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Sample records for age productivity spatial

  1. Age, Wage and Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.; Stoeldraijer, L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical studies on the effect of age on productivity and wages find contradicting results. Some studies find that if workers grow older there is an increasing gap between productivity and wages, i.e. wages increase with age while productivity does not or does not increase at the same

  2. Cooperation and age structure in spatial games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Xiaodan; Arenzon, Jeferson J

    2012-01-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in evolutionary spatial games when the payoff correlates with the increasing age of players (the level of correlation is set through a single parameter, α). The demographic heterogeneous age distribution, directly affecting the outcome of the game, is thus shown to be responsible for enhancing the cooperative behavior in the population. In particular, moderate values of α allow cooperators not only to survive but to outcompete defectors, even when the temptation to defect is large and the ageless, standard α=0 model does not sustain cooperation. The interplay between age structure and noise is also considered, and we obtain the conditions for optimal levels of cooperation. © 2012 American Physical Society

  3. Aging changes in hormone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004000.htm Aging changes in hormone production To use the sharing ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ...

  4. Spatially heterogeneous ages in glassy dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Horacio E.; Chamon, Claudio Chamon; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Iguain, Jose Luis; Kennett, Malcolm P.

    2003-09-01

    We construct a framework for the study of fluctuations in the nonequilibrium relaxation of glassy systems with and without quenched disorder. We study two types of two-time local correlators with the aim of characterizing the heterogeneous evolution in these systems: in one case we average the local correlators over histories of the thermal noise, in the other case we simply coarse-grain the local correlators obtained for a given noise realization. We explain why the noise-averaged correlators describe the fingerprint of quenched disorder when it exists, while the coarse-grained correlators are linked to noise-induced mesoscopic fluctuations. We predict constraints on the distribution of the fluctuations of the coarse-grained quantities. In particular, we show that locally defined correlations and responses are connected by a generalized local out-of-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation. We argue that large size heterogeneities in the age of the system survive in the long-time limit. A symmetry of the underlying theory, namely invariance under reparametrizations of the time coordinates, underlies these results. We establish a connection between the probabilities of spatial distributions of local coarse-grained quantities and the theory of dynamic random manifolds. We define, and discuss the behavior of, a two-time dependent correlation length from the spatial decay of the fluctuations in the two-time local functions. We characterize the fluctuations in the system in terms of their fractal properties. For concreteness, we present numerical tests performed on disordered spin models in finite and infinite dimensions. Finally, we explain how these ideas can be applied to the analysis of the dynamics of other glassy systems that can be either spin models without disorder or atomic and molecular glassy systems. (author)

  5. Development: Ages & Stages--Spatial Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Carla; Miller, Susan A.; Church, Ellen Booth

    2006-01-01

    Spatial concepts such as a sense of distance are learned through movement and exploration which is the most effective way for children to gain body awareness and an understanding of spatial relationships. It simultaneously develops muscle strength, coordination, self-confidence, and thinking skills. Spatial awareness can be defined as "an…

  6. Considering spatial ability in virtual route learning in early aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyselinck, Valérie; Meneghetti, Chiara; Bormetti, Monica; Orriols, Eric; Piolino, Pascale; De Beni, Rossana

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to broaden our understanding of the construction and early decline of spatial mental representations in route learning, considering the extent to which spatial ability and age-related differences in environment learning interact. The experiment examines spatial mental representation derived from taking a realistic route acquired using virtual environment and compares individuals different in age but with similar spatial ability. A sample of 34 young (20-30 years) and 30 middle-aged (50-60 years) females with good mental rotation ability were chosen. Participants learned a complex route through its presentation in a virtual environment and then performed a series of tasks (landmark recognition, location of landmarks and verification of spatial relations). Results show that the two participant age groups had similar performance in landmark recognition task and in verification of sentences describing direct spatial relations; instead, the middle-aged group showed a poorer performance than younger in their ability to locate landmarks and to judge the truth of indirect spatial sentences. These results first suggest that spatial abilities have to be seriously considered to avoid any confusion with age, as age-related differences are attenuated when individuals are different in age but similar in spatial ability. Second they confirm a specific difficulty of older participants to handle spatial information in a global configuration.

  7. Can infant self-locomotion and spatial exploration predict spatial memory at school age?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudgenoeg-Paz, Ora|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341157627; Leseman, Paul P M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070760810; Volman, M.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/163777349

    2014-01-01

    According to an embodied view of development sensorimotor activity plays a central role in cognitive development. Following this idea, we studied whether the age of achieving self-locomotion milestones and spatial exploration during the first years of life predict spatial memory at (pre)school age.

  8. Perspective and Spatiality in the Modern Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Fraisopi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available the domain of Art critique and becoming a philosophical argument. How can we think of Perspective as symbolic Form? Is Perspective really a symbolic form? Why is Perspective so important? Because at the beginning of the Modern Age, Perspective as spiritual figure grounds many symbolic or even many scientific constructions. We could we say that perspective open the foundation of modern science as such. The “Geometrization” of Vision, beginning with perspective, will be for us the interpretative key in order to understand the Modern Age as a whole.  This understanding will allow us to understand the anthropologic dimension arising from the Modern Age, called „Perspectivism“. Assuming that perspective was neither only an invention of painting nor of geometry nor of philosophy, taken as singular fields of human inquiry, we will try to sketch the genesis of “perspective” from an interdisciplinary point of view. By doing so, we will also try to fix its deep significance for the anthropology of the Modern Age. Living and feeling in a perspectival world is the real invention of the Modern Age, one that overcame the closed Cosmos of the Middle Ages in order to reveal to mankind its own potential. Our interdisciplinary approach will proceed from many points of view (history of art, science, theology, anthropology and converge on the idea of a new kind of human experience. Such an interdisciplinary approach will open new questions about our present time. Are we justified in thinking of our experience today as perspectival? What does it mean today to think from perspectives in the manifold dimensions of our living and to face to the complexity of our times?

  9. Differential Age Effects on Spatial and Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterman, Joukje M.; Morel, Sascha; Meijer, Lisette; Buvens, Cleo; Kessels, Roy P. C.; Postma, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The present study was intended to compare age effects on visual and spatial working memory by using two versions of the same task that differed only in presentation mode. The working memory task contained both a simultaneous and a sequential presentation mode condition, reflecting, respectively, visual and spatial working memory processes. Young…

  10. Spatial Frequency Discrimination: Effects of Age, Reward, and Practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlijn van den Boomen

    Full Text Available Social interaction starts with perception of the world around you. This study investigated two fundamental issues regarding the development of discrimination of higher spatial frequencies, which are important building blocks of perception. Firstly, it mapped the typical developmental trajectory of higher spatial frequency discrimination. Secondly, it developed and validated a novel design that could be applied to improve atypically developed vision. Specifically, this study examined the effect of age and reward on task performance, practice effects, and motivation (i.e., number of trials completed in a higher spatial frequency (reference frequency: 6 cycles per degree discrimination task. We measured discrimination thresholds in children aged between 7 to 12 years and adults (N = 135. Reward was manipulated by presenting either positive reinforcement or punishment. Results showed a decrease in discrimination thresholds with age, thus revealing that higher spatial frequency discrimination continues to develop after 12 years of age. This development continues longer than previously shown for discrimination of lower spatial frequencies. Moreover, thresholds decreased during the run, indicating that discrimination abilities improved. Reward did not affect performance or improvement. However, in an additional group of 5-6 year-olds (N = 28 punishments resulted in the completion of fewer trials compared to reinforcements. In both reward conditions children aged 5-6 years completed only a fourth or half of the run (64 to 128 out of 254 trials and were not motivated to continue. The design thus needs further adaptation before it can be applied to this age group. Children aged 7-12 years and adults completed the run, suggesting that the design is successful and motivating for children aged 7-12 years. This study thus presents developmental differences in higher spatial frequency discrimination thresholds. Furthermore, it presents a design that can be

  11. Common Spatialities: The Production of the Multitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Jalón Oyrazún

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gezi Park barricades in Istanbul, the OWS occupation of Zucotti Park in New York City, the tents of the Indignados movement in Spain, the London Blackberry riots and the seizure of Tahrir Square in Cairo to demand the overthrow of a dictator. As new forms of social coexistence and relationships are being configured, and new spaces for encounter and conflict are produced, architecture feels that essential questions regarding its activity are being addressed in each and every one of these situations. And yet we seem unable to relate to them and grasp their significance as we repeatedly turn to old metaphors and tools. If modern architecture pursues the modern liberal state techniques of management and administration of life, then recent forms of political action, which claim a new relation to the sensible, demand – and might help develop – a new understanding of architecture. We are moving from technical and disciplinary knowledge towards a critical practice that integrates with the action of the multitude. Starting from a definition of commons as the production of the multitude, we seek not only to understand the spatial dimension of this production, but also to acknowledge space as common. 

  12. Multiple outflows, spatial components, and nonlinearities in age theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2017-01-01

    Water age has become an important variable for the characterization of hydrologic systems. The goal of this paper is to analyze the role of multiple outflows, spatial components, and nonlinearities in age theory. We first extend the theory to linear systems with multiple outflows, including the relationship between age distribution at death and survival time distribution at birth. We further show that for each outflow there is a survival time distribution at birth, which normalized corresponds to the impulse-response function for the specific outflow. We also analyze how the impulse-response function affects both the amplitude gain and time delay of the outflow and the long-term average partitioning. With regard to linear spatially extended systems, we link the impulse-response function to the Green's function. This allows us to easily compute the loss function and the age distribution for the system. Finally, we focus on nonlinear systems to analyze the effects of storage-dependent and age distribution-dependent loss functions. By considering the Burgers' equation, we show how the relationships between spatial dynamics and the age distribution are complicated by nonlinearities.

  13. Gender, Age, Ethnicity Differences in Spatial Ability of Myanmar Middle School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Nu, Nu Khaing; Ishii, Hidetoki

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the levels of spatial ability of Myanmar middle school students across gender, age, and ethnicity by using a spatial ability test. It considered examining four spatial factors such as spatial perception, spatial orientation, spatial visualization and spatial manipulation. Therefore, the test includes four tasks; Paper Formboard for spatial perception. Figure Rotation for spatial orientation. Paper Folding for spatial visualization and Block Rotation for...

  14. Aging-associated excess formaldehyde leads to spatial memory deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhiqian; Han, Chanshuai; Luo, Wenhong; Li, Hui; Luo, Hongjun; Qiang, Min; Su, Tao; Wu, Beibei; Liu, Ying; Yang, Xu; Wan, You; Cui, Dehua; He, Rongqiao

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that formaldehyde participates in DNA demethylation/methylation cycle. Emerging evidence identifies that neuronal activity induces global DNA demethylation and re-methylation; and DNA methylation is a critical step for memory formation. These data suggest that endogenous formaldehyde may intrinsically link learning-responsive DNA methylation status and memory formation. Here, we report that during spatial memory formation process, spatial training induces an initial global DNA demethylation and subsequent re-methylation associated with hippocampal formaldehyde elevation then decline to baseline level in Sprague Dawley rats. Scavenging this elevated formaldehyde by formaldehyde-degrading enzyme (FDH), or enhancing DNA demethylation by a DNA demethylating agent, both led to spatial memory deficits by blocking DNA re-methylation in rats. Furthermore, we found that the normal adult rats intrahippocampally injected with excess formaldehyde can imitate the aged-related spatial memory deficits and global DNA methylation decline. These findings indicate that aging-associated excess formaldheyde contributes to cognitive decline during aging. PMID:23657727

  15. Normal aging selectively diminishes alpha lateralization in visual spatial attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiangfei; Sun, Junfeng; Bengson, Jesse J; Mangun, George R; Tong, Shanbao

    2015-02-01

    EEG studies of cue-induced visual alpha power (8-13 Hz) lateralization have been conducted on young adults without examining differences that may develop as a consequence of normal aging. Here, we examined age-related differences in spatial attention by comparing healthy older and younger adults. Our key finding is that cue-induced alpha power lateralization was observed in younger, but not older adults, even though both groups exhibited classic event-related potential signatures of spatial orienting. Specifically, both younger and older adults showed significant early directing-attention negativity (EDAN), anterior directing-attention negativity (ADAN), late directing-attention positivity (LDAP) and contingent negative variation (CNV). Furthermore, target-evoked sensory components were enhanced for attended relative to unattended targets in both younger and older groups. This pattern of results suggests that although older adults can successfully allocate spatial attention, they do so without the lateralization of alpha power that is commonly observed in younger adults. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that younger and older adults might engage different neural mechanisms for attentional orienting, and that alpha power lateralization during visual spatial attention is a phenomenon that diminishes during normal aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aging Effect on Audiovisual Integrative Processing in Spatial Discrimination Task

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    Zhi Zou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multisensory integration is an essential process that people employ daily, from conversing in social gatherings to navigating the nearby environment. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of aging on modulating multisensory integrative processes using event-related potential (ERP, and the validity of the study was improved by including “noise” in the contrast conditions. Older and younger participants were involved in perceiving visual and/or auditory stimuli that contained spatial information. The participants responded by indicating the spatial direction (far vs. near and left vs. right conveyed in the stimuli using different wrist movements. electroencephalograms (EEGs were captured in each task trial, along with the accuracy and reaction time of the participants’ motor responses. Older participants showed a greater extent of behavioral improvements in the multisensory (as opposed to unisensory condition compared to their younger counterparts. Older participants were found to have fronto-centrally distributed super-additive P2, which was not the case for the younger participants. The P2 amplitude difference between the multisensory condition and the sum of the unisensory conditions was found to correlate significantly with performance on spatial discrimination. The results indicated that the age-related effect modulated the integrative process in the perceptual and feedback stages, particularly the evaluation of auditory stimuli. Audiovisual (AV integration may also serve a functional role during spatial-discrimination processes to compensate for the compromised attention function caused by aging.

  17. Pharmaceutical Rejuvenation of Age-Associated Decline in Spatial Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2016-12-01

    Spatial memory and cognition decline during aging. Montelukast, an FDA approved drug for the treatment of asthma, can restore spatial memory in old rats to levels similar to those of young animals. Treatment improves three hallmarks of aging in the brain: reducing microglial-mediated neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and increasing neurogenesis in the hippocampus although not completely to youthful levels. Other aging-associated parameters, such as reduced synaptic density, are not affected, suggesting that anti-aging therapeutics may be further optimized. Montelukast targets leukotriene receptors GPR17 and CysLTR1 and appears to invert leukotriene signaling, converting an inflammatory signal into an anti-inflammatory signal. This acts as a dominant factor to overcome the dysfunctional effects of aging reportedly mediated, in part, by blood-borne factors such as beta-2 microglobulin that inhibit neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The key mechanism for cognitive improvement by montelukast may be restoration of BBB integrity, which would presumably decrease the amount of deleterious blood-borne factors to enter the brain. Whether or not this hypothesis is true for montelukast, drugs that restore or maintain BBB integrity may be useful in combating age-related loss of cognitive function.

  18. The role of gender, age, and ethnicity in spatial test performance of Myanmar middle school students

    OpenAIRE

    KHAING, Nu Nu; YASUNAGA, Kazuhiro; ISHII, Hidetoki; カイ, ヌヌ; 安永, 和央; 石井, 秀宗

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of gender, age, and ethnicity in spatial test performance of Myanmar middle school students by using two equivalent spatial ability tests (S.A.T; form A and form B). It considered examining four spatial factors such as spatial perception, spatial orientation, spatial visualization and spatial manipulation. Therefore, the tests include four tasks; Paper Formboard for spatial perception, Figure Rotation for spatial orientation, Paper Folding for ...

  19. Age, wage and productivity in Dutch manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.; Stoeldraijer, L.

    2011-01-01

    Previous empirical studies on the effect of age on productivity and wages find contradicting results. Some studies find that if workers grow older there is an increasing gap between productivity and wages, i.e. wages increase with age while productivity does not or does not increase at the same

  20. Spatial memory is intact in aged rats after propofol anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Ho; Culley, Deborah J; Baxter, Mark G; Xie, Zhongcong; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Crosby, Gregory

    2008-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that aged rats have persistent impairment of spatial memory after sedation with nitrous oxide or general anesthesia with isoflurane-nitrous oxide. Propofol has different receptor mechanisms of action and a favorable short-term recovery profile, and it has been proposed that propofol is devoid of enduring effects on cognitive performance. No studies have investigated this question in aged subjects, however, so we designed an experiment to examine the long-term effects of propofol anesthesia on spatial working memory. Eighteen-mo-old rats were randomized to 2 h of 100% oxygen-propofol anesthesia (n=11) or to a control group that breathed 100% oxygen (n=10). Propofol was administered by continuous infusion via a tail vein catheter. Rats breathed spontaneously and rectal temperature was maintained. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured noninvasively and a venous blood gas was obtained just before discontinuation of propofol. After a 2-day recovery, spatial working memory was assessed for 14 days using a 12-arm radial maze. The number of total errors, number of correct choices to first error, and time to complete the maze was recorded and analyzed using a repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), with Pmemory in aged rats. In aged rats, propofol anesthesia is devoid of the persistent memory effects observed with other general anesthetics in this model. Thus, while it appears that the state of general anesthesia is neither necessary nor sufficient for development of postanesthetic memory impairment, the choice of anesthetics may play a role in late cognitive outcome in the aged.

  1. SPATIAL DYNAMICS OF CEARÁ’S COCONUT PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Vieira Cavalcante

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to discuss the spatial dynamics of coconut production in the State of Ceará (Brazil while highlighting the spatialization of this process and the characterization of the coconut production spaces in Ceará’s territory. It also debates the effect agricultural activity has on the space production process, empirically evidenced from the coconut cultivation analysis.

  2. Spatial fuel data products of the LANDFIRE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt Reeves; Kevin C. Ryan; Matthew G. Rollins; Thomas G. Thompson

    2009-01-01

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) Project is mapping wildland fuels, vegetation, and fire regime characteristics across the United States. The LANDFIRE project is unique because of its national scope, creating an integrated product suite at 30-m spatial resolution and complete spatial coverage of all lands within the 50...

  3. Explaining Spatial Convergence of China's Industrial Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Paul Duo; Jefferson, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the conditions that may auger a reversal of China's increasingly unequal levels of regional industrial productivity during China's first two decades of economic reform. Using international and Chinese firm and industry data over the period 1995–2004, we estimate a produc......This article investigates the conditions that may auger a reversal of China's increasingly unequal levels of regional industrial productivity during China's first two decades of economic reform. Using international and Chinese firm and industry data over the period 1995–2004, we estimate...... a productivity growth–technology gap reaction function. We find that as China's coastal industry has closed the technology gap with the international frontier, labour productivity growth in the coastal region has begun to slow in relation to the interior. This may serve as an early indicator of China's initial...

  4. Spatial contrast sensitivity - Effects of age, test-retest, and psychophysical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Kent E.; Jaffe, Myles J.; Caruso, Rafael C.; Demonasterio, Francisco M.

    1988-01-01

    Two different psychophysical methods were used to test the spatial contrast sensitivity in normal subjects from five age groups. The method of adjustment showed a decline in sensitivity with increasing age at all spatial frequencies, while the forced-choice procedure showed an age-related decline predominantly at high spatial frequencies. It is suggested that a neural component is responsible for this decline.

  5. Perspectives on Spatial Decision Support Concerning Location of Biogas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Mikkel

    whilst safeguarding a transparent and informative decision making process. Through the PhD thesis spatial temporal issues regarding slurry biomass resource availability is analysed together with the aspects of spatial competition in order to achieve national biogas policy ambitions. We find that slurry......, understand the industrial economic aspects of such a role. Through the use of spatial multi-criteria evaluation models stakeholder preferences to decision criteria are included in a sustainable biogas facility location analysis. By the use of these models it is demonstrated how overall biogas production...... costs can be reduced by 3% while also environmental and social concerns are appreciated. Spatial decision support models offer great potential for enhancing transparency and qualifying the basis for decision making with regard to location of future biogas plant. The spatial decision support tools, which...

  6. Spatial Competition with Entry Deterrence considering Horizontal Product Differentiations

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    Ai-nong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial competition plays important roles in economics, which attracts extensive research. This paper addresses spatial competitions along with horizontal product differentiations and entry deterrence. By the dynamic game theory model about one firm and a potential entrant with different cost in a linear city, this paper finds that both the higher fixed setup cost and the higher transportation cost deter entrants. To efficiently deter the entrants, the establisher is inclined to locating at the middle point of the linear city.

  7. Uncertainties in Coastal Ocean Color Products: Impacts of Spatial Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Nima; Sarkar, Sudipta; Franz, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    With increasing demands for ocean color (OC) products with improved accuracy and well characterized, per-retrieval uncertainty budgets, it is vital to decompose overall estimated errors into their primary components. Amongst various contributing elements (e.g., instrument calibration, atmospheric correction, inversion algorithms) in the uncertainty of an OC observation, less attention has been paid to uncertainties associated with spatial sampling. In this paper, we simulate MODIS (aboard both Aqua and Terra) and VIIRS OC products using 30 m resolution OC products derived from the Operational Land Imager (OLI) aboard Landsat-8, to examine impacts of spatial sampling on both cross-sensor product intercomparisons and in-situ validations of R(sub rs) products in coastal waters. Various OLI OC products representing different productivity levels and in-water spatial features were scanned for one full orbital-repeat cycle of each ocean color satellite. While some view-angle dependent differences in simulated Aqua-MODIS and VIIRS were observed, the average uncertainties (absolute) in product intercomparisons (due to differences in spatial sampling) at regional scales are found to be 1.8%, 1.9%, 2.4%, 4.3%, 2.7%, 1.8%, and 4% for the R(sub rs)(443), R(sub rs)(482), R(sub rs)(561), R(sub rs)(655), Chla, K(sub d)(482), and b(sub bp)(655) products, respectively. It is also found that, depending on in-water spatial variability and the sensor's footprint size, the errors for an in-situ validation station in coastal areas can reach as high as +/- 18%. We conclude that a) expected biases induced by the spatial sampling in product intercomparisons are mitigated when products are averaged over at least 7 km × 7 km areas, b) VIIRS observations, with improved consistency in cross-track spatial sampling, yield more precise calibration/validation statistics than that of MODIS, and c) use of a single pixel centered on in-situ coastal stations provides an optimal sampling size for

  8. Artistic creativity, artistic production, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchi, Anna; Sinforiani, Elena; Boller, François

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews the changes produced by age on various aspects of artistic painting, particularly creativity and actual production. Aging in trained painters is often accompanied by a decline in creativity, which in turn is due to the cognitive decline related to aging. It has been argued, however, that aging does not cause a decline, but only changes in style and content. The two views are not mutually exclusive, and we present examples illustrating both aspects. We also show that, in addition to cognitive changes, impairment of sensory organs, especially vision, and of the bones and joints, may also produce marked changes in an artist's production and style. We conclude by showing that finding ways to induce creativity in persons who do not consider themselves artists can be a way of stimulating creativity and contribute to successful aging. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatial and temporal control of fungal natural product synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Fang Yun; Keller, Nancy P

    2014-10-01

    Despite their oftentimes-elusive ecological role, fungal natural products have, for better or worse, impacted our daily lives tremendously owing to their diverse and potent bioactive properties. This Janus-faced nature of fungal natural products inevitably ushered in a field of research dedicated towards understanding the ecology, organisms, genes, enzymes, and biosynthetic pathways that give rise to this arsenal of diverse and complex chemistry. Ongoing research in fungal secondary metabolism has not only increased our appreciation for fungal natural products as an asset but also sheds light on the pivotal role that these once-regarded "metabolic wastes" play in fungal biology, defense, and stress response in addition to their potential contributions towards human mycoses. Full orchestration of secondary metabolism requires not only the seamless coordination between temporal and spatial control of SM-associated machineries (e.g. enzymes, cofactors, intermediates, and end-products) but also integration of these machineries into primary metabolic processes and established cellular mechanisms. An intriguing, but little known aspect of microbial natural product synthesis lies in the spatial organization of both pathway intermediates and enzymes responsible for the production of these compounds. In this highlight, we summarize some major breakthroughs in understanding the genes and regulation of fungal natural product synthesis and introduce the current state of knowledge on the spatial and temporal control of fungal natural product synthesis.

  10. Exposure to an enriched environment up to middle age allows preservation of spatial memory capabilities in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Fanny; Cosquer, Brigitte; Penazzi, Lorène; Mathis, Chantal; Kelche, Christian; Majchrzak, Monique; Barbelivien, Alexandra

    2016-02-15

    In rats, some cognitive capabilities, like spatial learning and memory, are preserved from age-related decline by whole adult life enriched environment (EE) exposure. However, to which extent late EE contributes to such maintenance remains to be investigated. Here we assessed the impact of late housing condition (e.g., from the age of 18 months) on spatial learning and memory of aged rats (24 months) previously exposed or unexposed to EE from young adulthood. The results showed that late EE was not required for spatial memory maintenance in aged rats previously housed in EE. In contrast, late EE mitigates spatial memory deficit in aged rats previously unexposed to EE. These outcomes suggest that EE exposure up to middle age provides a "reserve"-like advantage which supports an enduring preservation of spatial capabilities in old age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial-Sequential Working Memory in Younger and Older Adults: Age Predicts Backward Recall Performance within Both Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Working memory is vulnerable to age-related decline, but there is debate regarding the age-sensitivity of different forms of spatial-sequential working memory task, depending on their passive or active nature. The functional architecture of spatial working memory was therefore explored in younger (18-40 years) and older (64-85 years) adults, using passive and active recall tasks. Spatial working memory was assessed using a modified version of the Spatial Span subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III; Wechsler, 1998). Across both age groups, the effects of interference (control, visual, or spatial), and recall type (forward and backward), were investigated. There was a clear effect of age group, with younger adults demonstrating a larger spatial working memory capacity than the older adults overall. There was also a specific effect of interference, with the spatial interference task (spatial tapping) reliably reducing performance relative to both the control and visual interference (dynamic visual noise) conditions in both age groups and both recall types. This suggests that younger and older adults have similar dependence upon active spatial rehearsal, and that both forward and backward recall require this processing capacity. Linear regression analyses were then carried out within each age group, to assess the predictors of performance in each recall format (forward and backward). Specifically the backward recall task was significantly predicted by age, within both the younger and older adult groups. This finding supports previous literature showing lifespan linear declines in spatial-sequential working memory, and in working memory tasks from other domains, but contrasts with previous evidence that backward spatial span is no more sensitive to aging than forward span. The study suggests that backward spatial span is indeed more processing-intensive than forward span, even when both tasks include a retention period, and that age predicts

  12. Spatial-sequential working memory in younger and older adults: age predicts backward recall performance within both age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Brown

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Working memory is vulnerable to age-related decline, but there is debate regarding the age-sensitivity of different forms of spatial-sequential working memory task, depending on their passive or active nature. The functional architecture of spatial working memory was therefore explored in younger (18-40 years and older (64-85 years adults, using passive and active recall tasks. Spatial working memory was assessed using a modified version of the Spatial Span subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale – Third Edition (WMS-III; Wechsler, 1998. Across both age groups, the effects of interference (control, visual, or spatial, and recall type (forward and backward, were investigated. There was a clear effect of age group, with younger adults demonstrating a larger spatial working memory capacity than the older adults overall. There was also a specific effect of interference, with the spatial interference task (spatial tapping reliably reducing performance relative to both the control and visual interference (dynamic visual noise conditions in both age groups and both recall types. This suggests that younger and older adults have similar dependence upon active spatial rehearsal, and that both forward and backward recall require this processing capacity. Linear regression analyses were then carried out within each age group, to assess the predictors of performance in each recall format (forward and backward. Specifically the backward recall task was significantly predicted by age, within both the younger and older adult groups. This finding supports previous literature showing lifespan linear declines in spatial-sequential working memory, and in working memory tasks from other domains, but contrasts with previous evidence that backward spatial span is no more sensitive to aging than forward span. The study suggests that backward spatial span is indeed more processing-intensive than forward span, even when both tasks include a retention period, and that age

  13. Dietary advanced glycation end products and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Contreras, Claudia; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen

    2010-12-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous, complex group of compounds that are formed when reducing sugar reacts in a non-enzymatic way with amino acids in proteins and other macromolecules. This occurs both exogenously (in food) and endogenously (in humans) with greater concentrations found in older adults. While higher AGEs occur in both healthy older adults and those with chronic diseases, research is progressing to both quantify AGEs in food and in people, and to identify mechanisms that would explain why some human tissues are damaged, and others are not. In the last twenty years, there has been increased evidence that AGEs could be implicated in the development of chronic degenerative diseases of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease and with complications of diabetes mellitus. Results of several studies in animal models and humans show that the restriction of dietary AGEs has positive effects on wound healing, insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, the effect of restriction in AGEs intake has been reported to increase the lifespan in animal models. This paper will summarize the work that has been published for both food AGEs and in vivo AGEs and their relation with aging, as well as provide suggestions for future research.

  14. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Chapman-Novakofski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are a heterogeneous, complex group of compounds that are formed when reducing sugar reacts in a non-enzymatic way with amino acids in proteins and other macromolecules. This occurs both exogenously (in food and endogenously (in humans with greater concentrations found in older adults. While higher AGEs occur in both healthy older adults and those with chronic diseases, research is progressing to both quantify AGEs in food and in people, and to identify mechanisms that would explain why some human tissues are damaged, and others are not. In the last twenty years, there has been increased evidence that AGEs could be implicated in the development of chronic degenerative diseases of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and with complications of diabetes mellitus. Results of several studies in animal models and humans show that the restriction of dietary AGEs has positive effects on wound healing, insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, the effect of restriction in AGEs intake has been reported to increase the lifespan in animal models. This paper will summarize the work that has been published for both food AGEs and in vivo AGEs and their relation with aging, as well as provide suggestions for future research.

  15. Spatial pattern and its changes of grain production using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianzhai; Shen, Chen; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xiangyang; Han, Shuqing

    2018-02-01

    Aiming to provide the support for maintaining grain security in China, we discussed the spatial distribution of China’s grain production and its changes in 1980-2013 using GIS spatial analysis method based on statistics data. The results show that regional differences of food production in China is obvious, and characterized as “up in south, low in north”on the north-south direction and “low in center, high in both sides “on the east-west direction. From 1980 to 2013, the concentration degree of grain production improved, and the output significantly concentrated to the northern and central regions. The regions with the rapid increase in grain yield are almost located in the Midwest China, and the northern China has also made a significant increase.

  16. Biodiversity, productivity, and the spatial insurance hypothesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, David W.; Dieckmann, Ulf; Jonas, Matthias; Franklin, Oskar; Loreau, Michel; Perrings, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating rates of biodiversity loss have led ecologists to explore the effects of species richness on ecosystem functioning and the flow of ecosystem services. One explanation of the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning lies in the spatial insurance hypothesis, which centers on the idea that productivity and stability increase with biodiversity in a temporally varying, spatially heterogeneous environment. However, there has been little work on the impact of dispersal where environmental risks are more or less spatially correlated, or where dispersal rates are variable. In this paper, we extend the original Loreau model to consider stochastic temporal variation in resource availability, which we refer to as “environmental risk,” and heterogeneity in species dispersal rates. We find that asynchronies across communities and species provide community-level stabilizing effects on productivity, despite varying levels of species richness. Although intermediate dispersal rates play a role in mitigating risk, they are less effective in insuring productivity against global (metacommunity-level) than local (individual community-level) risks. These results are particularly interesting given the emergence of global sources of risk such as climate change or the closer integration of world markets. Our results offer deeper insights into the Loreau model and new perspectives on the effectiveness of spatial insurance in the face of environmental risks. PMID:26100182

  17. Productive aging: an overview of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, P; Caro, F G

    1994-01-01

    "Productive aging" describes an array of activities through which older people contribute to society. Both the extent of current productive activities among older people and the barriers to more extensive productive activity are reviewed. If certain adjustments can be made for their special needs, older people have the potential to make substantial contributions. However, a variety of prejudicial attitudes and discriminatory practices continue to limit the opportunities of older people to make productive contributions, particularly in workplace settings. Interventions are needed to strengthen opportunities for retraining, employment, and volunteering for older people. At the same time, programs and policies to facilitate the productive participation of older people cannot easily correct for the adverse effects of a lifetime of racial or gender discrimination.

  18. Spatial Frequency Discrimination : Effects of Age, Reward, and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boomen, Carlijn; Peters, Judith Carolien

    Social interaction starts with perception of the world around you. This study investigated two fundamental issues regarding the development of discrimination of higher spatial frequencies, which are important building blocks of perception. Firstly, it mapped the typical developmental trajectory of

  19. Spatial scaling of net primary productivity using subpixel landcover information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. F.; Chen, Jing M.; Ju, Wei M.; Ren, L. L.

    2008-10-01

    Gridding the land surface into coarse homogeneous pixels may cause important biases on ecosystem model estimations of carbon budget components at local, regional and global scales. These biases result from overlooking subpixel variability of land surface characteristics. Vegetation heterogeneity is an important factor introducing biases in regional ecological modeling, especially when the modeling is made on large grids. This study suggests a simple algorithm that uses subpixel information on the spatial variability of land cover type to correct net primary productivity (NPP) estimates, made at coarse spatial resolutions where the land surface is considered as homogeneous within each pixel. The algorithm operates in such a way that NPP obtained from calculations made at coarse spatial resolutions are multiplied by simple functions that attempt to reproduce the effects of subpixel variability of land cover type on NPP. Its application to a carbon-hydrology coupled model(BEPS-TerrainLab model) estimates made at a 1-km resolution over a watershed (named Baohe River Basin) located in the southwestern part of Qinling Mountains, Shaanxi Province, China, improved estimates of average NPP as well as its spatial variability.

  20. Verbal, visual, and spatial working memory in written language production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Ronald T; Olive, Thierry; Piolat, Annie

    2007-03-01

    College students wrote definitions of either abstract or concrete nouns in longhand while performing a concurrent working memory (WM) task. They detected either a verbal (syllable), visual (shape), or spatial (location) stimulus and decided whether it matched the last one presented 15-45s earlier. Writing definitions of both noun types elevated the response time to verbal targets above baseline. Such interference was observed for visual targets only when defining concrete nouns and was eliminated entirely with spatial targets. The interference effect for verbal targets was the same whether they were read or heard, implicating phonological storage. The findings suggest that language production requires phonological or verbal WM. Visual WM is selectively engaged when imaging the referents of concrete nouns.

  1. Discrimination performance in aging is vulnerable to interference and dissociable from spatial memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah A.; Sacks, Patricia K.; Turner, Sean M.; Gaynor, Leslie S.; Ormerod, Brandi K.; Maurer, Andrew P.; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal-dependent episodic memory and stimulus discrimination abilities are both compromised in the elderly. The reduced capacity to discriminate between similar stimuli likely contributes to multiple aspects of age-related cognitive impairment; however, the association of these behaviors within individuals has never been examined in an animal model. In the present study, young and aged F344×BN F1 hybrid rats were cross-characterized on the Morris water maze test of spatial memory and a dentate gyrus-dependent match-to-position test of spatial discrimination ability. Aged rats showed overall impairments relative to young in spatial learning and memory on the water maze task. Although young and aged learned to apply a match-to-position response strategy in performing easy spatial discriminations within a similar number of trials, a majority of aged rats were impaired relative to young in performing difficult spatial discriminations on subsequent tests. Moreover, all aged rats were susceptible to cumulative interference during spatial discrimination tests, such that error rate increased on later trials of test sessions. These data suggest that when faced with difficult discriminations, the aged rats were less able to distinguish current goal locations from those of previous trials. Increasing acetylcholine levels with donepezil did not improve aged rats’ abilities to accurately perform difficult spatial discriminations or reduce their susceptibility to interference. Interestingly, better spatial memory abilities were not significantly associated with higher performance on difficult spatial discriminations. This observation, along with the finding that aged rats made more errors under conditions in which interference was high, suggests that match-to-position spatial discrimination performance may rely on extra-hippocampal structures such as the prefrontal cortex, in addition to the dentate gyrus. PMID:27317194

  2. Modeling the spatial structure of hog production in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larue, Solène; Abildtrup, Jens; Schmitt, Bertrand

    , the interaction between the location of hog production and slaughterhouses. It is the assumption that the location of slaughterhouses is influenced by the location of the primary producers, implying that this variable is endogenous, whereas the location of primary producers is independent of the location...... of slaughterhouses. This is due to the fact that transportation costs of pigs are paid by the cooperatives owning the slaughterhouses. This assumption is tested applying a spatial econometric model. The model is estimated for 1989, 1999 and 2004. In the latter period, it is the hypothesis that the demand for export...

  3. The Abilities of Understanding Spatial Relations, Spatial Orientation, and Spatial Visualization Affect 3D Product Design Performance: Using Carton Box Design as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kun-Hsi

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) product design is an essential ability that students of subjects related to product design must acquire. The factors that affect designers' performance in 3D design are numerous, one of which is spatial abilities. Studies have reported that spatial abilities can be used to effectively predict people's performance in…

  4. Continuous production of nanostructured particles using spatial atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ommen, J. Ruud van; Kooijman, Dirkjan; Niet, Mark de; Talebi, Mojgan; Goulas, Aristeidis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate a novel spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) process based on pneumatic transport of nanoparticle agglomerates. Nanoclusters of platinum (Pt) of ∼1 nm diameter are deposited onto titania (TiO 2 ) P25 nanoparticles resulting to a continuous production of an active photocatalyst (0.12–0.31 wt. % of Pt) at a rate of about 1 g min −1 . Tuning the precursor injection velocity (10–40 m s −1 ) enhances the contact between the precursor and the pneumatically transported support flows. Decreasing the chemisorption temperature (from 250 to 100 °C) results in more uniform distribution of the Pt nanoclusters as it decreases the reaction rate as compared to the rate of diffusion into the nanoparticle agglomerates. Utilizing this photocatalyst in the oxidation reaction of Acid Blue 9 showed a factor of five increase of the photocatalytic activity compared to the native P25 nanoparticles. The use of spatial particle ALD can be further expanded to deposition of nanoclusters on porous, micron-sized particles and to the production of core–shell nanoparticles enabling the robust and scalable manufacturing of nanostructured powders for catalysis and other applications

  5. Developing Bilateral and Spatial Concepts in Primary School-aged Children: An Empirical Evaluation of the Anker Bilateral Spatial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Richmond PhD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visual-spatial and visual-motor perceptual difficulties contribute to school-aged learning problems. Hence, a need exists to address children’s visual-spatial and visual-motor perceptual difficulties as early as possible in the child’s school career. Thus, this study reports on the evaluation of the Anker Bilateral Spatial System’s (ABSS effectiveness in remediating primary school children’s perceptual difficulties. Method: Thirty-one children (17 boys and 14 girls aged 6 to 12 years who had been identified by their classroom teacher as having observable visual-spatial and visual-motor perceptual difficulties participated in a 10-week pre/posttest intervention study. The study’s pre/posttest assessments included the Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI, the Spatial Awareness Skills Program Test (SASP, and two subscales of the School Function Assessment (SFA. Results: Paired t-test statistics were calculated on the pre/post intervention scores. Paired t-test statistics calculated (p = .05 that significant change had occurred in the writing speed (t = -3.978, p < .001. Conclusion: Given that the study’s Year 1 students made progress in more areas of remediation than did any other year level, it is evident that the ABSS is particularly effective with this year group.

  6. [Production of glass in early middle ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    For the production of glass three ingredients are necessary: sand, a flux to reduce the melting-temperature and calcium to reduce the danger of glass corrosion. The first objects of glass were made with calcium-rich ashes of halophytic plants, until, in the first millennium BC, the glassmakers began to use natron as a flux adding calcium deliberately or choosing a calcium-rich sand. Natron, a mineral applied to fertilize or to preserve, as a spice, a detergent or part of medical and cosmetic articles, was exploited in the regions south and east of the Mediterranean, so the Central European glassmakers had to import natron or the prefabricated raw glass for their work. Beginning in the 8th century AD in Central Europe the flux changed again: The glassmakers increasingly used ashes from wood growing in their native regions so becoming independent of the necessity to import the raw materials. There are various reasons for this change: First, the Mediterranean was no longer the trade area it had been at the time of the antique Roman Empire due to the activities of the Byzantine navy. Then, the climatic change in the 8th century and political upheavals during the 9th century in Egypt--being the main supplier of natron--caused a decrease in exploitation and trade with this good. Finally, the Egyptian state established a monopoly on the natron production, causing a permanent price increase. Nevertheless, during the Early Middle Ages natron was imported into Europe, although not necessarily for glass production. The article shows that glassmakers of Central Europe were able to produce glass since the end of the Western Roman Empire on the basis of the transfer of raw materials and know-how from the East. From the 8th century onwards they emancipated themselves from the dependency on imports by discovering and using native materials for glass production.

  7. Mesoscopic model of temporal and spatial heterogeneity in aging colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Nikolaj; Sibani, Paolo; Boettcher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We develop a simple and effective description of the dynamics of dense hard sphere colloids in the aging regime deep in the glassy phase. Our description complements the many efforts to understand the onset of jamming in low density colloids, whose dynamics is still time-homogeneous. Based...

  8. Capturing the age and spatial structures of migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, A; Raymer, J; Willekens, F

    In this paper we model the structures found in the level (generation) and allocation (distribution) components of age-specific and origin-destination-specific migration flows. For the examples, we examine the regional migration patterns in the USA for four periods: 1955-60, 1965-70, 1975-80, and

  9. The aging brain: Movement speed and spatial control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Damon G; Correa, Lauren N; Seider, Talia R; Mosquera, Diana M; Rodriguez, Julio A; Salazar, Liliana; Schwartz, Zared J; Cohen, Ronald A; Falchook, Adam D; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-11-01

    With aging, people commonly develop motor slowing (bradykinesia). Although this slowness with aging may be entirely related to degradation of the cerebral networks important in motor programing, it is possible that, at least in part, it may be a learned procedure for enhancing the accuracy and/or precision of movements. The goal of this study is to test these contradictory hypotheses. Twenty-four healthy adults, 12 younger than age 26 and 12 older than age 65 were asked to make alternative marks with a pen between a card centered in front of them and a series of circles distributed across a page. Performance was timed, and participants were instructed to complete the task as quickly as possible while not sacrificing accuracy for speed. The circle sizes and hand used varied by trial. The older adults performed the task more slowly for all target circle diameters. As the circles decreased in size, the younger adults performed the task more rapidly than did the older participants, but the younger participants also had a greater decline in accuracy. During this aiming task, healthy older adults were less likely than younger adults to sacrifice accuracy for speed. Thus, at least in part, their slowing may be a learned adaptive strategy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Age-dependent differences of treadmill exercise on spatial learning ability between young- and adult-age rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun-Jang; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Hwang, Lakkyong; Lee, Man-Gyoon; Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young

    2017-08-01

    The effect of exercise, which increases hippocampal neurogenesis and improves memory function, is well documented, however, differences in the effect of exercise on young children and adults are not yet known. In the present study, age-dependent differences of treadmill exercise on spatial learning ability between young- and adult-age rats were investigated. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 6 weeks. Radial 8-arm maze test was conducted for the determination of spatial learning ability. Cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine immunohistochemistry. Western blot for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) was performed. In the present study, the number of errors in the young-age rats was effectively decreased by treadmill exercise. Hippocampal neurogenesis was more active in the young-age rats than in the adult-age rats. BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus was greater in the adult-age rats than in the young-age rats. The results of this study showed that adults have excellent spatial learning abilities than children, but the improvement of exercise-induced spatial learning ability through neurogenesis is better in children.

  11. Differential effects of aging on spatial learning through exploratory navigation and map reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Degirolamo, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that abilities in spatial learning and memory are adversely affected by aging. The present study was conducted to investigate whether increasing age has equal consequences for all types of spatial learning or impacts certain types of spatial learning selectively. Specifically, two major types of spatial learning, exploratory navigation and map reading, were contrasted. By combining a neuroimaging finding that the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is especially important for exploratory navigation and a neurological finding that the MTL is susceptible to age-related atrophy, it was hypothesized that spatial learning through exploratory navigation would exhibit a greater decline in later life than spatial learning through map reading. In an experiment, young and senior participants learned locations of landmarks in virtual environments either by navigating in them in the first-person perspective or by seeing aerial views of the environments. Results showed that senior participants acquired less accurate memories of the layouts of landmarks than young participants when they navigated in the environments, but the two groups did not differ in spatial learning performance when they viewed the environments from the aerial perspective. These results suggest that spatial learning through exploratory navigation is particularly vulnerable to adverse effects of aging, whereas elderly adults may be able to maintain their map reading skills relatively well.

  12. The Effect of Spatial Working Memory Deterioration on Strategic Visuomotor Learning across Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uresti-Cabrera, Luis A; Diaz, Rosalinda; Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of age-related cognitive changes in a visuomotor learning task that depends on strategic control and contrast it with the effect in a task principally depending on visuomotor recalibration. Participants performed a ball throwing task while donning either a reversing dove prism or a displacement wedge prism, which mainly depend on strategic control or visuomotor recalibration, respectively. Visuomotor performance was then analysed in relation to rule acquisition and reversal, recognition memory, visual memory, spatial planning, and spatial working memory with tasks from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). The results confirmed previous works showing a detrimental effect of age on visuomotor learning. The analyses of the cognitive changes observed across age showed that both strategic control and visuomotor recalibration had significant negative correlations only with the number of errors in the spatial working memory task. However, when the effect of aging was controlled, the only significant correlation remaining was between the reversal adaptation magnitude and spatial working memory. These results suggest that spatial working memory decline across aging could contribute to age-dependent deterioration in both visuomotor learning processes. However, spatial working memory integrity seems to affect strategic learning decline even after controlling for aging.

  13. High Cognitive Reserve is associated with a reduced age-related deficit in spatial conflict resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga ePuccioni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies support the existence of a specific age-related difficulty in suppressing potentially distracting information. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether spatial conflict resolution is selectively affected by aging. The way aging affects individuals could be modulated by many factors determined by the socieconomic status: we investigated whether factors such as cognitive reserve (CR and years of education may play a compensatory role against age-related deficits in the spatial domain. A spatial Stroop task with no feature repetitions was administered to a sample of 17 non-demented older adults (69-79 years old and 18 younger controls (18-34 years old matched for gender and years of education. The two age groups were also administered with measures of intelligence and CR. The overall spatial Stroop effect did not differ according to age, neither for speed nor for accuracy. The two age groups equally showed sequential effects for congruent trials: reduced response times (RTs if another congruent trial preceded them, and accuracy at ceiling. For incongruent trials, older adults, but not younger controls, were influenced by congruency of trialn-1, since RTs increased with preceding congruent trials. Interestingly, such an age-related modulation negatively correlated with CR. These findings suggest that spatial conflict resolution in aging is predominantly affected by general slowing, rather than by a more specific deficit. However, a high level of CR seems to play a compensatory role for both factors.

  14. High cognitive reserve is associated with a reduced age-related deficit in spatial conflict resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccioni, Olga; Vallesi, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Several studies support the existence of a specific age-related difficulty in suppressing potentially distracting information. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether spatial conflict resolution is selectively affected by aging. The way aging affects individuals could be modulated by many factors determined by the socieconomic status: we investigated whether factors such as cognitive reserve (CR) and years of education may play a compensatory role against age-related deficits in the spatial domain. A spatial Stroop task with no feature repetitions was administered to a sample of 17 non-demented older adults (69–79 years-old) and 18 younger controls (18–34 years-old) matched for gender and years of education. The two age groups were also administered with measures of intelligence and CR. The overall spatial Stroop effect did not differ according to age, neither for speed nor for accuracy. The two age groups equally showed sequential effects for congruent trials: reduced response times (RTs) if another congruent trial preceded them, and accuracy at ceiling. For incongruent trials, older adults, but not younger controls, were influenced by congruency of trialn−1, since RTs increased with preceding congruent trials. Interestingly, such an age-related modulation negatively correlated with CR. These findings suggest that spatial conflict resolution in aging is predominantly affected by general slowing, rather than by a more specific deficit. However, a high level of CR seems to play a compensatory role for both factors. PMID:23248595

  15. The Effects Of Age, Spatial Ability, And Navigational Information On Navigational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY REPORTED HERE WAS TO EXAMINE WHETHER AGE AND SPATIAL ABILITY ARE FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE A DRIVER'S ABILITY TO NAVIGATE AND TO USE NAVIGATIONAL DISPLAYS. THESE FACTORS WERE EXAMINED BECAUSE PREVIOUS : RESEARCH SUGGESTS THAT SP...

  16. A spatial- and age-structured assessment model to estimate the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , thereby indirectly negatively impacting juvenile abalone which rely on the urchins for shelter. A model is developed for abalone that is an extension of more standard age-structured assessment models because it explicitly takes spatial effects ...

  17. Spatial Analysis of Thermal Aging of Overhead Transmission Conductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musílek, P.; Heckenbergerová, Jana; Bhuiyan, M.M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2012), s. 1196-1204 ISSN 0885-8977 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100300904 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : aluminium conductor steel reinforced (ACSR) conductor * hot spot * loss of tensile strength * numerical weather prediction * power transmission lines * thermal aging Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use Impact factor: 1.519, year: 2012

  18. Spatial but not verbal cognitive deficits at age 3 years in persistently antisocial individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Adrian; Yaralian, Pauline S; Reynolds, Chandra; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have repeatedly shown verbal intelligence deficits in adolescent antisocial individuals, but it is not known whether these deficits are in place prior to kindergarten or, alternatively, whether they are acquired throughout childhood. This study assesses whether cognitive deficits occur as early as age 3 years and whether they are specific to persistently antisocial individuals. Verbal and spatial abilities were assessed at ages 3 and 11 years in 330 male and female children, while antisocial behavior was assessed at ages 8 and 17 years. Persistently antisocial individuals (N = 47) had spatial deficits in the absence of verbal deficits at age 3 years compared to comparisons (N = 133), and also spatial and verbal deficits at age 11 years. Age 3 spatial deficits were independent of social adversity, early hyperactivity, poor test motivation, poor test comprehension, and social discomfort during testing, and they were found in females as well as males. Findings suggest that early spatial deficits contribute to persistent antisocial behavior whereas verbal deficits are developmentally acquired. An early-starter model is proposed whereby early spatial impairments interfere with early bonding and attachment, reflect disrupted right hemisphere affect regulation and expression, and predispose to later persistent antisocial behavior.

  19. Spatial self-organization and the production of the city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romulo Krafta

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Production of urban space is assumed to be a rent seeking activity, carried out by many developers who are constantly trying to get the best possible assessment of market and spatial features in order to better produce profit. Developers act locally, that is, they can choose their locations from all over the city, although they do not have a perfect foresight. Different urban locations prompt different types of development, e. g. several housing, commercial, industrial types, although each location can support more than one type development. The more structured the city is, the narrower is the type choice; on the contrary, in areas scarcely occupied the degree of freedom and unpredictability is larger. Developers compete to each other for locations where the land price is lower; in fact land is considered the single most important component of the development, in the sense that it is the only one whose price can vary and hence affect the price of the final good. Developers "invent" new locations constantly, by buying cheap land, investing on it and selling the resulting built space at higher prices. As soon as a developer discover a new location, others follow, making the land price to rise and the advantage to disappear. The resulting urban development is uneven and generally unpredictable; however, urban areas can be assessed from the point of view of its stability, or its resistance to change. A model has been tried out, as follows.Urban space is disaggregated in units of public space, each one presenting a certain level of urbanisation (infrastructure and built form, what affords a measure of spatial differentiation. Built form is also distinguished by their typological affiliation, so that the stocks are classified according to categories, precisely the ones taken on by developers. Moreover, stocks are also characterised by vintages, so that their actual market value can be updated after each iteration. The urban system is constituted by a

  20. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Kesby

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old and aged (15 months old mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions.

  1. Self-reported craft expertise predicts maintenance of spatial ability in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Shannon K T; Sims, Valerie K

    2014-05-01

    Three hundred and three female participants between the ages of 18 and 77 reported their experience in crafting (sewing, knitting, and crocheting) and completed a measure of spatial ability: The Paper Folding Test. To investigate the connection between spatial ability performance, age, and craft expertise, an ANOVA was conducted for the Paper Folding Test using two levels of crafting expertise (High and Low) and three age categories (younger adults: 18-39, middle-aged adults: 40-59, and older adults: 60-77). Performance on the spatial ability test declined with age as predicted from previous literature. However, there was a significant Age by Expertise interaction. No difference was found between High and Low craft expertise groups in younger adults (18-39), but there was a growing difference between expertise groups in middle-aged adults (40-59) and older adults (60-77). The results suggest that continued hands-on experience in spatial domains is a predictor of maintenance of spatial ability across the life span.

  2. Age and gender-related differences in a spatial memory task in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Irene; Tascón, Laura; Cimadevilla, José Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive skills decline with age. Our ability to keep oriented in our surrounding environment was demonstrated to be influenced by factors like age and gender. Introduction of virtual reality based tasks improved assessment of spatial memory in humans. In this study, spatial orientation was assessed in a virtual memory task in order to determine the effect of aging and gender on navigational skills. Subjects from 45 to 74 years of age were organized in three groups (45-54, 55-64, 65-74 years old). Two levels of difficulty were considered. Results showed that males outperformed females in 65-74 years-old group. In addition to this, females showed a more noticeable poor performance in spatial memory than males, since memory differences appeared between all age groups. On the other hand, 65-74 year-old males showed an impaired performance in comparison with 45-54 year-old group. These results support that spatial memory becomes less accurate as we age and gender is an important factor influencing spatial orientation skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Late Enrichment Maintains Accurate Recent and Remote Spatial Memory Only in Aged Rats That Were Unimpaired When Middle Aged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Fanny; Herbeaux, Karine; Aufrere, Noémie; Kelche, Christian; Mathis, Chantal; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Majchrzak, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rodents to a stimulating environment has beneficial effects on some cognitive functions that are impaired during physiological aging, and especially spatial reference memory. The present study investigated whether environmental enrichment rescues these functions in already declining subjects and/or protects them from subsequent…

  4. Spatial distribution and secondary production of Copepoda in a tropical reservoir: Barra Bonita, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ. Santos-Wisniewski

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to describe the spatial distribution of zooplankton copepods, their biomass and instantaneous secondary production, in Barra Bonita, a large eutrophic, polymitic reservoir (22° 29' S and 48° 34' W on the Tietê River, of the Paraná basin. Sampling was carried out during two seasons: dry winter and rainy summer. Species composition, age structure and numerical density of each copepod species population were analyzed at 25 sampling stations. Secondary production was calculated for Copepoda, the dominant group in zooplankton communities, taking Calanoida and Cyclopoida separately. Copepoda represented the largest portion of the total zooplankton biomass, the dominant species being Notodiaptomus iheringi among the Calanoida and Mesocyclops ogunnus and Thermocyclops decipiens among the Cyclopoida. The production of Copepoda was higher during the rainy summer (23.61 mgDW.m-3.d-1 in January 1995 than during the dry winter season (14 mgDW.m-3.d-1 in August 1995, following the general pattern of abundance for the whole zooplankton community. Among the copepods, Cyclopoida production was higher than that of Calanoida, a pattern commonly observed for tropical lakes and reservoirs. Barra Bonita copepods are very productive, but there was a great degree of spatial heterogeneity, related to the physical and chemical conditions, particularly the level of nutrients and also to phytoplankton biomass.

  5. Exposure to radiation accelerates normal brain aging and produces deficits in spatial learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Casadesus, G.; Carey, A.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    Previous studies have shown that radiation exposure, particularly to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles), produces deficits in spatial learning and memory. These adverse behavioral effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. It is possible that these shared effects may be produced by the same mechanism; oxidative stress damage to the central nervous system caused by an increased release of reactive oxygen species is likely responsible for the deficits seen in aging and following irradiation. Both aged and irradiated rats display cognitive impairment in tests of spatial learning and memory such as the Morris water maze and the radial arm maze. These rats have decrements in the ability to build spatial representations of the environment and they utilize non-spatial strategies to solve tasks. Furthermore, they show a lack of spatial preference, due to a decline in the ability to process or retain place (position of a goal with reference to a "map" provided by the configuration of numerous cues in the environment) information. These declines in spatial memory occur in measures dependent on both reference and working memory, and in the flexibility to reset mental images. These results show that irradiation with high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere. Supported by NASA Grants NAG9-1190 and NAG9-1529

  6. Spare Parts Management of Aging Capital Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hekimoğlu (Mustafa)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSpare parts are critical for operations of capital products such as aircraft, refineries, trucks, etc/, which require maintenance regularly. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) bear the responsibility of undisrupted maintenance service and spare parts flow for their capital products.

  7. The role of spatial dynamics in the stability, resilience, and productivity of an estuarine fish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, L A; Cadrin, S X; Secor, D H

    2010-03-01

    Understanding mechanisms that support long-term persistence of populations and sustainability of productive fisheries is a priority in fisheries management. Complex spatial structure within populations is increasingly viewed as a result of a plastic behavioral response that can have consequences for the dynamics of a population. We incorporated spatial structure and environmental forcing into a population model to examine the consequences for population stability (coefficient of variation of spawning-stock biomass), resilience (time to recover from disturbance), and productivity (spawning-stock biomass). White perch (Morone americana) served as a model species that exhibits simultaneous occurrence of migratory and resident groups within a population. We evaluated the role that contingents (behavioral groups within populations that exhibit divergent life histories) play in mitigating population responses to unfavorable environmental conditions. We used age-structured models that incorporated contingent-specific vital rates to simulate population dynamics of white perch in a sub-estuary of Chesapeake Bay, USA. The dynamics of the population were most sensitive to the proportion of individuals within each contingent and to a lesser degree to the level of correlation in recruitment between contingents in their responses to the environment. Increased representation of the dispersive contingent within populations resulted in increased productivity and resilience, but decreased stability. Empirical evidence from the Patuxent River white perch population was consistent with these findings. A high negative correlation in resident and dispersive contingent recruitment dynamics resulted in increased productivity and stability, with little effect on resilience. With high positive correlation between contingent recruitments, the model showed similar responses in population productivity and resilience, but decreased stability. Because contingent structure involves differing

  8. Genetic variance in processing speed drives variation in aging of spatial and memory abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Deborah; Reynolds, Chandra A; McArdle, John J; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2009-05-01

    Previous analyses have identified a genetic contribution to the correlation between declines with age in processing speed and higher cognitive abilities. The goal of the current analysis was to apply the biometric dual change score model to consider the possibility of temporal dynamics underlying the genetic covariance between aging trajectories for processing speed and cognitive abilities. Longitudinal twin data from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging, including up to 5 measurement occasions covering a 16-year period, were available from 806 participants ranging in age from 50 to 88 years at the 1st measurement wave. Factors were generated to tap 4 cognitive domains: verbal ability, spatial ability, memory, and processing speed. Model-fitting indicated that genetic variance for processing speed was a leading indicator of variation in age changes for spatial and memory ability, providing additional support for processing speed theories of cognitive aging. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Dietary polyphenol supplementation prevents alterations of spatial navigation in middle-aged mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien eBensalem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial learning and memory deficits associated with hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairments are commonly observed during aging. Besides, the beneficial role of dietary polyphenols has been suggested as potential functional food candidates to prevent this memory decline. Indeed, polyphenols could potentiate the signaling pathways of synaptic plasticity underlying learning and memory. In this study, spatial learning deficits of middle-aged mice were first highlighted and characterized according to navigation patterns in the Morris water maze task. An eight-week polyphenol-enriched diet, containing a polyphenol-rich extract from grape and blueberry (PEGB (from the Neurophenols Consortium with high contents of flavonoids, stilbenes and phenolic acids, was then successful in reversing these age-induced effects. The use of spatial strategies was indeed delayed with aging whereas a polyphenol supplementation could promote the occurrence of spatial strategies. These behavioral results were associated with neurobiological changes: while the expression of hippocampal CaMKII mRNA levels was reduced in middle-aged animals, the polyphenol-enriched diet could rescue them. Besides, an increased expression of NGF mRNA levels was also observed in supplemented adult and middle-aged mice. Thus these data suggest that supplementation with polyphenols could be an efficient nutritional way to prevent age-induced cognitive decline.

  10. Dietary Polyphenol Supplementation Prevents Alterations of Spatial Navigation in Middle-Aged Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalem, Julien; Servant, Laure; Alfos, Serge; Gaudout, David; Layé, Sophie; Pallet, Véronique; Lafenetre, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Spatial learning and memory deficits associated with hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairments are commonly observed during aging. Besides, the beneficial role of dietary polyphenols has been suggested as potential functional food candidates to prevent this memory decline. Indeed, polyphenols could potentiate the signaling pathways of synaptic plasticity underlying learning and memory. In this study, spatial learning deficits of middle-aged mice were first highlighted and characterized according to their navigation patterns in the Morris water maze task. An eight-week polyphenol-enriched diet, containing a polyphenol-rich extract from grape and blueberry (PEGB; from the Neurophenols Consortium) with high contents of flavonoids, stilbenes and phenolic acids, was then successful in reversing these age-induced effects. The use of spatial strategies was indeed delayed with aging whereas a polyphenol supplementation could promote the occurrence of spatial strategies. These behavioral results were associated with neurobiological changes: while the expression of hippocampal calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) mRNA levels was reduced in middle-aged animals, the polyphenol-enriched diet could rescue them. Besides, an increased expression of nerve growth neurotrophic factor (NGF) mRNA levels was also observed in supplemented adult and middle-aged mice. Thus these data suggest that supplementation with polyphenols could be an efficient nutritional way to prevent age-induced cognitive decline.

  11. The influence of enriched environment on spatial memory in Swiss mice of different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Fernandes Druzian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of enriched environment on spatial memory acquisition in mice of three different age groups. Weanling, young, and young adult female Swiss mice were housed in a standard control or enriched environment for 50 days, and their spatial memory was tested with the Morris Water Maze. We did not observe an experimental effect for spatial memory acquisition, and there was neither an effect of time of analysis nor an interaction between experimental group and time of analysis. Regarding effects of experimental group and training day in relation to latency in finding the hidden platform, we did find an effect in the experimental young adult mice group (p = 0.027, but there was no interaction between these factors in all three groups. Based on these findings environmental enrichment did not enhance spatial memory acquisition in female Swiss mice in the tested age groups.

  12. On the Nexus of the Spatial Dynamics of Global Urbanization and the Age of the City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Sebastian; Haase, Dagmar; Volk, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A number of concepts exist regarding how urbanization can be described as a process. Understanding this process that affects billions of people and its future development in a spatial manner is imperative to address related issues such as human quality of life. In the focus of spatially explicit studies on urbanization is typically a city, a particular urban region, an agglomeration. However, gaps remain in spatially explicit global models. This paper addresses that issue by examining the spatial dynamics of urban areas over time, for a full coverage of the world. The presented model identifies past, present and potential future hotspots of urbanization as a function of an urban area's spatial variation and age, whose relation could be depicted both as a proxy and as a path of urban development.

  13. On the Nexus of the Spatial Dynamics of Global Urbanization and the Age of the City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Scheuer

    Full Text Available A number of concepts exist regarding how urbanization can be described as a process. Understanding this process that affects billions of people and its future development in a spatial manner is imperative to address related issues such as human quality of life. In the focus of spatially explicit studies on urbanization is typically a city, a particular urban region, an agglomeration. However, gaps remain in spatially explicit global models. This paper addresses that issue by examining the spatial dynamics of urban areas over time, for a full coverage of the world. The presented model identifies past, present and potential future hotspots of urbanization as a function of an urban area's spatial variation and age, whose relation could be depicted both as a proxy and as a path of urban development.

  14. Spatial Mapping of Agricultural Water Productivity Using the SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokal, Rajesh Tulshiram; Gorantiwar, S. D.; Kothari, Mahesh; Bhakar, S. R.; Nandwana, B. P.

    2015-03-01

    The Sina river basin is facing both episodic and chronic water shortages due to intensive irrigation development. The main objective of this study was to characterize the hydrologic processes of the Sina river basin and assess crop water productivity using the distributed hydrologic model, SWAT. In the simulation year (1998-1999), the inflow to reservoir from upstream side was the major contributor to the reservoir accounting for 92 % of the total required water release for irrigation purpose (119.5 Mm3), while precipitation accounted for 4.1 Mm3. Annual release of water for irrigation was 119.5 Mm3 out of which 54 % water was diverted for irrigation purpose, 26 % was wasted as conveyance loss, average discharge at the command outlet was estimated as 4 % and annual average ground-water recharge coefficient was in the range of 13-17 %. Various scenarios involving water allocation rule were tested with the goal of increasing economic water productivity values in the Sina Irrigation Scheme. Out of those, only most benefited allocation rule is analyzed in this paper. Crop yield varied from 1.98 to 25.9 t/ha, with the majority of the area between 2.14 and 2.78 t/ha. Yield and WP declined significantly in loamy soils of the irrigation command. Crop productivity in the basin was found in the lower range when compared with potential and global values. The findings suggested that there was a potential to improve further. Spatial variations in yield and WP were found to be very high for the crops grown during rabi season, while those were low for the crops grown during kharif season. The crop yields and WP during kharif season were more in the lower reach of the irrigation commands, where loamy soil is more concentrated. Sorghum in both seasons was most profitable. Sorghum fetched net income fivefold that of sunflower, two and half fold of pearl millet and one and half fold of mung beans as far as crop during kharif season were concerned and it fetched fourfold that of

  15. Spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity in an aged creosote-contaminated site

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Juottonen, Heli; Siivonen, Pauli; Lloret Quesada, Cosme; Tuomi, Pirjo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of polluted sites via in situ bioremediation relies heavily on the indigenous microbes and their activities. Spatial heterogeneity of microbial populations, contaminants and soil chemical parameters on such sites is a major hurdle in optimizing and implementing an appropriate bioremediation regime. We performed a grid-based sampling of an aged creosote-contaminated site followed by geostatistical modelling to illustrate the spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity and ...

  16. Functional networks involved in spatial learning strategies in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begega, A; Cuesta, M; Rubio, S; Méndez, M; Santín, L J; Arias, J L

    2012-03-01

    Our aim was to assess the way that middle-aged rats solve spatial learning tasks that can be performed using different strategies. We assessed the brain networks involved in these spatial learning processes using Principal Component Analysis. Two tasks were performed in a complex context, a four-arm radial maze, in which each group must use either an allocentric or an egocentric strategy. Another task was performed in a simple T-maze in which rats must use an egocentric strategy. Brain metabolic activity was quantified to evaluate neural changes related to spatial learning in the described tasks. Our findings revealed that two functional networks are involved in spatial learning in aged rats. One of the networks, spatial processing, is composed of brain regions involved in the integration of sensory and motivational information. The other network, context-dependent processing, mainly involves the dorsal hippocampus and is related to the processing of contextual information from the environment. Both networks work together to solve spatial tasks in a complex spatial environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. New Research on Bronze Age Textile Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Eva Birgitta; Mårtensson, Linda; Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2008-01-01

    presentation of the results from the systematic tests with Bronze Age textile tools. results concerning mesurements of lenght and time consumed.......presentation of the results from the systematic tests with Bronze Age textile tools. results concerning mesurements of lenght and time consumed....

  18. An age-related deficit in spatial-feature reference memory in homing pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Vincent J; Flaim, Mary E; Carney, Samantha N; Bingman, Verner P

    2015-03-01

    Age-related memory decline in mammals has been well documented. By contrast, very little is known about memory decline in birds as they age. In the current study we trained younger and older homing pigeons on a reference memory task in which a goal location could be encoded by spatial and feature cues. Consistent with a previous working memory study, the results revealed impaired acquisition of combined spatial-feature reference memory in older compared to younger pigeons. Following memory acquisition, we used cue-conflict probe trials to provide an initial assessment of possible age-related differences in cue preference. Both younger and older pigeons displayed a similarly modest preference for feature over spatial cues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimating the Spatial Distribution of Groundwater Age Using Synoptic Surveys of Environmental Tracers in Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, W. P.

    2017-12-01

    A model which simulates tracer concentration in surface water as a function the age distribution of groundwater discharge is used to characterize groundwater flow systems at a variety of spatial scales. We develop the theory behind the model and demonstrate its application in several groundwater systems of local to regional scale. A 1-D stream transport model, which includes: advection, dispersion, gas exchange, first-order decay and groundwater inflow is coupled a lumped parameter model that calculates the concentration of environmental tracers in discharging groundwater as a function of the groundwater residence time distribution. The lumped parameters, which describe the residence time distribution, are allowed to vary spatially, and multiple environmental tracers can be simulated. This model allows us to calculate the longitudinal profile of tracer concentration in streams as a function of the spatially variable groundwater age distribution. By fitting model results to observations of stream chemistry and discharge, we can then estimate the spatial distribution of groundwater age. The volume of groundwater discharge to streams can be estimated using a subset of environmental tracers, applied tracers, synoptic stream gauging or other methods, and the age of groundwater then estimated using the previously calculated groundwater discharge and observed environmental tracer concentrations. Synoptic surveys of SF6, CFC's, 3H and 222Rn, along with measured stream discharge are used to estimate the groundwater inflow distribution and mean age for regional scale surveys of the Berland River in west-central Alberta. We find that groundwater entering the Berland has observable age, and that the age estimated using our stream survey is of similar order to limited samples from groundwater wells in the region. Our results show that the stream can be used as an easily accessible location to constrain the regional scale spatial distribution of groundwater age.

  20. From product to place - Spatializing governance in a commodified landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, van C.J.; Moeliono, Moira; Wiersum, K.F.

    2017-01-01

    This article analyzes the potential for landscape governance in large-scale commodity landscapes in Indonesia.
    It conceptualizes landscape governance as the spatialization of governance, which entails the interplay between natural-spatial conditions of place, public-private actor constellations,

  1. Strength and Aerobic Exercises Improve Spatial Memory in Aging Rats Through Stimulating Distinct Neuroplasticity Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Macan, Tamires Pavei; da Silva, Sabrina; Canteiro, Paula Bortoluzzi; de Sena Casagrande, Alisson; Pedroso, Giulia Dos Santos; Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; de Pinho, Ricardo Aurino

    2017-12-01

    Aging is associated with impaired cognition and memory and increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders. Physical exercise is neuroprotective; however, the major evidence of this effect involves studies of only aerobic training in young animals. The benefits of other exercise protocols such as strength training in aged animals remains unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of aerobic and strength training on spatial memory and hippocampal plasticity in aging rats. Aging Wistar rats performed aerobic or strength training for 50 min 3 to 4 days/week for 8 weeks. Spatial memory and neurotrophic and glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus of aged rats were evaluated after aerobic or strength training. Both aerobic and strength training improved cognition during the performance of a spatial memory task. Remarkably, the improvement in spatial memory was accompanied by an increase in synaptic plasticity proteins within the hippocampus after exercise training, with some differences in the intracellular functions of those proteins between the two exercise protocols. Moreover, neurotrophic signaling (CREB, BDNF, and the P75 NTR receptor) increased after training for both exercise protocols, and aerobic exercise specifically increased glutamatergic proteins (NMDA receptor and PSD-95). We also observed a decrease in DNA damage after aerobic training. In contrast, strength training increased levels of PKCα and the proinflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-1β. Overall, our results show that both aerobic and strength training improved spatial memory in aging rats through inducing distinct molecular mechanisms of neuroplasticity. Our findings extend the idea that exercise protocols can be used to improve cognition during aging.

  2. Influence of spatial perception abilities on reading in school-age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Saj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial perception abilities enable individuals to explore a visual field, to detect spatial position and to infer relationships between visual stimuli. Written words and text are conceptualized spatially along a horizontal mental line, but little is known about the way children develop these representations. The exact relationship between visuo-spatial perception and academic achievement has never been directly assessed. Therefore, our aim was to study the developmental trajectory of space perception abilities by assessing perceptual, attentional and memory components, the relationship between these abilities and reading achievement in school-age children. Forty-nine children aged between 6.5 and 11 years old were divided into four age groups and were assessed with visual bisection, visual search and visual memory location tasks. The results showed that the groups of older children, from the age of nine, improved significantly on the bisection and visual search tasks with respect to all visual fields, while the groups of younger children showed more errors in the left visual field (LVF. Performances on these tasks were correlated with reading level and age. Older children with a low reading score showed a LVF bias, similar to the youngest children. These results demonstrate how abnormal space perception might distort space representation and in turn affect reading and learning processes.

  3. Spatially Complete Surface Albedo Data Sets: Value-Added Products Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. Recent observations of diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky ) land surface albedo included in the MOD43B3 product from MODIS instruments aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics. Cloud and seasonal snow cover, however, curtail retrievals to approximately half the global land surfaces on an annual equal-angle basis, precluding MOD43B3 albedo products from direct inclusion in some research projects and production environments.

  4. Gait disorder as a predictor of spatial learning and memory impairment in aged mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate whether gait dysfunction is a predictor of severe spatial learning and memory impairment in aged mice. Methods A total of 100 12-month-old male mice that had no obvious abnormal motor ability and whose Morris water maze performances were not significantly different from those of two-month-old male mice were selected for the study. The selected aged mice were then divided into abnormal or normal gait groups according to the results from the quantitative gait assessment. Gaits of aged mice were defined as abnormal when the values of quantitative gait parameters were two standard deviations (SD lower or higher than those of 2-month-old male mice. Gait parameters included stride length, variability of stride length, base of support, cadence, and average speed. After nine months, mice exhibiting severe spatial learning and memory impairment were separated from mice with mild or no cognitive dysfunction. The rate of severe spatial learning and memory impairment in the abnormal and normal gait groups was tested by a chi-square test and the correlation between gait dysfunction and decline in cognitive function was tested using a diagnostic test. Results The 12-month-old aged mice were divided into a normal gait group (n = 75 and an abnormal gait group (n = 25. Nine months later, three mice in the normal gait group and two mice in the abnormal gait group had died. The remaining mice were subjected to the Morris water maze again, and 17 out of 23 mice in the abnormal gait group had developed severe spatial learning and memory impairment, including six with stride length deficits, 15 with coefficient of variation (CV in stride length, two with base of support (BOS deficits, five with cadence dysfunction, and six with average speed deficits. In contrast, only 15 out of 72 mice in the normal gait group developed severe spatial learning and memory impairment. The rate of severe spatial learning and memory impairment was

  5. Spatial but not verbal cognitive deficits at age 3 years in persistently antisocial individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Yaralian, P.S.; Raine, A.; Reynolds, C.; Venables, P.H.; Mednick, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have repeatedly shown verbal intelligence deficits in adolescent antisocial individuals, but it is not known whether these deficits are in place prior to kindergarten or, alternatively, whether they are acquired throughout childhood. This study assesses whether cognitive deficits occur as early as age 3 years and whether they are specific to persistently antisocial individuals. Verbal and spatial abilities were assessed at ages 3 and 11 years in 330 male and female children, ...

  6. Ageing shocks and short-run regional labour market dynamics in a spatial panel VAR approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo; Schmidt, Torben Dall; Rauhut, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Using a flexible spatial panel VAR model for a small-scale labour market system, we investigate the dynamic interdependences between changes in the demographic structure and the labour market performance of a regional economy. With a particular focus on ageing shocks, we describe an increase...

  7. Development of Allocentric Spatial Memory Abilities in Children from 18 months to 5 Years of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribordy, Farfalla; Jabes, Adeline; Lavenex, Pamela Banta; Lavenex, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Episodic memories for autobiographical events that happen in unique spatiotemporal contexts are central to defining who we are. Yet, before 2 years of age, children are unable to form or store episodic memories for recall later in life, a phenomenon known as infantile amnesia. Here, we studied the development of allocentric spatial memory, a…

  8. Age-Related Effects of Study Time Allocation on Memory Performance in a Verbal and a Spatial Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Lacy E.

    2012-01-01

    Past studies have suggested that study time allocation partially mediates age relations on memory performance in a verbal task. To identify whether this applied to a different material modality, participants ages 20-87 completed a spatial task in addition to a traditional verbal task. In both the verbal and the spatial task, increased age was…

  9. Spatial reference memory in normal aging Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuail, Joseph A; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (F344 × BN-F1) hybrid rats express greater longevity with improved health relative to aging rodents of other strains; however, few behavioral reports have thoroughly evaluated cognition across the F344 × BN-F1 lifespan. Consequently, this study evaluated spatial reference memory in F344 × BN-F1 rats at 6, 18, 24, or 28 months of age in the Morris water maze. Reference memory decrements were observed between 6 and 18 months and 18 and 24 months. At 28 months, spatial learning was not worse than 24 months, but swim speed was significantly slower. Reliable individual differences revealed that ∼50% of 24- to 28-month-old rats performed similarly to 6 months, whereas others were spatial learning impaired. Aged rats were impaired at learning within daily training sessions but not impaired at retaining information between days of training. Aged rats were also slower to learn to escape onto the platform, regardless of strategy. In summary, these data clarify the trajectory of cognitive decline in aging F344 × BN-F1 rats and elucidate relevant behavioral parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Analysis of Population Aging Phenomena in Poland in Spatial Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Justyna Wilk; Michal Bernard Pietrzak

    2014-01-01

    The processes of socio-economic development are continuously accompanied by the process of population aging. It is seen as a growing of the percentage share of people aged 65 and over in the general population. It covers the majority of European Union countries and also refers to Poland. The objective of the paper is to analyze the population aging phenomenon in spatial perspective. The study was carried out for 66 subregions (NUTS 3) and covered the period 1995-2012. Poland is characterized ...

  11. Influence of pedestrian age and gender on spatial and temporal distribution of pedestrian crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran Pour, Alireza; Moridpour, Sara; Tay, Richard; Rajabifard, Abbas

    2018-01-02

    Every year, about 1.24 million people are killed in traffic crashes worldwide and more than 22% of these deaths are pedestrians. Therefore, pedestrian safety has become a significant traffic safety issue worldwide. In order to develop effective and targeted safety programs, the location- and time-specific influences on vehicle-pedestrian crashes must be assessed. The main purpose of this research is to explore the influence of pedestrian age and gender on the temporal and spatial distribution of vehicle-pedestrian crashes to identify the hotspots and hot times. Data for all vehicle-pedestrian crashes on public roadways in the Melbourne metropolitan area from 2004 to 2013 are used in this research. Spatial autocorrelation is applied in examining the vehicle-pedestrian crashes in geographic information systems (GIS) to identify any dependency between time and location of these crashes. Spider plots and kernel density estimation (KDE) are then used to determine the temporal and spatial patterns of vehicle-pedestrian crashes for different age groups and genders. Temporal analysis shows that pedestrian age has a significant influence on the temporal distribution of vehicle-pedestrian crashes. Furthermore, men and women have different crash patterns. In addition, results of the spatial analysis shows that areas with high risk of vehicle-pedestrian crashes can vary during different times of the day for different age groups and genders. For example, for those between ages 18 and 65, most vehicle-pedestrian crashes occur in the central business district (CBD) during the day, but between 7:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., crashes among this age group occur mostly around hotels, clubs, and bars. This research reveals that temporal and spatial distributions of vehicle-pedestrian crashes vary for different pedestrian age groups and genders. Therefore, specific safety measures should be in place during high crash times at different locations for different age groups and genders to

  12. PROPOSAL OF SPATIAL OPTIMIZATION OF PRODUCTION PROCESS IN PROCESS DESIGNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Malega

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is focused on optimizing the use of space in the production process using software Process Designer. The aim of this contribution is to suggest possible improvements to the existing layout of the selected production process. Production process was analysed in terms of inputs, outputs and course of actions. Nowadays there are many software solutions aimed at optimizing the use of space. One of these software products is the Process Designer, which belongs to the product line Tecnomatix. This software is primarily aimed at production planning. With Process Designer is possible to design the layout of production and subsequently to analyse the production or to change according to the current needs of the company.

  13. Spatial memory deficit across aging: current insights of the role of 5-HT7 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory eBeaudet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Elderly persons often face biological, psychological or social changes over time that may cause discomfort or morbidity. While some cognitive domains remain stable over time, others undergo a decline. Spatial navigation is a complex cognitive function essential for independence, safety and quality of life. While egocentric (body-centered navigation is quite preserved during aging, allocentric (externally-centered navigation — based on a cognitive map using distant landmarks — declines with age. Recent preclinical studies showed that serotonergic 5-HT7 receptors are localized in brain regions associated with allocentric spatial navigation processing. Behavioral assessments with pharmacological or genetic tools have confirmed the role of 5-HT7 receptors in allocentric navigation. Moreover, few data suggested a selective age-related decrease in the expression of 5-HT7 receptors in pivotal brain structures implicated in allocentric navigation such as the hippocampal CA3 region. We aim to provide a short overview of the potential role of 5-HT7 receptors in spatial navigation, and to argue for their interests as therapeutic targets against age-related cognitive decline.

  14. Short-term spatial memory responses in aged Japanese quail selected for divergent adrenocortical stress responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, C L; Schmidt, J B; Treese, S T; Satterlee, D G

    2010-04-01

    Stress-induced glucocorticoids can dampen learning and spatial memory via neuronal damage to the hippocampus. Cognition losses can be transient (associated with acute stress episodes) or permanent as in aged individuals who show chronic glucocorticoid-induced accelerated brain aging and neurodegeneration (dementia). Thus, chronic versus acute stress effects on spatial memory responses of quail selected for reduced (low stress, LS) or exaggerated (high stress, HS) plasma corticosterone (B) response to brief restraint were assessed. Aged food-motivated male LS and HS quail were tested for 10 min in a feed-baited 8-arm radial arm maze (RAM) 1) at 255 d of age (quail who had experienced lifelong management stressors but who were otherwise never intentionally stressed; that is, chronically stressed birds), 2) on the next day post-acute stressor treatment (5 min of restraint), and 3) on the next day without treatment (acute stress recovery). The RAM tests used the win-shift procedure in which visited arms were not rebaited. Radial arm maze performance was measured by determination of the total number of arm choices made, the number of correct entries made into baited arms out of the first 8 choices, the time required to make a choice, and the number of pellets eaten. Line effects (P LS), and number of pellets eaten (HS RAM testing nor its interaction with line further influenced these variables. Thus, although selection for divergent plasma B responsiveness to an acute stressor was found to be associated with severe impairment of spatial memory in aged male HS compared with LS quail, the observed spatial memory impairments (HS > LS) could not be further altered by acute stressor treatment. Line differences in cognition may reflect lifelong management-induced stress episodes that periodically produce higher plasma B responses in HS than LS quail, which underlie HS quail memory deficits, or other etiologies, or both.

  15. A Combination Cocktail Improves Spatial Attention in a Canine Model of Human Aging and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Murphey, Heather L.; Dowling, Amy L.S.; McCarty, Katie L.; Bethel, Samuel R.; Nitz, Jonathan A.; Pleiss, Melanie; Vanrooyen, Jenna; Grossheim, Mike; Smiley, Jeffery R.; Murphy, M. Paul; Beckett, Tina L.; Pagani, Dieter; Bresch, Frederick; Hendrix, Curt

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves multiple pathological processes in the brain, including increased inflammation and oxidative damage, as well as the accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques. We hypothesized that a combinatorial therapeutic approach to target these multiple pathways may provide cognitive and neuropathological benefits for AD patients. To test this hypothesis, we used a canine model of human aging and AD. Aged dogs naturally develop learning and memory impairments, human-type Aβ deposits and oxidative damage in the brain. Thus, 9 aged beagles (98-115 months) were treated with a medical food cocktail containing (1) an extract of turmeric containing 95% curcuminoids; (2) an extract of green tea containing 50% epigallocatechingallate; (3) N-acetyl cysteine; (4) R-alpha lipoic acid; and (5) an extract of black pepper containing 95% piperine. Nine similarly aged dogs served as placebo-treated controls. After 3 months of treatment, 13 dogs completed a variable distance landmark task used as a measure of spatial attention. As compared to placebo-treated animals, dogs receiving the medical food cocktail had significantly lower error scores (t(11)=4.3, p=0.001) and were more accurate across all distances (F(1,9)=20.7, p=0.001), suggesting an overall improvement in spatial attention. Measures of visual discrimination learning, executive function and spatial memory, and levels of brain and CSF Aβ were unaffected by the cocktail. Our results indicate that this medical food cocktail may be beneficial for improving spatial attention and motivation deficits associated with impaired cognition in aging and AD. PMID:22886019

  16. Reaction time inconsistency in a spatial stroop task: age-related differences through childhood and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin R; Strauss, Esther H; Hultsch, David F; Hunter, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    Age-related differences in inconsistency of reaction time (RT) across the life span were examined on a task with differing levels of demand on executive control. A total of 546 participants, aged 5 to 76 years, completed a spatial Stroop task that permitted observations under three conditions (congruent, incongruent, and neutral) according to the correspondence between the required response (based on stimulus direction) and stimulus location. An interference effect was observed across all ages. Analyses of neutral condition data replicated previous research demonstrating RT inconsistency follows a U-shaped developmental curve across the life span. The relationship between age and inconsistency, however, depended on condition: inconsistency in the congruent condition was higher than inconsistency in both the neutral and incongruent conditions across middle-aged groups. Reaction time inconsistency may reflect processing efficiency that is maximal in young adulthood and may also be sensitive to fluctuations in performance that reflect momentarily highly efficient responding.

  17. Global hypoxia induced impairment in learning and spatial memory is associated with precocious hippocampal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Suryanarayan; Sharma, Deepti; Kumar, Kushal; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Barhwal, Kalpana; Hota, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Bhuvnesh

    2016-09-01

    Both chronological aging and chronic hypoxia stress have been reported to cause degeneration of hippocampal CA3 neurons and spatial memory impairment through independent pathways. However, the possible occurrence of precocious biological aging on exposure to single episode of global hypoxia resulting in impairment of learning and memory remains to be established. The present study thus aimed at bridging this gap in existing literature on hypoxia induced biological aging. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to simulated hypobaric hypoxia (25,000ft) for different durations and were compared with aged rats. Behavioral studies in Morris Water Maze showed decline in learning abilities of both chronologically aged as well as hypoxic rats as evident from increased latency and pathlength to reach target platform. These behavioral changes in rats exposed to global hypoxia were associated with deposition of lipofuscin and ultrastructural changes in the mitochondria of hippocampal neurons that serve as hallmarks of aging. A single episode of chronic hypobaric hypoxia exposure also resulted in the up-regulation of pro-aging protein, S100A9 and down regulation of Tau, SNAP25, APOE and Sod2 in the hippocampus similar to that in aged rats indicating hypoxia induced accelerated aging. The present study therefore provides evidence for role of biological aging of hippocampal neurons in hypoxia induced impairment of learning and memory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Enriched environment and masticatory activity rehabilitation recover spatial memory decline in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Fabíola de Carvalho Chaves de Siqueira; de Almeida, Marina Negrão Frota; Felício, André Pinheiro Gurgel; Fadel, Ana Carla; Silva, Diego de Jesus; Borralho, Thaíssa Gomes; da Silva, Rodrigo Perez; Bento-Torres, João; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa; Perry, Victor Hugh; Ramos, Edson Marcos Leal Soares; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley; Sosthenes, Marcia Consentino Kronka

    2013-06-28

    To measure the impact of masticatory reduction on learning and memory, previous studies have produced experimental masticatory reduction by modified diet or molar removal. Here we induced spatial learning impairment in mice by reducing masticatory activity and then tested the effect of a combination of environmental enrichment and masticatory rehabilitation in recovering spatial learning at adulthood and in later life. For 6 months (6M) or 18 months (18M), we fed three groups of mice from postnatal day 21 respectively with a hard diet (HD) of pellets; pellets followed by a powdered, soft diet (HD/SD, divided into equal periods); or pellets followed by powder, followed by pellets again (HD/SD/HD, divided into equal periods). To mimic sedentary or active lifestyles, half of the animals from each group were raised from weaning in standard cages (impoverished environment; IE) and the other half in enriched cages (enriched environment; EE). To evaluate spatial learning, we used the Morris water maze. IE6M-HD/SD mice showed lower learning rates compared with control (IE6M-HD) or masticatory rehabilitated (IE6MHD/SD/HD) animals. Similarly, EE-HD/SD mice independent of age showed lower performance than controls (EE-HD) or rehabilitated mice (EE-HD/SD/HD). However, combined rehabilitation and EE in aged mice improved learning rate up to control levels. Learning rates did not correlate with swim speed. Reduction in masticatory activity imposed on mice previously fed a hard diet (HD/SD) impaired spatial learning in the Morris water maze. In adults, masticatory rehabilitation recovered spatial abilities in both sedentary and active mice, and rehabilitation of masticatory activity combined with EE recovered these losses in aged mice.

  19. Determinants of the distribution and concentration of biogas production in Germany. A spatial econometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The biogas production in Germany is characterized by a heterogeneous distribution and the formation of regional centers. In the present study the determinants of the spatial distribution and concentration are analyzed with methods of spatial statistics and spatial econometrics. In addition to the consideration of ''classic'' site factors of agricultural production, the analysis here focuses on the possible relevance of agglomeration effects. The results of the work contribute to a better understanding of the regional distribution and concentration of the biogas production in Germany. [de

  20. An Empirical Study Of Productivity Growth In EU28 - Spatial Panel Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olejnik Alicja

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the spatial process of productivity growth in the European Union on the foundations of the theory of New Economic Geography. The proposed model is based on the study of NUTS 2 regions and takes into consideration a spatial weights matrix in order to better describe the structure of spatial dependence between EU regions. Furthermore, our paper attempts to investigate the applicability of some new approaches to spatial modelling including parameterization of the spatial weights matrix. Our study presents an application of the spatial panel model with fixed effects to Fingleton’s theoretical framework. We suggest that the applied approach constitutes an innovation to spatial econometric studies providing additional information hence, a deeper analysis of the investigated problem.

  1. Spatial pattern characteristics of water footprint for maize production in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Peili; Qin, Lijie; Wang, Yeqiao; He, Hongshi

    2016-01-30

    Water footprint (WF) methodology is essential for quantifying total water consumption of crop production and making efficient water management policies. This study calculated the green, blue, grey and total WFs of maize production in Northeast China from 1998 to 2012 and compared the values of the provinces. This study also analyzed the spatial variation and structure characteristics of the WFs at the prefecture level. The annual average WF of maize production was 1029 m(3) per ton, which was 51% green, 21% blue and 28% grey. The WF of maize production was highest in Liaoning Province, moderate in Heilongjiang Province and lowest in Jilin Province. The spatial differences of the WFs calculated for the 36 major maize production prefectures were significant in Northeast China. There was a moderate positive spatial autocorrelation among prefectures that had similar WFs. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation index (LISA) analysis identified prefectures with higher WFs in the southeast region of Liaoning Province and the southwest region of Heilongjiang Province and prefectures with lower WFs in the middle of Jilin Province. Spatial differences in the WF of maize production were caused mainly by variations in climate conditions, soil quality, irrigation facilities and maize yield. The spatial distribution of WFs can help provide a scientific basis for optimizing maize production distribution and then formulate strategies to reduce the WF of maize production. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Effects of Aging on Slow Wave Sleep Dynamics and Human Spatial Navigational Memory Consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Andrew W.; Ducca, Emma L.; Kishi, Akifumi; Fischer, Esther; Parekh, Ankit; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Yau, Po Lai; Gumb, Tyler; Leibert, David P.; Wohlleber, Margaret E.; Burschtin, Omar E.; Convit, Antonio; Rapoport, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The consolidation of spatial navigational memory during sleep is supported by electrophysiological and behavioral evidence. The features of sleep that mediate this ability may change with aging, as percentage of slow wave sleep is canonically thought to decrease with age, and slow waves are thought to help orchestrate hippocampal-neocortical dialogue that supports systems level consolidation. In this study, groups of younger and older subjects performed timed trials before and after polysomnographically recorded sleep on a 3D spatial maze navigational task. Although younger subjects performed better than older subjects at baseline, both groups showed similar improvement across pre-sleep trials. However, younger subjects experienced significant improvement in maze performance during sleep that was not observed in older subjects, without differences in morning psychomotor vigilance between groups. Older subjects had sleep quality marked by decreased amount of slow wave sleep and increased fragmentation of slow wave sleep, resulting in decreased slow wave activity. Across all subjects, frontal slow wave activity was positively correlated with both overnight change in maze performance and medial prefrontal cortical volume, illuminating a potential neuroanatomical substrate for slow wave activity changes with aging and underscoring the importance of slow wave activity in sleep-dependent spatial navigational memory consolidation. PMID:27143431

  3. Effects of aging on slow-wave sleep dynamics and human spatial navigational memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Andrew W; Ducca, Emma L; Kishi, Akifumi; Fischer, Esther; Parekh, Ankit; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Yau, Po Lai; Gumb, Tyler; Leibert, David P; Wohlleber, Margaret E; Burschtin, Omar E; Convit, Antonio; Rapoport, David M; Osorio, Ricardo S; Ayappa, Indu

    2016-06-01

    The consolidation of spatial navigational memory during sleep is supported by electrophysiological and behavioral evidence. The features of sleep that mediate this ability may change with aging, as percentage of slow-wave sleep is canonically thought to decrease with age, and slow waves are thought to help orchestrate hippocampal-neocortical dialog that supports systems level consolidation. In this study, groups of younger and older subjects performed timed trials before and after polysomnographically recorded sleep on a 3D spatial maze navigational task. Although younger subjects performed better than older subjects at baseline, both groups showed similar improvement across presleep trials. However, younger subjects experienced significant improvement in maze performance during sleep that was not observed in older subjects, without differences in morning psychomotor vigilance between groups. Older subjects had sleep quality marked by decreased amount of slow-wave sleep and increased fragmentation of slow-wave sleep, resulting in decreased slow-wave activity. Across all subjects, frontal slow-wave activity was positively correlated with both overnight change in maze performance and medial prefrontal cortical volume, illuminating a potential neuroanatomical substrate for slow-wave activity changes with aging and underscoring the importance of slow-wave activity in sleep-dependent spatial navigational memory consolidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. On the spatial heterogeneity of net ecosystem productivity in complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan E. Emanuel; Diego A. Riveros-Iregui; Brian L. McGlynn; Howard E. Epstein

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorological flux towers provide spatially integrated estimates of net ecosystem production (NEP) of carbon over areas ranging from several hectares to several square kilometers, but they do so at the expense of spatially explicit information within the footprint of the tower. This finer-scale information is crucial for understanding how physical and biological...

  5. Productivity convergence and spatial dependence among Spanish regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dall'erba, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper estimates the evolution of labor productivity disparities among 48 Spanish regions over 1980-1996 according to the concepts of β- and σ-convergence. The results of β-convergence emphasize the importance of including the impact of neighboring locations' productivity and a disaggregate

  6. Measuring the spatial and social characteristics of the architectural plans of aged care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyun Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method that combines visibility graph and isovist analyses to investigate the spatial and social properties of architectural plans for aged care facilities. The potential of the combined method is examined by measuring the properties of three sets of plans for residential aged care facilities. The first set is a pair of hypothetical, idealized plans, which allegedly reflect the “best practice” in the industry. The second set comprises a pair of plans for recent Australian designs, and the third set is a pair of plans for South Korean facilities. Results of the computational analysis of these six plans suggest that social and cultural factors may shape the design of aged care settings and partially explain their international differences. The application of this methodological approach contributes to the understanding of the relationship between spaces and their cultural and social properties in the design of aged care facilities.

  7. The age grading and the Chen-Ruan cup product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Hepworth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We prove that the obstruction bundle used to define the cup-product in Chen-Ruan cohomology is determined by the so-called `age grading' or `degree-shifting numbers'. Indeed, the obstruction bundle can be directly computed using the age grading. We obtain a Kunneth Theorem for Chen-Ruan cohomology...

  8. The Global Experience of Development of the Theory of Spatial Distribution of Productive Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Heiman Oleh A.; Kosyrieva Olena V.; Krasnonosova Yelena N.

    2016-01-01

    The publication is aimed at theoretical generalization of the global experience of development of the theory of spatial distribution of productive forces as the basis of regional economy. Considering the evolution of scientific views on the spatial development of territories, taking account of the particularities of the distribution of production, one can allocate and identify several paradigms, which replaced each other, but preserved their connection with the placement of ...

  9. Motivational effects and age differences of gamification in product advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bittner, Jenny; Schipper, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study motivational effects and age differences of gamification in product advertising. Game-elements can easily be embedded within product advertisements, but little is known about the success factors of this technology. We investigated which motivational

  10. Selective reminding in normal and demented aged people: auditory verbal versus visual spatial task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, O

    1984-12-01

    A new test of visual spatial learning (VS) which uses the rationale of selective reminding and evaluates memory and learning of spatial positions of objects was presented. This was compared with the auditory verbal selective reminding (AV) in regard to normal aging and dementia. The results showed that the performance of VS declines with age more steeply than those of AV. Factor analyses showed that the performance of VS to be factorially independent of that of AV, and showed that VS can account for most of the decline in performance of normal aged people. The performance on VS of demented patients correlated well with the serverity of dementia. The comparison between multi-infarct dementia and Alzheimer type dementia indicated that severe impairment of VS with relative preservation of AV is a distinctive pattern of Alzheimer type. These results suggest that VS is a useful tool to evaluate memory decline with aging and that it can be useful in the clinical diagnosis of dementia.

  11. Tactile spatial acuity in childhood: effects of age and fingertip size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Peters

    Full Text Available Tactile acuity is known to decline with age in adults, possibly as the result of receptor loss, but less is understood about how tactile acuity changes during childhood. Previous research from our laboratory has shown that fingertip size influences tactile spatial acuity in young adults: those with larger fingers tend to have poorer acuity, possibly because mechanoreceptors are more sparsely distributed in larger fingers. We hypothesized that a similar relationship would hold among children. If so, children's tactile spatial acuity might be expected to worsen as their fingertips grow. However, concomitant CNS maturation might result in more efficient perceptual processing, counteracting the effect of fingertip growth on tactile acuity. To investigate, we conducted a cross-sectional study, testing 116 participants ranging in age from 6 to 16 years on a precision-controlled tactile grating orientation task. We measured each participant's grating orientation threshold on the dominant index finger, along with physical properties of the fingertip: surface area, volume, sweat pore spacing, and temperature. We found that, as in adults, children with larger fingertips (at a given age had significantly poorer acuity, yet paradoxically acuity did not worsen significantly with age. We propose that finger growth during development results in a gradual decline in innervation density as receptive fields reposition to cover an expanding skin surface. At the same time, central maturation presumably enhances perceptual processing.

  12. Aboveground net primary production decline with stand age: potential causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, S T; McMurtrie, R E; Murty, D

    1996-09-01

    Aboveground net primary production (ANPP) commonly reaches a maximum in young forest stands and decreases by 0-76% as stands mature. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for the decline are not well understood. Current hypotheses for declining ANPP with stand age include: (1) an altered balance between photosynthetic and respiring tissues, (2) decreasing soil nutrient availability, and (3) increasing stomatal limitation leading to reduced photosynthetic rates. Recent empirical and modeling studies reveal that mechanisms (2) and (3) are largely responsible for age-related decline in ANPP for forests in cold environments. Increasing respiratory costs appear to be relatively unimportant in explaining declining productivity in ageing stands.

  13. Development of allocentric spatial memory abilities in children from 18 months to 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribordy, Farfalla; Jabès, Adeline; Banta Lavenex, Pamela; Lavenex, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Episodic memories for autobiographical events that happen in unique spatiotemporal contexts are central to defining who we are. Yet, before 2 years of age, children are unable to form or store episodic memories for recall later in life, a phenomenon known as infantile amnesia. Here, we studied the development of allocentric spatial memory, a fundamental component of episodic memory, in two versions of a real-world memory task requiring 18 month- to 5-year-old children to search for rewards hidden beneath cups distributed in an open-field arena. Whereas children 25-42-months-old were not capable of discriminating three reward locations among 18 possible locations in absence of local cues marking these locations, children older than 43 months found the reward locations reliably. These results support previous findings suggesting that allocentric spatial memory, if present, is only rudimentary in children under 3.5 years of age. However, when tested with only one reward location among four possible locations, children 25-39-months-old found the reward reliably in absence of local cues, whereas 18-23-month-olds did not. Our findings thus show that the ability to form a basic allocentric representation of the environment is present by 2 years of age, and its emergence coincides temporally with the offset of infantile amnesia. However, the ability of children to distinguish and remember closely related spatial locations improves from 2 to 3.5 years of age, a developmental period marked by persistent deficits in long-term episodic memory known as childhood amnesia. These findings support the hypothesis that the differential maturation of distinct hippocampal circuits contributes to the emergence of specific memory processes during early childhood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mente Activa® Improves Impaired Spatial Memory in Aging Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Avalos, M D; Fernández-Llebrez Zayas, R; Cifuentes, M; De Andrés, M V; Fernández-Llebrez Del Rey, P; Grondona, J M; Pérez-Martín, M; Pedraza, C

    2015-10-01

    Aging is accompanied by a decline in several aspects of the cognitive function, having negative personal and socioeconomic impacts. Dietary supplements could be beneficial for preventing age-related cognitive decline. In this context, we examined whether the nutritional supplement Mente Activa® has beneficial effects on aging-related cognitive deficits without inducing side effects. Mente Activa® was administered to old rats (n= 30 treated rats and n= 30 control rats) during 5 months, and the Morris water maze was used to test the learning capacities of the animals. The first assessment was conducted before the nutritional intervention (age of 18-19 months), to determine the baseline of the performance of animals on this test, and the second assessment was performed at the end of the treatment (23-24 moths). In order to examine possible secondary effects of this nutritional supplement, plasma, heart anatomy and liver parameters were evaluated. Our data indicate that supplemented rats showed less escape latency, distance swum, higher use of spatial search strategies, and crossed the former platform location with higher frequency than control rats. These effects were specific of the treatment, indicating that this nutritional supplement has a beneficial effect on spatial memory. On the other hand, the regular intake of Mente Activa® did not induce any negative effects in plasma parameters and heart size. Aged rats under a sustained dietary intake of the nutritional supplement Mente Activa® displayed improved learning and memory abilities compared to the non-treated rats. These results suggest the therapeutic potential and safety of use of Mente Activa® for age-related cognitive deficits, particularly, in the onset of the first cognitive dysfunction symptoms.

  15. Age-related reduction of hemispheric lateralisation for spatial attention: An EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Gemma; Benwell, Christopher S Y; Thut, Gregor; Harvey, Monika

    2017-06-01

    A group-level visuospatial attention bias towards the left side of space (pseudoneglect) is consistently observed in young adults, which is likely to be a consequence of right parieto-occipital dominance for spatial attention. Conversely, healthy older adults demonstrate a rightward shift of this behavioural bias, hinting that an age-related reduction of lateralised neural activity may occur within visuospatial attention networks. We compared young (aged 18-25) and older (aged 60-80) adults on a computerised line bisection (landmark) task whilst recording event-related potentials (ERPs). Full-scalp cluster mass permutation tests identified a larger right parieto-occipital response for long lines compared to short in young adults (confirming Benwell et al., 2014a) which was not present in the older group. To specifically investigate age-related differences in hemispheric lateralisation, cluster mass permutation tests were then performed on a lateralised EEG dataset (RH-LH electrodes). A period of right lateralisation was identified in response to long lines in young adults, which was not present for short lines. No lateralised clusters were present for either long or short lines in older adults. Additionally, a reduced P300 component amplitude was observed for older adults relative to young. We therefore report here, for the first time, an age-related and stimulus-driven reduction of right hemispheric control of spatial attention in older adults. Future studies will need to determine whether this is representative of the normal aging process or an early indicator of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity in an aged creosote-contaminated site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Juottonen, Heli; Siivonen, Pauli; Lloret Quesada, Cosme; Tuomi, Pirjo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of polluted sites via in situ bioremediation relies heavily on the indigenous microbes and their activities. Spatial heterogeneity of microbial populations, contaminants and soil chemical parameters on such sites is a major hurdle in optimizing and implementing an appropriate bioremediation regime. We performed a grid-based sampling of an aged creosote-contaminated site followed by geostatistical modelling to illustrate the spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity and to relate these patterns to the distribution of pollutants. Spatial distribution of bacterial groups unveiled patterns of niche differentiation regulated by patchy distribution of pollutants and an east-to-west pH gradient at the studied site. Proteobacteria clearly dominated in the hot spots of creosote pollution, whereas the abundance of Actinobacteria, TM7 and Planctomycetes was considerably reduced from the hot spots. The pH preferences of proteobacterial groups dominating in pollution could be recognized by examining the order and family-level responses. Acidobacterial classes came across as generalists in hydrocarbon pollution whose spatial distribution seemed to be regulated solely by the pH gradient. Although the community evenness decreased in the heavily polluted zones, basal respiration and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis rates were higher, indicating the adaptation of specific indigenous microbial populations to hydrocarbon pollution. Combining the information from the kriged maps of microbial and soil chemistry data provided a comprehensive understanding of the long-term impacts of creosote pollution on the subsurface microbial communities. This study also highlighted the prospect of interpreting taxa-specific spatial patterns and applying them as indicators or proxies for monitoring polluted sites. PMID:25105905

  17. Spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity in an aged creosote-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Juottonen, Heli; Siivonen, Pauli; Lloret Quesada, Cosme; Tuomi, Pirjo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2014-10-01

    Restoration of polluted sites via in situ bioremediation relies heavily on the indigenous microbes and their activities. Spatial heterogeneity of microbial populations, contaminants and soil chemical parameters on such sites is a major hurdle in optimizing and implementing an appropriate bioremediation regime. We performed a grid-based sampling of an aged creosote-contaminated site followed by geostatistical modelling to illustrate the spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity and to relate these patterns to the distribution of pollutants. Spatial distribution of bacterial groups unveiled patterns of niche differentiation regulated by patchy distribution of pollutants and an east-to-west pH gradient at the studied site. Proteobacteria clearly dominated in the hot spots of creosote pollution, whereas the abundance of Actinobacteria, TM7 and Planctomycetes was considerably reduced from the hot spots. The pH preferences of proteobacterial groups dominating in pollution could be recognized by examining the order and family-level responses. Acidobacterial classes came across as generalists in hydrocarbon pollution whose spatial distribution seemed to be regulated solely by the pH gradient. Although the community evenness decreased in the heavily polluted zones, basal respiration and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis rates were higher, indicating the adaptation of specific indigenous microbial populations to hydrocarbon pollution. Combining the information from the kriged maps of microbial and soil chemistry data provided a comprehensive understanding of the long-term impacts of creosote pollution on the subsurface microbial communities. This study also highlighted the prospect of interpreting taxa-specific spatial patterns and applying them as indicators or proxies for monitoring polluted sites.

  18. Spatial Variability and Uncertainty of Water Use Impacts from U.S. Feed and Milk Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Andrew D; Asselin-Balençon, Anne C; Heller, Martin; Lessard, Lindsay; Vionnet, Samuel; Jolliet, Olivier

    2017-02-21

    This paper addresses water use impacts of agriculture, developing a spatially explicit approach tracing the location of water use and water scarcity related to feed production, transport, and livestock, tracking uncertainties and illustrating the approach with a case study on dairy production in the United States. This approach was developed as a step to bring spatially variable production and impacts into a process-based life cycle assessment (LCA) context. As water resources and demands are spatially variable, it is critical to take into account the location of activities to properly understand the impacts of water use, accounting for each of the main feeds for milk production. At the crop production level, the example of corn grain shows that 59% of water stress associated with corn grain production in the United States is located in Nebraska, a state with moderate water stress and moderate corn production (11%). At the level of milk production, four watersheds account for 78% of the national water stress impact, as these areas have high milk production and relatively high water stress; it is the production of local silage and hay crops that drives water consumption in these areas. By considering uncertainty in both inventory data and impact characterization factors, we demonstrate that spatial variability may be larger than uncertainty, and that not systematically accounting for the two can lead to artificially high uncertainty. Using a nonspatial approach in a spatially variable setting can result in a significant underestimation or overestimation of water impacts. The approach demonstrated here could be applied to other spatially variable processes.

  19. Embodied HANPP. Mapping the spatial disconnect between global biomass production and consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Krausmann, Fridolin; Haberl, Helmut; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Biomass trade results in a growing spatial disconnect between environmental impacts due to biomass production and the places where biomass is being consumed. The pressure on ecosystems resulting from the production of traded biomass, however, is highly variable between regions and products. We use the concept of embodied human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP) to map the spatial disconnect between net-producing and net-consuming regions. Embodied HANPP comprises total biomass withdrawals and land use induced changes in productivity resulting from the provision of biomass products. International net transfers of embodied HANPP are of global significance, amounting to 1.7 PgC/year. Sparsely populated regions are mainly net producers, densely populated regions net consumers, independent of development status. Biomass consumption and trade are expected to surge over the next decades, suggesting a need to sustainably manage supply and demand of products of ecosystems on a global level. (author)

  20. Perspectives on Spatial Decision Support Concerning Location of Biogas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Mikkel

    Biogas production is a contemporary important topic in many agri-intensive countries, among these Denmark, where biogas has received increasingly political and scholarly awareness during recent years. The Danish government has set an ambition that 50% of the livestock slurry should by 2020 by used...... biomass resource availability is expected to decline by 10% until 2020 but with regional variation. We find that large scale biogas producers enjoy 16% lower transportation costs than small biogas producers. It is argued that biogas producers need to see themselves as agro-based retailers and accordingly...

  1. Aging ovary and the role for advanced glycation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertynska-Marczewska, Magdalena; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2017-03-01

    The hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator, the pituitary gonadotropes, the ovaries, and the uterus play a crucial role in female fertility. A decline in reproductive performance represents a complex interplay of actions at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Recently, in the field of female reproductive aging attention is drawn to the carbonyl stress theory. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute directly to protein damage, induce a chain of oxidative stress (OS) reactions, and increase inflammatory reactions. Here, we highlight some of the mechanisms underlying glycation damage in the ovary. Searches of electronic databases were performed. Articles relevant to possible role of OS, AGEs, and receptor for AGE (RAGE) in aging ovary were summarized in this interpretive literature review. Follicular microenvironment undergoes an increase in OS with aging. Data support the role of OS in ovulatory dysfunction because AGEs are well-recognized mediators of increased OS. RAGE and AGE-modified proteins with activated nuclear factor-kappa B are expressed in human ovarian tissue. It was suggested that accumulation of AGEs products at the level of the ovarian follicle might trigger early ovarian aging or could be responsible for reduced glucose uptake by granulosa cells, potentially altering follicular growth. Moreover, impaired methylglyoxal detoxification causing relevant damage to the ovarian proteome might be one of the mechanisms underlying reproductive aging. Further investigation of the role for the AGE-RAGE axis in the ovarian follicular environment is needed, and results could relate to assisted reproduction technology outcomes and new measures of ovarian reserve.

  2. A spatial Coherent Global Soil Moisture Product with Improved Temporal Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jeu, R.A.M.; Holmes, T.R.H.; Parinussa, R.M.; Owe, M.

    2014-01-01

    Global soil moisture products that are completely independent of any type of ancillary data and solely rely on satellite observations are presented. Additionally, we further develop an existing downscaling technique that enhances the spatial resolution of such products to approximately 11. km. These

  3. Spatial variation in age structure among colonies of a marine snake: the influence of ectothermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Xavier; Brischoux, François; Pinaud, David; Michel, Catherine Louise; Clobert, Jean; Shine, Richard; Fauvel, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Several tetrapod lineages that have evolved to exploit marine environments (e.g. seals, seabirds, sea kraits) continue to rely upon land for reproduction and, thus, form dense colonies on suitable islands. In birds and mammals (endotherms), the offspring cannot survive without their parents. Terrestrial colonies contain all age classes. In reptiles (ectotherms), this constraint is relaxed, because offspring are independent from birth. Hence, each age class has the potential to select sites with characteristics that favour them. Our studies of sea snakes (sea kraits) in the lagoon of New Caledonia reveal marked spatial heterogeneity in age structure among colonies. Sea krait colonies exhibit the endothermic 'seal-seabird' pattern (mixed-age classes within populations) only where the lagoon is narrow. Where the lagoon is wide, most snake colonies are comprised primarily of a single age cohort. Nurseries are located near the coast, adult colonies offshore and mixed colonies in-between. We suggest that ectothermy allows individuals to utilize habitats that are best suited to their own ecological requirements, a flexibility not available to endothermic marine taxa with obligate parental care. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  4. Age-Related Changes in the Ability to Switch between Temporal and Spatial Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Eleanor; Holland, Carol; Kessler, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background : Identifying age-related changes in cognition that contribute towards reduced driving performance is important for the development of interventions to improve older adults' driving and prolong the time that they can continue to drive. While driving, one is often required to switch from attending to events changing in time, to distribute attention spatially. Although there is extensive research into both spatial attention and temporal attention and how these change with age, the literature on switching between these modalities of attention is limited within any age group. Methods : Age groups (21-30, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70+ years) were compared on their ability to switch between detecting a target in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream and detecting a target in a visual search display. To manipulate the cost of switching, the target in the RSVP stream was either the first item in the stream (Target 1st), towards the end of the stream (Target Mid), or absent from the stream (Distractor Only). Visual search response times and accuracy were recorded. Target 1st trials behaved as no-switch trials, as attending to the remaining stream was not necessary. Target Mid and Distractor Only trials behaved as switch trials, as attending to the stream to the end was required. Results : Visual search response times (RTs) were longer on "Target Mid" and "Distractor Only" trials in comparison to "Target 1st" trials, reflecting switch-costs. Larger switch-costs were found in both the 40-49 and 60-69 years group in comparison to the 21-30 years group when switching from the Target Mid condition. Discussion : Findings warrant further exploration as to whether there are age-related changes in the ability to switch between these modalities of attention while driving. If older adults display poor performance when switching between temporal and spatial attention while driving, then the development of an intervention to preserve and improve this ability would be

  5. The effects of age and workload on 3D spatial attention in dual-task driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Russell S; Andersen, George J

    2014-06-01

    In the present study we assessed whether the limits in visual-spatial attention associated with aging affect the spatial extent of attention in depth during driving performance. Drivers in the present study performed a car-following and light-detection task. To assess the extent of visual-spatial attention, we compared reaction times and accuracy to light change targets that varied in horizontal position and depth location. In addition, because workload has been identified as a factor that can change the horizontal and vertical extent of attention, we tested whether variability of the lead car speed influenced the extent of spatial attention for younger or older drivers. For younger drivers, reaction time (RT) to light-change targets varied as a function of distance and horizontal position. For older drivers RT varied only as a function of distance. There was a distance by horizontal position interaction for younger drivers but not for older drivers. Specifically, there was no effect of horizontal position at any given level of depth for older drivers. However, for younger drivers there was an effect of horizontal position for targets further in depth but not for targets nearer in depth. With regards to workload, we found no statistically reliable evidence that variability of the lead car speed had an effect on the spatial extent of attention for younger or older drivers. In a control experiment, we examined the effects of depth on light detection when the projected size and position of the targets was constant. Consistent with our previous results, we found that drivers' reaction time to light-change targets varied as a function of distance even when 2D position and size were controlled. Given that depth is an important dimension in driving performance, an important issue for assessing driving safety is to consider the limits of attention in the depth dimension. Therefore, we suggest that future research should consider the importance of depth as a dimension of

  6. Age-related changes in rostral basal forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic projection neurons: relationship with spatial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos, Cristina; LaSarge, Candi L; McQuail, Joseph A; Hartman, John J; Gilbert, Ryan J; Ormerod, Brandi K; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    Both cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the rostral basal forebrain contribute to hippocampal function and mnemonic abilities. While dysfunction of cholinergic neurons has been heavily implicated in age-related memory decline, significantly less is known regarding how age-related changes in codistributed GABAergic projection neurons contribute to a decline in hippocampal-dependent spatial learning. In the current study, confocal stereology was used to quantify cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase [ChAT] immunopositive) neurons, GABAergic projection (glutamic decarboxylase 67 [GAD67] immunopositive) neurons, and total (neuronal nuclei [NeuN] immunopositive) neurons in the rostral basal forebrain of young and aged rats that were first characterized on a spatial learning task. ChAT immunopositive neurons were significantly but modestly reduced in aged rats. Although ChAT immunopositive neuron number was strongly correlated with spatial learning abilities among young rats, the reduction of ChAT immunopositive neurons was not associated with impaired spatial learning in aged rats. In contrast, the number of GAD67 immunopositive neurons was robustly and selectively elevated in aged rats that exhibited impaired spatial learning. Interestingly, the total number of rostral basal forebrain neurons was comparable in young and aged rats, regardless of their cognitive status. These data demonstrate differential effects of age on phenotypically distinct rostral basal forebrain projection neurons, and implicate dysregulated cholinergic and GABAergic septohippocampal circuitry in age-related mnemonic decline. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A versatile workstation for the diffusion, mixing, and post-production of spatial audio

    OpenAIRE

    Carpentier , Thibaut

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a versatile workstation for the diffusion, mixing, and post-production of spatial sound. Designed as a virtual console, the tool provides a comprehensive environment for combining channel–, scene–, and object–based audio. The incoming streams are mixed in a flexible bus architecture which tightly couples sound spatialization with reverberation effects. The application supports a broad range of rendering techniques (VBAP, HOA, binaural, etc.) and it ...

  8. Spatial gradients in Clovis-age radiocarbon dates across North America suggest rapid colonization from the north

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Marcus J.; Buchanan, Briggs

    2007-01-01

    A key issue in the debate over the initial colonization of North America is whether there are spatial gradients in the distribution of the Clovis-age occupations across the continent. Such gradients would help indicate the timing, speed, and direction of the colonization process. In their recent reanalysis of Clovis-age radiocarbon dates, Waters and Stafford [Waters MR, Stafford TW, Jr (2007) Science 315:1122–1126] report that they find no spatial patterning. Furthermore, they suggest that th...

  9. Effects of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) on skin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Abbreviations: AGEs, Glycation end-products; SD, Sprague-. Dawley; STZ, streptozotocin; EGF, epidermal growth factor; NF-. kB, nuclear factor-kappa B. result in significant morbidity. Impaired wound healing is a common vascular complication of diabetes mellitus and constitutes a major clinical problem ...

  10. Effects of age on spatial information processing: relationship to senescent changes in brain noradrenergic and opioid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    A major focus in current research on aging is the identification of senescent changes in cognitive function in laboratory animals. This literature indicates that the processing of spatial information may be particularly impaired during senescence. The degree to which nonspecific factors (eg. sensory of motor deficits) contribute to behavioral impairments in aging, however, remains largely uninvestigated. In addition, few studies have attempted to identify senescent changes in brain structure and function which might underlie the behavioral manifestations of aging. In the behavioral experiments reported here, the authors tested young, middle-age, and senescent rates in several versions of a spatial memory task, the Morris water maze. The results of these investigations demonstrate that aged rats are significantly impaired in the Morris task compared to young or middle-age animals. In addition, these studies indicate that age-related deficits in the water maze reflect a specific dysfunction in the ability of older animals to effectively process spatial information rather than a senescent decline in sensory or motor functions. Using the subjects from the behavioral studies, additional investigations assessed whether age-dependent changes in neurochemical and neuroanatomical systems which are known to mediate spatial learning in young animals were related to the behavioral deficits exhibited by aged rats. The results of these studies demonstrate that a portion of senescent animals exhibit significant increases in lateral septal 3 H-desmethylimipramine binding and decrease in 3 H-naloxone binding in this same region as assessed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

  11. Age-related effects of a memorizing spatial task in the adults and elderly postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Laetitia; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the age-related changes in postural control during a simple quiet standing task and a dual-task paradigm (applying a memory-spatial task and quiet standing). Thirty-five subjects were divided in two age-related groups: both younger (Y: 20-26 years) and older (O: 60-77 years) groups performed a simple postural task (quiet standing) and a dual-task (a visual memory task combined with quiet standing). Measures of the center of pressure (CoP) were recorded and its two components, the center of gravity (CG) and the differential CoP-CG, were evaluated. An age-related effect was observed in static postural performance during dual-tasking. Postural stability led to improved performance in younger subjects during the dual-task and but not in the elderly. Of the results suggest there is a "cognition first" principle for the younger adults, that is, the mirror image of the "posture first" principle observed in older adults under dual-tasking situations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A longitudinal analysis of sex differences in math and spatial skills in primary school age children☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Jennifer A.; Mazzocco, Michèle M.M.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a longitudinal study designed to assess possible sex differences in math achievement, math ability, and math-related tasks during the primary school age years. Participants included over 200 children from one public school district. Annual assessments included measures of math ability, math calculation achievement scores, rapid naming and decoding tasks, visual perception tests, visual motor tasks, and reading skills. During select years of the study we also administered tests of counting and math facts skills. We examined whether girls or boys were overrepresented among the bottom or top performers on any of these tasks, relative to their peers, and whether growth rates or predictors of math-related skills differed for boys and girls. Our findings support the notion that sex differences in math are minimal or nonexistent on standardized psychometric tests routinely given in assessments of primary school age children. There was no persistent finding suggesting a male or female advantage in math performance overall, during any single year of the study, or in any one area of math or spatial skills. Growth rates for all skills, and early correlates of later math performance, were comparable for boys and girls. The findings fail to support either persistent or emerging sex differences on non-specialized math ability measures during the primary school age years. PMID:20463851

  13. Elastin aging and lipid oxidation products in human aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamelija Zarkovic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vascular aging is associated with structural and functional modifications of the arteries, and by an increase in arterial wall thickening in the intima and the media, mainly resulting from structural modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM components. Among the factors known to accumulate with aging, advanced lipid peroxidation end products (ALEs are a hallmark of oxidative stress-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis. Aldehydes generated from the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, (4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, acrolein, form adducts on cellular proteins, leading to a progressive protein dysfunction with consequences in the pathophysiology of vascular aging. The contribution of these aldehydes to ECM modification is not known. This study was carried out to investigate whether aldehyde-adducts are detected in the intima and media in human aorta, whether their level is increased in vascular aging, and whether elastin fibers are a target of aldehyde-adduct formation. Immunohistological and confocal immunofluorescence studies indicate that 4-HNE-histidine-adducts accumulate in an age-related manner in the intima, media and adventitia layers of human aortas, and are mainly expressed in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, even if the structure of elastin fiber is strongly altered in the aged vessels, our results show that elastin is not or very poorly modified by 4-HNE. These data indicate a complex role for lipid peroxidation and in particular for 4-HNE in elastin homeostasis, in the vascular wall remodeling during aging and atherosclerosis development.

  14. How writing system and age influence spatial representations of actions: a developmental, cross-linguistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobel, Christian; Diesendruck, Gil; Bölte, Jens

    2007-06-01

    Recently, researchers reported a bias for placing agents predominantly on the left side of pictures. Both hemispheric specialization and cultural preferences have been hypothesized to be the origin of this bias. To evaluate these hypotheses, we conducted a study with participants exposed to different reading and writing systems: Germans, who use a left-to-right system, and Israelis, who use a right-to-left system. In addition, we manipulated the degree of exposure to the writing systems by testing preschoolers and adults. Participants heard agent-first or recipient-first sentences and were asked to draw the content of the sentences or to arrange transparencies of protagonists and objects such that their arrangement depicted the sentences. Although preschool-age children in both countries showed no directional bias, adults manifested a bias that was consistent with the writing system of their language. These results support the cultural hypothesis regarding the origin of spatial-representational biases.

  15. Using remotely sensed data to construct and assess forest attribute maps and related spatial products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Warren B. Cohen; Erik Naesset; Stephen V. Stehman; Erkki O. Tomppo

    2010-01-01

    Tremendous advances in the construction and assessment of forest attribute maps and related spatial products have been realized in recent years, partly as a result of the use of remotely sensed data as an information source. This review focuses on the current state of techniques for the construction and assessment of remote sensing-based maps and addresses five topic...

  16. Evaluating the Impacts of Spatial Uncertainties in Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) Products on Flood Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z.; Wu, H.; Li, J.; Hong, Y.; Huang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Precipitation is often the major uncertainty source of hydrologic modelling, e.g., for flood simulation. The quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) products when used as input for hydrologic modelling can cause significant difference in model performance because of the large variations in their estimation of precipitation intensity, duration, and spatial distribution. Objectively evaluating QPE and deriving the best estimation of precipitation at river basin scale, represent a bottleneck which has been faced by the hydrometeorological community, despite they are desired by many researches including flood simulation, such as the Global Flood Monitoring System using the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model (Wu et al., 2014). Recently we developed a Multiple-product-driven hydrological Modeling Framework (MMF) for objective evaluation of QPE products using the DRIVE model (Wu et al., 2017). In this study based on the MMF, we (1) compare location, spatial characteristics, and geometric patterns of precipitation among QPE products at various temporal scales by adopting an object-oriented method; (2) demonstrate their effects on flood magnitude and timing simulation through the DRIVE model; and (3) further investigate and understand how different precipitation spatial patterns evolute and result in difference in streamflow and flood peak (magnitude and timing), through a linear routing scheme which is employed to decompose the contribution of flood peak during rain-flood events. This study shows that there can be significant difference in spatial patterns of accumulated precipitation at various temporal scales (from days to hourly) among QPE products, which cause significant difference in flood simulation particularly in peak timing prediction. Therefore, the evaluation of spatial pattern of precipitation should be considered as an important part of the framework for objective evaluation of QPE and the derivation of the best

  17. The Spatial and Age Distribution of Stellar Populations in DDO 190

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, A.; Tikhonov, N.

    2000-05-01

    The spatial distribution of stellar populations, the star formation history, and other properties of the dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxy DDO 190 have been analyzed using color-magnitude diagrams of about 3900 resolved stars and the Hα fluxes of H II regions. From the mean color index of the red giant branch (RGB), a mean metallicity [Fe/H]=-2.0 is obtained. The I magnitude of the tip of the RGB has been used to estimate the distance. DDO 190 is 2.9+/-0.2 Mpc from the Milky Way, 2.1 Mpc from the M94 group (Cn 5-1), 2.4 Mpc from the M81 group, and 2.9 Mpc from the barycenter of the Local Group, all indicating that it is an isolated field galaxy. The surface brightness distribution of the galaxy is well fitted by ellipses of ellipticity e=1-a/b=0.1 and position angle of 82°. The radial star density distribution follows an exponential law of scale length α=43.4", corresponding to 611 pc. The Holmberg semimajor axis to μB=26.5 is estimated to be rB26.5=3.0‧. Stellar populations of different ages in DDO 190 show strong spatial decoupling, the oldest population appearing much more extended than the youngest. Stars younger than 0.1 Gyr occupy only the central 40" (0.55 kpc) stars younger than a few (~4) Gyr extend out to ~80" (125 kpc), and for larger galactocentric distances, only older stars seem to be present. This behavior is found in all the dIrr galaxies for which spatially extended studies have been performed and could be related to the kinematic history of the galaxy. Based on observations made with the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  18. Spatialization of Brazilian pig production: relationship between productive, physical, environmental, and socio-economic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Isabel C M; Bremm, Bárbara; Teixeira, Jennifer L; Costa, Nathalia S; Barcellos, Júlio O J; Braccini, José; Cesconeto, Robson J; McManus, Concepta

    2017-06-01

    Brazilian pig production spans over a large territory encompassing regions of different climatic and socio-economic realities. Production, physical, socio-economic, and environmental data were used to characterize pig production in the country. Multivariate analysis evaluated indices including number productivity, production levels, and income from pigs, together with the average area of pig farm and socio-economic variables such as municipal human development index, technical guidance received from agricultural cooperatives and industrial companies, number of family farms, and offtake; and finally, environmental variables: latitude, longitude, annual temperature range, solar radiation index, as well as temperature and humidity index. The Southern region has the largest herd, number of pigs sold/sow, and offtake rate (p Southeast. No significant correlations were seen between production rates and productivity with the socio-economic and environmental variables in the regions of Brazil. Production indexes, productivity, and offtake rate discriminated Northeast and Midwest and Northeast and Southeast regions. The Northern region, with a large area, has few and far-between farms that rear pigs for subsistence. The Northeast region has large herds, but low productivity. Number of slaughtered pigs has been variable over the past three decades, with few states responsible for maintaining high production in Brazil. However, the activity can be effective in any region of the country with technology and technical assistance adapted to regional characteristics.

  19. Alternative spatial allocation of suitable land for biofuel production in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Chen, Yang; Rao, Yongheng

    2017-01-01

    How to select locations for biofuel production is still a critical consideration for balance of crop and biofuel productions as well as of energy consumption and environmental conservation. Biofuels are widely produced all over the world, but this practice in China is still at the initial stage....... Based on China's current stage on food security and changing biofuel demands, this paper selected agro-environmental and socio-economic factors of biofuel production, and simulated and spatially allocated areas suited for biofuel production under the two scenarios of planning-oriented scenario (Po......S) and biofuel-oriented scenario (BoS) by the target year 2020. It also estimated biofuel production potentials and zones across China's provinces. The results show that land suited for biofuel production is primarily located in Northwestern, Northern, Northeastern, Central and Southwestern China...

  20. A Spatial Allocation Procedure to Downscale Regional Crop Production Estimates from an Integrated Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulds, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Savic, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model, provides insight into the interactions and feedbacks between physical and human systems. The land system component of GCAM, which simulates land use activities and the production of major crops, produces output at the subregional level which must be spatially downscaled in order to use with gridded impact assessment models. However, existing downscaling routines typically consider cropland as a homogeneous class and do not provide information about land use intensity or specific management practices such as irrigation and multiple cropping. This paper presents a spatial allocation procedure to downscale crop production data from GCAM to a spatial grid, producing a time series of maps which show the spatial distribution of specific crops (e.g. rice, wheat, maize) at four input levels (subsistence, low input rainfed, high input rainfed and high input irrigated). The model algorithm is constrained by available cropland at each time point and therefore implicitly balances extensification and intensification processes in order to meet global food demand. It utilises a stochastic approach such that an increase in production of a particular crop is more likely to occur in grid cells with a high biophysical suitability and neighbourhood influence, while a fall in production will occur more often in cells with lower suitability. User-supplied rules define the order in which specific crops are downscaled as well as allowable transitions. A regional case study demonstrates the ability of the model to reproduce historical trends in India by comparing the model output with district-level agricultural inventory data. Lastly, the model is used to predict the spatial distribution of crops globally under various GCAM scenarios.

  1. Analysis Framework of China’s Grain Production System: A Spatial Resilience Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dazhuan Ge

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available China’s grain production has transformed from absolute shortage to a current structural oversupply. High-intensity production introduced further challenges for the eco-environment, smallholder livelihood, and the man-land interrelationship. Driven by urban-rural transformation, research on food security patterns and grain production has expanded into a new field. To analyze the challenges and required countermeasures for China’s grain production system (GPS, this study constructed a theoretical GPS framework based on space resilience. Firstly, a new GPS concept was proposed and a functional system was established for protecting the regional food security, thus guaranteeing smallholder livelihood, stabilizing urban-rural transformation, and sustaining the eco-environment in terms of economic, social, and ecological attributes of the GPS. Secondly, based on a cross-scale interaction analysis that varied from a smallholder scale to a global scale, the systematic crisis of the GPS was analyzed. Thirdly, a cross-scale analytic framework of the GPS was formed from the perspective of spatial resilience, integrating both inner and external disturbance factors of the GPS. Both spatial heterogeneity and connectivity of internal and external disturbance factors are important contents of system space resilience. Finally, the hierarchy of spatial resilience of GPS became clear. The transformation of labor force and the land use transition form key thresholds of the GPS. In summary: based on protecting the basic functions of the GPS, the cross-scale effect of systematic disturbance factors and relevant countermeasures for spatial resilience are effectively influenced by the coordination of the interests of multiple stakeholders; spatial resilience is an effective analytical tool for GPS regulation, providing a reference for revealing the inherent mechanism and functional evolution of the GPS in the process of urban-rural transformation.

  2. Differential verbal, visual, and spatial working memory in written language production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulerson, Bascom A; Donovan, Michael J; Whiteford, Alison P; Kellogg, Ronald T

    2010-02-01

    The contributions of verbal, visual, and spatial working memory to written language production were investigated. Participants composed definitions for nouns while concurrently performing a task which required updating, storing, and retrieving information coded either verbally, visually, or spatially. The present study extended past findings by showing the linguistic encoding of planned conceptual content makes its largest demand on verbal working memory for both low and high frequency nouns. Kellogg, Olive, and Piolat in 2007 found that concrete nouns place substantial demands on visual working memory when imaging the nouns' referents during planning, whereas abstract nouns make no demand. The current study further showed that this pattern was not an artifact of visual working memory being sensitive to manipulation of just any lexical property of the noun prompts. In contrast to past results, writing made a small but detectible demand on spatial working memory.

  3. Spatial distribution of human neocortical neurons and glial cells according to sex and age measured by the saucer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Anette Kirstine; Petersen, A O; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    2007-01-01

    A new stereological probe, the saucer, was used for estimating three-dimensional (3D) spatial distributions of particles around particles. The advantages of the saucer include that the measurements and the results are in 3D and the size and design of the probe enables the investigator to sample...... primary neurons in the human neocortex (divided into frontal-, temporal-, parietal- and occipital cortex) of young and old subjects free of neurological or psychological disease to test if age and gender has any influence on the cell distribution in human neocortex. Plots of the spatial distribution...... disorders was independent of age and gender....

  4. On the Spatial and Temporal Sampling Errors of Remotely Sensed Precipitation Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Behrangi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Observation with coarse spatial and temporal sampling can cause large errors in quantification of the amount, intensity, and duration of precipitation events. In this study, the errors resulting from temporal and spatial sampling of precipitation events were quantified and examined using the latest version (V4 of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM mission integrated multi-satellite retrievals for GPM (IMERG, which is available since spring of 2014. Relative mean square error was calculated at 0.1° × 0.1° every 0.5 h between the degraded (temporally and spatially and original IMERG products. The temporal and spatial degradation was performed by producing three-hour (T3, six-hour (T6, 0.5° × 0.5° (S5, and 1.0° × 1.0° (S10 maps. The results show generally larger errors over land than ocean, especially over mountainous regions. The relative error of T6 is almost 20% larger than T3 over tropical land, but is smaller in higher latitudes. Over land relative error of T6 is larger than S5 across all latitudes, while T6 has larger relative error than S10 poleward of 20°S–20°N. Similarly, the relative error of T3 exceeds S5 poleward of 20°S–20°N, but does not exceed S10, except in very high latitudes. Similar results are also seen over ocean, but the error ratios are generally less sensitive to seasonal changes. The results also show that the spatial and temporal relative errors are not highly correlated. Overall, lower correlations between the spatial and temporal relative errors are observed over ocean than over land. Quantification of such spatiotemporal effects provides additional insights into evaluation studies, especially when different products are cross-compared at a range of spatiotemporal scales.

  5. Exposure to 56Fe irradiation accelerates normal brain aging and produces deficits in spatial learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Casadesus, Gemma; Carey, Amanda N.; Rabin, Bernard M.; Joseph, James A.

    Previous studies have shown that radiation exposure, particularly to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) such as 56Fe, produces deficits in spatial learning and memory. These adverse behavioral effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. It is possible that these shared effects may be produced by the same mechanism. For example, an increased release of reactive oxygen species, and the subsequent oxidative stress and inflammatory damage caused to the central nervous system, is likely responsible for the deficits seen in aging and following irradiation. Therefore, dietary antioxidants, such as those found in fruits and vegetables, could be used as countermeasures to prevent the behavioral changes seen in these conditions. Both aged and irradiated rats display cognitive impairment in tests of spatial learning and memory such as the Morris water maze and the radial arm maze. These rats have decrements in the ability to build spatial representations of the environment, and they utilize non-spatial strategies to solve tasks. Furthermore, they show a lack of spatial preference, due to a decline in the ability to process or retain place (position of a goal with reference to a “map” provided by the configuration of numerous cues in the environment) information. These declines in spatial memory occur in measures dependent on both reference and working memory, and in the flexibility to reset mental images. These results show that irradiation with 56Fe high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts, particularly middle-aged ones, to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere.

  6. Soil nitrate reducing processes – drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Madeline; Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Daniell, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate (NO3−) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O). A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub centimeter areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location, and potential for N2O production from soils. PMID:23264770

  7. Tracking changes in spatial frequency sensitivity during natural image processing in school age: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokszin, Adrienn Aranka; Győri-Dani, Dóra; Bácsi, János; Nyúl, László G; Csifcsák, Gábor

    2018-02-01

    Several studies have shown that behavioral and electrophysiological correlates of processing visual images containing low or high spatial frequency (LSF or HSF) information undergo development after early childhood. However, the maturation of spatial frequency sensitivity during school age has been investigated using abstract stimuli only. The aim of the current study was to assess how LSF and HSF features affect the processing of everyday photographs at the behavioral and electrophysiological levels in children aged 7-15 years and adults. We presented grayscale images containing either animals or vehicles and their luminance-matched modified versions filtered at low or high spatial frequencies. Modulations of classification accuracy, reaction time, and visual event-related potentials (posterior P1 and N1 components) were compared across five developmental groups and three image types. We found disproportionately worse response accuracies for LSF stimuli relative to HSF images in children aged 7 or 8 years, an effect that was accompanied by smaller LSF-evoked P1 amplitudes during this age period. At 7 or 8 years of age, P1 and N1 amplitudes were modulated by HSF and LSF stimuli (P1: HSF > LSF; N1: LSF > HSF), with a gradual shift toward the opposite pattern (P1: LSF > HSF; N1: HSF > LSF) with increasing age. Our results indicate that early cortical processing of both spatial frequency ranges undergo substantial development during school age, with a relative delay of LSF analysis, and underline the utility of our paradigm in tracking the maturation of LSF versus HSF sensitivity in this age group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spatial competition for biogas production using insights from retail location models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Mikkel; Birkin, M.; Clarke, G.

    2014-01-01

    analysis framework developed in this paper, facilitate the analysis and discussion of how national policies can be fulfilled. The capacity expansion of the Danish biogas sector should be centred on large-scale biogas production since large biogas plants are found to have 16% lower transportation costs than...... small biogas plants. Consequently, this minimizes the single most important production cost factor, transportation. The developed framework can be used and further developed in an analysis of how the spatial availability of, and competition for, different types of biomass can supplement each other...... in the development towards a bio-based economy....

  9. Spatial gradients in Clovis-age radiocarbon dates across North America suggest rapid colonization from the north.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Marcus J; Buchanan, Briggs

    2007-10-02

    A key issue in the debate over the initial colonization of North America is whether there are spatial gradients in the distribution of the Clovis-age occupations across the continent. Such gradients would help indicate the timing, speed, and direction of the colonization process. In their recent reanalysis of Clovis-age radiocarbon dates, Waters and Stafford [Waters MR, Stafford TW, Jr (2007) Science 315:1122-1126] report that they find no spatial patterning. Furthermore, they suggest that the brevity of the Clovis time period indicates that the Clovis culture represents the diffusion of a technology across a preexisting pre-Clovis population rather than a population expansion. In this article, we focus on two questions. First, we ask whether there is spatial patterning to the timing of Clovis-age occupations and, second, whether the observed speed of colonization is consistent with demic processes. With time-delayed wave-of-advance models, we use the radiocarbon record to test several alternative colonization hypotheses. We find clear spatial gradients in the distribution of these dates across North America, which indicate a rapid wave of advance originating from the north. We show that the high velocity of this wave can be accounted for by a combination of demographic processes, habitat preferences, and mobility biases across complex landscapes. Our results suggest that the Clovis-age archaeological record represents a rapid demic colonization event originating from the north.

  10. Riluzole partially rescues age-associated, but not LPS-induced, loss of glutamate transporters and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Holly M; Bardou, Isabelle; Hopp, Sarah C; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Corona, Angela W; Fenn, Ashley M; Godbout, Jonathan P; Wenk, Gary L

    2013-12-01

    Impaired memory may result from synaptic glutamatergic dysregulation related to chronic neuroinflammation. GLT1 is the primary excitatory amino acid transporter responsible for regulating extracellular glutamate levels in the hippocampus. We tested the hypothesis that if impaired spatial memory results from increased extracellular glutamate due to age or experimentally induced chronic neuroinflammation in the hippocampus, then pharmacological augmentation of the glutamate transporter GLT1 will attenuate deficits in a hippocampal-dependent spatial memory task. The profile of inflammation-related genes and proteins associated with normal aging, or chronic neuroinflammation experimentally-induced via a four-week LPS infusion into the IV(th) ventricle, were correlated with performance in the Morris water maze following treatment with Riluzole, a drug that can enhance glutamate clearance by increasing GLT1 expression. Age-associated inflammation was qualitatively different from LPS-induced neuro-inflammation in young rats. LPS produced a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by increased IL-1ß expression in the hippocampus, whereas aging was not associated with a strong central pro-inflammatory response but with a mixed peripheral immune phenotype. Riluzole attenuated the spatial memory impairment, the elevation of serum cytokines and the decrease in GLT1 gene expression in Aged rats, but had no effect on young rats infused with LPS. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of reducing glutamatergic function upon memory impairment in neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging.

  11. Age-dependent and -independent changes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) during spatial working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Steffen; Ghisleni, Carmen; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Martin, Ernst; Ball, Juliane; Eich-Höchli, Dominique; Klaver, Peter; O'Gorman, Ruth L; Michels, Lars; Brandeis, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been associated with spatial working memory as well as frontostriatal core deficits. However, it is still unclear how the link between these frontostriatal deficits and working memory function in ADHD differs in children and adults. This study examined spatial working memory in adults and children with ADHD, focussing on identifying regions demonstrating age-invariant or age-dependent abnormalities. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine a group of 26 children and 35 adults to study load manipulated spatial working memory in patients and controls. In comparison to healthy controls, patients demonstrated reduced positive parietal and frontostriatal load effects, i.e., less increase in brain activity from low to high load, despite similar task performance. In addition, younger patients showed negative load effects, i.e., a decrease in brain activity from low to high load, in medial prefrontal regions. Load effect differences between ADHD and controls that differed between age groups were found predominantly in prefrontal regions. Age-invariant load effect differences occurred predominantly in frontostriatal regions. The age-dependent deviations support the role of prefrontal maturation and compensation in ADHD, while the age-invariant alterations observed in frontostriatal regions provide further evidence that these regions reflect a core pathophysiology in ADHD.

  12. Spatial and temporal aspects of grain accumulation costs for ethanol production: An Australian case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderton, Nikki; Kingwell, Ross

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol production is increasingly commonplace in many grain-producing regions. This paper uses the grain-producing region of south-western Australia to illustrate spatial and temporal aspects of grain accumulation costs for ethanol production. Specifically, this study examines how price variability of various wheat grades, combined with spatial and temporal variability in production of those grades, affects the costs of grain accumulation. These costs are the main components of an ethanol plant's operating costs so lessening these costs can offer a comparative advantage for a plant owner. Logistics models based on mathematical programming are constructed for a range of plant sizes and locations for ethanol production. Modelling results identify low-cost sites that generate cost savings, in present value terms, of between 5 and 7.5 per cent, depending on plant size, over the 9-year study period. At all locations, small to medium-sized plants offer advantages of lower and less variable costs of grain accumulation. Yet, all locations and all plant sizes are characterised by marked volatility in the cost of grain accumulation. The profitability of ethanol production based on wheat in this region of Australia is particularly exposed to any prolonged period of high grain prices relative to petroleum prices, given current biofuel-policy settings in Australia. (author)

  13. Improvement of Allocentric Spatial Memory Resolution in Children from 2 to 4 Years of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Farfalla Ribordy; Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2015-01-01

    Allocentric spatial memory, the memory for locations coded in relation to objects comprising our environment, is a fundamental component of episodic memory and is dependent on the integrity of the hippocampal formation in adulthood. Previous research from different laboratories reported that basic allocentric spatial memory abilities are reliably…

  14. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Chen, X.; Ju, W.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs) for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP) estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI) is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE) in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m-2 yr-1 to 4.8 g C m-2 yr-1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m-2 yr-1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI) and elevation have small and additive effects on improving the spatial scaling

  15. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m−2 yr−1 to 4.8 g C m−2 yr−1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m−2 yr−1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI and elevation have small and additive effects on improving

  16. Spatial econometric analysis of China’s province-level industrial carbon productivity and its influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Ruyin; Shao, Tianxiang; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We evaluate the industrial carbon productivity of China’s provinces. • The regional disparity and clustering features exist simultaneously. • There is evident spatial dependence in regional industrial carbon productivity. • We employ spatial panel data models to examine the impact factors. • Spatial effects are found to be important in understanding industrial CO 2 emissions. - Abstract: This study measured the industrial carbon productivity of 30 provinces in China from 2005 to 2012 and examined the space–time characteristics and the main factors of China’s industrial carbon productivity using Moran’s I index and spatial panel data models. The empirical results indicate that there is significant positive spatial dependence and clustering characteristics in China’s province-level industrial carbon productivity. The spatial dependence may create biased estimated parameters in an ordinary least squares framework; according to the analysis of our spatial panel models, industrial energy efficiency, the opening degree, technological progress, and the industrial scale structure have significantly positive effects on industrial carbon productivity whereas per-capita GDP, the industrial energy consumption structure, and the industrial ownership structure exert a negative effect on industrial carbon productivity.

  17. Spatial extrapolation of light use efficiency model parameters to predict gross primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Schulz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To capture the spatial and temporal variability of the gross primary production as a key component of the global carbon cycle, the light use efficiency modeling approach in combination with remote sensing data has shown to be well suited. Typically, the model parameters, such as the maximum light use efficiency, are either set to a universal constant or to land class dependent values stored in look-up tables. In this study, we employ the machine learning technique support vector regression to explicitly relate the model parameters of a light use efficiency model calibrated at several FLUXNET sites to site-specific characteristics obtained by meteorological measurements, ecological estimations and remote sensing data. A feature selection algorithm extracts the relevant site characteristics in a cross-validation, and leads to an individual set of characteristic attributes for each parameter. With this set of attributes, the model parameters can be estimated at sites where a parameter calibration is not possible due to the absence of eddy covariance flux measurement data. This will finally allow a spatially continuous model application. The performance of the spatial extrapolation scheme is evaluated with a cross-validation approach, which shows the methodology to be well suited to recapture the variability of gross primary production across the study sites.

  18. SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY IN THE STATE OF PARANA – BRAZIL (1970, 1996 AND 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucir Reinaldo Alves

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper analyzes the spatial displacement of the productivity of Gross Value of Agricultural Production of the main activities and cultures of Parana’s State in 1970, 1996 and 2007. To this, we used a database of pre-existing on the Gross Value of Agricultural Production - the VBPA contained in the Agricultural Censuses (IBGE, Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics and the SEAB (Secretary of Agriculture and Supply of Paraná. The results showed that the VBPA of Paraná State has a spatial displacement during the period, where it was concentrated in 1970 in the northern portion of the state, influenced mainly by coffee plantations. In 2007, the most visible concentration hovered over the West and Southwest regions, and motion to expand the activities poultry and swine in those regions as well as crop production technicality as soybeans and corn. The findings of this study confirm the dynamism of the regions, as well as the impact of modernization on the field, and also highlights the role that agricultural activities have on the economy of the state of Parana.

  19. The level of spatial orientation of basketball players aged 14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomeschikova I. P.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the performance level of the spatial orientation of the basketball teams' pre-basic training, which was determined by standard methods. The study involved 12 athletes for 14 years with four years basketball. Teacher testing conducted to determine the allowed level of basketball and to determine the spatial relationship between the rates of the various manifestations of this ability. The level of spatial orientation of sportsmen evaluated according to the 8 test, methodology suggested V.A. Romanenko, L.P. Sergienko, V.I. Lyakh.

  20. Improving simulated spatial distribution of productivity and biomass in Amazon forests using the ACME land model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Shi, X.; Xu, M.; Hoffman, F. M.; Norby, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical forests play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle, accounting for one third of the global NPP and containing about 25% of global vegetation biomass and soil carbon. This is particularly true for tropical forests in the Amazon region, as it comprises approximately 50% of the world's tropical forests. It is therefore important for us to understand and represent the processes that determine the fluxes and storage of carbon in these forests. In this study, we show that the implementation of phosphorus (P) cycle and P limitation in the ACME Land Model (ALM) improves simulated spatial pattern of NPP. The P-enabled ALM is able to capture the west-to-east gradient of productivity, consistent with field observations. We also show that by improving the representation of mortality processes, ALM is able to reproduce the observed spatial pattern of above ground biomass across the Amazon region.

  1. Movement as Spatial Practices and Economic Strategies in Cheese Production at Family Farms in Bohinj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Repič

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article explores dairy and cheese production at family farms in Bohinj, their economical and organisational strategies (variations between family and cooperative organisation of farming and the connection of cheese production with different modes of spatial movement. In the past decade, several family farms have started producing cheese and milk products, which is an economic activity closely linked to traditional forms of cooperatives, and pasture rights of agricultural societies. These farms have revitalised traditional forms of cheese production and established new economic strategies, especially through the plurality of their activities – work outside of the farm, tourism, marketing of their products, etc. The article first presents a development of cheese production in Bohinj, changes in family and cooperative farming and explores movement and the meshwork of paths, tracks, roads and places that are fundamental to cheese economy. Further, the article connects different movements, e.g. daily pastures close to the villages, transhumance in mountain pasturelands, selling products in markets, etc. Modes of movement (walk, cattle herding, driving to markets are basic practices behind economic strategies of dairy and cheese farms, as well as organisations and use of space, in particular mountain paths and pasturelands.

  2. A spatial application of a vegetation productivity equation for neo-soil reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burley, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Reclamation specialists are interested in the application of recently developed soil productivity equations for post-mining reclamation planning and design. This paper presents the application of one recently developed soil productivity equation to a surface coal mine site in Mercer County, North Dakota. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology (Map*Factory 1.1) was combined with a soil productivity equation developed by the author to generate a GIS script to calculate a site's pre-mining productivity per 10 meter grid cell and then summed to calculate the grand and the expected average soil productivity for the site, resulting in a pre-mining baseline numerical spatial scores. Several post-mining alternatives were evaluated to study various soil management strategies to restore post-mining soil productivity, including: an abandoned mine landscape treatment, a reconstructed topsoil treatment with graded gentile slopes, and a reconstructed topsoil treatment with soil improvements. The results indicated that the abandoned mine scenario was significantly different than the other three treatments (ple0.05), with the reconstructed topsoil treatment with soil amendments generating the greatest estimated productivity

  3. Single Cell Responses to Spatially Controlled Photosensitized Production of Extracellular Singlet Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Brian Wett; Sinks, Louise E.; Breitenbach, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The response of individual HeLa cells to extracellularly produced singlet oxygen was examined. The spatial domain of singlet oxygen production was controlled using the combination of a membrane-impermeable Pd porphyrin-dendrimer, which served as a photosensitizer, and a focused laser, which served...... to localize the sensitized production of singlet oxygen. Cells in close proximity to the domain of singlet oxygen production showed morphological changes commonly associated with necrotic cell death. The elapsed post-irradiation “waiting period” before necrosis became apparent depended on (a) the distance...... between the cell membrane and the domain irradiated, (b) the incident laser fluence and, as such, the initial concentration of singlet oxygen produced, and (c) the lifetime of singlet oxygen. The data imply that singlet oxygen plays a key role in this process of light-induced cell death. The approach...

  4. The Spatial Dimension of Trade- and FDI-driven Productivity Growth in Chinese Provinces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, T.; Ozyurt, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the major determinants of long- and short-run labour productivity evolution for Chinese provinces between 1978 and 2010. The role played by openness to trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) constitutes the main focus of this analysis. From a methodological perspective, our...... main contribution is the inclusion of spatial effects into a dynamic error correction modelling framework. The results show that, in addition to domestic factors such as investment intensity and infrastructure use, trade openness and inward FDI also exert a direct impact on labour productivity...... to fully exploit the benefits from such spillovers, coordinated industrial policies which foster regional complementarities and support the free movement of production factors across regional borders are crucial....

  5. Medium Spatial Resolution Satellite Imagery to Estimate Gross Primary Production in an Urban Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rahman As-syakur

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing data with medium spatial resolution can provide useful information about Gross Primary Production (GPP, especially on the scale of urban areas. Most models of ecosystem carbon exchange that are based on remote sensing use some form of the light use efficiency (LUE model. The aim of this work is to analyze the distribution of annual GPP in the urban area of Denpasar, Bali. Additional analysis using two types of satellite data (ALOS/AVNIR-2 and Aster addresses the impact of spatial resolution on the detection of various ecosystem processes in Denpasar. Annual GPP estimated using ALOS/AVNIR-2 varied from 0.13 gC m−2 yr−1 to 2,586.18 gC m−2 yr−1. Meanwhile, the Aster estimate varied from 0.14 gC m−2 yr−1 to 2,595.26 gC m−2 yr−1. GPP as measured by ALOS/AVNIR-2 was lower than that from Aster because ALOS/AVNIR-2 has medium spatial resolution and a smaller spectral range than Aster. Variations in land use may influence the measured value of GPP via differences in vegetation type, distribution, and photosynthetic pathway type. The medium spatial resolution of the remote sensing data is crucial for discriminating different land cover types in heterogeneous urban areas. Given the heterogeneity of land cover over Denpasar, ALOS/AVNIR-2 detects a smaller maximum value of GPP than Aster, but the annual mean GPP from ALOS/AVNIR-2 is higher than that from Aster. Based on comparisons with previous work, we find that ALOS/AVNIR-2 and Aster satellite data provided more accurate estimates of maximum GPP in Denpasar and in the tropical Kalimantan-Indonesia and Amazon forest than estimates derived from the MODIS GPP product (MOD17.

  6. Spatial pattern affects diversity-productivity relationships in experimental meadow communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamošová, Tereza; Doležal, Jiří; Lanta, Vojtěch; Lepš, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Plant species create aggregations of conspecifics as a consequence of limited seed dispersal, clonal growth and heterogeneous environment. Such intraspecific aggregation increases the importance of intraspecific competition relative to interspecific competition which may slow down competitive exclusion and promote species coexistence. To examine how spatial aggregation impacts the functioning of experimental assemblages of varying species richness, eight perennial grassland species of different growth form were grown in random and aggregated patterns in monocultures, two-, four-, and eight-species mixtures. In mixtures with an aggregated pattern, monospecific clumps were interspecifically segregated. Mixed model ANOVA was used to test (i) how the total productivity and productivity of individual species is affected by the number of species in a mixture, and (ii) how these relationships are affected by spatial pattern of sown plants. The main patterns of productivity response to species richness conform to other studies: non-transgressive overyielding is omnipresent (the productivity of mixtures is higher than the average of its constituent species so that the net diversity, selection and complementarity effects are positive), whereas transgressive overyielding is found only in a minority of cases (average of log(overyielding) being close to zero or negative). The theoretical prediction that plants in a random pattern should produce more than in an aggregated pattern (the distances to neighbours are smaller and consequently the competition among neighbours stronger) was confirmed in monocultures of all the eight species. The situation is more complicated in mixtures, probably as a consequence of complicated interplay between interspecific and intraspecific competition. The most productive species ( Achillea, Holcus, Plantago) were competitively superior and increased their relative productivity with mixture richness. The intraspecific competition of these species is

  7. From Product to Place-Spatializing governance in a commodified landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oosten, Cora; Moeliono, Moira; Wiersum, Freerk

    2017-05-24

    This article analyzes the potential for landscape governance in large-scale commodity landscapes in Indonesia. It conceptualizes landscape governance as the spatialization of governance, which entails the interplay between natural-spatial conditions of place, public-private actor constellations, and policy responses. The article presents the case of a commodified oil palm landscape in West Kalimantan, where a potentially new type of landscape governance is emerging out of the experimental activities of an ecologically responsible commercial enterprise. It describes the development of a multifunctional concession as a process of productive bricolage involving the creative combination of different land uses within a single productive space. It also describes how such a multifunctional concession does not fit into existing policies, which are sectorally defined and embedded in sticky institutional frames. The formation of new public-private institutional arrangements needed for the development of multifunctional concessions is a difficult process, as it requires an alignment of contrasting discourses and an integration of sectorally-defined policy frames. If successful, it might facilitate the transition from multifunctional concessions to multifunctional landscapes. Such a fundamental change in land use and production relations however requires intensive stakeholder engagement and policy dialog. Indonesia's continuous decentralization process offers opportunities for this, as it increasingly provides institutional space at the landscape level, for public and private actors to explore common concerns, and craft public-private arrangements specific to the landscape.

  8. Spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Glecio; Silva, Jucicléia; Bezerra, Joel; Silva, Enio; Montenegro, Abelardo

    2013-04-01

    The cultivation of sugar cane in Brazil occupies a prominent place in national production chain, because the country is the main world producer of sugar and ethanol. Accordingly, studies are needed that allow an integrated production and technified, and especially that estimates of crops are consistent with the actual production of each region. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction. The field experiment was conducted at an agricultural research site located in Goiana municipality, Pernambuco State, north-east of Brazil (Latitude 07 ° 34 '25 "S, Longitude 34 ° 55' 39" W). The surface of the studied field is 6.5 ha, and its mean height 8.5 m a.s.l. This site has been under sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum sp.) monoculture during the last 24 years and it was managed burning the straw each year after harvesting, renewal of plantation was performed every 7 years. Studied the field is located 10 km east from Atlantic Ocean and it is representative of the regional landscape lowlands, whose soils are affected by salinity seawater, sugarcane plantations with the main economical activity. Soil was classified an orthic the Podsol. The productivity of cane sugar and electrical conductivity were measured in 90 sampling points. The productivity of cane sugar was determined in each of the sampling points in plots of 9 m2. The Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa, mS m-1) was measured with an electromagnetic induction device EM38-DD (Geonics Limited). The equipment consists of two units of measurement, one in a horizontal dipole (ECa-H) to provide effective measurement distance of 1.5 m approximately and other one in vertical dipole (ECa-V) with an effective measurement depth of approximately 0.75 m. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and geostatistical tools. The results showed that productivity in the study area

  9. Seasonal and spatial variation of bacterial production and abundance in the northern Levantine Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. YUCEL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in bacterial production and abundance in relation to ambient bio-physicochemical parameters has been investigated in the Levantine Sea. Five stations with different trophic states in an area extending from highly eutrophic Mersin bay to the mesotrophic Rhodes gyre area including the oligotrophic offshore waters were sampled four times. Integrated bacterial production varied between 6.1 and 90.3 µg C m-2 d-1 with higher rates occurring during September 2012 in offshore waters. Bacterial abundance ranged between 0.18 and 7.3 x 105 cells ml-1 within the euphotic zone and was generally higher up to 100 meters throughout the study period. In offshore waters, bacterial production (0.401 to 0.050 µg C m-3 d-1, abundance (4.5 to 1.6 x 105 cells ml-1 and depth of the productive layer decreased from 150 to 75 meters westward along the transect. Although the highest abundance was observed in July 2012 in offshore waters, the highest activity was measured in September 2012. These results indicated that the temperature played a key role in regulating bacterial abundance and production in the area. High chlorophyll concentrations in March did not correspond to high bacterial abundance and production at the same time. Increase in dissolved organic carbon content following spring phytoplankton bloom and the increase in temperature in the mean time might have enhanced the bacterial activity towards summer.

  10. Intentional switching in auditory selective attention: Exploring age-related effects in a spatial setup requiring speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberem, Josefa; Koch, Iring; Fels, Janina

    2017-06-01

    Using a binaural-listening paradigm, age-related differences in the ability to intentionally switch auditory selective attention between two speakers, defined by their spatial location, were examined. Therefore 40 normal-hearing participants (20 young, Ø 24.8years; 20 older Ø 67.8years) were tested. The spatial reproduction of stimuli was provided by headphones using head-related-transfer-functions of an artificial head. Spoken number words of two speakers were presented simultaneously to participants from two out of eight locations on the horizontal plane. Guided by a visual cue indicating the spatial location of the target speaker, the participants were asked to categorize the target's number word into smaller vs. greater than five while ignoring the distractor's speech. Results showed significantly higher reaction times and error rates for older participants. The relative influence of the spatial switch of the target-speaker (switch or repetition of speaker's direction in space) was identical across age groups. Congruency effects (stimuli spoken by target and distractor may evoke the same answer or different answers) were increased for older participants and depend on the target's position. Results suggest that the ability to intentionally switch auditory attention to a new cued location was unimpaired whereas it was generally harder for older participants to suppress processing the distractor's speech. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial learning and psychomotor performance of C57BL/6 mice: age sensitivity and reliability of individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; Sumien, Nathalie; Forster, Michael J; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2006-09-01

    Two tests often used in aging research, the elevated path test and the Morris water maze test, were examined for their application to the study of brain aging in a large sample of C57BL/6JNia mice. Specifically, these studies assessed: (1) sensitivity to age and the degree of interrelatedness among different behavioral measures derived from these tests, (2) the effect of age on variation in the measurements, and (3) the reliability of individual differences in performance on the tests. Both tests detected age-related deficits in group performance that occurred independently of each other. However, analysis of data obtained on the Morris water maze test revealed three relatively independent components of cognitive performance. Performance in initial acquisition of spatial learning in the Morris maze was not highly correlated with performance during reversal learning (when mice were required to learn a new spatial location), whereas performance in both of those phases was independent of spatial performance assessed during a single probe trial administered at the end of acquisition training. Moreover, impaired performance during initial acquisition could be detected at an earlier age than impairments in reversal learning. There were modest but significant age-related increases in the variance of both elevated path test scores and in several measures of learning in the Morris maze test. Analysis of test scores of mice across repeated testing sessions confirmed reliability of the measurements obtained for cognitive and psychomotor function. Power calculations confirmed that there are sufficiently large age-related differences in elevated path test performance, relative to within age variability, to render this test useful for studies into the ability of an intervention to prevent or reverse age-related deficits in psychomotor performance. Power calculations indicated a need for larger sample sizes for detection of intervention effects on cognitive components of the

  12. Importance of spatial and spectral data reduction in the detection of internal defects in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuechen; Nansen, Christian; Aryamanesh, Nader; Yan, Guijun; Boussaid, Farid

    2015-04-01

    Despite the importance of data reduction as part of the processing of reflection-based classifications, this study represents one of the first in which the effects of both spatial and spectral data reductions on classification accuracies are quantified. Furthermore, the effects of approaches to data reduction were quantified for two separate classification methods, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machine (SVM). As the model dataset, reflection data were acquired using a hyperspectral camera in 230 spectral channels from 401 to 879 nm (spectral resolution of 2.1 nm) from field pea (Pisum sativum) samples with and without internal pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum) infestation. We deployed five levels of spatial data reduction (binning) and eight levels of spectral data reduction (40 datasets). Forward stepwise LDA was used to select and include only spectral channels contributing the most to the separation of pixels from non-infested and infested field peas. Classification accuracies obtained with LDA and SVM were based on the classification of independent validation datasets. Overall, SVMs had significantly higher classification accuracies than LDAs (P food products with internal defects, and it highlights that spatial and spectral data reductions can (1) improve classification accuracies, (2) vastly decrease computer constraints, and (3) reduce analytical concerns associated with classifications of large and high-dimensional datasets.

  13. Interaction between age and perceptual similarity in olfactory discrimination learning in F344 rats: relationships with spatial learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Wendy M.; Gaynor, Leslie S.; Burke, Sara N.; Setlow, Barry; Smith, David W.; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that aging is associated with a reduced ability to distinguish perceptually similar stimuli in one’s environment. As the ability to accurately perceive and encode sensory information is foundational for explicit memory, understanding the neurobiological underpinnings of discrimination impairments that emerge with advancing age could help elucidate the mechanisms of mnemonic decline. To this end, there is a need for preclinical approaches that robustly and reliably model age-associated perceptual discrimination deficits. Taking advantage of rodents’ exceptional olfactory abilities, the present study applied rigorous psychophysical techniques to the evaluation of discrimination learning in young and aged F344 rats. Aging did not influence odor detection thresholds or the ability to discriminate between perceptually distinct odorants. In contrast, aged rats were disproportionately impaired relative to young on problems that required discriminations between perceptually similar olfactory stimuli. Importantly, these disproportionate impairments in discrimination learning did not simply reflect a global learning impairment in aged rats, as they performed other types of difficult discriminations on par with young rats. Among aged rats, discrimination deficits were strongly associated with spatial learning deficits. These findings reveal a new, sensitive behavioral approach for elucidating the neural mechanisms of cognitive decline associated with normal aging. PMID:28259065

  14. Spatial heterogeneity and risk factors for stunting among children under age five in Ethiopia: A Bayesian geo-statistical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifu Hagos

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatial distribution of stunting and underlying factors operating at meso-scale is of paramount importance for intervention designing and implementations. Yet, little is known about the spatial distribution of stunting and some discrepancies are documented on the relative importance of reported risk factors. Therefore, the present study aims at exploring the spatial distribution of stunting at meso- (district scale, and evaluates the effect of spatial dependency on the identification of risk factors and their relative contribution to the occurrence of stunting and severe stunting in a rural area of Ethiopia.A community based cross sectional study was conducted to measure the occurrence of stunting and severe stunting among children aged 0-59 months. Additionally, we collected relevant information on anthropometric measures, dietary habits, parent and child-related demographic and socio-economic status. Latitude and longitude of surveyed households were also recorded. Local Anselin Moran's I was calculated to investigate the spatial variation of stunting prevalence and identify potential local pockets (hotspots of high prevalence. Finally, we employed a Bayesian geo-statistical model, which accounted for spatial dependency structure in the data, to identify potential risk factors for stunting in the study area.Overall, the prevalence of stunting and severe stunting in the district was 43.7% [95%CI: 40.9, 46.4] and 21.3% [95%CI: 19.5, 23.3] respectively. We identified statistically significant clusters of high prevalence of stunting (hotspots in the eastern part of the district and clusters of low prevalence (cold spots in the western. We found out that the inclusion of spatial structure of the data into the Bayesian model has shown to improve the fit for stunting model. The Bayesian geo-statistical model indicated that the risk of stunting increased as the child's age increased (OR 4.74; 95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI]:3

  15. Can the ASAR Global Monitoring Mode Product Adequately Capture Spatial Soil Moisture Variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenova, I.; Lakshmi, V.; Walker, J.; Panciera, R.; Wagner, W.; Doubkova, M.

    2008-12-01

    Global soil moisture (SM) monitoring in the past several decades has been undertaken mainly at coarse spatial resolution, which is not adequate for addressing small-scale phenomena and processes. The currently operational Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (NASA) and future planned missions such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (ESA) and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (NASA) will remain resolution limited. Finer scale soil moisture estimates can be achieved either by down-scaling the available coarse resolution radiometer and scatterometer (i.e. ERS1/2, ASCAT) observations or by using high resolution active microwave SAR type systems (typical resolution is in the order of meters). Considering the complex land surface - backscatter signal interaction, soil moisture inversion utilizing active microwave observations is difficult and generally needs supplementary data. Algorithms based on temporal change detection offer an alternative less complex approach for deriving (and disaggregating coarse) soil moisture estimates. Frequent monitoring and low frequency range along with a high pixel resolution are essential preconditions when characterizing spatial and temporal soil moisture variability. An alternative active system that meets these requirements is the Advance Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) on ENVISAT [C-band, global, 1 km in Global Monitoring (GM) Mode]. The Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) has developed a 1 km soil moisture product using the temporal change detection approach and the ASAR GM. The TU Wien SM product sensitivity was evaluated at two scales: point (using in situ data from permanent soil moisture stations) and regional [using ground measured data and aircraft estimates derived from the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR)] over the National Airborne Field Experiment (NAFE'05) area located in the Goulburn catchment, SE Australia. The month long (November 2005) campaign was undertaken in a region predominantly covered

  16. A nonlinear problem for age-structured population dynamics with spatial diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Nakoulima, Ousseynou; Omrane, Abdennebi; Velin, Jean

    2001-01-01

    We consider a nonlinear model for age-dependent population dynamics subject to a density dependent factor which regulates the selection of newborn at age zero. The initial-boundary value problem is studied using a vanishing viscosity method (in the age direction) together with the fixed point theory. Existence and uniqueness are obtained, and also the positivity of the solution to the problem.

  17. Load-related brain activation predicts spatial working memory performance in youth aged 9–12 and is associated with executive function at earlier ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Anna S.; Klein, Daniel N.; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Spatial working memory is a central cognitive process that matures through adolescence in conjunction with major changes in brain function and anatomy. Here we focused on late childhood and early adolescence to more closely examine the neural correlates of performance variability during this important transition period. Using a modified spatial 1-back task with two memory load conditions in an fMRI study, we examined the relationship between load-dependent neural responses and task performance in a sample of 39 youth aged 9–12 years. Our data revealed that between-subject differences in task performance was predicted by load-dependent deactivation in default network regions, including the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Although load-dependent increases in activation in prefrontal and posterior parietal regions were only weakly correlated with performance, increased prefrontal-parietal coupling was associated with better performance. Furthermore, behavioral measures of executive function from as early as age 3 predicted current load-dependent deactivation in vACC and PCC. These findings suggest that both task positive and task negative brain activation during spatial working memory contributed to successful task performance in late childhood/early adolescence. This may serve as a good model for studying executive control deficits in developmental disorders. PMID:26562059

  18. [Spatial and temporal mangrove litter production in Barra de Navidad lagoon, Jalisco, México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Morales, Alma J; González-Sansón, Gaspar; Aguilar-Betancourt, Consuelo

    2016-03-01

    Barra de Navidad lagoon is a coastal wetland of international importance (Ramsar site) and it is included among the 81 Mexican mangrove priority sites. One of the most valued characteristics of this lagoon is the presence of mangrove forest in a good conservation state. The goal of our research was the measurement of mangrove litter production and environmental factors influencing its dynamics. The mangrove area was divided into seven zones and litterfall was monthly sampled from November 2011 to October 2012 using 0.25 m(2) square collectors made with mosquito mesh (1 mm) and positioned at 1.3 m above the ground. Abiotic variables of the interstitial water were measured simultaneously at each zone in permanent plots using a multi-parameter probe, YSI-556-M. Total mean value of litterfall production, weighted by zone surface, was 19.12 ± 1.23 gPS/m(2).mo (2.29 t/ha.year). This low productivity is a consequence of the region’s dry climate and low tide range. The species Avicennia germinans and Laguncularia racemosa produced more than 80 % of total litterfall, while Rhizophora mangle contributed only 16 % and Conocarpus erectus abiotic variables was found (e.g. salinity and interstitial water depth). We concluded that there are significant spatial variations in soil abiotic variables which are correlated with differences in mangrove species composition, and produce, together with the life cycles stages of those species, significant variations in the quantity and composition of litterfall. Future research will be focused on quantifying spatial variations in forest structure and their relationship with litterfall production.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Profiling of Griseofulvin Production in Xylaria cubensis Using Mass Spectrometry Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Vincent P.; Rees, Evan R.; Tchegnon, Edem; Bardsley, Robert H.; Raja, Huzefa A.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of natural products research revolves around the discovery of new, bioactive chemical entities; however, studies to probe the biological purpose of such secondary metabolites for the host organism are often limited. Mass spectrometry mapping of secondary metabolite biosynthesis in situ can be used to probe a series of ecological questions about fungi that may be lost through traditional natural products chemistry extraction protocols. A griseofulvin-producing fungal culture of the Xylariaceae family, isolated as an endophyte of the tree Asimina triloba, was analyzed through a series of spatial and temporal mapping experiments. This fungus produced unique fungal characteristics, such as guttates and stroma, both of which were explored spatially. The distribution of griseofulvin on this culture in isolation was compared to its dispersal when grown in co-culture with a competing Penicillium species via a droplet–based surface sampling system. The fungistatic properties of griseofulvin were visualized, including the consequences for biosynthesis of polyhydroxyanthraquinones in a rival culture. PMID:27199902

  20. Spatial and temporal profiling of griseofulvin production in Xylaria cubensis using mass spectrometry mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent eSica

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A large portion of natural products research revolves around the discovery of new, bioactive chemical entities; however, studies to probe the biological purpose of such secondary metabolites for the host organism are often limited. Mass spectrometry mapping of secondary metabolite biosynthesis in situ can be used to probe a series of ecological questions about fungi that may be lost through traditional natural products chemistry extraction protocols. A griseofulvin-producing fungal culture of the Xylariaceae family, isolated as an endophyte of the tree Asimina triloba, was analyzed through a series of spatial and temporal mapping experiments. This fungus produced unique fungal characteristics, such as guttates and stroma, both of which were explored spatially. The distribution of griseofulvin on this culture in isolation was compared to its dispersal when grown in co-culture with a competing Penicillium species via a droplet–based surface sampling system. The fungistatic properties of griseofulvin were visualized, including the consequences for biosynthesis of polyhydroxyanthraquinones in a rival culture.

  1. Force production and spatial arm coordination profile in arm crawl swimming in a fixed position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsai, István; Garrido, N; Louro, H; Leitão, L; Magyar, F; Alves, F; Silva, A

    2010-12-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between mechanical force production and spatial arm position of the swimming movement for each side of the swimmer. Eight internationally recognized male swimmers performed fix positioned arm only swimming with a dynamometer synchronized with underwater cameras. The upper arm positions (α in side, β in frontal view) and the elbow angles (γ in 3D) were determined at the moment where the force production reached the peak (Fmax) and the maximal values of rate of force development (RFDmax). RFDmax and α values showed significant differences between the sides (Pforce (ImpF50%) was calculated. The defined parameters as the mechanical and spatial predictor system were used for the model. The results of the MRA showed that the predictor system yielded the model structure of the variables that explain the criterion variables for ImpF50% by the dominant (P=0.007) and by the nondominant side (P=0.001), respectively. The alternate contribution of the variables to the models can objectively express the performance difference between the two sides of the swimmer.

  2. Long-term administration of Greek Royal Jelly improves spatial memory and influences the concentration of brain neurotransmitters in naturally aged Wistar male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Piechal, Agnieszka; Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Joniec-Maciejak, Ilona; Graikou, Konstantia; Chinou, Ioanna; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa

    2014-08-08

    Royal Jelly (RJ) is a bee-derived product that has been traditionally used in the European and Asian systems of medicine for longevity. RJ has various pharmacological activities that may prevent aging e.g., anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-hypercholesterolemic and anti-hyperglycemic properties. To evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of long-term oral, previously chemically analyzed, Greek RJ administration to aged rats. RJ powder was given to 18-month old male Wistar rats (50 and 100mg of powder/kg b.w./day) by gastric gavage for 2 months. The spatial memory was assessed in the water maze and next the level of neurotransmitters, their metabolites and utilization in the selected brain regions were estimated. The improvement of memory in rats pretreated with the smaller dose of RJ was observed compared with controls. In biochemical examination mainly the depletion of dopamine and serotonin in the prefrontal cortex along with an increase in their metabolite concentration and turnover were seen. Better cognitive performance in the old animals using a non-toxic, natural food product in the view of the process of the aging of human population is noteworthy. Our results contribute towards validation of the traditional use of RJ in promoting a better quality of life in old age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Does age matter? Controls on the spatial organization of age and life expectancy in hillslopes, and implications for transport parameterization using rSAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.; Harman, C. J.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Hillslopes have been extensively explored as a natural fundamental unit for spatially-integrated hydrologic models. Much of this attention has focused on their use in predicting the quantity of discharge, but hillslope-based models can potentially be used to predict the composition of discharge (in terms of age and chemistry) if they can be parameterized terms of measurable physical properties. Here we present advances in the use of rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) functions to parameterize transport through hillslopes. These functions provide a mapping between the distribution of water ages in storage and in outfluxes in terms of a probability distribution over storage. It has previously been shown that rSAS functions are related to the relative partitioning and arrangement of flow pathways (and variabilities in that arrangement), while separating out the effect of changes in the overall rate of fluxes in and out. This suggests that rSAS functions should have a connection to the internal organization of flow paths in a hillslope.Using a combination of numerical modeling and theoretical analysis we examined: first, the controls of physical properties on internal spatial organization of age (time since entry), life expectancy (time to exit), and the emergent transit time distribution and rSAS functions; second, the possible parameterization of the rSAS function using the physical properties. The numerical modeling results showed the clear dependence of the rSAS function forms on the physical properties and relations between the internal organization and the rSAS functions. For the different rates of the exponential saturated hydraulic conductivity decline with depth the spatial organization of life expectancy varied dramatically and determined the rSAS function forms, while the organizaiton of the age showed less qualitative differences. Analytical solutions predicting this spatial organization and the resulting rSAS function were derived for simplified systems. These

  4. Cognitive Changes Across the Menopause Transition: A Longitudinal Evaluation of the Impact of Age and Ovarian Status on Spatial Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebele, Stephanie V.; Mennenga, Sarah E.; Hiroi, Ryoko; Quihuis, Alicia M.; Hewitt, Lauren T.; Poisson, Mallori L.; George, Christina; Mayer, Loretta P.; Dyer, Cheryl A.; Aiken, Leona S.; Demers, Laurence M.; Carson, Catherine; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive changes that occur during mid-life and beyond are linked to both aging and the menopause transition. Studies in women suggest that the age at menopause onset can impact cognitive status later in life; yet, little is known about memory changes that occur during the transitional period to the post-menopausal state. The 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) model simulates transitional menopause in rodents by depleting the immature ovarian follicle reserve and allowing animals to retain their follicle-deplete ovarian tissue, resulting in a profile similar to the majority of perimenopausal women. Here, Vehicle or VCD treatment was administered to ovary-intact adult and middle-aged Fischer-344 rats to assess the trajectory of cognitive change across time with normal aging and aging with transitional menopause via VCD-induced follicular depletion, as well as to evaluate whether age at the onset of follicular depletion plays a role in cognitive outcomes. Animals experiencing the onset of menopause at a younger age exhibited impaired spatial memory early in the transition to a follicle-deplete state. Additionally, at the mid- and post- follicular depletion time points, VCD-induced follicular depletion amplified an age effect on memory. Overall, these findings suggest that the age at the onset of menopause is a critical parameter to consider when evaluating learning and memory across the transition to reproductive senescence. From a translational perspective, this study illustrates how age at menopause onset might impact cognition in menopausal women, and provides insight into time points to explore for the window of opportunity for hormone therapy during the menopause transition period. Hormone therapy during this critical juncture might be especially efficacious at attenuating age- and menopause- related cognitive decline, producing healthy brain aging profiles in women who retain their ovaries throughout their lifespan. PMID:27793768

  5. Cognitive changes across the menopause transition: A longitudinal evaluation of the impact of age and ovarian status on spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebele, Stephanie V; Mennenga, Sarah E; Hiroi, Ryoko; Quihuis, Alicia M; Hewitt, Lauren T; Poisson, Mallori L; George, Christina; Mayer, Loretta P; Dyer, Cheryl A; Aiken, Leona S; Demers, Laurence M; Carson, Catherine; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive changes that occur during mid-life and beyond are linked to both aging and the menopause transition. Studies in women suggest that the age at menopause onset can impact cognitive status later in life; yet, little is known about memory changes that occur during the transitional period to the postmenopausal state. The 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) model simulates transitional menopause in rodents by depleting the immature ovarian follicle reserve and allowing animals to retain their follicle-deplete ovarian tissue, resulting in a profile similar to the majority of perimenopausal women. Here, Vehicle or VCD treatment was administered to ovary-intact adult and middle-aged Fischer-344 rats to assess the trajectory of cognitive change across time with normal aging and aging with transitional menopause via VCD-induced follicular depletion, as well as to evaluate whether age at the onset of follicular depletion plays a role in cognitive outcomes. Animals experiencing the onset of menopause at a younger age exhibited impaired spatial memory early in the transition to a follicle-deplete state. Additionally, at the mid- and post- follicular depletion time points, VCD-induced follicular depletion amplified an age effect on memory. Overall, these findings suggest that age at the onset of menopause is a critical parameter to consider when evaluating learning and memory across the transition to reproductive senescence. From a translational perspective, this study illustrates how age at menopause onset might impact cognition in menopausal women, and provides insight into time points to explore for the window of opportunity for hormone therapy during the menopause transition period. Hormone therapy during this critical juncture might be especially efficacious at attenuating age- and menopause- related cognitive decline, producing healthy brain aging profiles in women who retain their ovaries throughout their lifespan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Influence of age, spatial memory, and ocular fixation on localization of auditory, visual, and bimodal targets by human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobreva, Marina S; O'Neill, William E; Paige, Gary D

    2012-12-01

    A common complaint of the elderly is difficulty identifying and localizing auditory and visual sources, particularly in competing background noise. Spatial errors in the elderly may pose challenges and even threats to self and others during everyday activities, such as localizing sounds in a crowded room or driving in traffic. In this study, we investigated the influence of aging, spatial memory, and ocular fixation on the localization of auditory, visual, and combined auditory-visual (bimodal) targets. Head-restrained young and elderly subjects localized targets in a dark, echo-attenuated room using a manual laser pointer. Localization accuracy and precision (repeatability) were quantified for both ongoing and transient (remembered) targets at response delays up to 10 s. Because eye movements bias auditory spatial perception, localization was assessed under target fixation (eyes free, pointer guided by foveal vision) and central fixation (eyes fixed straight ahead, pointer guided by peripheral vision) conditions. Spatial localization across the frontal field in young adults demonstrated (1) horizontal overshoot and vertical undershoot for ongoing auditory targets under target fixation conditions, but near-ideal horizontal localization with central fixation; (2) accurate and precise localization of ongoing visual targets guided by foveal vision under target fixation that degraded when guided by peripheral vision during central fixation; (3) overestimation in horizontal central space (±10°) of remembered auditory, visual, and bimodal targets with increasing response delay. In comparison with young adults, elderly subjects showed (1) worse precision in most paradigms, especially when localizing with peripheral vision under central fixation; (2) greatly impaired vertical localization of auditory and bimodal targets; (3) increased horizontal overshoot in the central field for remembered visual and bimodal targets across response delays; (4) greater vulnerability to

  7. AgesGalore-A software program for evaluating spatially resolved luminescence data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greilich, S. [Forschungsstelle Archaeometrie der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: Steffen.Greilich@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Harney, H.-L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Woda, C. [Forschungsstelle Archaeometrie der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Wagner, G.A. [Forschungsstelle Archaeometrie der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Low-light luminescence is usually recorded by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) yielding integrated photon-number data. Highly sensitive CCD (charged coupled device) detectors allow for the spatially resolved recording of luminescence. The resulting two-dimensional images require suitable software for data processing. We present a recently developed software program specially designed for equivalent-dose evaluation in the framework of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. The software is capable of appropriate CCD data handling, parameter estimation using a Bayesian approach, and the pixel-wise fitting of functions for time and dose dependencies to the luminescence signal. The results of the fitting procedure and the equivalent-dose evaluation can be presented and analyzed both as spatial and as frequency distributions.

  8. Spatial reorientation decline in aging: the combination of geometry and landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffò, Alessandro O; Lopez, Antonella; Spano, Giuseppina; Serino, Silvia; Cipresso, Pietro; Stasolla, Fabrizio; Savino, Michelina; Lancioni, Giulio E; Riva, Giuseppe; Bosco, Andrea

    2017-07-20

    The study is focused on the assessment of reorientation skills in a sample of community-dwelling elderly people, manipulating landmarks and geometric (layout) information. A neuropsychological assessment was administered to 286 elderly participants, divided into six groups (healthy controls, HC; four subgroups of participants with mild cognitive impairment, MCI; participants with probable dementia, Prob_D) and tested with the Virtual Reorientation Test (VReoT). VReoT manipulated different spatial cues: geometry and landmarks (proximal and distal). Compared with HC, participants with MCI and Prob_D showed to be impaired in tasks involving geometry, landmarks and a combination of them. Both single and multiple domain impairment in MCI had an impact on reorientation performance. Moreover, VReoT was marginally able to discriminate between amnesic and non-amnesic MCI. The occurrence of getting lost events seemed to be associated to learning of geometric information. The associative strength between landmark and target plays an important role in affecting spatial orientation performance of cognitively impaired participants. Geometry significantly supports landmark information and becomes helpful with the increase of cognitive impairment which is linked to a decrement in landmark encoding. VReoT seems to represent a reliable evaluation supplement for spatial orientation deficits in prodromal stages of dementia.

  9. Foundational Data Products for Europa: A Planetary Spatial Data Infrastructure Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archinal, B. A.; Laura, J.; Becker, T. L.; Bland, M. T.; Kirk, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    Any Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI), including a Planetary SDI (PSDI [1]), includes primary components such as "policy, access network, technical standards, people (including partnerships), and data" [2]. Data is largely categorized into critical foundational products and framework data products. Of data themes [3] previously identified for the U. S. National SDI, we identify [4] three types of products that are foundational to a PSDI: geodetic coordinate reference systems, elevation information, and orthomosaics. We previously listed examples of such products for the Moon (ibid.). Here, we list the current state of these three foundational products for Europa, a key destination in the outer Solar System. Geodetic coordinate reference systems for Europa are based on photogrammetric control networks generated from processing of Voyager and Galileo images, the most recent being that created by M. Davies and T. Colvin at The RAND Corporation in the late 1990s. The Voyager and Galileo images provide insufficient stereo coverage to derive a detailed global topographic model, but various global ellipsoidal shape models have been derived using e.g. the RAND network or limb profile data. The best-known global mosaic of Europa is a controlled orthomosaic produced by the U.S. Geological Survey [5], based on the RAND network and triaxial ellipsoid shape model. Near future needs include comparing the resolution and accuracy of these products with estimates for newer products that might supersede them, including released or unreleased regional products (such as digital terrain models or mosaics) and products that could be made by processing of extant data. Understanding these PSDI fundamental needs will also improve assessing and prioritizing products that are planned for by the upcoming NASA Europa Clipper mission. This effort is not only useful for Europa science, but is also a first step toward developing such summaries for all Solar System bodies with relevant data, which

  10. Genetic Variance in Processing Speed Drives Variation in Aging of Spatial and Memory Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Deborah; Reynolds, Chandra A.; McArdle, John J.; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous analyses have identified a genetic contribution to the correlation between declines with age in processing speed and higher cognitive abilities. The goal of the current analysis was to apply the biometric dual change score model to consider the possibility of temporal dynamics underlying the genetic covariance between aging trajectories…

  11. Spatially explicit modeling of 1992-2100 land cover and forest stand age for the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohl, Terry L.; Sayler, Kristi L.; Bouchard, Michelle; Reker, Ryan R.; Friesz, Aaron M.; Bennett, Stacie L.; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Sleeter, Rachel R.; Wilson, Tamara; Soulard, Christopher E.; Knuppe, Michelle; Van Hofwegen, Travis

    2014-01-01

    Information on future land-use and land-cover (LULC) change is needed to analyze the impact of LULC change on ecological processes. The U.S. Geological Survey has produced spatially explicit, thematically detailed LULC projections for the conterminous United States. Four qualitative and quantitative scenarios of LULC change were developed, with characteristics consistent with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on 5 Emission Scenarios (SRES). The four quantified scenarios (A1B, A2, B1, and B2) served as input to the Forecasting Scenarios of Land-use Change (FORE-SCE) model. Four spatially explicit datasets consistent with scenario storylines were produced for the conterminous United States, with annual LULC maps from 1992 through 2100. The future projections are characterized by a loss of natural land covers in most scenarios, with corresponding expansion of 10 anthropogenic land uses. Along with the loss of natural land covers, remaining natural land covers experience increased fragmentation under most scenarios, with only the B2 scenario remaining relatively stable in both proportion of remaining natural land covers and basic fragmentation measures. Forest stand age was also modeled. By 2100, scenarios and ecoregions with heavy forest cutting have relatively lower mean stand ages compared to those with less 15 forest cutting. Stand ages differ substantially between unprotected and protected forest lands, as well as between different forest classes. The modeled data were compared to the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) and other data sources to assess model characteristics. The consistent, spatially explicit, and thematically detailed LULC projections and the associated forest stand age data layers have been used to analyze LULC impacts on carbon and greenhouse gas fluxes, 20 biodiversity, climate and weather variability, hydrologic change, and other ecological processes.

  12. Extracting information on the spatial variability in erosion rate stored in detrital cooling age distributions in river sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jean; Gemignani, Lorenzo; van der Beek, Peter

    2018-03-01

    One of the main purposes of detrital thermochronology is to provide constraints on the regional-scale exhumation rate and its spatial variability in actively eroding mountain ranges. Procedures that use cooling age distributions coupled with hypsometry and thermal models have been developed in order to extract quantitative estimates of erosion rate and its spatial distribution, assuming steady state between tectonic uplift and erosion. This hypothesis precludes the use of these procedures to assess the likely transient response of mountain belts to changes in tectonic or climatic forcing. Other methods are based on an a priori knowledge of the in situ distribution of ages to interpret the detrital age distributions. In this paper, we describe a simple method that, using the observed detrital mineral age distributions collected along a river, allows us to extract information about the relative distribution of erosion rates in an eroding catchment without relying on a steady-state assumption, the value of thermal parameters or an a priori knowledge of in situ age distributions. The model is based on a relatively low number of parameters describing lithological variability among the various sub-catchments and their sizes and only uses the raw ages. The method we propose is tested against synthetic age distributions to demonstrate its accuracy and the optimum conditions for it use. In order to illustrate the method, we invert age distributions collected along the main trunk of the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra river system in the eastern Himalaya. From the inversion of the cooling age distributions we predict present-day erosion rates of the catchments along the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra river system, as well as some of its tributaries. We show that detrital age distributions contain dual information about present-day erosion rate, i.e., from the predicted distribution of surface ages within each catchment and from the relative contribution of any given catchment to the

  13. Spatial navigation-a unique window into physiological and pathological aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gažová, I.; Vlček, Kamil; Laczó, J.; Nedělská, Z.; Hynčicová, E.; Mokrišová, I.; Sheardová, K.; Hort, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 4, JUN 21 (2012), s. 16 ISSN 1663-4365 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/09/0286; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/09/1053; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0517; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NT11225 Program:NT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spatial navigation * Alzheimer’s Disease * disorientation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.224, year: 2012

  14. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Serdar, Marijana

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide-hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel.

  15. Attentional weights in vision as products of spatial and nonspatial components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordfang, Maria; Staugaard, Camilla; Bundesen, Claus

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between visual attentional selection of items in particular spatial locations and selection by nonspatial criteria was investigated in a partial report experiment with report of letters (as many as possible) from brief postmasked exposures of circular arrays of letters and digits....... The data were fitted by mathematical models based on Bundesen's (Psychological Review, 97, 523-547, 1990) theory of visual attention (TVA). Both attentional weights of targets (letters) and attentional weights of distractors (digits) showed strong variations across the eight possible target locations......, but for each of the ten participants, the ratio of the weight of a distractor at a given location to the weight of a target at the same location was approximately constant. The results were accommodated by revising the weight equation of TVA such that the attentional weight of an object equals a product...

  16. Effect of age on production characteristics of Boschveld indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okoro, Victor

    2017-02-06

    Feb 6, 2017 ... On fitting a prediction and optimization function using a regression model, these parameters showed significant linear response to age: HDEP, feed intake (g), and bodyweight (kg), while significant quadratic responses were found in egg weight and FCR. The prediction model shows that at age 34, 52 and.

  17. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in life history and productivity trends of Atlantic Weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) and implications to fisheries management

    OpenAIRE

    White, Allison Lynn

    2017-01-01

    The biological characteristics of fisheries stocks that are assessed for management considerations are rarely homogeneous over time or space. However, stock assessment scientists largely ignore this heterogeneity in their models. This thesis addresses the effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on stock assessment models using Atlantic Weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) as a case study. First, spatial and temporal variation was incorporated into length-, weight-, and maturity-at-age estimates...

  18. Cost Analysis of Spatial Data Production as Part of Business Intelligence Within the Mapping Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisa, A.; Erkek, B.; Çolak, S.

    2012-07-01

    Business intelligence is becoming an important strategic tool for business management. Companies have invested significant resources in applications for customer relationship management (CRM), supply chain management (SCM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), e-commerce, among others, which collect vast amounts of data. Today, these same companies are realizing that no matter how robust their application feature sets are, without an equally robust BI mechanism to make use of the collected data, these applications are ultimately coming up short. They do not provide actionable information to end users nor can they give a global understanding among all the organization's information from the various databases for accounting, CRM, and so on. General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre (GDLRC) is the leader organizations in Turkey on the field of mapping-land registry-cadastre. GDLRC has executed spatial based projects on the way National Spatial Data Infrastructure especially from the beginnings of 2000s. such as; Continuously Operating GPS Reference Stations (TUSAGA-Aktif), Geo-Metadata Portal (HBB), Orthophoto-Base Map Production and web services, Completion of Initial Cadastre, Cadastral Renovation Project (TKMP), Land Registry and Cadastre Information System (TAKBIS), Turkish National Spatial Data Infrastructure Project (TNSDI), Ottoman Land Registry Archive Information System (TARBIS). Most of this project has been completed. Some software has been developed within the mentioned project, especially reporting for management level to take decision. In the year of 2010 a new law launched and forced to reorganization of General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre. The new structural changes effected to whole organization, management understanding, carrier understanding so on. Even in mapping department which is spatial data producer, now there is no technician, there is no section; there are new carrier as experts. Because of that, all procedures and

  19. Spatial and temporal evaluations of disinfection by-products in drinking water distribution systems in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianrong; Ye, Bixiong; Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Linsheng; Tao, Jing; Hang, Zhiyu

    2010-09-15

    Disinfection by-products were determined in 15 water treatment plants in Beijing City. The effects of different water sources (surface water source, mixture water source and ground water source), seasonal variation and spatial variation were examined. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were the major disinfection by-products found in all treated water samples, which accounted for 42.6% and 38.1% of all disinfection by-products respectively. Other disinfection by-products including haloacetonitriles, chloral hydrate, haloketones and chloropicrin were usually detected in treated water samples but at lower concentrations. The levels of disinfection by-products in drinking water varied with different water sources and followed the order: surface water source > mixture water source > ground water source. High spatial and seasonal variation of disinfection by-products in the drinking water of Beijing was shown as a result. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) influences spatial cognition and modulates hippocampal structural synaptic plasticity in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Zhanchi; Kang, Lin; Geng, Dandan; Wang, Yanyong; Wang, Mingwei; Cui, Huixian

    2014-10-01

    Normal aging is characteristic with the gradual decline in cognitive function associated with the progressive reduction of structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has developed into a novel neurological and psychiatric tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency rTMS (≤1Hz) affects synaptic plasticity in rats with vascular dementia (VaD), and it ameliorates the spatial cognitive ability in mice with Aβ1-42-mediated memory deficits, but there are little concerns about the effects of rTMS on normal aging related cognition and synaptic plasticity changes. Thus, the current study investigated the effects of rTMS on spatial memory behavior, neuron and synapse morphology in the hippocampus, and synaptic protein markers and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in normal aging mice, to illustrate the mechanisms of rTMS in regulating cognitive capacity. Relative to adult animals, aging caused hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment, simultaneously inhibited the activation of the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway, reduced the transcription and expression of synaptic protein markers: synaptophysin (SYN), growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), as well as decreased synapse density and PSD (post-synaptic density) thickness. Interestingly, rTMS with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, LIMS) triggered the activation of BDNF and TrkB, upregulated the level of synaptic protein markers, and increased synapse density and thickened PSD, and further reversed the spatial cognition dysfunction in aging mice. Conversely, high-intensity magnetic stimulation (150% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, HIMS) appeared to be detrimental, inducing thinning of PSDs, disordered synaptic structure, and a large number of

  1. Spatial Multicriteria Decision Analysis of Flood Risks in Aging-Dam Management in China: A Framework and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Qian, Xin; Zhang, Yuchao; Sheng, Jinbao; Shen, Dengle; Ge, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 30,000 dams in China are aging and are considered to be high-level risks. Developing a framework for analyzing spatial multicriteria flood risk is crucial to ranking management scenarios for these dams, especially in densely populated areas. Based on the theories of spatial multicriteria decision analysis, this report generalizes a framework consisting of scenario definition, problem structuring, criteria construction, spatial quantification of criteria, criteria weighting, decision rules, sensitivity analyses, and scenario appraisal. The framework is presented in detail by using a case study to rank dam rehabilitation, decommissioning and existing-condition scenarios. The results show that there was a serious inundation, and that a dam rehabilitation scenario could reduce the multicriteria flood risk by 0.25 in the most affected areas; this indicates a mean risk decrease of less than 23%. Although increased risk (<0.20) was found for some residential and commercial buildings, if the dam were to be decommissioned, the mean risk would not be greater than the current existing risk, indicating that the dam rehabilitation scenario had a higher rank for decreasing the flood risk than the decommissioning scenario, but that dam rehabilitation alone might be of little help in abating flood risk. With adjustments and improvement to the specific methods (according to the circumstances and available data) this framework may be applied to other sites. PMID:21655125

  2. Pricing of Marine Products and Services in the Modular Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Liping; Al-Ajlouni, Omar

    in the market. Lastly, customer satisfaction and loyalty will be increased accordingly. WHAT CAN BE DONE? The pricing challenge for multiple products and services can be overcome by applying the modular concept on pricing, where each product or service is offered as a module, so suppliers can either set......WHAT IS THE ISSUE? Pricing can be a particular challenging issue for marine suppliers with multiple products and services especially when suppliers want to address specific customer needs and at the same time achieves the efficiency in pricing. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? Appropriate pricing of products......-and-services combination can have a much broader impact on the business. First, it will boost the sales and revenue by differentiating customers’ varied preference between offerings while reducing the transaction costs. In addition, it will enhance the competitiveness and minimize the ability of new entrants to compete...

  3. How to Select Anti-Aging Skin Care Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy priorities AADA Health System Reform Principles Drug pricing and availability CVS dermatologic formulary restrictions Access to ... the best results. Look for a product that targets your concern. There are two reasons for this: ...

  4. Discrimination Performance in Aging Is Vulnerable to Interference and Dissociable from Spatial Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah A.; Sacks, Patricia K.; Turner, Sean M.; Gaynor, Leslie S.; Ormerod, Brandi K.; Maurer, Andrew P.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Burke, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal-dependent episodic memory and stimulus discrimination abilities are both compromised in the elderly. The reduced capacity to discriminate between similar stimuli likely contributes to multiple aspects of age-related cognitive impairment; however, the association of these behaviors within individuals has never been examined in an animal…

  5. Intensive woodland management in the Middle Ages: spatial modelling based on archival data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szabó, Péter; Müllerová, Jana; Suchánková, Silvie; Kotačka, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, April 2015 (2015), s. 1-10 ISSN 0305-7488 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278065 - LONGWOOD Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : coppice * Moravia * Middle Ages Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.701, year: 2015

  6. AIDS in adults 50 years of age and over: characteristics, trends and spatial distribution of the risk1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Silva, Antônia Oliveira; de Sá, Laísa Ribeiro; de Almeida, Sandra Aparecida; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2014-01-01

    Objective to analyze the sociodemographic characteristics, epidemic trend and spatial distribution of the risk of AIDS in adults 50 years of age and over. Method population-based, ecological study, that used secondary data from the Notifiable Disease Information System (Sinan/AIDS) of Paraíba state from the period January 2000 to December 2010. Results during the study period, 307 cases of AIDS were reported among people 50 years of age or over. There was a predominance of males (205/66, 8%), mixed race, and low education levels. The municipalities with populations above 100 thousand inhabitants reported 58.5% of the cases. There was a progressive increase in cases among women; an increasing trend in the incidence (positive linear correlation); and an advance in the geographical spread of the disease, with expansion to the coastal region and to the interior of the state, reaching municipalities with populations below 30 thousand inhabitants. In some locations the risk of disease was 100 times greater than the relative risk for the state. Conclusion aging, with the feminization and interiorization of the epidemic in adults 50 years of age and over, confirms the need for the induction of affirmative policies targeted toward this age group. PMID:25029044

  7. Infant prodigy comes of age. [Subsea oil production equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Strong indications are that 1982 will be the year when subsea production technology sheds its past costly and risky labels to take its place at last on the oil companies' list of approved and practical production techniques. While a few companies can now offer large and sophisticated systems, others are increasingly favoring applications for simple, uncomplicated Plain Jane configurations. Additionally, a well established inventory of reliable components and equipment is now on the shelves and available.

  8. On bandlimited signals with minimal product of effective spatial and spectral widths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Venkatesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that signals (which could be functions of space or time belonging to 𝕃2-space cannot be localized simultaneously in space/time and frequency domains. Alternatively, signals have a positive lower bound on the product of their effective spatial andeffective spectral widths, for simplicity, hereafter called the effective space-bandwidthproduct (ESBP. This is the classical uncertainty inequality (UI, attributed to many, but, from a signal processing perspective, to Gabor who, in his seminal paper, established the uncertainty relation and proposed a joint time-frequency representation in which the basis functions have minimal ESBP. It is found that the Gaussian function is the only signal that has the lowest ESBP. Since the Gaussian function is not bandlimited, no bandlimited signal can have the lowest ESBP. We deal with the problem of determining finite-energy, bandlimited signals which have the lowest ESBP. The main result is as follows. By choosing the convolution product of a Gaussian signal (with σ as the variance parameter and a bandlimited filter with a continuous spectrum, we demonstrate that there exists a finite-energy, bandlimited signal whose ESBP can be made to be arbitrarily close (dependent on the choice of σ to the optimal value specified by the UI.

  9. Spatial analysis of climate factors used to determine suitability of greenhouse production in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemek, Bilal; Güler, Mustafa; Arslan, Hakan

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the most suitable growing periods for greenhouse production in Turkey in order to make valuable contribution to economic viability. Data collected from the meteorological databases of 81 provinces was used to determine periodic climatological requirements of greenhouses in terms of cooling, heating, natural ventilation, and lighting. Spatial distributions of mean daily outside temperatures and greenhouse heating requirements were derived using ordinary co-kriging (OCK) supported by Geographical Information System (GIS). Mean monthly temperatures throughout the country were found to decrease below 12 °C in January, February, March, and December, indicating heating requirements, whereas temperatures in 94.46 % of the country rose above 22 °C in July, indicating cooling requirements. Artificial lighting is not a requirement in Turkey except for November, December, and January. The Mediterranean, Aegean, Marmara, and Black Sea Regions are more advantageous than the Central, East, and Southeast Anatolia Regions in terms of greenhouse production because the Mediterranean and Aegean Regions are more advantageous in terms of heating, and the Black Sea Region is more advantageous in terms of cooling. Results of our study indicated that greenhouse cultivation of winter vegetables is possible in certain areas in the north of the country. Moreover, greenhouses could alternatively be used for drying fruits and vegetables during the summer period which requires uneconomical cooling systems due to high temperatures in the Mediterranean and Southeastern Anatolian Regions.

  10. Environmental Efficiency of Chinese Open-Field Grape Production: An Evaluation Using Data Envelopment Analysis and Spatial Autocorrelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Tian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Grape production is associated with some negative environmental externalities. However, they are not considered in the traditional data envelopment analysis (DEA efficiency assessment models and the research literature. Hence, the assessment results cannot correctly reflect the technical efficiency level of open-field grape production. We measured the environmental efficiency of China’s open-field grape production under the constraint of carbon emissions using the slacks-based measure (SBM model, including the undesirable outputs. In addition, spatial relations of environmental efficiency in different open-field grape production areas in China were evaluated by adopting spatial econometric methods. The results indicate that the average environmental efficiency score of grape production in China is at a low level of 0.651. Overall, the average environmental efficiencies in southern, southwest, and northeast regions are lower than the average levels, which implies the imbalance in economic outputs, resource consumption, and environmental efficiency in open-field grape cultivation. Moreover, the spatial autocorrelation results show that the environmental efficiency of grape production has obvious continuity in neighboring regions and spatial correlation.

  11. Spatial and seasonal distribution of American whaling and whales in the age of sail.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim D Smith

    Full Text Available American whalemen sailed out of ports on the east coast of the United States and in California from the 18(th to early 20(th centuries, searching for whales throughout the world's oceans. From an initial focus on sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus and right whales (Eubalaena spp., the array of targeted whales expanded to include bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus, humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, and gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus. Extensive records of American whaling in the form of daily entries in whaling voyage logbooks contain a great deal of information about where and when the whalemen found whales. We plotted daily locations where the several species of whales were observed, both those caught and those sighted but not caught, on world maps to illustrate the spatial and temporal distribution of both American whaling activity and the whales. The patterns shown on the maps provide the basis for various inferences concerning the historical distribution of the target whales prior to and during this episode of global whaling.

  12. Spatial and seasonal distribution of American whaling and whales in the age of sail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tim D; Reeves, Randall R; Josephson, Elizabeth A; Lund, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    American whalemen sailed out of ports on the east coast of the United States and in California from the 18(th) to early 20(th) centuries, searching for whales throughout the world's oceans. From an initial focus on sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) and right whales (Eubalaena spp.), the array of targeted whales expanded to include bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), and gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus). Extensive records of American whaling in the form of daily entries in whaling voyage logbooks contain a great deal of information about where and when the whalemen found whales. We plotted daily locations where the several species of whales were observed, both those caught and those sighted but not caught, on world maps to illustrate the spatial and temporal distribution of both American whaling activity and the whales. The patterns shown on the maps provide the basis for various inferences concerning the historical distribution of the target whales prior to and during this episode of global whaling.

  13. Effects of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) on skin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kappa B (NF-κB) localization and cell viability were measured in vivo. Keratinocytes from normal skin were cultured in AGE-enriched conditional media, and the cell viability, apoptosis, adhesion and migration were detected in order to find the ...

  14. Effects of Aging on the Production of Russian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarchuk, Iulia; Kemper, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Compares young and older adults' production of complex syntactic structures in Russian. Finds that content and fluency in Russian were associated with Russian vocabulary knowledge and influenced by educational level and knowledge of English and other languages and that working-memory limitations affect the use of clause and word order variations…

  15. Shade tree spatial structure and pod production explain frosty pod rot intensity in cacao agroforests, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidoin, Cynthia; Avelino, Jacques; Deheuvels, Olivier; Cilas, Christian; Bieng, Marie Ange Ngo

    2014-03-01

    Vegetation composition and plant spatial structure affect disease intensity through resource and microclimatic variation effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the independent effect and relative importance of host composition and plant spatial structure variables in explaining disease intensity at the plot scale. For that purpose, frosty pod rot intensity, a disease caused by Moniliophthora roreri on cacao pods, was monitored in 36 cacao agroforests in Costa Rica in order to assess the vegetation composition and spatial structure variables conducive to the disease. Hierarchical partitioning was used to identify the most causal factors. Firstly, pod production, cacao tree density and shade tree spatial structure had significant independent effects on disease intensity. In our case study, the amount of susceptible tissue was the most relevant host composition variable for explaining disease intensity by resource dilution. Indeed, cacao tree density probably affected disease intensity more by the creation of self-shading rather than by host dilution. Lastly, only regularly distributed forest trees, and not aggregated or randomly distributed forest trees, reduced disease intensity in comparison to plots with a low forest tree density. A regular spatial structure is probably crucial to the creation of moderate and uniform shade as recommended for frosty pod rot management. As pod production is an important service expected from these agroforests, shade tree spatial structure may be a lever for integrated management of frosty pod rot in cacao agroforests.

  16. Retrieving aerosol in a cloudy environment: aerosol product availability as a function of spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Remer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of using satellite observations to retrieve aerosol properties in a cloudy environment is to prevent contamination of the aerosol signal from clouds, while maintaining sufficient aerosol product yield to satisfy specific applications. We investigate aerosol retrieval availability at different instrument pixel resolutions using the standard MODIS aerosol cloud mask applied to MODIS data and supplemented with a new GOES-R cloud mask applied to GOES data for a domain covering North America and surrounding oceans. Aerosol product availability is not the same as the cloud free fraction and takes into account the techniques used in the MODIS algorithm to avoid clouds, reduce noise and maintain sufficient numbers of aerosol retrievals. The inherent spatial resolution of each instrument, 0.5×0.5 km for MODIS and 1×1 km for GOES, is systematically degraded to 1×1, 2×2, 1×4, 4×4 and 8×8 km resolutions and then analyzed as to how that degradation would affect the availability of an aerosol retrieval, assuming an aerosol product resolution at 8×8 km. The analysis is repeated, separately, for near-nadir pixels and those at larger view angles to investigate the effect of pixel growth at oblique angles on aerosol retrieval availability. The results show that as nominal pixel size increases, availability decreases until at 8×8 km 70% to 85% of the retrievals available at 0.5 km, nadir, have been lost. The effect at oblique angles is to further decrease availability over land but increase availability over ocean, because sun glint is found at near-nadir view angles. Finer resolution sensors (i.e., 1×1, 2×2 or even 1×4 km will retrieve aerosols in partly cloudy scenes significantly more often than sensors with nadir views of 4×4 km or coarser. Large differences in the results of the two cloud masks designed for MODIS aerosol and GOES cloud products strongly reinforce that cloud masks must be developed with specific purposes in mind and

  17. Influences of thermal aging on properties and pyrolysis products of tire tread compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitkarnka, Sirirat; Chusaksri, Boonrudee; Supaphol, Pitt; Magaraphan, Rathanawan [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College, Chulalongkorn University, Soi Chula 12, Phyathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2007-08-15

    Due to variation on waste tires as raw materials for pyrolysis process in terms of mileage leading to varied extents of degradation, the effects of time-governed thermal aging were investigated on two properties of tire, and on pyrolysis product yields and product distribution. Samples of a tire tread compound originally cured to 90% crosslink were aged in an environment-controlled oven for 0-4 weeks. Pyrolysis was performed on all samples. It was found that aging time had the influence over the crosslink density and hardness in steps during the course of aging due to the different response of the rubber constituents toward aging as well as changes on the tire molecules occurring in different stages upon aging. These affected the product yields and component distribution of products obtained from pyrolysis process. At the earlier stage of aging for 1-3 weeks, gas yield decreased with the aging time in accordance with the increase in liquid yield. The gas component distribution and carbon number distribution in liquid products insignificantly altered. However, the amount of gas oil in liquid products slightly decreased with aging time while the other commercial fractions remained practically constant. After 4 weeks of aging, sudden changes in opposite direction on the pyrolysis products occurred. The gas product rapidly increased along with the abrupt decrease in the liquid yield. The carbon number distribution in liquid product shifted to lower numbers, and the shape was narrower. The gas oil amount suddenly increased after reaching the lowest value at about 3 weeks of aging. An aging model was finally proposed in order to explain the observations. (author)

  18. Influence of spatial variation on countermeasures with special regards to animal food products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, G.; Kiefer, P.

    2000-07-01

    In the context of SAVE, soil and animal based countermeasures have been considered as well as human based ones: In this technical deliverable we have considered the following countermeasures: - Soil-plant transfer: The effectiveness of Ca, K, fertilisers and substances with a high cation exchange capacity on the transfer of radiocaesium from soil to plant for different soil types within Europe have been considered. In addition, the fertility status of soils will give an indication of the potential effectiveness of fertilisation. In this report the effect of K application in a specified area and a given contamination scenario is evaluated and demonstrated. - Plant-animal transfer: A wide range of countermeasures is available to directly reduce transfer of radionuclides to animals, and thereby animal products. The preferred option will always be the most cost effective and practically acceptable one, for both producers and consumers. In this report collection of animal based countermeasures for Cs, Sr and I with special respect to their acceptability, effectiveness and spatial variation is presented. The contribution and importance of countries in import and export of feedstuff used for animals is estimated based on trading information. (orig.)

  19. The Effects of Aging on Faculty Productivity. ASHE 1985 Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Ruth E.; Ging, Terry J.

    The relationship between productivity and aging in the context of the college faculty roles of teaching, research, and service is considered, based on a literature review on worker and faculty productivity and on theories of aging (i.e., biological, physiological, psychological, and sociological perspectives). It is concluded that faculty…

  20. The Iron Age iron slags of Maastricht – Randwyck: processing or production?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnoldussen, Stijn; Arnoldussen, Stijn; Müller, Axel; Norde, E.

    2017-01-01

    The increasingly abundant presence of iron artefacts in Early Iron Age urnfield contexts, is not matched by a similarly exhaustive dataset on (local) iron production. Rather, I have argued elsewhere (Arnoldussen & Brusgaard 2015, 117), that evidence for Iron Age primary iron production (i.e.

  1. The relative labour productivity contribution of different age-skill categories for a developing economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhardus van Zyl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The article dealt with the estimation, computation and interpretation of the relative productivity contributions of different age-skill categories.Research purpose: The aim of the article was to estimate and compute, (1 relative productivity contributions and (2 relative productivity contribution–employee remuneration cost levels for different age-skill categories.Motivation for the study: The research was deemed necessary given the current debate on relative productivity levels and possible changes to the retirement age in the South African labour market. No real research in this regard has been published regarding the South African labour market situation.Research design, approach and method: A less restrictive production function was used, allowing for the simultaneous estimation and final computation of relative labour contribution levels of different age-skill categories.Main findings: The lower-skilled segment produced significantly smaller productivity contributions and the relative productivity contribution–employee remuneration cost ratios of the 55 years and older age group were superior in the higher-skilled segment but, at the same time, the lowest in the lower-skilled segment.Practical/managerial implications: It is recommended that human resource practitioners (given the perceived rigidity of labour legislation implement and maintain structures that promote higher productivity levels for all age-skill categories in the workplace.Contribution/value-add: An estimation procedure, which can be applied to the measurement of the relative productivity contribution of different age-skill categories, has been established.

  2. The relative labour productivity contribution of different age-skill categories for a developing economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhardus van Zyl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The article dealt with the estimation, computation and interpretation of the relative productivity contributions of different age-skill categories. Research purpose: The aim of the article was to estimate and compute, (1 relative productivity contributions and (2 relative productivity contribution–employee remuneration cost levels for different age-skill categories. Motivation for the study: The research was deemed necessary given the current debate on relative productivity levels and possible changes to the retirement age in the South African labour market. No real research in this regard has been published regarding the South African labour market situation. Research design, approach and method: A less restrictive production function was used, allowing for the simultaneous estimation and final computation of relative labour contribution levels of different age-skill categories. Main findings: The lower-skilled segment produced significantly smaller productivity contributions and the relative productivity contribution–employee remuneration cost ratios of the 55 years and older age group were superior in the higher-skilled segment but, at the same time, the lowest in the lower-skilled segment. Practical/managerial implications: It is recommended that human resource practitioners (given the perceived rigidity of labour legislation implement and maintain structures that promote higher productivity levels for all age-skill categories in the workplace. Contribution/value-add: An estimation procedure, which can be applied to the measurement of the relative productivity contribution of different age-skill categories, has been established.

  3. Soil salinity and acidity : spatial variabil[it]y and effects on rice production in West Africa's mangrove zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylla, M.

    1994-01-01

    In the mangrove environment of West Africa, high spatial and temporal variability of soil constraints (salinity and acidity) to rice production is a problem for the transfer and adoption of new agronomic techniques, for land use planning, and for soil and water management. Recently, several

  4. Multi-Product Crops for Agricultural and Energy Production : an AGE Analysis for Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ignaciuk, A.; Dellink, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    By-products from agriculture and forestry can contribute to production of clean and cheap (bio)electricity. To assess the role of such multi-product crops in the response to climate policies, we present an applied general equilibrium model with special attention to biomass and multi-product crops

  5. Effects of Subchronic Treatment with Ibuprofen and Nimesulide on Spatial Memory and NMDAR Subunits Expression in Aged Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk Bilgin, Ozlem; Kumbul Doguc, Duygu; Altuntas, Irfan; Sutcu, Recep; Delibas, Namık

    2013-01-01

    Several studies point to an important function of cyclooxygenase (COX) and prostaglandin signaling in models of synaptic plasticity which is associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Cyclooxygenase gene is suggested to be an immediate early gene that is tightly regulated in neurons by NMDA dependent synaptic activity. Nonsteroid Antiinflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) exert their antiinflammatory effect by the inhibion of COX have controversial effects on learning and memory. We administered ibuprofen as a non-selective COX-2 inhibitor and nimesulide as a selective COX-2 inhibitor for 8 weeks for determining the cognitive impact of subchronic administration of NSAIDs to aged rats. Wistar albino rats (16 mo, n = 30) were separated into control (n = 10), ibuprofen (n = 10) and nimesulide (n = 10) treated groups. First we evaluated hippocampus-dependent spatial memory in the radial arm maze (RAM) and than we evaluated the expression of the NMDAR subunits, NR2A and NR2B by western blotting to see if their expressions are effected by subchronic administration with these drugs. Ibuprofen and nimesulide treated rats completed the task in a statistically significant shorter time when compared with control group (p RAM. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference was detected for the protein expressions of NR2A and NR2B of the subjects. Oral administration of ibuprofen and nimesulide for 8 weeks showed no impairment but partly improved spatial memory.

  6. Social isolation stress during the third week of life has age-dependent effects on spatial learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisone, Deborah F; Frye, Cheryl A; Zimmerberg, Betty

    2002-01-22

    Despite extensive research on the relationship between acute stress and hippocampal function in adults, little is known about the short- and long-term effects of prolonged juvenile stress on learning, memory, and other hippocampal functions. This experiment investigated whether spatial learning would be altered in juvenile and adult rats previously exposed to a chronic stressor: 6 h of social isolation (SI) daily at 15-21 days of age. SI was found to increase circulating plasma levels of corticosterone (CORT) and allopregnanolone (3-alpha,5-alpha-pregnan-20-one; 3,5-THP) at 1 h after separation on the fourth day, indicating that the isolation was an effective stressor. When tested as juveniles (post-natal (PN) 22-24), spatial learning was impaired on the Morris water maze in the previously isolated subjects compared to non-isolated controls. However, when tested as adults (PN 92-94), subjects previously exposed to SI during the third week of life demonstrated more rapid learning of the task than controls. These results are discussed in light of research on the effects of CORT on the developing hippocampus.

  7. The Contribution of Advanced Glycation End product (AGE) accumulation to the decline in motor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, Hans; Zuidema, Sytse; Bunt, Steven; Bautmans, Ivan; van der Schans, Cees; Hobbelen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Diminishing motor function is commonly observed in the elderly population and is associated with a wide range of adverse health consequences. Advanced Glycation End products (AGE's) may contribute to age-related decline in the function of cells and tissues in normal ageing. Although the negative

  8. Advanced glycation end-products (AGES) and heart failure : Pathophysiology and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Jasper W. L.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Smit, Andries J.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are molecules formed during a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and sugar residues, called the Maillard reaction. AGEs accumulate in the human body with age, and accumulation is accelerated in the presence of diabetes mellitus. In patients with diabetes,

  9. Age-related accumulation of Maillard reaction products in human articular cartilage collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Degroot, J.; Oldehinkel, E.; Bank, R. A.; Thorpe, S. R.; Baynes, J. W.; Bayliss, M. T.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Lafeber, F. P.; TeKoppele, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Non-enzymic modification of tissue proteins by reducing sugars, the so-called Maillard reaction, is a prominent feature of aging. In articular cartilage, relatively high levels of the advanced glycation end product (AGE) pentosidine accumulate with age. Higher pentosidine levels have been associated

  10. Effects of zinc and manganese on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation and AGEs-mediated endothelial cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiuyuan; Pang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Wenbin; Zhao, Jingjing; Yang, Huangjian; Qu, Weijing

    2012-01-16

    The present study investigated the effects of ZnCl₂ and MnCl₂ supplementations on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation and AGEs-mediated endothelial cell dysfunction. Fluorescence detection was used to monitor the Maillard reaction. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to test cellular zinc and manganese levels. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot were used to analyze the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB), and receptor for AGEs (RAGE). Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, NOS activity were determined by fluorescent probe assay, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was determined by water soluble tetrazolium salt assay. MnCl₂ showed excellent inhibitory effect on AGEs formation. Primary cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) were exposed to AGEs for 30 min, followed by trace element treatments. Cell viability and the zinc levels declined due to AGEs exposure, which were improved with the supplementations of ZnCl₂ and MnCl₂. Furthermore, ZnCl₂ supplementation effectively enhanced intracellular NO production, elevated eNOS expression and enzymatic activity, and down-regulated NF-κB activation and RAGE expression. MnCl₂ dose-dependently impaired ROS formation, down-regulated NF-κB protein expression and nuclear translocation, as well as restored Mn-SOD enzymatic capability. Our findings suggested that trace elements relevant to diabetic, such as zinc and manganese played different roles in the formation of AGEs. Both the elements benefited the AGEs-injured BAECs through different mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fuel age impacts on gaseous fission product capture during separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, Robert T.; Soelberg, Nicolas R.; Strachan, Denis M.; Ilas, G.

    2012-09-21

    relatively short half-lives, 12.3 y and 10.7 y, respectively, the dose decreases with the time from when the fuel is removed from the reactor to the time it is processed (herein “fuel age”). One possible strategy for limiting the discharges of these short halflife radionuclides is to allow the fuel to age to take advantage of radioactive decay. Therefore, the doses and required DFs are calculated as a function of fuel age. Here we calculate, given the above constraints and assumptions, the minimum ages for each fuel type that would not require additional effluent controls for the shorter half-life volatile radionuclides based on dose considerations. With respect to 129I doses, we find that the highest dose is calculated with iodine as a fine particulate. The dose scales as the fraction of the total 129I that is particulate. Therefore, we assume for all of our calculations that 100% of the 129I is particulate and allow the user of the results given here to scale our calculated doses to their needs. To summarize the data given in the body and appendices of this report, we find that the principal isotopes of concern are 3H and 129I, the latter requiring the highest DFs. The maximum DF value for 129I is 8000 for the illustrated cases. The required DF for 3H could be as high as 720, depending on the age of the fuel processed. The DF for 85Kr could be up to ~60, depending on fuel age. The DF for 14C is in many cases 1 (no treatment required) but could be as high as 30. The DFs required are within the range of DFs that are reported for the capture technologies that are available for the volatile radionuclides. Achieving the required 129I and 3H DFs is more challenging. Variations in stack design and other design factors may also significantly impact the DF requirements.

  12. Spatial statistics of poultry production in Anambra state of Nigeria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consequent on the need to utilize bio-wastes for energy generation, a preliminary study for bio-energy plant location modelling was carried out in this work using spatial statistics technique in Anambra State of Nigeria as a case study. Spatial statistics toolbox in ArcGIS was used to generate point density map which reveal ...

  13. Climate Change and Agricultural Productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Spatial Sample Selection Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, P.S.; Florax, R.J.G.M.; Flores-Lagunes, A.

    2014-01-01

    Using spatially explicit data, we estimate a cereal yield response function using a recently developed estimator for spatial error models when endogenous sample selection is of concern. Our results suggest that yields across Sub-Saharan Africa will decline with projected climatic changes, and that

  14. Age-related wayfinding differences in real large-scale environments: detrimental motor control effects during spatial learning are mediated by executive decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Taillade

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate motor control activity (active vs. passive condition with regards to wayfinding and spatial learning difficulties in large-scale spaces for older adults. We compared virtual reality (VR-based wayfinding and spatial memory (survey and route knowledge performances between 30 younger and 30 older adults. A significant effect of age was obtained on the wayfinding performances but not on the spatial memory performances. Specifically, the active condition deteriorated the survey measure in all of the participants and increased the age-related differences in the wayfinding performances. Importantly, the age-related differences in the wayfinding performances, after an active condition, were further mediated by the executive measures. All of the results relative to a detrimental effect of motor activity are discussed in terms of a dual task effect as well as executive decline associated with aging.

  15. A global and spatially explicit assessment of climate change impacts on crop production and consumptive water use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junguo Liu

    Full Text Available Food security and water scarcity have become two major concerns for future human's sustainable development, particularly in the context of climate change. Here we present a comprehensive assessment of climate change impacts on the production and water use of major cereal crops on a global scale with a spatial resolution of 30 arc-minutes for the 2030s (short term and the 2090s (long term, respectively. Our findings show that impact uncertainties are higher on larger spatial scales (e.g., global and continental but lower on smaller spatial scales (e.g., national and grid cell. Such patterns allow decision makers and investors to take adaptive measures without being puzzled by a highly uncertain future at the global level. Short-term gains in crop production from climate change are projected for many regions, particularly in African countries, but the gains will mostly vanish and turn to losses in the long run. Irrigation dependence in crop production is projected to increase in general. However, several water poor regions will rely less heavily on irrigation, conducive to alleviating regional water scarcity. The heterogeneity of spatial patterns and the non-linearity of temporal changes of the impacts call for site-specific adaptive measures with perspectives of reducing short- and long-term risks of future food and water security.

  16. A global and spatially explicit assessment of climate change impacts on crop production and consumptive water use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junguo; Folberth, Christian; Yang, Hong; Röckström, Johan; Abbaspour, Karim; Zehnder, Alexander J B

    2013-01-01

    Food security and water scarcity have become two major concerns for future human's sustainable development, particularly in the context of climate change. Here we present a comprehensive assessment of climate change impacts on the production and water use of major cereal crops on a global scale with a spatial resolution of 30 arc-minutes for the 2030s (short term) and the 2090s (long term), respectively. Our findings show that impact uncertainties are higher on larger spatial scales (e.g., global and continental) but lower on smaller spatial scales (e.g., national and grid cell). Such patterns allow decision makers and investors to take adaptive measures without being puzzled by a highly uncertain future at the global level. Short-term gains in crop production from climate change are projected for many regions, particularly in African countries, but the gains will mostly vanish and turn to losses in the long run. Irrigation dependence in crop production is projected to increase in general. However, several water poor regions will rely less heavily on irrigation, conducive to alleviating regional water scarcity. The heterogeneity of spatial patterns and the non-linearity of temporal changes of the impacts call for site-specific adaptive measures with perspectives of reducing short- and long-term risks of future food and water security.

  17. Role of Age-Related Shifts in Rumen Bacteria and Methanogens in Methane Production in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong; Meng, Qinghui; Chen, Yongxing; Xu, Mengsi; Shen, Min; Gao, Rui; Gan, Shangquan

    2017-01-01

    Rumen microbiota are essential for maintaining digestive and metabolic functions, producing methane as a byproduct. Dairy heifers produce large amounts of methane based on fermentation of digested organic matter, with adverse consequences for feed efficiency and the environment. It is therefore important to understand the influence of host age on the relationship between microbiota and methane production. This study explored the age effect on the relationship between microbial communities and enteric methane production in dairy cows and heifers using high-throughput sequencing. Methane production and volatile fatty acid concentrations were age-related. Heifers (9–10 months) had lower methane production but higher methane production per dry matter intake (DMI). The acetate:propionate ratio decreased significantly with increasing age. Age-related microbiota changes in the rumen were reflected by a significant shift in bacterial taxa, but relatively stable archaeal taxa. Prevotella, Ruminococcus, Flavonifractor, Succinivibrio, and Methanobrevibacter were affected by age. This study revealed different associations between predominant bacterial phylotypes and Methanobrevibacter with increasing age. Prevotella was strongly correlated with Methanobrevibacter in heifers; howerver, in older cows (96–120 months) this association was replaced by a correlation between Succinivibrio and Methanobrevibacter. This shift may account for the age-related difference in rumen fermentation and methane production per DMI. PMID:28855896

  18. Role of Age-Related Shifts in Rumen Bacteria and Methanogens in Methane Production in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rumen microbiota are essential for maintaining digestive and metabolic functions, producing methane as a byproduct. Dairy heifers produce large amounts of methane based on fermentation of digested organic matter, with adverse consequences for feed efficiency and the environment. It is therefore important to understand the influence of host age on the relationship between microbiota and methane production. This study explored the age effect on the relationship between microbial communities and enteric methane production in dairy cows and heifers using high-throughput sequencing. Methane production and volatile fatty acid concentrations were age-related. Heifers (9–10 months had lower methane production but higher methane production per dry matter intake (DMI. The acetate:propionate ratio decreased significantly with increasing age. Age-related microbiota changes in the rumen were reflected by a significant shift in bacterial taxa, but relatively stable archaeal taxa. Prevotella, Ruminococcus, Flavonifractor, Succinivibrio, and Methanobrevibacter were affected by age. This study revealed different associations between predominant bacterial phylotypes and Methanobrevibacter with increasing age. Prevotella was strongly correlated with Methanobrevibacter in heifers; howerver, in older cows (96–120 months this association was replaced by a correlation between Succinivibrio and Methanobrevibacter. This shift may account for the age-related difference in rumen fermentation and methane production per DMI.

  19. River-floodplain Hydrologic Connectivity: Impact on Temporal and Spatial Floodplain Water Quality and Productivity Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, E. L.; Ahearn, D.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Grosholz, E.

    2003-12-01

    Nutrient spiraling and cycling are critical processes for floodplain systems, but these have not been well studied in western North America. Floodplain production and function relies on the integrity of river-floodplain interactions, particularly during periods of hydrologic connectivity. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the importance of the timing and duration of river-floodplain hydrologic connectivity, (2) link flood event water quality to subsequent primary and secondary production, and (3) identify temporal and spatial patterns of floodplain production. The Cosumnes River watershed transports surface runoff and snowmelt from the Sierra Nevadas to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. It is one of the few watersheds in California that has no major water diversions or impoundments; therefore the river responds to the natural watershed hydrology. The study site in southern Sacramento County is an unmanaged experimental floodplain, one of the few remaining floodplains in California. Weekly and flood-event water quality and macroinvertebrate sampling was conducted during the flood season from January through June in 2001 and 2002. Both water years were characterized by historically low river flows. On average, volatile suspended solids in the water column increased from 5 mg/l to 10 mg/l during early season periods of hydrologic connectivity (December - February), suggesting that during watershed flushing flood events, the river acts as a source of nutrients and organic matter to the floodplain. Following a flood event, invertebrate concentrations decreased on average from 26,000 individuals/m3 to 9,000 individuals/m3 for zooplankton and from 350 individuals/m2 to 65 individuals/m2 for benthic macro-invertebrate, suggesting a net dilution of invertebrates during flood events. Chlorophyll a (chl-a) levels were also diluted during flood events, on average from 25 ppb to 5 ppb. Zooplankton densities and chl-a levels quickly rose after flood events. On

  20. Study of bovine gene: the temporal-spatial expression patterns, polymorphism and association analysis with meat production traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczuk-Kubiak, E; Bujko, K; Grześ, M; Cymer, M; Wicińska, K; Szostak, A; Pierzchała, M

    2016-11-01

    The gene () encodes a transcription factor belonging to the MEF2 family that plays an important role in myogenesis by transcriptional regulation of genes involved in skeletal muscle growth and development. Despite the established importance of the factors in the muscular growth and development, the temporal-spatial expression and biological function of have not been reported in cattle. The aim of this study was to analyze the level of expression in the developing longissimus dorsi muscle (LM) of 4 cattle breeds (Polish Holstein-Friesian [HF], Limousine [LIM], Hereford [HER], Polish Red [PR]), differing in terms of meat production and utility type, at 6, 9, and 12 mo of age. The genetic polymorphism and expression patterns in 6 tissues (heart, spleen, liver, semitendinosus muscle [ST], gluteus medius muscle [GM], and LM) were also investigated. The results showed that mRNA was expressed at a high level in adult skeletal and cardiac muscles. Moreover, expression was markedly greater in the GM than in the LM ( 0.05) and ST ( 0.01). An age-dependent and breed-specific comparison of mRNA level in skeletal muscle of HF, LIM, HER, and PR bulls showed that age was significant differentiating factor of transcript/protein abundance in the LM of HER and LIM ( 0.001) compared to HF and PR, for which the differences in mRNA level were not significant ( > 0.05). Regarding the breed effect on the expression, significantly greater mRNA/protein level was noticed in the LM of 9 and 12 mo-old HER than of LIM ( 0.01), HF ( 0.001), and PR ( 0.001). Four novel SNP, namely, (promoter), (exon 7), (exon 8), and (3'UTR), were identified. We found that 3'UTR variant, situated within the seed region of the miR-5187-3p and miR-6931-5p binding sites, was associated with the level of mRNA/protein in LM of 12-mo-old HF bulls. In addition, we observed a significant association between some carcass quality traits, including meat and carcass fatness quality traits, and various 3'UTR genotypes in the

  1. Predictable Surprise: The Spatial and Social Morphology of Aging Suburbs in the U.S. Metropolitan Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaekyung Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Elderburbs, defined as old suburban neighborhoods in terms of their ‘built environments’ and ‘demographic structures’, have emerged prominently in academic discussion due to the social vulnerability and outdated built environments of senior dominant neighborhoods that barely meet the needs of their aging populations. Even though previous literature has revealed concerns about suburban decline and the growing number of seniors, these two points of interest have largely been examined in isolation from one another. Thus, this paper attempts to unveil the spatial and social morphology of Elderburbs in 20 U.S. metropolitan areas from 1990 to 2010. Elderburbs were identified by two major criteria; built year (first-generation suburbs built between 1950 and 1970 and demographic aging (based on elderly, elderly-child, and elderly dependency ratios. The findings of this study indicate that Elderburbs have increased and expanded out to suburban areas, especially in the Northeast and Midwest. On the contrary, Elderburbs in the South have decreased and moved closer to core cities. Differing from our assumptions, both Elderburbs and Elderurbans were found to be less socially vulnerable than ordinary suburban and urban neighborhoods.

  2. Age affects responses on the Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) by adults with minimal audiometric loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, Jessica; Singh, Gurjit; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2012-02-01

    Age-related declines in auditory and cognitive processing may contribute to the difficulties with listening in noise that are often reported by older adults. Such difficulties are reported even by those who have relatively good audiograms that could be considered "normal" for their age (ISO 7029-2000 [ISO, 2000]). The Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ; Gatehouse and Noble, 2004) is a questionnaire developed to measure a listener's self-reported ability to hear in a variety of everyday situations, such as those that are challenging for older adults, and it can provide insights into the possible contributions of auditory and cognitive factors to their listening difficulties. The SSQ has been shown to be a sensitive and reliable questionnaire to detect benefits associated with the use of different hearing technologies and potentially other forms of intervention. Establishing how age-matched listeners with audiograms "normal" for their age rate the items on the SSQ could enable an extension of its use in audiological assessment and in setting rehabilitative goals. The main purpose of this study was to investigate how younger and older adults who passed audiometric screening and who had thresholds considered to be "normal" for their age responded on the SSQ. It was also of interest to compare these results to those reported previously for older listeners with hearing loss in an attempt to tease out the relative effects of age and hearing loss. The SSQ was administered to 48 younger (mean age = 19 yr; SD = 1.0) and 48 older (mean age = 70 yr, SD = 4.1) adults with clinically normal audiometric thresholds below 4 kHz. The younger adults were recruited through an introductory psychology course, and the older adults were volunteers from the local community. Both age groups completed the SSQ. The differences between the groups were analyzed. Correlations were used to compare the pattern of results across items for the two age groups in the

  3. Do Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) Contribute to the Comorbidities of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra Zofia; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed both during the endogenous and exogenous reactions and are implicated in the process of ageing, pathogenesis of diabetes, atherosclerosis, female fertility, and cancers. Food and smoking are the most important sources of exogenous AGEs in daily life. The biochemical composition of meal, cooking methods, time and temperature of food preparation may impact AGEs formation, therefore Western-type diet, rich in animal-derived products as well as in fast foods seems to be the main source of AGEs. Both, endogenous and exogenous AGEs can act intracellularly or during serum interaction with cell surface receptors called RAGE influencing variety of molecular pathways. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. The aetiology of this disorder remains unclear, however the environmental and genetic factors may play an important role in its pathogenesis. Nevertheless, PCOS women have increased factors for reproductive and cardiometabolic comorbidities. AGEs can contribute to the pathogenesis of PCOS as well as its consequences. It has been shown that chronic inflammation and increased oxidative stress may be a link between the mechanisms of AGEs action and the metabolic and reproductive consequences of PCOS. This review highlights that high dietary AGEs intake promotes deteriorating biological effects in women with PCOS, whereas AGEs restriction seems to have beneficial impact on women health. Better understanding AGEs formation and biochemistry as well as AGE-mediated pathophysiological mechanisms may open new therapeutic avenues converging to the achievement of the complete treatment of PCOS and its consequences.

  4. A mid-life vitamin A supplementation prevents age-related spatial memory deficits and hippocampal neurogenesis alterations through CRABP-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touyarot, Katia; Bonhomme, Damien; Roux, Pascale; Alfos, Serge; Lafenêtre, Pauline; Richard, Emmanuel; Higueret, Paul; Pallet, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Age-related memory decline including spatial reference memory is considered to begin at middle-age and coincides with reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Moreover, a dysfunction of vitamin A hippocampal signalling pathway has been involved in the appearance of age-related memory deficits but also in adult hippocampal neurogenesis alterations. The present study aims at testing the hypothesis that a mid-life vitamin A supplementation would be a successful strategy to prevent age-related memory deficits. Thus, middle-aged Wistar rats were submitted to a vitamin A enriched diet and were tested 4 months later in a spatial memory task. In order to better understand the potential mechanisms mediating the effects of vitamin A supplementation on hippocampal functions, we studied different aspects of hippocampal adult neurogenesis and evaluated hippocampal CRABP-I expression, known to modulate differentiation processes. Here, we show that vitamin A supplementation from middle-age enhances spatial memory and improves the dendritic arborisation of newborn immature neurons probably resulting in a better survival and neuronal differentiation in aged rats. Moreover, our results suggest that hippocampal CRABP-I expression which controls the intracellular availability of retinoic acid (RA), may be an important regulator of neuronal differentiation processes in the aged hippocampus. Thus, vitamin A supplementation from middle-age could be a good strategy to maintain hippocampal plasticity and functions.

  5. In vitro autoradiography of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampus and striatum of aged Long-Evans rats: relationship to spatial learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, M. [Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Bizon, J.L. [Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Nicolle, M.M. [Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1996-08-02

    Using in vitro autoradiography, we investigated [{sup 3}H]{alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate, [{sup 3}H]kainate and [{sup 3}H]N-methyl-d-aspartate binding in two forebrain regions, the hippocampus and striatum, of young (four months of age) and aged (24-25 months of age) Long-Evans rats that had previously been tested for spatial learning ability in the Morris water maze. Although there was substantial preservation of binding in the aged rats, reductions in binding were present in the aged rats that were specific to ligand and anatomical region. In the hippocampus of aged rats, [{sup 3}H]{alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate binding in CA1 and [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in CA3 were reduced. In contrast, N-methyl-d-aspartate binding was not significantly different between age groups. There was evidence of sprouting in the dentate gyrus molecular layer of aged rats, indicated by changes in the topography of [{sup 3}H]kainate binding. Binding density was analysed with respect to patch/matrix compartmentalization in the striatum. The most striking result was a large decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding in aged rats that was not limited to any dorsal/ventral or patch/matrix area of the striatum. Additionally, [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in striatal matrix was modestly reduced in aged rats. Of these age effects, only N-methyl-d-aspartate binding in the striatum and [{sup 3}H]kainate binding in the CA3 region of the hippocampus were correlated with spatial learning, with lower binding in the aged rats associated with better spatial learning ability.Age-related alterations in ionotropic glutamate receptors differ with respect to the receptor subtype and anatomical region examined. The age effects were not neccessarily indicative of cognitive decline, as only two age-related binding changes were correlated with spatial learning. Interestingly, in these instances, lower binding in the aged rats was associated with preserved spatial

  6. Orthographic error monitoring in old age: lexical and sublexical availability during perception and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafto, Meredith A

    2010-12-01

    Previous research suggests that older adults suffer declines in producing accurate spellings but retain the ability to accurately detect misspellings. The preservation of perception in the face of impaired production has been used to support a model of aging in which age impairs access to linguistic representations under specific circumstances, while representations themselves remain intact. The current research tests two predictions of this Transmission Deficit Hypothesis (TDH): first, that the differential effect of age on perception and production occurs when tasks are equated on response requirements and underlying representations, and second, that both word and spelling frequency interact to determine the effect of age on performance. Results of two error monitoring tasks supported the predictions of the TDH, demonstrating age-related production impairments that interacted with both word and spelling frequency, but no impairment of older adults' spelling perception, even for low frequency words or spellings. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Visual attention to spatial and non-spatial visual stimuli is affected differentially by age: effects on event-related brain potentials and performance data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, D.; Kok, A.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2006-01-01

    To assess selective attention processes in young and old adults, behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures were recorded. Streams of visual stimuli were presented from left or right locations (Experiment 1) or from a central location and comprising two different spatial frequencies

  8. Gender, aging, and work: aging workers' strategies to confront the demands of production in maquiladora plants in nogales, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarga, Mireya Scarone; Becerril, Leonor Cedillo; Champion, Catalina Denman

    2010-01-01

    This work is part of a qualitative socio-cultural investigation with a group of men and women 40 years and older in the maquila export industry in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. In 1994, as a result of the North American Free Trade Agreement, maquila plants combined traditional intensive work methods with new "just in time" production norms that impacted work and health conditions, particularly in older, or aging, workers. The workers that were interviewed for this study show a reduction in their functional ability to work starting at 40 years of age. Work organization demands, general health conditions, and a decrease in physical abilities brings these 40-year-old workers to prematurely construct an image of themselves as aging workers and to develop coping strategies that vary by gender.

  9. Spatial distribution, territoriality and sound production by tropical cryptic butterflies (Hamadryas, Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): implications for the "industrial melanism" debate

    OpenAIRE

    Julián Monge-Nájera; Francisco Hernández; María Isabel González; Javier Soley; José Araya; Stefano Zolla

    1998-01-01

    Neotropical butterflies of the genus Hamadryas, noted by the emission of sound, spend much time perching on trees and are believed to be cryptically patterned and colored with respect to tree trunks and branches they use as perching sites, but the subject had not been studied previously. This paper describes spatial distribution, territoriality and sound production in five species, under natural conditions: Hamadryas amphinome (Lucas, 1853), H. februa (Godart, 1824), H. feronia (Fruhstorfer, ...

  10. Perception-production asymmetries in homophone spelling: the unique influence of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Katherine K; Abrams, Lise; Zoller, Sarah M

    2013-09-01

    This research investigated three potential asymmetries in the production and perception of homophone spelling errors: aging, homophone dominance, and priming. A homophone spelling error occurs when a contextually appropriate word (beet) is replaced with its homophone (e.g., beat glaze). Two experiments investigated young and older adults' written production and detection of these errors. Participants wrote sentences (Experiment 1) or detected errors in sentences (Experiment 2) containing a dominant homophone (beat) or subordinate homophone (beet). Homophones were preceded by a prime (neat) that shared orthography with the contextually inappropriate homophone (beat) or by an unrelated control word (fun). Results revealed an aging asymmetry in production and detection as a function of dominance. Older adults made more errors than young adults when producing dominant homophones but fewer errors in producing subordinate homophones. In contrast, older adults consistently made fewer errors than young adults when detecting homophone errors. Independent of aging, dominance had similar effects on production and detection, with more errors on subordinate homophones. Priming had asymmetric effects different from aging by increasing errors in production but not detection. These results suggest aging uniquely dissociates perception and production of homophone spelling and demonstrate circumstances under which aging benefits language processing.

  11. Being Involved in the Country: Productive Ageing in Different Types of Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sandra; Crothers, Natalie; Grant, Jeanette; Young, Sari; Smith, Karly

    2012-01-01

    Productive ageing recognises the contribution of older people to economic, social and cultural growth and helps build a sustainable community. Being involved in community life is good for individuals and good for society. However, we know very little about the participation of and contribution by people aged 50 and over in rural communities. This…

  12. Downscaling of coarse resolution LAI products to achieve both high spatial and temporal resolution for regions of interest

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2015-11-12

    This paper presents a flexible tool for spatio-temporal enhancement of coarse resolution leaf area index (LAI) products, which is readily adaptable to different land cover types, landscape heterogeneities and cloud cover conditions. The framework integrates a rule-based regression tree approach for estimating Landsat-scale LAI from existing 1 km resolution LAI products, and the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) to intelligently interpolate the downscaled LAI between Landsat acquisitions. Comparisons against in-situ records of LAI measured over corn and soybean highlights its utility for resolving sub-field LAI dynamics occurring over a range of plant development stages.

  13. Ageing and employers’ perceptions of labour costs and productivity : A survey among european employers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conen, W.S.; van Dalen, H.P.; Henkens, C.J.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine employers’ perceptions of changes in the labour cost‐productivity gap due to the ageing of the workforce, the effects of tenure wages and employment protection on the perceived gap, and whether a perceived labour cost‐productivity gap affects

  14. School-Age Children's Self-Assessment of Oral Narrative Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderavek, Joan N.; Gillam, Ronald B.; Ukrainetz, Teresa A.; Justice, Laura M.; Eisenberg, Sarita N.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined aspects of self-assessment, a metacognitive ability, and oral narrative production in 401 children between 5 and 12 years of age. Oral narrative production was evaluated through the administration of the "Test of Narrative Language" (TNL). Self-assessment of narrative performance was determined by asking children to…

  15. Ageing and employers' perceptions of labour costs and productivity: a survey among European employers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conen, W.S.; van Dalen, H.P.; Henkens, C.J.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper examines employers’ perceptions of changes of the labour cost-productivity gap due to the ageing of the workforce, the effects of tenure wages and employment protect ion on the perceived gap and whether a perceived labour cost-productivity gap affects employers’ recruitment and

  16. Local Hotspots In The Gulf Of Maine: Spatial Overlap Between Dynamic Aggregations Of Primary Productivity And Fish Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, M.

    2016-12-01

    Identification of biological hotspots may be a necessary step toward ecosystem-based management goals, as these often signal underlying processes that aggregate or stimulate resources in a particular location. However, previously used metrics to locate these hotspots are not easily adapted to local marine datasets, in part due to the high spatial and temporal variability of phytoplankton populations. While most fish species in temperate regions are well adapted to the seasonal variability of phytoplankton abundance, it is the variability beyond this predictable pattern (i.e. anomalies) that may heavily impact the abundance and spatial distribution of organisms higher up the food chain. The objective of this study was to identify local-scale biological hotspots in a region in the western side of the Gulf of Maine using remote sensing chlorophyll-a data (from MERIS sensor), and to study the spatial overlap between these hotspots and high concentrations of fish abundance (derived from VTR dataset). For this reason, we defined a new hotspot metric that identified as a hotspot any area that consistently exhibited high-magnitude anomalies through time, a sign of highly dynamic communities. We improved on previous indices by minimizing the effect that different means and variances across space may have on the results, a situation that often occurs when comparing coastal and offshore systems. Results show a significant spatial correlation between pelagic fish abundance and aggregations of primary productivity. Spatial correlations were also significant between benthic fish abundance and primary productivity hotspots, but only during spring months. We argue that this new hotspot index compliments existing global measures as it helps managers understand the dynamic characteristics of a complex marine system. It also provides a unique metric that is easily compared across space and between different trophic levels, which may facilitate future ecosystem-wide studies.

  17. Demographic and spatial predictors of anemia in women of reproductive age in Timor-Leste: implications for health program prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lover, Andrew A; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Heymann, David L

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is a significant risk factor for poor health outcomes for both the mother and neonate; however, the determinants of anemia in many epidemiological settings are poorly understood. Using a subset of a nationally representative cluster survey (2010 Demographic and Health Survey) in combination with other non-contemporaneous survey data, the epidemiology of anemia among women of reproductive age in Timor-Leste has been explored. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors, population-level impacts were estimated as population attributable fractions and spatial analytics were used to identify regions of highest risk. The DHS survey found that ∼ 21% of adult women in Timor-Leste are anemic (49,053; 95% CI: 37,095 to 61,035), with hemoglobin Timor-Leste indicates low-to-moderate prevalence with generally low egg counts, suggesting a limited impact on anemia in this setting, although comprehensive survey data are lacking. Examination of the population-level effects highlights the impacts of both recent births and malaria on anemia, with more limited impacts from diet; the evidence does not suggest a large contribution from geohelminths within Timor-Leste. These patterns are divergent from some other settings in the Asia-Pacific region and highlight the need for further focused research. Targeting high-burden districts and by increasing access to pre/postnatal care, raising literacy levels, increasing access to family planning, and improving malaria control should be prioritized to maximize inherently limited health budgets in reaching these populations.

  18. Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources About Policymakers Media ASA Member Toolkit Risks Age Explore this page: Age Do anesthesia risks increase ... can you reduce anesthesia risks in older patients? Age Age may bring wisdom but it also brings ...

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Primary Productivity (NDVI) of Coastal Alaskan Tundra: Decreased Vegetation Growth Following Earlier Snowmelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamon, John A.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Stone, Robert S.; Tweedie, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    In the Arctic, earlier snowmelt and longer growing seasons due to warming have been hypothesized to increase vegetation productivity. Using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from both field and satellite measurements as an indicator of vegetation phenology and productivity, we monitored spatial and temporal patterns of vegetation growth for a coastal wet sedge tundra site near Barrow, Alaska over three growing seasons (2000-2002). Contrary to expectation, earlier snowmelt did not lead to increased productivity. Instead, productivity was associated primarily with precipitation and soil moisture, and secondarily with growing degree days, which, during this period, led to reduced growth in years with earlier snowmelt. Additional moisture effects on productivity and species distribution, operating over a longer time scale, were evident in spatial NDVI patterns associated with microtopography. Lower, wetter regions dominated by graminoids were more productive than higher, drier locations having a higher percentage of lichens and mosses, despite the earlier snowmelt at the more elevated sites. These results call into question the oft-stated hypothesis that earlier arctic growing seasons will lead to greater vegetation productivity. Rather, they agree with an emerging body of evidence from recent field studies indicating that early-season, local environmental conditions, notably moisture and temperature, are primary factors determining arctic vegetation productivity. For this coastal arctic site, early growing season conditions are strongly influenced by microtopography, hydrology, and regional sea ice dynamics, and may not be easily predicted from snowmelt date or seasonal average air temperatures alone. Our comparison of field to satellite NDVI also highlights the value of in-situ monitoring of actual vegetation responses using field optical sampling to obtain detailed information on surface conditions not possible from satellite observations alone.

  20. Photosensitized production of singlet oxygen: spatially-resolved optical studies in single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbach, Thomas; Kuimova, Marina; Gbur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    be monitored using viability assays. Time- and spatially-resolved optical measurements of both singlet oxygen and its precursor, the excited state sensitizer, reflect the complex and dynamic morphology of the cell. These experiments help elucidate photoinduced, oxygen-dependent events that compromise cell...

  1. An intercomparison of remotely sensed soil moisture products at various spatial scales over the Iberian Peninsula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parinussa, R.M.; Yilmaz, M.T.; Anderson, M.; Hain, C.; de Jeu, R.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture (SM) can be retrieved from active microwave (AM), passive microwave (PM) and thermal infrared (TIR) observations, each having unique spatial and temporal coverages. A limitation of TIR-based retrievals is a dependence on cloud-free conditions, whereas microwave retrievals are almost

  2. Women's gambling behaviour, product preferences, and perceptions of product harm: differences by age and gambling risk status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Simone; Thomas, Samantha L; Randle, Melanie; Bestman, Amy; Pitt, Hannah; Cowlishaw, Sean; Daube, Mike

    2018-04-24

    Women's participation in, and harm from gambling, is steadily increasing. There has been very limited research to investigate how gambling behaviour, product preferences, and perceptions of gambling harm may vary across subgroups of women. This study surveyed a convenience sample of 509 women from Victoria and New South Wales, Australia. Women were asked a range of questions about their socio-demographic characteristics and gambling behaviour. Focusing on four gambling products in Australia-casino gambling, electronic gambling machines (EGMs), horse betting, and sports betting-women were asked about their frequency of participation, their product preferences, and perceptions of product harms. The sample was segmented a priori according to age and gambling risk status, and differences between groups were identified using Chi-square tests and ANOVAs. Thematic analysis was used to interpret qualitative data. Almost two thirds (n = 324, 63.7%) of women had engaged with one of the four products in the previous 12 months. Compared to other age groups, younger women aged 16-34 years exhibited a higher proportion of problem gambling, gambled more frequently, and across more products. While EGMs were the product gambled on most frequently by women overall, younger women were significantly more likely to bet on sports and gamble at casinos relative to older women. Qualitative data indicated that younger women engaged with gambling products as part of a "night out", "with friends", due to their "ease of access" and perceived "chance of winning big". There were significant differences in the perceptions of the harms associated with horse and sports betting according to age and gambling risk status, with younger women and gamblers perceiving these products as less harmful. This study highlights that there are clear differences in the gambling behaviour, product preferences, and perceptions of product harms between subgroups of women. A gendered approach will enable public

  3. Productivity and Nutrient Quality of Some Sorghum Mutant Lines at Different Cutting Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Puteri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to explore the appropriate cutting age to produce optimal biomass and good nutrient quality from sorghum mutant lines BMR i.e., PATIR 3.5 M7, PATIR 3.6 M7, and PATIR 3.7 M7, also SAMURAI I (M17. A completely randomized in Split Plot design with 2 factors and 3 replicates was used. The first factor was the type of sorghum (SAMURAI I M17, PATIR 3.5, PATIR 3.6, PATIR 3.7 as the main plot and the second factor was the cutting age (85, 95, 105 as a subplot. Parameters observed were the production of stems, leaves, grains, total biomass production, ash, crude fat, crude fiber, crude protein, NFE, TDN, percentage of DMD, OMD and N-NH3. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA followed by DMRT (Duncan Multiple Range Test. The results showed that there were highly significant interactions (P<0.01 between cutting age and type of sorghum in production of stems, leaves, grains, total biomass production, value of TDN, DMD, OMD, and N-NH3. Increasing cutting age significantly increased the percentage of ash content, crude protein and crude fat. The sorghum type significantly affected crude fat content nonBMR sorghum variety of SAMURAI I (M17 and achieved optimal biomass production and nutrient content at cutting age of 85 d similar to BMR sorghum mutant lines PATIR 3.6 and PATIR 3.5, whereas BMR sorghum mutant lines of PATIR 3.7 achieved optimum production at the age of 95 d of cutting. All types of sorghum varieties was not recommended to be harvested at 105 d. Biomass production increased with the increasing of cutting age, but the nutrient content decreased.

  4. [Quantitative and spatial analysis in image processing: study of drusen distribution from the foveal center in age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, A; Conrath, J; Ridings, B

    2005-03-01

    Angiofluorograms were obtained from 58 patients presenting posterior pole drusen due to age-related macular degeneration. These frames underwent image processing by morphological mathematics algorithms. The detection sensitivity of this algorithm is 78%. We present a quantitative and spatial analysis of drusen distribution from the foveal center in the form of a graph. This technique may allow for multi-date comparisons, by using a graphic representation of this risk factor for age-related macular degeneration.

  5. Silver Entrepreneurship Agenda in Malaysia: A Proposed Model for Productive Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Aizzat Mohd Nasurdin; Hasliza Abdul Halim; Pishen Seet

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at proposing a framework for productive aging among those aged 45-plus or retiree via entrepreneurial initiatives, known as ‘silver entrepreneurs’. Evidence has shown that the number of Malaysians aged population is estimated to be more than 1.4 million and is projected to increase to 3.3 million in the year 2020 (Mafauzy, 2000). It is acknowledged that a group of these will comprise of professionals who are aged 45-plus and retirees with relevant industry experience as well a...

  6. Differential rescue of spatial memory deficits in aged rats by L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, S C; D'Angelo, H M; Royer, S E; Kaercher, R M; Adzovic, L; Wenk, G L

    2014-11-07

    Age-associated memory impairments may result as a consequence of neuroinflammatory induction of intracellular calcium (Ca(+2)) dysregulation. Altered L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC) and ryanodine receptor (RyR) activity may underlie age-associated learning and memory impairments. Various neuroinflammatory markers are associated with increased activity of both L-VDCCs and RyRs, and increased neuroinflammation is associated with normal aging. In vitro, pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs and RyRs has been shown to be anti-inflammatory. Here, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs or RyRs with the drugs nimodipine and dantrolene, respectively, could improve spatial memory and reduce age-associated increases in microglia activation. Dantrolene and nimodipine differentially attenuated age-associated spatial memory deficits but were not anti-inflammatory in vivo. Furthermore, RyR gene expression was inversely correlated with spatial memory, highlighting the central role of Ca(+2) dysregulation in age-associated memory deficits. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatial-temporal Climate System Drivers of Australia's Total Water Storage and Vegetation Productivity under Hydroclimatic Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.; Huete, A. R.; Ma, X.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme climate variability over Australia is driven by three dominant ocean-atmosphere climate systems including El Niño Southern Oscillation, Indian Ocean Dipole and Southern Annular Mode. In a previous study, we observed spatial clustering of Total Water Storage (TWS) responses to a Millennium drought (`big dry', 2001-09) and subsequent wet period (`big wet', 2010-11) across Australia. The entire continent partitioned into three geographic zones with diverse drying and wetting trends in rainfall, vegetation productivity, and total water storage, mimicking to varying extents, fundamental influences from the individual climate modes. We utilized Climate Index, satellite-based GRACE-Total Water Storage Anomaly (TWSA) and MODIS-Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) data to investigate the spatial-temporal responses, dynamics and trends of Australia's hydrologic and productivity patterns with the three climate systems. Three hydroclimatic extremes of a prolonged drought, a dramatic wet pulse and another anomalous El Niño event were analyzed from 2002 to 2015, using Partial Cross-Correlation Analyses to capture the controls of each climate driver on EVI, TWS, and rainfall. Our results confirmed the dominant influence of the climate modes and their geographic impacts on the continental scale ecohydrological patterns. Three distinct hydrologic zones in TWS patterns were observed across the hydroclimatic extremes study period, which were more pronounced than the spatial-temporal continental rainfall patterns. We further observed distinct changing patterns in surface greenness within the three zones, which were largely driven by respective Climate mode-TWS relationships, and poorly correlated with rainfall patterns. Moreover, the 2015 El Niño event, which caused severe declines in TWS and vegetation productivity over many parts of Australia, corroborated the three-zone-like influences from the climate modes. This study highlights the value of GRACE-TWSA for effectively

  8. Advanced glycation end products and their receptor contribute to ovarian ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensen, Mette Haug; Tanbo, Tom; Storeng, Ritsa; Fedorcsak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Do advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) affect the cells of the human ovarian follicle? AGE accumulate on the surface of ovarian granulosa-lutein (GL) cells and monocytes by binding to RAGE and other receptors with possible functional effects on these cells. AGE and RAGE are expressed in granulosa and theca cells, as well as in luteinized cells derived from the ovary. In this prospective cohort study, human follicle fluid-derived cells were isolated from aspirates of ovarian follicles of women who underwent assisted reproduction treatment. Immunofluorescence microscopy and multi-colour flow cytometry were used to determine the presence of AGE and RAGE on the surface of follicular fluid-derived cells and to characterize downstream effects of RAGE activation. GL cells and ovarian monocytes were found to contain AGE and RAGE and to bind AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) in correlation with the patients' chronological age. AGE-BSA and BSA failed to induce significantly the cleavage of caspase-3, phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB or the binding of annexin V (the latter was marginally increased). AGE-fibronectin was found to induce detachment of cultured GL cells in vitro. The impact of AGE and RAGE in the ovary, shown here in cells in culture, remains to be affirmed in clinical settings. The ligands of RAGE and their effects in the ovary remain uncertain but this study implies that AGEs in the form of structural long-lived extracellular matrix proteins, rather than soluble AGEs, may play a role in the decline of ovarian function during ageing. The project was funded by the Norwegian Resource Centre for Women's Health, Oslo University Hospital. The authors have no conflicts of interests.

  9. An exploration of collaborative scientific production at MIT through spatial organization and institutional affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudel, Matthew; Massaro, Emanuele; Santi, Paolo; Murray, Fiona; Ratti, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Academic research is increasingly cross-disciplinary and collaborative, between and within institutions. In this context, what is the role and relevance of an individual's spatial position on a campus? We examine the collaboration patterns of faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, through their academic output (papers and patents), and their organizational structures (institutional affiliation and spatial configuration) over a 10-year time span. An initial comparison of output types reveals: 1. diverging trends in the composition of collaborative teams over time (size, faculty versus non-faculty, etc.); and 2. substantively different patterns of cross-building and cross-disciplinary collaboration. We then construct a multi-layered network of authors, and find two significant features of collaboration on campus: 1. a network topology and community structure that reveals spatial versus institutional collaboration bias; and 2. a persistent relationship between proximity and collaboration, well fit with an exponential decay model. This relationship is consistent for both papers and patents, and present also in exclusively cross-disciplinary work. These insights contribute an architectural dimension to the field of scientometrics, and take a first step toward empirical space-planning policy that supports collaboration within institutions.

  10. Correlation analysis of electronic products with myopia in preschool and school aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the influence of electronic products on myopia in preschool and school aged children, and the development regularities of myopia, to formulate reasonable guidelines for using eyes healthily, and lay a solid foundation for the prevention and control work. METHODS: This retrospective analysis enrolled 900 3~12 years old children from outpatients department, and all of them were established individualized archives, recording: uncorrected visual acuity, optometry, slit lamp, ophthalmoscopy, strabismus inspection results; recording eye usage condition on TVs, computers, mobile phones, iPad, homework, extra-curricular books. Statistical analyze the refractive status of each age group, the use of electronic products of different age groups and their correlation with refractive status. RESULTS: The number of preschool children with normal uncorrected visual acuity was more than that of early school-age children, and the difference was statistically significant(PP>0.05; the number of children aged 7~12(early school aged childrenwith myopia was more than that of children aged 3~6(preschool childrenand the difference was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: For preschool children, it is necessary to conduct early screening, health guidance, the establishment of personalized medical records and one-to-one personalized guidance; it is also needed to avoid the arduous learning task with the stacking usage of eyes, to fight for myopia and to control the development of myopia. Therefore, to reduce the use of electronic products has become a topic worthy of further study.

  11. Improving a spatial rainfall product using multiple-point geostatistical simulations and its effect on a national hydrological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriani, F.; Stisen, S.

    2016-12-01

    Rainfall amount is one of the most sensitive inputs to distributed hydrological models. Its spatial representation is of primary importance to correctly study the uncertainty of basin recharge and its propagation to the surface and underground circulation. We consider here the 10-km-grid rainfall product provided by the Danish Meteorological Institute as input to the National Water Resources Model of Denmark. Due to a drastic reduction in the rain gauge network in recent years (from approximately 500 stations in the period 1996-2006, to 250 in the period 2007-2014), the grid rainfall product, based on the interpolation of these data, is much less reliable. Consequently, the related hydrological model shows a significantly lower prediction power. To give a better estimation of spatial rainfall at the grid points far from ground measurements, we use the direct sampling technique (DS) [1], belonging to the family of multiple-point geostatistics. DS, already applied to rainfall and spatial variable estimation [2, 3], simulates a grid value by sampling a training data set where a similar data neighborhood occurs. In this way, complex statistical relations are preserved by generating similar spatial patterns to the ones found in the training data set. Using the reliable grid product from the period 1996-2006 as training data set, we first test the technique by simulating part of this data set, then we apply the technique to the grid product of the period 2007-2014, and subsequently analyzing the uncertainty propagation to the hydrological model. We show that DS can improve the reliability of the rainfall product by generating more realistic rainfall patterns, with a significant repercussion on the hydrological model. The reduction of rain gauge networks is a global phenomenon which has huge implications for hydrological model performance and the uncertainty assessment of water resources. Therefore, the presented methodology can potentially be used in many regions where

  12. Spatial and Functional Organization of Pig Trade in Different European Production Systems: Implications for Disease Prevention and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relun, Anne; Grosbois, Vladimir; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Alexandrov, Tsviatko; Feliziani, Francesco; Waret-Szkuta, Agnès; Molia, Sophie; Etter, Eric Marcel Charles; Martínez-López, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the complexity of live pig trade organization is a key factor to predict and control major infectious diseases, such as classical swine fever (CSF) or African swine fever (ASF). Whereas the organization of pig trade has been described in several European countries with indoor commercial production systems, little information is available on this organization in other systems, such as outdoor or small-scale systems. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the spatial and functional organization of live pig trade in different European countries and different production systems. Data on premise characteristics and pig movements between premises were collected during 2011 from Bulgaria, France, Italy, and Spain, which swine industry is representative of most of the production systems in Europe (i.e., commercial vs. small-scale and outdoor vs. indoor). Trade communities were identified in each country using the Walktrap algorithm. Several descriptive and network metrics were generated at country and community levels. Pig trade organization showed heterogeneous spatial and functional organization. Trade communities mostly composed of indoor commercial premises were identified in western France, northern Italy, northern Spain, and north-western Bulgaria. They covered large distances, overlapped in space, demonstrated both scale-free and small-world properties, with a role of trade operators and multipliers as key premises. Trade communities involving outdoor commercial premises were identified in western Spain, south-western and central France. They were more spatially clustered, demonstrated scale-free properties, with multipliers as key premises. Small-scale communities involved the majority of premises in Bulgaria and in central and Southern Italy. They were spatially clustered and had scale-free properties, with key premises usually being commercial production premises. These results indicate that a disease might spread very differently

  13. Spatial and functional organization of pig trade in different european production systems: implications for disease prevention and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eRelun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the complexity of live pig trade organization is a key factor to predict and control major infectious diseases such as Classical or African swine fever. Whereas the organization of pig trade has been described in several European countries with indoor commercial production systems, little information is available on this organisation in other systems like outdoor or small-scale systems. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the spatial and functional organisation of live pig trade in different European countries and different production systems. Data on premise characteristics and pig movements between premises were collected during 2011 from Bulgaria, France, Italy and Spain, which swine industry is representative of most of the production systems in Europe (i.e. commercial vs small-scale; outdoor vs indoor. Trade communities were identified in each country using the Walktrap algorithm. Several descriptive and network metrics were generated at country and community level. Pig trade organization showed heterogeneous spatial and functional organization. Trade communities mostly composed of indoor commercial premises were identified in Western France, Northern Italy, Northern Spain and North-Western Bulgaria. They covered large distances, overlapped in space, demonstrated both scale-free and small-world properties, with a role of trade operators and multipliers as key premises. Trade communities involving outdoor commercial premises were identified in Western Spain, South-Western and Central France. They were more spatially clustered, demonstrated scale-free properties, with multipliers as key premises. Small-scale communities involved the majority of premises in Bulgaria and in central and Southern Italy. They were spatially clustered and had scale-free properties, with key premises usually being commercial production premises. These results indicate that a disease might spread very differently according to the

  14. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D X; Deng, T Z; Lv, J; Ke, J

    2014-12-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80 ± 5.50%, PRAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.

  15. [Problems associated with chronological age estimation of children exploited in child pornography production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, Jarosław

    2006-01-01

    Chronological age assessment of young persons featuring in pornographic pictures and videos is crucial to prove a violation of law. The paper discusses possibilities of and difficulties inherent in age estimation in cases of production and distribution of child pornography. The presented problems were divided into technical and individual development-associated issues. Technical difficulties included lack of a reference system for biological features reconstruction, poor quality and resolution of pictures or movies, pictures retouching and photomontage. The author stressed that biological hindrances in age assessment were the consequences of interpersonal variation of developmental patterns, namely overlapping of ranges typical for feature values at particular ages and biological variations between different human populations. The described problems can render age estimation impossible or far from precise. Developing more accurate methods of estimating age from pictures and videos requires the collaboration of specialists in the field of auxology, anthropology, pediatrics, as well as experts in photography and video techniques.

  16. Advanced glycation End-products (AGEs): an emerging concern for processed food industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chetan; Kaur, Amarjeet; Thind, S S; Singh, Baljit; Raina, Shiveta

    2015-12-01

    The global food industry is expected to increase more than US $ 7 trillion by 2014. This rise in processed food sector shows that more and more people are diverging towards modern processed foods. As modern diets are largely heat processed, they are more prone to contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are a group of complex and heterogeneous compounds which are known as brown and fluorescent cross-linking substances such as pentosidine, non-fluorescent cross-linking products such as methylglyoxal-lysine dimers (MOLD), or non-fluorescent, non-cross linking adducts such as carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (a pyrrole aldehyde). The chemistry of the AGEs formation, absorption and bioavailability and their patho-biochemistry particularly in relation to different complications like diabetes and ageing discussed. The concept of AGEs receptor - RAGE is mentioned. AGEs contribute to a variety of microvascular and macrovascular complications through the formation of cross-links between molecules in the basement membrane of the extracellular matrix and by engaging the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Different methods of detection and quantification along with types of agents used for the treatment of AGEs are reviewed. Generally, ELISA or LC-MS methods are used for analysis of foods and body fluids, however lack of universally established method highlighted. The inhibitory effect of bioactive components on AGEs by trapping variety of chemical moieties discussed. The emerging evidence about the adverse effects of AGEs makes it necessary to investigate the different therapies to inhibit AGEs.

  17. The effect of rosemary extract on spatial memory, learning and antioxidant enzymes activities in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoolijazi, Homa; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Nikbakhte, Farnaz; Eslami Farsani, Mohsen; Ababzadeh, Shima

    2015-01-01

    The Rosemary extract (RE) possesses various antioxidant, cytoprotective and cognition- improving bioactivities. In this study, we postulated which doses of RE have a more effect on the hippocampus of middle-aged rats. In this experimental study, thirty-two middle-aged male Wistar rats were fed by different doses (50,100 and 200 mg/kg/day) of RE (containing 40% carnosic acid) or distilled water for 12 weeks. The effects of different RE doses on learning and spatial memory scores, hippocampal neuronal survival, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation amount were evaluated by one and two way analysis of variance (ANOVA). It seemed that RE (100mg/kg) could recover the spatial memory retrieval score (prosemary extract (40% carnosic acid) may improve the memory score and oxidative stress activity in middle aged rats in a dose dependent manner, especially in 100mg/kg.

  18. Age-related changes in kynurenic acid production in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, J B; Schmidt, W; Turski, W A

    1992-01-01

    months of age in all five brain regions examined. No changes were observed in the liver. The changes were particularly pronounced in the cortex and in the striatum where enzyme activity increased three-fold during the period studied. KYNA production from its bioprecursor L-kynurenine was also......-dependent increase of KYNA concentration in brain tissue, suggest an enhanced KYNA tone in the aged brain. Together with the reported decline in cerebral excitatory amino acid receptor densities with age, increased production of KYNA may play a role in cognitive and memory dysfunction in old animals....... investigated in tissue slices and was found to be significantly enhanced in the cortex and hippocampus of old animals. The effect of depolarizing agents or sodium replacement was virtually identical in tissues from young and old rats. These data, which are in excellent agreement with reports on an age...

  19. Investigation of Ageing Effects on Organic Binders used for Mineral Wool Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zafar, Ashar

    Phenol-Urea-Formaldehyde (PUF) binder based mineral wool products’ mechanical properties have been observed to degrade during ageing at elevated temperatures and humidity, while mineral wool products based on a newly developed alkanol amine-acid anhydride binder exhibited better ageing properties...... for the same duration of ageing. The main purpose of the present work is to examine the chemical changes occurring in the phenol-urea-formaldehyde binder based mineral fibres due to ageing, which cause deterioration of the mechanical properties of mineral wool products. This has been done using surface...... mainly due to hydrolyzation of urea containing groups. On the other hand, XPS and ToF-SIMS characterization of alkanol amine-acid anhydride binder coated mineral fibres consistently showed that the surface chemical composition of the organic components of these samples did not change appreciably during...

  20. Age-related changes in kynurenic acid production in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, J B; Schmidt, W; Turski, W A

    1992-01-01

    months of age in all five brain regions examined. No changes were observed in the liver. The changes were particularly pronounced in the cortex and in the striatum where enzyme activity increased three-fold during the period studied. KYNA production from its bioprecursor L-kynurenine was also...... investigated in tissue slices and was found to be significantly enhanced in the cortex and hippocampus of old animals. The effect of depolarizing agents or sodium replacement was virtually identical in tissues from young and old rats. These data, which are in excellent agreement with reports on an age......-dependent increase of KYNA concentration in brain tissue, suggest an enhanced KYNA tone in the aged brain. Together with the reported decline in cerebral excitatory amino acid receptor densities with age, increased production of KYNA may play a role in cognitive and memory dysfunction in old animals....

  1. Non-Invasive Assessment of Dairy Products Using SpatiallyResolved Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann; Kamran, Faisal; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2015-01-01

    of commercially available milk and yogurt products with three different levels of fat content are measured. These constitute a relevant range of products at a dairy plant. The measured reduced scattering properties of the samples are presented and show a clear discrimination between levels of fat contents as well...

  2. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Li,D.X.; Deng,T.Z.; Lv,J.; Ke,J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts t...

  3. Modeling ecotoxicity impacts in vineyard production: Addressing spatial differentiation for copper fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Nancy; Antón, Assumpció; Kamilaris, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    the toxicity-related characterization of copper-based fungicides (Cu) for LCA studies. Potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts of 12 active ingredients used to control downy mildew in European vineyards were quantified and compared. Soil ecotoxicity impacts were calculated for specific soil chemistries...... the 12 studied active ingredients. With the inclusion of spatial differentiation, Cu toxicity potentials vary 3 orders of magnitude, making variation according to water archetypes potentially relevant. In the case of non-calcareous soils ecotoxicity characterization, the variability of Cu impacts...

  4. Prevalence and Characteristics of Low Back Pain among Productive Age Population in Jatinangor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dini Diwayani Novitasari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain is one of the global health issues which prevalence is high among productive ages. It oftentimes corresponds with one’s physical activity during work . The purpose of this study was to determine theprevalence and characteristics of low back pain among productive age population in Jatinangor, West Java, Indonesia. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted during the period of August to October 2014 in the three villages in Jatinangor, West Java, Indonesia. In order to determine the demographic data and history of low back pain in the last three months, about 1075 productive age populations were selected through validated questionnaire as the secondary data. These data consisting of 310 subjects were then described according to the pain characteristics and physical activity during work. Results: During three months of examination, s the prevalence of low back pain was 38.4%, with the average age 50–59 years old. Furthermore, about 22.3% subjects were indicated chronic low back pain. The most prevalent qseverity of the pain was dull pain (29.4%, followed with pins and needles pain (23.1%, As the intensity of the pain increased, there was a tendency of increasing interference in daily activities. Static posture was also the most frequent physical activity during work (53.2%. Conclusions: The prevalence of low back pain is more than one third (38.4% among productive age populations in Jatinangor, West Java, Indonesia.

  5. Advanced glycation end-products: Mechanics of aged collagen from molecule to tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautieri, Alfonso; Passini, Fabian S; Silván, Unai; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Carimati, Giulia; Volpi, Piero; Moretti, Matteo; Schoenhuber, Herbert; Redaelli, Alberto; Berli, Martin; Snedeker, Jess G

    2017-05-01

    Concurrent with a progressive loss of regenerative capacity, connective tissue aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). Besides being part of the typical aging process, type II diabetics are particularly affected by AGE accumulation due to abnormally high levels of systemic glucose that increases the glycation rate of long-lived proteins such as collagen. Although AGEs are associated with a wide range of clinical disorders, the mechanisms by which AGEs contribute to connective tissue disease in aging and diabetes are still poorly understood. The present study harnesses advanced multiscale imaging techniques to characterize a widely employed in vitro model of ribose induced collagen aging and further benchmarks these data against experiments on native human tissues from donors of different age. These efforts yield unprecedented insight into the mechanical changes in collagen tissues across hierarchical scales from molecular, to fiber, to tissue-levels. We observed a linear increase in molecular spacing (from 1.45nm to 1.5nm) and a decrease in the D-period length (from 67.5nm to 67.1nm) in aged tissues, both using the ribose model of in vitro glycation and in native human probes. Multiscale mechanical analysis of in vitro glycated tendons strongly suggests that AGEs reduce tissue viscoelasticity by severely limiting fiber-fiber and fibril-fibril sliding. This study lays an important foundation for interpreting the functional and biological effects of AGEs in collagen connective tissues, by exploiting experimental models of AGEs crosslinking and benchmarking them for the first time against endogenous AGEs in native tissue. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Spatial Dimension of Trade- and FDI-driven Productivity Growth in Chinese Provinces – A Global Cointegration Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özyurt, Selin; Mitze, Timo

    Since the introduction of its “open door” policy in the late 1970s, China has been attracting a growing share of FDI inflows and its international trade integration has advanced considerably. In this study, we take a closer look at the regional growth impact of the Chinese internationalization......-run relationship, regional labour productivity is indeed driven by direct and indirect spatial effects of FDI and trade activity next to further supply side factors such as the regional infrastructure equipment and human capital endowment. Similarly, in the short-run, changes in FDI activity and especially human...

  7. Multi-generation chemical aging of α-pinene ozonolysis products by reactions with OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningxin; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Donahue, Neil M.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2018-03-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere can be thought of as a succession of oxidation steps. The production of later-generation SOA via continued oxidation of the first-generation products is defined as chemical aging. This study investigates aging in the α-pinene ozonolysis system with hydroxyl radicals (OH) through smog chamber experiments. The first-generation α-pinene ozonolysis products were allowed to react further with OH formed via HONO photolysis. After an equivalent of 2-4 days of typical atmospheric oxidation conditions, homogeneous OH oxidation of the α-pinene ozonolysis products resulted in a 20-40 % net increase in the SOA for the experimental conditions used in this work. A more oxygenated product distribution was observed after aging based on the increase in aerosol atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O : C) by up to 0.04. Experiments performed at intermediate relative humidity (RH) of 50 % showed no significant difference in additional SOA formation during aging compared to those performed at a low RH of less than 20 %.

  8. Multi-generation chemical aging of α-pinene ozonolysis products by reactions with OH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the atmosphere can be thought of as a succession of oxidation steps. The production of later-generation SOA via continued oxidation of the first-generation products is defined as chemical aging. This study investigates aging in the α-pinene ozonolysis system with hydroxyl radicals (OH through smog chamber experiments. The first-generation α-pinene ozonolysis products were allowed to react further with OH formed via HONO photolysis. After an equivalent of 2–4 days of typical atmospheric oxidation conditions, homogeneous OH oxidation of the α-pinene ozonolysis products resulted in a 20–40 % net increase in the SOA for the experimental conditions used in this work. A more oxygenated product distribution was observed after aging based on the increase in aerosol atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O : C by up to 0.04. Experiments performed at intermediate relative humidity (RH of 50 % showed no significant difference in additional SOA formation during aging compared to those performed at a low RH of less than 20 %.

  9. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU—A spatially explicit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, U. Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates’ biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures’ carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops), or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent). PMID:28141827

  10. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU-A spatially explicit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Einarsson

    Full Text Available This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates' biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures' carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops, or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent.

  11. Sulforaphane reduces advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced inflammation in endothelial cells and rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Ojima, A; Nishino, Y; Yamagishi, S-I

    2016-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-receptor RAGE interaction evokes oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions, thereby being involved in endothelial cell (EC) damage in diabetes. Sulforaphane is generated from glucoraphanin, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, by myrosinase. Sulforaphane has been reported to protect against oxidative stress-mediated cell and tissue injury. However, effects of sulforaphane on AGEs-induced vascular damage remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether and how sulforaphane could inhibit inflammation in AGEs-exposed human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) and AGEs-injected rat aorta. Sulforaphane treatment for 4 or 24 h dose-dependently inhibited the AGEs-induced increase in RAGE, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecular-1 (VCAM-1) gene expression in HUVECs. AGEs significantly stimulated MCP-1 production by, and THP-1 cell adhesion to, HUVECs, both of which were prevented by 1.6 μM sulforaphane. Sulforaphane significantly suppressed oxidative stress generation and NADPH oxidase activation evoked by AGEs in HUVECs. Furthermore, aortic RAGE, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in AGEs-injected rats were increased, which were suppressed by simultaneous infusion of sulforaphane. The present study demonstrated for the first time that sulforaphane could inhibit inflammation in AGEs-exposed HUVECs and AGEs-infused rat aorta partly by suppressing RAGE expression through its anti-oxidative properties. Inhibition of the AGEs-RAGE axis by sulforaphane might be a novel therapeutic target for vascular injury in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Measuring spatial variation in secondary production and food quality using a common consumer approach in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Evans, Mary Anne; Schaeffer, Jeff; Wynne, Timothy; Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Nelson, J. C.; Vallazza, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Erie is a large lake straddling the border of the U.S. and Canada that has become increasingly eutrophic in recent years. Eutrophication is particularly focused in the shallow western basin. The western basin of Lake Erie is hydrodynamically similar to a large estuary, with riverine inputs from the Detroit and Maumee Rivers mixing together and creating gradients in chemical and physical conditions. This study was driven by two questions: How does secondary production and food quality for consumers vary across this large mixing zone? and Are there correlations between cyanobacterial abundance and secondary production or food quality for consumers? Measuring spatial and temporal variation in secondary production and food quality is difficult for a variety of logistical reasons, so here a common consumer approach was used. In a common consumer approach, individuals of a single species are raised under similar conditions until placed in the field across environmental gradients of interest. After some period of exposure, the response of that common consumer is measured to provide an index of spatial variation in conditions. Here, a freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) was deployed at 32 locations that spanned habitat types and a gradient in cyanobacterial abundance in the western basin of Lake Erie to measure spatial variation in growth (an index of secondary production) and fatty acid (FA) content (an index of food quality). We found secondary production was highest within the Maumee rivermouth and lowest in the open waters of the lake. Mussel tissues in the Maumee rivermouth also included more eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic fatty acids (EPA and DPA, respectively), but fewer bacterial FAs, suggesting more algae at the base of the food web in the Maumee rivermouth compared to open lake sites. The satellite-derived estimate of cyanobacterial abundance was not correlated to secondary production, but was positively related to EPA and DPA content in the

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variation in the Effects of Climatic Variables on Dugong Calf Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Mariana M P B; Delean, Steven; Grayson, Jillian; Lavender, Sally; Logan, Murray; Marsh, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the relationships between environmental forcing and demographic parameters is important for predicting responses from climatic changes and to manage populations effectively. We explore the relationships between the proportion of sea cows (Dugong dugon) classified as calves and four climatic drivers (rainfall anomaly, Southern Oscillation El Niño Index [SOI], NINO 3.4 sea surface temperature index, and number of tropical cyclones) at a range of spatially distinct locations in Queensland, Australia, a region with relatively high dugong density. Dugong and calf data were obtained from standardized aerial surveys conducted along the study region. A range of lagged versions of each of the focal climatic drivers (1 to 4 years) were included in a global model containing the proportion of calves in each population crossed with each of the lagged versions of the climatic drivers to explore relationships. The relative influence of each predictor was estimated via Gibbs variable selection. The relationships between the proportion of dependent calves and the climatic drivers varied spatially and temporally, with climatic drivers influencing calf counts at sub-regional scales. Thus we recommend that the assessment of and management response to indirect climatic threats on dugongs should also occur at sub-regional scales.

  14. History and Productivity Determine the Spatial Distribution of Key Habitats for Biodiversity in Norwegian Forest Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magne Sætersdal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Retention forestry, including the retention of woodland key habitats (WKH at the forest stand scale, has become an essential management practice in boreal forests. Here, we investigate the spatial distribution of 9470 habitat patches, mapped according to the Complementary Habitat Inventory method (CHI habitats, as potential WKHs in 10 sample areas in Norway. We ask whether there are parts of the forest landscapes that have consistently low or high density of CHI habitats compared to the surveyed landscape as a whole, and therefore have a low or high degree of conflict with harvesting, respectively. We found that there was a general pattern of clumped distribution of CHI habitats at distances up to a few kilometres. Furthermore, results showed that most types of CHI habitats were approximately two to three times as common in the 25% steepest slopes, lowest altitudes and highest site indices. CHI habitats that are most common in old-growth forests were found at longer distances from roads, whereas habitats rich in deciduous trees were found at shorter distances from roads than expected. Both environmental factors and the history of human impact are needed to explain the spatial distribution of CHI habitats. The overrepresentation of WKHs in parts of the forest landscapes represents a good starting point to develop more efficient inventory methods.

  15. Phylogeographic analysis reveals significant spatial genetic structure of Incarvillea sinensis as a product of mountain building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shaotian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incarvillea sinensis is widely distributed from Southwest China to Northeast China and in the Russian Far East. The distribution of this species was thought to be influenced by the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and Quaternary glaciation. To reveal the imprints of geological events on the spatial genetic structure of Incarvillea sinensis, we examined two cpDNA segments ( trnH- psbA and trnS- trnfM in 705 individuals from 47 localities. Results A total of 16 haplotypes was identified, and significant genetic differentiation was revealed (GST =0.843, NST = 0.975, P  Conclusions The results revealed that the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau likely resulted in the significant divergence between the lineage in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and the other one outside this area. The diverse niches in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau created a wide spectrum of habitats to accumulate and accommodate new mutations. The features of genetic diversity of populations outside the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau seemed to reveal the imprints of extinction during the Glacial and the interglacial and postglacial recolonization. Our study is a typical case of the significance of the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and the Quaternary Glacial in spatial genetic structure of eastern Asian plants, and sheds new light on the evolution of biodiversity in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau at the intraspecies level.

  16. Making Clothing Retail Place-Specific, While Changing The Spatialities Of Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lotte

    This paper takes its starting point in literature on retail geographies to discuss a relatively unexplored relationship between globalization and the significance of place for retail in global tourist destinations. Based on fieldwork conducted in Hoi An, Vietnam, it shows how local clothing...... retailers, the so-­called tailor shops, that sell their products to foreign tourists become part of a ‘planned authenticity’ that characterize the city. While clothing products in Hoi An retain an image of being produced by local and traditional tailors, the production is becoming increasingly...

  17. Spatial optimization of cropping pattern for sustainable food and biofuel production with minimal downstream pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femeena, P V; Sudheer, K P; Cibin, R; Chaubey, I

    2018-04-15

    Biofuel has emerged as a substantial source of energy in many countries. In order to avoid the 'food versus fuel competition', arising from grain-based ethanol production, the United States has passed regulations that require second generation or cellulosic biofeedstocks to be used for majority of the biofuel production by 2022. Agricultural residue, such as corn stover, is currently the largest source of cellulosic feedstock. However, increased harvesting of crops residue may lead to increased application of fertilizers in order to recover the soil nutrients lost from the residue removal. Alternatively, introduction of less-fertilizer intensive perennial grasses such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and Miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus Greef et Deu.) can be a viable source for biofuel production. Even though these grasses are shown to reduce nutrient loads to a great extent, high production cost have constrained their wide adoptability to be used as a viable feedstock. Nonetheless, there is an opportunity to optimize feedstock production to meet bioenergy demand while improving water quality. This study presents a multi-objective simulation optimization framework using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Multi Algorithm Genetically Adaptive Method (AMALGAM) to develop optimal cropping pattern with minimum nutrient delivery and minimum biomass production cost. Computational time required for optimization was significantly reduced by loose coupling SWAT with an external in-stream solute transport model. Optimization was constrained by food security and biofuel production targets that ensured not more than 10% reduction in grain yield and at least 100 million gallons of ethanol production. A case study was carried out in St. Joseph River Watershed that covers 280,000 ha area in the Midwest U.S. Results of the study indicated that introduction of corn stover removal and perennial grass production reduce nitrate and total phosphorus loads without

  18. Short bouts of mild-intensity physical exercise improve spatial learning and memory in aging rats: involvement of hippocampal plasticity via AKT, CREB and BDNF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Aderbal S; Castro, Adalberto A; Moreira, Eduardo L; Glaser, Viviane; Santos, Adair R S; Tasca, Carla I; Latini, Alexandra; Prediger, Rui D S

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether mild-intensity physical exercise represents a successful strategy to enhance spatial learning and memory and hippocampal plasticity in aging rats, as previously described for long-term exposure to running wheel or treadmill exercise. Aging Wistar rats were submitted to short bouts (4-6 min) of exercise treadmill during five consecutive weeks. This mild-intensity exercise program increased muscle oxygen consumption by soleus and heart in aging rats and reversed age-related long-term spatial learning and memory impairments evaluated in the water maze and step-down inhibitory avoidance tasks. Remarkably, the observed cognitive-enhancing properties of short bouts of exercise were accompanied by the activation of serine/threonine protein kinase (AKT) and cAMP response element binding (CREB) pro-survival signaling that culminates in the marked increase on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and BDNF protein levels on the hippocampus of aging rats. Altogether, these results indicate that short bouts of exercise represent a viable behavioral strategy to improve cognition and synaptic plasticity in aging rats which should be taken into account in further studies addressing the effects of physical exercise in aging subjects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Children Facial Expression Production: Influence of Age, Gender, Emotion Subtype, Elicitation Condition and Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charline Grossard

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The production of facial expressions (FEs is an important skill that allows children to share and adapt emotions with their relatives and peers during social interactions. These skills are impaired in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. However, the way in which typical children develop and master their production of FEs has still not been clearly assessed. This study aimed to explore factors that could influence the production of FEs in childhood such as age, gender, emotion subtype (sadness, anger, joy, and neutral, elicitation task (on request, imitation, area of recruitment (French Riviera and Parisian and emotion multimodality. A total of one hundred fifty-seven children aged 6–11 years were enrolled in Nice and Paris, France. We asked them to produce FEs in two different tasks: imitation with an avatar model and production on request without a model. Results from a multivariate analysis revealed that: (1 children performed better with age. (2 Positive emotions were easier to produce than negative emotions. (3 Children produced better FE on request (as opposed to imitation; and (4 Riviera children performed better than Parisian children suggesting regional influences on emotion production. We conclude that facial emotion production is a complex developmental process influenced by several factors that needs to be acknowledged in future research.

  20. Geographical variations and contextual effects on age of initiation of sexual intercourse among women in Nigeria: a multilevel and spatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uthman Olalekan A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The age of initiation of sexual intercourse is an increasingly important issue to study given that sexually active young women are at risk of multiple outcomes including early pregnancies, vesico-vaginal fistula, and sexually transmitted infections. Much research has focused on the demographic, familial, and social factors associated with sexual initiation and reasons adolescents begin having consensual intercourse. Less is known, however, about the geographical and contextual factors associated with age of initiation of sexual intercourse. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the extent of regional and state disparities in age of initiation of sexual intercourse and to examine individual- and community-level predictors of early sexual debut. Methods Multilevel logistic regression models were applied to data on 5531 ever or currently married women who had participated in 2003 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey. Coital debut at 15 years or younger was used to define early sexual debut. Exploratory spatial data analysis methods were used to study geographic variation in age at first sexual intercourse. Results The median age at first sexual intercourse for all women included in the study was 15 years (range; 14 – 19. North West and North East had the highest proportion of women who had reported early sexual debut (61% – 78%. The spatial distribution of age of initiation of sexual intercourse was nonrandom and clustered with a Moran's I = 0.635 (p = .001. There was significant positive spatial relationship between median age of marriage and spatial lag of median age of sexual debut (Bivariate Moran's I = 0.646, (p = .001. After adjusting for both individual-level and contextual factors, the probability of starting sex at an earlier age was associated with respondents' current age, education attainment, ethnicity, region, and community median age of marriage. Conclusion The study found that individual

  1. Advanced glycation end products overload might explain intracellular cobalamin deficiency in renal dysfunction, diabetes and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Rima; Shannan, Batool; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to aging. Cobalamin (Cbl) is required for cell growth and functions, and its deficiency causes serious complications. Diabetics and renal patients show high concentrations of Cbl, but metabolic evidence of Cbl deficiency that is reversible after Cbl treatment. Cbl might be sequestered in blood and cannot be delivered to the cell. Megalin mediates the uptake of transcobalamin-Cbl complex into the proximal tubule cells. Megalin is involved in the uptake and degradation of AGEs. In aging, diabetes or renal dysfunction, AGEs might overload megalin thus lowering Cbl uptake. Transcobalamin-Cbl might retain in blood. Shedding of megalin and transcobalamin receptor under glycation conditions is also a possible mechanism of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Listening in Spatialized Noise-Sentences Test (LiSN-S): normative and retest reliability data for adolescents and adults up to 60 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Sharon; Glyde, Helen; Dillon, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    The Australian version of the Listening in Spatialized Noise-Sentences Test (LiSN-S) was originally developed to assess auditory stream segregation skills in children aged 6 to 11 yr with suspected central auditory processing disorder. The LiSN-S creates a three-dimensional auditory environment under headphones. A simple repetition-response protocol is used to assess a listener's speech reception threshold (SRT) for target sentences presented in competing speech maskers. Performance is measured as the improvement in SRT in decibels gained when either pitch, spatial, or both pitch and spatial cues are incorporated in the maskers. To collect additional normative data on the Australian LiSN-S for adolescents and adults up to 60 yr of age, to analyze the effects of age on LiSN-S performance, to examine retest reliability in the older population, and to extrapolate findings from the Australian data so that the North American version of the test can also be used clinically with older adults. In a descriptive design, normative and test-retest reliability data were collected from adolescents and adults and combined with previously published data from Australian children aged 6 to 11 yr. One hundred thirty-two participants with normal hearing aged 12 yr, 0 mo, to 60 yr, 7 mo, took part in the normative data study. Fifty-five participants returned between 2 and 4 mo after the initial assessment for retesting. Analysis of variance revealed a significant effect of age on LiSN-S performance (p retest ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 dB across the four LiSN-S test conditions (p ranging from .01 to test and retest on the advantage measures (p ranging from .143 to .768). Test-retest differences across all LiSN-S measures were significantly correlated (r ranging from 0.2 to 0.7, p ranging from .023 to <.00000001) and did not differ as a function of age (p ranging from .178 to .980). As there was no significant difference among adults aged 18-60 yr on the LiSN-S talker, spatial, and total

  3. Demographic and spatial predictors of anemia in women of reproductive age in Timor-Leste: implications for health program prioritization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Lover

    Full Text Available Anemia is a significant risk factor for poor health outcomes for both the mother and neonate; however, the determinants of anemia in many epidemiological settings are poorly understood. Using a subset of a nationally representative cluster survey (2010 Demographic and Health Survey in combination with other non-contemporaneous survey data, the epidemiology of anemia among women of reproductive age in Timor-Leste has been explored. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors, population-level impacts were estimated as population attributable fractions and spatial analytics were used to identify regions of highest risk. The DHS survey found that ∼ 21% of adult women in Timor-Leste are anemic (49,053; 95% CI: 37,095 to 61,035, with hemoglobin <12.0 g/dL. In this population, the main risk factors (adjusted odds ratio; 95% CI are: currently abstaining from sex for any reason (2.25; 1.50 to 3.38; illiteracy (2.04; 1.49 to 2.80; giving birth within the previous year (1.80; 1.29 to 2.51; consumption of fruits/vegetables low in vitamin A (1.57; 1.13 to 2.20; and the district-level confirmed malaria incidence (1.31; 1.15 to 1.49. A review of prior soil-transmitted helminth surveys in Timor-Leste indicates low-to-moderate prevalence with generally low egg counts, suggesting a limited impact on anemia in this setting, although comprehensive survey data are lacking. Examination of the population-level effects highlights the impacts of both recent births and malaria on anemia, with more limited impacts from diet; the evidence does not suggest a large contribution from geohelminths within Timor-Leste. These patterns are divergent from some other settings in the Asia-Pacific region and highlight the need for further focused research. Targeting high-burden districts and by increasing access to pre/postnatal care, raising literacy levels, increasing access to family planning, and improving malaria control should be prioritized to maximize inherently

  4. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.X.; Deng, T.Z.; Lv, J.; Ke, J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction

  5. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs and their receptor (RAGE induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.X. Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs and their receptor (RAGE. We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA, bovine serum albumin (BSA alone, or given no treatment (control. Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01 and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05. Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.

  6. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.X.; Deng, T.Z.; Lv, J.; Ke, J. [Department of Stomatology, Air Force General Hospital PLA, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

    2014-09-19

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.

  7. Declining forest productivity in aging forest stands: a modeling analysis of alternative hypotheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, D.; McMurtrie, R. E. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ryan, M. G. [Forest Service, Fort Collins, CO (United States). Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station

    1996-01-01

    Various hypotheses regarding the decline in forest net primary productivity (NPP) with age in closed-canopy stands were evaluated by graphical analysis using the G`DAY model. Results indicated that the interaction between decline in stomatal conductance, hence photosynthetic efficiency and decline in soil nutrient availability, provided the most plausible answer to reduced productivity, although the relative importance of these two explanations varied according to certain key model assumptions. Increased sapwood respiration, one of the hypotheses tested, was found to have only a minor effect on the decline of forest productivity. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Production of Materials with Spatially-Controlled Cross-Link Density via Vat Photopolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gregory I; Schwartz, Johanna J; Zhang, Di; Weiss, Benjamin M; Ganter, Mark A; Storti, Duane W; Boydston, Andrew J

    2016-10-26

    We describe an efficient method to produce objects comprising spatially controlled and graded cross-link densities using vat photopolymerization additive manufacturing (AM). Using a commercially available diacrylate-based photoresin, 3D printer, and digital light processing (DLP) projector, we projected grayscale images to print objects in which the varied light intensity was correlated to controlled cross-link densities and associated mechanical properties. Cylinder and bar test specimens were used to establish correlations between light intensities used for printing and cross-link density in the resulting specimens. Mechanical testing of octet truss unit cells in which the properties of the crossbars and vertices were independently modified revealed unique mechanical responses from the different compositions. From the various test geometries, we measured changes in mechanical properties such as increased strain-to-break in inhomogeneous structures in comparison with homogeneous variants.

  9. The gene expression of weaning age and its effect on productive performance of rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. El-Sabrout

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Weaning age for mammals remains a topic of debate and an interesting subject of research. The literature data reflect opposite views on the recommended weaning age of rabbits. Thus, we determined the optimal weaning age for average commercial rabbit lines by studying one of these lines, the V-line. Gene expression of weaning age was studied in this research to reach the optimal weaning age for efficient rabbit growth and survival. The effect of weaning age on growth and mortality rates was investigated in young rabbits by comparing 3 groups (kits of 10 V-line does for each group, weaned at 23 (W23, 28 (W28 and 33 (W33 days of age. Rabbits weaned at 23 d of age had significantly (P<0.05 lower body weight at the age of 63 d (market age than those weaned at 28 and 33 d of age. The weaning age also influenced survival; mortality rate was highest in rabbits weaned at 23 d of age, followed by those weaned at 28 and 33 d of age. Morphometric parameters reflect the integral effect of all factors influencing digestive tract growth and development. From the results, it seems that the small intestine length did not have a clear effect on different weaning ages. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis is an important tool to monitor changes in gene expression in animals such as rabbits. We used this approach to measure intestinal insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 mRNA level and observed that the expression levels of IGF-1Ea, IGF-1Eb and IGF-1R were nearly the same in W28 and W33 rabbits, while they were the lowest in W23 rabbits. Serum IGF-1 concentrations tended to present significant differences (P<0.05 with different weaning ages. We found that levels of IGF-1 in rabbits weaned at 28 and 33 d of age were convergent and higher than the IGF-1 levels in rabbits weaned at 23 d of age. Moreover, the early weaning of rabbits has a negative impact on growth. This therefore suggests that moderate weaning (28W will be suitable for the farm

  10. Estimating High Spatial Resolution Air Temperature for Regions with Limited in situ Data Using MODIS Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyoung Rhee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of land surface temperature and vertical temperature profile data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, to estimate high spatial resolution daily and monthly maximum and minimum 2 m above ground level (AGL air temperatures for regions with limited in situ data was investigated. A diurnal air temperature change model was proposed to consider the differences between the MODIS overpass times and the times of daily maximum and minimum temperatures, resulting in the improvements of the estimation in terms of error values, especially for minimum air temperature. Both land surface temperature and vertical temperature profile data produced relatively high coefficient of determination values and small Mean Absolute Error (MAE and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values for air temperature estimation. The correction of the estimates using two gridded datasets, National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and Climate Research Unit (CRU, was performed and the errors were reduced, especially for maximum air temperature. The correction of daily and monthly air temperature estimates using the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, however, still produced relatively large error values compared to existing studies, while the correction of monthly air temperature estimates using the CRU data significantly reduced the errors; the MAE values for estimating monthly maximum air temperature range between 1.73 °C and 1.86 °C. Uncorrected land surface temperature generally performed better for estimating monthly minimum air temperature and the MAE values range from 1.18 °C to 1.89 °C. The suggested methodology on a monthly time scale may be applied in many data sparse areas to be used for regional environmental and agricultural studies that require high spatial resolution air temperature data.

  11. Spatially Resolved Characterization of Biogenic Manganese Oxide Production within a Bacterial Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm-forming bacterial culture, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of aqueous Mn+2 [Mn+2(aq)] by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm, using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn L2,3 absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36, and 48 h after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at a 40-nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from X-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well-characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III), and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn+2(aq) was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy is a promising tool for advancing the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained. PMID:15746332

  12. A Spatial Data Model Desing For The Management Of Agricultural Data (Farmer, Agricultural Land And Agricultural Production)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşkanat, Talha; İbrahim İnan, Halil

    2016-04-01

    Since the beginning of the 2000s, it has been conducted many projects such as Agricultural Sector Integrated Management Information System, Agriculture Information System, Agricultural Production Registry System and Farmer Registry System by the Turkish Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock and the Turkish Statistical Institute in order to establish and manage better agricultural policy and produce better agricultural statistics in Turkey. Yet, it has not been carried out any study for the structuring of a system which can meet the requirements of different institutions and organizations that need similar agricultural data. It has been tried to meet required data only within the frame of the legal regulations from present systems. Whereas the developments in GIS (Geographical Information Systems) and standardization, and Turkey National GIS enterprise in this context necessitate to meet the demands of organizations that use the similar data commonly and to act in terms of a data model logic. In this study, 38 institutions or organization which produce and use agricultural data were detected, that and thanks to survey and interviews undertaken, their needs were tried to be determined. In this study which is financially supported by TUBITAK, it was worked out relationship between farmer, agricultural land and agricultural production data and all of the institutions and organizations in Turkey and in this context, it was worked upon the best detailed and effective possible data model. In the model design, UML which provides object-oriented design was used. In the data model, for the management of spatial data, sub-parcel data model was used. Thanks to this data model, declared and undeclared areas can be detected spatially, and thus declarations can be associated to sub-parcels. Within this framework, it will be able to developed agricultural policies as a result of acquiring more extensive, accurate, spatially manageable and easily updatable farmer and

  13. Serum Antioxidative Enzymes Levels and Oxidative Stress Products in Age-Related Cataract Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the products of oxidative stress in patients with age-related cataracts and compare the findings with those in healthy control subjects. Method. Sixty patients with age-related cataract and sixty healthy controls of matched age and gender were included in this study. Serum samples were obtained to detect the antioxidative enzymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and oxidation degradation products of malondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, conjugated diene (CD, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, protein carbonyl (PC, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Results. Serum SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT activities in cataract group were significantly decreased as compared to the control subjects (P<0.05. The levels of MDA, 4-HNE, and CD in cataract patients were significantly higher than those in the control subjects (P<0.05, P<0.01. Cataract patients had higher levels of 8-OHdG, AOPP, and PC with respect to the comparative group of normal subjects (P<0.01. And there was no statistical significance in concentration of antioxidative enzymes and oxidative stress products in patients with different subtype cataract. Conclusions. Oxidative stress is an important risk factor in the development of age-related cataract, and augmentation of the antioxidant defence systems may be of benefit to prevent or delay cataractogenesis.

  14. Age and size effects on seed productivity of northern black spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. N. Viglas; C. D. Brown; J. F. Johnstone

    2013-01-01

    Slow-growing conifers of the northern boreal forest may require several decades to reach reproductive maturity, making them vulnerable to increases in disturbance frequency. Here, we examine the relationship between stand age and seed productivity of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) Britton, Sterns & Poggenb.) in Yukon Territory and Alaska....

  15. Productivity as related to diversity and age in planted versus natural forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Hai Ren

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the performance of plantations relative to natural forests of the same climate zone and age. China has more plantations than any other country as a consequence of massive afforestation efforts.We use data from China to comparatively examine tree biomass and productivity of planted and natural stands in relation to climate zone, latitude, elevation...

  16. Genetic characterization of egg weight, egg production and age at first egg in quails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marubayashi Hidalgo, A.; Martins, E.N.; Santos, A.L.; Quadros, T.C.O.; Ton, A.P.S.; Teixeira, R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to estimate genetic parameters for the traits egg weight, egg production in 189 days and age at first egg in three laying quails and one meat line of quails. Data was analyzed by Bayesian procedures using Gibbs sampling. The heritability estimates for egg weight,

  17. Comparisons of antifeedancy and spatial repellency of three natural product repellents against horn flies, Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junwei J; Brewer, Gary J; Boxler, David J; Friesen, Kristina; Taylor, David B

    2015-11-01

    Horn flies are among the most important biting fly pests of cattle in the United States. Horn fly management is largely dependent upon pesticides, which ultimately leads to the rapid development of insecticide resistance. Alternative control strategies, including repellents, have shown promising results in reducing fly biting. In the present study, we examined the efficacy and longevity of recently identified natural product repellents against horn flies. Catnip oil, geraniol and C8910 acids reduced horn fly feeding in a laboratory bioassay and also exhibited spatial repellency in the olfactometer. Residual activity was observed for up to 3 days in laboratory assays; however, 24 h of residual effectiveness was observed from the two repellents when applied on cattle in the field. The limited residual effectiveness was correlated with the high volatility of the major active repellent compounds. All three natural product repellents effectively repel biting horn flies, exhibiting both feeding deterrence and spatial repellency. They may be used for developing an effective push-pull strategy with a slow release matrix that can prolong their effectiveness for horn fly management. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The effects of age on second language grammar and speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Becky H

    2014-08-01

    The current study examined the age of learning effect on second language (L2) acquisition. The research goals of the study were twofold: to test whether there is an independent age effect controlling for other potentially confounding variables, and to clarify the age effect across L2 grammar and speech production domains. The study included 118 Mandarin-speaking immigrants and 24 native English speakers. Grammar knowledge was assessed by a grammaticality judgment task, and speech production was measured by native English speaking raters' ratings of participants' foreign accents. Results from the study revealed that the age of learning effect was robust for both L2 domains even after controlling for the influences of other variables, such as length of residence and years of education in the United States. However, the age of learning variable had a stronger impact on speech production than on grammar. The current results support the framework of multiple critical/sensitive periods (Long in Int Rev Appl Linguist 43(4):287-317, 2005; Newport et al. in Language, brain and cognitive development: Essays in honor of Jacques Mehler. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2001; Werker and Tees in Dev Psychobiol 46(3):233-251, 2005).

  19. Productivity Costs Associated With Breast Cancer Among Survivors Aged 18-44 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwueme, Donatus U; Trogdon, Justin G; Khavjou, Olga A; Guy, Gery P

    2016-02-01

    No study has quantified productivity losses associated with breast cancer in younger women aged 18-44 years. This study estimated productivity costs, including work and home productivity losses, among younger women who reported ever receiving a breast cancer diagnosis. A two-part regression model and 2000-2010 National Health Interview Survey data were used to estimate the number of work and home productivity days missed because of breast cancer, adjusted for socioeconomic characteristics and comorbidities. Estimates for younger women were compared with those for women aged 45-64 years. Data were analyzed in 2013-2014. Per capita, younger women with breast cancer had annual losses of $2,293 (95% CI=$1,069, $3,518) from missed work and $442 (95% CI=$161, $723) from missed home productivity. Total annual breast cancer-associated productivity costs for younger women were $344 million (95% CI=$154 million, $535 million). Older women with breast cancer had lower per capita work loss productivity costs of $1,407 (95% CI=$899, $1,915) but higher total work loss productivity costs estimated at $1,072 million (95% CI=$685 million, $1,460 million) than younger women. Younger women with a history of breast cancer face a disproportionate share of work and home productivity losses. Although older women have lower per capita costs, total productivity costs were higher for older women because the number of older women with breast cancer is higher. The results underscore the importance of continued efforts by the public health community to promote and support the unique needs of younger breast cancer survivors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Hormesis-based anti-aging products: a case study of a novel cosmetic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh; Kryzch, Valerie; Schnebert, Sylvianne

    2013-01-01

    and cosmeceuticals. Here we present the example of a skin care cosmetic as one of the first successful product developments incorporating the ideas of hormesis. This was based on the studies to analyse the molecular effects of active ingredients extracted from the roots of the Chinese herb Sanchi (Panax notoginseng...... in reducing the age-related accumulation of molecular damage. For example, repeated heat stress-induced synthesis of heat shock proteins has been shown to have a variety of anti-aging effects on growth and other cellular and biochemical characteristics of normal human skin fibroblasts, keratinocytes...... and endothelial cells undergoing aging in vitro. Therefore, searching for potential hormetins – conditions and compounds eliciting SR-mediated hormesis – is drawing attention of not only the researchers but also the industry involved in developing healthcare products, including nutriceuticals, functional foods...

  1. Estimation of new production in the North Sea: consequences for temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Katherine; Bo Pedersen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    By coupling knowledge of oceanographic processes and phytoplankton responses to light and nutrient availability, we estimate a total potential new (sensu Dugdale and Goering,1967) production for the North Sea of approximately 15.6 million tons C per year. In a typical year, about 40% of this prod......By coupling knowledge of oceanographic processes and phytoplankton responses to light and nutrient availability, we estimate a total potential new (sensu Dugdale and Goering,1967) production for the North Sea of approximately 15.6 million tons C per year. In a typical year, about 40...

  2. Approaching Specialisation: Craft Production in Late Neolithic/Copper Age Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available While political models of craft specialisation are integral to archaeological frameworks describing social complexity, they do not adequately describe the emergence of nascent specialists in the absence of concomitant regional, political and economic organisation. This paper reviews several examples of craft production in the Late Neolithic/Copper Age of southern Iberia. In particular, it focuses on the production of engraved slate plaques as an example of how Late Neolithic/Copper Age prestige objects may comprise an intermediate step in this process, approaching traditional models of craft specialisation in some respects, but defying them in others. It suggests that social practices such as the systematic production and consumption of rarefied or prestigious objects have a recursive relationship with the emergence of social complexity, forming the underlying basis of more institutionalised forms of specialisation and social inequality.

  3. Testing the validity of the neoclassical migration model: Overall and age-group specific estimation results for German spatial planning regions

    OpenAIRE

    Mitze, Timo; Reinkowski, Janina

    2010-01-01

    This paper assess the empirical validity of the neoclassical migration model to predict German internal migration flows driven by regional labour market disparities. We estimate static and dynamic migration functions for 97 Spatial Planning Regions between 1996--2006 using key labour market signals including income and unemployment differences among a broader set of explanatory variables. Beside an aggregate specification we also estimate the model for age-group related subsamples. Our result...

  4. Effect of production system and flock age on eggshell and egg internal quality measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiullah, Sami; Omar, Amal Saleh; Roberts, Juliet; Chousalkar, Kapil

    2017-01-01

    Egg quality was measured in eggs from different flocks that were reared together and then allocated to different production systems. Eggs were processed for measurements of eggshell and egg internal quality variables, scoring of ultrastructural mammillary layer features, completeness of cuticle cover, and protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) quantification. There was a significant main effect (P egg weight, and egg internal quality and significant effects of flock age on most measurements. The mammillary layer ultrastructural variables showed no clear relationship with production system and flock age. However, there was a significant interaction between production system and flock age for mammillary cap, early and late fusions. Cuticle cover ([Formula: see text]), was significantly higher in barn eggs (19.20), followed by free range (17.57), and cage eggs (15.99). Completeness of cuticle cover was significantly higher in eggs from the 44 week old flock than for 64 week and 73 week old flocks. For eggshells with cuticle intact, there was a significant main effect of both production system and flock age, and significant interaction between the two, for shell reflectivity, L*a*b* values and amount of PP IX. For PP IX, when this difference was calculated for the cuticle alone, there were no statistically significant differences. In 1 g of shell with and without cuticle, there was more PP IX in cage eggs (9.49 × 10 -8 , 7.90 × 10 -8  mM) followed by free range (8.24 × 10 -8 , 6.90 × 10 -8  mM), and barn eggs (8.64 × 10 -8 , 7.28 × 10 -8  mM). Similar trends were recorded for the amount of PP IX in 1 g of cuticle, but the difference was not statistically significant. The amount of PP IX decreased significantly with increasing flock age. Comparing the cage and barn production systems at 68 week of flock age, there was no difference for the amount of PP IX in shell with or without cuticle, or in the cuticle alone. Eggs from the cage production system were darker in color

  5. Review of nanomaterial aging and transformations through the life cycle of nano-enhanced products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrano, Denise M; Motellier, Sylvie; Clavaguera, Simon; Nowack, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    In the context of assessing potential risks of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), life cycle thinking can represent a holistic view on the impacts of ENPs through the entire value chain of nano-enhanced products from production, through use, and finally to disposal. Exposure to ENPs in consumer or environmental settings may either be to the original, pristine ENPs, or more likely, to ENPs that have been incorporated into products, released, aged and transformed. Here, key product-use related aging and transformation processes affecting ENPs are reviewed. The focus is on processes resulting in ENP release and on the transformation(s) the released particles undergo in the use and disposal phases of its product life cycle for several nanomaterials (Ag, ZnO, TiO2, carbon nanotubes, CeO2, SiO2 etc.). These include photochemical transformations, oxidation and reduction, dissolution, precipitation, adsorption and desorption, combustion, abrasion and biotransformation, among other biogeochemical processes. To date, few studies have tried to establish what changes the ENPs undergo when they are incorporated into, and released from, products. As a result there is major uncertainty as to the state of many ENPs following their release because much of current testing on pristine ENPs may not be fully relevant for risk assessment purposes. The goal of this present review is therefore to use knowledge on the life cycle of nano-products to derive possible transformations common ENPs in nano-products may undergo based on how these products will be used by the consumer and eventually discarded. By determining specific gaps in knowledge of the ENP transformation process, this approach should prove useful in narrowing the number of physical experiments that need to be conducted and illuminate where more focused effort can be placed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial Settlement Pattern of Settlements in Laweyan as Supportive Batik Production Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Mirsa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laweyan, a traditional village, has existed before 1500 AD. As the trade center yarn (clothing material of Pajang Kingdom, its presence meant after Kyai Ageng Anis (descendant of Brawijaya V and grandson Raden Ngabehi Lor Ing Pasar who later became the first king of Mataram settled in Laweyan in 1546. Laweyan entrepreneurship in the communities ushered in the heyday of batik economic in century. Successfulness in the field of economy turned an impact on development in various fields, helped shape the pattern of space and environment. Spatial pattern and traditional settlements are usually much characterized by the mass of buildings that have appeared in the form of walls covered choke and surrounded by alley or narrow street, as seen in Laweyan with the existence of high ‘beteng’ which raises many narrow alleys and a Laweyan hallmark not only as a security but also one of the merchants attempt to maintain the privacy and obtain local authority in the community.

  7. The impact of major transformations of a production process on age-related accident risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, V L; Laflamme, L; Diderichsen, Finn

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a study of whether accident risks were equally distributed across age categories among a population of mining workers whose work activities were suspected to be age-impaired. The impairment factors in focus are the transformation of production technology during the 80s...... and consequent changes in job content. It was hypothesized that the combined effect of these factors might lead accident risks, both non-specific (aggregated) and specific (by kind), to increase with age. Accident risk ratios (ARRs), however, proved to be higher for younger workers than older ones, in both...... the non-specific and the specific cases. However, two accident patterns (specific risks) also show relatively high ARRs among workers in their 40s (and even 30s), results that might be explained by particular exposures and/or age-related performance problems. The findings suggest that technological...

  8. The role of glycation in the pathogenesis of aging and its prevention through herbal products and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Park, Sok; Kim, Junghyun

    2017-09-30

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are non-enzymatic modifications of proteins or lipids after exposure to sugars. In this review, the glycation process and AGEs are introduced, and the harmful effects of AGEs in the aging process are discussed. Results from human and animal studies examining the mechanisms and effects of AGEs are considered. In addition, publications addressing means to attenuate glycation stress through AGE inhibitors or physical exercise are reviewed. AGEs form in hyperglycemic conditions and/or the natural process of aging. Numerous publications have demonstrated acceleration of the aging process by AGEs. Exogenous AGEs in dietary foods also trigger organ dysfunction and tissue aging. Various herbal supplements or regular physical exercise have beneficial effects on glycemic control and oxidative stress with a consequent reduction of AGE accumulation during aging. The inhibition of AGE formation and accumulation in tissues can lead to an increase in lifespan. ©2017 The Korean Society for Exercise Nutrition

  9. A new approach to spatially explicit modelling of forest dynamics: spacing, ageing and neighbourhood competition of mangrove trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, U.; Hildenbrandt, H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to spatially explicit modelling that enables the influence of neighbourhood effects on the dynamics of forests and plant communities to be analysed. We refer to this approach as 'field of neighbourhood' (FON). It combines the 'neighbourhood philosophy' of

  10. Planning Strategies in an Age of Active Citizenship : A Post-structuralist Agenda for Self-organization in Spatial Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, B.

    2015-01-01

    Civic initiatives in spatial development are on the rise. Whereas for a long time they were just a fringe movement, sometimes even a stand in the way of planned urban development, civic initiatives today are increasingly seen as valuable strategies for urban development. So far, however, when

  11. How to enhance route learning and visuo-spatial working memory in aging: a training for residential care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitolo, Micaela; Borella, Erika; Meneghetti, Chiara; Carbone, Elena; Pazzaglia, Francesca

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a route-learning training in a group of older adults living in a residential care home. We verified the presence of training-specific effects in tasks similar to those trained - route-learning tasks - as well as transfer effects on related cognitive processes - visuo-spatial short-term memory (VSSTM; Corsi Blocks Test (CBT), forward version), visuo-spatial working memory (VSWM; CBT, backward version; Pathway Span Tasks; Jigsaw Puzzle Test) - and in self-report measures. The maintenance of training benefits was examined after 3 months. Thirty 70-90-year-old residential care home residents were randomly assigned to the route-learning training group or to an active control group (involved in non-visuo-spatial activities). The trained group performed better than the control group in the route-learning tasks, retaining this benefit 3 months later. Immediate transfer effects were also seen in visuo-spatial span tasks (i.e., CBT forward and backward version and Pathway Span Task); these benefits had been substantially maintained at the 3-month follow-up. These findings suggest that a training on route learning is a promising approach to sustain older adults' environmental learning and some related abilities (e.g., VSSTM and VSWM), even in residential care home residents.

  12. Atlas-based and DTI-guided quantification of human brain cerebral blood flow: feasibility, quality assurance, spatial heterogeneity and age effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Khader M; Ali, Hiba; Shad, Mujeeb U

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and noninvasive quantification of regional cerebral blood perfusion (CBF) of the human brain tissue would advance the study of the complex interplay between human brain structure and function, in both health and disease. Despite the plethora of works on CBF in gray matter, a detailed quantitative white matter perfusion atlas has not been presented on healthy adults using the International Consortium for Brain Mapping atlases. In this study, we present a host of assurance measures such as temporal stability, spatial heterogeneity and age effects of regional and global CBF in selected deep, cortical gray matter and white matter tracts identified and quantified using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We utilized whole brain high-resolution DTI combined with arterial spin labeling to quantify regional CBF on 15 healthy adults aged 23.2-57.1years. We present total brain and regional CBF, corresponding volume, mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy spatial heterogeneity, and dependence on age as additional quality assurance measures to compare with published trends using both MRI and nuclear medicine methods. Total CBF showed a steady decrease with age in gray matter (r=-0.58; P=.03), whereas total CBF of white matter did not significantly change with age (r=0.11; P=.7). This quantitative report offers a preliminary baseline of CBF, volume and DTI measurements for the design of future multicenter and clinical studies utilizing noninvasive perfusion and DT-MRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of the Spatial Characteristics of Four Remotely Sensed Leaf Area Index Products over China: Direct Validation and Relative Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlu Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area index (LAI is a key input for many land surface models, ecological models, and yield prediction models. In order to make the model simulation and/or prediction more reliable and applicable, it is crucial to know the characteristics and uncertainties of remotely sensed LAI products before they are input into models. In this study, we conducted a comparison of four global remotely sensed LAI products—Global Land Surface Satellite (GLASS, Global LAI Product of Beijing Normal University (GLOBALBNU, Global LAI Map of Chinese Academy of Sciences (GLOBMAP, and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS LAI, while the former three products are newly developed by three Chinese research groups on the basis of the MODIS land reflectance product over China between 2001 and 2011. Direct validation by comparing the four products to ground LAI observations both globally and over China demonstrates that GLASS LAI shows the best performance, with R2 = 0.70 and RMSE = 0.96 globally and R2 = 0.94 and RMSE = 0.61 over China; MODIS performs worst (R2 = 0.55, RMSE = 1.23 globally and R2 = 0.03, RMSE = 2.12 over China, and GLOBALBNU and GLOBMAP performs moderately. Comparison of the four products shows that they are generally consistent with each other, giving the smallest spatial correlation coefficient of 0.7 and the relative standard deviation around the order of 0.3. Compared with MODIS LAI, GLOBALBNU LAI is the most similar, followed by GLASS LAI and GLOBMAP. Large differences mainly occur in southern regions of China. LAI difference analysis indicates that evergreen needleleaf forest (ENF, woody savannas (SAV biome types and temperate dry hot summer, temperate warm summer dry winter and temperate hot summer no dry season climate types correspond to high standard deviation, while ENF and grassland (GRA biome types and temperate warm summer dry winter and cold dry winter warm summer climate types are responsible for the large relative standard

  14. Renewable Energy Production from Waste to Mitigate Climate Change and Counteract Soil Degradation - A Spatial Explicit Assessment for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxner, Florian; Yoshikawa, Kunio; Leduc, Sylvain; Fuss, Sabine; Aoki, Kentaro; Yamagata, Yoshiki

    2014-05-01

    Waste production from urban areas is growing faster than urbanization itself, while at the same time urban areas are increasingly contributing substantial emissions causing climate change. Estimates indicate for urban residents a per capita solid waste (MSW) production of 1.2 kg per day, subject to further increase to 1.5 kg beyond 2025. Waste water and sewage production is estimated at about 260 liters per capita and day, also at increasing rates. Based on these figures, waste - including e.g. MSW, sewage and animal manure - can generally be assumed as a renewable resource with varying organic components and quantity. This paper demonstrates how new and innovative technologies in the field of Waste-to-Green Products can help in various ways not only to reduce costs for waste treatment, reduce the pressure on largely overloaded dump sites, and reduce also the effect of toxic materials at the landfill site and by that i.e. protect the groundwater. Moreover, Waste-to-Green Products can contribute actively to mitigating climate change through fossil fuel substitution and carbon sequestration while at the same time counteracting negative land use effects from other types of renewable energy and feedstock production through substitution. At the same time, the co-production and recycling of fertilizing elements and biochar can substantially counteract soil degradation and improve the soil organic carbon content of different land use types. The overall objective of this paper is to assess the total climate change mitigation potential of MSW, sewage and animal manure for Japan. A techno-economic approach is used to inform the policy discussion on the suitability of this substantial and sustainable mitigation option. We examine the spatial explicit technical mitigation potential from e.g. energy substitution and carbon sequestration through biochar in rural and urban Japan. For this exercise, processed information on respective Japanese waste production, energy demand

  15. Phytochemicals Against Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) and the Receptor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Ishibashi, Yuji; Isami, Fumiyuki; Abe, Yumi; Sakaguchi, Tatsuya; Higashimoto, Yuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Reducing sugars can react non-enzymatically with amino groups of proteins and lipids to form irreversibly cross-linked macroprotein derivatives called as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Cross-linking modification of extracellular matrix proteins by AGEs deteriorate their tertiary structural integrity and function, contributing to aging-related organ damage and diabetes-associated complications, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, engagement of receptor for AGEs, RAGE with the ligands evoke oxidative stress generation and inflammatory, thrombotic and fibrotic reactions in various kinds of tissues, further exacerbating the deleterious effects of AGEs on multiple organ systems. So the AGE-RAGE axis is a novel therapeutic target for numerous devastating disorders. Several observational studies have shown the association of dietary consumption of fruits and vegetables with the reduced risk of CVD in a general population. Although beneficial effects of fruits and vegetables against CVD could mainly be ascribed to its anti-oxidative properties, blockade of the AGERAGE axis by phytochemicals may also contribute to cardiovascular event protection. Therefore, in this review, we focus on 4 phytochemicals (quercetin, sulforaphane, iridoids, and curcumin) and summarize their effects on AGE formation as well as RAGE-mediated signaling pathway in various cell types and organs, including endothelial cells, vessels, and heart. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. EFFECT OF AGING TIME TOWARD CRYSTALLINITY OF PRODUCTS IN SYNTHESIS OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES MCM-41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanta Suyanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches about the effects of aging time toward crystallinity of products in the synthesis of mesoporous silicates MCM-41 have been done. MCM-41 was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment to the mixture of sodium silicate, sodium hydroxide, cetyltrimetylammoniumbromide (CTMAB and aquadest in the molar ratio of 8Na2SiO3 : CTMAB : NaOH : 400H2O. Hydrothermal treatment was carried out at 110 °C in a teflon-lined stainless steel autoclave heated in the oven, with variation of aging time, i.e.: 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36, 48, and 72 h respectively. The solid phase were filtered, then washed with deionised water, and dried in the oven at 100 °C for 2 h. The surfactant CTMAB was removed by calcinations at 550 °C for 10 h with heating rate 2 °C/min. The as-synthesized and calcined powders were characterized by using FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction method. The relative crystallinity of products was evaluated based on the intensity of d100 peaks. The best product was characterized by using N2 physisorption method in order to determine the specific surface area, mean pore diameter, lattice parameter, and pore walls thickness. It was concluded that the relative crystallinity of the products was sensitively influenced by the aging time. The highest relative crystallinity was achieved when used 36 h of aging time in hydrothermal treatment. In this optimum condition the product has 946.607 m2g-1 of specific surface area, 3.357 nm of mean pore diameter, 4.533 nm of lattice parameter, and 1.176 nm of pore walls thickness.

  17. Spatial regression between soil surface elevation, water storage in root zone and biomass productivity of alfalfa within an irrigated field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2014-05-01

    NIIGiM situated at a left bank of Volga River of Saratov Region of Russia (N51.384650°, E46.055890°). The digital elevation model of soil surface has been created, as well as monitoring of spatial water storage with EM 38 device and of a biomass were carried out. Layers of corresponding spatial data have been created and analyzed. The carried out analysis of spatial regresses has shown presence of links between productivity of a biomass of a alfalfa, water storage and topography. The obtained results shows the significance to include spatial characteristics of the topography and water storage to the irrigation models, as well as adaptation of sprinkler technology to allow differentiate the volume and rate of the applied water within the field. Special attention should be done to quantify relationships between uniform technology of water application by sprinkler and spatial nonuniformity of moisture storage (zoning of high soil moisture in depressions) in soil and as consequence of infiltration capacity.

  18. Spatial Variability of Soil Moisture and the Validation of Remote Sensing Products in a Unique Beach Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J.; Berg, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Soil water conditions are crucial for understanding the exchange of energy and mass at the earth's surface. The need for a better description of the heterogeneity of surface soil moisture in both space and time has garnered interest from areas including agricultural management and drought monitoring, water resources and flood prediction, and more recently climate modeling. Soil moisture has also been identified as a critical parameter in the initiation of particle entrainment by wind due to the alteration of physical properties such as aggregate structure and inter-particle cohesion. Therefore the dynamics of soil moisture are of great interest for regional wind erosion modeling as well as for the development of agricultural productivity and soil loss models. In this study, a unique environment for the study of soil moisture was investigated at Williston Reservoir in Northern British Columbia, Canada. For a period of a month or more before the reservoir is filled by the spring melt, several thousand hectares of fine-grained sediments are exposed to wind causing significant erosion and therefore potential air quality concerns. Here we present a study of the spatial and temporal patterning of surface soil moisture in exposed sediments. Measurements at small scales are used in the validation of remote sensing products at large scales and these estimates have been implemented into blowing dust models. Active microwave (RADARSAT-2) and optical (LandSAT-5) scenes were obtained between May 24th - June 2nd, 2009. On the ground, point measurements using capacitance based probes were performed over 4 test plots coincident with satellite overpass. Areal averages of soil moisture collected on the ground are used in the validation of soil moisture estimates from four backscatter inversion models (microwave) and a thermal band mono-window brightness temperature algorithm (optical). The studied environment represents an important validity test because backscatter inversion models

  19. The quinoa boom of the southern Bolivian Altiplano - linking geomorphology, erosion and spatial production patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Lasse; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2014-05-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a native Andean crop that gained worldwide popularity over the last few decades due to its outstanding nutritional properties. The plant is characterized by an exceptional adaptation and is able to produce decent yields despite harsh environmental conditions like drought, frost, or soil salinity. Quinoa is thus an exceptional income opportunity in the arid southern Bolivian Altiplano, an area endemically struck by rural poverty and malnutrition. In the early 1970s, the Bolivian government introduced the first tractors to southern Bolivia's Salar region with the intention to push agricultural development - with obvious success. The cultivation of quinoa is today the most important land use, with a continued increase in production volume and areal extent. We here trace back land-use changes from 1972 to 2013 in one of the most important areas of quinoa production. Using Landsat images, SRTM elevations and field survey data, we investigate the relationship of field areas to erosion patterns and large-scale geomorphology. The soils of the southern Bolivian Altiplano are highly susceptible to particle entrainment due to a loose and sandy substrate, strong winds, and rapid drainage during precipitation and snow melt events. It appears that many of the first quinoa fields were established on flood plain deposits, where good yields could be anticipated despite the apparent risk of erosion. The subsequent expansion of production areas was paralleled by an increase in field density. Locally, this implied a reduction of fallowing length and the incorporation of marginal lands. The almost complete removal of natural (i.e. protecting) vegetation over large and continuous areas, results in increased wind erosion and partial crop failure. While production extended by approx. 1,6 % per year between 1985 and 2003, an average annual increase of 8,4 % could be observed for the last decade, when many new fields were established at lower elevations

  20. The aging of radiosterilized and modified products and materials intended for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imrishova, D.

    1976-01-01

    The aging of radiosterilized sanitary products and materials during storage is of importance from a practical viewpoint. During storage, some materials alter their physicochemical and mechanical properties which may affect their applicability. Under conditions of modified aging, changes in physicochemical structure of untreated cotton canvas treated chemically and mechanically to increase its moisture absorbing capacity were studied. An analysis of samples irradiated with doses of 2.5-10 Mrads has confirmed that ionizing radiation impairs some macromolecular bonds in cellulose materials thus affecting their degradation during storage. Under such conditions, the progressive degradation of cellulose materials is characterized by increased oxidation as demonstrated by infrared spectral analysis. (author)

  1. Effect of dietary fish oil supplementation on the exploratory activity, emotional status and spatial memory of the aged mouse lemur, a non-human primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languille, Solène; Aujard, Fabienne; Pifferi, Fabien

    2012-12-01

    The data are inconsistent about the ability of dietary omega-3 fatty acids to prevent age-associated cognitive decline. Indeed, most clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a protective effect of omega-3 fatty acids against cognitive decline, and methodological issues are still under debate. In contrast to human studies, experiments performed in adult rodents clearly indicate that omega-3 fatty acids supplement can improve behavioural and cognitive functions. The inconsistent observations between human and rodent studies highlight the importance of the use of non-human primate models. The aim of the present study was to address the impact of omega-3 fatty acids (given in the form of dietary fish oil) on exploratory activity, emotional status and spatial reference memory in the aged mouse lemur, a non-human primate. Aged animals fed fish oil exhibited decreased exploratory activity, as manifested by an increase in the latency to move and a reduced distance travelled in an open-field. The fish oil-supplemented animals exhibited no change in the anxiety level, but they were more reactive to go into the dark arms of a light/dark plus-maze. In addition, we found that fish oil supplementation did not significantly improve the spatial memory performance in the Barnes maze task. This study demonstrated for the first time that a fish oil diet initiated late in life specifically modifies the exploratory behaviour without improving the spatial memory of aged non-human primates. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may be effective when started early in life but less effective when started at later ages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Increasing opportunities for the productive engagement of older adults: a response to population aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Ernest; Matz-Costa, Christina; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    "Productive aging" puts forward the fundamental view that the capacity of older adults must be better developed and utilized in activities that make economic contributions to society-working, caregiving, volunteering. It is suggested that productive engagement can lead to multiple positive ends: offsetting fiscal strains of a larger older population, contributing to the betterment of families and civil society, and maintaining the health and economic security of older adults. Advocates claim that outdated social structures and discriminatory behaviors limit participation of older adults in these important social roles as well as prevent the optimization of outcomes for older adults, families, and society. We ask two important questions: (a) How can we shape policies and programs to optimally engage the growing resources of an aging population for the sake of society and older adults themselves? and (b) How can policies pertaining to productive engagement reduce health and economic disparities? We answer these questions by first describing the current state of engagement in each of the three productive activities and summarize some current policies and programs that affect engagement. Next we highlight challenges that cross-cut productive engagement. Finally, we provide policy recommendations to address these challenges. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. New commercial dairy products in the feeding of children aged 1 to 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Abramova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is of particular importance in young children who are characterized by exceptionally high growth rates in conjunction with scare resources of nutrients in their body. The physiological features of infants suggest that this active life period in the child requires adequate attitude towards his nutrition that largely differs from that during the first year of life. The paper considers the issues of organizing the nutrition of children aged 1 to 3 years, by using commercial infant dairy products — new combined products — sterilized milk- and fruit-milk-based desserts and milk cocktails for infant feeding. 

  4. A critical examination of spatial biases between MODIS and MISR aerosol products – application for potential AERONET deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Eck

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while sidestepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a kml file.

  5. Spatial analysis of the potential crops for the production of biofuels in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carballo, Stella; Marco, Noelia Flores; Anschau, Alicia [Centro de Investigaciones de Recursos Naturales (CIRN/INTA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Inst. de Tecnologia Agropecuaria. Inst. de Clima y Agua], E-mail: scarballo@cnia.inta.gov.ar; Hilbert, Jorge [Instiuto de Ingenieria Rural (CIA/INTA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: hilbert@cnia.inta.gov.ar

    2008-07-01

    The increase in biofuels production has been rising in the last ten years at a high rate. Argentina as one of the main crop producers in the world has a great potential to contribute with high volumes of biofuels. At present time common crops are used for large scale production but new alternatives are under study in different regions of the country. The increase in pressure for expansion also raises concerns on the impact on ecology issues such as soil erosion and biodiversity. Looking at a national level INTA has been working on the construction of a GIS were different crops were placed. The purpose is to identify critical information, to raise a methodology to obtain accurate and up-to date thematic maps using satellite images, to feed a GIS and to integrate the different layers to estimate biomass potentials for energy supply in our country, assessing potential land availability for biofuel crops or plantations to be made with ecological, economic and social sustainability bases. (author)

  6. Spatial and temporal nature of reactive oxygen species production and programmed cell death in elm (Ulmus pumila L.) seeds during controlled deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Die; Ma, Gang; Wang, Qiong; Yao, Jinghan; Wang, Yu; Pritchard, Hugh W; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2012-11-01

    Seed deterioration is poorly understood and remains an active area for research. Seeds of elm (Ulmus pumila L.) were aged at 37 °C above water [controlled deterioration treatment (CDT)] for various lengths of time to assess programmed cell death (PCD) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) product in embryonic tissues during a 5 d period. The hallmarks of PCD were identified in the elm seeds during CDT including TUNEL experiments, DNA laddering, cytochrome c (cyt c) leakage and enzymatic activities. These analyses indicated that PCD occurred systematically and progressively in deteriorated elm seeds. Cyt c release and increase in caspase-3-like/DEVDase activity occurred during CDT, which could be suppressed by ascorbic acid (AsA) and caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO, respectively. In situ localization of ROS production indicated that the distinct spatial-temporal signature of ROS during CDT coincided with the changes in PCD hallmark features. Multiple antioxidant elements were activated during the first few days of CDT, but were subsequently depleted as PCD progressed. Taken together, our findings identify PCD as a key mechanism that occurs asymmetrically during elm seeds CDT and suggest an important role for PCD in seeds deterioration. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Atmospheric Inversion of the Global Surface Carbon Flux with Consideration of the Spatial Distributions of US Crop Production and Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jonathan Winston

    Carbon dioxide is taken up by crops during production and released back to the atmosphere at different geographical locations through respiration of consumed crop commodities. In this study, spatially distributed county-level US cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, changes in soil carbon, and human and livestock consumption data were integrated into the prior terrestrial biosphere flux generated by the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS). A global time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversion with a nested focus on North America was carried out based on CO2 observations at 210 stations. Overall, the inverted annual North American CO2 sink weakened by 6.5% over the period from 2002 to 2007 compared to simulations disregarding US crop statistical data. The US Midwest is found to be the major sink of 0.36±0.13 PgC yr-1 whereas the large sink in the US Southeast forests weakened to 0.16±0.12 PgC yr-1 partly due to local CO2 sources from crop consumption.

  8. A new heat flux model for the Antarctic Peninsula incorporating spatially variable upper crustal radiogenic heat production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Johnson, A.; Halpin, J.; Whittaker, J. M.; Graham, F. S.; Watson, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    We present recently published findings (Burton-Johnson et al., 2017) on the variability of Antarctic sub-glacial heat flux and the impact from upper crustal geology. Our new method reveals that the upper crust contributes up to 70% of the Antarctic Peninsula's subglacial heat flux, and that heat flux values are more variable at smaller spatial resolutions than geophysical methods can resolve. Results indicate a higher heat flux on the east and south of the Peninsula (mean 81 mWm-2) where silicic rocks predominate, than on the west and north (mean 67 mWm-2) where volcanic arc and quartzose sediments are dominant. Whilst the data supports the contribution of HPE-enriched granitic rocks to high heat flux values, sedimentary rocks can be of comparative importance dependent on their provenance and petrography. Models of subglacial heat flux must utilize a heterogeneous upper crust with variable radioactive heat production if they are to accurately predict basal conditions of the ice sheet. Our new methodology and dataset facilitate improved numerical model simulations of ice sheet dynamics. The most significant challenge faced remains accurate determination of crustal structure, particularly the depths of the HPE-enriched sedimentary basins and the sub-glacial geology away from exposed outcrops. Continuing research (particularly detailed geophysical interpretation) will better constrain these unknowns and the effect of upper crustal geology on the Antarctic ice sheet. Burton-Johnson, A., Halpin, J.A., Whittaker, J.M., Graham, F.S., and Watson, S.J., 2017, A new heat flux model for the Antarctic Peninsula incorporating spatially variable upper crustal radiogenic heat production: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 44, doi: 10.1002/2017GL073596.

  9. Comparison of Persian Simple Vowels Production in Cochlear Implanted Children Based on Implantation Age

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    Peiman Zamani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Age at implantation is one of the most important factors in improving speech and language skills in children with cochlear implants. Moreover, good vowel articulation is very important in the speech. So, the purpose of this research was to determine whether age at cochlear implantation influences the production of Persian simple vowels when cochlear implantation is undertaken below the age of 2 years as compared with cochlear implantation later in life. Materials & Methods: This research was a comparative and cross-sectional study. Based on inclusive and exclusive criteria (i.e., have physical and mental health, monolingual or bilingual, have 9±1 months post-surgery rehabilitation, no hearing handicapped parents and no medical problems history, 140 children who cochlear implanted in Amir-Alam and Hazrate Rasool hospital of Tehran city were selected by convenient sampling and assigned to two groups, children implanted under the age of 2 years and those implanted above the age of 2 years Also 238 normally hearing children were selected for control group by randomized sampling. The first and second formant frequency (F1 & F2 of the Persian simple vowels /i, e, æ, a, o, u/ were evaluated by the version of 1.2 of SFSwin software. Data were analyzed by Independent T test. Results: The findings indicated that there were significant differences between two groups in the mean of F2/i/ (P=0.046, F1/e/ (P=0.011, F2/e/ (P=0.005, F2/æ/ (P=0.039, F2/a/ (P=0.012, F2/o/ (P=0.012 and F2/u/ (P=0.006, but there was no significant difference between then in the mean of F1/i/, F1/æ/, F2/a/, F1/o/, F1/u/ (P>0.05. According to these results, no significant difference was seen between normal group and children who received their cochlear implants under the age of 2 years in the mean of variables (P>0.05. Conclusion: Observing significant differences in the quality of the production of Persian simple vowels between children implanted under the age of 2

  10. An advanced glycation end product (AGE)-receptor for AGEs (RAGE) axis restores adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes through modulation of p53 protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Abell, Allison Martorano; Moon, Yang Soo; Kim, Kee-Hong

    2012-12-28

    The impaired adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes is a hallmark of adipose aging and aging-related adipose dysfunction. Although advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from both foods and endogenous nonenzymatic glycation and AGE-associated signaling pathways are known to play a key role in aging and its related diseases, the role of AGEs in adipose aging remains elusive. We show a novel pro-adipogenic function of AGEs in replicative senescent preadipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as primary preadipocytes isolated from aged mice. Using glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein of AGEs, we found that glycated BSA restores the impaired adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes in vitro and ex vivo. However, glycated BSA showed no effect on adipogenesis in nonsenescent preadipocytes. The AGE-induced receptor for AGE (RAGE) expression is required for the pro-adipogenic function of AGEs in senescent preadipocytes. RAGE is required for impairment of p53 expression and p53 function in regulating p21 expression in senescent preadipocytes. We also observed a direct binding between RAGE and p53 in senescent preadipocytes. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel pro-adipogenic function of the AGE-RAGE axis in p53-regulated adipogenesis of senescent preadipocytes, providing new insights into aging-dependent adiposity by diet-driven and/or endogenous glycated proteins.

  11. Spatial and temporal patterns of net primary productivity in the duration of 1981-2000 in Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Gui; Tang, Xu-Li; Zhou, Guo-Yi; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2007-01-01

    The knowledge of net primary production (NPP) dynamics at regional scale will help to understand terrestrial carbon cycling, especially with respect to land use and global climate change. Guangdong province has high plant growth potential because of plenty of light, heat, and water resources in this region. Forest coverage increased significantly from less than 30% in the early l980s to approximately 60% in 2000 owing to the launching of the "Greening Guangdong in 10 years", a provincial afforestation and reforestation project started in 1985. Meanwhile, economy growth has been fast in Guangdong province during the past 20 years. Long-term spatial and temporal NPP dynamics in Guangdong province are not well-known. To fill this knowledge gap, the spatial and temporal patterns of annual NPP from 1981 to 2000, derived from the global production efficiency model (GLO-PEM), were analyzed in this study. NPP patterns were compared at three spatial scales (i. e. , province, region, and city) and among three major forest types (i. e. , broadleaf, coniferous, and mixed). The results showed that for the entire province annual NPP varied between (1360 ±431) and (1626 ± 471) g/(m^2•a), with a mean value of (1480 ±407)g/(m^2•a). NPP increased to the maximum value (1534 ±121 g/(m^2•a)) in late 1980s (1986~1990) while decreased in early 1990s (1991~1995), and then recovered slightly in late 1990s (1996~2000). NPP differed distinctly across geographic regions, with the highest in the southwest coastal region, followed by the southeast coastal region, and the lowest in the inner land region. The differences were probably caused by vegetation composition, heat and water resources, and the distribution of the cropland. NPP dynamics of 21 cities were divided into three types. NPP kept stable in 12 cities including Shaoguan, Qingyuan, and Meizhou etc. NPP increased in Chaozhou, Shanwei, Zhanjiang and Jieyang, and decreased significantly (peconomy development in the Pearl River

  12. Marine Mammal Train Oil Production Methods: Experimental Reconstructions of Norwegian Iron Age Slab-Lined Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Gørill

    2016-08-01

    Seal hunting and whaling have played an important part of people's livelihoods throughout prehistory as evidenced by rock carvings, remains of bones, artifacts from aquatic animals and hunting tools. This paper focuses on one of the more elusive resources relating to such activities: marine mammal blubber. Although marine blubber easily decomposes, the organic material has been documented from the Mesolithic Period onwards. Of particular interest in this article are the many structures in Northern Norway from the Iron Age and in Finland on Kökar, Åland, from both the Bronze and Early Iron Ages in which these periods exhibited traits interpreted as being related to oil rendering from marine mammal blubber. The article discusses methods used in this oil production activity based on historical sources, archaeological investigations and experimental reconstruction of Iron Age slab-lined pits from Northern Norway.

  13. Factors Associated with Abdominal Obesity in the Productive Age in Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fani Kusteviani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a public health and nutrition issues the world both developed countries and developing countries, including Indonesia. Abdominal obesity is one type of obesity where there is abdominal fat deposits as measured by waist circumference. Abdominal obesity is more at risk of health problems such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and cardiovascular disease than general obesity. Behavioral and environmental factors as well as genetic plays a role in the onset of abdominal obesity. The purpose of the study was to analyze factors associated with abdominal obesity in the productive age (15–64 years in Surabaya. The independent variables used were age, sex, marital status, family size, education, occupation, smoking, physical activity, consumption of vegetables and or fruit, food or sugary drinks, fatty foods and mental health. This research was analytical study use cross sectional design. The study used secondary data from Basic Health Research Surabaya 2007 amounted to 2191 respondents by simple random sampling. Data were analyzed with Chi-square test and logistic regression. Result of analysis showed that risk factors of abdominal obesity were age 35–64 years, female gender and married or divorced status, level of education ≤ SMA and consume fatty food regularly. The most influential risk factors are female. Increasing knowledge, physical activity, and reducing fat intake can prevent the risk of abdominal obesity. Keyword: abdominal obesity, productive age, lifestyle, female

  14. Mayo's Older Americans Normative Studies: Age- and IQ-Adjusted Norms for the Auditory Verbal Learning Test and the Visual Spatial Learning Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Brett A; Bieliauskas, Linas A; Smith, Glenn E; Ivnik, Robert J; Malec, James F

    2005-01-01

    Although normative data sets for standardized neuropsychometric instruments frequently feature adjustments for subject variables, there are reasons to believe that improvements in interpretive accuracy that result from such adjustments are less than optimal. In particular, years of education may be less closely associated with test performances than is overall intellectual functioning. In this last of four reanalyses of results from the Mayo Clinic's Older Americans Normative Studies (MOANS) databases, age-adjusted scores for the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and the Visual Spatial Learning Test were found to be more strongly related to Mayo age-adjusted WAIS-R Full Scale IQ scores (rs=.150 to .395) than to education (rs=.060 to .236) for healthy older examinees between 56 and 99 years of age. Although AVLT-FSIQ correlations were greatest at moderate levels of intelligence, VSLT-FSIQ correlations consistently increased in strength as intelligence increased (cf. Dodrill, 19971999). Based on these results, we present tables of age- and IQ-adjusted percentile equivalents of Mayo age-adjusted AVLT index scores and MOANS age-adjusted AVLT and VSLT scaled scores for ten age ranges and either seven (AVLT) or five (VSLT) IQ ranges.

  15. Accumulation of advanced glycation end (AGEs products in intensive care patients: an observational, prospective study

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    Rommes Johannes H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in the course and eventual outcome in a majority of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. Markers to estimate oxidative stress are not readily available in a clinical setting. AGEs accumulation has been merely described in chronic conditions, but can also occur acutely due to oxidative stress. Since AGEs have emerged to be stable end products, these can be a marker of oxidative stress. Skin autofluorescence (AF is a validated marker of tissue content of AGEs. We hypothesized that AGEs accumulate acutely in ICU patients. Methods We performed an observational prospective study in a medical surgical ICU in a university affiliated teaching hospital. All consecutively admitted ICU patients in a 2 month period were included. Skin AF was measured using an AGE reader in 35 consecutive ICU patients > 18 yrs. As a comparison, historical data of a control group (n = 231 were used. These were also used to calculate age-adjusted AF-levels (AFadj. Values are expressed as median and interquartile range [P25-P75]. Differences between groups were tested by non parametric tests. P Results AFadj values were higher in ICU patients (0.33 [0.00 - 0.68] than in controls (-0.07 [-0.29 - 0.24]; P adj were observed between acute or planned admissions, or presence of sepsis, nor was skin AFadj related to severity of disease as estimated by APACHE-II score, length of ICU, hospital stay or mortality. Conclusion Acute AGE accumulation in ICU patients was shown in this study, although group size was small. This can possibly reflect oxidative stress in ICU patients. Further studies should reveal whether AGE-accumulation will be a useful parameter in ICU patients and whether skin AF has a predictive value for outcome, which was not shown in this small study.

  16. Advanced Glycation End Product (AGE) Accumulation in the Skin is Associated with Depression: The Maastricht Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooren, Fleur E P; Pouwer, Frans; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Sep, Simone J S; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Henry, Ronald M A; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Schaper, Nicolaas C; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Koster, Annemarie; Denollet, Johan; Verhey, Frans R J; Schram, Miranda T

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent disease with a high morbidity and mortality risk. Its pathophysiology is not entirely clear. However, type 2 diabetes is an important risk factor for depression. One mechanism that may explain this association may include the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We therefore investigated the association of AGEs with depressive symptoms and depressive disorder. In addition, we examined whether the potential association was present for somatic and/or cognitive symptoms of depression. Cross-sectional data were used from the Maastricht Study (N = 862, mean age 59.8 ± 8.5 years, 55% men). AGE accumulation was measured with skin autofluorescence (SAF) by use of the AGE Reader. Plasma levels of protein-bound pentosidine were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) were measured with ultraperformance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorder were assessed by the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Higher SAF was associated with depressive symptoms (β = 0.42, 95% CI 0.12-0.73, P = .007) and depressive disorder (OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.04-1.95, P = .028) after adjustment for age, sex, type 2 diabetes, smoking, BMI, and kidney function. Plasma pentosidine, CML, and CEL were not independently associated with depressive symptoms and depressive disorder. This study shows that AGE accumulation in the skin is independently associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms and depressive disorder. This association is present for both somatic and cognitive symptoms of depression. This might suggest that AGEs are involved in the development of depression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Coffee consumption in aged mice increases energy production and decreases hepatic mTOR levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keita; Yanai, Shuichi; Shimokado, Kentaro; Ishigami, Akihito

    2017-06-01

    Coffee, one of the world's most consumed beverages, has many benefits. Some studies have reported the effects of coffee on aging. The aim of this study was to investigate the locomotor activity, energy metabolism, and lipid metabolism of aged (20-mo-old) mice given coffee. Aged C57 BL/6 NCr mice were divided into three groups: controls that were not given coffee (n = 9), a group that received 0.1% caffeinated coffee (n = 9), and a group that received 0.1% decaffeinated coffee (n = 9). This regimen continued for 17 wk until mice reached the age of 24 mo. Regular and decaffeinated coffee consumption decreased plasma-free fatty acid levels, increased hepatic adenosine triphosphate content, and decreased total mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR) protein content in the liver. However, no differences were found in the protein or activity levels of Akt, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), p70 S6 kinase, or sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, proteins that are upstream or downstream of the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-related pathways. Regular coffee consumption increased food and water intake, locomotor activity, the volume of carbon dioxide production, and the respiration exchange ratio. Regular and decaffeinated coffee consumption decreased hepatic total mTOR and p-mTOR levels independently of Akt and AMPK pathways in aged mice. Because decreased mTORC1 activity is known to have antiaging effects, coffee consumption during old age may retard aging. Moreover, coffee consumption by the aged population had a positive effect on behavioral energy and lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Yamada, Michiko

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that exposure to ionizing radiation accelerates the aging process has been actively investigated at ABCC-RERF since 1958, when longitudinal cohort studies of the Adult Health Study (AHS) and the Life Span Study (LSS) were initiated. In their 1975 overall review of aging studies related to the atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, Finch and Beebe concluded that while most studies had shown no correlation between aging and radiation exposure, they had not involved the large numbers of subjects required to provide strong evidence for or against the hypothesis. Extending LSS mortality data up to 1978 did not alter the earlier conclusion that any observed life-shortening was associated primarily with cancer induction rather than with any nonspecific cause. The results of aging studies conducted during the intervening 15 years using data from the same populations are reviewed in the present paper. Using clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory techniques, a broad spectrum of aging parameters have been studied, such as postmortem morphological changes, tests of functional capacity, physical tests and measurements, laboratory tests, tissue changes, and morbidity. With respect to the aging process, the overall results have not been consistent and are generally thought to show no relation to radiation exposure. Although some preliminary results suggest a possible radiation-induced increase in atherosclerotic diseases and acceleration of aging in the T-cell-related immune system, further study is necessary to confirm these findings. In the future, applying the latest gerontological study techniques to data collected from subjects exposed 45 years ago to A-bomb radiation at relatively young ages will present a new body of data relevant to the study of late radiation effects. (author) 103 refs

  19. A spatial model for the economic evaluation of biomass production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Liu; Phillips, V.D.; Singh, Devindar

    1992-01-01

    A system model for estimating short-rotation, intensive-culture woody biomass production costs, including establishment, maintenance, harvesting, and transport costs, was developed and applied to the island of Kauai. Using data from existing large-plot field trials, biomass yield of the tropical hardwood Eucalyptus saligna was predicted from site-specific factors such as local weather and soil conditions and management strategies. Possible harvesting systems were identified and associated harvesting costs were estimated. The distances from the plantation sites to a bio-conversion plant located at the Lihue sugar mill were calculated based on existing road networks. The delivered cost of biomass on a dollar per dry metric ton (Mg) basis was then calculated using a discounted cash flow method. A geographic information system was interfaced with the biomass system model to access a database and present results in map form. Under the most favorable management strategy modeled, approximately 330 x 10 3 dry Mg year -1 of Eucalyptus saligna could be produced from 12,000 ha at a delivered cost of $25-38 per dry Mg chips. (author)

  20. Spatial and seasonal variability of fractionated phytoplankton biomass and primary production in the frontal region of the Northern Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. VADRUCCI

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and seasonal patterns of variation of fractionated phytoplankton biomass and primary production and their relationships with nutrient concentrations were analyzed along an inshore - offshore gradient and in relation to the presence of a frontal system in the Northern Adriatic Sea. Sampling was carried out in winter and summer during four oceanographic cruises (June 1996 and 1997, February 1997 and 1998 as part of the PRISMA II project. Water samples for determining nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton biomass (as Chla and primary production (as 14 C assimilation were collected at five optical depths. Sampling stations were located along 2 or 4 parallel transects arranged perpendicularly to the shoreline and the frontal system. The transects were located at such a distance from the coast that the frontal system crossed them at their halfway point. Total dissolved nitrogen (TDN and total dissolved phosphorus concentrations (TDP were 12.41 ± 3 .95 mM and 0.146 ± 0 .070 mM, respectively. The values in the two seasonal periods were similar, decreasing along the inshore-offshore gradient. Values for phytoplankton biomass and primary productionwere higher in the winter than the summer cruises, and decreased, in both seasonal periods, along the inshore / offshore gradient. Moreover, in both seasonal periods, picophytoplankton dominated both biomass and productivity, (56% and 44%, respectively at stations beyond the frontal system, while microphytoplankton was more important at stations inside it (44% and 44%, respectively. Total phytoplankton biomass and primary production were directly related to nutrient concentrations. Regarding size classes, significant patterns of variation with nutrients were observed particularly for biomass. The results indicate that the size structure and function of phytoplankton guilds seem to be mediated by nutrient inflow, as well as by competitive interaction among size fractions.

  1. Happiness and age in European adults: The moderating role of gross domestic product per capita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica; Robinson, Oliver; Thompson, Trevor

    2015-09-01

    Studies of happiness levels across the life span have found support for two rival hypotheses. The positivity effect states that as people get older, they increasingly attend to positive information, which implies that happiness remains stable or increases with age, whereas the U-shaped hypothesis posits a curvilinear shape resulting from a dip during midlife. Both have been presented as potentially universal hypotheses that relate to cognitive and/or biological causes. The current study examined the happiness-age relationship across 29 European nations (N = 46,301) to explore whether it is moderated by national wealth, as indexed by Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita. It was found that eudaimonic and hedonic happiness remained relatively stable across the life span only in the most affluent nations; in poorer nations, there was either a fluctuating or steady age-associated decline. These findings challenge the cultural universality of the happiness-age relationship and suggest that models of how age relates to happiness should include the socioeconomic level of analysis. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Ameliorating Effect of Akebia quinata Fruit Extracts on Skin Aging Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoungwoo Shin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGEs in the skin plays a very important role in skin aging. Both are known to interact with each other. Therefore, natural compounds or extracts that possess both antioxidant and antiglycation activities might have great antiageing potential. Akebia quinata fruit extract (AQFE has been used to treat urinary tract inflammatory disease in traditional Korean and Chinese medicines. In the present study, AQFE was demonstrated to possess antioxidant and antiglycation activity. AQFE protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs from oxidative stress and inhibits cellular senescence induced by oxidative stress. We also found that AQFE inhibits glycation reaction between BSA and glucose. The antiglycation activity of AQFE was dose-dependent. In addition, the antiglycation activity of AQFE was confirmed in a human skin explant model. AQFE reduced CML expression and stimulated fibrillin-1 expression in comparison to the methyglyoxal treatment. In addition, the possibility of the extract as an anti-skin aging agent has also been clinically validated. Our analysis of the crow’s feet wrinkle showed that there was a decrease in the depth of deep furrows in RI treated with AQFE cream over an eight-week period. The overall results suggest that AQFE may work as an anti-skin aging agent by preventing oxidative stress and other complications associated with AGEs formation.

  3. PSEUDOAFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY ENRICHMENT OF GLYCATED PEPTIDES FOR MONITORING ADVANCED GLYCATION END PRODUCTS (AGES IN METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekar R. Prasanna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Glycation End (AGE products are produced due to diabetic progression and they are responsible for many complications in the diabetic disorder. The diabetic progression is measured, particularly following glycated hemoglobin using specific antibodies. However, the most abundant protein in blood, human serum albumin, is also found to be glycated which has a much shorter half life and gives information on short term glycemic control. In addition, glycated albumins are considered as markers of diabetic complications such as nephropathy, peripheral vascular calcification and also in Alzheimer’s disease. The glycation proceeds from the interaction between aldehyde group of sugar and the free amino group of the protein, resulting in the formation of Schiff’s base, which undergoes a series of modifications leading to generation of imidazoyl derivatives of amino acids known as Amadori rearrangement products. The imidazoyl derivatives from arginine and lysine are the most prominent modifications observed in proteins in the presence of reducing sugar and these imidazoyl derivatives have an affinity towards certain transition metal ions. Based on our earlier exhaustive work on trapping the histidine peptides using transition metal ion, Cu(II linked to imino-diacetate complex, we explored Cu(II immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC as a potential tool for specific detection of glycated peptides of human serum albumin. Our results clearly demonstrate that Cu(II IMAC is able to detect glycated peptides very efficiently while the non-glycated forms were not retained on the Cu (II column as confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. We further discuss the utility of IMAC technology to enrich the detection of AGE products in plasma. We anticipate that these studies may provide valuable information on understanding disease pathologies and the potential of AGE products as biomarkers of various diseases including neurodegenerative, renal and

  4. Brucellosis in cattle and micro-scale spatial variability of pastoral household income from dairy production in south western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, Pius Mbuya; Mugisha, Samuel; Leirs, Herwig; Basuta, Gilbert Isabirye; Van Damme, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Brucellosis in cattle and humans has received world-wide research attention as a neglected and re-emerging zoonotic disease with many routes of transmission. Studies of brucellosis in Uganda have emphasized occupational exposures and also revealed variations in prevalence levels by region and cattle production systems. To date, research linking pastoralist household income from dairy production to brucellosis and its transmission risk pathways do not exist in Uganda. We assessed whether spatial differences in unit milk prices can be explained by brucellosis prevalence in cattle along a distance gradient from Lake Mburo National Park in Uganda. Semi-structured interviews administered to 366 randomly selected household heads were supplemented with serological data on brucellosis in cattle. Statistical analysis included Pearson correlation test, multiple regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SPSS version 17. Serological results showed that 44% of cattle blood samples were sero-positive for brucellosis. The results obtained from interviews put the statistical mean of household reported cattle abortions at 5.39 (5.08-5.70 at 95% CI, n=366). Post-hoc analysis of variance revealed that both sero-positive cattle and reported cattle abortions significantly were much lower when moving outwards from the park boundary (pbrucellosis management practices at the nexus of wildlife and livestock in Uganda. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatially resolved modelling of the fission product behaviour in a HTR-core with spherical or prismatic fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xhonneux, Andre

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important aspects during the licensing procedure of nuclear facilities is the release of radioactive isotopes. The transport from the origin to the environment is called release chain. In the scope of this work, the spatially distributed fission product release from both spherical and prismatic fuel elements, the transport with the coolant as well as the deposition on reactor internals are simulated in detail. The fission product release codes which were developed at Forschungszentrum Juelich are analyzed, shortcomings are identified and resolved. On this basis, a consistent simulation module, named STACY, was developed, which contains all capabilities of the stand-alone codes and at the same time exceeds the methodology towards new aspects. The physics models were extended, for example to take the radial temperature profile within the fuel element and the realistic time-depending nuclide inventory into account. A central part of this work is the automated treatment of the release behavior of a representative number of fuel elements. This allows for a spatially resolved release calculation, where an individual release rate is calculated for each space region. The coupling with the depletion code Topological Nuclide Transmutation (TNT) allows for conducting an individual depletion calculation for each considered fuel element. It is shown, that the released inventory is representative for a certain number of fuel elements. By using this model, the fission product release is being studied for a reference plant (HTR-Modul). Both the releases from the equilibrium core as well as the release during a core heat-up after a fast depressurization accident are being studied. In comparison to former studies, the cumulative release of long-lived nuclides during the core heat-up phase is lower and the release of short-lived nuclides is about two times higher. The release calculation can also be conducted for prismatic fuel elements (e.g. those of the Japanese

  6. The economics of nuclear power plants as they age: Production (capacity factors), variable costs, and retirement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinze-Fry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines, using multiple regression analyses, production at nuclear power plants, the variable costs involved, and estimate to dismantle reactors. Variable costs generally follow U-shaped curves as reactors age. Performance is modelled with polynomial equations, using chiefly intercept, age and age .5 terms, interacting with various reactor characteristics, plus time and operating experience. US nuclear capacity factors (actual output/possible) averaged 60% for 13 of 15 years during 1971-1985. Output generally peaked during ages 3-12. Capacity factors were much lower, or aging was faster, for reactors that are-from the worst-non-light water types, prototypes, salt water cooled, expensive to build, large, and boiling water reactors (BWRs). Expected nuclear capacity factors average 56% and reactor lives average 30 years. Outside America, generally capacity factors are much higher and reactor aging is slower. Heavy water reactors perform best, gas cooled ones worst, and BWRs do as well as pressurized water reactors. Capital addition costs have risen fastest and were most affected by aging. Fuel costs were almost constant. Repairs and O and M led the 15.3% real annual increase in nuclear variable costs/kW during 1978-1984. Forecast variable costs rise more slowly. If owners retire reactors when variable costs exceed alternatives, the last reactor should close about 2010. Then expected future lifetime levelized real variable costs range, by reactor, from 2 to 8 cents/kWh, median 4.4 (twice 1983 levels). Expected reactor lives average 24 years. At closed reactors, owners estimate costs to dismantle averaging $760/kW (1985$), or 53% of construction cost. Analysis of owner opinions for all American reactors suggests actual costs may average $200/kW. Higher burial prices could increase that substantially

  7. Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs Antibody Protects Against AGEs-induced Apoptosis and NF-ĸB p65 Subunit Overexpression in Rat Glomerular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktavia Rahayu Adianingsih

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs have been thought to be a major cause of diabetic nephropathy (DN. The mechanisms underlying the involvement of AGEs antibody in diabetic nephropathy are not fully understood. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of AGEs antibody on AGEs-induced glomerular damage. Isolated glomeruli were pre-incubated either with 10 µg/mL polyclonal anti-AGEs antibody (AGE-pAb or monoclonal anti-Nɜ -carboxymethyl-lysine antibody (CML-mAb as a model of AGEs antibody to block interaction of AGEs with receptor for AGEs (RAGE and incubated afterwards either with 100 µg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA or AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA for 48 h. Annexin V/nephrin doublestaining was performed to determine apoptosis. Using immunofluorescence, we found that administration of AGE-BSA not only significantly increased glomerular cells apoptosis and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-ĸB p65 expression, but also reduced expression of nephrin, an important structural and signal molecule of podocytes slit diaphragm. Blocking the interaction of AGE-RAGE with AGEs antibody significantly protected glomerular cells from AGEs-induced apoptosis and NF-ĸB p65 overexpression. We found that AGE-pAb conferred superior protective effect compared with CmL-mAb for the same reduction in apoptosis and NF-ĸB p65 expression. In sharp contrast, CmL-mAb led to preserve expression of podocytes nephrin better than AGE-pAb. These results demonstrate that the antibody against AGEs may be beneficial for preventing the glomerular damage in DN.

  8. Spatial discrimination deficits as a function of mnemonic interference in aged adults with and without memory impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagh, Zachariah M.; Roberts, Jared M.; Ly, Maria; DiProspero, Natalie; Murray, Elizabeth; Yassa, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that aging is associated with declines in episodic memory. In recent years, an emphasis has emerged on the development of behavioral tasks and the identification of biomarkers that are predictive of cognitive decline in healthy as well as pathological aging. Here, we describe a memory task designed to assess the accuracy of discrimination ability for the locations of objects. Object locations were initially encoded incidentally, and appeared in a single space against a 5x7 grid. During retrieval, subjects viewed repeated object-location pairings, displacements of 1, 2, 3, or 4 grid spaces, and maximal corner-to-opposite-corner displacements. Subjects were tasked with judging objects in this second viewing as having retained their original location, or having moved. Performance on a task such as this is thought to rely on the capacity of the individual to perform hippocampus-mediated pattern separation. We report a performance deficit associated with a physically healthy aged group compared to young adults specific to trials with low mnemonic interference. Additionally, for aged adults, performance on the task was correlated with performance on the delayed recall portion of the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), a neuropsychological test sensitive to hippocampal dysfunction. In line with prior work, dividing the aged group into unimpaired and impaired subgroups based on RAVLT Delayed Recall scores yielded clearly distinguishable patterns of performance, with the former subgroup performing comparably to young adults, and the latter subgroup showing generally impaired memory performance even with minimal interference. This study builds on existing tasks used in the field, and contributes a novel paradigm for differentiation of healthy from possible pathological aging, and may thus provide an avenue for early detection of age-related cognitive decline. PMID:24167060

  9. Spatial discrimination deficits as a function of mnemonic interference in aged adults with and without memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagh, Zachariah M; Roberts, Jared M; Ly, Maria; DiProspero, Natalie; Murray, Elizabeth; Yassa, Michael A

    2014-03-01

    It is well established that aging is associated with declines in episodic memory. In recent years, an emphasis has emerged on the development of behavioral tasks and the identification of biomarkers that are predictive of cognitive decline in healthy as well as pathological aging. Here, we describe a memory task designed to assess the accuracy of discrimination ability for the locations of objects. Object locations were initially encoded incidentally, and appeared in a single space against a 5 × 7 grid. During retrieval, subjects viewed repeated object-location pairings, displacements of 1, 2, 3, or 4 grid spaces, and maximal corner-to-opposite-corner displacements. Subjects were tasked with judging objects in this second viewing as having retained their original location, or having moved. Performance on a task such as this is thought to rely on the capacity of the individual to perform hippocampus-mediated pattern separation. We report a performance deficit associated with a physically healthy aged group compared to young adults specific to trials with low mnemonic interference. Additionally, for aged adults, performance on the task was correlated with performance on the delayed recall portion of the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), a neuropsychological test sensitive to hippocampal dysfunction. In line with prior work, dividing the aged group into unimpaired and impaired subgroups based on RAVLT Delayed Recall scores yielded clearly distinguishable patterns of performance, with the former subgroup performing comparably to young adults, and the latter subgroup showing generally impaired memory performance even with minimal interference. This study builds on existing tasks used in the field, and contributes a novel paradigm for differentiation of healthy from possible pathological aging, and may thus provide an avenue for early detection of age-related cognitive decline. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Comparison of ease of swallowing of dietary supplement products for age-related eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherman, Donald P; Bayraktaroglu, Tolgar O; Garofalo, Renee J

    2004-01-01

    To examine patients' perceptions on the relative importance of the physical characteristics and appearance of dietary supplements, and to evaluate two supplements with the same combination of vitamins and minerals used in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) with respect to ease of swallowing and other features in elderly patients. A single-site, single-visit, crossover design, subject-masked comparison of two dietary supplements (ICaps AREDS Formula--Alcon; Ocuvite PreserVision-Bausch & Lomb). Ophthalmology practice. 50 patients aged 50 years or older. Patients ranked the importance of eight physical characteristics of a vitamin tablet or capsule (ease of swallowing, size, shape, color, smell, coating, texture, and taste) irrespective of the test products used in the study and then took both test products randomly and were asked to indicate which product they preferred based on the same eight characteristics. Overall patient preference and preference for swallowing two tablets at once. The highest rated (most important) characteristic in a vitamin supplement was ease of swallowing, with a median score of 9.0 on a 0-10 visual analogue scale. The characteristic of least importance was tablet color, with the lowest median score of 1.0. Statistically significant differences were detected between the products with regard to preferences for ease of swallowing, swallowing two tablets at once, size, and coating (P preferred the ICaps AREDS formula to Ocuvite PreserVision with respect to these characteristics and overall preference (P preferences. Based on the results of this study, ease of swallowing is the most important characteristic of dietary supplement tablets for elderly patients, followed by taste, size, and smell. Significant differences in preference exist between the study products, which contain similar formulations but have different physical characteristics.

  11. Evaluating spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China based on improved FORCCHN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfang Zhao

    Full Text Available An improved individual-based forest ecosystem carbon budget model for China (FORCCHN was applied to investigate the spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China. In this study, the forests of northeastern China were categorized into four ecological types according to their habitats and generic characteristics (evergreen broadleaf forest, deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest. The results showed that distribution and change of forest NPP in northeastern China were related to the different forest types. From 1981 to 2002, among the forest types in northeastern China, per unit area NPP and total NPP of deciduous broadleaf forest were the highest, with the values of 729.4 gC/(m(2•yr and 106.0 TgC/yr, respectively, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest, deciduous needleleaf forest and evergreen needleleaf forest. From 1981 to 2002, per unit area NPP and total NPP of different forest types in northeastern China exhibited significant trends of interannual increase, and rapid increase was found between the 1980s and 1990s. The contribution of the different forest type's NPP to total NPP in northeastern China was clearly different. The greatest was deciduous broadleaf forest, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest. The smallest was evergreen needleleaf forest. Spatial difference in NPP between different forest types was remarkable. High NPP values of deciduous needleleaf forest, mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous broadleaf forest were found in the Daxing'anling region, the southeastern of Xiaoxing'anling and Jilin province, and the Changbai Mountain, respectively. However, no regional differences were found for evergreen needleleaf NPP. This study provided not only an estimation NPP of different forest types in northeastern China but also a useful methodology for estimating forest

  12. Meat quality of "Galician Mountain" foals breed. Effect of sex, slaughter age and livestock production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Daniel; Rodríguez, Eva; Purriños, Laura; Crecente, Santiago; Bermúdez, Roberto; Lorenzo, José M

    2011-06-01

    The effects of sex, slaughter age (9 vs. 12 months) and livestock production system (freedom extensive system (FES) vs. semi extensive system (SES)) of "Galician Mountain" foals breed on meat quality from the Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle were investigated. Forty-two foals had been used for this study, 19 (11 females and 8 males) were reared in a semi extensive system and weaned three months prior to slaughtering (8 and 11 were slaughtered at 9 and 12 months, respectively) while the other 23 (11 females and 12 males) were reared together with its mothers in a system in freedom and were slaughtered at the age of 9 months. The obtained results showed that there were no significant differences between the sexes and the slaughter age whereas the livestock production system was a significant variation source on intramuscular fat content and meat tenderness because SES foals showed 51.6% more of IMF and the improved meat tenderness achieved a shear force of lean meat (20.5%) and heme-iron (1.62 mg/100g meat) comparable to veal meat. Furthermore, the meat samples showed a higher luminosity (L*>40), a very good water holding capacity, measured by cooking losses (<18.3%), and a tenderness less than 4 kg. Thus, it can be classified as "very tender" meat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. School-aged children's production of /s/ and /r/ consonant clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; Arciuli, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    To describe the acquisition of /s/ and /r/ word-initial consonant clusters across 2 elicitation modalities. Seventy-four typically developing children aged 5-12 years produced 2- and 3-element /s/ and /r/ consonant clusters in word-initial position. Stimuli were presented pictorially and as written words in separate trials. Overall, 94.5% of the consonant clusters were produced correctly. Two-element /r/ clusters were 94.0% correct, 2-element /s/ clusters were 96.8% correct, and 3-element clusters were 92.0% correct. The age of acquisition was typically younger than established by previous researchers. The characteristic non-adult production of /s/ consonant clusters was the substitution of /s/ with interdental or lateral phonemes, and of /r/ consonant clusters the substitution of /r/ with [w]. The last consonant clusters to be mastered were: /thetar/ (thr), /str/, /spr/ and /skr/. There were no significant differences in error rates across the modalities; although younger children required significantly more prompting when naming written words. Primary-school-aged children characteristically produced /s/ and /r/ consonant clusters correctly. The accuracy of production was not influenced by the elicitation modality. Elicitation using pictures compared with written words was more efficient for 5- to 8-year-olds. Both elicitation modes were equally efficient for 9- to 12-year-olds. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. The Success Rate in a Complicated Spatial Memory Test Is Determined by Age, Sex, Life History and Search Strategies in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda S; Kalliokoski, Otto; Sajuthi, Dondin

    2014-01-01

    of six identical opaque cups. Although the task was challenging for all subjects, generating a high level of guesswork, evidence of common behaviors when approaching the spatial memory test were found. The search patterns employed by the monkeys suggest the use of landmark cues, adaption in response...... to failure and chronological memory recall. These strategies appeared to be shared by most subjects, however, the overall success rate appeared to also depend on individual characteristics including age, gender and whether the subject had been born in caged captivity or not. By elucidating some...

  15. Age-related defects in spatial memory are correlated with defects in the late phase of hippocampal long-term potentiation in vitro and are attenuated by drugs that enhance the cAMP signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Bach, Mary Elizabeth; Barad, Mark; Son, Hyeon; Zhuo, Min; Lu, Yun-Fei; Shih, Robert; Mansuy, Isabelle; Hawkins, Robert D.; Kandel, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    To study the physiological and molecular mechanisms of age-related memory loss, we assessed spatial memory in C57BL/B6 mice from different age cohorts and then measured in vitro the late phase of hippocampal long-term potentiation (L-LTP). Most young mice acquired the spatial task, whereas only a minority of aged mice did. Aged mice not only made significantly more errors but also exhibited greater individual differences. Slices from the hippocampus of aged mice exhibited significantly reduce...

  16. Spatial pattern of mass loss processes across the Greenland Ice Sheet from the Little Ice Age to 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, K. H.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Kjeldsen, K. K.

    The Greenland Ice Sheet loses mass through surface meltwater runoff and discharge from marine terminating outlet glaciers. The spatial variability and magnitude of these processes have been studied and described in detail for the past decades. Here, we combine the mass loss between the LIA to 2010...... (ICESat) from 2003-2009, NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) from 2010, and ASTER (Silcast AST14DMO) co-registered to ICESat, to estimate mass loss throughout the 20th and early 21st Century. The mass balance estimates of the GrIS since retreat from maximum LIA is combined with a SMB model...... correspond to those that experienced considerable thinning throughout the 20th century. Consequently, comparing the 20th century thinning pattern to that of the last decade, and assuming a similar warming pattern, we argue that the present sensitivity distribution will hold also for future ice sheet mass...

  17. Unraveling the impact of workforce age diversity on labor productivity : The moderating role of firm size and job security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Meulenaere, Kim; Boone, Christophe; Buyl, T.P.L.

    Previous literature has suggested both positive and negative effects of age diversity on labor productivity: positive because of the potential knowledge complementarities between employees of different ages and negative because of the age-related value differences that might reduce cohesion and

  18. Role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and oxidative stress in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Ueda, Seiji; Matsui, Takanori; Nakamura, Kazuo; Okuda, Seiya

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common and potentially devastating microvascular complication in diabetes and is a leading cause of acquired blindness among the people of occupational age. However, current therapeutic options for the treatment of sight-threatening proliferative diabetic retinopathy such as photocoagulation and vitrectomy are limited by considerable side effects and far from satisfactory. Therefore, to develop novel therapeutic strategies that specifically target diabetic retinopathy is actually desired for most of the patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is a major initiator of diabetic retinopathy. However, recent clinical study has substantiated the concept of 'hyperglycemic memory' in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Indeed, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial-Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT-EDIC) Research, has revealed that the reduction in the risk of progressive retinopathy resulting from intensive therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes persisted for at least several years after the DCCT trial, despite increasing hyperglycemia. These findings suggest a long-term beneficial influence of early metabolic control on clinical outcomes in type 1 diabetic patients. Among various biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, the process of formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their mode of action are most compatible with the theory 'hyperglycemic memory'. Further, there is a growing body of evidence that AGEs-RAGE (receptor for AGEs) interaction-mediated oxidative stress generation plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy. This article summarizes the role of AGEs and oxidative stress in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy and the therapeutic interventions that could prevent this devastating disorder. We also discuss here the pathological crosstalk between the AGEs-RAGE and the renin-angiotensin system in

  19. Silver Entrepreneurship Agenda in Malaysia: A Proposed Model for Productive Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizzat Mohd Nasurdin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at proposing a framework for productive aging among those aged 45-plus or retiree via entrepreneurial initiatives, known as ‘silver entrepreneurs’. Evidence has shown that the number of Malaysians aged population is estimated to be more than 1.4 million and is projected to increase to 3.3 million in the year 2020 (Mafauzy, 2000. It is acknowledged that a group of these will comprise of professionals who are aged 45-plus and retirees with relevant industry experience as well as knowledge and well-established networks built up over their working careers which will enable them to effectively identify entrepreneurial opportunities and secure resources efficiently to exploit them. However, there is little research on and understanding of what drives these ‘silver entrepreneurs’, with most of the research, focussed on entrepreneurial ventures started by 18-35 year-olds.  This means that policy-makers are ill-equipped to develop specific measures that will assist retirees into a second or sunset career in entrepreneurship.  This research aims to bridge the gap by assessing the profile and motivations of silver entrepreneurs in Malaysia with a specific focus on understanding the internal and external factors that affect their intentions to start new ventures as well as factors that affect the success and growth of these ventures. 

  20. The Canine Sand Maze: An Appetitive Spatial Memory Paradigm Sensitive to Age-Related Change in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvin, Hannah E.; McGreevy, Paul D.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Valenzuela, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Aged dogs exhibit a spectrum of cognitive abilities including a syndrome similar to Alzheimer's disease. A major impediment to research so far has been the lack of a quick and accurate test of visuospatial memory appropriate for community-based animals. We therefore report on the development and validation of the Canine Sand Maze. A 4.5-m-diameter…

  1. Mechanisms underlying the production of false memories for famous people's names in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancher, Gaën; Guyard, Anne; Nicolas, Serge; Piolino, Pascale

    2009-10-01

    It is well known that the occurrence of false memories increases with aging, but the results remain inconsistent concerning Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, the mechanisms underlying the production of false memories are still unclear. Using an experimental episodic memory test with material based on the names of famous people in a procedure derived from the DRM paradigm [Roediger, H. L., III, & McDermott, K. B. (1995). Creating false memories: Remembering words not presented in lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 21, 803-814], we examined correct and false recall and recognition in 30 young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 30 patients with AD. Moreover, we evaluated the relationships between false memory performance, correct episodic memory performance, and a set of neuropsychological assessments evaluating the semantic memory and executive functions. The results clearly indicated that correct recall and recognition performance decreased with the subjects' age, but it decreased even more with AD. In addition, semantically related false recalls and false recognitions increased with age but not with dementia. On the contrary, non-semantically related false recalls and false recognitions increased with AD. Finally, the regression analyses showed that executive functions mediated related false memories and episodic memory mediated related and unrelated false memories in aging. Moreover, executive functions predicted related and unrelated false memories in AD, and episodic and semantic memory predicted semantically related and unrelated false memories in AD. In conclusion, the results obtained are consistent with the current constructive models of memory suggesting that false memory creation depends on different cognitive functions and, consequently, that the impairments of these functions influence the production of false memories.

  2. Study of {lambda} hyperon production in C+C collisions at 2 AGeV beam energy with the HADES spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaki, K.

    2007-03-15

    The HADES spectrometer is a high resolution detector installed at the SIS/GSI, Darmstadt. It was primarily designed for studying dielectron decay channels of vector mesons. However, its high accuracy capabilities make it an attractive tool for investigating other rare probes at these beam energies, like strange baryons. Development and investigation of Multiwire Drift Chambers for high spatial resolution have been provided. One of the early experimental runs of HADES was analyzed and the {lambda} hyperon signal was successfully reconstructed for the first time in C+C collisions at 2 AGeV beam kinetic energy. The total {lambda} production cross section is contrasted with expectations from simulations and compared with measurements of the {lambda} yield in heavier systems at the same energy. In addition, the result is considered in the context of strangeness balance and the relative strangeness content of the reaction products is determined. (orig.)

  3. Study of Λ hyperon production in C+C collisions at 2 AGeV beam energy with the HADES spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaki, K.

    2007-03-01

    The HADES spectrometer is a high resolution detector installed at the SIS/GSI, Darmstadt. It was primarily designed for studying dielectron decay channels of vector mesons. However, its high accuracy capabilities make it an attractive tool for investigating other rare probes at these beam energies, like strange baryons. Development and investigation of Multiwire Drift Chambers for high spatial resolution have been provided. One of the early experimental runs of HADES was analyzed and the Λ hyperon signal was successfully reconstructed for the first time in C+C collisions at 2 AGeV beam kinetic energy. The total Λ production cross section is contrasted with expectations from simulations and compared with measurements of the Λ yield in heavier systems at the same energy. In addition, the result is considered in the context of strangeness balance and the relative strangeness content of the reaction products is determined. (orig.)

  4. The spatial distribution of age-related white matter changes as a function of vascular risk factors--results from the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, E; Gouw, A A; Vrenken, H

    2012-01-01

    associations were found for age, gender and hypertension. Different distribution patterns were found for men and women. Further, increased probability was found in association with self-reported alcohol and tobacco consumption, as well as in those with a history of migraine. It is concluded that the location...... logistic regression, and validate the method using simulated datasets. The method was then applied in a total of 605 participants of the LADIS study (age 74 ± 5 years, all with WMH), and the location of manually delineated WMH was investigated after spatial normalisation. Particularly strong and widespread...... of WMH is dependent on the risk factors involved pointing towards a regionally different pathogenesis and/or vulnerability of the white matter....

  5. The low-AGE content of low-fat vegan diets could benefit diabetics - though concurrent taurine supplementation may be needed to minimize endogenous AGE production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2005-01-01

    Increased endogenous generation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) contributes importantly to the vascular complications of diabetes, in part owing to activation of the pro-inflammatory RAGE receptor. However, AGE-altered oligopeptides with RAGE-activating potential can also be absorbed from the diet, and indeed make a significant contribution to the plasma and tissue pool of AGEs; this contribution is especially prominent when compromised renal function impairs renal clearance of AGEs. Perhaps surprisingly, foods rich in both protein and fat, and cooked at high heat, tend to be the richest dietary sources of AGEs, whereas low-fat carbohydrate-rich foods tend to be relatively low in AGEs. Conceivably, this reflects the fact that the so-called "AGEs" in the diet are generated primarily, not by glycation reactions, but by interactions between oxidized lipids and protein; such reactions are known to give rise to certain prominent AGEs, such as epsilonN-carboxymethyl-lysine and methylglyoxal. Although roasted nuts and fried or broiled tofu are relatively high in AGEs, low-fat plant-derived foods, including boiled or baked beans, typically are low in AGEs. Thus, a low-AGE content may contribute to the many benefits conferred to diabetics by a genuinely low-fat vegan diet. Nonetheless, the plasma AGE content of healthy vegetarians has been reported to be higher than that of omnivores - suggesting that something about vegetarian diets may promote endogenous AGE production. Some researchers have proposed that the relatively high-fructose content of vegetarian diets may explain this phenomenon, but there so far is no clinical evidence that normal intakes of fructose have an important impact on AGE production. An alternative or additional possibility is that the relatively poor taurine status of vegetarians up-regulates the physiological role of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants in the generation of AGEs - in which case, taurine supplementation might be expected to

  6. Life-long environmental enrichment counteracts spatial learning, reference and working memory deficits in middle-aged rats subjected to perinatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Pablo; Blanco, Eduardo; Logica Tornatore, Tamara M A; Romero, Juan I; Holubiec, Mariana I; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Capani, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Continuous environmental stimulation induced by exposure to enriched environment (EE) has yielded cognitive benefits in different models of brain injury. Perinatal asphyxia results from a lack of oxygen supply to the fetus and is associated with long-lasting neurological deficits. However, the effects of EE in middle-aged rats suffering perinatal asphyxia are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether life-long exposure to EE could counteract the cognitive and behavioral alterations in middle-aged asphyctic rats. Experimental groups consisted of rats born vaginally (CTL), by cesarean section (C+), or by C+ following 19 min of asphyxia at birth (PA). At weaning, rats were assigned to standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE) for 18 months. During the last month of housing, animals were submitted to a behavioral test battery including Elevated Plus Maze, Open Field, Novel Object Recognition and Morris water maze (MWM). Results showed that middle-aged asphyctic rats, reared in SE, exhibited an impaired performance in the spatial reference and working memory versions of the MWM. EE was able to counteract these cognitive impairments. Moreover, EE improved the spatial learning performance of middle-aged CTL and C+ rats. On the other hand, all groups reared in SE did not differ in locomotor activity and anxiety levels, while EE reduced locomotion and anxiety, regardless of birth condition. Recognition memory was altered neither by birth condition nor by housing environment. These results support the importance of environmental stimulation across the lifespan to prevent cognitive deficits induced by perinatal asphyxia.

  7. Life-long environmental enrichment counteracts spatial learning, reference and working memory deficits in middle-aged rats subjected to perinatal asphyxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Pablo; Blanco, Eduardo; Logica Tornatore, Tamara M. A.; Romero, Juan I.; Holubiec, Mariana I.; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Capani, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Continuous environmental stimulation induced by exposure to enriched environment (EE) has yielded cognitive benefits in different models of brain injury. Perinatal asphyxia results from a lack of oxygen supply to the fetus and is associated with long-lasting neurological deficits. However, the effects of EE in middle-aged rats suffering perinatal asphyxia are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether life-long exposure to EE could counteract the cognitive and behavioral alterations in middle-aged asphyctic rats. Experimental groups consisted of rats born vaginally (CTL), by cesarean section (C+), or by C+ following 19 min of asphyxia at birth (PA). At weaning, rats were assigned to standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE) for 18 months. During the last month of housing, animals were submitted to a behavioral test battery including Elevated Plus Maze, Open Field, Novel Object Recognition and Morris water maze (MWM). Results showed that middle-aged asphyctic rats, reared in SE, exhibited an impaired performance in the spatial reference and working memory versions of the MWM. EE was able to counteract these cognitive impairments. Moreover, EE improved the spatial learning performance of middle-aged CTL and C+ rats. On the other hand, all groups reared in SE did not differ in locomotor activity and anxiety levels, while EE reduced locomotion and anxiety, regardless of birth condition. Recognition memory was altered neither by birth condition nor by housing environment. These results support the importance of environmental stimulation across the lifespan to prevent cognitive deficits induced by perinatal asphyxia. PMID:25601829

  8. Life-long environmental enrichment counteracts spatial learning, reference and working memory deficits in middle-aged rats subjected to perinatal asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo eGaleano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous environmental stimulation induced by exposure to enriched environment (EE has yielded cognitive benefits in different models of brain injury. Perinatal asphyxia results from a lack of oxygen supply to the fetus and is associated with long-lasting neurological deficits. However, the effects of EE in middle-aged rats suffering perinatal asphyxia are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether life-long exposure to EE could counteract the cognitive and behavioral alterations in middle-aged asphyctic rats. Experimental groups consisted of rats born vaginally (CTL, by cesarean section (C+, or by C+ following 19 min of asphyxia at birth (PA. At weaning, rats were assigned to standard (SE or enriched environment (EE for 18 months. During the last month of housing, animals were submitted to a behavioral test battery including Elevated Plus Maze, Open Field, Novel Object Recognition and Morris water maze (MWM. Results showed that middle-aged asphyctic rats, reared in SE, exhibited an impaired performance in the spatial reference and working memory versions of the MWM. EE was able to counteract these cognitive impairments. Moreover, EE improved the spatial learning performance of middle-aged CTL and C+ rats. On the other hand, all groups reared in SE did not differ in locomotor activity and anxiety levels, while EE reduced locomotion and anxiety, regardless of birth condition. Recognition memory was altered neither by birth condition nor by housing environment. These results support the importance of environmental stimulation across the lifespan to prevent cognitive deficits induced by perinatal asphyxia.

  9. An application of the spatial equilibrium model to soybean production in tocantins and neighboring states in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Clara Barraza De La Cruz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the production chain of soybeans in Brazil a sizable part of the corresponding cost structure is the result of logistics costs. Given the location of its production sites, distant from the ocean, the optimization of the transportation costs is essential for preserving competitiveness. Using nonlinear programming, this study proposes a spatial multimodal and temporal equilibrium model. The applicability of the model is tested with a case study regarding the exports of the soybeans produced in three states in the northern part of the Brazilian cerrado region. In the state of Tocantins, the effects of infrastructure investments in the competitiveness of the production are described through four proposed scenarios, while the basic scenario compares the three states. The data are treated using the GAMS/MINOS program. The study asserts that soybean production will be more competitive if warehousing facilities are used extensively and when the project hydroway becomes operational.Na cadeia de produção da soja no Brasil, parte substancial da estrutura correspondente dos custos é resultado dos custos logísticos. Dada a localização das áreas produtivas, distante do oceano, a otimização dos custos de transporte é essencial para garantir a competitividade. Usando programação não-linear, este estudo propõe um modelo de equilíbrio espacial temporal e multimodal. A aplicabilidade do modelo proposto é testada com um estudo de caso referente às exportações de soja produzida em três estados na parte norte do cerrado brasileiro. No estado de Tocantins, o efeito na competitividade de investimentos na infraestrutura de transporte estão descritos por meio de quatro cenários, enquanto que os três estados são comparados pelo cenário básico. Os dados são tratados usando o programa GAMS/MINOS. O estudo assegura que a produção de soja nesses estados será mais competitiva se armazéns forem usados mais extensamente e quando o projeto

  10. The Products of Research on Spatial Planning and Urban Development. An inquiry into the recent Italian planning literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zanon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, recent University reforms, a research quality assessment exercise, and the selection of academics by means of innovative procedures are all accelerating the discussion on the specificity ofresearch on spatial planning and urban design. One first step was a discussion on the quality of the journals in which planners and urban designers customarily publish, but there is an urgent need for a more general debate on what kind of research is expected to be developed, and what ‘research products’ must be delivered. This also relates to the structure itself of the discipline (such as its focus, and the specific methods used, the way academics are trained (Ph.D. programmes, inparticular, how they participate in the national and international debate, as well as how they are selected, the way research is supported financially, and finally, the connections between scholarship and practical (including professional activities. Following a review of the international debate on which an analytical framework has been developed, this paper analyses what is considered by Italian academia to be ‘research product’, on the basis of articles published in key Italian journals. The goal is not to pass judgment on each contribution, but to develop a classification of content, methods and results of what is put forward as – or should be – the product of research.

  11. Trade-offs and spatial dependency of rice production and environmental consequences at community level in Southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Liu, Zhong; Wang, Lihua; Wan, Haibo; Jing, Changwei; Jiang, Jingang; Wu, Jiaping; Qi, Jiaguo

    2018-02-01

    Over the past three decades, farmers in China have increasingly used fertilizers to increase paddy rice production. While this approach has eased the rising demand for food, it is unclear whether it pays off in the long-run when costs associated with environmental consequences are considered. Using two case studies in Zhejiang Province, China, this paper analyzed field-based rice yields, fertilizer inputs, nitrogen leaching and greenhouse emissions and their socioeconomic values of different farm practices. The objective was to assess the trade-offs among economic gains from increased yield and environmental consequences of different paddy rice management practices. The results indicated short-term economic gains to farmers outweigh the environmental cost concerns. However, considering the lasting environmental effects, there is a significant imbalance toward a conservative farming practice. The results further indicated that synergies can be achieved if precision management practices are adopted. It was also indicated that a large spatial variation exists in yields and environmental impacts, suggesting ‘one-size fits all’ policies will likely be ineffective in reducing environmental impacts. Although only two case studies were demonstrated in this study, the approach may be generalized to other geographic regions to help guide paddy farmers in similar climatic and land use environments such as those in the subtropical regions of Southeast Asia, to achieve synergic environment practices.

  12. Prosody Perception and Production in Children with Hearing Loss and Age- and Gender-Matched Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathottukaren, Rose Thomas; Purdy, Suzanne C; Ballard, Elaine

    2017-04-01

    Auditory development in children with hearing loss, including the perception of prosody, depends on having adequate input from cochlear implants and/or hearing aids. Lack of adequate auditory stimulation can lead to delayed speech and language development. Nevertheless, prosody perception and production in people with hearing loss have received less attention than other aspects of language. The perception of auditory information conveyed through prosody using variations in the pitch, amplitude, and duration of speech is not usually evaluated clinically. This study (1) compared prosody perception and production abilities in children with hearing loss and children with normal hearing; and (2) investigated the effect of age, hearing level, and musicality on prosody perception. Participants were 16 children with hearing loss and 16 typically developing controls matched for age and gender. Fifteen of the children with hearing loss were tested while using amplification (n = 9 hearing aids, n = 6 cochlear implants). Six receptive subtests of the Profiling Elements of Prosody in Speech-Communication (PEPS-C), the Child Paralanguage subtest of Diagnostic Analysis of Nonverbal Accuracy 2 (DANVA 2), and Contour and Interval subtests of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) were used. Audio recordings of the children's reading samples were rated using a perceptual prosody rating scale by nine experienced listeners who were blinded to the children's hearing status. Thirty two children, 16 with hearing loss (mean age = 8.71 yr) and 16 age- and gender-matched typically developing children with normal hearing (mean age = 8.87 yr). Assessments were completed in one session lasting 1-2 hours in a quiet room. Test items were presented using a laptop computer through loudspeaker at a comfortable listening level. For children with hearing loss using hearing instruments, all tests were completed with hearing devices set at their everyday listening setting. All PEPS

  13. Evolution of Ni3X Precipitation Kinetics, Morphology and Spatial Correlations in Binary Ni-X Alloys Aged Under Externally Applied Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardell, Alan J

    2006-02-07

    Coarsening of Ni3Al, Ni3Ga, Ni3Ge and Ni3Si precipitates in aged binary single-crystal Ni-Al, Ni-Ga, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si alloys under applied compressive stress was measured experimentally over the temperature range 600 to 700 °C. Experiments were also performed on binary Ni-Al single crystals deformed in tension at 640°C. The orientation of the crystals was [100] in all the experiments. Compared to the kinetics of coarsening in unstressed alloys, coarsening was slightly slower in specimens aged under compression and slightly faster in specimens aged in tension. The effect of applied stress on morphology and spatial correlation was also measured and found to be small. Ni3Al precipitates of a given size generally tended to become more non-equiaxed and their interfaces more planar, with increasing compressive stress. Ni3Ge precipitates behaved differently, becoming more spherical in specimens aged under compression. The effect of applied stress on kinetics is attributed to the influence of elastic deformation on diffusion. A model was developed that predicts slightly slower diffusion under compression and slightly faster diffusion in tension. The elastic constants of single crystals of Ni-Al, Ni-Si, Ni-Ga and Ni-Ge solid solutions were measured from room temperature to about 1100 K using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

  14. Fast food and obesity: a spatial analysis in a large United Kingdom population of children aged 13-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Lorna K; Clarke, Graham P; Cade, Janet E; Edwards, Kimberly L

    2012-05-01

    The childhood obesity epidemic is a current public health priority in many countries, and the consumption of fast food has been associated with obesity. This study aims to assess the relationship between fast-food consumption and obesity as well as the relationship between fast-food outlet access and consumption in a cohort of United Kingdom teenagers. A weighted accessibility score of the number of fast-food outlets within a 1-km network buffer of the participant's residence at age 13 years was calculated. Geographically weighted regression was used to assess the relationships between fast-food consumption at age 13 years and weight status at ages 13 and 15 years, and separately between fast-food accessibility and consumption. Data were collected from 2004 to 2008. The consumption of fast food was associated with a higher BMI SD score (β=0.08, 95% CI=0.03, 0.14); higher body fat percentage (β=2.06, 95% CI=1.33, 2.79); and increased odds of being obese (OR=1.23, 95% CI=1.02, 1.49). All these relationships were stationary and did not vary over space in the study area. The relationship between the accessibility of outlets and consumption did vary over space, with some areas (more rural areas) showing that increased accessibility was associated with consumption, whereas in some urban areas increased accessibility was associated with lack of consumption. There is continued need for nutritional education regarding fast food, but public health interventions that place restrictions on the location of fast-food outlets may not uniformly decrease consumption. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. How are academic age, productivity and collaboration related to citing behavior of researchers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staša Milojević

    Full Text Available References are an essential component of research articles and therefore of scientific communication. In this study we investigate referencing (citing behavior in five diverse fields (astronomy, mathematics, robotics, ecology and economics based on 213,756 core journal articles. At the macro level we find: (a a steady increase in the number of references per article over the period studied (50 years, which in some fields is due to a higher rate of usage, while in others reflects longer articles and (b an increase in all fields in the fraction of older, foundational references since the 1980s, with no obvious change in citing patterns associated with the introduction of the Internet. At the meso level we explore current (2006-2010 referencing behavior of different categories of authors (21,562 total within each field, based on their academic age, productivity and collaborative practices. Contrary to some previous findings and expectations we find that senior researchers use references at the same rate as their junior colleagues, with similar rates of re-citation (use of same references in multiple papers. High Modified Price Index (MPI, which measures the speed of the research front more accurately than the traditional Price Index of senior authors indicates that their research has the similar cutting-edge aspect as that of their younger colleagues. In all fields both the productive researchers and especially those who collaborate more use a significantly lower fraction of foundational references and have much higher MPI and lower re-citation rates, i.e., they are the ones pushing the research front regardless of researcher age. This paper introduces improved bibliometric methods to measure the speed of the research front, disambiguate lead authors in co-authored papers and decouple measures of productivity and collaboration.

  16. How are academic age, productivity and collaboration related to citing behavior of researchers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojević, Staša

    2012-01-01

    References are an essential component of research articles and therefore of scientific communication. In this study we investigate referencing (citing) behavior in five diverse fields (astronomy, mathematics, robotics, ecology and economics) based on 213,756 core journal articles. At the macro level we find: (a) a steady increase in the number of references per article over the period studied (50 years), which in some fields is due to a higher rate of usage, while in others reflects longer articles and (b) an increase in all fields in the fraction of older, foundational references since the 1980s, with no obvious change in citing patterns associated with the introduction of the Internet. At the meso level we explore current (2006-2010) referencing behavior of different categories of authors (21,562 total) within each field, based on their academic age, productivity and collaborative practices. Contrary to some previous findings and expectations we find that senior researchers use references at the same rate as their junior colleagues, with similar rates of re-citation (use of same references in multiple papers). High Modified Price Index (MPI, which measures the speed of the research front more accurately than the traditional Price Index) of senior authors indicates that their research has the similar cutting-edge aspect as that of their younger colleagues. In all fields both the productive researchers and especially those who collaborate more use a significantly lower fraction of foundational references and have much higher MPI and lower re-citation rates, i.e., they are the ones pushing the research front regardless of researcher age. This paper introduces improved bibliometric methods to measure the speed of the research front, disambiguate lead authors in co-authored papers and decouple measures of productivity and collaboration.

  17. Declining forest productivity in aging forest stands: a modeling analysis of alternative hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, Danuse; McMurtrie, Ross E.; Ryan, Michael G.

    1996-01-01

    Several explanations have been advanced to account for the decline in forest net primary productivity (NPP) with age in closed-canopy stands including the hypotheses that: (1) sapwood maintenance respiration rate increases, reducing the availability of carbon to support new growth; (2) stomatal conductance and hence photosynthetic efficiency decline; and (3) soil nutrient availability declines. To evaluate these hypotheses we applied the ecosystem model G'DAY to a 40- and a 245-year-old stand of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.), growing on infertile soils. Net primary productivity estimated from biomass data was 0.47 and 0.25 kg C m(-2) year(-1) and foliar nitrogen/carbon ratio (N/C) was 0.0175 and 0.017 for the 40- and 245-year-old stands, respectively. Productivities of the young and old stands were derived from a graphical analysis of the G'DAY model. The graphical analysis also indicated that the observed age-related decline in NPP can be explained in terms of interacting processes associated with Hypotheses 2 and 3. However, the relative importance of these two hypotheses differed depending on key model assumptions, in particular those relating to variation in soil N/C ratio. Thus, if we assumed that soil N/C ratio can vary significantly during stand development, then Hypotheses 2 and 3 jointly explain the decline in NPP, whereas if we assumed that soil N/C ratios are constant, then Hypothesis 3 alone explains the decline in NPP. The analysis revealed that only a small fraction of the decline of NPP can be explained in terms of increasing sapwood respiration.

  18. Sensitivity analysis in a life cycle assessment of an aged red wine production from Catalonia, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneses, M., E-mail: montse.meneses@uab.cat [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Systems Engineering and Telecomunication Department, ESE, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Torres, C.M.; Castells, F. [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Departament d' Enginyeria Química, Environmental Analysis and Management Group, AGA, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    Sustainability in agriculture and food processing is an issue with a clear growing interest; especially in products were consumers have particular awareness regarding its environmental profile. This is the case of wine industry depending on grape production, winemaking and bottling. Also viticulture and generally agricultural production is significantly affected by climate variations. The aim of this article is to determine the environmental load of an aged red wine from a winery in Catalonia, Spain, over its entire life cycle, including sensitivity analysis of the main parameters related to the cultivation, vinification and bottling. The life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used for the environmental analysis. In a first step, life cycle inventory (LCI) data were collected by questionnaires and interviews with the winemaker, all data are actual operating data and all the stages involved in the production have been taken into account (viticulture, vinification, bottling and the disposal subsystem). Data were then used to determine the environmental profile by a life cycle impact assessment using the ReCiPe method. Annual variability in environmental performance, stresses the importance of including timeline analysis in the wine sector. Because of that this study is accompanied with a sensitivity analysis carried out by a Monte Carlo simulation that takes into account the uncertainty and variability of the parameters used. In this manner, the results are presented with confidence intervals to provide a wider view of the environmental issues derived from the activities of the studied wine estate regardless of the eventualities of a specific harvesting year. Since the beverage packaging has an important influence in this case, a dataset for the production of green glass was adapted to reflect the actual recycling situation in Spain. Furthermore, a hypothetical variation of the glass-recycling rate in the glass production completes this article, as a key variable

  19. Sensitivity analysis in a life cycle assessment of an aged red wine production from Catalonia, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, M.; Torres, C.M.; Castells, F.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability in agriculture and food processing is an issue with a clear growing interest; especially in products were consumers have particular awareness regarding its environmental profile. This is the case of wine industry depending on grape production, winemaking and bottling. Also viticulture and generally agricultural production is significantly affected by climate variations. The aim of this article is to determine the environmental load of an aged red wine from a winery in Catalonia, Spain, over its entire life cycle, including sensitivity analysis of the main parameters related to the cultivation, vinification and bottling. The life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used for the environmental analysis. In a first step, life cycle inventory (LCI) data were collected by questionnaires and interviews with the winemaker, all data are actual operating data and all the stages involved in the production have been taken into account (viticulture, vinification, bottling and the disposal subsystem). Data were then used to determine the environmental profile by a life cycle impact assessment using the ReCiPe method. Annual variability in environmental performance, stresses the importance of including timeline analysis in the wine sector. Because of that this study is accompanied with a sensitivity analysis carried out by a Monte Carlo simulation that takes into account the uncertainty and variability of the parameters used. In this manner, the results are presented with confidence intervals to provide a wider view of the environmental issues derived from the activities of the studied wine estate regardless of the eventualities of a specific harvesting year. Since the beverage packaging has an important influence in this case, a dataset for the production of green glass was adapted to reflect the actual recycling situation in Spain. Furthermore, a hypothetical variation of the glass-recycling rate in the glass production completes this article, as a key variable

  20. The biological waste product formation in the light of the membrane hypothesis of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zs-Nagy, Imre

    2002-01-01

    The membrane hypothesis of aging (MHA) explains the biological waste product (lipofuscin) formation as a disbalance between the rates of protein synthesis and damage, as well as of elimination of the damaged components. Although, this concept has not been refuted on the basis of any experimental evidence, it has neither been widely accepted. During the last decade the general interest has turned toward the molecular genetics so intensely, that research aimed at clarifying cell biological mechanisms became so to say hibernated. Nowadays it is being recognized more and more that after the complete description of the human genetic code, attention has to be dedicated again to the cellular mechanisms explaining the function of the gene products (proteins). In this context, our experimental findings described during the recent years may become again the subject of interest. We have shown that the in vivo inhibition of the lysosomal thiol-proteinase functions by sublethal doses of leupeptin in young, adult and old mice results in a considerable increase (about 30%) of the immobile fraction of membrane proteins in hepatocyte plasma membrane, meanwhile the lateral diffusion constant of the still mobile membrane proteins increased. These observations were interpreted as signs of a general slowing down of protein turnover in the plasma membrane, just by inhibiting the elimination mechanisms in the lysosomes. This paper will discuss the theoretical conclusions and significance of these findings for the biological waste product formation, as a basic cell biological function.

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and aging: Effects on spatial learning and memory after sleep deprivation in Octodon degus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, C; Fernández-Gómez, F J; López, D; Gonzalez-Cuello, A; Tunez, I; Toledo, F; Blin, O; Bordet, R; Richardson, J C; Fernandez-Villalba, E; Herrero, M T

    2015-11-01

    The benefits of neuromodulatory procedures as a possible therapeutic application for cognitive rehabilitation have increased with the progress made in non-invasive modes of brain stimulation in aged-related disorders. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method used to examine multiple facets of the human brain and to ameliorate the impairment in cognition caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to evaluate how a chronic TMS treatment could improve learning and memory functions after sleep deprivation (SD) in old Octodon degus. SD was executed by gently handling to keep the animals awake throughout the night. Thirty young and twenty-four old O. degus females were divided in six groups (control, acute and chronic TMS treatment). Behavioral tests included; Radial Arm Maze (RAM), Barnes Maze (BM) and Novel Object Recognition (NOR). Although learning and memory functions improved in young animals with only one session of TMS treatment, a significant improvement in cognitive performance was seen in old animals after 4 and 7days of TMS, depending on the task that was performed. No side effects were observed following, which showed therapeutic potential for improving age-related cognitive performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Research note: Mapping spatial patterns in sewer age, material, and proximity to surface waterways to infer sewer leakage hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Kristina G.; Bain, Daniel J.

    2018-01-01

    Identifying areas where deteriorating sewer infrastructure is in close proximity to surface waterways is needed to map likely connections between sewers and streams. We present a method to estimate sewer installation year and deterioration status using historical maps of the sewer network, parcel-scale property assessment data, and pipe material. Areas where streams were likely buried into the sewer system were mapped by intersecting the historical stream network derived from a 10-m resolution digital elevation model with sewer pipe locations. Potential sewer leakage hotspots were mapped by identifying where aging sewer pipes are in close proximity (50-m) to surface waterways. Results from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA), indicated 41% of the historical stream length was lost or buried and the potential interface between sewers and streams is great. The co-location of aging sewer infrastructure (>75 years old) near stream channels suggests that 42% of existing streams are located in areas with a high potential for sewer leakage if sewer infrastructure fails. Mapping the sewer-stream interface provides an approach to better understand areas were failing sewers may contribute a disproportional amount of nutrients and other pathogens to surface waterways.

  3. Biological production and spatial variation of dimethylated sulfur compounds and their relation with plankton in the North Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Xuan; Yang, Gui-Peng; Wang, Bao-Dong

    2015-07-01

    The concentrations of dimethylated sulfur compounds and chlorophyll a, as well as biological production and consumption rates of dimethylsulfide (DMS), were measured in the surface water of the North Yellow Sea (NYS, 37-40°N to 121-124°E) in winter 2007. Surface DMS, dissolved and particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPd and DMSPp) concentrations in the study area increased significantly from offshore to inshore sites, with the average values of 2.00, 4.52 and 7.21 nM, respectively. The biological production and consumption rates of DMS were estimated, with the average values of 5.41 and 3.84 nM d-1, respectively. The spatial variation of chlorophyll a was consistent with that of DMS and DMSP, as well as with that of DMS biological production, suggesting that phytoplankton biomass might play an important role in controlling the distribution of DMS and DMSP in the study area. According to the collective data of dimethylated sulfur compounds and DMS biological conversion in China Seas, the dimethylated sulfur compounds concentrations in the NYS during winter were a factor of 2 and 1.3 higher than those in the East China Sea and South China Sea, respectively. Less DMS (DMSP) in NYS was released in winter than that in spring and summer, which could be attributed to the shift in phytoplankton community composition dominated by diatoms to non-diatoms from winter to summer. Quantitative comparison analysis pointed to DMSPp rather than DMSPd as an important precursor of DMS in the surface water. The estimated sea-to-air fluxes of DMS using Liss and Merlivat (LM86), Wanninkhof (W92) and Nightingale (N2000) formulae were 2.72, 5.12 and 4.28 μmol m-2 d-1, respectively. In the surface water, the biological turnover time of DMS varied from 0.21 to 1.73 d with an average of 0.83 d, which was about 5.43-fold faster than the mean DMS sea-air turnover time (3.12 d), implying that microbial consumption was a main sink of DMS in the surface water.

  4. A synthesis of terrestrial mercury in the western United States: Spatial distribution defined by land cover and plant productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrist, Daniel; Pearson, Christopher; Webster, Jackson; Kane, Tyler J.; Lin, Che-Jen; Aiken, George R.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    A synthesis of published vegetation mercury (Hg) data across 11 contiguous states in the western United States showed that aboveground biomass concentrations followed the order: leaves (26 μg kg− 1) ~ branches (26 μg kg− 1) > bark (16 μg kg− 1) > bole wood (1 μg kg− 1). No spatial trends of Hg in aboveground biomass distribution were detected, which likely is due to very sparse data coverage and different sampling protocols. Vegetation data are largely lacking for important functional vegetation types such as shrubs, herbaceous species, and grasses.Soil concentrations collected from the published literature were high in the western United States, with 12% of observations exceeding 100 μg kg− 1, reflecting a bias toward investigations in Hg-enriched sites. In contrast, soil Hg concentrations from a randomly distributed data set (1911 sampling points; Smith et al., 2013a) averaged 24 μg kg− 1 (A-horizon) and 22 μg kg− 1 (C-horizon), and only 2.6% of data exceeded 100 μg kg− 1. Soil Hg concentrations significantly differed among land covers, following the order: forested upland > planted/cultivated > herbaceous upland/shrubland > barren soils. Concentrations in forests were on average 2.5 times higher than in barren locations. Principal component analyses showed that soil Hg concentrations were not or weakly related to modeled dry and wet Hg deposition and proximity to mining, geothermal areas, and coal-fired power plants. Soil Hg distribution also was not closely related to other trace metals, but strongly associated with organic carbon, precipitation, canopy greenness, and foliar Hg pools of overlying vegetation. These patterns indicate that soil Hg concentrations are related to atmospheric deposition and reflect an overwhelming influence of plant productivity — driven by water availability — with productive landscapes showing high soil Hg accumulation and unproductive barren soils and shrublands

  5. Inhibition of Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs Accumulation by Pyridoxamine Modulates Glomerular and Mesangial Cell Estrogen Receptor α Expression in Aged Female Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pereira-Simon

    Full Text Available Age-related increases in oxidant stress (OS play a role in regulation of estrogen receptor (ER expression in the kidneys. In this study, we establish that in vivo 17β-estradiol (E2 replacement can no longer upregulate glomerular ER expression by 21 months of age in female mice (anestrous. We hypothesized that advanced glycation end product (AGE accumulation, an important source of oxidant stress, contributes to these glomerular ER expression alterations. We treated 19-month old ovariectomized female mice with pyridoxamine (Pyr, a potent AGE inhibitor, in the presence or absence of E2 replacement. Glomerular ERα mRNA expression was upregulated in mice treated with both Pyr and E2 replacement and TGFβ mRNA expression decreased compared to controls. Histological sections of kidneys demonstrated decreased type IV collagen deposition in mice receiving Pyr and E2 compared to placebo control mice. In addition, anti-AGE defenses Sirtuin1 (SIRT1 and advanced glycation receptor 1 (AGER1 were also upregulated in glomeruli following treatment with Pyr and E2. Mesangial cells isolated from all groups of mice demonstrated similar ERα, SIRT1, and AGER1 expression changes to those of whole glomeruli. To demonstrate that AGE accumulation contributes to the observed age-related changes in the glomeruli of aged female mice, we treated mesangial cells from young female mice with AGE-BSA and found similar downregulation of ERα, SIRT1, and AGER1 expression. These results suggest that inhibition of intracellular AGE accumulation with pyridoxamine may protect glomeruli against age-related oxidant stress by preventing an increase of TGFβ production and by regulation of the estrogen receptor.

  6. D-Galactose High-Dose Administration Failed to Induce Accelerated Aging Changes in Neurogenesis, Anxiety, and Spatial Memory on Young Male Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Armando; Magano, Sara; Marrana, Francisco; Andrade, José P

    2015-12-01

    The model of accelerated senescence with the prolonged administration of d-galactose is used in anti-aging studies because it mimics several aging-associated alterations such as increase of oxidative stress and decline of cognition. However, there is no standardized protocol for this aging model, and recently some reports have questioned its effectiveness. To clarify this issue, we used a model of high-dose d-galactose on 1-month-old male Wistar rats and studied the hippocampus, one of the most affected brain regions. In one group (n = 10), d-galactose was daily administered intraperitoneally (300 mg/kg) during 8 weeks whereas age-matched controls (n = 10) were injected intraperitoneally with saline. A third group (n = 10) was treated with the same dose of d-galactose and with oral epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (2 grams/L), a green tea catechin with anti-oxidant and neuroprotective properties. After treatments, animals were submitted to open-field, elevated plus-maze and Morris water maze tests, and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus subgranular layer was quantified. There were no significant alterations when the three groups were compared in the number of doublecortin- and Ki-67-immunoreactive cells, and also on anxiety levels, spatial learning, and memory. Therefore, d-galactose was not effective in the induction of accelerated aging, and EGCG administered to d-galactose-treated animals did not improve behavior and had no effects on neurogenesis. We conclude that daily 300 mg/kg of d-galactose administered intraperitoneally may not be a suitable model for inducing age-related neurobehavioral alterations in young male Wistar rats. More studies are necessary to obtain a reliable and reproducible model of accelerated senescence in rodents using d-galactose.

  7. A comparison of average wages with age-specific wages for assessing indirect productivity losses: analytic simplicity versus analytic precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Mark P; Tashjian, Cole; Kotsopoulos, Nikolaos; Bhatt, Aomesh; Postma, Maarten J

    2017-07-01

    Numerous approaches are used to estimate indirect productivity losses using various wage estimates applied to poor health in working aged adults. Considering the different wage estimation approaches observed in the published literature, we sought to assess variation in productivity loss estimates when using average wages compared with age-specific wages. Published estimates for average and age-specific wages for combined male/female wages were obtained from the UK Office of National Statistics. A polynomial interpolation was used to convert 5-year age-banded wage data into annual age-specific wages estimates. To compare indirect cost estimates, average wages and age-specific wages were used to project productivity losses at various stages of life based on the human capital approach. Discount rates of 0, 3, and 6 % were applied to projected age-specific and average wage losses. Using average wages was found to overestimate lifetime wages in conditions afflicting those aged 1-27 and 57-67, while underestimating lifetime wages in those aged 27-57. The difference was most significant for children where average wage overestimated wages by 15 % and for 40-year-olds where it underestimated wages by 14 %. Large differences in projecting productivity losses exist when using the average wage applied over a lifetime. Specifically, use of average wages overestimates productivity losses between 8 and 15 % for childhood illnesses. Furthermore, during prime working years, use of average wages will underestimate productivity losses by 14 %. We suggest that to achieve more precise estimates of productivity losses, age-specific wages should become the standard analytic approach.

  8. Beef production potential of Norwegian Red and Holstein-Friesian bulls slaughtered at two ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, R M; Patterson, D C; Keady, T W J; Moss, B W; Steen, R W J

    2007-11-01

    There is a paucity of data on the beef production potential of Norwegian Red (NOR) compared with 'modern' Holstein-Friesian (HF) cattle. The present study used a total of 64 bulls in a 2 × 2 factorial design study encompassing two breeds (HF and NOR) and two slaughter ages (485; E, and 610; L, days). The mean initial age and live weight of the HF bulls were 179 (s.d. 47.1) days and 203 (s.d. 64.0) kg, while the corresponding data for the NOR bulls were 176 (s.d. 39.7) days and 185 (s.d. 63.6) kg, respectively. Bulls were offered a 50 : 50 mixture (dry matter (DM) basis) of grass silage and concentrates. No breed × slaughter group interactions were recorded for any parameters evaluated (P > 0.05). HF bulls had higher (P 0.05). NOR bulls had higher (P 0.05) on carcass fat classification, depth of subcutaneous fat, marbling score or on the weight of fat in the internal depots. Daily food intakes did not differ (P > 0.05) across the two slaughter age groups, though efficiency of conversion of food to carcass gain was poorer (P 0.05) between the E and L bulls. Increasing age at slaughter increased (P 0.05) on the carcass conformation score. Instrumental measures of meat quality indicated that meat from NOR bulls was tougher (P < 0.01) than meat from HF bulls, while delaying slaughter increased (P < 0.001) a* and C*ab, and decreased (P < 0.01) h0, indicating improved redness. It is concluded that NOR bulls have higher food efficiency and produce more highly conformed carcasses than HF bulls, but HF bulls produce more tender meat.

  9. RESEARCH ON THE CORRELATION BETWEEN THE AGE AT THE FIRST CALVING AND MILK PRODUCTION CHARACTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha POPESCU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to present the genetic determinism of milk yield traits and age at first calving using a number of 2,237 half sibs, offspring of 989 Friesian bulls and raised in various farms in Romania. Taking into account the peculiarities of half sibs families, it was used a linear mathematical model for unbiased cross classification. Average 305-days milk yield at the first lactation was 3,034.88 ± 14.67 kg, while the average milk fat percentage registered 3.79 ±0.004 %. Average 305 days fat yield accounted for 115.12±0.59 kg, average age at first calving regietered 839.25±1.43 days ( 27.5 months. Between milk yield and fat percentage, it was found a correlation of rG - 0.245, reflecting a weak but positive relation between the two traits. The phenotypic correlation was low and a negative one (rF = -0.181, showing a weak and reverse link between the two traits. Between milk yield and fat yield, both the genotypic and phenotypic correlations were very high and had positive values, rG = 0.971 and rF = 0.964. Between fat percentage and fat yield, it was found a genotypic and phenotypic positive correlation, rG = 0.465, and, respectively, rF = 0.240. The correlation between age at first calving and milk yield was extremely weak and negative, rG = - 0.257 şi rF = - 0.090. Between age at first calving and fat percentage, the correlation was very small and had a negative value (rG = - 0.187 and (rF = - 0.032. Between age at first calving and fat yield, both the genetic and phenotypic correlations were weak and negative (rG = -0.288 and rF = - 0.093. The values of the heritability and genotypic correlations pointed out the effect of the aditive action of the genes, but the phenotypic correlations indicated that some traits were also determined by the environment factors. Cow selection based on milk yield has a positive impact on the future milk performance. In the breeding programmes, age at first calving should not be neglected as it could

  10. Effects of differential postnatal exposure of the rat cerebellum to x-rays on spatial discrimination learning as a function of age and position preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to analyze the effects of postnatal exposure of the cerebellum to x-irradiation on the use of proprioceptive feedback in spatial learning. A total of 337 naive male Long-Evans hooded rats were assigned at birth to one of four treatments: 12-15x, 4-5x, 4-15x and control. Subjects assigned to the 12-15x treatment were exposed to 200R at 12 and 13 days of age, and to 150R at 15 days of age. The subjects exposed to the 4-5x schedule received 200R on days 4 and 5. The 4-15x subjects are exposed to 200R on days 4 and 5, and to 150R on days 7, 9, 11, 13, 15. Subjects from each treatment started spatial discrimination testing in a T-shaped water maze at 30 to 31, 60 to 63, or 180 to 185 days of age. A preference effect was evident in the control, 12-15x and 4-5x subjects, but not in the 4-15x subjects during acquisition testing. Those control, 12-15x and 4-5x subjects trained against their preference made more errors and required more trials to attain acquisition criterion than did those subjects trained toward their preference. The absence of a position preference in the 4-15x subjects is attributed to the absence of the mossy fiber channel of input to the Purkinje cells in this preparation. Deficits in spatial learning were evident in both the 12-15x and 4-15x subjects, the former differing significantly from control subjects and the latter from the 4-5x subjects in the number of trials needed to complete reversal testing and/or the number of errors made during this phase of the testing. It is the upper portion of the molecular layer, absent in the 12-15x and 4-15x preparations, which receives afferent input from the spinal cord

  11. Study on measurement of spatial dose rates from simulated products made from recycled metal below clearance levels arising from dismantling of nuclear facilities. Contract research

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, A; Kitami, Y; Nakamura, H; Nakashima, M; Saitô, K

    2002-01-01

    In order to contribute to safety assessment of recycling products made from dismantling metal wastes, metal ingots containing sup 6 sup 0 Co were produced and spatial dose rates from ingots were evaluated by gamma-ray measurement and calculation. Stripping operations were made using detector response functions calculated by Monte Carlo program to derive spatial dose rates from measured gamma-ray spectra. In the computer simulation, Monte Carlo and point kernel calculation codes were used. Agreement between measured and calculated values was satisfactory in spite of an extremely low concentration of sup 6 sup 0 Co in the ingots and a complicated geometric condition between detector and samples.

  12. Six Myths About Spatial Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, Nora S.; Stieff, Mike

    2012-04-01

    Visualizations are an increasingly important part of scientific education and discovery. However, users often do not gain knowledge from them in a complete or efficient way. This article aims to direct research on visualizations in science education in productive directions by reviewing the evidence for widespread assumptions that learning styles, sex differences, developmental stages, and spatial language determine the impact of visualizations on science learning. First, we examine the assumption that people differ in their verbal versus visual learning style. Due to the lack of rigorous evaluation, there is no current support for this distinction. Future research should distinguish between two different kinds of visual learning style. Second, we consider the belief that there are large and intractable sex differences in spatial ability resultant from immutable biological reasons. Although there are some spatial sex differences (in some types of spatial tests although not all), there is actually only very mixed support for biological causation. Most important, there is conclusive evidence that spatial skills can be improved through training and education. Third, we explore educators' use of Piaget's ideas about spatial development to draw conclusions about 'developmental appropriateness'. However, recent research on spatial development has focused on identifying sequences that begin with early starting points of skill, and spatial education is possible in some form at all ages. Fourth, although spatial language does not determine spatial thought, it does frame attention in a way that can have impact on learning and understanding. We examine the empirical support for each assumption and its relevance to future research on visualizations in science education.

  13. Influence of landscape heterogeneity on spatial patterns of wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Anderson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies using the RAINFOR network of forest plots have generated significant insights into the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest carbon cycling in Amazonia. In this work, we map and explore the landscape context of several major RAINFOR plot clusters using Landsat ETM+ satellite data. In particular, we explore how representative the plots are of their landscape context, and test whether bias in plot location within landscapes may be influencing the regional mean values obtained for important forest biophysical parameters. Specifically, we evaluate whether the regional variations in wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass derived from the RAINFOR network could be driven by systematic and unintentional biases in plot location. Remote sensing data covering 45 field plots were aggregated to generate landscape maps to identify the specific physiognomy of the plots. In the Landsat ETM+ data, it was possible to spectrally differentiate three types of terra firme forest, three types of forests over Paleovarzea geomorphologycal formation, two types of bamboo-dominated forest, palm forest, Heliconia monodominant vegetation, swamp forest, disturbed forests and land use areas. Overall, the plots were generally representative of the forest physiognomies in the landscape in which they are located. Furthermore, the analysis supports the observed regional trends in those important forest parameters. This study demonstrates the utility of landscape scale analysis of forest physiognomies for validating and supporting the finds of plot based studies. Moreover, the more precise geolocation of many key RAINFOR plot clusters achieved during this research provides important contextual information for studies employing the RAINFOR database.

  14. Land management as a factor controlling dissolved organic carbon release from upland peat soils 1: spatial variation in DOC productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallop, A R; Clutterbuck, B

    2009-06-01

    The importance of soil storage in global carbon cycling is well recognised and factors leading to increased losses from this pool may act as a positive feedback mechanism in global warming. Upland peat soils are usually assumed to serve as carbon sinks, there is however increasing evidence of carbon loss from upland peat soils, and DOC concentrations in UK rivers have increased markedly over the past three decades. A number of drivers for increasing DOC release from peat soils have been proposed although many of these would not explain fine-scale variations in DOC release observed in many catchments. We examined the effect of land use and management on DOC production in upland peat catchments at two spatial scales within the UK. DOC concentration was measured in streams draining 50 small-scale catchments (b3 km2) in three discrete regions of the south Pennines and one area in the North Yorkshire Moors. Annual mean DOC concentration was also derived from water colour data recorded at water treatment works for seven larger scale catchments (1.5-20 km2) in the south Pennines. Soil type and land use/management in all catchments were characterised from NSRI digital soil data and ortho-corrected colour aerial imagery. Of the factors assessed, representing all combinations of soil type and land use together with catchment slope and area, the proportion of exposed peat surface resulting from new heather burning was consistently identified as the most significant predictor of variation in DOC concentration. This relationship held across all blanket peat catchments and scales. We propose that management activities are driving changes in edaphic conditions in upland peat to those more favourable for aerobic microbial activity and thus enhance peat decomposition leading to increased losses of carbon from these environments.

  15. Spitzer Observations of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 During Deep Impact : Water and Dust Production and Spatial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, Adeline; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Kelley, M. S.; Woodward, C. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft encountered comet 9P/Tempel 1 on July 4th, 2005 (rh = 1.506 AU). Spectral maps covering 20'' x 67'' (1.85''/pixel) were acquired with the IRS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope (ΔSpitzer = 0.72 AU) at different times around the Deep Impact event: twice before impact (TI-41.3hrs and TI-22.9hrs) and twelve times after impact (between TI+0.67hrs and TI+1027hrs). These IRS observations (Lisse et al 2006, Sciences 313, 635) were taken from the Spitzer data archive. We present the interpretation of 5.2-7.6 µm spectra obtained in the second order of the short-wavelength module (SL2). To reduce the contribution of artifacts in the spectra, 5x5 pixel extraction apertures (9.25''x9.25'') were used. On the first stage we studied the water ν2 vibrational band emission at 6.4µm, which is present in most spectra. The water production rate before impact is deduced ( 4.25e27 molecules/sec). In order to study both the amount and origin of the water molecules released after impact, we used extractions centered on the nucleus and along the length of the slit. We analyzed the spatial distribution of water and its time evolution with a time-dependent model which describes the evolution of the water cloud after impact. The underlying continuum in the spectra provides information on the evolution and color temperature of the dust ejecta. The dust mass and dust/gas ratio in the ejecta cloud are derived and compared with other values published in the literature.

  16. Early age shrinkage pattern of concrete on replacement of fine aggregate with industrial by-product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Mishra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is an experimental work carried out to investigate early age shrinkage pattern of concrete, prepared, on 50% replacement of industrial by-product (like pond ash and granulated blast furnace slag as fine aggregate using OPC, PPC and PSC as a binder. This is to observe the effect of pond ash and slag as they are having some cementitious properties and effect of cement type is also discussed. All the mixes were prepared keeping in view of pumpable concrete without any super plasticizers. Higher shrinkage value indicates the presence of more bleed water or internal moisture. It is concluded that slag is the best option for fine aggregate replacement for concrete making and durable structure.

  17. Trade typhoon over Japan: Turbulence metaphor and spatial production cycles feedback loops of the Japanese economy, 1980–85–90

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sonis

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the turbulence similitude between whirlpool structure of atmosphere disturbances and the spatial production cycles. Such an analogy leads to the production cycles feedback loops superposition analysis of trade feedbacks reflecting the economic phenomena of horizontal and vertical trade specifications. Moreover, the visualization of this process is achieved with the help of coloring the different permutation matrices presenting the hierarchy of production cycles feedback loops. In this manner the qualitative presentation of Japan inter-regional and inter-industry trade, 1980–85–90, is visualized and interpreted.

  18. Executive function is less sensitive to estradiol than spatial memory: performance on an analog of the card sorting test in ovariectomized aged rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacreuse, A; Chhabra, R K; Hall, M J; Herndon, J G

    2004-09-30

    Functions supported by the frontal lobes are particularly sensitive to the detrimental effects of aging. Recent studies on postmenopausal women find that estrogen replacement therapy benefits performance on tasks dependent on the frontal lobes. To determine whether estrogen has a similar influence in a rhesus monkey model of menopause, we tested five aged, long-term ovariectomized rhesus monkeys in a modified version of the Wisconsin Card Sort test which had been adapted to the nonhuman primate. In this test, monkeys had to select 3-D objects based either on color (blue, red, yellow) or shape (block, tube, cup) and had to be able to switch their response as a function of reinforcement contingencies. The monkeys were treated with placebo and ethinyl estradiol (EE2, 450 ng/kg/day) in alternation with each successive test. Contrary to our hypothesis, estradiol treatment did not affect performance. Because previous studies in the same monkeys [Neurobiol. Aging 23 (2002) 589] had shown that EE2 improves performance on a spatial memory task dependent on the hippocampus, but not on another task dependent upon the frontal lobes (the delayed response), we conclude that executive processes may be less sensitive to the effects of estradiol than hippocampal-dependent tasks.

  19. Neutron activation analysis of Lerna ceramics (Greece) at Early Bronze Age: local production and trade exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attas, M.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is a powerful tool for determining the provenance of ancient ceramics. A sophisticated analytical system for gamma-ray spectrometry, designed specifically for the chemical analysis of ceramics by thermal neutron activation, was used to determine the concentrations of twenty elements in samples of ancient pottery. The measurements were made relative to the standard pottery of Perlman and Asaro. The purpose of the work was to study the production of fine pottery at the settlement of Lerna, in the Argolid of Greece, during the Early Bronze Age (third millennium BC). About half of the 50 samples analysed formed the major compositional group, which was attributed to Lerna. It included, besides the majority of the samples from the second phase of the Early Bronze Age (Lerna III), several samples from the third phase (Lerna IV); that is, from levels immediately succeeding the great destruction which marks the end of the Lerna III settlement. A small number of objects forms a second group of local origin and includes 4 of the 5 clay sealings sampled. Among the archaeologically unusual objects, several could be attributed to Lerna, while others were characterized as imports [fr

  20. Chemical Characterization of Beer Aging Products Derived from Hard Resin Components in Hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Makiko; Taniguchi, Harumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-25

    The bitter taste of beer originates from resins in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which are classified into two subtypes (soft and hard). Whereas the nature and reactivity of soft-resin-derived compounds, such as α-, β-, and iso-α-acids, are well studied, there is only a little information on the compounds in hard resin. For this work, hard resin was prepared from stored hops and investigated for its compositional changes in an experimental model of beer aging. The hard resin contained a series of α-acid oxides. Among them, 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones were unstable under beer storage conditions, and their transformation induced primary compositional changes of the hard resin during beer aging. The chemical structures of the products, including novel polycyclic compounds scorpiohumulinols A and B and dicyclohumulinols A and B, were determined by HRMS and NMR analyses. These compounds were proposed to be produced via proton-catalyzed cyclization reactions of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones. Furthermore, they were more stable than their precursor 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones during prolonged storage periods.

  1. Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End Products as a Molecular Mechanism for Aging as a Risk Factor in Osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J. de; Verzijl, N.; Wenting-Wijk, M.J.G. van; Jacobs, K.M.G.; El, B. van; Roermund, P.M. van; Bank, R.A.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent and disabling chronic conditions affecting the elderly. Its etiology is largely unknown, but age is the most prominent risk factor. The current study was designed to test whether accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which

  2. Impact of smoking and obesity on rheumatic disease in persons of productive age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusianawaty Tana

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a disease of the joints that causes pain and musculoskeletal stiffness, and may cause limitation of joint movement. Age, obesity, smoking behavior, and occupation are risk factors for rheumatic diseases. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of body mass index (BMI, smoking behavior, and occupation on rheumatic disease among persons of productive age in Indonesia. A cross-sectional study was conducted using National Basic Health Research data. The inclusion criterion was age 15-64 years. Rheumatic disease diagnosis was based on interview results and was defined as the presence of a history of rheumatic disease diagnosed by health professionals and/or rheumatic symptoms in the past 12 months. The study sample consisted of 609.097 persons who fulfilled the inclusion criterion. Compared to persons with normal BMI, rheumatic disease was more prevalent in the overweight (OR 1.25; 95%CI 1.21—1.29 and the obese (OR 1.52; 95%CI 1.47—1.56, but less prevalent in the underweight (OR 0.91; 95%CI 0.88—0.93. Compared to non-smokers, rheumatic disease was more prevalent in every day smokers (OR 1.65; 95%CI 1.60—1.70, occasional smokers (OR 1.41; 95%CI 1.35—1.47, and ex-smokers (OR 1.85; 95%CI 1.76—1.95. Measures for prevention of rheumatic disease are needed, e.g. through education to increase knowledge about the impact of smoking and obesity on rheumatic disease.

  3. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  4. Sensitivity analysis in a life cycle assessment of an aged red wine production from Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, M; Torres, C M; Castells, F

    2016-08-15

    Sustainability in agriculture and food processing is an issue with a clear growing interest; especially in products were consumers have particular awareness regarding its environmental profile. This is the case of wine industry depending on grape production, winemaking and bottling. Also viticulture and generally agricultural production is significantly affected by climate variations. The aim of this article is to determine the environmental load of an aged red wine from a winery in Catalonia, Spain, over its entire life cycle, including sensitivity analysis of the main parameters related to the cultivation, vinification and bottling. The life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used for the environmental analysis. In a first step, life cycle inventory (LCI) data were collected by questionnaires and interviews with the winemaker, all data are actual operating data and all the stages involved in the production have been taken into account (viticulture, vinification, bottling and the disposal subsystem). Data were then used to determine the environmental profile by a life cycle impact assessment using the ReCiPe method. Annual variability in environmental performance, stresses the importance of including timeline analysis in the wine sector. Because of that this study is accompanied with a sensitivity analysis carried out by a Monte Carlo simulation that takes into account the uncertainty and variability of the parameters used. In this manner, the results are presented with confidence intervals to provide a wider view of the environmental issues derived from the activities of the studied wine estate regardless of the eventualities of a specific harvesting year. Since the beverage packaging has an important influence in this case, a dataset for the production of green glass was adapted to reflect the actual recycling situation in Spain. Furthermore, a hypothetical variation of the glass-recycling rate in the glass production completes this article, as a key variable

  5. In-situ high spatial resolution LA-MC-ICPMS 230Th/U dating enables detection of small-scale age inversions in speleothems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Lin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an in-situ method for Th and U isotope measurements by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS to determine possible age inversions of stalagmites, using a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser connected to an MC-ICPMS. Due to the low ion beam intensity of 230Th (20–120 counts per second, cps, we carefully optimized the operating parameters to get highest possible ion beam intensities, i.e., laser fluence (25 J cm−2, spot size (110 μm, pulse repetition rate (20 Hz, scan speed (4 μm s−1, integration time (1000 s, and He and Ar gas flow (∼0.9 L min−1 and ∼0.6 L min−1 respectively. A precision (2 relative standard error, 2RSE of better than 1.8% was obtained for a single 230Th/238U measurement performed on a stalagmite from Hϋttenblӓserschachthöhle, western Germany, having U concentrations of 2–7 μg g−1 and with 230Th beam intensity of less than 100 cps. Compared to previous studies (Hoffmann et al., 2009, this is the about same precision, however at lower U concentrations. The data are corrected and calibrated by two factors (F1 and F2 for 230Th/238U and 234U/238U, respectively, using a carbonate material (flowstone in secular equilibrium. We obtained an age uncertainty (2 SE, 2σ of ca. 9 ka at ca. 215 ka. Most data agree with solution MC-ICPMS results obtained on the same sample within their uncertainties. The reproducibility of the LA-MC-ICPMS age data is within 4.5% (2RSE as determined from 3 to 4 repeated analyses. With a spot size of 110 μm and spatial resolution of about 400 μm or higher, it is possible to see much more details in thin growing layers than conventional solution analysis, where mixed layer sampling cannot be avoided. Potential age inversions in small regions are revealed, which cannot be detected by solution analysis due to the insufficient spatial resolution.

  6. Plane of nutrition before and after 6 months of age in Holstein-Friesian bulls: I. Effects on performance, body composition, age at puberty, and postpubertal semen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, C J; Fair, S; English, A M; Cirot, M; Staub, C; Lonergan, P; Kenny, D A

    2018-02-07

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of plane of nutrition (1) during the first 6 mo of life and (2) from 6 mo of age to puberty on early growth characteristics, age at puberty, and postpubertal semen production in Holstein-Friesian bulls. Holstein-Friesian bull calves (n = 83) with a mean (standard deviation) age and body weight of 17 (4.4) d and 52 (6.2) kg, respectively, were assigned to a high (Hi) or low (Lo) plane of nutrition for the first 6 mo of life. The Hi and Lo calves received 1,200 and 450 g of milk replacer, respectively; Hi calves were fed concentrate ad libitum and Lo were fed a maximum of 1 kg concentrate daily, and concentrate allowances remained the same after weaning. At 24 wk of age, bulls were reassigned within treatment to either remain on the same diet or to switch to the opposite diet until puberty, resulting in 4 treatment groups: Hi-Hi, Hi-Lo, Lo-Lo, and Lo-Hi. After puberty, all bulls were fed a moderate plane of nutrition until 60 wk of age; thereafter, the diet was ad libitum concentrates until slaughter at 72 wk of age. Bulls were weighed weekly before weaning and every 2 wk after weaning. Scrotal circumference (SC) was measured every 2 wk, beginning at 15 wk of age. Beginning at a SC of 24 cm, electro-ejaculation was carried out every 2 wk to establish the onset of puberty. Semen collection continued monthly after puberty. Thermal images of the scrotum were taken monthly from 28 to 36 wk of age. Scrotal skin thickness (SST) was measured monthly (from 16 wk of age to puberty) using a digital calipers. Bulls on the Hi diet had a higher scrotal temperature and SST at each time point than those on the Lo diet. Average daily gain (ADG) was greatest in Hi-Hi bulls, with Hi-Lo and Lo-Hi having similar ADG but both being greater than Lo-Lo. Bulls on the Hi diet pre-6 mo of age were younger at puberty, regardless of diet offered post-6 mo of age. Bulls offered a Hi diet post-6 mo were heavier at puberty. Neither scrotal

  7. The implementation of rating of the audivisual products by suatibility for age groups in the Czech republic

    OpenAIRE

    Peprníková, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    The diploma thesis "The Implementation of rating of the audio-visual products by suitability for age groups in the Czech Republic" deals with issues of classification of audio- visual products in Czech medial space. At first, text analyses, what the audio-visual media product is, and what are the legal, psychological and economic arguments for its implementation. The history and current status of labelling in the Czech Republic is also described in this part. Included is also a description of...

  8. Impact of the aging process of black carbon aerosols on their spatial distribution, hygroscopicity, and radiative forcing in a global climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, D.; Oshima, N.; Nakajima, T.; Takemura, T.; Ohara, T.

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) absorbs shortwave radiation more strongly than any other type of aerosol, and an accurate simulation of the aging processes of BC-containing particle is required to properly predict aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and climate change. However, BC aging processes have been simplified in general circulation models (GCMs) due to limited computational resources. In particular, differences in the representation of the mixing states of BC-containing particles between GCMs constitute one of main reasons for the uncertainty in ARF estimates. To understand an impact of the BC aging processes and the mixing state of BC on the spatial distribution of BC and ARF caused by BC (BC-ARF), we implemented three different methods of incorporating BC aging processes into a global aerosol transport model, SPRINTARS: (1) the "AGV" method, using variable conversion rates of BC aging based on a new type of parameterization depending on both BC amount and sulfuric acid; (2) the "AGF" method, using a constant conversion rate used worldwide in GCMs; and (3) the "ORIG" method, which is used in the original SPRINTARS. First, we found that these different methods produced different BC burden within 10% over industrial areas and 50% over remote oceans. Second, a ratio of water-insoluble BC to total BC (WIBC ratio) was very different among the three methods. Near the BC source region, for example, the WIBC ratios were estimated to be 80-90% (AGV and AGF) and 50-60% (ORIG). Third, although the BC aging process in GCMs had small impacts on the BC burden, they had a large impact on BC-ARF through a change in both the WIBC ratio and non-BC compounds coating on BC cores. As a result, possible differences in the treatment of the BC aging process between aerosol modeling studies can produce a difference of approximately 0.3 Wm-2 in the magnitude of BC-ARF, which is comparable to the uncertainty suggested by results from a global aerosol modeling intercomparison project, AeroCom. The

  9. Temporal and spatial distribution of Paleozoic metamorphism in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge and Inner Piedmont delimited by ion microprobe U-Pb ages of metamorphic zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschat, Arthur J.; Bream, Brendan R.; Huebner, Matthew T.; Hatcher, Robert D.; Miller, Calvin F.

    2017-01-01

    Ion microprobe U-Pb zircon rim ages from 39 samples from across the accreted terranes of the central Blue Ridge, eastward across the Inner Piedmont, delimit the timing and spatial extent of superposed metamorphism in the southern Appalachian orogen. Metamorphic zircon rims are 10–40 µm wide, mostly unzoned, and dark gray to black or bright white in cathodoluminescence, and truncate and/or embay interior oscillatory zoning. Black unzoned and rounded or ovoid-shaped metamorphic zircon morphologies also occur. Th/U values range from 0.01 to 1.4, with the majority of ratios less than 0.1. Results of 206Pb/238U ages, ±2% discordant, range from 481 to 305 Ma. Clustering within these data reveals that the Blue Ridge and Inner Piedmont terranes were affected by three tectonothermal events: (1) 462–448 Ma (Taconic); (2) 395–340 Ma (Acadian and Neoacadian); and (3) 335–322 Ma, related to the early phase of the Alleghanian orogeny. By combining zircon rim ages with metamorphic isograds and other published isotopic ages, we identify the thermal architecture of the southern Appalachian orogen: juxtaposed and superposed metamorphic domains have younger ages to the east related to the marginward addition of terranes, and these domains can serve as a proxy to delimit terrane accretion. Most 462–448 Ma ages occur in the western and central Blue Ridge and define a continuous progression from greenschist to granulite facies that identifies the intact Taconic core. The extent of 462–448 Ma metamorphism indicates that the central Blue Ridge and Tugaloo terranes were accreted to the western Blue Ridge during the Taconic orogeny. Zircon rim ages in the Inner Piedmont span almost 100 m.y., with peaks at 395–385, 376–340, and 335–322 Ma, and delimit the Acadian-Neoacadian and Alleghanian metamorphic core. The timing and distribution of metamorphism in the Inner Piedmont are consistent with the Devonian to Mississippian oblique collision of the Carolina superterrane

  10. Using isotopes to constrain water flux and age estimates in snow-influenced catchments using the STARR (Spatially distributed Tracer-Aided Rainfall-Runoff) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-aho, Pertti; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; McNamara, James P.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Soulsby, Chris

    2017-10-01

    Tracer-aided hydrological models are increasingly used to reveal fundamentals of runoff generation processes and water travel times in catchments. Modelling studies integrating stable water isotopes as tracers are mostly based in temperate and warm climates, leaving catchments with strong snow influences underrepresented in the literature. Such catchments are challenging, as the isotopic tracer signals in water entering the catchments as snowmelt are typically distorted from incoming precipitation due to fractionation processes in seasonal snowpack. We used the Spatially distributed Tracer-Aided Rainfall-Runoff (STARR) model to simulate fluxes, storage, and mixing of water and tracers, as well as estimating water ages in three long-term experimental catchments with varying degrees of snow influence and contrasting landscape characteristics. In the context of northern catchments the sites have exceptionally long and rich data sets of hydrometric data and - most importantly - stable water isotopes for both rain and snow conditions. To adapt the STARR model for sites with strong snow influence, we used a novel parsimonious calculation scheme that takes into account the isotopic fractionation through snow sublimation and snowmelt. The modified STARR setup simulated the streamflows, isotope ratios, and snow pack dynamics quite well in all three catchments. From this, our simulations indicated contrasting median water ages and water age distributions between catchments brought about mainly by differences in topography and soil characteristics. However, the variable degree of snow influence in catchments also had a major influence on the stream hydrograph, storage dynamics, and water age distributions, which was captured by the model. Our study suggested that snow sublimation fractionation processes can be important to include in tracer-aided modelling for catchments with seasonal snowpack, while the influence of fractionation during snowmelt could not be unequivocally

  11. Transforming growth factor-β1 expression in endangered age-0 shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) from Upper Klamath Lake, OR relative to histopathology, meristic, spatial, and temporal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Christopher A.; Densmore, Christine L.; Robertson, Laura S.; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Vanderkooi, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    During July – September of 2008, 2009, and 2010 endangered age-0 juvenile shortnose suckers were sampled from Upper Klamath Lake, OR in a health evaluation that included the measurement of transforming growth factor – beta (TGF-β) expression in spleen in combination with a histopathology assessment. This analysis was performed to determine if the expression of this immuno-regulator could be used as a component of a larger health evaluation intended to identify potential risk-factors that may help to explain why very few of these fish survive to age-1. Potential associations between TGF-β1 expression, histopathological findings, meristic data as well as temporal and spatial data were evaluated using analysis-of-variance. In this analysis, the absence or presence of opercula deformity and hepatic cell necrosis were identified as significant factors in accounting for the variance in TGF-β1 expression observed in age-0 shortnose suckers (n = 122, squared multiple R = 0.989). Location of sample collection and the absence or presence of anchor worms (Lernaea spp.) were identified as significant cofactors. The actual mechanisms involved with these relationships have yet to be determined. The strength, however, of our findings support the concept of using TGF-β1 expression as part of a broader fish health assessment and suggests the potential for using additional immunologic measures in future studies. Specifically, our results indicate that the measure of TGF-β1 expression in age-0 shortnose sucker health assessments can facilitate the process of identifying disease risks that are associated with the documented lack of recruitment into the adult population.

  12. Postural instability detection: aging and the complexity of spatial-temporal distributional patterns for virtually contacting the stability boundary in human stance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa C Kilby

    Full Text Available Falls among the older population can severely restrict their functional mobility and even cause death. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms and conditions that cause falls, for which it is important to develop a predictive model of falls. One critical quantity for postural instability detection and prediction is the instantaneous stability of quiet upright stance based on motion data. However, well-established measures in the field of motor control that quantify overall postural stability using center-of-pressure (COP or center-of-mass (COM fluctuations are inadequate predictors of instantaneous stability. For this reason, 2D COP/COM virtual-time-to-contact (VTC is investigated to detect the postural stability deficits of healthy older people compared to young adults. VTC predicts the temporal safety margin to the functional stability boundary ( =  limits of the region of feasible COP or COM displacement and, therefore, provides an index of the risk of losing postural stability. The spatial directions with increased instability were also determined using quantities of VTC that have not previously been considered. Further, Lempel-Ziv-Complexity (LZC, a measure suitable for on-line monitoring of stability/instability, was applied to explore the temporal structure or complexity of VTC and the predictability of future postural instability based on previous behavior. These features were examined as a function of age, vision and different load weighting on the legs. The primary findings showed that for old adults the stability boundary was contracted and VTC reduced. Furthermore, the complexity decreased with aging and the direction with highest postural instability also changed in aging compared to the young adults. The findings reveal the sensitivity of the time dependent properties of 2D VTC to the detection of postural instability in aging, availability of visual information and postural stance and potential applicability as a

  13. Spatial analysis of the distribution of Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and losses in maize crop productivity using geo statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Paulo R.S.; Miranda, Vicente S.; Ribeiro, Susane M. [Universidade Federal Rural da Amazonia (UFRA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Agrarias]. E-mail: paulo.farias@ufra.edu.br; Barbosa, Jose C. [UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas; Busoli, Antonio C. [UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Fitossanidade; Overal, William L. [Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi (MPEG), Belem, PA (Brazil). Coordenacao de Zoologia

    2008-05-15

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is one of the chief pests of maize in the Americas. The study of its spatial distribution is fundamental for designing correct control strategies, improving sampling methods, determining actual and potential crop losses, and adopting precise agricultural techniques. In Sao Paulo state, Brazil, a maize field was sampled at weekly intervals, from germination through harvest, for caterpillar densities, using quadrates. In each of 200 quadrates, 10 plants were sampled per week. Harvest weights were obtained in the field for each quadrate, and ear diameters and lengths were also sampled (15 ears per quadrate) and used to estimate potential productivity of the quadrate. Geostatistical analyses of caterpillar densities showed greatest ranges for small caterpillars when semivariograms were adjusted for a spherical model that showed greatest fit. As the caterpillars developed in the field, their spatial distribution became increasingly random, as shown by a model adjusted to a straight line, indicating a lack of spatial dependence among samples. Harvest weight and ear length followed the spherical model, indicating the existence of spatial variability of the production parameters in the maize field. Geostatistics shows promise for the application of precise methods in the integrated control of pests. (author)

  14. Regional models of metal production in Western Asia in the Chalcolithic, Early and Middle Bronze Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avilova, Liudmila

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is the reconstruction and comparative analysis of regional models of metal production in the Chalcolithic, Early and Middle Bronze Ages. The work is based on the statistical analysis of unique computer database on archaeological metal finds from four regions of the Near East: Anatolia, Mesopotamia, the Levant, and Iran. The materials are analysed by four indicators: distribution by the chronological periods, artefacts’ function, proportion of used metals and copper- based alloys. The author presents a series of conclusions concerning the preconditions for the beginnings of metal production in Western Asia and the pioneering role of Iran in its emergence, the important role the piedmont territories played in the development of metal production, the leap-like pattern of production dynamics shown by the periods, and its relation to the spread of a producing economy, long-distance exchange, and the emergence of the early civilizations.

    El objetivo de este trabajo es la reconstrucción y análisis comparativo de modelos regionales de producción metalúrgica del Calcolítico y la Edad del Bronce Inicial y Media. Se basa en el análisis estadístico de una base de datos única sobre hallazgos metálicos de cuatro regiones del Próximo Oriente: Anatolia, Mesopotamia, el Levante e Irán. Los materiales se analizan atendiendo a cuatro variables: períodos cronológicos, función de los artefactos, proporción de los metales usados y las distintas aleaciones del cobre. La autora aporta una serie de conclusiones respecto a las precondiciones para los inicios de la producción metalúrgica en el Oeste Asiático; sobre el papel pionero de Irán en su aparición; la importancia de los piedemontes en su desarrollo; el patrón no continuo que se observa en las dinámicas de producción por periodos; y su relación con la expansión de la economía de producción, el intercambio a larga distancia y la aparición de las

  15. Studies for Improving Productive Efficiency and Immune System Response of Aged Female Japanese Quail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabek, E.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was performed in animal house Nuclear Research Center-Atomic Energy Authority at Inshas. The objective of this study was to overcome decrease productive efficiency and immune system response as a result of advanced of female Japanese quail (Coturnix Coturnix japonica) and multiple the production period of females studying the effect of three methods of force rest and their effect on physiological and endocrinological changes associated with each of procedure used. Three hundred birds were used, 240 female and 120 males (50 weeks of age). Females were at 44% hen day (HD) egg production. The birds randomly divided into four groups, 60 females and 30 males in each treatment which divided into three replicate of 20 females and 10 males in each. The first group was fed a layer diet, plus 2% zinc oxide (20,000 ppm) for 14 days. The second group was fed a commercial layer diet containing 8 mg / birds / day tamoxifen for 14 days. The third group was force molted by the California method (fed withdrawal by removing the diet 10 days then feed for 7 days corn). The fourth group fed the layer diet and served as the control. The results obtained showed significant increase in body weight, egg production, egg weight, shell weight, hatchability percent, fertility percent, embryonic mortality percent, hatching weight percent mortality percent, carcass relative weight, kidney relative weight, intestine relative weight, intestine length, proventriculus relative weight, ovary relative weight, oviduct relative weight, oviduct length, femur breaking strength, tibia breaking strength, packed cell volume, globulin, phosphorus concentration, triglyceride, estrogen hormone, aldosterone hormone and significant decrease in heart relative weight, albumin to globulin ratio, GOT, testosterone hormone, T 3 , T 4 , Heamaglutination inhibition test in treated groups than control group. While gizzard relative weight, femur relative weight, tibia relative weight, femur ash, tibia

  16. Redefining face contour with a novel anti-aging cosmetic product: an open-label, prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garre, Aurora; Martinez-Masana, Gemma; Piquero-Casals, Jaime; Granger, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Skin aging is accelerated by multiple extrinsic factors: ultraviolet radiation, smoking and pollution increase oxidative activity, damaging cellular and extracellular components such as DNA, proteins, and lipids. With age, collagen and hyaluronic acid levels decline, resulting in loss of elasticity and moisture of the skin. Over time this damage leads to characteristic signs that make the skin look older: altered facial contour, sagging skin, wrinkles, and an uneven complexion. This study evaluated the anti-aging effects of a new facial cream formulated with carnosine, Alteromonas ferment extract, crosspolymer hyaluronic acid, and a tripeptide. An open-label intra-individual study to assess the anti-aging efficacy of the investigational product in 33 women aged 45 to 65 years. The product was applied twice daily for 56 days. Facial contour and skin deformation, elasticity, hydration, and complexion were measured with specialized equipment at baseline and days 28 and 56. Additionally, subjects completed questionnaires at days 28 and 56 on the perceived efficacy and cosmetic characteristics of the product. After 56 days of use of the investigational product, a redefining effect was observed, with a significant decrease in sagging jawline (7%). Skin was significantly more hydrated (12%), firmer (29%), and more elastic (20%) ( P <0.001 for all). On complexion assessment, skin texture (a measure of skin smoothness) and spots (brown and red skin lesions) also improved significantly (12% and 6% decrease, respectively). In the subjective self-evaluation, the majority of subjects reported that the skin was visibly tightened and more elastic, flexible, and moisturized (91%, 88%, 91%, and 90%, respectively). The product was well tolerated with no adverse events reported during the study. This new cosmetic product demonstrated anti-aging effects after 56 days of use, most notably a redefined facial contour and improved complexion. It is a safe and effective anti-aging product.

  17. Spatialization of climate, physical and socioeconomic factors that affect the dairy goat production in Brazil and their impact on animal breeding decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando B. Lopes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has high climate, soil and environmental diversity, as well as distinct socioeconomic and political realities, what results in differences among the political administrative regions of the country. The objective of this study was to determine spatial distribution of the physical, climatic and socioeconomic aspects that best characterize the production of dairy goats in Brazil. Production indices of milk per goat, goat production, milk production, as well as temperature range, mean temperature, precipitation, normalized difference vegetation index, relative humidity, altitude, agricultural farms; farms with native pasture, farms with good quality pasture, farms with water resources, farms that receive technical guidance, family farming properties, non-familiar farms and the human development index were evaluated. The multivariate analyses were carried out to spatialize climatic, physical and socioeconomic variables and so differenciate the Brazilian States and Regions. The highest yields of milk and goat production were observed in the Northeast. The Southeast Region had the second highest production of milk, followed by the South, Midwest and North. Multivariate analysis revealed distinctions between clusters of political-administrative regions of Brazil. The climatic variables were most important to discriminate between regions of Brazil. Therefore, it is necessary to implement animal breeding programs to meet the needs of each region.

  18. Beneficial effects of metformin and irbesartan on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-RAGE-induced proximal tubular cell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis contributes to diabetic nephropathy. An oral hypoglycemic agent, metformin may have a potential effect on the inhibition of glycation reactions. Further, since a pathophysiological crosstalk between renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and AGEs-RAGE axis is involved in diabetic nephropathy, it is conceivable that metformin and irbesartan additively could protect against the AGEs-RAGE-induced tubular cell injury. In this study, we addressed the issues. Metformin dose-dependently inhibited the formation of AGEs modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Compared with AGEs-modified BSA prepared without metformin (AGEs-MF0), those prepared in the presence of 30 mM or 100 mM metformin (AGEs-MF30 or AGEs-MF100) significantly reduced RAGE mRNA level, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β mRNA level in tubular cells. Irbesartan further inhibited the harmful effects of AGEs-MF0 or AGEs-MF30 on tubular cells. Our present study suggests that combination therapy with metformin and irbesartan may have therapeutic potential in diabetic nephropathy; it could play a protective role against tubular injury in diabetes not only by inhibiting AGEs formation, but also by attenuating the deleterious effects of AGEs via down-regulating RAGE expression and subsequently suppressing ROS generation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Age and Bulls on Fresh Semen Quality and Frozen Semen Production of Holstein Bulls in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiris, A.; Ondho, Y. S.; Santoso, S. I.; Kurnianto, E.

    2018-02-01

    Artificial Insemination is a compatible method of reproduction in an effort to increase dairy productivity. Artificial Insemination Center as a producer of frozen semen was required to maximize bulls in producing high quality frozen semen optimally. The purpose of this research was to determine effect of age and bulls on fresh semen quality and frozen semen production of Holstein bulls in Indonesia. The research was conducted at Lembang and Singosari AI Centers. The material used were 24.634 data of qualified fresh semen and frozen semen production from 81 Holstein Bulls aged 1-9 years that used as frozen semen producer in period of 2008 to 2016. The variables observed in this research were data of age of bulls, fresh semen volume (mL); sperm motility (%); mass movement; concentrations (million/mL) and frozen semen doses at each production at age of bulls. Nested design was applied to obtain and analyze data. Results showed that Age and bulls have significant effect (PAI Centre might adapt management of AI bulls to improve semen production.

  20. EDXRF and micro-EDXRF studies of Late Bronze Age metallurgical productions from Canedotes (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Pedro; Araújo, M. de Fátima; Canha, Alexandre

    2007-10-01

    Metallurgical production in Central Portugal during the Late Bronze Age was primarily based on copper-tin alloys, despite influences from the Atlantic area where copper-tin-lead alloys are common. Metallic artefacts from archaeological site of Canedotes (Central Portugal) were analysed by EDXRF to establish the type of alloys present. Polished spots in selected artefacts were also analysed by micro-EDXRF to determine the major and minor elemental composition of the original alloys. The collection constitutes 18 copper-tin artefacts and one unalloyed copper artefact with tin and arsenic as minor constituents. Artefacts that require a thermomechanical finishing process, such as tools and weapons, seem to have improved control over the tin content. The composition of two buttons, one cramp and one metallic droplet suggest that some of the copper sources were rich in arsenic. Finally, the low iron content of the artefacts seems to agree well with the smelting of copper ores in crucible furnaces, a smelting process used in certain areas of the Iberian Peninsula until pre-Roman times.

  1. The Influence of Phosphor and Binder Chemistry on the Aging Characteristics of Remote Phosphor Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Lynn; Yaga, Robert; Lamvik, Michael; Mills, Karmann; Fletcher, B.

    2017-06-30

    The influence of phosphor and binder layer chemistries on the lumen maintenance and color stability of remote phosphor disks were examined using wet high-temperature operational lifetime testing (WHTOL). As part of the experimental matrix, two different correlated color temperature (CCT) values, 2700 K and 5000 K, were studied and each had a different binder chemistry. The 2700 K samples used a urethane binder whereas the 5000 K samples used an acrylate binder. Experimental conditions were chosen to enable study of the binder and phosphor chemistries and to minimize photo-oxidation of the polycarbonate substrate. Under the more severe WHTOL conditions of 85°C and 85% relative humidity (RH), absorption in the binder layer significantly reduced luminous flux and produced a blue color shift. The milder WHTOL conditions of 75°C and 75% RH, resulted in chemical changes in the binder layer that may alter its index of refraction. As a result, lumen maintenance remained high, but a slight yellow shift was found. The aging of remote phosphor products provides insights into the impact of materials on the performance of phosphors in an LED lighting system.

  2. Chronic stress in adulthood followed by intermittent stress impairs spatial memory and the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals: prevention by FGL, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borcel, Erika; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; Herrero, Ana Isabel

    2008-01-01

    , a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule, during the 4 weeks of continuous stress not only prevented the deleterious effects of chronic stress on spatial memory, but also reduced the survival of the newly generated hippocampal cells in aging animals. FGL treatment did not, however, prevent......In this study, we examined whether chronic stress in adulthood can exert long-term effects on spatial-cognitive abilities and on the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals. Male Wistar rats were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress at midlife (12 months old) and then reexposed...... each week to a stress stimulus. When evaluated in the water maze at the early stages of aging (18 months old), chronic unpredictable stress accelerated spatial-cognitive decline, an effect that was accompanied by a reduction in the survival of newborn cells and in the number of adult granular cells...

  3. Influences of geo-spatial location on pre-exposure prophylaxis use in South Africa: positioning microbicides for better product uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Eliza M; Mansoor, Leila E; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha

    2017-06-01

    Young women bear a disproportionately high burden of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa, prioritising pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can be an integral part of HIV prevention combination strategies. Women initiated HIV prevention technology options will require consistent adherence, an imperative for product effectiveness. With several PrEP clinical trials underway; exploring women's acceptability to advances in HIV prevention technologies can better facilitate demand creation for future PrEP roll out. This study utilised the opportunity of post-trial access to CAPRISA 008 women (trial) and non-trial women from three geo-spatial settings (urban, rural and peri-urban) to identify microbicide acceptability and how product associations of microbicides can influence future HIV prevention choices. Six participatory workshops using participatory action research with art-based activities and discussion groups were conducted in KwaZulu-Natal with 104 women from various geo-spatial locations and social status to understand microbicide acceptability and product associations. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. The study found that women's acceptability and product association of the tenofovir gel microbicide differed according to rural and urban areas. Most urban women identified confidence, sexiness and classiness as key associations that will encourage microbicide acceptability and use, while rural women identified respect, responsibility and confidence as the key product associations, with increased focus on the individual and collective family/community benefits of product acceptance and use. Urban-rural differences suggest a market segmentation that is contextualised to be locally responsive to promote HIV prevention technologies. Various sexual encounters further determined the types of HIV prevention technologies women would consider. In line with WHO's recommendation that PrEP should be an additional prevention choice for people at risk of HIV, this

  4. Estimating Soil Moisture at High Spatial Resolution with Three Radiometric Satellite Products: A Study from a South-Eastern Australian Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, I. P.; Yeo, I. Y.; Tangdamrongsub, N.; Willgoose, G. R.; Hancock, G. R.; Wells, T.; Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2017-12-01

    Long-term soil moisture datasets at high spatial resolution are important in agricultural, hydrological, and climatic applications. The soil moisture estimates can be achieved using satellite remote sensing observations. However, the satellite soil moisture data are typically available at coarse spatial resolutions ( several tens of km), therefore require further downscaling. Different satellite soil moisture products have to be conjointly employed in developing a consistent time-series of high resolution soil moisture, while the discrepancies amongst different satellite retrievals need to be resolved. This study aims to downscale three different satellite soil moisture products, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, 25 km), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP, 36 km) and the SMAP-Enhanced (9 km), and to conduct an inter-comparison of the downscaled results. The downscaling approach is developed based on the relationship between the diurnal temperature difference and the daily mean soil moisture content. The approach is applied to two sub-catchments (Krui and Merriwa River) of the Goulburn River catchment in the Upper Hunter region (NSW, Australia) to estimate soil moisture at 1 km resolution for 2015. The three coarse spatial resolution soil moisture products and their downscaled results will be validated with the in-situ observations obtained from the Scaling and Assimilation of Soil Moisture and Streamflow (SASMAS) network. The spatial and temporal patterns of the downscaled results will also be analysed. This study will provide the necessary insights for data selection and bias corrections to maintain the consistency of a long-term high resolution soil moisture dataset. The results will assist in developing a time-series of high resolution soil moisture data over the south-eastern Australia.

  5. Regional-Scale High Spatial Resolution Mapping of Aboveground Net Primary Productivity (ANPP from Field Survey and Landsat Data: A Case Study for the Country of Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Tebbs

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an alternative approach for high spatial resolution vegetation productivity mapping at a regional scale, using a combination of Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI imagery and widely distributed ground-based Above-ground Net Primary Production (ANPP estimates. Our method searches through all available single-date NDVI imagery to identify the images which give the best NDVI–ANPP relationship. The derived relationships are then used to predict ANPP values outside of field survey plots. This approach enables the use of the high spatial resolution (30 m Landsat 8 sensor, despite its low revisit frequency that is further reduced by cloud cover. This is one of few studies to investigate the NDVI–ANPP relationship across a wide range of temperate habitats and strong relationships were observed (R2 = 0.706, which increased when only grasslands were considered (R2 = 0.833. The strongest NDVI–ANPP relationships occurred during the spring “green-up” period. A reserved subset of 20% of ground-based ANPP estimates was used for validation and results showed that our method was able to estimate ANPP with a RMSE of 15–21%. This work is important because we demonstrate a general methodological framework for mapping of ANPP from local to regional scales, with the potential to be applied to any temperate ecosystems with a pronounced green up period. Our approach allows spatial extrapolation outside of field survey plots to produce a continuous surface product, useful for capturing spatial patterns and representing small-scale heterogeneity, and well-suited for modelling applications. The data requirements for implementing this approach are also discussed.

  6. Performance of an Age Series of Alnus–Cardamom Plantations in the Sikkim Himalaya: Productivity, Energetics and Efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHARMA, G.; SHARMA, E.; SHARMA, R.; SINGH, K. K.

    2002-01-01

    Biomass, net primary productivity, energetics and energy efficiencies were estimated in an age series of Alnus–cardamom plantations in the eastern Himalaya. The impact of stand age (5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 years) on the performance of mixtures of N2‐fixing (Alnus nepalensis) and non‐N2‐fixing (large cardamom) plants was studied. Large cardamom (Amomum subulatum) is the most important perennial cash crop in the region and is cultivated predominantly under Alnus trees. Net primary productivity was lowest (7 t ha–1 per year) in the 40‐year‐old stand and was more than three times higher (22 t ha–1 per year) in the 15‐year‐old stand. Agronomic yield of large cardamom peaked between 15 and 20 years of age. Cardamom productivity doubled from the 5‐ to the 15‐year‐old stand, and then decreased with plantation age to reach a minimum in the 40‐year‐old stand. Performance of cardamom in association of N2‐fixing Alnus remained beneficial until 20 years of age. Annual net energy fixation was highest (444 × 106 kJ ha –1 per year) in the 15‐year‐old stand, being 1·4 times that of the 5‐year‐old stand and 2·9‐times that of the 40‐year‐old stand. Inverse relationships of production efficiency, energy conversion efficiency and energy utilized in N2‐fixation against stand age, and a positive relationship between production efficiency and energy conversion efficiency suggest that the younger plantations are more productive. The Alnus–cardamom plantation system will be sustainable by adopting a rotational cycle of 15 to 20 years. PMID:12096738

  7. Performance of an age series of alnus-cardamom plantations in the Sikkim Himalaya: productivity, energetics and efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, G; Sharma, E; Sharma, R; Singh, K K

    2002-03-01

    Biomass, net primary productivity, energetics and energy efficiencies were estimated in an age series of Alnus-cardamom plantations in the eastern Himalaya. The impact of stand age (5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 years) on the performance of mixtures of N2-fixing (Alnus nepalensis) and non-N2-fixing (large cardamom) plants was studied. Large cardamom (Amomum subulatum) is the most important perennial cash crop in the region and is cultivated predominantly under Alnus trees. Net primary productivity was lowest (7 t ha(-1) per year) in the 40-year-old stand and was more than three times higher (22 t ha(-1) per year) in the 15-year-old stand. Agronomic yield of large cardamom peaked between 15 and 20 years of age. Cardamom productivity doubled from the 5- to the 15-year-old stand, and then decreased with plantation age to reach a minimum in the 40-year-old stand. Performance of cardamom in association of N2-fixing Alnus remained beneficial until 20 years of age. Annual net energy fixation was highest (444 x 10(6) kJ ha(-1) per year) in the 15-year-old stand, being 1.4 times that of the 5-year-old stand and 2.9-times that of the 40-year-old stand. Inverse relationships of production efficiency, energy conversion efficiency and energy utilized in N2-fixation against stand age, and a positive relationship between production efficiency and energy conversion efficiency suggest that the younger plantations are more productive. The Alnus-cardamom plantation system will be sustainable by adopting a rotational cycle of 15 to 20 years.

  8. Armorican arrowhead biographies: Production and function of an Early Bronze Age prestige good from Brittany (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brittany can pride itself on the Armorican arrowheads found in Early Bronze Age graves (2150-1700 BC. In the present state of knowledge, these are the only specialized craft products in knapped flint produced in this region at the western edge of continental Europe. Admired since the 19th century, these flint arrowheads have never really been studied. Due to the wealth of graves and grave-goods, a relatively precise study can be undertaken of the development of these craft products, despite the low number of reliable radiocarbon dates.These arrowheads are characterized by a well-defined type (pointed tang and oblique barbs most often combined with ogival form. Raw materials show the selection of a high quality yellow translucent flint, of which the origin has to be sought at more than 400 kilometers (Lower Turonian flint from Cher Valley. From a technical point of view, Armorican arrowheads reveal a great mastery of retouch by pressure-flaking. This skill is written in stone by the perfection of forms, the extreme thinness (until 2,5 mm thick and very long barbs (until 25 mm long. Such work could not have been done without the use of copper, even bronze, awls. Moreover, some marks may testify to the implication of these tools. On 549 arrowheads that have reached to us, none of them presents diagnostical impact features. However, use-wear analysis indicates that most of them were hafted (adhesive traces, bright spots, blunt edges. These facts suggest that they are less functional arrowheads than objects for the show. In the graves, Armorican arrowheads are frequently set down carefully in wooden boxes taking the shaft off.The Armorican arrowheads with their exotic raw materials, their high-degree of technicality, and their absence of use, have all features of a prestige good. They have been discovered by dozens in few graves under barrows with very rich funeral items (bronze daggers decorated with golden pins, precious bracers, silver beakers

  9. Role of Production Area, Seasonality and Age of Fermented Camel (Camelus Dromedarius Milk Gariss on Mineral Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ismail Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the differences between some minerals content of gariss samples collected from two different production areas in two different production systems (i.e. traditional system Kordofan area and semi-intensive system- which, the camels are kept in an open barn and graze around the farm. The lactating female camels are supplemented with concentrates in addition to good quality ration containing groundnut cake and Sorghum biocolor and water supply upon required in Kordofan and Khartoum provinces in Sudan at the different seasons (summer, autumn and winter and their gariss samples were collected. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus of gariss samples collected in autumn season (Kordofan area, summer season (Khartoum area, and winter season (Khartoum and Kordofan areas were determined, after that the age of gariss was noted from farmers directly when the samples were collected. Four different ages of gariss which registered were (5-8 hrs, 12 hrs, 48 hrs and more than 48 hrs. Each fermentation time (age of gariss was used for analyzing mineral contents. The results showed that gariss prepared from different production locations and in different seasons in Kordofan and Khartoum production areas were statistically different in most of the mineral contents determined. To conclude, different feeding sources or different physiological status may affect camels’ milk and consequently their gariss product, also different age of gariss had affects the mineral content of milk.

  10. Local Rural Product as a "Relic" Spatial Strategy in Globalised Rural Spaces: Evidence from County Clare (Ireland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Geoff A.; Whitehead, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Using a case study from County Clare (Ireland), this study critically analyses notions of "local" rural production. It investigates where rural businesses source the different components of their products and how these interrelate with the locality, how local businesses use the notion of "local" in their product branding, and…

  11. Evaluation of corneal thickness alterations during menstrual cycle in productive age women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Amiri Ghahfarokhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the change in corneal thickness through different phases of menstrual cycle in women who are in their productive age. Materials and Methods: Fifty healthy women with normal past medical history were enrolled in this prospective study. Central corneal thickness was measured with ultrasound pachymeter three times during a menstrual cycle: Beginning of the cycle (days 1-3, ovulation time, and at the end of cycle (days 27-32. We confirmed ovulation time with determining a peak in luteinizing hormone in urine. To avoid the diurnal variation of the corneal thickness which is well recognized, we checked all our subjects at 10 in the morning. Results: In days 1 to 3 of menstruation, mean corneal thickness was 541.40±11.36 and 540.82±11.70 microns for left and right eyes respectively. At ovulation time the mean thickness changed to 556.50±7.11 and 555.98±7.26 microns for left and right eyes respectively, and at the end of the cycle, the corneal thickness turned in to 536.38±12.83 and 535.48±13.08 microns for left and right eyes respectively. The difference of corneal thickness was statistically significant relating to the different stages of menstrual cycle. Conclusion: The thickest cornea during the menstruation cycle is achieved at the ovulation time and the thinnest at the end of the cycle and this should be taken in to account whilst plan to do a corneal refractive surgery.

  12. Production of neutral pions Pb+Au collisions at 158 AGeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soualah, Rachik

    2009-06-24

    The direct photons are a particularly useful probe to search for an evidence of the Quark-Gluon Plasma formation in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Direct photons can be extracted experimentally by measuring the large background from {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} meson decays. This thesis work represents the production of the neutral pion mesons measured with the CERES/NA45 experiment at the top SPS energy in 158 AGeV/c Pb-Au collisions. The {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} (98.8%) is the decay channel used in the reconstruction scheme. The {pi}{sup 0} measurement is based on the data taken in the year 2000. The CERES experiment can measure the photons that convert shortly before the TPC by measuring the e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs in the TPC. The RICH2 mirror is the main converter used for this analysis. The presented analysis method describes in more details the selection of the e{sup +} and e{sup -} tracks using only the TPC information to reconstruct the converted photon. A Secondary vertex technique was developed and used to select the photons converted in the RICH2 mirror area. The extraction of the {pi}{sup 0} needs a careful study of the combinatorial background determined using the mixed event technique. The obtained invariant mass distribution of the two photons defined well the {pi}{sup 0} peak. The neutral pion transverse spectra compared to phenomenological models and other experiments validate our analysis method. (orig.)

  13. Typologies and Spatialization of Agricultural Production Systems in Rondônia, Brazil: Linking Land Use, Socioeconomics and Territorial Configuration

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    Cláudio Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The current Amazon landscape consists of heterogeneous mosaics formed by interactions between the original forest and productive activities. Recognizing and quantifying the characteristics of these landscapes is essential for understanding agricultural production chains, assessing the impact of policies, and in planning future actions. Our main objective was to construct the regionalization of agricultural production for Rondônia State (Brazilian Amazon at the municipal level. We adopted a decision tree approach, using land use maps derived from remote sensing data (PRODES and TerraClass combined with socioeconomic data. The decision trees allowed us to allocate municipalities to one of five agricultural production systems: (i coexistence of livestock production and intensive agriculture; (ii semi-intensive beef and milk production; (iii semi-intensive beef production; (iv intensive beef and milk production, and; (v intensive beef production. These production systems are, respectively, linked to mechanized agriculture (i, traditional cattle farming with low management, with (ii or without (iii a significant presence of dairy farming, and to more intensive livestock farming with (iv or without (v a significant presence of dairy farming. The municipalities and associated production systems were then characterized using a wide variety of quantitative metrics grouped into four dimensions: (i agricultural production; (ii economics; (iii territorial configuration, and; (iv social characteristics. We found that production systems linked to mechanized agriculture predominate in the south of the state, while intensive farming is mainly found in the center of the state. Semi-intensive livestock farming is mainly located close to the southwest frontier and in the north of the state, where human occupation of the territory is not fully consolidated. This distributional pattern reflects the origins of the agricultural production system of Rond

  14. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs accumulation in skin: relations with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder

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    Renata de Almeida França

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, main causes related with cardiovascular disease (CVD and bone mineral disorder (CKD-BMD. Uremic toxins, as advanced glycation end products (AGEs, are non-traditional cardiovascular risk factor and play a role on development of CKD-BMD in CKD. The measurement of skin autofluorescence (sAF is a noninvasive method to assess the level of AGEs in tissue, validated in CKD patients. Objective: The aim of this study is analyze AGEs measured by sAF levels (AGEs-sAF and its relations with CVD and BMD parameters in HD patients. Methods: Twenty prevalent HD patients (HD group and healthy subjects (Control group, n = 24, performed biochemical tests and measurements of anthropometric parameters and AGEs-sAF. In addition, HD group performed measurement of intact parathormone (iPTH, transthoracic echocardiogram and radiographies of pelvis and hands for vascular calcification score. Results: AGEs-sAF levels are elevated both in HD and control subjects ranged according to the age, although higher at HD than control group. Single high-flux HD session does not affect AGEs-sAF levels. AGEs-sAF levels were not related to ventricular mass, interventricular septum or vascular calcification in HD group. AGEs-sAF levels were negatively associated with serum iPTH levels. Conclusion: Our study detected a negative correlation of AGEs-sAF with serum iPTH, suggesting a role of AGEs on the pathophysiology of bone disease in HD prevalent patients. The nature of this relation and the clinical application of this non-invasive methodology for evaluation AGEs deposition must be confirmed and clarified in future studies.

  15. Redefining face contour with a novel anti-aging cosmetic product: an open-label, prospective clinical study

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    Garre A

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aurora Garre,1 Gemma Martinez-Masana,1 Jaime Piquero-Casals,2 Corinne Granger1 1Innovation and Development, ISDIN S.A., Barcelona, Spain; 2Dermik Clinic, Barcelona, Spain Background: Skin aging is accelerated by multiple extrinsic factors: ultraviolet radiation, smoking and pollution increase oxidative activity, damaging cellular and extracellular components such as DNA, proteins, and lipids. With age, collagen and hyaluronic acid levels decline, resulting in loss of elasticity and moisture of the skin. Over time this damage leads to characteristic signs that make the skin look older: altered facial contour, sagging skin, wrinkles, and an uneven complexion. This study evaluated the anti-aging effects of a new facial cream formulated with carnosine, Alteromonas ferment extract, crosspolymer hyaluronic acid, and a tripeptide. Methods: An open-label intra-individual study to assess the anti-aging efficacy of the investigational product in 33 women aged 45 to 65 years. The product was applied twice daily for 56 days. Facial contour and skin deformation, elasticity, hydration, and complexion were measured with specialized equipment at baseline and days 28 and 56. Additionally, subjects completed questionnaires at days 28 and 56 on the perceived efficacy and cosmetic characteristics of the product. Results: After 56 days of use of the investigational product, a redefining effect was observed, with a significant decrease in sagging jawline (7%. Skin was significantly more hydrated (12%, firmer (29%, and more elastic (20% (P<0.001 for all. On complexion assessment, skin texture (a measure of skin smoothness and spots (brown and red skin lesions also improved significantly (12% and 6% decrease, respectively. In the subjective self-evaluation, the majority of subjects reported that the skin was visibly tightened and more elastic, flexible, and moisturized (91%, 88%, 91%, and 90%, respectively. The product was well tolerated with no adverse events reported

  16. Spatial Consequences of Biogas Production and Agricultural Changes in the Czech Republic after EU Accession: Mutual Symbiosis, Coexistence or Parasitism?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinát, Stanislav; Dvořák, Petr; Frantál, Bohumil; Klusáček, Petr; Kunc, Josef; Kulla, M.; Mintálová, T.; Navrátil, J.; Van der Horst, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 2 (2013), s. 1-18 ISSN 1212-2157 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0025 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : anaerobic digestion plants * agriculture * Czech Republic * spatial differentiation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://geography.upol.cz/soubory/vyzkum/aupo/Acta-44-2/Martinat_et_al_PRAC.pdf

  17. A Spatial Decision Support System Framework for the Evaluation of Biomass Energy Production Locations: Case Study in the Regional Unit of Drama, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Ioannou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Renewable Energy Sources are expected to play a very important role in energy production in the following years. They constitute an energy production methodology which, if properly enabled, can ensure energy sufficiency as well as the protection of the environment. Energy production from biomass in particular is a very common method, which exploits a variety of resources (wood and wood waste, agricultural crops and their by-products after cultivation, animal wastes, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW and food processing wastes for the production of energy. This paper presents a Spatial Decision Support System, which enables managers to locate the most suitable areas for biomass power plant installation. For doing this, fuzzy logic and fuzzy membership functions are used for the creation of criteria layers and suitability maps. In this paper, we use a Multicriteria Decision Analysis methodology (Analytical Hierarchy Process combined with fuzzy system elements for the determination of the weight coefficients of the participating criteria. Then, based on the combination of fuzzy logic and theAnalytic Hierarchy Process (AHP, a final proposal is created thatdivides the area into four categories regarding their suitability forsupporting a biomass energy production power plant. For the two optimal locations, the biomass is also calculated.The framework is applied to theRegional Unit of Drama, which is situated in Northern Greece and is very well known for the area’s forest and agricultural production.

  18. Monitoring land surface albedo and vegetation dynamics using high spatial and temporal resolution synthetic time series from Landsat and the MODIS BRDF/NBAR/albedo product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuosen; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Sun, Qingsong; Kim, JiHyun; Erb, Angela M.; Gao, Feng; Román, Miguel O.; Yang, Yun; Petroy, Shelley; Taylor, Jeffrey R.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Papuga, Shirley A.

    2017-07-01

    Seasonal vegetation phenology can significantly alter surface albedo which in turn affects the global energy balance and the albedo warming/cooling feedbacks that impact climate change. To monitor and quantify the surface dynamics of heterogeneous landscapes, high temporal and spatial resolution synthetic time series of albedo and the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) were generated from the 500 m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) operational Collection V006 daily BRDF/NBAR/albedo products and 30 m Landsat 5 albedo and near-nadir reflectance data through the use of the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM). The traditional Landsat Albedo (Shuai et al., 2011) makes use of the MODIS BRDF/Albedo products (MCD43) by assigning appropriate BRDFs from coincident MODIS products to each Landsat image to generate a 30 m Landsat albedo product for that acquisition date. The available cloud free Landsat 5 albedos (due to clouds, generated every 16 days at best) were used in conjunction with the daily MODIS albedos to determine the appropriate 30 m albedos for the intervening daily time steps in this study. These enhanced daily 30 m spatial resolution synthetic time series were then used to track albedo and vegetation phenology dynamics over three Ameriflux tower sites (Harvard Forest in 2007, Santa Rita in 2011 and Walker Branch in 2005). These Ameriflux sites were chosen as they are all quite nearby new towers coming on line for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), and thus represent locations which will be served by spatially paired albedo measures in the near future. The availability of data from the NEON towers will greatly expand the sources of tower albedometer data available for evaluation of satellite products. At these three Ameriflux tower sites the synthetic time series of broadband shortwave albedos were evaluated using the tower albedo measurements with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) less than 0.013 and a

  19. When Can Insurers Offer Products That Dominate Delayed Old-Age Pension Benefit Claiming?

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, E.A.T.; De Waegenaere, A.M.B.; Nijman, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    It is common practice for public pension schemes to offer individuals the option to delay benefit claiming until after the normal retirement age and adjust the annual benefit level as a result. This adjustment is often not actuarially neutral with respect to the age at which benefits are claimed. The degree of actuarial nonequivalence varies by interest rates as well as individual characteristics such as gender and age. In this paper we show that actuarial nonequivalence can imply that deferr...

  20. Advertisement and knowledge of tobacco products among Ellisras rural children aged 11 to 18 years: Ellisras Longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monyeki, K.D.; Kemper, H.C.G.; Amusa, L.O.; Motshwane, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tobacco products use is the leading cause of chronic diseases morbidity and mortality. This study explores an exposure to tobacco advertisements factors and knowledge, an association with snuff/pipe usage and cigarette smoking among Ellisras rural children aged between 11 to 18

  1. Comparison of Different Height–Diameter Modelling Techniques for Prediction of Site Productivity in Natural Uneven-Aged Pure Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshuang Duan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable estimates of forest site productivity are a central element of forest management. The model of height-diameter relationship of dominant trees using algebraic difference approach (ADA is a commonly used method to measure site productivity of natural uneven-aged stands. However, the existing models of this method do not recognize site type or sample plot specific variability in height curves; thus, it cannot be effectively used to estimate site type or sample plot-related site productivity for natural uneven-aged stands. Two primary subject-specific approaches, ADA with dummy variable (DV (ADA + DV and ADA with combination of dummy variable and nonlinear mixed-effects modelling (CM (ADA + CM, were proposed for height–diameter modelling. Height–diameter models developed with ADA, ADA + DV and ADA + CM were compared using data from 4161 observations on 349 permanent sample plots of four major natural uneven-aged pure stands (Spruce, Korean Larch, Mongolian Oak, and White Birch in northeastern China. It was found that models developed with ADA + CM provided the best performance, followed by the models with ADA + DV, and the models developed with ADA performed the worst. Random effects at the plot level were substantial, and their inclusion greatly improved the model’s accuracy. More importantly, the models developed with ADA + CM provide an effective method for quantifying site type- and sample plot-specific forest site productivity for uneven-aged pure stands.

  2. Relationships between age at first calving, herd management criteria and lifetime milk, fat, and protein production in holstein cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from 69,145 Holstein cows that calved for the first time in 2005 were evaluated to determine the influence of age at first calving (AFC) on first lactation and lifetime production in commercial dairy herds. A DHI database was divided into four herd management criteria (HMC). The four HMC were: ...

  3. Age and gender differences in the influence of extrinsic product information on acceptability for RTD green tea beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ye-Won; Lee, Soh Min; Kim, Kwang-Ok

    2016-03-15

    The introduction of ready-to-drink (RTD) green tea beverage has allowed diverse consumers to consume green teas and related products. Green tea that has been traditionally consumed for its delicate flavor characteristics is also widely consumed for its recognition as a healthy product. Because it is reported that age difference exists in consideration of health-related information, the objective of the study was to investigate how sensory and non-sensory factors, in particular health-related information, price and packaging, would affect the flavor acceptability of green tea beverages, depending on consumers' age and gender. Regardless of the product information, old consumers preferred products that provided an indication of health beneficial effect. On the other hand, young consumers tended to be influenced by extrinsic product information such as packaging, brand/manufacturer and/or price, though these consumers were not so much influenced by health beneficial information as were the old consumers. The findings of the study implied that the influence of non-sensory information such as health beneficial information in flavor liking differed depending mostly on consumers' age, and little on gender, for RTD green tea beverages. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Spatial distribution, territoriality and sound production by tropical cryptic butterflies (Hamadryas, Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: implications for the "industrial melanism" debate

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    Julián Monge-Nájera

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Neotropical butterflies of the genus Hamadryas, noted by the emission of sound, spend much time perching on trees and are believed to be cryptically patterned and colored with respect to tree trunks and branches they use as perching sites, but the subject had not been studied previously. This paper describes spatial distribution, territoriality and sound production in five species, under natural conditions: Hamadryas amphinome (Lucas, 1853, H. februa (Godart, 1824, H. feronia (Fruhstorfer, 1916, H. glauconome (Bates, 1864 and H. guatemalena (Bates, 1864. Tree characteristics and use by butterflies were recorded under natural conditions in open habitats (grassland thinly covered with trees in Costa Rica and Panama, avoiding the problems that affected previous natural selection studies in Biston betularia (the "industrial melanism" moth. Males perched on the trees and used them