking and loss of prestress. Atmospheric temperature is an important factor in shrinkage strain. However, current research does not provide much attention to the effect of atmospheric temperature on shrinkage of early age concrete. In this paper, a laboratory study was undertaken to present the time-dependent shrinkage of early age concrete under...

  20. A comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    In the absence of age-specific biokinetic models, current retention models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) frequently are used as a point of departure for evaluation of exposures to the general population. These models were designed and intended for estimation of long-term integrated doses to the adult worker. Their format and empirical basis preclude incorporation of much valuable physiological information and physiologically reasonable assumptions that could be used in characterizing the age-specific behavior of radioelements in humans. In this paper we discuss a comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling in which consideration is given not only to changes with age in masses and relative geometries of body organs and tissues but also to best available physiological and radiobiological information relating to the age-specific biobehavior of radionuclides. This approach is useful in obtaining more accurate estimates of long-term dose commitments as a function of age at intake, but it may be particularly valuable in establishing more accurate estimates of dose rate as a function of age. Age-specific dose rates are needed for a proper analysis of the potential effects on estimates or risk of elevated dose rates per unit intake in certain stages of life, elevated response per unit dose received during some stages of life, and age-specific non-radiogenic competing risks

  1. A comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    In the absence of age-specific biokinetic models, current retention models of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) frequently are used as a point of departure for evaluation of exposures to the general population. These models were designed and intended for estimation of long-term integrated doses to the adult worker. Their format and empirical basis preclude incorporation of much valuable physiological information and physiologically reasonable assumptions that could be used in characterizing the age-specific behavior of radioelements in humans. In this paper a comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling is discussed in which consideration is given not only to changes with age in masses and relative geometries of body organs and tissues but also to best available physiological and radiobiological information relating to the age-specific biobehavior of radionuclides. This approach is useful in obtaining more accurate estimates of long-term dose commitments as a function of age at intake, but it may be particularly valuable in establishing more accurate estimates of dose rate as a function of age. Age-specific dose rates are needed for a proper analysis of the potential effects on estimates of risk of elevated dose rates per unit intake in certain stages of life, elevated response per unit dose received during some stages of life, and age-specific non-radiogenic competing risks. 16 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  2. Effect of Coadministered Fat on the Tolerability, Safety, and Pharmacokinetic Properties of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Papua New Guinean Children with Uncomplicated Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, B. R.; Benjamin, J. M.; Salman, S.; Griffin, S.; Ginny, E.; Page-Sharp, M.; Robinson, L. J.; Siba, P.; Batty, K. T.; Mueller, I.; Davis, T. M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Coadministration of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) with fat may improve bioavailability and antimalarial efficacy, but it might also increase toxicity. There have been no studies of these potential effects in the pediatric age group. The tolerability, safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of DHA-PQ administered with or without 8.5 g fat were investigated in 30 Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 10 years diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Three daily 2.5:11.5-mg-base/...

  3. Towards an age-dependent transmission model of acquired and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; Calero, Miguel; Rábano, Alberto; Cruz, Mabel; Siden, Åke; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Laursen, Henning; Ruiz-Tovar, María; Mølbak, Kåre

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) might be transmitted by surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential susceptibility to sCJD from surgery at juvenile age and in early adulthood. From Danish and Swedish national registries we identified 167 definite and probable sCJD cases with onset from 1987 through 2003, and 835 age-, sex- and residence-matched controls along with their surgical histories. Main, anatomically or etiologically classified surgical procedures followed by a ≥20-year lag were analyzed using logistic regression, and stratified by age at first-registered surgical discharge. The risk of having a diagnosis of CJD depended strongly on age at first surgery with odds ratio (OR) of 12.80 (95% CI 2.56-64.0) in patients <30 years, 3.04 (95% 1.26-7.33) in 30-39 years, and 1.75 (95% CI 0.89-3.45) in ≥40 years, for anatomically classified surgical procedures. Similar figures were obtained for etiologically classified surgical procedures. Risk of surgical-acquired sCJD depends on age at exposure; this pattern is similar to age-specific profiles reported for CJD accidentally transmitted by human pituitary-derived growth hormone and susceptibility curves for variant CJD estimated after adjustment for dietary exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. There might be an age-at-exposure-related susceptibility to acquire all CJD forms, including sCJD from routine surgery.

  4. Oral fondaparinux: use of lipid nanocapsules as nanocarriers and in vivo pharmacokinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alyaa Ramadan1,4, Frederic Lagarce1,3, Anne Tessier-Marteau2, Olivier Thomas1, Pierre Legras5, Laurent Macchi2, Patrick Saulnier1, Jean Pierre Benoit1,31LUNAM Université, Ingénierie de la Vectorisation Particulaire, Inserm U-646, Angers, France; 2Hematology Department, Angers University Hospital, Angers, France; 3Department of Pharmacy, Angers University Hospital, Angers, France; 4Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt; 5SCAHU, Animal House, Angers, FranceAbstract: Oral anticoagulant therapy could be advanced using lipid-based nanoparticulate systems. This study examined lipid nanocapsules for their oral absorption potential as the first step in developing oral fondaparinux (Fp novel carriers. Using phase inversion method and cationic surfactants such as hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB or stearylamine (SA, cationic lipid nanocapsules (cLNCs, loaded with Fp on their surface, were prepared and characterized (zeta potential, size and Fp association efficiency and content. In vivo studies were conducted after single oral increasing doses of Fp-loaded cLNCs (0.5 to 5 mg/kg of Fp in rats and the concentration of Fp in the plasma was measured by anti-factor Xa activity assay. The monodisperse, (~50 nm, positively charged Fp-cLNCs with high drug loadings demonstrated linear pharmacokinetic profiles of the drug with an increased oral absolute bioavailability (up to ~21% compatible with therapeutic anticoagulant effect (>0.2 µg/mL.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, fondaparinux, lipid nanocapsules, bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, rats

  5. Mixed models, linear dependency, and identification in age-period-cohort models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Robert M

    2017-07-20

    This paper examines the identification problem in age-period-cohort models that use either linear or categorically coded ages, periods, and cohorts or combinations of these parameterizations. These models are not identified using the traditional fixed effect regression model approach because of a linear dependency between the ages, periods, and cohorts. However, these models can be identified if the researcher introduces a single just identifying constraint on the model coefficients. The problem with such constraints is that the results can differ substantially depending on the constraint chosen. Somewhat surprisingly, age-period-cohort models that specify one or more of ages and/or periods and/or cohorts as random effects are identified. This is the case without introducing an additional constraint. I label this identification as statistical model identification and show how statistical model identification comes about in mixed models and why which effects are treated as fixed and which are treated as random can substantially change the estimates of the age, period, and cohort effects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Modulation of NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, In Sup; Lee, Young Sup; Bae, Young Seuk; Huh, Tae Lin; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2004-01-01

    NADPH is an important cofactor in many biosynthesis pathways and the regeneration of reduced glutathione, critically important in cellular defense against oxidative damage. It is mainly produced by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, and NADP(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenases (ICDHs). Here, we investigated age-related changes in ICDH activity and protein expression in IMR-90 human diploid fibroblast cells and tissues from Fischer 344 rats. We found that in IMR-90 cells the activity of cytosolic ICDH (IDPc) gradually increased with age up to the 46-48 population doubling level (PDL) and then gradually decreased at later PDL. 2',7'-Dichloro-fluorescein fluorescence which reflects intracellular ROS generation was increased with aging in IMR-90 cells. In ad libitum-fed rats, we noted age-related, tissue-specific modulations of IDPc and mitochondrial ICDH (IDPm) activities and protein expression in the liver, kidney and testes. In contrast, ICDH activities and protein expression were not significantly modulated in diet-restricted rats. These data suggest that modulation of ICDH is an age-dependent and a tissue-specific phenomenon.

  7. ‘Developmental Delay’ Reconsidered: The Critical Role of Age-Dependent, Co-variant Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonata Levy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In memory of Annette Karmiloff-Smith.This paper reviews recent neurobiological research reporting structural co-variance and temporal dependencies in age-dependent gene expression, parameters of cortical maturation, long range connectivity and interaction of the biological network with the environment. This research suggests that age by size trajectories of brain structures relate to functional properties more than absolute sizes. In line with these findings, recent behavioral studies of typically developing children whose language development was delayed reported long term consequences of such delays. As for neurodevelopmental disorders, disrupted developmental timing and slow acquisitional pace are hallmarks of these populations. It is argued that these behavioral and neuro-biological results highlight the need to commit to a developmental model which will reflect the fact that temporal dependencies overseeing structural co-variance among developmental components are major regulatory factors of typical development of the brain/mind network. Consequently, the concept of ‘developmental delay’ in developmental theorizing needs to be reconsidered.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of SCT800, a new recombinant FVIII, in hemophilia A mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruo-lan; Liu, Liang; Xie, Liang-zhi; Gai, Wen-lin; Cao, Si-shuo; Meng, Zhi-yun; Gan, Hui; Wu, Zhuo-na; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Xiao-xia; Dou, Gui-fang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: SCT800 is a new third-generation recombinant FVIII agent that is undergoing promising preclinical study. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of SCT800 in hemophilia A mice. Methods: After hemophilia A mice were intravenously injected with single dose of SCT800 (80, 180, and 280 IU/kg) or the commercially available product Xyntha (280 IU/kg), pharmacokinetics profiles were evaluated based on measuring plasma FVIII: C. For pharmacodynamics study, dose-response curves of SCT800 and Xyntha (1–200 IU/kg) were constructed using a tail bleeding model monitoring both bleeding time and blood loss. Results: Pharmacokinetics profile analysis showed a dose independency of SCT800 ranging from 80 to 280 IU/kg and comparable pharmacokinetic profiles between SCT800 and Xyntha at the doses tested. Pharmacodynamics study revealed comparable ED50 values of SCT800 and Xyntha in the tail bleeding model: 14.78 and 15.81 IU/kg for bleeding time, respectively; 13.50 and 13.58 IU/kg for blood loss, respectively. Moreover, at the doses tested, the accompanying dose-related safety evaluation in the tail bleeding model showed lower hypercoagulable tendency and wider dosage range potential for SCT800 than Xyntha. Conclusion: In hemophilia A mice, SCT800 shows comparable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to Xyntha at the doses tested, and possibly with better safety properties. PMID:26806305

  9. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics and pleural fluid penetration in patients with pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzika, Kalliopi; Manika, Katerina; Kontou, Paschalina; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papakosta, Despina; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kioumis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and penetration of moxifloxacin (MXF) in patients with various types of pleural effusion. Twelve patients with empyema/parapneumonic effusion (PPE) and 12 patients with malignant pleural effusion were enrolled in the study. A single-dose pharmacokinetic study was performed after intravenous administration of 400 mg MXF. Serial plasma (PL) and pleural fluid (PF) samples were collected during a 24-h time interval after drug administration. The MXF concentration in PL and PF was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and main pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. Penetration of MXF in PF was determined by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to 24 h (AUC24) in PF (AUC24PF) to the AUC24 in PL. No statistically significant differences in the pharmacokinetics in PL were observed between the two groups, despite the large interindividual variability in the volume of distribution, clearance, and elimination half-life. The maximum concentration in PF (CmaxPF) in patients with empyema/PPE was 2.23±1.31 mg/liter, and it was detected 7.50±2.39 h after the initiation of the infusion. In patients with malignant effusion, CmaxPF was 2.96±1.45 mg/liter, but it was observed significantly earlier, at 3.58±1.38 h (Ppleural effusion.

  10. Pharmacokinetic models relevant to toxicity and metabolism for uranium in humans and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Models to predict short and long term accumulation of uranium in the human kidney are reviewed and summarised. These are generally first order linear compartmental models or pseudo-pharmacokinetic models such as the retention model of the ICRP. Pharmacokinetic models account not only for transfer from blood to organs, but also recirculation from the organ to blood. The most recent information on mammalian and human metabolism of uranium is used to establish a revised model. The model is applied to the short term accumulation of uranium in the human kidney after a single rapid dosage to the blood, such as that obtained by inhaling UF6 or its hydrolysis products. It is shown that the maximum accumulation in the kidney under these conditions is less than the fraction of the material distributed from the blood to kidney if a true pharmacokinetic model is used. The best coefficients applicable to man in the authors' view are summarised in model V. For a half-time of two days in the mammalian kidney, the maximum concentration in kidney is 75% of that predicted by a retention model such as that used by the ICRP following a single acute intake. We conclude that one must use true pharmacokinetic models, which incorporate recirculation from the organs to the blood, in order to realistically predict time dependent uptake in the kidneys and other organs. Information is presented showing that the half-time for urinary excretion of soluble uranium in man after inhalation of UF6 is about one quarter of a day. (author)

  11. Effect of diurnal variation, CYP2B6 genotype and age on the pharmacokinetics of nevirapine in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienczak, A.; Cook, A.; Wiesner, L.; Mulenga, V.; Kityo, C.; Kekitiinwa, A.; Walker, A.S.; Owen, A.; Gibb, D.M.; Burger, D.M.; McIlleron, H.; Denti, P.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize the effects of CYP2B6 polymorphisms, diurnal variation and demographic factors on nevirapine pharmacokinetics in African children. METHODS: Non-linear mixed-effects modelling conducted in NONMEM 7.3 described nevirapine plasma concentration-time data from 414 children

  12. Determination of 6258-70, a new semi-synthetic taxane, in rat plasma and tissues: Application to the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the leading cause of death all over the world. Among the chemotherapy drugs, taxanes play an important role in cancer treatment. 6258-70 is a new semi-synthetic taxane which has a broad spectrum of antitumor activity. A fast and reliable high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS/MS method was developed for quantification of 6258-70 in rat plasma and tissues in this paper. After extraction by liquid-liquid extraction method with methyl tert-butyl ether, the samples were separated on a Kinetex C18 column (50 mm×2.1 mm, 2.6 µm, Phenomenex, USA within 3 min. The method was fully validated with the matrix effect between 87.7% and 99.5% and the recovery ranging from 80.3% to 90.1%. The intra- and inter-day precisions were less than 9.5% and the accuracy ranged from −3.8% to 6.5%. The reliable method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution studies of 6258-70 after intravenous administration in rats. The pharmacokinetic results indicated that the pharmacokinetic behavior of 6258-70 in rats was in accordance with linear features within tested dosage of 1 to 4 mg/kg, and there was no significant difference between the two genders. The tissue distribution study showed that 6258-70 had an effective penetration, spread widely and rapidly and could cross blood-brain barrier. The results of pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution may provide a guide for future study.

  13. Pegylated interferon fractal pharmacokinetics: individualized dosing for hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta K; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Alder, Lara; Lee, William M; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2013-03-01

    Despite recent advances in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapeutics, the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEGIFN/RBV) remains the cornerstone of treatment. Optimization and individualization of PEGIFN dosing could improve outcomes. Week one PEGIFN serum concentrations in 42 HCV genotype 1-infected patients treated with conventional PEGIFN/RBV were analyzed using multicompartmental pharmacokinetic models. For each patient, pharmacokinetic parameter estimates, weight, age, interleukin-28B (IL-28B) single-nucleotide polymorphism, CD4 count, baseline HCV RNA, gender, race, and HIV status were examined using classification and regression tree analysis to identify factors predictive of sustained viral response (SVR). Survival analysis was performed to compare the time to undetectable viral load in patients with and without the highest scoring predictor. PEGIFN concentrations varied at least 87-fold. Pharmacokinetics were best described by a two-compartment model with an 8.4-h absorption lag. Patient weight correlated with PEGIFN systemic clearance based on fractal geometry relationships. SVR was achieved in 36% of patients; a PEGIFN cumulative 1-week area under the curve (AUC) of ≤0.79 mg · h/liter scored highest in predicting poor response, followed by a weight of ≥93.7 kg. Patients with a PEGIFN AUC of >0.79 mg · h/liter achieved undetectable viral load more rapidly than those with a lower AUC (hazard ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 2.04). PEGIFN exhibits wide pharmacokinetic variability, mainly driven by patient weight, so that the standard dose may not reach levels needed to achieve SVR. Optimizing dose to patient weight and PEGIFN AUC in the first week offers a solution to improve SVR and to potentially shorten duration of therapy.

  14. PHARMACOKINETICS OF PIROXICAM IN CRANES (FAMILY GRUIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiper, Naomi L; Cox, Sherry K; Doss, Grayson A; Elsmo, Betsy; Franzen-Klein, Dana; Hartup, Barry K

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) piroxicam in cranes, three brolgas (Antigone rubicunda) were administered piroxicam as a single oral dose at 0.5 mg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg during separate trials. Serial blood samples were collected for quantification of piroxicam in plasma. Piroxicam was readily absorbed at both dosages, and no adverse effects were observed. Plasma concentrations peaked at 3.67 hr with a concentration of 4.00 μg/ml for the lower dosage, and at 0.83 hr at 8.77 μg/ml for the higher dosage. Piroxicam may exhibit linear kinetics and dose proportionality in brolgas, but will require further study. Mean peak plasma concentrations in brolgas were comparable to concentrations demonstrated to be analgesic in humans. To the authors' knowledge, this study represents the first pharmacokinetic investigation of piroxicam in an avian species.

  15. Rats and rabbits as pharmacokinetic screening tools for long acting intramuscular depots: case study with paliperidone palmitate suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harilal; Patel, Prakash; Modi, Nirav; Patel, Pinakin; Wagh, Yogesh; George, Alex; Desai, Nirmal; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2018-05-08

    Development of prodrug of 9-hydroxyrisperidone (paliperidone) long-acting intramuscular injection has enabled delivery over four-week time period with improved compliance. The key aim of this work was to establish a reliable preclinical model which may potentially serve as a screening tool for judging the pharmacokinetics of paliperidone formulation(s) prior to human clinical work. Sparse sampling composite study was used in rats, (Wistar/Sprague-Dawley (SD; n = 10)) and a serial blood sampling study design was used in rabbits (n = 4). Animals received intramuscular injection of paliperidone palmitate in the thigh muscle at dose of 16 (rats) and 4.5 mg/kg (rabbits). Samples were drawn in rats (retro-orbital sinus) and rabbits (central ear artery) and were analysed for paliperidone using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/ mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay. The plasma data was subjected to pharmacokinetic analysis. Following intramuscular injection of depot formulation in Wistar/SD rats and rabbits, absorption of paliperidone was slow and gradual with median value of time to reach maximum concentration (T max ) occurring on day 7. The exposures (i.e. area under the curve (AUC; 0-28) days) were 18,597, 21,865 and 18,120 ng.h/mL, in Wistar, SD and rabbits, respectively. The clearance was slow and supported long half-life (8-10 days). Either one of the two models can serve as a research tool for establishing pharmacokinetics of paliperidone formulation(s).

  16. Pharmacokinetics of labelled compounds with technetium-99m and samarium-153

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borda O, L.B.; Torres L, M.N.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish the different pharmacokinetics parameters of the main radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and samarium-153. These parameters could be subsequently used as reference to compare other products with the same use. Mathematical models and a computerized pharmacokinetic program were used to this purpose. A biodistribution study in quadruplicate and/or quintuplicate was conducted for each radiopharmaceutical, data was was obtained in injection dose percentages. The biodistribution study involved the injection of a predetermined dose of the radiopharmaceutical into animals (rats or mice), which were subsequently put away at different time intervals, removing the relevant organs. Activity in each organ was read by means of a well-type NaI scintillation counter, data obtained in activity counts was transformed into injection dose percentages. Based on these percentages, the mathematical model was constructed and the pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained using the computerized program Expo 2 v. 1, which is written in C language and works in windows. Analyzing the results obtained, we can conclude that the use of the Expo 2 v. 1 program for a bi compartmental analysis allowed us to obtain reliable pharmacokinetic parameters which describe what happens in the organism when the radiopharmaceutical passes from the central compartment to the peripheral one and vice versa

  17. Practical applications of age-dependent reliability models and analysis of operational data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lannoy, A.; Nitoi, M.; Backstrom, O.; Burgazzi, L.; Couallier, V.; Nikulin, M.; Derode, A.; Rodionov, A.; Atwood, C.; Fradet, F.; Antonov, A.; Berezhnoy, A.; Choi, S.Y.; Starr, F.; Dawson, J.; Palmen, H.; Clerjaud, L

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to present the experience of practical application of time-dependent reliability models. The program of the workshop comprises the following sessions: -) aging management and aging PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment), -) modeling, -) operation experience, and -) accelerating aging tests. In order to introduce time aging effect of particular component to the PSA model, it has been proposed to use the constant unavailability values on the short period of time (one year for example) calculated on the basis of age-dependent reliability models. As for modeling, it appears that the problem of too detailed statistical models for application is the lack of data for required parameters. As for operating experience, several methods of operating experience analysis have been presented (algorithms for reliability data elaboration and statistical identification of aging trend). As for accelerated aging tests, it is demonstrated that a combination of operating experience analysis with the results of accelerated aging tests of naturally aged equipment could provide a good basis for continuous operation of instrumentation and control systems.

  18. Practical applications of age-dependent reliability models and analysis of operational data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannoy, A.; Nitoi, M.; Backstrom, O.; Burgazzi, L.; Couallier, V.; Nikulin, M.; Derode, A.; Rodionov, A.; Atwood, C.; Fradet, F.; Antonov, A.; Berezhnoy, A.; Choi, S.Y.; Starr, F.; Dawson, J.; Palmen, H.; Clerjaud, L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to present the experience of practical application of time-dependent reliability models. The program of the workshop comprises the following sessions: -) aging management and aging PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment), -) modeling, -) operation experience, and -) accelerating aging tests. In order to introduce time aging effect of particular component to the PSA model, it has been proposed to use the constant unavailability values on the short period of time (one year for example) calculated on the basis of age-dependent reliability models. As for modeling, it appears that the problem of too detailed statistical models for application is the lack of data for required parameters. As for operating experience, several methods of operating experience analysis have been presented (algorithms for reliability data elaboration and statistical identification of aging trend). As for accelerated aging tests, it is demonstrated that a combination of operating experience analysis with the results of accelerated aging tests of naturally aged equipment could provide a good basis for continuous operation of instrumentation and control systems

  19. Meta-analysis of clinical studies supports the pharmacokinetic variability hypothesis for acquired drug resistance and failure of antituberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Srivastava, Shashikant; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2012-07-01

    Using hollow-fiber tuberculosis studies, we recently demonstrated that nonadherence is not a significant factor for ADR and that therapy failure only occurs after a large proportion of doses are missed. Computer-aided clinical trial simulations have suggested that isoniazid and rifampin pharmacokinetic variability best explained poor outcomes. We were interested in determining whether isoniazid pharmacokinetic variability was associated with either microbiological failure or ADR in the clinic. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trials that reported isoniazid acetylation status and microbiological outcomes were selected. The main effects examined were microbiological sputum conversion, ADR, and relapse. Effect size was expressed as pooled risk ratios (RRs) comparing rapid with slow acetylators. Thirteen randomized studies with 1631 rapid acetylators and 1751 slow acetylators met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Rapid acetylators were more likely than slow acetylators to have microbiological failure (RR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-2.7), ADR (RR, 2.0; CI, 1.1-3.4), and relapse (RR, 1.3; CI, .9-2.0). Higher failure rates were encountered even in drug regimens comprising >3 antibiotics. No publication bias or small-study effects were observed for the outcomes evaluated. Pharmacokinetic variability to a single drug in the regimen is significantly associated with failure of therapy and ADR in patients. This suggests that individualized dosing for tuberculosis may be more effective than standardized dosing, which is prescribed in directly observed therapy programs.

  20. Phase I biodistribution and pharmacokinetic study of Lewis Y targeting immunoconjugate CMD-193 in patients with advanced epithelial cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbertson, R. A.; Lee, F. T.; Hopkins, W.; Smyth, F. E.; Murone, C.; Tebbutt, N. C.; Micallef, N.; MacFarlane, D. J.; Bellen, J.; Sonnichsen, D. S.; Brechbiel, M. W.; Scott, A. M.; Lee, T. L.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Background: The Lewis Y (Ley) antigen is a blood-group related antigen expressed in >70% of solid tumours. This study explored the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the immunoconjugate CMD-193 (humanized anti-Ley antibody conjugated with calichaemicin) in patients with advanced Ley expressing epithelial cancers. Methods: There were 2 dose cohorts, (1.0mg/m2 and 2.6mg/m2). Primary objectives were to determine biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of CMD-193. The first cycle was labelled with 111In for biodistribution assessment, and subsequent cycles were administered 3 weekly to a maximum of 6 cycles. Tumour targeting was assessed using SPECT imaging, and pharmacokinetic analysis was based on gamma counting (111In-CMD-193) and ELISA (CMD-193 protein). Results: Nine patients were enrolled, and received 1-6 treatment cycles. Biodistribution imaging demonstrated initial blood pooling, followed by markedly increased hepatic uptake by day 2 (which persisted to day 8), and fast blood clearance. This pattern was seen for all patients, with no significant tumour uptake visualised in any patient. The overall T 1 /2 of 111In-CMD-193 complex formation in blood. One patient had partial metabolic response on 18F-FDG-PET. No radiologic responses were observed. Conclusions: CMD-193 demonstrates rapid blood clearance and increased hepatic uptake compared to prior studies of the original non-conjugated antibody. This trial highlights the importance of biodistribution and pharmacodynamic assessment in early phase studies of new biologics in clinical development.

  1. Cell cycle age dependence for radiation-induced G2 arrest: evidence for time-dependent repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Exponentially growing eucaryotic cells, irradiated in interphase, are delayed in progression to mitosis chiefly by arrest in G 2 . The sensitivity of Chinese hamster ovary cells to G 2 arrest induction by X rays increases through the cell cycle, up to the X-ray transition point (TP) in G 2 . This age response can be explained by cell cycle age-dependent changes in susceptibility of the target(s) for G 2 arrest and/or by changes in capability for postirradiation recovery from G 2 arrest damage. Discrimination between sensitivity changes and repair phenomena is possible only if the level of G 2 arrest-causing damage sustained by a cell at the time of irradiation and the level ultimately expressed as arrest can be determined. The ability of caffeine to ameliorate radiation-induced G 2 arrest, while inhibiting repair of G 2 arrest-causing damage makes such an analysis possible. In the presence of caffeine, progression of irradiated cells was relatively unperturbed, but on caffeine removal, G 2 arrest was expressed. The duration of G 2 arrest was independent of the length of the prior caffeine exposure. This finding indicates that the target for G 2 arrest induction is present throughout the cell cycle and that the level of G 2 arrest damage incurred is initially constant for all cell cycle phases. The data are consistent with the existence of a time-dependent recovery mechanism to explain the age dependence for radiation induction of G 2 arrest

  2. Nicotinamide pharmacokinetics in humans and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, M.R.; Hoyer, M.; Overgaard, J.; Honess, D.J.; Dennis, A.F.

    1993-01-01

    Healthy human volunteers orally ingested escalating doses of up to 6 g nicotinamide in capsule form on an empty stomach. Some side-effects were seen although these were mild and transient. HPLC analysis of blood samples showed peak plasma levels, typically within 45 min after ingestion, which were linearly dependent on dose ingested. The elimination half-life and AUC were also found to increase with drug dose, although these increases were non-linear. Pharmacokinetic studies were also performed to female CDF1 mice with C3H mammary carcinomas grown in the right rear foot. Analysis of blood and tumour samples taken from mice injected i.p. with nicotinamide doses between 100-1000 mg/kg showed similar characteristics as the human data, although the elimination half-lives were not dose-dependent. The average peak plasma concentration of 160 μg/ml measured in humans after taking 6 g of nicotinamide was equivalent to that seen in mice after injecting 171 mg/kg. Using a regrowth delay assay the enhancement of radiation damage by nicotinamide in this mouse tumour was found to be independent of drug dose from 100-1000 mg/kg, resulting in a constant 1.3-fold increase in radiation response. Doses of nicotinamide that can be tolerated clinically should therefore produce adequate enhancements of radiation damage in human tumours. (author)

  3. Analysis of a general age-dependent vaccination model for a vertically transmitted disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Doma, M.

    1995-05-01

    A SIR epidemic model of a general age-dependent vaccination for a vertically as well as horizontally transmitted disease is investigated when the total population is time dependent, and fertility, mortality and removal rates depend on age. We establish the existence and the uniqueness of the solution and obtain the asymptotic behaviour for the solution. For the steady state solution a critical vaccination coverage which will eventually eradicate the disease is determined. (author). 18 refs

  4. In vitro and in vivo studies of pharmacokinetics and antitumor efficacy of D07001-F4, an oral gemcitabine formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wei-Hua; Wang, Jong-Jing; Hsueh, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Pei-Jing; Chang, Li-Chien; Hsu, Chang-Shan; Hsu, Kuang-Yang

    2013-02-01

    The chemotherapy agent gemcitabine is currently administered intravenously because the drug has poor oral bioavailability. In order to assess the pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of D07001-F4, a new self-microemulsifying oral drug delivery system preparation of gemcitabine, this study was performed to compare the effect of D07001-F4 with administered gemcitabine in vitro and in vivo. D07001-F4 pharmacokinetics was examined by evaluation of in vitro deamination of D07001-F4 and gemcitabine hydrochloride by recombinant human cytidine deaminase (rhCDA) and in vivo evaluation of D07001-F4 pharmacokinetics in mice. Antitumor activity was evaluated by comparing the effect of D07001-F4 and gemcitabine hydrochloride in inhibiting growth in nine cancer cell lines and by examining the effect of D07001-F4 and gemcitabine in two xenograft tumor models in mice. In vitro deamination of D07001-F4 by rhCDA was 3.3-fold slower than deamination of gemcitabine hydrochloride. Growth inhibition by D07001-F4 of 7 of the 8 cancer cell lines was increased compared with that seen with gemcitabine hydrochloride, and D07001-F4 inhibited the growth of pancreatic and colon cancer xenografts. In vivo pharmacokinetics showed the oral bioavailability of D07001-F4 to be 34%. D07001-F4 was effective against several cancer types, was metabolized more slowly than gemcitabine hydrochloride, and exhibited enhanced oral bioavailability.

  5. Contribution of the D-Serine-dependent pathway to the cellular mechanisms underlying cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Rouaud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An association between age-related memory impairments and changes in functional plasticity in the aging brain has been under intense study within the last decade. In this article, we show that an impaired activation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDA-R by its agonist D-serine contributes to deficits of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats. Supplementation with exogenous D-serine prevents the age-related deficits of isolated NMDA-R-dependent synaptic potentials as well as those of theta-burst-induced long-term potentiation and synaptic depotentiation. Endogenous levels of D-serine are reduced in the hippocampus with aging, that correlates with a weaker expression of serine racemase synthesizing the amino acid. On the contrary, the affinity of D-serine binding to NMDA-R is not affected by aging. These results point to a critical role for the D-serine-dependent pathway in the functional alterations of the brain underlying memory impairment and provide key information in the search for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of memory deficits in the elderly.

  6. Nox2-dependent ROS signaling protects against skeletal ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone remodeling is age-dependently regulated and changes dramatically during the course of development. Progressive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals, has been suspected to be the leading cause of many inflammatory and degen...

  7. Age-Dependent Cancer Risk Is not Different in between MSH2 and MLH1 Mutation Carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olschwang, S.; Olschwang, S.; Yu, K.

    2009-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is mostly characterized by early-onset colorectal and endometrial adenocarcinomas. Over 90% of the causal mutations occur in two mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the age-dependent cancer risk in MSH2 or MLH1 mutation carriers from data of DNA diagnostic laboratories. To avoid overestimation, evaluation was based on the age-dependent proportion of mutation carriers in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of identified mutation carriers. Data from 859 such eligible relatives were collected from 8 centers; 387 were found to have inherited the mutation from their relatives. Age-dependent risks were calculated either using a nonparametric approach for four discrete age groups or assuming a modified Weibull distribution for the dependence of risk on age. Cancer risk was estimated starting at 28 (25-32 0.68 confidence interval) and to reach near 0.70 at 70 years. The risks were very similar for MSH2 and MLH1 mutation carriers. Although not statistically significant, the risk in males appeared to precede that for females by ten years. This difference needs to be investigated on a larger dataset. If confirmed, this would indicate that the onset of the colonoscopic surveillance may be different in male and female mutation carriers.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of linezolid in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazdanovic, Predrag; Jankovic, Slobodan M; Kostic, Marina; Dimitrijevic, Aleksandra; Stefanovic, Srdjan

    2016-06-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic active against Gram-positive bacteria, and is most commonly used to treat life-threatening infections in critically ill patients. The pharmacokinetics of linezolid are profoundly altered in critically ill patients, partly due to decreased function of vital organs, and partly because life-sustaining drugs and devices may change the extent of its excretion. This article is summarizes key changes in the pharmacokinetics of linezolid in critically ill patients. The changes summarized are clinically relevant and may serve as rationale for dosing recommendations in this particular population. While absorption and penetration of linezolid to tissues are not significantly changed in critically ill patients, protein binding of linezolid is decreased, volume of distribution increased, and metabolism may be inhibited leading to non-linear kinetics of elimination; these changes are responsible for high inter-individual variability of linezolid plasma concentrations, which requires therapeutic plasma monitoring and choice of continuous venous infusion as the administration method. Acute renal or liver failure decrease clearance of linezolid, but renal replacement therapy is capable of restoring clearance back to normal, obviating the need for dosage adjustment. More population pharmacokinetic studies are necessary which will identify and quantify the influence of various factors on clearance and plasma concentrations of linezolid in critically ill patients.

  9. Comparative bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of two oral formulations of flurbiprofen: a single-dose, randomized, open-label, two-period, crossover study in Pakistani subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Aisha; Najmi, Muzammil Hasan; Abbas, Mateen

    2013-11-01

    Comparative bioavailability studies are conducted to establish the bioequivalence of generic formulation with that of branded reference formulation, providing confidence to clinicians to use these products interchangeably. This study was carried out to compare a locally manufactured formulation of flurbiprofen with that of a branded product. Twenty two healthy male adults received a single dose of flurbiprofen (100mg) either generic or branded product according to randomization scheme on each of 2 periods. Blood samples were collected and plasma flurbiprofen concentration was determined by a validated HPLC method. Pharmacokinetic parameters like AUC(0-t), AUC(0-oo), Cmax, Tmax, t½, Vd and clearance were determined. The 90% CI for the ratio of geometric means of test to reference product's pharmacokinetic variables was calculated. Pharmacokinetic parameters for two formulations were comparable. Ratio of means of AUC(0-24), AUC(0-oo) and Cmax for test to reference products and 90% CI for these ratios were within the acceptable range. The p-values calculated by TOST were much less than the specified value (p-0.05). ANOVA gave p-values which were more than the specified value (p-0.05) for sequence, subject, period and formulation. Test formulation of flurbiprofen (tablet Flurso) was found to meet the criteria for bioequivalence to branded product (tablet Ansaid) based on pharmacokinetic parameters.

  10. Randomized, open-label, 5-way crossover study to evaluate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic interaction between furosemide and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs diclofenac and ibuprofen in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, C A; Jacobs, D; Rasmussen, S; Youngberg, S P; McGuinness, N

    2011-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can induce renal complications in patients taking loop diuretics. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic effects and safety profile of orally administered diclofenac sodium, ibuprofen and diclofenac epolamine topical patch (DETP) on furosemide in healthy adult subjects. This open-label, randomized, 5-way crossover study was conducted in 40 subjects (aged 19 - 45 y). Diclofenac (75 mg taken orally twice daily), DETP (1.3% applied topically twice daily), or ibuprofen (800 mg taken orally thrice daily) was administered for 3 consecutive days, followed by co-administration with furosemide (given intravenously as 20 mg/2 min). Plasma furosemide and NSAID concentrations, urine furosemide, sodium and potassium concentrations and urine output were determined throughout the 24 h period following furosemide administration. Orally administered ibuprofen significantly increased furosemide AUC(0-t) (37%) and AUC(0-inf) (36%) and decreased total body CL (27%), R(max) (19%) and CLR (23%) geometric mean ratios compared with furosemide control. Oral and topical diclofenac had no pharmacokinetic effects on furosemide. Ibuprofen increased sodium excretion (Ae(0-24), 16%) and decreased sodium R(max) (15%), and oral diclofenac decreased urine output (Vu(0-24), 15%). DETP had no effect on furosemide pharmacodynamics; total systemic exposure to diclofenac during DETP treatment was diclofenac. Treatments were generally safe, with 25 subjects reporting a total of 112 adverse events. Pharmacodynamic effects were seen with oral diclofenac (urine output) and ibuprofen (urine sodium excretion). Furosemide also affected plasma and urine pharmacokinetic profiles. Pharmacologic effects of DETP on furosemide were not observed under these conditions. Additional research is warranted to delineate the potential interactions of other NSAIDs with furosemide and other loop diuretics.

  11. Age-dependent Characteristics in Women with Breast Cancer: Mastectomy and Reconstructive Trends at an Urban Academic Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodby, Katherine A; Robinson, Emilie; Danielson, Kirstie K; Quinn, Karina P; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-03-01

    Breast reconstruction is an important aspect of treatment after breast cancer. Postmastectomy reconstruction bears a significant impact on a woman's postsurgical confidence, sexuality, and overall well-being. Previous studies have inferred that women under age 40 years have unique characteristics that distinguish them from an older cohort. Identifying age-dependent trends will assist with counseling women on mastectomy and reconstruction. To identify age-dependent trends, 100 consecutive women were sampled from a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database at an urban academic institution from June 2010 through June 2013. Women were placed into two cohorts mastectomy, reconstructive and symmetry procedures were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. In 100 patients of the sample study cohort, 151 reconstructions were performed. Increasing age was associated with one or more comorbidities [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, P = 0.005], whereas younger age was associated with metastatic disease (OR = 0.88, P = 0.006), chemotherapy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.01), and radiation (OR = 0.94, P = 0.006); split cohorts demonstrated similar trends (P Mastectomy and reconstructive characteristics associated with younger age included bilateral mastectomy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.004), tissue expander (versus autologous flap) (OR = 0.94, P = 0.009), extra high implant type (OR = 0.94, P = 0.049), whereas increasing use of autologous flaps and contralateral mastopexy symmetry procedures (OR = 1.09, P = 0.02) were associated with an aging cohort. Increasing age was not associated with an increasing likelihood of complications (P = 0.75). Age-related factors play a role in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. Younger women typically present with more aggressive features requiring oncologic treatment including chemotherapy and radiation. Mastectomy and reconstructive choices also demonstrate age-dependent characteristics. Women in younger age groups are more

  12. PET Studies of d-Methamphetamine Pharmacokinetics in Primates: Comparison with l-Methamphetamine and (—)-Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Kroll, Carsten; Ferrieri, Richard; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Dewey, Stephen L.; Schiffer, Wynne; Schlyer, David; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Shea, Colleen; Xu, Youwen; Muench, Lisa; Benveniste, Helene; Vaska, Paul; Volkow, Nora D.

    2009-01-01

    The methamphetamine molecule has a chiral center and exists as 2 enantiomers, d-methamphetamine (the more active enantiomer) and l-methamphetamine (the less active enantiomer). d-Methamphetamine is associated with more intense stimulant effects and higher abuse liability. The objective of this study was to measure the pharmacokinetics of d-methamphetamine for comparison with both l-methamphetamine and (—)-cocaine in the baboon brain and peripheral organs and to assess the saturability and pharmacologic specificity of binding. Methods d- and l-methamphetamine and (—)-cocaine were labeled with 11C via alkylation of the norprecursors with 11C-methyl iodide using literature methods. Six different baboons were studied in 11 PET sessions at which 2 radiotracer injections were administered 2–3 h apart to determine the distribution and kinetics of 11C-d-methamphetamine in brain and peripheral organs. Saturability and pharmacologic specificity were assessed using pretreatment with d-methamphetamine, methylphenidate, and tetrabenazine. 11C-d-Methamphetamine pharmacokinetics were compared with 11C-l-methamphetamine and 11C-(—)-cocaine in both brain and peripheral organs in the same animal. Results 11C-d- and l-methamphetamine both showed high uptake and widespread distribution in the brain. Pharmacokinetics did not differ between enantiomers, and the cerebellum peaked earlier and cleared more quickly than the striatum for both. 11C-d-Methamphetamine distribution volume ratio was not substantially affected by pretreatment with methamphetamine, methylphenidate, or tetrabenazine. Both enantiomers showed rapid, high uptake and clearance in the heart and lungs and slower uptake and clearance in the liver and kidneys. A comparison of 11C-d-methamphetamine and 11C-(—)-cocaine showed that 11C-d-methamphetamine peaked later in the brain than did 11C-(—)-cocaine and cleared more slowly. The 2 drugs showed similar behavior in all peripheral organs examined except the kidneys

  13. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) Analysis with Drug Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-08-30

    Discriminative stimulus and other drug effects are determined by the concentration of drug at its target receptor and by the pharmacodynamic consequences of drug-receptor interaction. For in vivo procedures such as drug discrimination, drug concentration at receptors in a given anatomical location (e.g., the brain) is determined both by the dose of drug administered and by pharmacokinetic processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion that deliver drug to and from that anatomical location. Drug discrimination data are often analyzed by strategies of dose-effect analysis to determine parameters such as potency and efficacy. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) analysis is an alternative to conventional dose-effect analysis, and it relates drug effects to a measure of drug concentration in a body compartment (e.g., venous blood) rather than to drug dose. PKPD analysis can yield insights on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic determinants of drug action. PKPD analysis can also facilitate translational research by identifying species differences in pharmacokinetics and providing a basis for integrating these differences into interpretation of drug effects. Examples are discussed here to illustrate the application of PKPD analysis to the evaluation of drug effects in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline.

  14. Extending Metformin Use in Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Pharmacokinetic Study in Stage 4 Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Ajith Munasinghe Dissanayake

    2017-07-01

    Discussion: In our patient cohorts with diabetes and stage 4 chronic kidney disease, treatment with 4 weeks of low-dose metformin was not associated with adverse safety outcomes and revealed stable pharmacokinetics. Our study supports the liberalization of metformin use in this population and supports the use of metformin assays for more individualized dosing.

  15. AGE-DEPENDENT FEATURES OF EVOLVING HUMORAL IMMUNITY IN CHILDREN

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    A. P. Toptygina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Age dynamics of humoral immunity was studied in healthy children, i.e., 11 newborns, 33 infants of 4 to 8 months, 32 children of 1 to 2 years old,, 17 children of 4 to 5 years old, 25 children of 6 to 8 years old, 15 children of 9 to 11 years old, and 28 adolescents of 14 to 16 years old. Evaluation of membrane receptors on B cells was performed by means of three-colour fluorescent label and allowed of characterizing B1 subpopulations (CD19+CD5+CD27-, naпve B2 cells (CD19+CD5-CD27-, and B2 memory cells (CD19+CD5-CD27+. B1 cells have been shown to dominate in blood of newborns and younger children (up to 5 years old. By the contrary, B2 memory cells were nearly undetectable in newborns, and exceeded 20% in adolescents (by 15 years old. Meanwhile, it has been revealed that the amounts of IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses did progressively increase with age, whereas IgG2 remained decreased to 50% of adult values for a long time, and reached them by 11 years and later. We suggest that the age dynamics of IgG subclasses is connected with age-dependent changes in B cell subpopulations.

  16. Concurrent administration of anticancer chemotherapy drug and herbal medicine on the perspective of pharmacokinetics

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    Yung-Yi Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing number of cancer patients seeking an improved quality of life, complementary and alternative therapies are becoming more common ways to achieve such improvements. The potential risks of concurrent administration are serious and must be addressed. However, comprehensive evidence for the risks and benefits of combining anticancer drugs with traditional herbs is rare. Pharmacokinetic investigations are an efficient way to understand the influence of concomitant remedies. Therefore, this study aimed to collect the results of pharmacokinetic studies relating to the concurrent use of cancer chemotherapy and complementary and alternative therapies. According to the National Health Insurance (NHI database in Taiwan and several publications, the three most commonly prescribed formulations for cancer patients are Xiang-Sha-Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang, Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San and Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang. The three most commonly prescribed single herbs for cancer patients are Hedyotis diffusa, Scutellaria barbata, and Astragalus membranaceus. Few studies have discussed herb–drug interactions involving these herbs from a pharmacokinetics perspective. Here, we reviewed Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San, Long-Dan-Xie-Gan-Tang, Curcuma longa and milk thistle to provide information based on pharmacokinetic evidence for healthcare professionals to use in educating patients about the risks of the concomitant use of various remedies. Keywords: Traditional Chinese medicine, Chemotherapy drug, Pharmacokinetics, Herb–drug interaction

  17. Dosing-time contributes to chronotoxicity of clofarabine in mice via means other than pharmacokinetics

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    Jia-Jie Luan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the time- and dose-dependent toxicity of clofarabine in mice and to further define the chronotherapy strategy of it in leukemia, we compared the mortality rates, LD50s, biochemical parameters, histological changes and organ indexes of mice treated with clofarabine at various doses and time points. Plasma clofarabine levels and pharmacokinetic parameters were monitored continuously for up to 8 hours after the single intravenous administration of 20 mg/kg at 12:00 noon and 12:00 midnight by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV method. Clofarabine toxicity in all groups fluctuated in accordance with circadian rhythms in vivo. The toxicity of clofarabine in mice in the rest phase was more severe than the active one, indicated by more severe liver damage, immunodepression, higher mortality rate, and lower LD50. No significant pharmacokinetic parameter changes were observed between the night and daytime treatment groups. These findings suggest the dosing-time dependent toxicity of clofarabine synchronizes with the circadian rhythm of mice, which might provide new therapeutic strategies in further clinical application.

  18. Transplacental pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in perfused human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Kyohei; Hori, Satoko; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Nagata, Hideaki; Satoh, Shoji; Tsukimori, Kiyomi; Nakano, Hitoo; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Taketani, Yuji; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2009-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac and to determine the effect of L-lactic acid on the transplacental transfer of diclofenac. The maternal and fetal vessels of human placenta were perfused in a single-pass mode with a solution containing diclofenac and antipyrine. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the time profiles of the drug concentrations in the effluent and placenta to obtain transplacental pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, chloride ion in the perfusate was partially replaced with L-lactic acid to see the change in the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac. The TPT(ss) value (ratio of the rate of amount transferred across the placenta to that infused in the steady state) of diclofenac was 2.22%, which was approximately one-third that of antipyrine and was significantly reduced in the presence of L-lactic acid. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model could adequately explain the transplacental transfer of diclofenac with influx clearances from maternal and fetal perfusates to placental tissue of 0.276 and 0.0345 ml/min/g cotyledon and efflux rate constants from placental tissue to maternal and fetal perfusates of 0.406 and 0.0337 min(-1), respectively. By taking into account protein binding, the placental tissue/plasma concentration ratio in humans for diclofenac was estimated to be 0.108 ml/g of cotyledon and was smaller than that of antipyrine. In conclusion, human placental perfusion and transplacental pharmacokinetic modeling allowed us to determine the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac quantitatively. Diclofenac may share transplacental transfer system(s) with L-lactic acid.

  19. Melatonin membrane receptor (MT1R) expression and nitro-oxidative stress in testis of golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus: An age-dependent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arun; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-09-01

    Age-dependent decline in melatonin level induces nitro-oxidative stress that compromises physiological homeostasis including reproduction. However, less information exist regarding the age-dependent variation in local melatonin (lMel) concentration and MT1R expression in testis and its interaction with testicular steroidogenesis and nitro-oxidative stress in golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus. Therefore, we evaluated lMel level along with MT1R expression and its possible interaction with steroidogenesis and nitro-oxidative stress in testes of young (6weeks), adult (15weeks) and old (2years) aged hamsters. Further, we injected the old hamsters with melatonin to address whether age-related decline in lMel and MT1R is responsible for the reduction in testicular steroidogenesis and antioxidant status. Increased expression of steroidogenic markers suggests increased testicular steroidogenesis in adult hamsters that declined in old hamsters. An age-dependent elevation in the level of NOX, TBARS, corticosterone and the expression of iNOS and GR with a concomitant decrease in enzyme activities for SOD, CAT, GSH-PX indicate increased nitro-oxidative stress in testes. Data suggest that reproductive senescence in male hamsters might be a consequence of declined lMel concentration with MT1R expression inducing nitro-oxidative stress resulting in diminished testicular steroidogenesis. However, administration of Mel in old-aged hamsters significantly increased steroidogenesis and antioxidant status without a significant variation in lMel concentration and MT1R expression in testes. Therefore, decreased lMel and MT1R might not be the causative factor underlying the age-associated decrease in antioxidant defence and steroidogenesis in testes. In conclusion, Mel induced amelioration of testicular oxidative insult and elevation of steroidogenic activity suggests a potential role of increased nitro-oxidative stress underlying the age-dependent decrease in steroidogenesis. Copyright

  20. Vascular input function correction of inflow enhancement for improved pharmacokinetic modeling of liver DCE-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jia; Schubert, Tilman; Johnson, Kevin M; Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Chen, Huijun; Yuan, Chun; Reeder, Scott B

    2018-06-01

    To propose a simple method to correct vascular input function (VIF) due to inflow effects and to test whether the proposed method can provide more accurate VIFs for improved pharmacokinetic modeling. A spoiled gradient echo sequence-based inflow quantification and contrast agent concentration correction method was proposed. Simulations were conducted to illustrate improvement in the accuracy of VIF estimation and pharmacokinetic fitting. Animal studies with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR scans were conducted before, 1 week after, and 2 weeks after portal vein embolization (PVE) was performed in the left portal circulation of pigs. The proposed method was applied to correct the VIFs for model fitting. Pharmacokinetic parameters fitted using corrected and uncorrected VIFs were compared between different lobes and visits. Simulation results demonstrated that the proposed method can improve accuracy of VIF estimation and pharmacokinetic fitting. In animal study results, pharmacokinetic fitting using corrected VIFs demonstrated changes in perfusion consistent with changes expected after PVE, whereas the perfusion estimates derived by uncorrected VIFs showed no significant changes. The proposed correction method improves accuracy of VIFs and therefore provides more precise pharmacokinetic fitting. This method may be promising in improving the reliability of perfusion quantification. Magn Reson Med 79:3093-3102, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Population pharmacokinetics of a three-day chloroquine treatment in patients with Plasmodium vivax infection on the Thai-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Richard; Moussavi, Younis; Ruengweerayut, Ronnatrai; Cheomung, Anurak; Äbelö, Angela; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2016-02-29

    A three-day course of chloroquine remains a standard treatment of Plasmodium vivax infection in Thailand with satisfactory clinical efficacy and tolerability although a continuous decline in in vitro parasite sensitivity has been reported. Information on the pharmacokinetics of chloroquine and its active metabolite desethylchloroquine are required for optimization of treatment to attain therapeutic exposure and thus prevent drug resistance development. The study was conducted at Mae Tao Clinic for migrant worker, Tak province, Thailand. Blood samples were collected from a total of 75 (8 Thais and 67 Burmeses; 36 males and 39 females; aged 17-52 years) patients with mono-infection with P. vivax malaria [median (95 % CI) admission parasitaemia 4898 (1206-29,480)/µL] following treatment with a three-day course of chloroquine (25 mg/kg body weight chloroquine phosphate over 3 days). Whole blood concentrations of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. Concentration-time profiles of both compounds were analysed using a population-based pharmacokinetic approach. All patients showed satisfactory response to standard treatment with a three-day course of chloroquine with 100 % cure rate within the follow-up period of 42 days. Neither recurrence of P. vivax parasitaemia nor appearance of P. falciparum occurred. A total of 1045 observations from 75 participants were included in the pharmacokinetic analysis. Chloroquine disposition was most adequately described by the two-compartment model with one transit compartment absorption model into the central compartment and a first-order transformation of chloroquine into desethylchloroquine with an additional peripheral compartment added to desethylchloroquine. First-order elimination from the central compartment of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine was assumed. The model exhibited a strong predictive ability and the pharmacokinetic parameters were

  2. Comparative steady-state pharmacokinetic study of an extended-release formulation of itopride and its immediate-release reference formulation in healthy volunteers

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    Yoon S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seonghae Yoon,1,* Howard Lee,2,* Tae-Eun Kim,1 SeungHwan Lee,1 Dong-Hyun Chee,3 Joo-Youn Cho,1 Kyung-Sang Yu,1 In-Jin Jang1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, 2Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, 3AbbVie Ltd., Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: This study was conducted to compare the oral bioavailability of an itopride extended-release (ER formulation with that of the reference immediate-release (IR formulation in the fasting state. The effect of food on the bioavailability of itopride ER was also assessed. Methods: A single-center, open-label, randomized, multiple-dose, three-treatment, three-sequence, crossover study was performed in 24 healthy male subjects, aged 22–48 years, who randomly received one of the following treatments for 4 days in each period: itopride 150 mg ER once daily under fasting or fed conditions, or itopride 50 mg IR three times daily in the fasting state. Steady-state pharmacokinetic parameters of itopride, including peak plasma concentration (Cmax and area under the plasma concentration versus time curve over 24 hours after dosing (AUC0–24h, were determined by noncompartmental analysis. The geometric mean ratio of the pharmacokinetic parameters was derived using an analysis of variance model. Results: A total of 24 healthy Korean subjects participated, 23 of whom completed the study. The geometric mean ratio and its 90% confidence interval of once-daily ER itopride versus IR itopride three times a day for AUC0–24h were contained within the conventional bioequivalence range of 0.80–1.25 (0.94 [0.88–1.01], although Cmax was reached more slowly and was lower for itopride ER than for the IR formulation. Food delayed the time taken to reach Cmax for itopride ER, but AUC0–24h was not affected. There were no serious adverse events and both formulations were

  3. Age- and sex-dependent model for estimating radioiodine dose to a normal thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the derivation of an age- and sex-dependent model of radioiodine dosimetry in the thyroid and the application of the model to estimating the thyroid dose for each of 4215 patients who were exposed to 131 I in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The model was made to conform to these data requirements by the use of age-specific estimates of the biological half-time of iodine in the thyroid and an age- and sex-dependent representation of the mass of the thyroid. Also, it was assumed that the thyroid burden was maximum 24 hours after administration (the 131 I dose is not critically sensitive to this assumption). The metabolic model is of the form A(t) = K[exp(-μ 1 t) - exp(-μ 2 t)] (μCi), where μ 1 = lambda/sub r/ + lambda/sub i//sup b/ (i = 1, 2), lambda/sub r/ is the radiological decay-rate coefficient, and lambda/sub i//sup b/ are biological removal rate coefficients. The values of lambda/sub i//sup b/ are determined by solving a nonlinear equation that depends on assumptions about the time of maximum uptake and the eventual biological loss rate (through which age dependence enters). The value of K may then be calculated from knowledge of the uptake at a particular time. The dosimetric S-factor (rad/μCi-day) is based on specific absorbed fractions for photons of energy ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV for thyroid masses from 1.29 to 19.6 g; the functional form of the S-factor also involves the thyroid mass explicitly, through which the dependence on age and sex enters. An analysis of sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the thyroid mass and the biological removal rate for several age groups is reported. The model could prove useful in the dosimetry of very short-lived radioiodines. Tables of age- and sex-dependent coefficients are provided to enable readers to make their own calculations. 12 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  4. A comparative study of self-regulation in substance dependent and non-dependent individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshani, Nour Mohammad; Hosseinbor, Mohsen

    2013-08-05

    Several factors influence the beginning and maintenance of substance use. The purpose of this study was to examine as well as to compare 'self-regulation' in both substance dependent and non-substance dependent individuals. In a cross-sectional study 228 (118 substance dependent and 110 with no history of using substance) participants aged 16-55 were recruited. All of the participants were asked to complete the Self-Regulation Inventory (SRI-25) and a demographic characteristics data checklist. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation) and the t-test. The results showed significant differences between substance dependent and non- substance dependent groups in all the scales of the self-regulation inventory including positive actions, controllability, expression of feelings and needs, assertiveness, and well-being seeking (p<0.01). Self-regulation and self-control skills in drug dependent individuals are lower than those without substance dependence individuals. It is concluded that substance use may related to a deficiency in self-control and regulation of feelings. Therefore, for prevention and treatment of substance dependence disorder, it is necessary to work out and exploit strategies that include the improvement of self-regulation.

  5. Relationship between age and promotion orientation depends on perceived older worker stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Catherine E; Staudinger, Ursula M

    2013-01-01

    Research has consistently revealed a negative relationship between chronological age and promotion orientation, that is, the motivational orientation toward approaching possible gains. In addition, experimental research has demonstrated that activating positive self-relevant stereotypes (e.g., for men, the stereotype that men are good at math) can stimulate increases in promotion orientation. Integrating and applying this research to the work context, we hypothesized that the relationship between age and promotion orientation would depend on employees' perceptions of the stereotype of older workers in their work context, such that there would be no negative relationship between age and promotion orientation when individuals perceive a more positive older worker stereotype. We analyzed the relationships between age, perceived older worker stereotype (POWS), and promotion orientation using a sample of working adults (N = 337) aged 19-64 years. Results revealed a significant age by POWS interaction such that there was a negative relationship between age and promotion orientation when POWS was less positive. However, there was no relationship between age and promotion orientation when POWS was more positive. Results suggest that the negative relationship between age and promotion orientation depends on contextual factors such as POWS.

  6. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bačić, Goran; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS), are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI) and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans) under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes. PMID:26827126

  7. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Bačić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS, are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of Active Components From Guhong Injection in Normal and Pathological Rat Models of Cerebral Ischemia: A Comparative Study

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    Li Yu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Guhong Injection (GHI is usually administered for the treatment of stroke in clinics. Aceglutamide and hydroxyl safflower yellow A (HSYA are its key ingredients for brain protective effect. To investigate the pharmacokinetics of aceglutamide and HSYA under pathological and normal conditions, the pharmacokinetic parameters and characteristics of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and normal rats given the same dosage of GHI were studied compared.Methods: 12 SD rats were divided into two groups, namely, MCAO and normal groups. Both groups were treated with GHI in the same dosage. Plasma samples were collected from the jaw vein at different time points and subsequently tested by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC.Results: After administration of GHI, both aceglutamide and HSYA were immediately detected in the plasma. Ninety percent of aceglutamide and HSYA was eliminated within 3 h. For aceglutamide, statistically significant differences in the parameters including AUC(0−t, AUC(0−∞, AUMC(0−t, AUMC(0−∞, Cmax (P < 0.01, and Vz (P < 0.05. Meanwhile, compared with the MCAO group, in the normal group, the values of AUC(0−t, AUMC(0−t, VRT(0−t, and Cmax (P < 0.01 for HSYA were significantly higher, whereas the value of MRT(0−t was significantly lower in the normal group.Conclusions: The in vivo trials based on the different models showed that, the pharmacokinetic behaviors and parameters of aceglutamide and HSYA in GHI were completely different. These results suggest that the pathological damage of ischemia-reperfusion has a significant impact on the pharmacokinetic traits of aceglutamide and HSYA.

  9. Estimating Age-Dependent Extinction: Contrasting Evidence from Fossils and Phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Oskar; Andermann, Tobias; Quental, Tiago B; Antonelli, Alexandre; Silvestro, Daniele

    2018-05-01

    The estimation of diversification rates is one of the most vividly debated topics in modern systematics, with considerable controversy surrounding the power of phylogenetic and fossil-based approaches in estimating extinction. Van Valen's seminal work from 1973 proposed the "Law of constant extinction," which states that the probability of extinction of taxa is not dependent on their age. This assumption of age-independent extinction has prevailed for decades with its assessment based on survivorship curves, which, however, do not directly account for the incompleteness of the fossil record, and have rarely been applied at the species level. Here, we present a Bayesian framework to estimate extinction rates from the fossil record accounting for age-dependent extinction (ADE). Our approach, unlike previous implementations, explicitly models unobserved species and accounts for the effects of fossil preservation on the observed longevity of sampled lineages. We assess the performance and robustness of our method through extensive simulations and apply it to a fossil data set of terrestrial Carnivora spanning the past 40 myr. We find strong evidence of ADE, as we detect the extinction rate to be highest in young species and declining with increasing species age. For comparison, we apply a recently developed analogous ADE model to a dated phylogeny of extant Carnivora. Although the phylogeny-based analysis also infers ADE, it indicates that the extinction rate, instead, increases with increasing taxon age. The estimated mean species longevity also differs substantially, with the fossil-based analyses estimating 2.0 myr, in contrast to 9.8 myr derived from the phylogeny-based inference. Scrutinizing these discrepancies, we find that both fossil and phylogeny-based ADE models are prone to high error rates when speciation and extinction rates increase or decrease through time. However, analyses of simulated and empirical data show that fossil-based inferences are more</