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Sample records for age gastric cancer

  1. Cancer stem cells in Helicobacter pylori infection and aging: Implications for gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edi; Levi; Paula; Sochacki; Nabiha; Khoury; Bhaumik; B; Patel; Adhip; PN; Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrated the combined effects of aging and carcinogen treatment on cancer stem/stem-like cells(CSCs) of gastric mucosa in an animal model. METHODS: In this study we investigated the effects of aging and Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) inflammation as a model for inflammation induced carcinogenesis in human and rat gastric mucosa samples. In aging studies, we compared 4-mo old(young) with 22 mo(aged) old Fischer-344 rats. For human studies, gastric biop-sies and resection specimens representing normal mucosa or different stages of H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas were used for determining the expression of stem cell markers CD166, ALDH1 and LGR5. In addition we performed immunofluorescent double labeling for B-catenin and Lgr5 in both rat and human gastric tissues to examine the status of Wnt signaling in these cells. RESULTS: CSC markers ALDH1, LGR5, and CD166 were expressed in very low levels in normal human gastric mucosa or young rat gastric mucosa. In contrast, level of expression for all three markers significantly increased in H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas as well as in normal gastric mucosa in aged rats. We also observed cytoplasmic B-catenin staining in both aged rat and human H. pylori inflamed gastric mucosa, which were found to be colocalized with Lgr5 immunoreactive cells. The increased number of ALDH1, CD166 and LGR5 positive cells in H. pylori gastritis indicates that increased number of stem-like cells in gastric mucosa is an early event, and may constitute an important step in the progression to neoplasia. CONCLUSION: Our observation of the age-related increase in cancer stem/stem-like cells in the gastric mucosa may explain the increased incidence of gastric cancer during aging. Combination of aging and H. pylori infection may have additive effects in progression to neoplasia.

  2. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  3. [Gastric cancer].

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    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  4. Familial gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bresciani Cláudio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Familial aggregation of gastric cancer has pointed out to a possible hereditary and genetic factor involved in the carcinogenesis of this disease. The diffuse type gastric cancer patients are frequently younger and the tumor has locally infiltrative growth pattern early in its development. Observation of families with frequent early onset gastric cancer has led to the identification of a novel gene implicated in gastric cancer susceptibility: CDH1/E-cadherin. Diffuse familiar gastric cancer is defined as any family presenting: two first-degree relatives with diffuse gastric cancer, one of them with age under 50 years or at least 3 first-degree relatives irrespective age of onset. CASE REPORT: The family reported by us does not fit in any of the classification proposed. The precise identification of these families by clinical and molecular tools is of great importance. The case reported is an example of a family that probably is a form of hereditary gastric cancer not yet fully understood. CONCLUSION: Soon there will be new criteria, possibly including genetic and molecular characteristics.

  5. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... has stayed about the same since 2005. Stomach (gastric) cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ...

  6. Analysis of demographic characteristics in 3242 young age gastric cancer patients in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hye; Won; Chung; Sung; Hoon; Noh; Jong-Baeck; Lim

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the epidemiologic features of young age gastric cancer(GC). METHODS:Retrospectively,a total of 3242 patients with GC between 18 and 45 years of age and 3000 sex-and age-matched controls were reviewed.All subjects were stratified into 3 groups based on age (A,18-30 years;B,31-40 years;C,41-45 years). Epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors were investigated with reference to their age and gender. RESULTS:Compared to controls,more frequent intake of high risk diet(P=0.00075),history of ...

  7. The influence of advanced age on the morbi-mortality of gastric cancer after curative surgery

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    Araceli Mayol-Oltra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: gastric cancer (GC is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Spain after lung, colorectal, breast and prostate tumours. Surgery remains the only potentially curative treatment in localized gastric cancer. Objective: the aim of our study is to evaluate and compare the clinical and surgical aspects, development of postoperative complications and outcomes of patients over 75 years old compared with younger patients in our centre. Material and methods: comparative retrospective study, from March 2003 to June 2011. We diagnosed 166 cases of GC, 109 (65 % underwent curative surgery. Two groups were settled: group M: ≥ 75 years (41 patients and group m: < 75 years (68 patients. We analyzed age, sex, comorbidities, tumour location, clinical stage, perioperative chemotherapy, surgical technique, postoperative complications, recurrence and mortality from cancer. Results: a more frequent presence of cardiovascular comorbidities and a greater postoperative mortality by medical causes were the only significant differences between both groups. Also, a lower proportion of patients in group M received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent D1 lymphadenectomy. However, the rate of local and systemic recurrence and overall survival were similar in both groups. Conclusions: age should not be considered a contraindication for curative surgery on GC. The general condition and comorbidities are more important to contraindicate surgical treatment.

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms in gastric cancer.

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    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2012-06-01

    Cancer is considered one of the major health issues worldwide, and gastric cancer accounted for 8% of total cases and 10% of total deaths in 2008. Gastric cancer is considered an age-related disease, and the total number of newly diagnosed cases has been increasing as a result of the higher life expectancy. Therefore, the basic mechanisms underlying gastric tumorigenesis is worth investigation. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling complex and miRNA, involved in gastric cancer. As the studies in gastric cancer continue, the mapping of an epigenome code is not far for this disease. In conclusion, an epigenetic therapy might appear in the not too distant future.

  9. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gastric Cancer Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... from the . There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach cancer. Several types of screening tests have been ...

  10. Lung, gastric and colorectal cancer mortality by occupation and industry among working-aged men in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Hisashi; Wada, Koji; Prieto-Merino, David; Smith, Derek R.

    2017-01-01

    We examined occupational and industrial differences in lung, gastric, and colorectal cancer risk among Japanese men of working age (25–64 years) using the 2010 Japanese national survey data for occupation and industry-specific death rates. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the age-adjusted incident rate ratios by lung, gastric, and colorectal cancers, with manufacturing used as the referent occupation or industry. Unemployed Japanese men and those in manufacturing had an 8–11-fold increased risk of lung, gastric and colorectal cancer. The highest mortality rates for lung and colorectal cancer by occupation were “administrative and managerial” (by occupation) and “mining” (by industry). For gastric cancer, the highest mortality rate was “agriculture” (by occupation) and “mining” (by industry). By occupation; Japanese men in service occupations, those in administrative and managerial positions, those in agriculture, forestry and fisheries, and those in professional and engineering categories had higher relative mortality risks for lung, gastric, and colorectal cancers. By industry; mining, electricity and gas, fisheries, and agriculture and forestry had the higher mortality risks for those cancers. Unemployed men had higher mortality rates than men in any occupation and industry for all three cancers. Overall, this study suggests that for Japanese men, occupations and industries may be a key social determinant of health. PMID:28230191

  11. Epidemiology of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katherine D Crew; Alfred I Neugut

    2006-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have fallen dramatically in US and elsewhere over the past several decades. Nonetheless, gastric cancer remains a major public health issue as the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Demographic trends differ by tumor location and histology. While there has been a marked decline in distal, intestinal type gastric cancers, the incidence of proximal, diffuse type adenocarcinomas of the gastric cardia has been increasing, particularly in the Western countries. Incidence by tumor sub-site also varies widely based on geographic location, race, and socioeconomic status. Distal gastric cancer predominates in developing countries, among blacks, and in lower socioeconomic groups, whereas proximal tumors are more common in developed countries, among whites, and in higher socio-economic classes. Diverging trends in the incidence of gastric cancer by tumor location suggest that they may represent two diseases with different etiologies. The main risk factors for distal gastric cancer include Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and dietary factors, whereas gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity play important roles in the development of proximal stomach cancer. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of gastric cancer, and to discuss strategies for primary prevention.

  12. Diet and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šipetić Sandra B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case-control study, conducted in Serbia during the period 1998-2000, was to investigate whether diet was associated with the development of gastric cancer. The case group consisted of 131 patients with histologically confirmed gastric cancer, and the control group of 131 patients with orthopedics diseases and injuries. Cases and controls were individually matched by age (±± 2 years, gender, and place of residence. On the basis of multivariate logistic regression analysis, following factors were found as independent risk factors for gastric cancer: more frequent consumption of high-fat milk [Odds ratio (OR =1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.99-2.16]; mutton, lamb and/or calf meat (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.11-5.47, sugar (OR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.43-3.18, semi-white bread (OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.25-3.50, and salting food (OR = 5.72, 95% CI = 2.63-12.42. Factors found as protective were: more frequent consumption of margarine (OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.25-0.69, „other“ cheeses (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.29 - 0.77, and fish (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.19-0.76.

  13. Gastrin and Gastric Cancer

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    Waldum, Helge L.; Sagatun, Liv; Mjønes, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer although occurring in reduced frequency is still an important disease, partly because of the bad prognosis when occurring in western countries. This decline in occurrence may mainly be due to the reduced prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, which is the most important cause of gastric cancer. There exist many different pathological classifications of gastric carcinomas, but the most useful seems to be the one by Lauren into intestinal and diffuse types since these types seldom transform into the other and also have different epidemiology. During the nearly 30 years that have passed since the groundbreaking description of Hp as the cause of gastritis and gastric cancer, a continuous search for the mechanism by which Hp infection causes gastric cancer has been done. Interestingly, it is mainly atrophic gastritis of the oxyntic mucosa that predisposes to gastric cancer possibly by inducing hypoacidity and hypergastrinemia. There are many arguments in favor of an important role of gastrin and its target cell, the enterochromaffin-like cell, in gastric carcinogenesis. The role of gastrin in gastric carcinogenesis implies caution in the long-term treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion inducing secondary hypergastrinemia, in a common disease like gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:28144230

  14. Current issues in gastric cancer epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patru, C L; Surlin, V; Georgescu, I; Patru, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most common malignant tumors of digestive tract continues to be a major health problem by frequency, aggressiveness and low rate of cure in symptomatic stage. Although its incidence is decreasing (especially in the West), globally the gastric cancer is ranked fourth in incidence among cancers at various sites. Despite these developments, the gastric cancer mortality, overall declining globally, is high. especially in the West where even if diagnosed fewer cases of gastric cancer, TNM stages are advanced and have a poor prognosis. In contrast, in Japan, where the incidence is still high, the percentage of cases diagnosed at the stage of "early gastric cancer" has greatly increased, thus improving prognosis. Gastric neoplasia affects more men, age range 50-70 years, disadvantaged social classes and black race. In Romania the gastric cancer incidence is increasing over recent years, presenting variations across the country being more common in men compared with women, reaching a peak of incidence around age 60. Gastric cancer mortality in the world places Romania among the countries with average mortality. Gastric cancer prognosis remains extremely reserved, in close correlation with tumor stage at diagnosis, surgical treatment being the only possibility to provide improved survival, especially in the early stages. Improvement of survival rate in recent years is due to increased gastric resectability result of an earlier diagnosis, a more complex treatment and a closer monitoring of the population at risk.

  15. Cate's Story: Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Megan

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and is thought to be responsible for about 10% of cancer-related deaths across the globe. A small proportion of all gastric cancers arise because of a known hereditary syndrome, the most common of which is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). This is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an increased risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer at a young age. The gene responsible for HDGC is CDH1, also known as E-cadherin, a germline mutation conferring an 80% risk of developing gastric cancer during the lifetime of the carrier. Females with germline CDH1 mutations face an additional risk of developing lobular breast cancer, with a reported cumulative risk of 60% by the age of 80 years.
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  16. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects...

  17. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright.

  18. The gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelayo Correa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer ranks fourth in incidence and second in mortality among all cancers worldwide. Despite the decrease in incidencein some regions of the world, gastric cancer continues to present a major clinical challenge due to most cases beingdiagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. The development of gastric cancer is acomplex and multi-factored process involving a number of etiological factors and multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations.Among the predisposing factors are: Helicobacter pylori infection, high salt intake, smoking, and, in a small percentage ofpatients, a family genetic component. More than 90% of stomach cancers are adenocarcinomas, which are classified intotwo major histological groups: intestinal and diffuse. Intestinal adenocarcinoma is preceded by a sequence of gastric lesionsknown as Correa´s cascade. According to the anatomical position, adenocarcinomas are classified as proximal (originatingin the cardia and distal (originating in the body and antrum. This is a classification that recognizes two different clinicalentities. In general, the only possible cure for the disease is resection of the tumor in an early stage for which the identificationand monitoring of at-risk patients play a significant role. With the exception of Japan, no effective early detection programsexist. Anti-H. pylori has been shown to be an effective measure in the prevention of gastric cancer.

  19. The effect of age on illness cognition, subjective well-being and psychological distress among gastric cancer patients.

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    Palgi, Yuval; Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Shacham Shmueli, Einat; Shrira, Amit

    2014-10-01

    The current study examined illness cognition-thoughts and perceptions-patients hold regarding their illness and psychological adaptation in various age groups. More specifically, we aimed to examine whether illness cognition among cancer patients is related to their age. In addition, such association of illness cognition and age was also examined with respect to subjective well-being and psychological distress. A cross-sectional sample comprised of 123 consecutive post-treatment gastric outpatients. Their mean age was 57.31 (SD = 12.74), 56.9% (n = 70) were men and 81.3% (n = 100) were married. The results indicated a higher level of acceptance and a lower level of psychological distress among the young-old participants (60-69) compared with their counterparts. The oldest group (70+ years) had the highest level of helplessness and psychological distress, and the lowest level of acceptance, satisfaction and affect balance compared with the young-old participants. Among gastric cancer patients, age was found to be a factor relevant to the understanding of illness cognitions (acceptance and sense of helplessness) along with subjective well-being and psychological distress. These findings have practical implications for working with older cancer patients. Implications of these results are discussed.

  20. Gastric metastasis of bilateral breast cancer

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    Belaïd, Asma; Mghirbi, Fahmi; Béhi, Khalil; Doghri, Raoudha; Benna, Farouk

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The most frequent metastatic sites are lung, bone, liver and brain. On the other hand, gastric metastases are rare. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC) occurs rarely. Lobular carcinoma is the histological type most often associated with bilateral breast carcinomas and gastric metastases. We made a retrospective study including four patients followed in the Salah Azaiez Institute, for a bilateral breast cancer with gastric metastases. We analyzed the epidemiological, anatomoclinical and therapeutic particularities of this rare entity. Symptoms were unspecific. The diagnosis of gastric metastasis of the SBBC was confirmed by a histopathological examination of an endoscopic biopsy. The median age was 46.2 years (range, 36–51 years) and the median time until the gastric involvement was 19 months (range, 0–41 months). None of patients had a surgical treatment for the gastric location. All Patients received at least one line of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Median survival following the detection of gastric involvement was 22 months (range, 1–56 months). Gastric metastases from breast cancer are rare and frequently associated with other distant metastasis. Symptoms are unspecific and endoscopy may not be contributive. Therefore, gastric involvement is underestimated. Lobular infiltrating carcinoma (LIC) is the most histological type incriminated in its occurrence. The supply of immunohistochemistry is crucial to distinguish between primary or metastatic gastric cancer. PMID:28280631

  1. Familial gastric cancer: detection of a hereditary cause helps to understand its etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Vogelaar Ingrid P; van der Post Rachel S; Bisseling Tanya M; van Krieken J Han JM; Ligtenberg Marjolijn JL; Hoogerbrugge Nicoline

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Worldwide, gastric cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer, with a high morbidity and mortality. Several environmental factors predispose to the development of gastric cancer, such as Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and smoking. Familial clustering of gastric cancer is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of gastric cancer cases arise in the setting of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In families with HDGC, gastric cancer presents at relatively young age. ...

  2. Epidemiological characteristics of gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Šipetić Sandra B.; Tomić-Kundaković Slađana; Vlajinac Hristina D.; Maksimović Nataša; Knežević Anita; Kisić Darija

    2005-01-01

    Introduction. Gastric cancer was the third most common cancer worldwide in 2000, accounting for approximately 876 000 new cases or 9% of the global cancer burden. Epidemiological characteristics As a result of changes in diet, the incidence of gastric cancer has decreased in most countries. Now days, consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits is increasing in regard to canned food. In addition to unhealthy diet, the main risk factors for gastric cancer are H. pylori infection, alcohol consump...

  3. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  4. [Gastric carcinoma in the aged].

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    Pannella, A; Laboranti, F; Guardamagna, A; Di Ninno, N; Fossa, M

    1989-08-31

    After examining the literature on the subject, all patients aged over 60 and admitted to the Surgical Pathology Department of Pavia University from 1-1-1974 to 31-12-1985, suffering from gastric carcinoma have been considered. From the results obtained it is concluded that stomach cancer is a disease that preferentially affects the IIIrd age, usually occurring with atypical symptomatology that leads the patient to underestimate the seriousness of the disease, and impeding early diagnosis that would be effective for therapeutic purposes. It is therefore essential for the necessary examination to be carried out at the first warning symptoms. Further, the general state of these patients has to be controlled and appropriate treatment sought to treat the various accompanying conditions and so prepare the patient for operation.

  5. Direct gastroscopy for detecting gastric cancer in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张子其; 万军; 朱成; 王孟薇; 赵东海; 付永和; 张建萍; 王亚红; 吴本俨

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of direct gastroscopy for detecting gastric cancer. Methods Clinical screening by direct gastroscopy was performed for gastric cancer (GC) from September 1985 to July 1998. 3048 elderly people were screened. Their age ranged from 60 to 93 years, and 2034 of the 3084 were followed up. Results Ninety-two patients with gastric cancer were discovered by gastroscopy, representing 3.02% of the screened population. The rate of early gastric cancer (EGC) was 63.04% (58/92) of all gastric cancers detected. The rate was up to 79.59% (39/49) on follow-up, and was 74.14% (43/51) in asymptomatic patients with gastric cancer. The excision rate was 88.89% for patients with gastric cancer, and 100% for patients with early gastric cancer. The 5-year survival rate was 91.89% for patients with gastric cancer, and 96.30% for patients with early gastric cancer. Conclusion Clinical screening and follow-up by direct gastroscopy in persons over 60 years of age are a safe and effective method for raising the 5-year survival and detection rate of gastric cancer, especially early gastric cancer.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions hereditary diffuse gastric cancer hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  7. Nutrition and Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo La Vecchia; Silvia Franceschi

    2000-01-01

    The reasons for the worldwide decline in stomach cancer incidence and mortality rates are not fully understood, but dietary changes are clearly implicated. While the possible mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis and the impact of Helicobacter pylori eradication remain open to debate, at least two practical recommendations – to increase fruit and vegetable intake, and to reduce consumption of salt – are already supported by epidemiological evidence. These dietary recommend...

  8. Chemotherapy for gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javier Sastre; Jose Angel García-Saenz; Eduardo Díaz-Rubio

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic gastric cancer remains a non-curative disease.Palliative chemotherapy has been demonstrated to prolong survival without quality of life compromise. Many single-agents and combinations have been confirmed to be active in the treatment of metastatic disease. Objective response rates ranged from 10-30% for single-agent therapy and 30-60% for polychemotherapy. Results of phase Ⅱ and Ⅲ studies are reviewed in this paper as well as the potential efficacy of new drugs. For patients with localized disease, the role of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy is discussed.Most studies on adjuvant chemotherapy failed to demonstrate a survival advantage, and therefore, it is not considered as standard treatment in most centres. Adjuvant immunochemotherapy has been developed fundamentally in Korea and Japan. A meta-analysis of phase Ⅲ trials with OK-432 suggested that immunochemotherapy may improve survival of patients with curatively resected gastric cancer. Based on the results of US Intergroup 0116study, postoperative chemoradiation has been Accepted as standard care in patients with resected gastric cancer in North America. However, the results are somewhat confounded by the fact that patients underwent less than a recommended D1 lymph node dissection and the pattern of recurrence suggested a positive effect derived from local radiotherapy without any effect on micrometastatic disease.Neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy remains experimental, but several phase Ⅱstudies are showing promising results. Phase Ⅲ trials are needed.

  9. Epidemiological characteristics of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šipetić Sandra B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastric cancer was the third most common cancer worldwide in 2000, accounting for approximately 876 000 new cases or 9% of the global cancer burden. Epidemiological characteristics As a result of changes in diet, the incidence of gastric cancer has decreased in most countries. Now days, consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits is increasing in regard to canned food. In addition to unhealthy diet, the main risk factors for gastric cancer are H. pylori infection, alcohol consumption, smoking, gastritis, stomach ulcer, gastrectomy, stomach polyposis, positive family history for gastric cancer, pernicious anemia and blood type A. Diet rich in vegetables and fruits, and reduced salt intake can prevent 65-75% of gastric cancer cases among nonsmokers. Prevention of Helicobacter pylori infection can also reduce the incidence of this malignant disease. .

  10. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

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    Timothy C. Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field.

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  12. MYCOPLASMA HYORHINIS IN GASTRIC CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季加孚; 张霁; 寿成超; 王怡; 徐光炜

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis in archived paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissue. Methods: The antigen recognized by anti-tumor monoclonal antibody PD4 was identified as P40 (a specific Mycoplasma hyorhinis protein). We constructed a tissue-microarray of high density containing 105 gastric cancer samples, 101 non-tumor margin samples and 62 benign gastric disease samples for detecting Mycoplasma hyorhinis using Immunohistochemistry. Results: The infection rate of M. hyorhinis was 54.1%(53/98) in gastric cancer samples, 51.7%(45/87) in non-tumor margin samples and 15.8%(9/57) in benign disease samples. The difference in infection rate between gastric cancer and benign gastric disease has statistical significance (P=0.001). Highly differentiated adenocarcinomas have a greater chance (84.6%) to be infected with M. hyorhinis than poorly differentiated ones (45.5%)(P<0.05. Conclusion: The infection rate of M. yorhinis was higher in gastric cancer than in other tastric diseases, which suggests the association between Mycoplasma infection and gastric cancer. Whether M. hyorhinis has oncogenic potential needs to be elucidated.

  13. Early-onset gastric cancer: Learning lessons from the young

    OpenAIRE

    Milne, A. N.; Offerhaus, G J A

    2010-01-01

    There is by no means a clear-cut pattern of mutations contributing to gastric cancers, and gastric cancer research can be hampered by the diversity of factors that can induce gastric cancer, such as Helicobacter pylori infection, diet, ageing and other environmental factors. Tumours are unquestionably riddled with genetic changes yet we are faced with an unsolvable puzzle with respect to a temporal relationship. It is postulated that inherited genetic factors may be more important in early-on...

  14. Photodynamic therapy of gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharnas, Sergey S.; Kuzin, N. M.; Zavodnov, Victor Y.; Sclyanskaya, Olga A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Torshina, Nadezgda L.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the use of laser endoscopic spectrum analyzer (LESA-5), the spectral-analyzing video-imaging system, Kr laser and various types of catheters for different tumor localizations, and Phthalocyanine aluminum photosensitizers in patients with gastric cancer was discussed. PDT was carried out in fifteen patients with gastric cancer. There were the following indications for PDT: early gastric cancer (3 patients), malignant stenosis of the cardia or pyloric portion of the stomach (4 patients), cancer of gastric stump with stenosis of gastrojejunal anastomosis (1 patient), preoperative treatment of patients with large but probably resectable gastric tumor size (7 patients). Usually we used 3 - 4 seances of laser treatment 10 - 30 minutes long. Concentration of photosensitizer in normal and malignant tissue was controlled by LESA-5. Treatment was monitored by spectral-analyzing video- imaging system in fluorescent light. The results show high efficiency of PDT especially in patients with early gastric cancer (necrosis of all tumor mass, i.e. complete regression of tumor). For all other patients we obtained partial regression of gastric cancer.

  15. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel Doxorubicin Hydrochloride 5-FU (Fluorouracil ...

  16. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do.

  17. Alterations of serum cholinesterase in patients with gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Zhi Gu; Xin-Han Zhao; Ping Quan; Sheng-Bin Li; Bo-Rong Pan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To understand the correlation of serum cholinesterase (CHE) activity with gastric cancer and to assess their clinical significance.METHODS: The velocity method was adopted to detect the activity of serum CHE in patients with gastric cancer and in patients with non-malignant tumor as controls.RESULTS: The serum CHE activity in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group with a very significant difference between the two groups (83.3:113.1,P = 0.0003). Age was significantly associated with the incidence of gastric caner.CONCLUSION: Serum CHE activity has a close relation with the incidence of gastric cancer.

  18. ANTIGEN MG7 IN GASTRIC CANCER AND GASTRIC PRECANCEROUS LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭冬丽; 宁佩芳; 袁媛

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the dynamic change and its diagnostic significance of MG7 expression in the process of gastric cancer development. Methods: The expression level of antigen MG7 was determined by immunohistochemistry method in 406 cases of gastric mucosa. The classification of intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa was determined by histochemistry method in 82 cases. Results: The positive rate of MG7 expression in normal gastric mucosa, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of gastric mucosa and gastric cancer were increased gradually (P<0.01). The positive rate of MG7 expression in superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer were increased on sequence (P<0.01). The positive rate of antigen MG7 expression in type Ⅲ intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa had significant difference,compared with that in type Ⅰ an Ⅱ intestinal metaplasia (P<0.05). Conclusion: MG7 antigen had close relationship with gastric cancer. Type Ⅲ intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and dysplasia should be followed up in order to improve the early detection of gastric cancer. MG7 antigen had great clinical value in the dynamic follow-up of gastric precursors.

  19. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Zhan-Kui Liu

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is common in China, and its early diagnosis and treatment are difficult. In recent years great progress has been achieved in gene therapy, and a wide array of gene therapy systems for gastric cancer has been investigated. The present article deals with the general principles of gene therapy and then focuses on how these principles may be applied to gastric cancer.

  20. Worldwide practice in gastric cancer surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenkman, Hylke Jf; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the current status of gastric cancer surgery worldwide. METHODS: An international cross-sectional survey on gastric cancer surgery was performed amongst international upper gastro-intestinal surgeons. All surgical members of the International Gastric Cancer Association were invited

  1. Multifactorial etiology of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaleta, Jovanny

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of gastric cancer is associated with several factors including geographical location, diet, and genetic background of the host. However, it is evident that infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is crucial for the development of the disease. Virulence of the bacteria is also important in modulating the risk of the disease. After infection, H. pylori gains access to the gastric mucosa and triggers the production of cytokines that promote recruitment of inflammatory cells, probably involved in tissue damage. Once the infection is established, a cascade of inflammatory steps associated with changes in the gastric epithelia that may lead to cancer is triggered. H. pylori-induced gastritis and H. pylori-associated gastric cancer have been the focus of extensive research aiming to discover the underlying mechanisms of gastric tissue damage. This research has led to the association of host genetic components with the risk of the disease. Among these is the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in several genes, including cytokine genes, which are able to differentially modulate the production of inflammatory cytokines and then modulate the risk of gastric cancer. Interestingly, the frequency of some of these SNPs is different among populations and may serve as a predictive factor for gastric cancer risk within that specific population. However, the role played by other genetic modifications should not be minimized. Methylation of gene promoters has been recognized as a major mechanism of gene expression regulation without changing the primary structure of the DNA. Most DNA methylation occurs in cytosine residues in CpG dinucleotide, but it can also be found in other DNA bases. DNA methyltransferases add methyl groups to the CpG dinucleotide, and when this methylation level is too high, the gene expression is turned off. In H. pylori infection as well as in gastric cancer, hypermethylation of promoters of genes involved in cell cycle

  2. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gastric Cancer Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... from the . There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach cancer. Several types of screening tests have been ...

  3. [Photodynamic therapy for gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, S; Narahara, H; Uehara, H; Otani, T; Okuda, S

    1996-01-01

    In this article, we first present our clinical data on PDT for the treatment of gastric cancer and make a comparison between a continuous wave laser and a pulsed laser. The reasons for PDT failure in certain cases are also discussed. In the fifteen years from 1981 to 1995, we have treated a total of 76 gastric cancer lesions (73 cases), which was consist of 69 early gastric cancer lesions (66 cases) and seven advanced gastric cancer lesions (seven cases) by PDT. From 1981 to 1990, we used an argon dye laser (ADL, Models 171-08 and 375-03, Spectra-Physics, Mountain View, Calif., US) as an excitation light source for PDT with HpD (Photofrin I), DHE (Photofrin II) or PHE (freeze-dried Photofrin II). From analysis of the results in terms of the depth of cancer invasion in these 44 lesions (41 cases), the rate of cure for mucosal carcinomas was 57% (13/23), that of submucosal carcinomas was 53% (10/19), and that of carcinomas invading more than the muscularis propria was 0% (0/2). These data can be interpreted to indicate that the ADL laser beam could not penetrate and supply sufficient energy to activate HpD not only in the submoucosal layer but also in the mucosal layer. In 1990, therefore, we investigated an excimer dye laser (EDL, Hamamatsu Photonics, Hamamatsu, Japan), because its pulsed beam with extremely high peak power was expected to be more efficient at exciting HpD than continuous wave lasers such as ADL and high frequency pulsed lasers such as cooper vapor dye laser (Cu VDL). From 1990 to 1995, twenty-seven early gastric cancer lesions (27 cases) and five advanced gastric cancer lesions (five cases) were treated by PDT with EDL and PHE. Of these 32 lesions, the rate of cure for mucosal carcinomas was 100% (15/15), that of submucosal carcinomas was 75% (9/12), and that of carcinomas invading more than the muscularis propria was 20% (1/5). For the purpose of determining how much energy was required for a complete cure in early gastric cancer, and to compare

  4. Genetic Determinants of Gastric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Boccia (Stefania)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractResults show that gastric cancer risk is increased by the inheritance of the variant alleles of the metabolic genes SULT1A1 and CYP2E1 *6, especially among smokers and drinkers, respectively. An additional increased risk is conferred by the inheritance of GSTT1 null variant, especially i

  5. Gene therapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chang-tai; Guo Xue-gang; Pan Bo-rong

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction We have reviewed the gene therapy in gastrointestinal diseases[1]. Gastric cancer is common in China[2~20] ,and its early diagnosis andtreatment are still difficult up to now[13~36]. The expression of anexogenous gene introduced by gene therapy into patients with gliomascan be monitored non- invasively by positron- emission tomography[4]. In recent years, gene study in cancer is a hotspot, and great progress hasbeen achieved[33~41].

  6. D2 Lymphadenectomy in Gastric Cancer Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyu Deng; Han Liang

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death worldwide. Surgery is the most widely utilized treatment for resectable gastric cancer. Evidence indicates that lymph node involvement and depth of invasion of the primary tumor are the most important prognostic factors for gastric cancer patients. Therefore, lymph node clearance is deemed a key procedure in gastric cancer surgery for the prognostic value to patients. Although the appropriate lymphadenectomy during gastrectomy for cancer still remains controversial, extended lymph node dissection (D2 lymphadenectomy) should be recommended in high volume hospitals.

  7. Adipokines and ghrelin in gastric cancer cachexia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa Kerem; Zafer Ferahkose; Utku Tonguc Yilmaz; Hatice Pasaoglu; Ebru Ofluoglu; Abdulkadir Bedirli; Bulent Salman; Tevfik Tolga Sahin; Murat Akin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles of the adipocytokines, ghrelin and leptin in gastric cancer cachexia.METHODS: Resistin, ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I), were measured in 30 healthy subjects, and 60 gastric cancer patients of which 30 suffered from cancer- induced cachexia and 30 served as a control group. The relationships between hormones, body mass index (BMI) loss ratio, age, gender, and Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) were investigated.RESULTS: Cachexia patients had higher tumor stage and GPS when compared with non-cachexia patients (P<0.05). Ghrelin, resistin, leptin, adiponectin and IGF-I, showed a significant correlation with BMI loss ratio and GPS (P < 0.05). A strong correlation was seen between GPS and BMI loss (R = -0.570, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis indicated that BMI loss was significantly independent as a predictor of ghrelin, resistin, leptin and IGF-I (P<0.05). Existence of an important significant relationship between resistin and insulin resistance was also noted.CONCLUSION: These results showed that serum ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, and IGF-I play important roles in cachexia-related gastric cancers. No relationship was found between resistin and cancer cachexia. Also, because of the correlation between these parameters and GPS, these parameters might be used as a predictor factor.

  8. Genetic Screening for Familial Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Carla

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Approximately 10% of gastric cancer cases show familial clustering but only 1-3% of gastric carcinomas arise as a result of inherited gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Direct proof that Hereditary Gastric Cancer a genetic disease with a germline gene defect has come from the demonstration of co-segregation of germline E-cadherin (CDH1 mutations with early onset diffuse gastric cancer in families with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance (HDGC. E-cadherin is a transmembrane calcium-dependent cell-adhesion molecule involved in cell-junction formation and the maintenance of epithelial integrity. In this review, we describe frequency and type of CDH1 mutations in sporadic and familial gastric cancer. Further we demonstrate the functional significance of some CDH1 germline missense mutations found in HDGC. We also discuss the CDH1 polymorphisms that have been associated to gastric cancer. We report other types of malignancies associated to HDGC, besides diffuse gastric cancer. Moreover, we review the data available on putative alternative candidate genes screened in familial gastric cancer. Finally, we briefly discuss the role of low-penetrance genes and Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer. This knowledge is a fundamental step towards accurate genetic counselling, in which a highly specialised pre-symptomatic therapeutic intervention should be offered.

  9. Lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer: Contentious issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj Kumar Garg; Ashish Jakhetiya; Jyoti Sharma; Mukur Dipi Ray; Durgatosh Pandey

    2016-01-01

    The stomach is the sixth most common cause of cancer worldwide. Surgery is an important component of the multi-modality treatment of the gastric cancer. The extent of lymphadenectomy has been a controversial issue in the surgical management of gastric cancer. The East-Asian surgeons believe that quality-controlled extended lymphadenectomy resulting in better locoregional control leads to survival benefit in the gastric cancer; contrary to that, many western surgeons believe that extended lymphadenectomy adds to only postoperative morbidity and mortality without significantly enhancing the overall survival. We present a comprehensive review of the lymphadenectomy in the gastric cancer based on the previously published randomized controlled trials.

  10. The journey of personalizing gastric cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the fourth most prevalent malignancy yet it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Every year, gastric cancer adds nearly 1 million new cancer cases, and 723,000 or 10%of cancer deaths to the global cancer burden. Approximately, 405,000 or 43%of the new cases and 325,000 or 45%of the deaths are in China, mak-ing gastric cancer a particularly challenging malignancy. This thematic series discusses the molecular classiifcations of gastric cancer by the Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) and the Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) as well as the implications in personalized therapeutic choices;discusses the evolution of gastric surgery and presents perspectives on surgical techniques in treating gastric cancer;and reviews current and emerging targeted agents as well as immu-notherapies in treating gastric cancer. With these advancements in molecular characterization, surgical intervention, and targeted and immunotherapies, gastric cancer will enter a personalized medicine era in the next 5 years.

  11. Early-onset gastric cancers have a different molecular expression profile than conventional gastric cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N.A. Milne; R. Carvalho; F.M. Morsink; A.R. Musler; W.W.J. de Leng; A. Ristimaki; G.J.A. Offerhaus

    2006-01-01

    Many studies examine the molecular genetics of gastric cancer, but few look at young patients in particular and there is no comparison of molecular expression between early-onset gastric cancer (<= 45 years old) and conventional gastric cancers. Expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) is elevated in g

  12. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bornschein Jan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1, pepsinogen 2 (PG2 and gastrin 17 (G17 offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation, degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status. Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003. The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058. The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer.

  13. Eradication of gastric cancer and more efficient gastric cancer surveillance in Japan: two peas in a pod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y; Asaka, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We provide a historical review and update on current thinking regarding the possibility of elimination of gastric cancer from Japan. Because Helicobacter pylori infection is the cause gastric cancer, its elimination forms the cornerstone of eradication of gastric cancer. However, simply eradicating H. pylori from the entire population will not immediately solve the problem because many patients with H. pylori infections have already developed the precursor lesion, atrophic gastritis. Cure of H. pylori in these high risk patients will only reduce the risk of subsequent cancer. In contrast, treatment of low risk patients will prevent cancer. Thus, to eliminate gastric cancer it is necessary to identify and treat all infected individuals. In addition, those at increased risk for gastric cancer (i.e., atrophic gastritis irrespective of age) should be considered for endoscopic surveillance to identify those cancers that develop at an early stage. We propose that severity and extent of atrophy be used to separate those expected to benefit from endoscopy and annual surveillance from those with little or no potential benefit. We suggest an algorithm for eradicating gastric cancer that incorporates H. pylori and atrophic gastritis testing, H. pylori therapy, and surveillance to institute a program of surveillance restricted to those who could benefit most (i.e., those with moderate or severe atrophy). This will also allow a much closer matching of surveillance capacity and surveillance need making surveillance more clinically- and cost-effective.

  14. Gastric Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie On-On Chan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in the world. However, in the past 10 decades, the view of gastric cancer has been changing. This includes the unexplained decline in the incidence of the cancer, the proximal shift of the cancer in the stomach, the identification of Helicobacter pylori as an etiological agent, rapid development in molecular tumour biology, new treatment modalities and the adoption of mass screening for prevention. This article reviews the changing views of gastric cancer and the latest developments.

  15. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management.

  16. Gastric metastasis from primary lung adenocarcinomamimicking primary gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Ji Kim; Ji Hyung Hong; Eun Su Park; Jae Ho Byun

    2015-01-01

    Gastric metastases from lung adenocarcinoma arerare. Because gastric metastasis grossly resemblesadvanced gastric cancer, it is difficult to diagnose gastricmetastasis especially when the histology of the primarylung cancer is adenocarcinoma. We describe a case ofgastric metastasis from primary lung adenocarcinomamimicking Borrmann type Ⅳ primary gastric cancer.A 68-year-old man with known lung adenocarcinomawith multiple bone metastases had been experiencingprogressive epigastric pain and dyspepsia over one year.Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed linitis plasticalikelesions in the fundus of the stomach. Pathologicexamination revealed a moderately differentiatedadenocarcinoma with submucosal infiltration. Positiveimmunohistochemical staining for thyroid transcriptionfactor-1 (TTF-1) and napsin A (Nap-A) confirmed thatthe metastasis was pulmonary in origin. The patienthad been treated with palliative chemotherapy for thelung cancer and had lived for over fifteen months afterthe diagnosis of gastric metastasis. Clinicians should beaware of the possibility of gastric metastasis in patientswith primary lung adenocarcinoma, and additionalimmunohistochemical staining for Nap-A as well as TTF-1may help in differentiating its origin.

  17. Epidemiology of gastric cancer and perspectives for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUÑOZ NUBIA

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The most recent estimates of the world-wide incidence of cancer indicate that gastric cancer was in 1990 the second most frequent cancer in the world (after lung cancer, with about 900 000 new cases diagnosed every year. Steady declines in the rates have been observed everywhere in the last few decades, but the absolute number of new cases per year is increasing mainly because of ageing of the population. The exact causes of the decline of gastric cancer are not well understood, but must include improvements in diet, food storage (e.g., refrigeration and, possibly, the decline of Helicobacter pylori infection. Dietary modifications and, possibly, vitamin supplements remain one of the most important tool for the prevention of gastric cancer. Control of H. pylori infection, by means of eradication or immunization, is also likely to offer great potential for the prevention of this important malignancy.

  18. H pylori and gastric cancer: Shifting the global burden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Prinz; Susanne Schwendy; Petra Voland

    2006-01-01

    Infection with H pylori leads to a persistent chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa, thereby increasing the risk of distal gastric adenocarcinoma. Numerous studies have determined a clear correlation between H pylori infection and the risk of gastric cancer; however, general eradication is not recommended as cancer prophylaxis and time points for treatment remain controversial in different areas of the world. Prevalence rates in Western countries are decreasing, especially in younger people (< 10%); and a decline in distal gastric adenocarcinoma has been observed. Risk groups in Western countries still show considerably higher risk of developing cancer, especially in patients infected with cagA+ strains and in persons harboring genetic polymorphism of the IL-1B promoter (-511T/T) and the corresponding IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN*2). Thus, general eradication of all infected persons in Western countries not recommended and is limited to risk groups in order to achieve a risk reduction. In contrast, infection rates and cancer prevalence are still high in East Asian countries. A prevention strategy to treat infected persons may avoid the development of gastric cancer to a large extent and with enormous clinical importance. However, studies in China and Japan indicate that prevention of gastric cancer is effective only in those patients that do not display severe histological changes such as atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Thus, prophylactic strategies to prevent gastric cancer in high risk populations such as China should therefore especially aim at individuals now at younger age when the histological alterations caused by the bacterial infection was still reversible. In countries with a low prevalence of gastric cancer, risk groups carrying cagA+ strains and IL-1 genetic polymorphisms should be identified and treated.

  19. Upregulation of Leukotriene Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venerito, Marino [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Kuester, Doerthe [Institute of Pathology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Harms, Caroline [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Schubert, Daniel [Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Wex, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.wex@med.ovgu.de; Malfertheiner, Peter [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany)

    2011-08-08

    Leukotrienes (LT) mediate allergic and inflammatory processes. Previously, we identified significant changes in the expression pattern of LT receptors in the gastric mucosa after eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and LT receptors in gastric cancer (GC). The expression of 5-LOX and receptors for LTB4 (BLT-1, BLT-2) and cysteinyl-LT (CysLT-1, CysLT-2) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in GC samples of 35 consecutive patients who underwent gastrectomy and in 29 tumor-free tissue specimens from gastric mucosa. Male-to-female ratio was 24:11. The median age was 70 years (range 34–91). Twenty-two patients had GC of intestinal, six of diffuse, six of mixed and one of undifferentiated type. The IHC analysis showed a nearly ubiquitous expression of studied proteins in GC (88–97%) and in tumor-free specimens as well (89–100%). An increase in the immunoreactive score of both BLT receptors and CysLT-1 was observed in GC compared to tumor-free gastric mucosa (p < 0.001 for BLT-1; p < 0.01 for BLT-2 and CysLT-1, Mann-Whitney U-test). No differences in the IHC expression of 5-LOX and CsyLT-2 were observed between GC and tumor-free mucosa. The expression of BLT-2, CysLT-1 and CysLT-2 was increased in GC of intestinal type when compared to the diffuse type (p < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). LTB4 receptors and CysLT-1 are up-regulated in GC tissue implying a role in gastric carcinogenesis.

  20. Upregulation of Leukotriene Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schubert

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leukotrienes (LT mediate allergic and inflammatory processes. Previously, we identified significant changes in the expression pattern of LT receptors in the gastric mucosa after eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX and LT receptors in gastric cancer (GC. Methods: The expression of 5-LOX and receptors for LTB4 (BLT-1, BLT-2 and cysteinyl-LT (CysLT-1, CysLT-2 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC in GC samples of 35 consecutive patients who underwent gastrectomy and in 29 tumor-free tissue specimens from gastric mucosa. Results: Male-to-female ratio was 24:11. The median age was 70 years (range 34–91. Twenty-two patients had GC of intestinal, six of diffuse, six of mixed and one of undifferentiated type. The IHC analysis showed a nearly ubiquitous expression of studied proteins in GC (88–97% and in tumor-free specimens as well (89–100%. An increase in the immunoreactive score of both BLT receptors and CysLT-1 was observed in GC compared to tumor-free gastric mucosa (p < 0.001 for BLT-1; p < 0.01 for BLT-2 and CysLT-1, Mann-Whitney U-test. No differences in the IHC expression of 5-LOX and CsyLT-2 were observed between GC and tumor-free mucosa. The expression of BLT-2, CysLT-1 and CysLT-2 was increased in GC of intestinal type when compared to the diffuse type (p < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test. Conclusions: LTB4 receptors and CysLT-1 are up-regulated in GC tissue implying a role in gastric carcinogenesis.

  1. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  2. Does remnant gastric cancer really differ from primary gastric cancer? A systematic review of the literature by the Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Fukagawa, Takeo; Haga, Yoshio; Oba, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Remnant gastric cancer, most frequently defined as cancer detected in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy for benign disease and those cases after surgery of gastric cancer at least 5 years after the primary surgery, is often reported as a tumor with poor prognosis. The Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association for Research Promotion evaluated the clinical impact of remnant gastric cancer by systematically reviewing publications focusing on molecular carcinogenesis, lymph node status, patient survival, and surgical complications. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE with the keywords "remnant," "stomach," and "cancer," revealing 1154 relevant reports published up to the end of December 2014. The mean interval between the initial surgery and the diagnosis of remnant gastric cancer ranged from 10 to 30 years. The incidence of lymph node metastases at the splenic hilum for remnant gastric cancer is not significantly higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer. Lymph node involvement in the jejunal mesentery is a phenomenon peculiar to remnant gastric cancer after Billroth II reconstruction. Prognosis and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates seem to be comparable to those for primary proximal gastric cancer. The crude 5-year mortality for remnant gastric cancer was 1.08 times higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer, but this difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, although no prospective cohort study has yet evaluated the clinical significance of remnant gastric cancer, our literature review suggests that remnant gastric cancer does not adversely affect patient prognosis and postoperative course.

  3. Gastric cancer and related epigenetic alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Trupti N; Roy, Soumyadipta; Ravi, Revathi

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer, a malignant and highly proliferative condition, has significantly affected a large population around the globe and is known to be caused by various factors including genetic, epigenetic, and environmental influences. Though the global trend of these cancers is declining, an increase in its frequency is still a threat because of changing lifestyles and dietary habits. However, genetic and epigenetic alterations related to gastric cancers also have an equivalent contribution towards carcinogenic development. DNA methylation is one of the major forms of epigenetic modification which plays a significant role in gastric carcinogenesis. Methylation leads to inactivation of some of the most important genes like DNA repair genes, cell cycle regulators, apoptotic genes, transcriptional regulators, and signalling pathway regulators; which subsequently cause uncontrolled proliferation of cells. Mutations in these genes can be used as suitable prognostic markers for early diagnosis of the disease, since late diagnosis of gastric cancers has a huge negative impact on overall patient survival. In this review, we focus on the important epigenetic mutations that contribute to the development of gastric cancer and the molecular pathogenesis underlying each of them. Methylation, acetylation, and histone modifications play an integral role in the onset of genomic instability, one of the many contributory factors to gastric cancer. This article also covers the constraints of incomplete knowledge of epigenetic factors influencing gastric cancer, thus throwing light on our understanding of the disease. PMID:28144288

  4. Chemoprevention of gastric cancer: current status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The development of gastric cancer is a multi-factor process. In addition to genetic factors, environmental factors including smoking, low gastric acidity, excessive intake of salt or salty food and low consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables all contribute to the development of gastric cancer. Of particular interest, epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is causally linked to gastric cancer. Most studies using micronutrient supplementation have failed to demonstrate any preventive effect against the development of gastric cancer. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been consistently observed to protect against the development of gastric cancer. Recently, eradication of H. pylori infection by a chemopreventative approach is being studied in a number of trials. Studies using precancerous lesions as an end point of the treatment have produced conflicting and mostly negative results. Trials using cancer as an end point are being cautiously carried out in high-risk populations, and will provide the definitive answer to this important question. In the end, vaccination may be proven to be the optimal strategy in human for the management of H. pylori infection and prevention of gastric cancer.

  5. Dietary Flavonoids and Gastric Cancer Risk in a Korean Population

    OpenAIRE

    Hae Dong Woo; Jeonghee Lee; Il Ju Choi; Chan Gyoo Kim; Jong Yeul Lee; Oran Kwon; Jeongseon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer among men in Korea, and dietary factors are closely associated with gastric cancer risk. We performed a case-control study using 334 cases and 334 matched controls aged 35–75 years. Significant associations were observed in total dietary flavonoids and their subclasses, with the exception of anthocyanidins and isoflavones (OR (95% CI): 0.49 (0.31–0.76), p trend = 0.007 for total flavonoids). However, these associations were not significant after furthe...

  6. CD147 Expression in Human Gastric Cancer Is Associated with Tumor Recurrence and Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dake Chu; Shaojun Zhu; Jipeng Li; Gang Ji; Weizhong Wang; Guosheng Wu; Jianyong Zheng

    2014-01-01

    CD147 is correlated with tumor aggressiveness in various human malignancies. Here, we investigated CD147 protein expression in 223 patients with gastric cancer by immunohistochemistry and analyzed its association with disease-free and overall survival. CD147 was increased in gastric cancer compared to normal tissues. Additionally, CD147 expression was associated with gastric cancer invasion, metastasis and TNM stage, whereas it was not related to age, sex, differentiation status, tumor site o...

  7. Updates on esophageal and gastric cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amy Gallo; Charles Cha

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancers are both common and deadly. Patients present most often after disease progression and survival is therefore poor. Due to demographic variability and recent changes in disease incidence, much emphasis has been placed on studying risk factors for both esophageal and gastric cancers.However, with increasing understanding of these diseases, low survival rates persist and continued intensive studies are necessary to optimize treatment plans. This review article discusses updates in the evolving epidemiology, clinical presentation, risk factors,and diagnostic and treatment modalities of esophageal and gastric cancers.

  8. Nutrition and Gastric Cancer Risk: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from epidemiologic, experimental, and animal studies indicate that diet plays an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer. High intake of fresh fruit and vegetable, lycopene and lycopene-containing food products, and potentially vitamin C and selenium may reduce the risk for gastric can...

  9. Mitochondrial microsatellite instability in gastric cancer and its precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Long Ling; Dian-Chun Fang; Rong-Quan Wang; Shi-Ming Yang; Li Fang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of mitochondrial microsatelliteinstability (mtMSI) in gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS: MtMSI was measured with PCR-single strand conformation polymophism (PCR-SSCP) in 68 cases of advanced gastric cancer, 40 cases of chronic gastritis, 30 cases of intestinal metaplasia and 20 cases of dysplasia.RESULTS: MtMSI was observed in 12.5% (5 of 40) of chronic gastritis, 20.0% (6 of 30) of intestinal metaplasia, 25.0% (5 of 20) of dysplasia and 38.2% (26 of 68) of gastric cancer. These findings showed a sequential accumulation of mtMSI in the histological progression from chonic gastritis to gastric cancer. An association of mtMSI with intestinal histological type and distal location was found (P=0.001 and P=0.002), whereas no significant correlation was found between mtMSI and age at diagnosis, sex, tumor size, depthof invasion, lymph node spread and clinical stages (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: MtMSI may play an early and importantrole in the gastric carcinogenesis pathway, especially in the intestinal type and distal gastric cancer.

  10. Epidemiological review of gastric cancer in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh P Dikshit; Garima Mathur; Sharayu Mhatre; Yeole, B. B.

    2011-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the one of the leading cause of cancer in southern region of India. Its incidence is decreasing worldwide yet on global scale stomach cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. Etiology of gastric cancer includes Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and lifestyle, tobacco, alcohol and genetic susceptibility. In this review, we tried to find the contribution of Indian scientist in understanding the descriptive and observational epidemiology of stomach cancer...

  11. A p53 genetic polymorphism of gastric cancer: Difference between early gastric cancer and advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Young Yi; Woon Jung Lee

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of the polymorphism of p53 codon 72 in early gastric cancer (EGC) and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) in Korean patients.METHODS:DNA was extracted from blood samples of gastric cancer patients (n = 291) and controls (n=216).tn the p53 codon 72 genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP.RESULTS: Patients with gastric cancer had a significantly higher frequency of the homozygous proline (Pro) allele than the control (P=0.032). Patients with AGC had a significantly higher frequency of the Arg/Arg (arginine)allele (P=0.038) than EGC and a similar Pro/Pro allele.The signet ring cell type had a higher frequency of the Pro/Pro allele than other types (P=0.031). The Pro/Pro genotype carries a 3.9-fold increased risk of developing gastric cancer (95% CI,1.3-15.4,P=0.039)when compared to Arg/Arg and Arg/Pro genotypes and to develop EGC is a 5.25 fold increased risk (95% CI,1.8-19.6,P=0.021).CONCLUSION: The Pro/Pro genotype of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism carries a higher risk for gastric cancer in general and is also associated with a much higher risk for EGC than AGC.

  12. Dietary flavonoids and gastric cancer risk in a Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Jeonghee; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Chan Gyoo; Lee, Jong Yeul; Kwon, Oran; Kim, Jeongseon

    2014-11-10

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer among men in Korea, and dietary factors are closely associated with gastric cancer risk. We performed a case-control study using 334 cases and 334 matched controls aged 35-75 years. Significant associations were observed in total dietary flavonoids and their subclasses, with the exception of anthocyanidins and isoflavones (OR (95% CI): 0.49 (0.31-0.76), p trend = 0.007 for total flavonoids). However, these associations were not significant after further adjustment for fruits and vegetable consumption (OR (95% CI): 0.62 (0.36-1.09), p trend = 0.458 for total flavonoids). Total flavonoids and their subclasses, except for isoflavones, were significantly associated with a reduced risk gastric cancer in women (OR (95% CI): 0.33 (0.15-0.73), p trend = 0.001 for total flavonoids) but not in men (OR (95% CI): 0.70 (0.39-1.24), p trend = 0.393 for total flavonoids). A significant inverse association with gastric cancer risk was observed in flavones, even after additional adjustment for fruits and vegetable consumption in women. No significantly different effects of flavonoids were observed between H. pylori-positive and negative subjects. In conclusion, dietary flavonoids were inversely associated with gastric cancer risk, and these protective effects of dietary flavonoids were prominent in women. No clear differences were observed in the subgroup analysis of H. pylori and smoking status.

  13. Incidence of Gastric Cancer in Marrakech and Casablanca, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney L. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer globally with over 70% of new cases occurring in developing countries. In Morocco, oncologists in Marrakech suspected higher frequency of gastric cancer compared to Casablanca, a city 150 kilometers away. This study calculated age-specific, sex-specific, and total incidence rates of gastric cancer in Marrakech and was compared to the Casablanca population-based cancer registry. Using medical records from Center Hospital University Mohammad VI and reports from 4 main private pathology laboratories in Marrakech, we identified 774 patients for the period 2008–2012. Comparison of rates showed higher age-specific incidence in Marrakech in nearly all age groups for both genders. A higher total incidence in Marrakech than in Casablanca was found with rates of 5.50 and 3.23 per 100,000, respectively. Incidence was significantly higher among males in Marrakech than males in Casablanca (7.19 and 3.91 per 100,000, resp. and females in Marrakech compared to females in Casablanca (3.87 and 2.58 per 100,000, resp.. Future studies should address possible underestimation of gastric cancer in Marrakech, estimate incidence in other regions of Morocco, and investigate possible risk factors to explain the difference in rates.

  14. 老年胃癌的治疗研究进展%Research progress in the treatment of aged gastric cancer (

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜飞; 白松; 王智华; 杨青梅; 江德军

    2014-01-01

    In China,gastric belong to a more common malignant disease.With the advent of an aging society,elderly patients with gastric cancer continued to increase.The main treatment of gastric cancer include surgery,radiotherapy and chemotherapy,en-doscopic intervention,as well as targeted therapy,gene therapy,immunotherapy and so on.Various treatments have certain character-istics and limitations,relying solely on a particular method of treatment is difficult to achieve the desired results.With the advent of endoscopic therapy and the development of technology applications,new chemotherapy drugs and targeted neoadjuvant therapy con-cept,made in good efficacy in clinical applications,significantly improved the prognosis of patients,prolong the survival of patients, improve the quality of life of patients.%在我国,胃癌属于一种较为常见的恶性肿瘤疾病。随着老龄化社会的到来,老年胃癌患者数量不断增多。目前胃癌的主要治疗方式包括手术、放化疗、内镜介入治疗,还有靶向治疗、基因治疗、免疫治疗等。各种治疗手段都有一定的特点和局限性,单独依靠某一种治疗方法很难取得理想效果。随着内镜介入治疗技术的应用,新型化疗和靶向药物的问世以及新辅助治疗理念的发展,临床取得了不错的疗效,显著改善了患者的预后,延长了患者的生存,提高了患者的生活质量。

  15. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    Findings in epidemiological studies of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer have been inconsistent: many studies have yielded a positive relationship, whereas several studies have shown no relationship. The inconsistency arises because of the occurrence of seroreversion during the period between the time that H. pylori exerts a carcinogenic effect and the time of blood sampling. When this seroreversion is taken into account, there is an epidemiologically positive association between H. pylori status and the risk for gastric cancer. In addition to the epidemiological evidence, experimental studies using Mongolian gerbils have shown that H. pylori infection elevates the risk for gastric cancer. It is concluded that H. pylori is a causal factor for gastric cancer. In the creation of preventive strategies against gastric cancer by the eradication of H. pylori, determination of the time at which H. pylori plays a role as a carcinogen is important. Three hypotheses have been proposed in regard to this timing: that H. pylori infection in childhood or the teenage years acts as a factor that produces precancerous lesions with irreversible damage in the gastric mucosa, that in adulthood it acts as an initiator, and also in adulthood, that it acts as a promoter. As these hypotheses are not mutually exclusive, the extent to which each hypothesis plays a part in explaining gastric carcinogenesis should be evaluated. Only a small proportion of subjects infected with H. pylori have gastric cancer during their lifetime. Interleukin-1 polymorphism, a host factor, and CagA, a virulence factor of H. pylori, are suspected to be risk factors for gastric cancer in subjects with H. pylori infection. Dietary factors, especially vitamin C, and patterns of precancerous lesions also seem to influence the relationship between H. pylori and gastric cancer. H. pylori seems to reduce the risk for esophageal and for some gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. This finding, as

  16. Gastric Cancer Regional Detection System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Berkan; Hardalaç, Fırat; Serhatlioğlu, Selami; İlhan, Mustafa Necmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel system was created to localize cancerous regions for stomach images which were taken with computed tomography(CT). The aim was to determine the coordinates of cancerous regions which spread in the stomach area in the color space with using this system. Also, to limit these areas with a high accuracy ratio and to feedback to the user of this system were the other objectives. This integration was performed with using energy mapping, analysis methods and multiple image processing methods and the system which was consisted from these advanced algorithms was appeared. For this work, in the range of 25-40 years and when gender discrimination was insignificant, 30 volunteer patients were chosen. During the formation of the system, to exalt the accuracy to the maximum level, 2 main stages were followed up. First, in the system, advanced image processing methods were processed between each other and obtained data were studied. Second, in the system, FFT and Log transformations were used respectively for the first two cases, then these transformations were used together for the third case. For totally three cases, energy distribution and DC energy intensity analysis were done and the performance of this system was investigated. Finally, with using the system's unique algorithms, a non-invasive method was achieved to detect the gastric cancer and when FFT and Log transformation were used together, the maximum success rate was obtained and this rate was calculated as 83,3119 %.

  17. Gastric cancer - clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Link, Alexander; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) ranks fifth for cancer incidence and second for cancer deaths. Epidemiological data showed that survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma and patients with pernicious anemia etiologically linked to autoimmune gastritis are at increased risk of GC. Screening of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease by means of pepsinogen (PG) I and PG I/II detected autoimmune gastritis with oxyntic gastric atrophy in one of four patients and may be recommended for GC prevention purposes. The International Agency for Research on Cancer reported a positive association between consumption of processed meet and increased GC risk. A new GC risk prediction model based on biological markers, age, gender, smoking status, family history of GC, and consumption of highly salted food showed good predictive performance, and might prompt individuals to modify their lifestyle habits, attend regular check-up visits or participate in screening programs. A novel GC classification based on gene expression of primary resected cancers correlated with clinicopathological features. Noncoding RNA for GC screening remains the focus of multiple studies. Patients with early GC undergoing endoscopic resection are more likely to develop metachronous lesions than patients undergoing surgery and endoscopic surveillance is warranted in this special cohort. The addition of gastrectomy to chemotherapy did not improve survival of patients with advanced GC and a single noncurable factor. Apatinib, a novel oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved the median overall survival of patients with advanced GC and progressive disease after two or more lines of prior chemotherapy of nearly 3 months.

  18. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  19. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer is a relativelynew research field, with convincing results mostlystemming from Asian countries. The use of the roboticsurgery platform, thus far assessed as a safe procedure,which is also easier to learn, sets the background fora wider spread of minimally invasive technique in thetreatment of gastric cancer. This review will cover theliterature published so far, analyzing the pros and consof robotic surgery and highlighting the remaining studyquestions.

  20. Current practice of gastric cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoon Young Choi; Ji Yeong An; Hyung-Il Kim; Jae-Ho Cheong; Woo Jin Hyung; Sung Hoon Noh

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review was to overview the current practice of gastric cancer treatment including surgery and other adjuvant modalities.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and main guidelines in the East and West.Study selection Articles with high level of evidence or current best evidence in each issue were selected to be reviewed.Results Although varied adjuvant modalities have been proved to be benefit for treating gastric cancer,surgery is still the most important treatment strategy against gastric cancer.Actively adapting to new technology is important but it should be balanced with an effort to establish sound scientific rationale that adheres to oncologic principles.Conclusions Future treatment of gastric cancer will be focused on tailored,personalized therapy.For achieving it,collaboration across disciplines is essential.Also the philosophy of caring for the patients with gastric cancer should be rooted in the realization of true patient benefit regardless of who is providing the care.With these philosophies,we can shift the scientific and technological advances toward triumph over gastric cancer.

  1. Kimchi and soybean pastes are risk factors of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei Nan; Heon Kim; Jin-Woo Park; Young-Jin Song; Hyo-Yung Yun; Joo-Seung Park; Taisun Hyun; Sei-Jin Youn; Yong-Dae Kim; Jong-Won Kang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This case-control study investigated the effects of kimchi, soybean paste, fresh vegetables, nonfermented alliums, nonfermented seafood, nonfermented soybean foods, and the genetic polymorphisms of some metabolic enzymes on the risk of gastric cancer in Koreans.METHODS: We studied 421 gastric cancer patients and 632 age- and sex-matched controls. Subjects completed a structured questionnaire regarding their food intake pattern. Polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1),cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), glutathione S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1), glutathione S-transferase theta 1 (GSTT1) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) were investigated. RESULTS: A decreased risk of gastric cancer was noted among people with high consumption of nonfermented alliums and nonfermented seafood. On the other hand, consumption of kimchi, and soybean pastes was associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Individuals with the CYP1A1 Ile/Val or Val/Val genotype showed a significantly increased risk for gastric cancer. Increased intake of kimchi or soybean pastes was a significant risk factor for the CYP1A1 Ile/Ile, the CYP2E1 c1/c1, the GSTM1 non-null,the GSTT1 non-null, or the ALDH2 *1/*1 genotype. In addition, eating soybean pastes was associated with the increased risk of gastric cancer in individuals with the GSTM1 null type. Nonfermented alliums were significant in individuals with the CYP1A1 Ile/Ile, the CYP2E1 c1/c2or c2/c2, the GSTT1 null, the GSTT1 non-null, or the ALDH2 * 1/*2 or *2/*2 genotype, nonfermented seafood was those with the CYP1A1 Ile/Ile, the CYP2E1 c1/c1, the ALDH2 * 1/*1 genotype or any type of GSTM1 or GSTT1. In homogeneity tests, the odds ratios of eating kimchi for gastric cancer according to the GSTM1 or GSTT1 genotypewere not homogeneous.CONCLUSION: Kimchi, soybean pastes, and the CYP1A1 Ile/Val or Val/Val are risk factors, and nonfermented seafood and alliums are protective factors against gastric cancer in Koreans. Salt or some chemicals contained

  2. Familial gastric cancer: detection of a hereditary cause helps to understand its etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelaar Ingrid P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Worldwide, gastric cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer, with a high morbidity and mortality. Several environmental factors predispose to the development of gastric cancer, such as Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and smoking. Familial clustering of gastric cancer is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of gastric cancer cases arise in the setting of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC. In families with HDGC, gastric cancer presents at relatively young age. Germline mutations in the CDH1 gene are the major cause of HDGC and are identified in approximately 25-50% of families which fulfill strict criteria. Prophylactic gastrectomy is the only option to prevent gastric cancer in individuals with a CDH1 mutation. However, in the majority of families with multiple cases of gastric cancer no germline genetic abnormality can be identified and therefore preventive measures are not available, except for general lifestyle advice. Future research should focus on identifying new genetic predisposing factors for all types of familial gastric cancer.

  3. Quality of life in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ad A. Kaptein; Satoshi Morita; Junichi Sakamoto

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To summarize the empirical research on assessing quality of life (QOL) in patients with gastric carcinoma. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted in MedLine from 1966 to February 2004. RESULTS: Twenty-six studies were identified. QOL was used as an outcome measure in virtually all identified studies, such as those examining the effects of gastric cancer and various medical or surgical treatments in the patients. QOL was assessed mainly with generic measures; the social dimensions of QOL were largely neglected. The lack of gastric cancer-specific QOL measures hampers QOL research up to now. The gastric cancer-specific EORTCQLQ-STO22 and the FACT-Ga are important additions to the arsenal of disease-specific QOL measures. In most of the studies, the label QOL is used for questionnaires, which only assess symptoms or performance status, or are physician-reported rather than patient-reported outcomes. CONCLUSION: QOL in patients with gastric cancer deserves more systematic studies, especially as one of the outcome measures in randomized clinical trials. Results of studies that include QOL in patients with gastric cancer should be applied in clinical care, which aims at improving QOL of these patients.

  4. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: current status of the Austrian-Czech-German gastric cancer prevention trial (PRISMA-Study)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Miehlke; A. Leodolter; P. Malfertheiner; A. Neubauer; G. Ehninger; M. Stolte; E, Bayerdorffer; C. Kirsch; B. Dragosics; M. Gschwantler; G. Oberhuber; D. Antos; P. Dite; J. Lauter; J. Labenz

    2001-01-01

    AIM To test the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori eradication alone can reduce the incidence of gastric cancer in a subgroup of individuals with an increased risk for this fatal disease.METHODS It is a prospective, randomized,double-blind, placebo-controlled multinational multicenter trial. Men between 55 and 65 years of age with a gastric cancer phenotype of Helicobacterpylori gastritis are randomized to receive a 7-day course of omeprazole 2 × 20 mg,clarithromycin 2 × 500 mg, and amoxicillin 2 ×lg for 7 days, or omeprazole2 × 20mg plusplacebo. Follow - up endoscopy is scheduled 3months after therapy, and thereafter in one-year intervals. Predefined study endpoints are gastric cancer, precancerous lesions (dysplasia, adenoma), other cancers, anddeath.RESULTS Since March 1998, 1524 target patients have been screened, 279 patients (18.3%) had a corpus-dominant type of H.pylori gastritis, and 167 of those were randomized (58.8%). In the active treatment group (n -- 86), H. pylori infection infection was cured in 88.9% of patients. Currently, thecumulative follow-up time is 3046 months (253.8patient-years, median follow-up 16 months). So far, none of the patients developed gastric cancer or any precancerous lesion. Three(1.8%) patients reached study endpoints other than gastric cancer.CONCLUSION Among men between 55 and 65years of age, the gastric cancer phenotype of H.pylori gastritis appears to be more common than expected. Further follow- up and continuing recruitment are necessary to fulfil the main aim of the study.

  5. Hedgehog signaling pathway and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2005-10-01

    Hedgehog, WNT, FGF and BMP signaling pathways network together during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling pathway leads to pathological consequences in a variety of human tumors, such as gastric cancer and pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), surgical gastrectomy and chemotherapy are therapeutic options for gastric cancer; however, prognosis of advanced gastric cancer patient is still poor. Here, Hedgehog signaling pathway in human gastric cancer and its clinical applications will be reviewed. Human SHH, IHH, DHH (Hedgehog homologs), HHAT (Hedgehog acyltransferase), HHIP (Hedgehog-interacting protein), DISP1, DISP2, DISP3 (Dispatched homologs), PTCH1, PTCH2 (Patched homologs), SMO (Smoothened homolog), KIF27, KIF7 (Costal-2 homologs), STK36 (Fused homolog), SUFU (SuFu homolog), DZIP1 (Iguana homolog), GLI1, GLI2 and GLI3 (Cubitus interruptus homologs) are implicated in the Hedgehog signaling. PTCH1, FOXM1 and CCND2 are direct transcriptional targets of Hedgehog signaling. Hedgehog signaling activation leads to cell proliferation through cell cycle regulation. SHH regulates growth and differentiation within gastric mucosa through autocrine loop and FOXL1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. SHH is implicated in stem/progenitor cell restitution of damaged gastric mucosa during chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori. SHH up-regulation, IHH upregulation and HHIP down-regulation lead to aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling through PTCH1 to GLI1 in gastric cancer. Small molecule compounds targeted to SMO (KADD-cyclopamine, SANT1-4, Cur61414) as well as humanized anti-SHH antibodies are potent anti-cancer drugs for gastric cancer. Cocktail of Hedgehog inhibitors would be developed as novel therapeutics for gastric cancer. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number polymorphism (CNP) of Hedgehog signaling genes would be utilized

  6. Gastric Cancer in Korean Americans: Risks and Reductions

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Karen E

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leadings cause of cancer worldwide. However, Koreans have the highest reported incidence of this deadly disease. Risk factors predisposing to the formation of gastric cancer include a combination of environmental risks, such as diet and infection (Helicobacter pylori), and, in some cases, genetic predisposition. Early screening and detection is essential to reduce gastric cancer mortality. The low prevalence and late onset of gastric cancer in Americans, compared ...

  7. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  8. Oct-4 is associated with gastric cancer progression and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang WL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wen-Li Jiang,1 Peng-Fei Zhang,2 Guo-Feng Li,1 Jian-Hua Dong,1 Xue-Song Wang,1 Yuan-Yu Wang3 1Department of Surgery, Juxian People’s Hospital, 2Department of Surgery, Rizhao People’s Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Rizhao, 3Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Aim: To investigate the clinical significance of Oct-4 in the development and progression of gastric cancer.Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze Oct-4 expression in 412 gastric cancer cases. Oct-4 protein levels were upregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues.Results: Positive expression of Oct-4 correlated with age, depth of invasion, Lauren classification, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stage. In stages I, II, and III, the 5-year survival rate of patients with high expression of Oct-4 was significantly lower than that in patients with low expression of Oct-4. In stage IV, Oct-4 expression did not correlate with the 5-year survival rate. Furthermore, multivariate analysis suggested that the depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, TNM stage, and upregulation of Oct-4 were independent prognostic factors of gastric cancer.Conclusion: Oct-4 protein is a useful marker in predicting tumor progression and prognosis. Keywords: gastric carcinoma, invasion, metastasis, survival rate

  9. Comparison of nuclear matrix proteins between gastric cancer and normal gastric tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin-Xian Zhang; Yi Ding; Zhuo Li; Xiao-Ping Le; Wei Zhang; Ling Sun; Hui-Rong Shi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the alteration of nuclear matrix proteins (NMPs) in gastric cancer.METHODS: The NMPs extracted from 22 cases of gastric cancer and normal gastric tissues were investigated by SDS-PAGE technique and the data were analyzed using Genetools analysis software.RESULTS: Compared with normal gastric tissue, the expression of 30 ku and 28 ku NMPs in gastric cancer decreased significantly (P=0.002, P=0.001, P<0.05). No significant difference was found in the expression of the two NMPs between the various differentiated grades (P=0.947, P=0.356) and clinical stages of gastric cancer (P=0.920, P=0.243, P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The results suggested that the alteration of NMPs in gastric cancer occurred at the early stage of gastric cancer development.

  10. Immunotherapy for gastric premalignant lesions and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzetto, Valerio; Maddalo, Gemma; Basso, Daniela; Farinati, Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous change for gastric cancer, shows a loss of appropriate glands, Helicobacter pylori infection and autoimmune gastritis being the two main etiologic factors. While H. pylori eradication is the mandatory treatment for the former, no etiologic treatment is available for the latter, in which a Th1-type response, modulated by Tregs and Th17 cells, is involved. H. pylori-related atrophic gastritis is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, while autoimmune atrophic gastritis is also linked to a substantial risk of gastric type I carcinoid, related to the chronic stimulus exerted by hypergastrinemia on enterochromaffin-like cells. Several studies have been published on gastric cancer treatment through an active specific immunotherapy, aimed at improving the immunoregulatory response and increasing the circulating tumor-specific T cells. No study on immunotherapy of carcinoids is available but, in our experience, the administration of an antigastrin 17 vaccine induced carcinoid regression in two out of three patients treated.

  11. Quantitative assessment model for gastric cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Chen; Wei-Ping Yu; Liang Song; Yi-Min Zhu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To set up a mathematic model for gastric cancer screening and to evaluate its function in mass screening for gastric cancer.METHODS: A case control study was carried on in 66patients and 198 normal people, then the risk and protective factors of gastric cancer were determined, including heavy manual work, foods such as small yellow-fin tuna, dried small shrimps, squills, crabs, mothers suffering from gastric diseases, spouse alive, use of refrigerators and hot food,etc. According to some principles and methods of probability and fuzzy mathematics, a quantitative assessment model was established as follows: first, we selected some factors significant in statistics, and calculated weight coefficient for each one by two different methods; second, population space was divided into gastric cancer fuzzy subset and non gastric cancer fuzzy subset, then a mathematic model for each subset was established, we got a mathematic expression of attribute degree (AD).RESULTS: Based on the data of 63 patients and 693 normal people, AD of each subject was calculated. Considering the sensitivity and specificity, the thresholds of AD values calculated were configured with 0.20 and 0.17, respectively.According to these thresholds, the sensitivity and specificity of the quantitative model were about 69% and 63%.Moreover, statistical test showed that the identification outcomes of these two different calculation methods were identical (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The validity of this method is satisfactory.It is convenient, feasible, economic and can be used to determine individual and population risks of gastric cancer.

  12. Borrmann Type 4 Advanced Gastric Cancer: Focus on the Development of Scirrhous Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Park, Moo In; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Seun Ja

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Borrmann type 4 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is very important for improving the prognosis of AGC patients. Because there is no definite mass in most cases of Borrmann type 4 AGC, its accurate diagnosis via endoscopy requires an understanding of its pathogenesis and developmental process. Moreover, many people confuse linitis plastica (LP) type gastric cancer (GC), scirrhous GC, and Borrmann type 4 AGC. To distinguish each of these cancers, knowledge of their endoscopic an...

  13. Multiorgan resection in patients with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Dragan L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Multiorgan resection for a malignancy is a very comlicated procedure, but there is always the question: does it work? In everyday clinical practice gastric cancer in phases III and IV is rather frequent. Unfortunately, our patients are under the age of 55 years. D2 lymphadenectomy is not as extensive as D2 %/ or D3, so one must ask himself if multiorgan resection is worth the risk. Material and methods We evaluated two groups of patients: group I consisted of 34 patients who underwent total or subtotal gastrectomy, systematic lymphadenectomy and resection of one or more organs; group II (control consisted of 167 patients who underwent total or subtotal gastrectomy and systematic lymphadenectomy. These two groups of patients were analzyed in regard to: Bormann's classification, histopathologic type, early mortality, early postoperative complications, lymph node dissection and long-term survival. Results According to Bormann's classification the most common type of carcinoma in both groups was ulcerovegetativ tumor (70.6% in I and 58% in II. In the first group of patients a great number of patients had poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas (47%, while in the second group the most common histologic type was well differentiated intestinal carcinoma (28%. Patients with multiorgan resections had higher rates of early postoperative mortality and morbiditiy (mortality - 14.7% and complications - 26.5% than patients in control group (mortality - 4.8% and complications - 11.4%. The most frequent causes of postopertive mortality and morbidity were anastomotic leakage and wound infections in both groups. Metastatic lymph node invelvement was higher in the first group (41%, than in the second (28%. Long-term survival was best in the control group (38.5 months. Patients with multiorgan resection had better survival (25.4 months than inoperable cases (only 5 months. Discussion Patients undergoing multiorgan resection usually have advanced gastric

  14. Epidemiological review of gastric cancer in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P Dikshit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomach cancer is the one of the leading cause of cancer in southern region of India. Its incidence is decreasing worldwide yet on global scale stomach cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. Etiology of gastric cancer includes Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and lifestyle, tobacco, alcohol and genetic susceptibility. In this review, we tried to find the contribution of Indian scientist in understanding the descriptive and observational epidemiology of stomach cancer. PubMed was used as a search platform using key words such as "stomach cancer, treatment, clinical characteristics, stomach cancer outcome, epidemiology, etiological factor and their corresponding Mesh terms were used in combination with Boolean operators OR, AND". Most of the reported studies on gastric cancer from India are case report or case series and few are case-control studies. Indian studies on this topic are limited and have observed H. pylori infection, salted tea, pickled food, rice intake, spicy food, soda (additive of food, tobacco and alcohol as risk factors for gastric cancer. More research is required to understand the etiology, develop suitable screening test, to demarcate high-risk population and to develop and evaluate the effect of primary prevention programs.

  15. Treatment modalities for early gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesús; Espinel; Eugenia; Pinedo; Vanesa; Ojeda; Maria; Guerra; del; Rio

    2015-01-01

    Different treatment modalities have been proposed in the treatment of early gastric cancer(EGC). Endoscopic resection(ER) is an established treatment that allows curative treatment, in selected cases. In addition, ER allows for an accurate histological staging, which is crucial when deciding on the best treatment option for EGC. Recently, endoscopic mucosal resection(EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection(ESD) have become alternatives to surgery in early gastric cancer, mainly in Asian countries. Patients with "standard" criteria can be successfully treated by EMR techniques. Those who meet "expanded" criteria may benefit from treatment by ESD, reducing the need for surgery. Standardized ESD training system is imperative to promulgate effective and safe ESD technique to practices with limited expertise. Although endoscopic resection is an option in patients with EGC, surgical treatment continues to be a widespread therapeutic option worldwide. In this review we tried to point out the treatment modalities for early gastric cancer.

  16. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer--An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Orlowska, Janina; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Kadar, Zoltan; Turdean, Sabin; Bara, Tivadar

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer varies by up to ten fold throughout the world, and the geographic distribution of hereditary cases is not well explored. Familial clustering is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of all gastric cancers develop due to hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this review, the characteristics of HDGC are presented according to molecular particularities, geographic distribution, and other parameters. Based on our experience and the data from the literature, we discuss the possibility of applying a mutation signature (spectrum) study and adductomic approaches to a comparative carcinogenesis of HDGC. We also provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review of genetic counseling and criteria for screening and surveillance of eligible families.

  17. Control study of arterial interventional chemotherapy before radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer and simple radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer in treatment of advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the differences in effect of arterial interventional chemotherapy before radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer and simple radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer in treatment of advanced gastric cancer.Methods:A total of 86 cases of patients with advanced gastric cancer treated in our hospital were selected as research subjects and randomly divided into two groups, observation group received arterial interventional chemotherapy combined with radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer, control group received simple radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer, and then differences in prognosis-associated factors, MMP and Leptin contents as well as tumor marker and telomerase activity levels of two groups were compared.Results:Serum HER-2/neu ECD level of observation group was lower than that of control group, and serum DKK-1, TS and TP levels were higher than those of control group; at each point in time after treatment, serum CA72-4 and CA50 contents of observation group were lower than those of control group; intraoperative MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and Leptin levels in gastric cancer tissue of observation group were lower than those of control group; telomerase activity value in gastric cancer tissue of observation group after treatment was lower than that of control group, and both PGⅠ positive expression rate and PGⅠ/ PGⅡ ratio were higher than those of control group.Conclusion: Arterial interventional chemotherapy before radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer can lower tumor malignancy, promote the curative effect of radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer and improve long-term prognosis.

  18. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegels, Juul J W; De Maat, Michiel F G; Hulsewé, Karel W E; Hoofwijk, Anton G M; Stoot, Jan H M B

    2014-10-14

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain.

  19. Cellular and molecular aspects of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm G Smith; Georgina L Hold; Eiichi Tahara; Emad M El-Omar

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a global killer with a shifting burden from the developed to the developing world.The cancer develops along a multistage process that is defined by distinct histological and pathophysiological phases. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations mediate the transition from one stage to another and these include mutations in oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cell cycle and mismatch repair genes. The most significant advance in the fight against gastric caner came with the recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) as the most important acquired aetiological agent for this cancer. Recent work has focussed on elucidating the complex host/microbial interactions that underlie the neoplastic process. There is now considerable insight into the pathogenesis of this cancer and the prospect of preventing and eradicating the disease has become a reality. Perhaps more importantly, the study of H pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis offers a paradigm for understanding more complex human cancers. In this review, we examine the molecular and cellular events that underlie H pyloriinduced gastric cancer.

  20. Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Pseudoachalasia, and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilsa Mizrak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a rare, inherited skeletal disorder characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen. Malignancy is rarely reported in patients with OI and it was suggested that this disease can protect against cancer. Here, we report a 41-year-old woman with symptoms of achalasia where repeated treatment of pneumatic dilation and stent replacement was unsuccessful; therefore, surgery was performed. Pathology showed gastric adenocarcinoma unexpectedly. Chemotherapy was given after assessing dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD enzyme activity, which can be deficient in OI patients. This is the first report of gastric cancer mimicking achalasia in a patient with OI.

  1. E-cadherin in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annie On On Chan

    2006-01-01

    Cadherin is an adhesion molecule and a superfamily of calcium-mediated membrane glycoproteins. E-cadherin is the prototype of the class E-cadherin that links to catenins to form the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence has shown that E-cadherin not only acts as an adhesive, but also plays important roles in growth development and carcinogenesis. It has been recently viewed as an invasion as well as a growth suppressor gene. This review summarizes the recent discoveries on E-cadherin and its role in gastric cancer. In particular, our work on E-cadherin in gastric cancer, including its relation with Helicobacter pylori and clinical applications, are described in detail.

  2. Expression and Clinical Significance of REGy in Gastric Cancer Tissue and Variously Differentiated Gastric Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Tian Tian; Xiaoyi Wang; Fan Li; Guosheng Ren

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the REGy expression in gastric cancer tissue and gastric cancer cell lines of various differentiation levels and its clinical significance.METHODS Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of REGy protein in 70 specimens of gastric cancer and 30 specimens of normal gastric mucosa. The relationship between the expression of REGy protein and the biological behaviors of gastric cancer was analyzed. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the mRNA level and the protein expression of REGγ in normal gastric cell line GES-1, well differentiated gastric cancer cell line MKN-28, moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 and poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line BGC-823.RESULTS The expression rate of REGγprotein in gastric cancer tissue (52/70, 74.29%) was significantly higher than that in normal gastric tissue (12/30, 40%) (P<0.01). The expression rate of REGywas correlated with tumor size (P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), differentiation degree (P<0.01), infiltration depth (P<0.01)and distant metastasis (P<0.05). RT-PCR analysis showed that theexpression of REGγ mRNA was 0.459±0.079 in the normal gastric mucosa cell line, 0.588±0.118 in the well differentiated gastric cancer cell line, 0.715±0.066 in the moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line, and 0.873±0.099 in the poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line, showing a negative correla- tion between REGγmRNA expression and differentiation level (P <0.05). Western blot analysis showed that the expression of REGy protein was 0.712±0.065 in the normal gastric mucosa cell line, 1.176±0.185 in the well differentiated gastric cancer cell line, 1.533 ±0.127 in the moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line, and 2.061±0.398 in the poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line, showing a negative correlation between REGγprotein expression and differentiation level (P<0.05).CONCLUSION REGγ is expressed in gastric cancer

  3. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  4. Gastric varicella: two cases in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta María Sastre-Lozano

    Full Text Available Gastric involvement with the varicella-zoster virus is an uncommon clinical condition where early suspicion and diagnosis are important to prevent the consequences deriving from its high morbidity and mortality, which in immunocompromised patients oscillate between 9% and 41% according to the various series. Two cases of gastric involvement with the varicella-zoster virus (VZV in two patients with blood cancer are reported below. Gastric lesions are usually preceded by typical papulovesicular skin lesions. When gastric involvement is the first symptom of the disease its diagnosis and management may be delayed, which may entail severe consequences for immunocompromised patients. It is therefore that we suggest its inclusion in the algorithm for immunocompromised patients with abdominal pain and ulcer-like endoscopic lesions.

  5. Microsatellite instability in gastric cancer and pre-cancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Liu; Xiao-Yong Zhang; Yun Shao; Dao-Fu Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the microsatellite instability (MSI) in cancer and pre-cancerous lesions of the stomach and its mechanisms underlying the development of gastric cancer.METHODS: Thirty-six gastric cancer samples were obtained from patients undergoing surgery. Forty-one gastric mucosa samples with dysplasia and 51 with intestinal metaplasia (IM) were obtained from patients with chronic gastritis undergoing gastro-endoscopy. Genomic DNA was extracted from the samples. Silver staining single strand conformation polymorphis-polymerize chain reaction (SSCP-PCR) was used to screen MSI markers at 5 loci (Bat-25, Bat-26, D5S346, D17S250, and D2S123)in fresh tissues and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and their corresponding normal gastric mucosa.RESULTS: The abnormal shifting of the single-strand DNA (MSI) was identified in 21 out of 36 (58.3%) gastric cancers.Seven cases showed high-level MSI (two or more loci altered) and 14 showed low-level MSI (one locus altered).Gastric cancer with MSI had a tendency to be located in the distal stomach. MSI was also detected in 11 out of 41(26.8%) dysplasia samples and in 9 of 51 (17.6%) IM samples respectively. Three cases of dysplasia and one case of IM showed high-level MSI. Eight cases of dysplasia and 8 cases of IM displayed low-level MSI. MIS in IM was found only in moderate or severe-grade IM. No association was detected between MSI and dysplasia grade.CONCLUSION: Accumulation of MSI in dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa may be an early molecular event during gastric carcinogenesis and may contribute to the acquisition of transformed cell phenotype and the development of gastric cancer.

  6. Gastric cancer progression associated with local humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda, López-Vidal; Sergio, Ponce-de-León; Hugo, Esquivel-Solís; Isabel, Amieva-Fernández Rosa; Rafael, Barreto-Zúñiga; Aldo, Torre-Delgadillo; Gonzalo, Castillo-Rojas

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the association between H. pylori and gastric cancer has been well described, the alterations studies are scarce in the humoral immune response in specific anatomical areas of stomach and during the stages of gastric cancer. The aim in this study was to determine the influence of humoral immune responses against H. pylori infection on gastric carcinoma. Methods We selected 16 gastric cancer cases and approximately one matched control per case at the National Institute of M...

  7. Intake of wine, beer and spirits and risk of gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barstad, B; Sørensen, T I A; Tjønneland, A

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to study prospectively the relation between quantity and type of alcohol and risk of gastric cancer. In a pooled database from three population studies conducted in 1964-1992, a total of 15 236 men and 13 227 women were followed for a total of 389 051 person-years. During follow......-up 122 incident cases of gastric cancer were identified. Total alcohol intake itself was not associated with gastric cancer, but type of alcohol seemed to influence risk. Compared with non-wine drinkers, participants who drank 1-6 glasses of wine had a relative risk ratio of 0.76 (95% confidence interval...... adjustment for age, gender, educational level, body mass index, smoking habits, inhalation and physical activity. There was no association between beer or spirits drinking and gastric cancer. In conclusion, the present study suggests that a daily intake of wine may prevent development of gastric cancer....

  8. The Prognostic Value of UHRF-1 and p53 in Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babacan, Nalan A.; Eğilmez, Hatice Reyhan; Yücel, Birsen; Parlak, Ilknur; Şeker, Mehmet Metin; Kaçan, Turgut; Bahçeci, Aykut; Cihan, Sener; Akinci, Bülent; Eriten, Berna; Kılıçkap, Saadettin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study aimed to examine whether UHRF-1 and p53 overexpression is a prognostic marker for gastric cancer. Patients and Methods: Sixty-four patients with gastric cancer (study group) and 23 patients with gastritis (control group) were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine expression of UHRF-1 and p53 in gastric cancers and a control group diagnosed with gastritis. Results: The median age was 63 years (18-83 years) in the study group. UHRF-1 was positive in 15 (23%) patients with gastric cancer and five (21.7%) patients with gastritis (P = 0.559). UHRF1 expression level in gastric cancer is more powerful than in gastritis (P = 0.046). Thirty-seven (61%) patients with gastric cancer and only one patient with gastritis were p53 positive (P < 0.001). After a median follow-up of 12 months (1–110), the 2-year overall survival rates were 55% and 30% in negative and positive p53, respectively (P = 0.084). Also, the 2-year overall survival rates were 45% and 53% in negative and positive UHRF-1, respectively (P = 0.132). Conclusion: According to this study, UHRF-1and p53 were not prognostic factors for gastric cancer, whereas they may have a diagnostic value for differantiating between gastric cancer and gastritis. PMID:26831603

  9. The prognostic value of UHRF-1 and p53 in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan A Babacan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to examine whether UHRF-1 and p53 overexpression is a prognostic marker for gastric cancer. Patients and Methods: Sixty-four patients with gastric cancer (study group and 23 patients with gastritis (control group were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine expression of UHRF-1 and p53 in gastric cancers and a control group diagnosed with gastritis. Results: The median age was 63 years (18-83 years in the study group. UHRF-1 was positive in 15 (23% patients with gastric cancer and fi ve (21.7% patients with gastritis (P = 0.559. UHRF1 expression level in gastric cancer is more powerful than in gastritis (P = 0.046. Thirty-seven (61% patients with gastric cancer and only one patient with gastritis were p53 positive (P < 0.001. After a median follow-up of 12 months (1-110, the 2-year overall survival rates were 55% and 30% in negative and positive p53, respectively (P = 0.084. Also, the 2-year overall survival rates were 45% and 53% in negative and positive UHRF-1, respectively (P = 0.132. Conclusion: According to this study, UHRF-1and p53 were not prognostic factors for gastric cancer, whereas they may have a diagnostic value for differantiating between gastric cancer and gastritis.

  10. Relationship between expression of EGFR in gastric cancer tissue and clinicopathological features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Gao; Xiu-Ju Liang; Zi-Sen Zhang; Wang Ma; Zhi-Wei Chang; Ming-Zhi Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in gastric cancer and the clinicopathological features and prognosis. Methods: A total of 78 paraffin specimens of gastric cancer operation were collected. The immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of EGFR in 78 cases of gastric cancer and 20 cases of adjacent normal tissue. The relationship between the high expression of EGFR and clinicopathological features was analyzed. Results: EGFR positive expression rate in the 78 cases of gastric cancer tissue was 57.7 %( 45/78), while EGFR was not expressed in 20 cases of adjacent normal tissue. The high EGFR expression was positively correlated with the position of gastric cancer, tumor size, cell differentiation, invasive depth, lymph node metastasis and TNM staging, yet having no obvious relation with gender or age. Conclusions: EGFR expression level in gastric cancer is closely related to the incidence and development of gastric cancer, which can provide a theoretical basis for the targeted therapy for gastric cancer with EGFR as the target.

  11. TFF3 and survivin expressions associate with a lower survival rate in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia-Rong; Tang, Hui-Zhong; Zhou, Kai-Zong; Shen, Wu-Hong; Guo, He-Yi

    2013-11-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) and survivin with functions of inhibiting apoptosis are involved in the gastric cancer by overexpression. The purpose of this study is to examine the expression of TFF3 and survivin in patients' tissue samples with gastric cancer and analyze the relationship between the protein expression and the different clinical records. By studying the expressions of TFF3 and survivin in gastric cancer through immunohistochemical staining and examining the survival rate via Kaplan-Meier analysis for gastric cancer patients, we found that the TFF3 and survivin positive expressions have a significant relationship with the lower survival rate comparing to that of negative expressions in the analyzed patients (P TFF3 and survivin expressions have the lowest survival rate. TFF3 or survivin positive expression correlates with the lymph node metastasis, metastasis, and TNM stages of gastric cancer. Survival analysis indicates that survival rate has a close relationship with the age, tumor histology, tumor differentiation, degree of infiltration, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stages (P TFF3 and survivin expressions play a vital role in gastric cancer development, and these two proteins are important markers for prognosis in gastric cancer. Patients with gastric cancer can increase the survival rate through an earlier diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  12. Dietary Flavonoids and Gastric Cancer Risk in a Korean Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Dong Woo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the most common cancer among men in Korea, and dietary factors are closely associated with gastric cancer risk. We performed a case-control study using 334 cases and 334 matched controls aged 35–75 years. Significant associations were observed in total dietary flavonoids and their subclasses, with the exception of anthocyanidins and isoflavones (OR (95% CI: 0.49 (0.31–0.76, p trend = 0.007 for total flavonoids. However, these associations were not significant after further adjustment for fruits and vegetable consumption (OR (95% CI: 0.62 (0.36–1.09, p trend = 0.458 for total flavonoids. Total flavonoids and their subclasses, except for isoflavones, were significantly associated with a reduced risk gastric cancer in women (OR (95% CI: 0.33 (0.15–0.73, p trend = 0.001 for total flavonoids but not in men (OR (95% CI: 0.70 (0.39–1.24, p trend = 0.393 for total flavonoids. A significant inverse association with gastric cancer risk was observed in flavones, even after additional adjustment for fruits and vegetable consumption in women. No significantly different effects of flavonoids were observed between H. pylori-positive and negative subjects. In conclusion, dietary flavonoids were inversely associated with gastric cancer risk, and these protective effects of dietary flavonoids were prominent in women. No clear differences were observed in the subgroup analysis of H. pylori and smoking status.

  13. Familial gastric cancer : guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and periodic surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, Irma; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Plukker, John T.; de Jong, Daphne; van Krieken, J. Han; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Bleiker, Eveline; Cats, Anemieke

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a relatively rare disorder, with a mutated CDH1 gene as the only known cause. Carriers of a germline mutation in CDH1 have a lifetime risk of > 80% of developing diffuse gastric cancer. As periodic gastric surveillance is of limited value in detecting earl

  14. [Familial gastric cancer: diagnosis, treatment and periodic surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Vasen, H.F.; Cats, A.

    2011-01-01

    The only known genetic causes of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) are germline mutations in the CDH1 gene.- CDH1 mutation carriers have a lifetime risk of 70-80% of developing diffuse gastric cancer. As periodic gastric surveillance is of limited value in detecting early stages of HDGC, prop

  15. Expression of periostin and its clinicopathological relevance in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression and localization of periostin in gastric cancer and its clinical relevance.METHODS: Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to measure periostin mRNA expression. Western blotting was carried out to detect periostin protein expression. Immunohistochemistry was performed to localize and quantify the expression of periostin in benign gastric diseases and gastric cancer,and immunostaining results were correlated with gastric cancer pathological stages.RESULTS: Periostin expression was low at both mRNA and protein levels in normal gastric tissues,but was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues.Immunohistochemical staining revealed that periostin was overexpressed in primary gastric cancer, as well as in metastatic lymph nodes, but only faint staining was found in benign gastric ulcers. By quantitative analysis of the immunostaining results, periostin expression was increased 2.5-4-fold in gastric cancer, compared to that in benign gastric disease, and there was a trend toward increasing periostin expression with tumor stage.CONCLUSION: This observation demonstrated that periostin was overexpressed in gastric cancer and lymph node metastasis, which suggests that periostin plays an important role in the progression and metastasis of gastric cancer.

  16. Expression of Telomerase Activity in Gastric Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between telomerase activity and biological behavior in human gastric cells and appraise the clinical significance of detecting telomerase activity. Methods The telomerase activity in 47 gastric cancer tissue samples,their matched nomal tissues,7 gastric ulcer and 2 gastric cancer cell lines was detected using a PCR-based non-radioisotopic telomeric repeat amplification protocol(TRAP) assay. Results None of the 47 samples from normal gastric tissues expressed telomerase activity.The 41 of 47 cases of gastric cancer presented telomerase activity with an 87.2% positive rate (P<0.001). 2/2 gastric cancer cell lines and 0/7 gastric ulcer line were also positive for telmerase activity.The activity of telomerase was associated with the pathological differentiation of gastric cancer. Conclusion Telomerase activity may be related to the biological behavior of gastric cancer and can help in assessing the malignant poten-tial of gastric cancer.Telomerase activity will be a good diagnostic marker for the detection of gastric cancer.

  17. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  18. Multiple early gastric cancer with duodenal invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okino Tetsuya

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early gastric cancers with duodenal invasion are rare, and no previous case of multiple early gastric cancer, one invading the duodenal bulb, has been reported. Case presentation A 79-year-old woman was investigated for upper abdominal discomfort. Endoscopic examination revealed an irregular nodulated lesion in the antrum area, and a reddish aggregated-type semi-circumferential nodulated lesion extending from the prepyloric area to the duodenal bulb through the normal mucosa with the antrum lesion. Biopsy revealed a tubular adenoma for the antrum lesion and a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma for the prepyloric lesion. Distal gastrectomy with sufficient duodenal resection was performed. Microscopically, the antrum lesion appeared as a papillary adenocarcinoma, and the prepyloric lesion as a mainly papillary adenocarcinoma which partially invaded the submucosa without any sequential elongation for endoscopic findings. The lesion extended into the duodenal bulb, and was 12 mm in length from the oral end of Brunner's gland's area and limited within the duodenal mucosa. Conclusion Here, we present an unusual case of multiple early gastric cancer, one of which invaded the duodenum with relative wide mucosal spreading. This case illustrates that even early stage cancers located in the gastric antrum, particularly in the prepyloric area can invade the duodenum directly.

  19. [Volumes of lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniavskiĭ, A A; Lavrov, N A

    2015-01-01

    It is summarized an experience of 1528 resections for gastric cancer supplemented by D1-, D2-, D2,5- and D3-lymphadenectomy in 751, 241, 359 and 177 patients resrectively. Unconventional type D2.5 means D2-lymphodis section with additional lymphadenectomy along hepatoduodenal ligament and superior retropancreatic nodes as well as omental bursa removal with lymphodis section of esophageal opening crura. Analysis of immediate and remote results is presented. It is concluded that D3-lymphadenectomy is minimally preferred over D2.5-type in gastric cancer staging. D3-lymphodis section has the largest number of especially purulent and pancreatogenic postoperative complications. D2.5-lymphadenectomy significantly increases 5-year survival in comparison with D2-lymphodis section (from 51.2 ± 4.9 to 64.0 ± 4.1%; p<0.001) and may be chosen for any radical surgery for gastric cancer including early forms. Localized proximal tumors which are in distinctive for metastasis into hepatoduodenal ligament lymph nodes are exception. D3-lymphodis section did not impact on survival in comparison with D2,5-lymphadenectomy. Only patients with antral cancer after distal subtotal gastric resection had 5-year survival increasing on 8 % (from 60.6 ± 7.5 to 68.5 ± 6.3%).

  20. Determining gastric cancer resectability by dynamic MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Zilai; Zhang, Huan; Du, Lianjun; Ding, Bei; Song, Qi; Ling, Huawei; Huang, Baisong; Chen, Kemin [Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Yan, Chao [Jiaotong University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2010-03-15

    Multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has been widely used to detect primary lesions and to evaluate TNM staging. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of dynamic MDCT in the preoperative determination of the resectability of gastric cancer. MDCT was used to image 350 cases of gastric cancer diagnosed by biopsy before surgery. MDCT findings regarding TNM staging and resectability were correlated with surgical and pathological findings. The accuracy of MDCT for staging gastric cancer was high, especially for tumour stage T1 (94.3%), lymph node stage N2 (87.3%), and for predicting distant metastases (>96.6%). When resectability was considered to be the outcome, the total accuracy of MDCT was 87.4%, sensitivity was 89.7% and specificity was 76.7%. Results showed high sensitivity for identifying peritoneal seeding (90.0%) and for predicting liver metastasis (80.0%). Dynamic enhanced MDCT is useful for TNM staging of gastric cancers and for predicting tumour respectability preoperatively. (orig.)

  1. Clinicopathological Characteristics of Synchronous Multiple Gastric Cancers in Chinese: An Analysis of 44 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-shan Zhang; Cai-gang Liu; Yang Lu; Feng Jin; Hui-mian Xu; Ping Lu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinicopathologic characteristics of the primary synchronous multiple gastric cancers (SMGC) in Chinese.Methods: Clinicopathologic data of patients with histologically confirmed gastric cancer who received surgical operations in our department between 1993 and 2002 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Clinicopathologic characteristics including gender, age, tumor location, differentiation and staging between patients with SMGC and those with solitary gastric cancer (SGC) were compared. Synchronous multiple and solitary gastric cancers were diagnosed and classified based on radiography upper endoscopy and histology. All the cases were followed up after the operation and 5-year survival rate between the two groups was compared.Results: A total of 871 patients with gastric cancer were included. Synchronous multiple gastric cancers were found in 44 (5.1%) of these cases. More of the diagnose in the early stage to SMGC than to SGC. SMGC were more likely to be located at the lower third stomach and of a low grade differentiation, compared to SGC. However, there were no significant differences in the rates of lymph node metastasis and lymphatic vessel invasion between multiple and solitary gastric cancers. In addition, the 5-year survival rate did not difference between the two groups.Conclusion: The whole stomach should be detected carefully to avoid missing out the multiple gastric cancers. Concerning the treatment of multiple gastric cancer, the sufficient extent of the stomach wall resection was necessary, and the extent of lymphadenectomy was supposed to follow the operation for the solitary gastric cancer according to the staging of the cancer lesions.

  2. Factors associated with use of gastric cancer screening services in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young Min Kwon; Hyung Taek Lim; Kiheon Lee; Be Long Cho; Min Sun Park; Ki Young Son; Sang Min Park

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify the factors associated with participation in gastric cancer screening programs. METHODS: Using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005 (KNHANES Ⅲ), a nationwide health-related survey in Korea, a cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the multiple factors associated with gastric cancer screening attendance among persons aged at least 40 years. The study population included 4593 individuals who completed a gastric cancer screening questionnaire and had no previous cancer history. Four groups of individual-level or environmental level covariates were considered as potential associated factors. RESULTS: Using KNHANES Ⅲ data, an estimated 31.71% of Korean individuals aged at least 40 years adhered to gastric cancer screening recommendations. Subjects who graduated from elementary school [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 1.66; 95% CI: 1.21-2.26], middle/high school (aOR, 1.38; 95% CI: 1.01-1.89), and university or higher (aOR, 1.64; 95% CI: 1.13-2.37) were more likely to undergo gastric cancer screening than those who received no formal education at all. The population with the highest income tertile had more attendance at gastric screening compared to those with the lowest income tertile (aOR, 1.36; 95% CI: 1.06-1.73). Gastric screening was also negatively associated with excessive alcohol consumption (aOR, 0.71; 95% CI: 0.53-0.96). A positive attitude to preventive medical evaluation was significantly associated with better participation in gastric cancer screening programs (aOR, 5.26; 95% CI: 4.35-6.35). CONCLUSION: Targeted interventions for vulnerable populations and public campaigns about preventivemedical evaluation are needed to increase gastric cancer screening participation and reduce gastric cancer mortality.

  3. [Matrix metalloproteases as molecular markers in gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth

    2010-02-06

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the world. Prognosis in patients with gastric cancer is difficult to establish because it is commonly diagnosed when gastric wall invasion and metastasis have occurred. Currently, some members of the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases have been identified, whose expression in gastric tumor tissue is significantly elevated compared to healthy gastric tissue. Matrix metalloproteinases are 24 zinc-dependent endopeptidases that catalyze the proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. This degradation allows the cancer cells invade the surrounding stroma and trigger metastasis. Upregulation of certain matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis and elevated invasive capacity. This review compiles evidence about the genetic expression of matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer and their role in tumour invasion and metastasis, emphasizing their potential as molecular markers of prognosis.

  4. Outcome after emergency surgery in patients with a free perforation caused by gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Hironori; Hiraki, Shuichi; Sakamoto, Naoko; Yaguchi, Yoshihisa; Horio, Takuya; Kumano, Isao; Akase, Takayoshi; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Aiko, Satoshi; Ono, Satoshi; Ichikura, Takashi; Kazuo, Hase

    2010-01-01

    Perforation of gastric cancer is rare and it accounts for less than 1% of the incidences of an acute abdomen. In this study, we reviewed cases of benign or malignant gastric perforation in terms of the accuracy of diagnosis and investigated the clinical outcome after emergency surgery in patients with a free perforation caused by gastric cancer. On the basis of pathological examination, gastric cancer was diagnosed in 8 patients and benign ulcer perforation in 32 patients. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis by pathological examination were 50, 93.8 and 85%, respectively. Except for age, there were no differences in the other demographic characteristics between patients with gastric cancer and benign ulcer perforation. The median survival time of patients with perforated gastric cancer was 195 days after surgery. Patients with gastric cancer perforation had a poorer overall survival rate than those who had T3 tumors without perforation. In addition, in patients with perforation, recurrence of peritoneum occurred more frequently. In conclusion, to improve the survival rate of patients with perforated gastric cancer and to improve the accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis, endoscopic examination and/or pathological examination of the frozen section should be performed, if possible. A balanced surgical strategy using laparoscopic local repair as the first-step of surgery, followed by radical open gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy may be considered.

  5. Expression of CD40 and CD40L in Gastric Cancer Tissue and Its Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To study expression of CD40 and CD40L in gastric cancer tissue we assessed gastric cancer patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology of The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University and control subjects. Gastric cancer and normal (from around tumours tissue samples were obtained from patients. Venous blood samples (gastric cancer and ulcer groups were drawn on the morning of the day before surgery for the measurement of peripheral sCD40L. The expression of CD40 in gastric carcinoma specimens was examined immuno-histochemically. The clinicopathological factors, including age, sex, tumor size, gross appearance, degree of cellular differentiation, histological classification, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and TNM stage were analyzed according to the different expression of CD40. The results indicated a high CD40 expression in gastric cancer tissues. This positive expression of CD40 revealed a significant (P < 0.05 correlation with lymphatic metastasis and tumor TNM stage in gastric cancer patients. It is concluded that higher CD40 expression existed in expanding type tumors and could play an important role in clinical diagnosis of gastric cancer patients.

  6. Alcohol consumption and gastric cancer in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizbeth López-Carrillo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an assessment of alcohol consumption, including the popular Mexican liquor tequila, in relation to the incidence of gastric cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study in Mexico City, with 220 gastric cancer cases and 752 population-based controls. A food frequency questionnaire was used to measure consumption of alcohol and other dietary items. Grams of ethanol were estimated by the Food Intake Analysis System 3.0 software. After adjustment for known risk factors, wine consumption was positively associated with the risk of developing gastric cancer (OR = 2.93; CI 95% 1.27-6.75 in the highest category of wine consumption, corresponding to at least 10 glasses of wine per month, with a significant trend (p = 0.005. This association remained among intestinal (OR = 2.16; CI 95% 0.68-6.92, p-value for trend = 0.031 and diffuse (OR = 4.48; CI 95% 1.44-13.94, p-value for trend = 0.018 gastric cancer cases. A borderline significant trend between GC risk and total ethanol intake was observed (p = 0.068. Consumption of beer and distilled alcoholic beverages including brandy, rum, and tequila was not associated with GC risk. The results indicate the need to focus on the study of the potential effects of different types of wine, with emphasis on components other than ethanol regarding the incidence of gastric cancer, even among populations with moderate to low levels of alcohol consumption.

  7. A Case Report of One-Point Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoqing Song; Qiang Wang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Introduction Carcinoma of the stomach is the most common malignant tumor in China. Due to advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment, the detection of early gastric carcinoma (EGC) has increased worldwide.Yet gastric one-point cancer is rarely detected.

  8. Risk Factors of Gastric Cancer in Wuwei City an Endemic Region of Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denghai Mi; Chengyu Su; Haozeng Luo; Jilin Yi; Tianzhong Jing; Qing Xu; Wangsheng Yang; Guoquan Yang; Shuzhen Wang; Gonghan Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Studies have shown that risk factors of gastric cancer include living habits, eating moldy pickled food, dystrophy, lack of nutrients, and genetics, etc. This study explores the prevalence of these factors in Wuwei, a city in northwest China with a high incidence of gastric cancer.METHODS Family histories of the residents in Wuwei City were investigated with a case-control method. Segregation ratio and heredity degree of gastric cancer were calculated using theLi-Mantel-Cart and Falconer's regression methods. Chronic gastritis patients were followed-up by home visits, gastroscopy, and pathology. Carcinogenic fungi and volatilile N-nitroso compounds were noted in the residents' meals. Helicobactor pylori (Hp) was assessed in their gastric mucosa and the total content of serum vitamin C in 293 healthy adults was determined.RESULTS In Wuwei City, the segregation ratio of gastric cancer was 0.077. The heredity degree of first-degree relatives was 22.91%. The incidence rate of cancer per year in people in an atrophic gastritis group was 1.09%. Eight kinds of nitrosamines and 14 kinds of carcinogenic fungi were detected in the residents' food. Total average vitamin C in the serum of the 293 healthy adults in the summer was 5.74±2.79 mg/L. The positive rate of Hp in gastric mucosa of the residents was 67%.CONCLUSION The majorextrinsic factors include infection of Hp, atrophic gastritis (especially atrophic hyperplasia), and genetic susceptibility.

  9. Efficiency of photodynamic treatment in patients with early gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Е. V. Filonenko; Sokolov, V. V.; Е. S. Karpova

    2013-01-01

    The experience of photodynamic therapy for early gastric cancer is described in the article. The treatment results in 68 patients who were excluded for convenient surgical treatment because of advanced age or severe co-morbidity are represented. 63 patients had single tumor, 5 patients – 2 tumors. Four Russian agents: photogem, photosens, radaсhlorin and alasens, were used for photodynamic therapy. The treatment session was performed under local anesthesia during routine endoscopy with diode ...

  10. HER2 testing in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarello, Luca; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Molecular therapies targeting HER2 are part of the established drug armamentarium in breast carcinoma. Now the ToGA trial, an international multicenter phase III clinical study, involving 24 countries globally, has shown that the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody Trastuzumab is effective in prolonging survival in HER2-positive carcinoma of the stomach and the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Similarly to breast carcinoma, >20% of gastric cancers show HER2 overexpression and/or amplification, and this percentage increases to 33% in GEJ tumors. Thus, as in breast carcinoma, pathologists are now asked to evaluate HER2 status in gastric carcinoma samples. As validated in the ToGA trial, the HER2 testing criteria that must be used in evaluating both gastric carcinoma biopsies and surgical specimens significantly differ from those routinely applied in breast carcinoma. The main variations with regard to the pattern of reactivity in HER2-expressing cells are as follows: the completeness of membrane staining is not a "conditio sine qua non" and the number of stained cells necessary to consider a case as positive is different. We must also take note of the much more frequent heterogeneity of HER2 positivity in gastric cancer compared with breast carcinoma and the less stringent correlation between HER2 amplification and protein overexpression that is observed in gastric carcinoma, where more than 20% of cases may carry HER2 amplification, although of low level, without HER2 expression. In these patients, in the ToGA trial, there was no apparent benefit from adding Trastuzumab to chemotherapy: for this reason the European Medicines Agency, while approving usage of Trastuzumab for metastatic adenocarcinoma treatment, indicated HER2 testing by immunohistochemistry as first evaluation assay, followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 2+ equivocal cases. HER2 testing in gastric carcinoma is a new field, opening several opportunities: for patients with gastric cancer

  11. Risk Factors and Epidemiology of Gastric Cancer in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Saeed; Ahmad, Mukhtiar; Asif, Hafiz Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad; Ur Rehman, Saif; Sultana, Sabira

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the 2nd most common cause of death among all cancers and is the 4th most common cancer in the world. The number of deaths due to gastric cancer is about 800,000 annually. Gastric cancer is more common in men as compared to women and is 3rd most common cancer after colorectal and breast cancers in women. A progressive rise in the incidence rate has been observed in females over the last 5 years. The highest incidence of stomach cancer is in China, South America and Eastern Europe. The incidence of gastric cancer has 20 fold variation worldwide. Global variation is linked by two factors which play important role in developing gastric cancer. One is infection with Helicobacter pylori and the 2nd is diet. South Asia is a region with low risk, despite a high prevalence of H.pylori. Gastric carcinoma is common in southern region of India. Gastric cancer is more readily treated if diagnosed early. This study aims to provide awareness about gastric cancer as well as an updated knowledge about risk factors and epidemiology of gastric cancer in Pakistan.

  12. PIVKA-II-producing advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Shigetsugu; Honda, Ichiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Soda, Hiroaki; Nagata, Matsuo; Hoshino, Isamu; Takenouchi, Toshinao; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2004-08-01

    We describe the case of a 68-year-old man with primary advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach, who displayed extremely high plasma levels of protein induced by vitamin K antagonist (PIVKA)-II (15 600 mAU/ml) and normal levels of alphafetoprotein (AFP) (4 ng/ml). Ultrasonography and dynamic computed tomography ruled out hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastasis. After preoperative chemotherapy, pancreatico-spleno total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy was performed. Postoperatively, plasma levels of PIVKA-II returned to within the normal range (29 mAU/ml). Microscopic examination revealed stomach adenocarcinoma showing various histological types, such as moderately to poorly differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma, but hepatoid differentiation of gastric adenocarcinoma was not detected. Localization of PIVKA-II and AFP within tumor cells was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies. These results indicate that tumor cells from gastric cancer may produce PIVKA-II. Some cases of PIVKA-II- and AFP-producing advanced gastric cancer with liver metastasis have been reported, but this is the first report of gastric cancer without liver metastasis producing PIVKA-II alone.

  13. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  14. Reproductive factors, hormone use and gastric cancer risk: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhensheng; Butler, Lesley M; Wu, Anna H; Koh, Woon-Puay; Jin, Aizhen; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2016-06-15

    Gastric cancer incidence varies greatly worldwide, but is consistently twice as high in men than in women. The hormone-related factors hypothesized to be associated with lower risk of gastric cancer in women have not been fully explored in populations with a high background risk of gastric cancer. The Singapore Chinese Health Study (SCHS) is a prospective cohort study in which 34,022 of the participants enrolled between 1993 and 1998 were women between 45 and 74 years of age. Information on reproductive histories, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptive (OC) use was collected through in-person interviews at baseline. As of December 31, 2013, 269 incident gastric cancer cases were identified. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate gastric cancer risk associations. Older age at natural menopause (≥55 versus 3 years and 0.67 (0.47-0.94) for ever use of OCs, compared with never use. Reproductive factors associated with a longer window of fertility and the use of exogenous hormones were shown to reduce gastric cancer development in a cohort of Chinese women with a high background risk of gastric cancer.

  15. Adenoviral gene therapy in gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nima Khalighinejad; Hesammodin Hariri; Omid Behnamfar; Arash Yousefi; Amir Momeni

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. With current therapeutic approaches the prognosis of gastric cancer is very poor, as gastric cancer accounts for the second most common cause of death in cancer related deaths. Gastric cancer like almost all other cancers has a molecular genetic basis which relies on disruption in normal cellular regulatory mechanisms regarding cell growth, apoptosis and cell division. Thus novel therapeutic approaches such as gene therapy promise to become the alternative choice of treatment in gastric cancer. In gene therapy, suicide genes, tumor suppressor genes and anti-angiogenesis genes among many others are introduced to cancer cells via vectors.Some of the vectors widely used in gene therapy are Adenoviral vectors. This review provides an update of the new developments in adenoviral cancer gene therapy including strategies for inducing apoptosis, inhibiting metastasis and targeting the cancer cells.

  16. Comparative proteomics analysis of human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Jian-Fang Li; Ying Qu; Xue-Hua Chen; Jian-Min Qin; Qin-Long Gu; Min Yan; Zheng-Gang Zhu; Bing-Ya Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify differentially expressed proteins between cancer and normal tissues of gastric cancer by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).METHODS: Soluble fraction proteins of gastric cancer tissues and paired normal tissues were separated by 2-DE.The differentially expressed proteins were selected and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and database search.RESULTS: 2-DE profiles with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained.Twenty-three protein spots were excised from sliver staining gel and digested in gel by trypsin,in which fifteen protein spots were identified successfully.Among the identified proteins,there were ten over-expressed and five under-expressed proteins in stomach cancer tissues compared with normal tissues.CONCLUSION: In this study,the well-resolved,reproducible 2-DE patterns of human gastric cancer tissue and paired normal tissue were established and optimized and certain differentially-expressed proteins were identified.The combined use of 2-DE and MS provides an effective approach to screen for potential tumor markers.

  17. Esophageal and gastric cancer incidence and mortality in alendronate users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Pazianas, Michael; Eiken, Pia Agnete

    2012-01-01

    their esophageal or gastric location could be accurately distinguished. We conducted a register-based, open cohort study using national healthcare data for Denmark. Upper endoscopy frequency, cancer incidence and mortality was examined in 30,606 alendronate users (female, age 50¿+¿) and 122,424 matched controls......Recent studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the risk of esophageal cancer with oral bisphosphonates. Prior studies did not record the number of cancer deaths or endoscopy rates, which could be higher in bisphosphonate users and lead to more cancers being diagnosed at a stage when....... Primary outcomes were esophageal cancer incidence and death due to esophageal cancer. The analysis showed that alendronate users were more likely to have undergone recent upper endoscopy (4.1 vs 1.7%, p¿...

  18. Decreased expression of DICER1 in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhi-hong; SUN Xiu-ju; FU Wei-neng; GUAN Yi; GAO Feng; WANG Ying; SUN Kai-lai

    2007-01-01

    Background The role of epigenetics in gene expression regulation and development significantly enhances our understanding of carcinogenesis.All the tumor related genes may be the target of epigenetical or genetic regulation.We selected some epigenetically regulated genes for cDNA array analysis and observed variability in the expression of the DICER1 gene in distinct stages of gastric cancer.The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between the expression of DICER1,an epigenetically regulated gene,and gastric cancer.Methods To detect the expression of 506 tumor-associated genes,including DICER1,in the matched cancerous mucosa,pre-malignant lesion (adjacent mucosa),non-cancerous gastric mucosa and distant lymphocyte metastatic lesion in 3 cases of gastric cancers using cDNA array.DICER1 mRNA expression and DICER1 protein expression were further analyzed by Real-time PCR and Western blot in 32 cases of progressive gastric cancer.DICER1 protein expression was also detected in 33 early and 30 progressive gastric cancers by the immunohistochemistry (IHC) method.Results In 3 cases of gastric cancer cDNA array showed dramatically decreased expression of DICER1 in pre-malignant Iesion,cancerous mucosa and distant lymphocyte metastatic lesions compared with matched noncancerous gastric mucosa,pre-malignant lesion and cancerous mucosa.Real-time PCR results showed that the expression level of DICER1 mRNA in gastric cancer was significantly down-regulated compared to normal gastric tissue (P<0.05).The IHC assay also showed that the expression of DICER1 was significantly decreased in progressive gastric cancer.Among the 63 cases of gastric cancers,13/33 early(39.4%)and 19/30(63.3%)progressive cancers showed negative expression of DICER1(50.8%).The difference in expression of DICER1 between early and progressive gastric cancers was significant(P<0.01).The result of Western blotting showed that DICER1 protein was down-regulated significantly in advanced gastric cancer

  19. Fluorescense laparoscopy in patients with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lukin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of fluorescence laparoscopy in 60 patients with gastric cancer in P.A.Herzen MCRI are represented in the article. All patients had gastric cancer stage III. Undifferentiated cancer was diagnosed in 3 (5% patients, signet ring cell carcinoma – in 42 (70%, low differentiated adenocarcinoma – in 15 (25%. Fluorescence diagnosis was performed using fluorescence laparoscope by Carl Storz (Germany with wavelengths 380-460 nm and alasens given per os at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight 3 h before study. During the investigation the examination of parietal and visceral peritoneum, great omentum with instrumental revision of pelvic organs was made. The technique of fluorescence diagnosis and assessment of its results are described. According to results of the study occult tumor microdissemination over peritoneum was detected in 10 (16.7% patients. The sensitivity of fluorescence laparoscopy in patients with gastric cancer accounted for 87.5%, specificity – 76%. The data of fluorescence diagnosis allowed to perform staging of tumor process and influenced on following management. 

  20. Salt processed food and gastric cancer in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Si-Hao; Li, Yuan-Hang; Leung, Kayee; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between salt processed food and gastric cancer, a hospital based case-control study was conducted in a high risk area of China. One hundred and seven newly diagnosed cases with histological confirmation of gastric cancer and 209 controls were recruited. Information on dietary intake was collected with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was applied to estimate the odds ratios with adjustment for other potential confounders. Comparing the high intake group with never consumption of salt processed foods, salted meat, pickled vegetables and preserved vegetables were significantly associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Meanwhile, salt taste preference in diet showed a dose-response relationship with gastric cancer. Our results suggest that consumption of salted meat, pickled and preserved vegetables, are positively associated with gastric cancer. Reduction of salt and salt processed food in diets might be one practical measure to preventing gastric cancer.

  1. Diet, microbial virulence, and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, Timothy L; Peek, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the strongest known risk factors for this malignancy. H. pylori strains exhibit a high level of genetic diversity, and the risk of gastric cancer is higher in persons carrying certain strain types (for example, those that contain a cag pathogenicity island or type s1 vacA alleles) than in persons carrying other strain types. Additional risk factors for gastric cancer include specific human genetic polymorphisms and specific dietary preferences (for example, a high-salt diet or a diet deficient in fruits and vegetables). Finally, iron-deficiency anemia is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Recent studies have provided evidence that several dietary risk factors for gastric cancer directly impact H. pylori virulence. In this review article, we discuss mechanisms by which diet can modulate H. pylori virulence and thereby influence gastric cancer risk.

  2. [Research progression of translational medicine in gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoran; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Chunchao

    2014-02-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors which is a great threat to human health. In recent years, the reform of surgical mordalities and the optimization of radiation and chemotherapy is still far from reducing morbidity and mortality of gastric cancer. As a new research pattern, translational medicine has emerged in various clinical subjects, which leads to remarkable effects. In this paper, the definition and development of translational medicine, molecular markers and drug treatment of gastric cancer will be discussed and the feasibility of translational medicine in the treatment of gastric cancer will be explained. In our opinion, the intervention of translational medicine could change the current situation that scientific researches is severely disconnected with clinical practice and increase the detection rate of gastric cancer and the effective rate of adjuvant therapy after surgery to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

  3. Menstrual and Reproductive Factors and Risk of Gastric and Colorectal Cancer in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lope, Virginia; Fernández de Larrea, Nerea; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Martín, Vicente; Moreno, Victor; Costas, Laura; Longo, Federico; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Llorca, Javier; Ascunce, Nieves; Peiró-Pérez, Rosana; Altzibar, Jone M.; Tardón, Adonina; Alguacil, Juan; Navarro, Carmen; Sierra, Ángeles; Vega, Ana Belén; Villafañe, Amaya; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Kogevinas, Manolis; Pollán, Marina; Aragonés, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex hormones play a role in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer etiology, however, epidemiological evidence is inconsistent. This study examines the influence of menstrual and reproductive factors over the risk of both tumors. Methods In this case-control study 128 women with gastric cancer and 1293 controls, as well as 562 female and colorectal cancer cases and 1605 controls were recruited in 9 and 11 Spanish provinces, respectively. Population controls were frequency matched to cases by age and province. Demographic and reproductive data were directly surveyed by trained staff. The association with gastric, colon and rectal cancer was assessed using logistic and multinomial mixed regression models. Results Our results show an inverse association of age at first birth with gastric cancer risk (five-year trend: OR = 0.69; p-value = 0.006). Ever users of hormonal contraception presented a decreased risk of gastric (OR = 0.42; 95%CI = 0.26–0.69), colon (OR = 0.64; 95%CI = 0.48–0.86) and rectal cancer (OR = 0.61; 95%CI = 0.43–0.88). Postmenopausal women who used hormone replacement therapy showed a decreased risk of colon and rectal tumors. A significant interaction of educational level with parity and months of first child lactation was also observed. Conclusion These findings suggest a protective role of exogenous hormones in gastric and colorectal cancer risk. The role of endogenous hormones remains unclear. PMID:27776142

  4. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with esophageal and gastric cancers: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Sohei; Takayama, Tomoyoshi; Wakatsuki, Kohei; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Migita, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome (CCS) is a rare non-inherited gastrointestinal polyposis syndrome with characteristic ectodermal changes. We report an extremely unusual case of CCS associated with primary esophageal and gastric cancers. A 74-year-old Japanese man with symptoms of anorexia and diarrhea was found to have primary esophageal and gastric cancers, as well as multiple gastric and colonic polyps. Based on the physical findings of onychodystrophy and alopecia, we diagnosed CCS. Because of his age and nutritional status, we decided to perform total gastrectomy for gastric cancer and chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer, upon completion of which the patient was started on steroid therapy for the CCS. After 1 week of steroid therapy, the patient's watery diarrhea improved. We recommend that for patients with CCS, the therapeutic strategy be carefully considered based on the patient's nutritional status, the severity of the CCS, and the extent of gastrointestinal cancer.

  5. CD147 expression in human gastric cancer is associated with tumor recurrence and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dake Chu

    Full Text Available CD147 is correlated with tumor aggressiveness in various human malignancies. Here, we investigated CD147 protein expression in 223 patients with gastric cancer by immunohistochemistry and analyzed its association with disease-free and overall survival. CD147 was increased in gastric cancer compared to normal tissues. Additionally, CD147 expression was associated with gastric cancer invasion, metastasis and TNM stage, whereas it was not related to age, sex, differentiation status, tumor site or Lauren classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed that CD147 was associated with disease-free and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer; i.e., patients with positive CD147 staining tend to have worse disease-free and overall survival. Moreover, Cox's proportional hazards analysis demonstrated that CD147 was an independent marker of disease-free and overall survival for patients with gastric cancer. These results confirm the association of CD147 with gastric cancer invasion and metastasis and prove that CD147 might be an indicator of tumor recurrence and prognosis in gastric cancer.

  6. Ku80 gene G-1401T promoter polymorphism and risk of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Qi Li; Jie Chen; Nan-Nan Liu; Li Yang; Ying Zeng; Bin Wang; Xue-Rong Wang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the possible relationship between the Ku80 gene polymorphism and the risk of gastric cancer in China. METHODS: In this hospital-based case-control study of gastric cancer in Jiangsu Province, China, we investigated the association of the Ku80 G-1401T (rs828907) polymorphism with gastric cancer risk. A total of 241 patients with gastric cancer and 273 age- and sexmatched control subjects were genotyped and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS: The frequencies of genotypes GG, GT and TT were 65.6%, 22.8% and 11.6% in gastric cancer cases, respectively, and 75.8%, 17.6% and 6.6% in controls, respectively. There were significant differences between gastric cancer and control groups in the distribution of their genotypes (P = 0.03) and allelic requencies (P = 0.002) in the Ku80 promoter G-1401T polymorphism. CONCLUSION: The T allele of Ku80 G-1401T may be associated with the development of gastric cancer.

  7. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and gastric cancer risk in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praud, Delphine; Bertuccio, Paola; Bosetti, Cristina; Turati, Federica; Ferraroni, Monica; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-06-15

    We investigated gastric cancer risk in relation to the adherence to the Mediterranean diet using data from two case-control studies conducted in Italy between 1985 and 2007, including 999 incidents, histologically confirmed gastric cancers and 2,628 controls admitted to hospital for acute non-neoplastic diseases. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) based on nine of the major characteristics of the Mediterranean diet in the overall dataset. The Mediterranean Dietary Pattern adherence index (MDP) and the Mediterranean Adequacy Index (MAI) were considered in the second study only. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) of gastric cancer for categories of the three scores using multiple logistic regression models. We found a reduced risk of gastric cancer for increasing levels of the MDS: as compared to subjects in the lowest category of the MDS, the ORs were 0.78, 0.61 and 0.57 in subsequent levels of MDS, with a significant trend in risk. Risk estimates were consistent across strata of age, sex, education, smoking, body mass index, and family history of gastric cancer. We also observed a decreased risk of gastric cancer for the highest versus the lowest quintile for MDP and MAI, with OR of 0.58 and 0.71, respectively. Our study provides convincing evidence of a beneficial role of the Mediterranean diet on gastric cancer.

  8. CD147 expression in human gastric cancer is associated with tumor recurrence and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dake; Zhu, Shaojun; Li, Jipeng; Ji, Gang; Wang, Weizhong; Wu, Guosheng; Zheng, Jianyong

    2014-01-01

    CD147 is correlated with tumor aggressiveness in various human malignancies. Here, we investigated CD147 protein expression in 223 patients with gastric cancer by immunohistochemistry and analyzed its association with disease-free and overall survival. CD147 was increased in gastric cancer compared to normal tissues. Additionally, CD147 expression was associated with gastric cancer invasion, metastasis and TNM stage, whereas it was not related to age, sex, differentiation status, tumor site or Lauren classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed that CD147 was associated with disease-free and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer; i.e., patients with positive CD147 staining tend to have worse disease-free and overall survival. Moreover, Cox's proportional hazards analysis demonstrated that CD147 was an independent marker of disease-free and overall survival for patients with gastric cancer. These results confirm the association of CD147 with gastric cancer invasion and metastasis and prove that CD147 might be an indicator of tumor recurrence and prognosis in gastric cancer.

  9. EXPRESSION MECHANISM AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF NOB1 IN GASTRIC CANCER TISSUE AND ADJACENT NORMAL TISSUE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W-P; Liu, X; Yang, Y; Liu, Y-F

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the effect and relationship of NOB1 in the development of gastric cancer, based on an analysis of NOB1expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent tissue. Thirty gastric cancer tissue samples taken during surgery with complete pathological data and their related adjacent normal tissue were examined in this study. NOB1 protein expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Real-time PCR was used to detect NOB1 mRNA expression, which provided a basis on which to explore the clinical pathological characteristics for patients with gastric cancer. Results show that NOB1 protein in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue were diffusely expressed both in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The positive expression rate in gastric cancer tissue was 73%, higher than that in adjacent normal tissue (47%). Both the reference NAPDH and NOB1 amplification are reflected in the amplification curve in standard S-shape and the unimodal solubility curve which was not altered by non-specific amplification and primer dimer. NOB1 mRNA relative expression in cancer tissue was 4.899∓1.412. NOB1 expression had no direct relationship with the patients’ age, gender, tumor differentiation or infiltration degree, lymphatic metastasis, distant metastasis nor pTNM periodization, but was directly related to the size of the tumor. All the findings in this paper suggest that NOB1 can be one of the focuses for diagnosing and treating gastric cancer and that its protein expression is likely to increase with the growth of tumor, thus playing a great role in the incidence and development of gastric cancer.

  10. Clinicopathological analysis of patients with gastric cancer in 1200 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xin Niu; Xin Yu Qin; Han Liu; Cheng Pei Wang

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Gastric cancer is one of the most common fatal malignancies in the world. The prognosis is generally poor in advanced gastric cancer .The low survival is related to delayed diagnosis, metastasis and recurrence after operation .The aim of this paper was to find correlation between clinical factors was to find correlation between clinical factors and biologic behavior of gastric cancer in a series of 1200 patients undergoing surgical resection.

  11. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: a public health priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-04-28

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  12. Diet, microbial virulence, and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cover, Timothy L.; Peek, Jr, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the strongest known risk factors for this malignancy. H. pylori strains exhibit a high level of genetic diversity, and the risk of gastric cancer is higher in persons carrying certain strain types (for example, those that contain a cag pathogenicity island or type s1 vacA alleles) than in persons carrying other strain types. Additional risk factors for gastric cancer includ...

  13. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: A public health priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  14. Current role of surgical therapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan Swan; Thomas J Miner

    2006-01-01

    Surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment for gastric cancer. Since the inception of the gastrectomy for cancer of the stomach, there has been debate over the bounds of surgical therapy, balancing potential long-term survival with perioperative morbidity and mortality. This review delineates the current role of surgery in preoperative staging, curative resection, and palliative treatment for gastric cancer.

  15. Gene expression profile differences in gastric cancer, pericancerous epithelium and normal gastric mucosa by gene chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Ding Yu; Shen-Hua Xu; Hang-Zhou Mou; Zhi-Ming Jiang; Chi-Hong Zhu; Xiang-Lin Liu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the difference of gene expression in gastric cancer (T), pericancerous epithelium (P) and normal tissue of gastric mucosa (C), and to screen an associated novel gene in early gastric carcinogenesis by oligonudeotide microarray.METHODS: U133A (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) gene chip was used to detect the gene expression profile difference in T, P and C, respectively. Bioinformatics was used to analyze the detected results.RESULTS: When gastric cancer was compared with normal gastric mucosa, 766 genes were found, with a difference of more than four times in expression levels. Of the 766 genes,530 were up-regulated (Signal Log Ratio [SLR]>2), and 236 were down-regulated (SLR<-2). When pericancerous epithelium was compared with normal gastric mucosa, 64genes were found, with a difference of more than four times in expression levels. Of the 64 genes, 50 were up-regulated (SLR>2), and 14 were down-regulated (SLR<-2). Compared with normal gastric mucosa, a total of 143 genes with a difference in expression levels (more than four times, either in cancer or in pericancerous epithelium) were found in gastric cancer (T) and pericancerous epithelium (P). Of the 143 genes, 108 were up-regulated (SLR>2), and 35were down-regulated (SLR<-2).CONCLUSION: To apply a gene chip could find 143 genes associated with the genes of gastric cancer in pericancerous epithelium, although there were no pathological changes in the tissue slices. More interesting, six genes of pericancerous epithelium were up-regulated in comparison with genes of gastric cancer and three genes were down-regulated in comparison with genes of gastric cancer. It is suggested that these genes may be related to the carcinogenesis and development of early gastric cancer.

  16. Features of gastritis predisposing to gastric adenoma and early gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Meining, A; Riedl, B; Stolte, M

    2002-01-01

    Background/Aims: Helicobacter pylori gastritis is a risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. The results of several studies indicate that gastric adenomas, which are considered premalignant lesions, may also be associated with H pylori gastritis. However, it is not clear whether there are different patterns of gastritis in these patients compared with patients with gastric cancer or patients with H pylori gastritis alone. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the pattern...

  17. TCGA divides gastric cancer into four molecular subtypes:implications for individualized therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. The treatment of gastric cancer is chalenging because of its highly heterogeneous etiology and clinical characteristics. Recent genomic and molecular characterization of gastric cancer, especialy the findings reported by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), have shed light on the heterogeneity and potential targeted therapeutics for four different subtypes of gastric cancer.

  18. Non-invasive diagnosis of gastric mucosal atrophy in an asymptomatic population with high prevalence of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio Rollan; Catterina Ferreccio; Alessandra Gederlini; Carolina Serrano; Javiera Torres; Paul Harris

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To validate a non-invasive method to detect gastric mucosal atrophy in a Chilean population with high prevalence of gastric cancer and a poor survival rate.METHODS: We first determined the optimal cut-off level of serum pepsinogen (PG)-1, PG-1/PG-2 ratio and 17-gastrin in 31 voluntary symptomatic patients (mean age: 66.1 years), of them 61% had histologically confirmed gastric atrophy. Then, in a population-based sample of 536 healthy individuals (209 residents in counties with higher relative risk and 327 residents in counties with lower relative risk for gastric cancer),we measured serum anti-Hpylori antibodies, PG and 17-gastrin and estimated their risk of gastric cancer.RESULTS: We found that serum PG-1 < 61.5 μg/L,PG-1/PG-2 ratio < 2.2 and 17-gastrin > 13.3 pmol/L had a high specificity (91%-100%) and a fair sensitivity (56%-78%) to detect corpus-predominant atrophy.Based on low serum PG-1 and PG-1/PG-2 ratio together as diagnostic criteria, 12.5% of the asymptomatic subjects had corpus-predominant atrophy (0% of those under 25 years and 20.2% over 65 years old). The frequency of gastric atrophy was similar (12% vs 13%)but H pylori infection rate was slightly higher (77% vs 71%) in the high-risk compared to the low-risk counties.Based on their estimated gastric cancer risk, individuals were classified as: low-risk group (no H pylori infection and no atrophy; n = 115; 21.4%); moderate-risk group (H pylori infection but no atrophy; n = 354, 66.0%);and high-risk group (gastric atrophy, with or without H pylori infection; n = 67, 12.5%). The high-risk group was significantly older (mean age: 61.9 ± 13.3 years),more frequently men and less educated as compared with the low-risk group.CONCLUSION: We propose to concentrate on an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for detection of early gastric cancer in the high-risk group. This intervention model could improve the poor prognosis of gastric cancer in Chile.

  19. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface MM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan M Boniface,1 Sachin B Wani,2 Tracey E Schefter,3 Phillip J Koo,4 Cheryl Meguid,1 Stephen Leong,5 Jeffrey B Kaplan,6 Lisa J Wingrove,7 Martin D McCarter1 1Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Therapeutic and Interventional Endoscopy, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Division of Radiology-Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, 5Division of Medical Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, 7Department of Food and Nutrition Services, University of Colorado Hospital Cancer Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical, and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Keywords: tumor board, upper gastrointestinal malignancies, patient centered

  20. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisei Sako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered.

  1. The Characteristics of Gastrin Receptor Expression in Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGGuangjian; ZHANGYanling; LEZhuqin; YUFen; ZHANGGuangming; DENShouzhen; NIQuanxing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics and significance of gastrin receptor (GR) expression in gastric cancer. Methods: The content and affinity of GR were determined in 34 specimens of gastric cancer using radioligand binding assay. The correlation was analyzed between GR expression in tumors and tumor sites, stages, grades, DNA of gastric cancer cells, GR of adjacent normal gastric mucosa, survival time. Results: Among the 34 cases of gastric cancer, 16 patients (47.1%) had positive GR in specimens of gastric cancer, with high-affinity GR in 14 cases (41.2%) and low-affinity GR in 2 cases. Of high-affinity GR, 9 cases had cancers with GR>10 fmol/mg.protein (39.5±14.4 fmol/mg.protein), 5 cases with GR≤10fmol/mg.protein (6.0±2.8 fmol/mg.protein). High-affinity GR was easier to be expressed in cancers ofgastric body (7/9) and cardia (3/6) than in gastric antrum (4/19). The expression of GR in gastric cancer accorded well with that in normal gastric mucosa at the same sites, but with more high-special binding sites than the latter (39.5±14.4 vs 26.1±16.6 fmol/mg.protein). A significantly greater proportion of patients withⅢ+Ⅳ stages (13/24) had high-affinity GR compared with I+II stages (1/10) of gastric cancers. During a follow-up of 23-61 months, 11 of 13 cases with high-affinity GR were dead, whereas 4 of 11 cases with low-affinity or negative GR were dead in Ⅲ+Ⅳ stages of gastric cancer. Conclusion: GR is an important factor in the autocrine growth of gastric cancer cells, and helpful in the prediction of prognosis and guidance of treatment with GR antagonists.

  2. Dynamic expression of pepsinogen C in gastric cancer, precancerous lesions and Helicobacter pylori associated gastric diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Fang Ning; Hui-Jie Liu; Yuan Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the expression of pepsinogen C (PGC) and gastric cancer, precancerous diseases, and Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection. METHODS: The expression of PGC was determined by immunohistochemistry method in 430 cases of gastric mucosa. H pylori infection was determined by HE staining, PCR and ELISA in 318 specimens.RESULTS: The positive rate of PGC expression in 54 cases of normal gastric mucosa was 100%. The positive rates of PGC expression in superficial gastritis or gastric ulcer or erosion, atrophic gastritis or gastric dysplasia and gastric cancer decreased significantly in sequence (P<0.05;100%/89.2% vs 14.3%/15.2% vs 2.4%). The overexpression rate of PGC in group of superficial gastritis with H pylori infection was higher than that in group without H pylori infection (P<0.05; χ2= 0.032 28/33 vs 15/25).The positive rate of PGC expression in group of atrophic gastritis with H pylori infection was lower than that in group without H pylori infection (P<0.01; χ2 = 0.003 4/61vs 9/30), and in dysplasia and gastric cancer. CONCLUSION: The level of PGC expression has a close relationship with the degree of malignancy of gastric mucosa and development of gastric lesions. There is a relationship between H pylori infection and expression of antigen PGC in gastric mucosa, the positive rate of PGC expression increases in early stage of gastric lesions with H pylori infection such as gastric inflammation and decreases during the late stage such as precancerous diseases and gastric cancer. PGC-negative cases with H pylori-positive gastric lesions should be given special attention.

  3. Gastric cancer; Cancer de l'estomac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineur, L.; Jaegle, E. [Unite de cancerologie digestive, Institut Sainte Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Pointreau, Y. [Clinique d' oncologie radiotherapie, Centre Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, Clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le Mans (France)

    2010-07-01

    Radio-chemotherapy Gastro-intestinal inter-group study have demonstrated a convincing local control and overall survival benefit. Oncologists and GI workshops have in the present not had a major interest in the radiotherapy treatment of gastric cancer due to a number of factors. Primary because toxicities may be severe, second physicians may have low experience in definition of clinical target volume and in third perioperative chemotherapy is widely used in this indication. In Summary this issue should be used as guides for defining appropriate radiation planning treatment for the adjuvant postoperative therapy of gastric cancer. (authors)

  4. Immunotherapy of gastric cancer with levamisole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa,Hiroaki

    1978-10-01

    Full Text Available Ninety-nine gastric cancer patients initially received levamisole at a daily dose of 150 mg for three consecutive days before operation. This therapy was repeated fortnightly (3-day administration followed by 11-day withdrawal period for more than one month as long as possible and the survival rate up to 18 months was compared with thas of control patients. The 18 month survival rate of advanced Stage IV patients was significantly higher in patients receiving levamisole than that of control patients. The effects of levamisole in cases of advanced cancer have been discussed in relation to the literature available.

  5. Progress of Photodynamic Therapy in Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Seishiro Mimura; Hiroyuki Narahara; Toru Otani; Shigeru Okuda

    1999-01-01

    Progress of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastric cancer and the clinical outcome are described in this paper. (1) We included the whole lesion and a 5 mm margin in the field for irradiation. Marking by injection of India-ink showing the irradiation field was performed beforehand. (2) We established the standard light dose to be 90 J/cm2 for an argon dye laser and 60 J/cm2 for a pulse wave laser. (3) The size of cancerous lesion curable by PDT was expanded from 3 cm in diameter, i.e. 7 cm2 in...

  6. Cancer type-specific epigenetic changes: gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major cause of mortality despite declining rate in the world. Epigenetic alterations contribute significantly to the development and progression of gastric tumors. Epigenetic refers to the number of modifications of the chromatin structure that affect gene expression without altering the primary sequence of DNA, and these changes lead to transcriptional activation or silencing of the gene. Over the years, the study of epigenetic processes has increased, and novel therapeutic approaches have emerged. This chapter summarizes the main epigenomic mechanisms described recently involved in gastric carcinogenesis, focusing on the roles that aberrant DNA methylation, histone modifications (histone acetylation and methylation), and miRNAs (oncogenic and tumor suppressor function of miRNA) play in the onset and progression of gastric tumors. Clinical implications of these epigenetic alterations in GC are also discussed.

  7. Specific expression and methylation of SLIT1, SLIT2, SLIT3, and miR-218 in gastric cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mirang; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Yong Sung

    2016-06-01

    SLIT has been suggested as a key regulator of cancer development and a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Herein, we analyzed expression and methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 in 11 gastric cancer cell lines, 96 paired gastric tumors and adjacent normal gastric tissues, and 250 gastric cancers provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas. Methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 was found both in early gastric cancers, and in advanced gastric cancers. Even normal gastric tissue showed increased methylation of SLIT1 and SLIT3 that correlated with patient age. Furthermore, epigenetic inactivation of SLIT occurred in a gastric cancer subtype-dependent manner. SLIT2 and SLIT3 expression was reduced in Epstein-Barr virus-positive and microsatellite instability subtypes, but increased in the genomically stable subtype. Expression of miR‑218 correlated negatively with methylation of SLIT2 or SLIT3. These findings suggest that a molecular subtype-specific therapeutic strategy is needed for targeting SLITs and miR-218 in treatment of gastric cancer.

  8. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis associated with multiple gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otowa, Yasunori; Mitsutsuji, Masaaki; Urade, Takeshi; Chono, Teruhiro; Morimoto, Haruki; Yokoyama, Kunio; Hirata, Kenro; Kawamura, Shiro; Shimada, Etsuji; Fujita, Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is an inflammation of the digestive tract that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration. There are no specific symptoms, and are related to the layer in which eosinophilic infiltration is observed. A 69-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of general malaise, diarrhea, and dysgeusia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed reddish elevated lesions that were edematous all over the gastric mucosa. In addition, three tumors were also observed. The biopsies of the reddish elevated mucosa revealed eosinophilic infiltration and tubular adenocarcinoma from the tumors. Colonoscopy showed abnormal reddish elevated mucosa. The biopsies from the reddish elevated mucosa showed eosinophilic infiltration. From the abdominal contrast computed tomography scan, tumor stain was seen in the anterior wall of the gastric body. No ascites, intestinal wall thickening, or lymph node swelling were found. A slight elevation in the serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), 480 IU/ml, was found from the laboratory test results; other laboratory results were within normal limits including the number of peripheral eosinophils. No specific allergen was found from the multiple antigen simultaneous test and from the skin patch test. The parasitic immunodiagnosis was negative. He was diagnosed with EG associated with gastric cancer and underwent total gastrectomy, regional lymph node dissection with reconstruction by a Roux-en-Y method. He was prescribed prednisolone after the operation and showed a good clinical response. There are many case reports on EG, but none of them were associated with cancer. We encountered a case of EG associated with multiple gastric cancer; the patient underwent total gastrectomy.

  9. Identifying module biomarkers from gastric cancer by differential correlation network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoping Liu,1–3,* Xiao Chang1,3,* 1College of Statistics and Applied Mathematics, Anhui University of Finance and Economics, Bengbu, Anhui Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Collaborative Research Center for Innovative Mathematical Modeling, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gastric cancer (stomach cancer is a severe disease caused by dysregulation of many functionally correlated genes or pathways instead of the mutation of individual genes. Systematic identification of gastric cancer biomarkers can provide insights into the mechanisms underlying this deadly disease and help in the development of new drugs. In this paper, we present a novel network-based approach to predict module biomarkers of gastric cancer that can effectively distinguish the disease from normal samples. Specifically, by assuming that gastric cancer has mainly resulted from dysfunction of biomolecular networks rather than individual genes in an organism, the genes in the module biomarkers are potentially related to gastric cancer. Finally, we identified a module biomarker with 27 genes, and by comparing the module biomarker with known gastric cancer biomarkers, we found that our module biomarker exhibited a greater ability to diagnose the samples with gastric cancer. Keywords: biomarkers, gastric cancer, stomach cancer, differential network

  10. Gastric cancer: prevention, screening and early diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasechnikov, Victor; Chukov, Sergej; Fedorov, Evgeny; Kikuste, Ilze; Leja, Marcis

    2014-10-14

    Gastric cancer continues to be an important healthcare problem from a global perspective. Most of the cases in the Western world are diagnosed at late stages when the treatment is largely ineffective. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a well-established carcinogen for gastric cancer. While lifestyle factors are important, the efficacy of interventions in their modification, as in the use of antioxidant supplements, is unconvincing. No organized screening programs can be found outside Asia (Japan and South Korea). Although several screening approaches have been proposed, including indirect atrophy detection by measuring pepsinogen in the circulation, none of them have so far been implemented, and more study data is required to justify any implementation. Mass eradication of H. pylori in high-risk areas tends to be cost-effective, but its adverse effects and resistance remain a concern. Searches for new screening biomarkers, including microRNA and cancer-autoantibody panels, as well as detection of volatile organic compounds in the breath, are in progress. Endoscopy with a proper biopsy follow-up remains the standard for early detection of cancer and related premalignant lesions. At the same time, new advanced high-resolution endoscopic technologies are showing promising results with respect to diagnosing mucosal lesions visually and targeting each biopsy. New histological risk stratifications (classifications), including OLGA and OLGIM, have recently been developed. This review addresses the current means for gastric cancer primary and secondary prevention, the available and emerging methods for screening, and new developments in endoscopic detection of early lesions of the stomach.

  11. Multidisciplinary approach to understand the pathogenesis of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Shang; AS Pe(n)a

    2005-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma remains a common disease worldwide with a dismal prognosis. Therefore, it represents a very important health problem. It occurs with a high incidence in Asia and is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. Although the incidence and mortality of gastric carcinoma are decreasing in many countries,gastric cancer still represents the second most frequent malignancies in the world and the fourth in Europe. The 5-year survival rate of gastric carcinoma is low. The etiology and pathogenesis are not yet fully known. The study of gastric cancer is important in clinical medicine as well as in public health. Over the past 15 years,integrated research in molecular pathology has clarified the details of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities of cancer-related genes in the course of the development and progression of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer, as all cancers, is the end result of the interplay of many risk factors as well as protective factors. Although epidemiological evidence indicates that environmental factors play a major role in gastric carcinogenesis, the role of immunological, genetic, and immunogenetic factors are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma. Among the environmental factors,diet and Helicobacter pylori are more amenable to intervention aimed at the prevention of gastric cancer.The aim of the present paper is to review and include the most recent published evidence to demonstrate that only a multidisciplinary approach will lead to the advancement of the pathogenesis and prevention of gastric cancer. On the immunogenetic research it is clear that evidence is accumulating to suggest that a genetic profile favoring the proinflammatory response increases the risk of gastric carcinoma.

  12. Unfavorable survival rates in Iranian patients with gastric cancers: a single center experience from Tehran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of potential interfering factors that play major roles in the outcome of our patients with stomach cancer. 100 consecutive patients diagnosed with gastric cancers were prospectively observed, treated and followed from November 2009 to January. Absence of Helicobacter pylori infection (P=0.027, absence of vascularisation (P<0.001, and undetermined histopathological type of adenocarcinoma (P=0.003 were factors significantly associated with higher grade of gastric lesions. Life tables were used to define survival of gastric cancers. Survival rates of these patients at 1st week, 1st month, 2nd month, 3rd month, and 6th month were 97%, 96%, 91%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. The only determinant of 6 months of survival was age over 68 (P=0.039. Our study confirms our previous knowledge that gastric cancers have unfavorable outcome in Iran.

  13. Expression of the EGF family in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Ostergaard; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women. The epidermal growth factor receptors are EGFR, HER2, HER3 and HER4. Of the four epidermal growth factor receptors, EGFR and HER2 are well-known oncogenes involved in gastric cancer. Little, however, is known about...... the role played by HER3 and HER4 in this disease. We obtained paired samples from the tumor and the adjacent normal tissue from the same patient undergoing surgery for gastric cancer. Using RT-qPCR, we quantified the mRNA expression of the four receptors including the HER4 splicing isoforms and all....... These results support the involvement of EGFR and HER2 in gastric cancer and suggest an interesting association of reduced HER4 expression with development of gastric cancer....

  14. Genomic and genetic alterations influence the progression of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefania Nobili; Lorenzo Bruno; Ida Landini; Cristina Napoli; Paolo Bechi; Francesco Tonelli; Carlos A Rubio; Enrico Mini; Gabriella Nesi

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancerrelated deaths worldwide, although the incidence has gradually decreased in many Western countries. Twomain gastric cancer histotypes, intestinal and diffuse, are recognised. Although most of the described genetic alterations have been observed in both types, different genetic pathways have been hypothesized. Genetic and epigenetic events, including 1q loss of heterozygosity (LOH), microsatellite instability and hypermethylation, have mostly been reported in intestinal-type gastric carcinoma and its precursor lesions, whereas 17p LOH, mutation or loss of E-cadherin are more often implicated in the development of diffuse-type gastric cancer.

  15. Salty Food Preference and Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: The JACC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsumasa Umesawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: High sodium intake is a potential risk factor of gastric cancer. However, limited information is available on the relationship between salty food preference or intake and risk of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between these variables among the Japanese population. Methods: Between 1988 and 1990, 15 732 men and 24 997 women aged 40–79 years old with no history of cancer or cardiovascular disease completed a lifestyle questionnaire that included information about food intake. The subjects were enrolled in the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk Sponsored by Monbusho. After a median follow-up of 14.3 years, 787 incident gastric cancers were documented. We examined the associations between salty food preference and intake and gastric cancer incidence using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: The risk of gastric cancer among subjects with a strong preference for salty food was approximately 30% higher than among those who preferred normal-level salty food (hazard ratio [HR] 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.67. The risk of gastric cancer in subjects who consumed 3 and ≥4 bowls/day of miso soup was approximately 60% higher than in those who consumed less miso soup (HR 1.67; 95% CI, 1.16–2.39 and HR 1.64; 95% CI, 1.11–2.42, respectively. Sodium intake correlated positively and linearly with risk of gastric cancer (P for trend = 0.002. Conclusions: The present study showed that salty food preference, consumption of large quantities of miso soup, and high sodium intake were associated with increased risk of gastric cancer among Japanese people.

  16. Microsatellite Instability in Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOYun; ZHANGXiao-yong; LIUPing

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the changeable patterns of microsatellite instability(MSI)in intestinal metaplasia(IM)and gastric cancer(GC)and the role of MSI in gastric carcinogenesis. Methods: Silver staining single strand confornmtion polymorphism-polymeriase chain reaction(PCR-SSCP)wus used to screen MSI nmrkers at 5 loci in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of GC ( n = 30), IM ( n = 40) and corresponding normal gastric tissues. Resu/ts: The abnormal shifting of the single-strand DNA was identified in 7 (23.3%) out of GC and in 8 (20%) out of IM samples. Three ( 10 % ) tumors and one ( 2.5 % ) IM displayed high- frequency MSI ( two or more loci altered ). Low- frequencySI(one loci altered) was detected in 4( 13.3% )of the tmnors and in 7( 17.5% ) IM samples. GC with MSI was associated with distal location of the tumors but age,sex, differenl~ation, lymph nodes metastasis and TNM stage( P = 0.044).MSI was more likely detected in moderate-grade IM than in mild, grade IM tissues(34.8% versus 0; P = 0.013) ; and MSI had a tendency to be easily detected in female with IM. Conc/u,6~ : The progressive accmnulation of MSI in areas ofIM may contribute to GC development, represen~_g an importmlt molecular event in the multistep gastric ~~.

  17. Diagnoses of gastric cancer and other gastric diseases by serum pepsinogen I and Ⅱ levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoZhi-Jian; ChengZhao-Ming; 等

    1998-01-01

    Serum pepsinogens I and Ⅱ(PGI,PGⅡ) levels were determined by PGI and PGⅡ-RIA kits in 84 healthy controls and 128 patients of gastric diseases including 42 patients with gastric cancer.The results showed peptic ulcer cases had elevated PGI and PGⅡ levels.The atrophic gastritis cases had low PGI levels and the gastric cancer cases had low PGI and low PGI/PGⅡ ratio.Using the cut-off values of PGI<35μg/L and PGI/PGⅡ<1.5 for clinical purpose,the sensitivity andspecificity of the test for gastric cancer was 73% and 78%,respectively.Combined with endoscope examination,the serum PGI and PGⅡ levels are valuable for the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  18. Review of docetaxel in the treatment of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Tetzlaff

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Eric D Tetzlaff1, Jonathan D Cheng1, Jaffer A Ajani21Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Gastric cancer is a global health problem accounting for 800,000 cancer related deaths annually. Often diagnosed at an advanced stage, the treatment of gastric cancer with chemotherapy is directed towards palliating cancer related symptoms with only modest improvements in survival. In addition, no regimen has emerged as a globally accepted standard. New therapeutic options are desperately needed for the treatment of gastric cancer. Docetaxel given in combination has recently emerged as a new option for patients with advanced gastric cancer. This review focuses on the treatment of advanced gastric cancer utilizing docetaxelbased therapy and the novel additions of biotherapy to the existing cytotoxic platforms. In addition, the current investigations of docetaxel for the treatment of potentially curable gastric cancer will be discussed.Keywords: docetaxel, gastric cancer, chemotherapy, biotherapy

  19. Incidence and mortality of gastric cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Yang

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world; almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. In China,based on two national mortality surveys conducted in 1970s and 1990s, there is an obvious clustering of geographical distribution of gastric cancer in the country, with the high mortality being mostly located in rural areas, especially in Gansu, Henan, Hebei, Shanxi and Shaanxi Provinces in the middle-western part of China. Despite a slight increase from the 1970s to early 1990s, remarkable declines in gastric cancer mortality were noticed in almost the entire population during the last decade in China. These declines were largely due to the dramatic improvements in the social-economic environment, lifestyle, nutrition, education and health care system after economic reforms started two decades ago. Nevertheless, gastric cancer will remain a significant cancer burden currently and be one of the key issues in cancer prevention and control strategy in China. It was predicted that, in 2005, 0.3 million deaths and 0.4 million new cases from gastric cancer would rank the third most common cancer. The essential package of the prevention and control strategy for gastric cancer in China would focus on controlling Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection, improving educational levels, advocating healthy diet and anti-tobacco campaign, searching for cost-effective early detection, diagnosis and treatment programs including approaches for curable management and palliative care.

  20. Scorpion venoms in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Venom secretions from snakes, scorpions, spiders and bees, have been widely applied in traditional medicine and current biopharmaceutical research. Possession of anticancer potential is another novel discovery for animal venoms and toxins. An increasing number of studies have shown the anticancer effects of venoms and toxins of snakes, and scorpions in vitro and in vivo, which were achieved mainly through the inhibition of cancer growth, arrest of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and suppression of cancer metastasis. However, more evidence is needed to support this concept and the mechanisms of anticancer actions are not clearly understood. The present review is focused on the recant updates on anticancer venom research. PMID:27900054

  1. Mortality rate of gastric cancer in the population of Belgrade for 1990-2002 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šipetić Sandra B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Worldwide, gastric cancer is the fourth leading cause of diseases, and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Aim. To analyze the differences between men and women in mortality rate of gastric cancer in Belgrade from 1990−2002. Methods. Mortality rates standardized directly to the „World population“, and regression analysis were used. Results. In Belgrade population, 29.2% out the total number of deaths attributable to cancer were caused by gastric cancer. Gastric cancer was the second most common cause of death among digestive tract cancers. In women, in the period between 1990 and 1993, an average annual decline of mortality was 9.0% (95% confidence interval (CI = 5.9−13.1, and between 1994 and 2002, an average annual increase was 10.3% (CI = 8.4−12.6. Mortality rate series of gastric cancer in men did not fit any of the usual trend functions. The male/female gastric cancer mortality ratio was 1.7 : 1. Mortality rates for gastric cancer rose with age in both sexes and they were highest in the age group of 70 and more years. From 1990−2002, in both sexes aged 70 years and more, mortality from gastric cancer rose by 67.2% (CI = 58.0−76.4 in men and by 69.6% (CI = 60.6−78.6 in women. During the same period, the death rates in men decreased by 75.9 % (CI = 67.5−84.4 in the age group of 30−39 years, and by 48.1% (CI = 38.4−57.9 in women aged 50−59 years. In both sexes mortality rate series of all other age groups did not fit any of the usual trend functions. Conclusions. The increase in mortality rate of gastric in women over the past few years, showed the necessity of instituting primary and secondary preventive measures.

  2. Impact of Annexin A3 expression in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S Y; Li, Y; Fan, L Q; Zhao, Q; Tan, B B; Liu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Annexin A3 participates in various biological processes, including tumorigenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Annexin A3 in gastric cancer and its relationship with cell differentiation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Annexin A3 expression in gastric cancer tissues was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. The proliferation of gastric cancer cells was measured by the MTT assay. Cell migration and invasion were determined via wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. Knock down of endogenous Annexin A3 in gastric cancer BGC823 cells was performed using siRNA technology. The expression of Annexin A3 was significantly upregulated in gastric cancer tissues, and negatively correlated with the differentiation degree. Silencing of endogenous Annexin A3 suppressed the proliferation, migration, and invasion of BGC823 cells. Additionally, the expression of p21, p27, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 was upregulated, and the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1, MMP-1, and MMP-2 decreased in cells treated with Annexin A3-siRNA. Annexin A3 was upregulated in gastric cancer cells. Deletion of endogenous Annexin A3 significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

  3. A Rare Case: Gastric Cancer; Involving Primery Thoracal Vertebral Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Arslan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Primery bone metastases rarely occur in gastric cancer. Bone metastases indicate that the prognosis is bad. In that article we present a case that is diagnosed as a gastric cancer with primary bone metasteses that caused pathologic thoracal vertebral fracture seenby computer ised tomography.

  4. Selection of chemotherapy for hyperthermic intraperitoneal use in gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, H. J.; Schellens, J. H.; Boot, H.; van Sandick, J. W.; Knibbe, C. A.; Boerma, D.; van Ramshorst, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have shown the potential benefit of cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in gastric cancer patients. At present the most effective chemotherapeutic regime in HIPEC for gastric cancer is unknown. The aim of this review was to p

  5. Gastric cancer patients at high-risk of having synchronous cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ho Lee; Jae-Gahb Park; Jae-Moon Bae; Ja Seong Bae; Keun Won Ryu; Jong Seok Lee; Sook Ryun Park; Chan Gyoo Kim; Myoung Cheorl Kook; Il Ju Choi; Young Woo Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To identify patients with a high-risk of having a synchronous cancer among gastric cancer patients.METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the prospective gastric cancer database at the National Cancer Center,Korea from December 2000 to December 2004. The clinicopathological characteristics of patients with synchronous cancers and those of patients without synchronous cancers were compared. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors for the presence of a synchronous cancer in gastric cancer patients.RESULTS: 111 of 3291 gastric cancer patients (3.4%)registered in the database had a synchronous cancer.Among these 111 patients, 109 had a single synchronous cancer and 2 patients had two synchronous cancers. The most common form of synchronous cancer was colorectal cancer (42 patients, 37.2%) followed by lung cancer (21 patients, 18.6%). Multivariate analyses revealed that elderly patients with differentiated early gastric cancer have a higher probability of a synchronous cancer.CONCLUSION: Synchronous cancers in gastric cancer patients are not infrequent. The physicians should try to find synchronous cancers in gastric cancer patients,especially in the elderly with a differentiated early gastric cancer.

  6. Comparative epidemiology of gastric cancer between Japan and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingsong Lin; Junko Ueda; Shogo Kikuchi; Yukari Totsuka; Wen-Qiang Wei; You-Lin Qiao; Manami Inoue

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the similarities and differences in gastric cancer epidemiology between Japan and China. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search of the PubMed database was performed. The relevant literature published in China was also been cited. Data on incidence and mortality rates in 2008 were obtained from the Cancer Mondial database, published by International Agency for Research on Cancer at http://www-dep.iarc.fr/.RESULTS: Gastric cancer remains a significant public health burden in both Japan and China. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization is high in the adult populations of both countries. Accumulating evidence from intervention studies in both countries has shown the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication in reducing gastric cancer incidence. There are differences, however, in many aspects of gastric cancer, including patterns of incidence and mortality, trends in the prevalence of H. pylori infection, H. pylori strains, the magnitude of risk of gastric cancer related to H. pylori infection, and associations with dietary habits. Compared with China, Japan has seen a more rapid decline in H. pylori infection among adolescents. While Japanese cohort studies have dominated the literature concerning the associations between gastric cancer and dietary habits, numerous case-control studies in China suggest a positive association between a high intake of preserved fish and vegetables and gastric cancer risk. There is a need for a multidisciplinary research approach to understand the interactions between various strains of H. pylori, host factors, and other lifestyle and environmental factors in gastric carcinogenesis in both countries.CONCLUSION: The shared high incidence of gastric cancer and high prevalence of H. pylori, as well as differences in many aspects of gastric cancer, provide an excellent opportunity to establish Sino-Japanese collaborations.

  7. A Possible Link between Gastric Mucosal Atrophy and Gastric Cancer after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of H. pylori eradication in gastric cancer prevention can be attributed to the improvement of atrophic gastritis, which is a known risk of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer has also been diagnosed after long-term H. pylori eradication. This study aimed to clarify the association between gastric atrophy and gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication, including its clinicopathological features. Methods A total of 55 consecutive patients with 64 early gastric cancers (EGCs) diagnosed after H. pylori eradication were enrolled. The degree of endoscopic atrophy and the histological degrees of mononuclear cell infiltration, atrophy, and metaplasia in the corpus and adjacent mucosa of the EGCs were determined and scored. Results The majority of EGCs (63/64) were located within the endoscopically assessed atrophic mucosa or along the atrophic border. The adjacent mucosa of the EGCs presented significantly higher degrees of all histological parameters than in the corpus (mononuclear cell infiltration, 0.86+/-0.09 vs. 0.51+/-0.11, P = 0.016; atrophy, 1.77+/-0.13 vs. 0.65+/-0.14, Pgastric ulcers. Conclusions Severe gastric atrophy remained in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs after H. pylori eradication, which may be linked to gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27706195

  8. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takafumi Ando; Yasuyuki Goto; Osamu Maeda; Osamu Watanabe; Kazuhiro Ishiguro; Hidemi Goto

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most frequent cancer in the world, accounting for a large proportion of all cancer cases in Asia, Latin America, and some countries in Europe. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) is regarded as playing a specific role in the development of atrophic gastritis, which represents the most recognized pathway in multistep intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis. Recent studies suggest that a combination of host genetic factors, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental and lifestyle factors determine the severity of gastric damage and the eventual clinical outcome of H pylori infection. The seminal discovery of H pylori as the leading cause of gastric cancer should lead to effective eradication strategies. Prevention of gastric cancer requires better screening strategies to identify candidates for eradication.

  9. Characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric cancer: A study of 235 cases at a comprehensive cancer center in U.S.A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yingyan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV has been shown to be associated with gastric cancer. However, inconsistent findings have been reported regarding the distribution of EBV infected cells (in normal gastric epithelium vs. intestinal metaplastic cells vs. in neoplastic cells and the characteristics of EBV-associated gastric cancer. Lymph node positive EBV-associated gastric cancer has not been systematically studied. The aims of this study were to evaluate EBV-associated gastric cancer, to assess the distribution of EBV infected cells including all positive lymph nodes, and to define the characteristics of EBV-associated gastric cancer. Design The study included primary gastric cancer patients who underwent surgical resection with no preoperative treatment at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1987 and 2006. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from these resection specimens were assessed for EBV by in situ hybridization, the gold standard for EBV detection in tissue. EBV status was analyzed along with clinicopathologic parameters including age, gender, tumor type, lymph node status, and pathologic stage of the tumor. Results Among 235 patients, 12 had intranuclear expression of EBV. EBV staining was seen only in tumor cells and no detectable EBV was observed in normal gastric mucosa, intestinal metaplasia or stromal cells. Eight of 12 patients with EBV-associated gastric cancer had regional lymph node metastasis. Of note, metastatic tumor cells in all of the involved lymph nodes of these 8 cases contained EBV. The epidemiologic data showed 11 of the 12 patients with EBV-associated gastric cancer were men, ranging in age from 54 to 78 years (mean age, 60 years; median age, 62.1 years. The age distribution for non-EBV associated gastric cancer patients ranged from 21 to 93 years (mean age, 67 years; median age, 66.4 years. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that EBV is present exclusively in gastric cancer cells. The detection of EBV in

  10. Participation of microbiota in the development of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Li; Yu, Xin-Juan; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Jia, Sheng-Jiao; Tian, Zi-Bin; Dong, Quan-Jiang

    2014-05-07

    There are a large number of bacteria inhabiting the human body, which provide benefits for the health. Alterations of microbiota participate in the pathogenesis of diseases. The gastric microbiota consists of bacteria from seven to eleven phyla, predominantly Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria. Intrusion by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) does not remarkably interrupt the composition and structure of the gastric microbiota. Absence of bacterial commensal from the stomach delays the onset of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, while presence of artificial microbiota accelerates the carcinogenesis. Altered gastric microbiota may increase the production of N-nitroso compounds, promoting the development of gastric cancer. Further investigation of the carcinogenic mechanisms of microbiota would benefit for the prevention and management of gastric cancer.

  11. MRI for advanced gastric cancer; Especially for scirrhous cancer of the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Hisato; Masuko, Eiichi; Saito, Tadanori; Ikeda, Shigeyuki (National Sapporo Hospital (Japan)); Mezawa, Synichi; Betsuyaku, Takashi; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    1993-01-01

    We conducted MRI examinations in 92 patients with advanced gastric cancer and evaluated the clinical potential of MRI for diagnosis of scirrhous cancer of the stomach. The feature of scirrhous cancer of stomach by MRI are: (1) thickened gastric wall, (2) shortening of T1 and T2 values; and (3) clear contrast between the gastric mucosae and cancer areas found in the T1 and T2 weighted images (preservation of the mucosae). MRI for scirrhous cancer of the stomach is thought a useful image diagnosis as an adjunct method to gastric X-ray and gastric endoscopy. (author).

  12. Gastric cancer:The times they are a-changin’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria; Antonietta; Satolli; Lucio; Buffoni; Rosella; Spadi; Ilaria; Roato

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide.Even though during these last decades gastric cancer incidence decreased in Western countries,it remains endemic and with a high incidence in Eastern countries.The survival in advanced and metastatic stage of gastric cancer is still very poor.Recently the Cancer Genoma Atlas Research Network identified four subtypes with different molecular profiles to classify gastric cancer in order to offer the optimal targeted therapies for pre-selected patients.Indeed,the key point is still the selection of patients for the right treatment,on basis of molecular tumor characterization.Since chemotherapy reached a plateau of efficacy for gastric cancer,the combination between cytotoxic therapy and biological agents gets a better prognosis and decreases chemotherapeutic toxicity.Currently,Trastuzumab in combination with platinum and fluorouracil is the only approved targeted therapy in the first line for c-erb B2 positive patients,whereas Ramucirumab is the only approved targeted agent for patients with metastatic gastric cancer.New perspectives for an effective treatment derived from the immunotherapeutic strategies.Here,we report an overview on gastric cancer treatments,with particular attention to recent advances in targeted therapies and in immunotherapeutic approach.

  13. Regional PET/CT after water gastric inflation for evaluating loco-regional disease of gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Jin, E-mail: suji76@hanmail.net [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Woo, E-mail: wwlee@snubh.org [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hai-Jeon, E-mail: punsu07@naver.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho-Young, E-mail: debobkr@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho, E-mail: kholeemail@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hoon, E-mail: yhkrad@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Park, Do Joong, E-mail: djpark@snubh.org [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Ho, E-mail: hhkim@snubh.org [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); So, Young, E-mail: youngso@kuh.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-06-15

    Objective: We aimed to improve diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT for gastric cancer with water gastric inflation. Materials and methods: 44 gastric cancer patients (M:F = 30:14, age ± std = 62.1 ± 14.5y) were enrolled before surgery. Fifty minutes after injection of FDG (0.14 mCi/kg body weight), whole body PET/CT was performed first and then regional PET/CT over gastric area was obtained 80 min post FDG injection after water gastric inflation. Diagnostic accuracies for loco-regional lesions were compared between whole body and regional PET/CT. Results: 48 primary tumors (23 EGC and 25 AGC) and 348 LN stations (61 metastatic and 287 benign) in 44 patients were investigated. Primary tumor sensitivity of whole body PET/CT (50% = 24/48) was significantly improved by regional PET/CT (75% = 36/48, p < 0.005). Sensitivity of whole body PET/CT (24.6% = 15/61) for LN metastasis was also significantly improved by regional PET/CT (36.1% = 22/61, p < 0.01), whereas specificity of whole body PET/CT (99.3% = 285/287) was not compromised by regional PET/CT (98.3% = 282/287, p > 0.05). Higher primary tumor FDG uptake in regional PET/CT indicated shorter progress-free survival (p = 0.0003). Conclusion: Diagnostic accuracy of whole body PET/CT for loco-regional disease of gastric cancer could be significantly improved by regional PET/CT after water gastric inflation and prognosis could be effectively predicted by primary tumor FDG uptake in regional PET/CT.

  14. Inducible nitric oxide synthase polymorphism is associated with the increased risk of differentiated gastric cancer in a Japanese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuyuki Goto; Takafumi Ando; Mariko Naito; Hidemi Goto; Nobuyuki Hamajima

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) C150T polymorphism with gastric cancer, as well as with gastric atrophy and H pylori seropositivity.METHODS: A single nucleotide polymorphism of iNOS C150T was examined for 454 Japanese health checkup examinees (126 males and 328 females) aged 35 to 85 years without a history of cancer and 202 gastric cancer patients (134 males and 68 females) aged 33 to 94 years with pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma.RESULTS: The iNOS C150T polymorphism was not associated with gastric atrophy or with H pylori seropositivity. The odds ratio (OR) of the C/T +T/T for gastric cancer was increased without statistical significance (OR=1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI):0.68-2.08). In the differentiated subgroup (n = 113),however, the OR of the C/T genotype for gastric cancer was significant (OR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.04-3.92) relative to the C/C genotype. In addition, considering the location of gastric cancer (n = 105), there were significant differences between the controls and non-cardia group with the OR of 2.13 (95% CI: 1.08-4.18) for C/T and 1.94(95% CI: 1.00-3.78) for C/T + T/T.CONCLUSION: The iNOS C150T polymorphism is associated with the risk of H pylori-related gastric cancer in a Japanese population. This polymorphism may play an important role in increasing the risk of gastric cancer in Asian countires with the highest rates of gastric cancer.

  15. Gastric cancer screening in 16 villages of Zhuanghe region: a mass screeningreport from a high risk area of stomach cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yuan; Wei Gong; Rong Tian Xu; Xuan Jie Wang; Hua Gao

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the comprehensive prevention and treatment of gastric cancer among high-risk population inthe high risk areas.METHODS A gastrocarcinoma mass screening was performed in 16 villages of Zhuanghe region. About50 000 population were involved and 3033 cases aged above 35 suffering from gastric diseases, and/or hadfamily history of gastric cancer were screened. Clinical epidemiological investigation, double-contrast X-ray,serum pepsinogen monitor, gastroscopic biopsies and histopathologic examinations were adopted in thescreening.RESULTS The ratio of the examined patients with gastric disorder reached up to 82% and 32 patients withgastric cancer were detected (1.06%) and 18 cases were early gastric cancer (56.25%). Patients with gastriccancer were treated successively. Aside from gastric cancer, several gastric lesions were also detected, whichlaid a good foundation for further interventional treatment. It was also found in the examination that93.97% of the local residents were addicted to salted pork and more than 60% of the residents had Hpinfection.CONCLUSION Gastric diseases, Hp infection of gastric mucosa and eating salted pork are very common inZhuanghe region. These are very dangerous factors causing gastric cancer. It is feasible to quit eating saltedpork and eradicate Hp infection and cure precancerous diseases.

  16. Eradication of H pylori for the prevention of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karolin Trautmann; Manfred Stolte; Stephan Miehlke

    2006-01-01

    Tnfection with H pylori is the most important known etiological factor associated with gastric cancer. While colonization of the gastric mucosa with H pylori results in active and chronic gastritis in virtually all individuals infected, the likelihood of developing gastric cancer depends on environmental, bacterial virulence and host specific factors. The majority of all gastric cancer cases are attributable to H pylori infection and therefore theoretically preventable. There is evidence from animal models that eradication of H pylori at an early time point can prevent gastric cancer development. However, randomized clinical trials exploring the prophylactic effect of H pylori eradication on the incidence of gastric cancer in humans remain sparse and have yielded conflicting results. Better markers for the identification of patientsat risk for H pylori induced gastric malignancy are needed to allow the development of a more efficient public eradication strategy. Meanwhile, screening and treatment of H pylori in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients as well as certain high-risk populations might be beneficial.

  17. Characteristics of gastric cancer in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Rubayat; Asombang, Akwi W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-04-28

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world with more than 70% of cases occur in the developing world. More than 50% of cases occur in Eastern Asia. GC is the second leading cause of cancer death in both sexes worldwide. In Asia, GC is the third most common cancer after breast and lung and is the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Although the incidence and mortality rates are slowly declining in many countries of Asia, GC still remains a significant public health problem. The incidence and mortality varies according to the geographic area in Asia. These variations are closely related to the prevalence of GC risk factors; especially Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its molecular virulent characteristics. The gradual and consistent improvements in socioeconomic conditions in Asia have lowered the H. pylori seroprevalence rates leading to a reduction in the GC incidence. However, GC remains a significant public health and an economic burden in Asia. There has been no recent systemic review of GC incidence, mortality, and H. pylori molecular epidemiology in Asia. The aim of this report is to review the GC incidence, mortality, and linkage to H. pylori in Asia.

  18. Gastric Cancer: Current Status of Diagnosis and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Saikawa, Yoshiro, E-mail: saiky@z8.keio.jp; Kitagawa, Yuko [Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Keio University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 1608582 (Japan)

    2013-01-16

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of death from malignant disease worldwide and most frequently discovered in advanced stages. Because curative surgery is regarded as the only option for cure, early detection of resectable gastric cancer is extremely important for good patient outcomes. Therefore, noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as evolutionary endoscopy and positron emission tomography are utilized as screening tools for gastric cancer. To date, early gastric cancer is being treated using minimally invasive methods such as endoscopic treatment and laparoscopic surgery, while in advanced cancer it is necessary to consider multimodality treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Because of the results of large clinical trials, surgery with extended lymphadenectomy could not be recommended as a standard therapy for advanced gastric cancer. Recent clinical trials had shown survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection compared with surgery alone. In addition, recent advances of molecular targeted agents would play an important role as one of the modalities for advanced gastric cancer. In this review, we summarize the current status of diagnostic technology and treatment for gastric cancer.

  19. Expressions of SEL 1L and C-erbB-2 in Gastric Cancer Tissues and Its Clinical Signiifcance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Guanghui; Li Yu; Li Yan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expressions and clinical signiifcance of human sel-1-like (SEL 1L) gene and oncogene c-erbB-2 in gastric cancer tissue. Methods:SEL 1L and c-erbB-2 expressions in gastric cancer tissues of 96 patients with gastric cancer were detected by immunohistochemical method. Results: The positive expression rate of SEL 1L gene in gastric cancer tissue was 84.4% (81/96), and its expression was significantly associated with the differentiated degree of gastric cancer tissue (P=0.001), but had no association with the age, gender, tumor size, infiltration depth, lymphatic metastasis and TNM staging (P>0.05). The positive expression rate of c-erbB-2 was 70.8% (68/96), and its expression was related to the differentiated degree of gastric cancer tissue, inifltration depth, lymphatic metastasis and TNM staging (P=0.002,P0.05). SEL 1L and c-erbB-2 expressions had a signiifcantly positive correlation (r=0.568,P<0.01). Conclusion: Both SEL 1L and c-erbB-2 are highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues and their joint detection can be considered as a biomarker for identifying the high-risk patients with gastric cancer.

  20. Expression of Pepsinogen C in Gastric Cancer and Precancerous Diseases and its Clinical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeifangNing; UpingSun; HuijieLiu; YuanYuan

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the active expression of pepsinogen C (PGC) and its value in detection of precancerous diseases and gastric cancer.METHODS Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of pepsinogen C in 424 specimens of gastric mucosa collected by gastroscopy.RIFSULTS The positive rate of PGC expression in 54 cases of normal gastric mucosa was 100 % and 2.4% in 124 cases of gastric cancer. The positive rate of PGC expression in superficial gastritis, gastric ulcer or erosion, atrophic gastritis or gastric dysplasia and gastric cancer decreased significantly in the sequence indicated (P<0.05).CONCLUSION The expression of PGC is negatively correlated with the degree of malignancy of gastric mucosa and with development of gastric lesions. PGC expression has a high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of precancerous diseases which can lead to gastric cancer and may be a good indicator for screening and diagnosis of gastric cancer and precursors of gastric cancer.

  1. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  2. Novel therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue; Zhang; Shenhong; Wu

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer(GC) is a common lethal malignancy.Gastroesophageal junction and gastric cardia tumors are the fastest rising malignancies due to increasing prevalence of obesity and acid reflex in the United States.Traditional chemotherapy remains the main treatment with trastuzumab targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive disease.The median overall survival(OS) is less than one year for advanced GC patients; thus,there is an urgent unmet need to develop novel therapy for GC.Although multiple targeted agents were studied,only the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor ramucirumab was approved recently by the United States Food and Drug Administration because of its 1.4 mo OS benefit(5.2 mo vs 3.8 mo,P = 0.047) as a single agent; 2.2 mo improvement of survival(9.6 mo vs 7.4 mo,P = 0.017) when combined with paclitaxel in previously treated advanced GC patients.It is the first single agent approved for previously treated GC and the second biologic agent after trastuzumab.Even with limited success,targeted therapy may be improved by developing new biomarkers.Immune therapy is changing the paradigm of cancer treatment and is presently under active investigation for GC in clinical trials.More evidence supports GC stem cells existence and early stage studies are looking for its potential therapeutic possibilities.

  3. Immunochemotherapy of gastric cancer with levamisole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa,Hiroaki

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available In 156 cases of gastric cancer, levamisole (LMS was administered at a daily dose of 150 mg for three consecutive days every other week. The administration was started 3 days before operation. This medication was repeated for more than one month. The survival rate up to two years after surgery was studied. The survival rate was not affected in patients with Stage I and II gastric cancer, but in patients with Stage III, the difference in the survival rate between the LMS group and the control group was significantly higher than that in the control group (p less than 0.05. In patients with Stage IV, the survival rate in the LMS group was higher than that in the control group although the difference was not significant. In patients of Stage III and IV, the effect of LMS on the survival rate was highest in cases with curative resection (p less than 0.01. In cases with noncurative resection, the difference between the LMS group and the control group was greatest (24.4% 12 months after surgery but not significant (p less than 0.5, and also in cases without resection the difference between the two groups was greatest (20.3% 12 months after surgery but not significant (p less than 0.2.

  4. Risk factors for the gastric cardia cancer: a case-control study in Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Cai; Zong-Li Zheng; Zuo-Feng Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The incidence of gastric cardia cancer has greatlyincreased in the past 2-3 decades, however, the risk factorsfor the disease are still not clearly understood. Theinvestigations among Chinese population on the risk factorsof gastric cardia cancer were also scarcely reported. Wetherefore conducted a case-control study in Fujian province,China, to investigate the potential risk and protective factorsof this disease.METHODS: 191 cardia and 190 non-cardia gastric cancercases, and a total of 222 control cases were included in thisstudy. Standard questionnaires were used in collectingepidemiological factors and the data were then analyzed bythe unconditional logistic regression model.RESULTS: As the factors such as age, gender, smoking,alcohol consumption, and family history of gastric cancerwere controlled, a multivariable analysis was conducted,which revealed that there was a significant correlationbetween the dietary habits such as irregular meal, over andfast eating, and the gastric cardia cancer with the odds ratios(ORs) of 4.2 (95 % confidence interval: 2.3-7.7), 4.7 (2.1-10.8), and 2.7 (1.3-5.3) respectively. Other correlations werealso observed between the gastric cardia cancer and theconsumption of salty fish or pickled vegetable, smoking,and the family cancer history with the ORs of 5.5 (1.4-19.5),1.8 (1.0-3.0), 2.1 (1.3-3.5), and 3.8 (2.3-6.2) respectively.In contrast, the negative correlations were found existingbetween the intake of fresh vegetables and fruits, the useof refrigerator, and the gastric cardia cancer, with the ORsof 0.4 (0.2-0.9), 0.2 (0.1-0.5), and 0.2 (0.1-0.4),respectively. However, dietary habits were associated lesswith non-cardia gastric cancer compared with its cardiacounterpart.CONCLUSION: Dietary habits might be one of the riskfactors for the cardia carcinogenesis among Chinesepopulation.

  5. Targeting HER2 amplifications in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ung L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lawson Ung, Terence C Chua, Neil D Merrett Department of Surgery, South Western Sydney Upper GI Surgical Unit, Bankstown Hospital, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: While multimodality treatments, including neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation, have become the global standard of care in patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancers (GCs, long-term outcomes for patients remain poor. This reflects the aggressive tumor biology of GCs and occult nature of the disease, often presenting in its advanced stages, as well as the challenges of developing effective targeted therapy to treat this disease. The Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer trial demonstrates that the addition of human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab to standard chemotherapy regimen consisting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU or capecitabine with cisplatin results in significant improvement in overall and progression-free survival. Although questions remain regarding the best methods by which to determine HER2 mutation positivity and amplification, through immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization, and whether trastuzumab is effective for locally advanced, nonmetastatic GC in an adjuvant setting, the trial has led to a surge of clinical trials investigating the potential role of other HER2- and non-HER2-targeted therapies to improve patient outcomes. This review will discuss our current understanding of GC pathogenesis, current available treatments, and the potential impact that targeting HER2 amplifications may have in our efforts to individualize and optimize cancer care in GC individuals. Keywords: Personalized cancer therapy, surgical oncology, gastrectomy, adjuvant treatment, targeted therapies

  6. Comparing mass screening techniques for gastric cancer in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi Tashiro; Masatoshi Sano; Koichi Kinameri; Kazutaka Fujita; Yutaka Takeuchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the efficacy of endoscopic mass screening for gastric cancer. METHODS: The data used in this study were the results of mass screening programs for gastric cancer in Niigata City from 2002 to 2004. The number of participants was 35089 in 2002, 34557 in 2003 and 36600 in 2004. The finding ratio referred to the final diagnosis of gastric cancer after a double check of endoscopic files and histological findings. The costs of identifying one case of gastric cancer were calculated based on the total expense for each screening program and additional close examinations. RESULTS: From the analysis of individual screening program with endoscopy, individual screening program with X-ray (ISX) and mass screening program with photofluorography (MSP) in reference to the finding ratio of gastric cancer, endoscopic examination was the best for detecting early gastric cancer, the finding ratio was 0.87% in 2004, approximately 2.7 and 4.6 times higher than those of the ISX and MSP groups. In addition, this novel method was the cheapest means regarding the cost of identifying one case of gastric cancer, which was estimated to be 1 608000 Japanese yen in 2004. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic mass screening is a promising method and can be effectively applied if a sufficient number of skilled endoscopists become available to staff the system and if city offices support it.

  7. [Early diagnosis of gastric cancer, a utopian idea? (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, E

    1981-05-01

    In order to improve the prognosis of gastric cancer it is necessary to discover the lesions at an early stage of the disease. Early gastric cancer has an excellent prognosis with a postoperative survival rate of 77 to 99%. Since 1970 we have diagnosed 76 cases of early gastric cancer and the percentage of early cancer out of all gastric cancers increased from 10 to 23%. This improvement is based on selected examinations of high-risk patients, on better diagnostic methods and on our better knowledge of macroscopic and histological appearance. In particular, the use of snare biopsy in protruding lesions and the implementation of continuous endoscopic-bioptic follow-up of all gastric ulcers until complete healing is achieved have improved the accuracy of histological verification. In 16 out of 76 cases of early gastric cancer a multicentric growth was observed. The diagnosis of gastric cancer at an early stage is not an utopian idea. It is reality when we pay attention to the aspects mentioned before.

  8. Expression of gastric cancer—associated MG7 antigen in gastric cancer,precancerous lesions and H.pylori—associated gastric diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-LiGuo; MingDong; LanWang; Li-PingSun; YuanYuan

    2002-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the relationship between the antigen MG7 antigen expression and gastric cancer as well as precancerous condition;to study the relationship between the MG7 antigen expression and H.pyiori infection in benign gastric lesions in order to find out the effect of H.pylori infection on the process of gastric cancer development.

  9. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  10. Family history of cancer and risk for esophageal and gastric cancer in Shanxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldstein Alisa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family history (FH by different relative types and risk of upper gastrointestinal (UGI cancers has been only rarely reported; the data on UGI cancer survival are sparse. Methods 600 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC cases, 598 gastric cardia adenocarcinoma cases, and 316 gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma cases, and 1514 age-, gender-, and neighborhood-matched controls were asked for FH in first degree relatives and non-blood relatives. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs from logistic regressions, and hazard ratios (HRs from Cox proportional hazard regressions were estimated. Results Increased ESCC risk was associated with FH of any cancer (OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.39–2.12, FH of any UGI cancer (OR = 2.28, 95%CI = 1.77–2.95 and FH of esophageal cancer (OR = 2.84, 95%CI = 2.09–3.86, but not FH of non-UGI cancer. Individuals with two or more affected first-degree relatives had 10-fold increased ESCC risk. FH of gastric cardia cancer was associated with an increased risk of all three cancers. Cancer in non-blood relatives was not associated with risk of any UGI cancer. FH of UGI cancer was associated with a poorer survival rate among younger ESCC cases (HR = 1.82, 95%CI = 1.01–3.29. Conclusion These data provide strong evidence that shared susceptibility is involved in esophageal carcinogenesis and also suggest a role in prognosis.

  11. Gastric Cancer in the Young: Is It a Different Clinical Entity? A Retrospective Cohort Study

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    Adolfo Pisanu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The rate of gastric cancer in young patients has increased over the past few decades. The aim of this study was to search for independent risk factors related to patients of younger age. Methods. From January 1996 to December 2012, a series of 179 consecutive patients were admitted to our surgical department because of a gastric cancer. We carried out a retrospective cohort study in 20 patients younger than 50 and in 112 patients aged 50 and older treated by curative gastrectomy. The comparison involved the evaluation of patient and tumor characteristics. Results. Younger patients had significantly less comorbidities and a more favorable American Society of Anesthesiology score; they had significantly less preoperative weight loss and a significantly longer duration of symptoms; Helicobacter pylori infection and diffuse histological type were significantly associated with younger age. There was no statistically significant difference regarding overall and cancer-related 5-year survival; advanced cancer stage and diffuse histological type were the independent negative prognostic factors influencing cancer-related survival. Conclusions. We do not have sufficient evidence to consider gastric cancer in younger patients as a different clinical entity. Further studies are needed to understand carcinogenesis in younger patients and to improve gastric cancer classification.

  12. Preoperative staging of nodal status in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlth, Felix; Chon, Seung-Hun; Chevallay, Mickael; Jung, Minoa Karin

    2017-01-01

    An accurate preoperative staging of nodal status is crucial in gastric cancer, because it has a great impact on prognosis and therapeutic decision-making. Different staging methods have been evaluated for gastric cancer in order to predict nodal involvement. So far, no technique could meet the necessary requirements, which include a high detection rate of infiltrated lymph nodes and a low frequency of false-positive results. This article summarizes different staging methods used to assess lymph node status in patients with gastric cancer, evaluates the evidence, and proposes to establish new methods. PMID:28217758

  13. Gastric Metastasis of Breast Cancer: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Fernandes, Gustavo; Batista Bugiato Faria, Luiza D.; de Assis Pereira, Isadora; Neves, Natália C. Moreira; Vieira, Yasmine Oliveira; Leal, Alessandro I. Cavalcanti

    2016-01-01

    Gastric metastasis is rare but it can be the initial symptom of cancer. The second leading cause of this type of metastasis is breast cancer. A lack of clinical signs and nonspecific side effects of the treatment of primary tumors can lead to the misdiagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with biopsy and immunohistochemistry should be used for diagnosis. Treatment is palliative; it includes chemo, endocrine, and radiation therapies. Four patients with breast cancer and gastric metastasis were identified. All the patients tested positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors, and received chemotherapy and hormone therapy. One patient underwent surgery and two received radiation therapy. Patients with breast cancer and gastrointestinal symptoms should be investigated for gastric metastasis, given its morbidity and negative impact on quality of life.

  14. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: advances and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wenbo; Bai, Bing; Sheng, Liang; Li, Yan; Yue, Ping; Li, Xun; Qiao, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers of digestive system globally and Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is believed to be a major risk factor. HP can be classified into different types based on the presence and expression level of CagA and VacA, and, when exposed to adverse environment, HP changes its phenotype from helical type to coccoid type, with each having different pathogenicity. The mechanisms of HP-induced gastric carcinogenesis and progression are complicated, including DNA nitration and oxidation induced by mutagenic factors, HP-induced epigenetic modifications, HP-induced disruption of the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, and HP-induced cancer cell invasion and metastasis. HP may also affect the biological function of cancer stem cells and induction of cell autophagy. The lipopolysaccharide produced by HP can act through toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) to induce gastric mucosal inflammation and is thereby linked to the development of gastric cancer.

  15. Progress of photodynamic therapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, S; Narahara, H; Otani, T; Okuda, S

    1999-01-01

    Progress of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastric cancer and the clinical outcome are described in this paper. (1) We included the whole lesion and a 5 mm margin in the field for irradiation. Marking by injection of India-ink showing the irradiation field was performed beforehand. (2) We established the standard light dose to be 90 J/cm(2) for an argon dye laser and 60 J/cm(2) for a pulse wave laser. (3) The size of cancerous lesion curable by PDT was expanded from 3 cm in diameter, i.e. 7 cm(2) in area to 4 cm in diameter, i.e. 13 cm(2) by employing a new excimer dye laser model, which could emit 4mJ/pulse with 80 Hz pulse frequency. (4) The depth of cancer invasion which could be treated by PDT was increased from about 4 mm, i.e. the superficial part of the submucosal layer (SM-1) to more than 10 mm in depth, i.e. the proper muscular layer. These improvements owe much to the pulse laser, the photodynamic action induced by which permits deeper penetration than that of a continuous wave laser. (5) We employed a side-viewing fiberscope for gastric PDT to irradiate the lesion from an angle of 90 degrees . (6) We designed a simple cut quartz fiber for photoradiation with a spiral spring thickened toward the end. (7) We developed an endoscopic device for photoradiation in PDT which achieves accurate and efficient irradiation. As a result of these improvements a higher cure rate was obtained even with a lower light dose of irradiation.

  16. Helicobacter pylori eradication as a preventive tool against gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Goto, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuko; Tanaka, Daisuke; Kawai, Sayo; Sakakibara, Hisataka; Kondo, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which increases the risk of gastric diseases, including digestive ulcers and gastric cancer, is highly prevalent in Asian countries. There is no doubt that eradication of the bacterium is effective as a treatment of digestive ulcer, but eradication aiming to reduce the gastric cancer risk is still controversial. Observational studies in Japan demonstrated that the eradication decreased the gastric cancer risk among 132 stomach cancer patients undergoing endoscopical resection (65 treated with omeprazol and antibiotics and 67 untreated). In Columbia, 976 participants were randomized into eight groups in a three-treatment factorial design including H. pylori eradication, resulting in significant regression in the H. pylori eradication group. A recent randomized study in China also showed a significant reduction of gastric cancer risk among those without any gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Efficacy of eradication may vary in extent among countries with different incidence rates of gastric cancer. Since the lifetime cumulative risk (0 to 84 years old) of gastric cancer in Japan is reported to be 12.7% for males and 4.8% for females (Inoue and Tominaga, 2003), the corresponding values for H. pylori infected Japanese can be estimated at 21.2% in males and 8.0% in females under the assumptions that the relative risk for infected relative to uninfected is 5 and the proportion of those infected is 0.5. Both the fact that not all individuals are infected among those exposed and the knowledge that only a small percentage of individuals infected with the bacterium develop gastric cancer, indicate the importance of gene-environment interactions. Studies on such interactions should provide useful information for anti-H. pylori preventive strategies.

  17. Tnactivation of PTEN is associated with increased angiogenesis and VEGF overexpression in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-Jiang Zhou; Yu-Xia Xiong; Xiao-Ting Wu; De Shi; Wei Fan; Tong Zhou; Yue-Chun Li; Xiong Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), their roles in biologic behavior and angiogenesis and their association in gastric cancer.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining was used to evaluate the expression of PTEN, VEGF and microvascular density (MVD) on paraffin-embedded sections in 70 patients with primary gastric cancer and 24 patients with chronic superficial gastritis (CSG). Expression of PTEN, VEGF and MVD were compared with clinicopathological features of gastric cancer. The relationship between expression of PTEN, VEGF and MVD as well as the relationship between PTEN and VEGF expression in caner cells were investigated.RESULTS: PTEN expression significantly decreased (t= 3.98,P<0.01) whereas both VEGF expression and MVD significant increased (t = 4.29 and 4.41, respectively, both P<0.01)in gastric cancer group compared with CSG group. PTEN expression was significantly down-regulated (t = 1.95,P<0.05) whereas VEGF expression (t = 2.37, P<0.05) and MVD (t = 3.28, P<0.01) was significantly up-regulated in advanced gastric cancer compared with early-stage gastric cancer. PTEN expression in gastric cancer showed a negative association with lymph node metastasis (t= 3.91, P<0.01),invasion depth (t= 1.95, P<0.05) and age (t= 4.69, P<0.01).MVD in PTEN-negative gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in PTEN-positive gastric cancer (t = 3.69,P<0.01), and there was a negative correlation between PTEN expression and MVD (γ = -0.363, P<0.05). VEGF expression was positively associated with invasion depth (especially with serosa invasion, t = 4.69, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (t= 2.31, P<0.05) and TNM stage (t= 3.04,P<0.01). MVD in VEGF-positive gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in VEGF-negative gastric cancer (t = 4.62,P<0.01), and there was a positive correlation between VEGF expression of and MVD (γ = 0.512, P<0.05). VEGF expression in PTEN

  18. Role of computed tomographic colonoscopy of postoperative surveillance in patient with gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dae Won Jun; Dong Hoo Lee; Oh Young Lee; Hyun Chul Lim; Sung Joon Kwon; Hang Lak Lee; Byung Chul Yoon; Ho Soon Choi; Joon Soo Hahm; Min Ho Lee

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the diagnostic yield of colorectal neoplasia at computed tomographic colonoscopy (CTC) as well as the feasibility of contrast enhanced CTC in patients with gastric cancer.METHODS: To examine the incidence of colon polyp we selected postoperative 188 gastric cancer patients, which we refer to as the 'colon polyp survey group'. To examine the feasibility of CTC for early detection of colon cancer or advanced colon adenoma, we selected 47 gastric cancer patients (M:F 29:18, mean age 53.8 years), which we call the 'CT colonoscopy group'. All the 47 patients underwent successive CTC and colonoscopy on the same day.RESULTS: Totally 109 colon polyps were observed from 59 out of 188 gastric cancer patients, the incidence rate of colon polyps in gastric cancer patients being 31.4%. The sensitivity of CTC in detecting individuals with at least 1 lesion of any size was 57.1%, the specificity was 72.7%, the positive predictive value was 47.1%, and the negative predictive value was 71.9%. When the cutoff size was decreased to 6 mm, the sensitivity and specificity were 80.0% and 92.9%, respectively, with positive and negative predictive values of 57.1% and 97.5%, respectively. Only one patient was classified as false negative by virtual colonoscopy.CONCLUSION: The diagnostic yield of colorectal polyp was 31.4% in patients with gastric cancer, and contrast enhanced CTC is an acceptable tool for the detection of synchronous colorectal advanced adenoma and postoperative surveillance of gastric cancer patients.

  19. Way forward: Geriatric frailty assessment as risk predictor in gastric cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juul; JW; Tegels; Jan; HMB; Stoot

    2015-01-01

    In gastric cancer patients chronological and biological age might vary greatly between patients. Age as well as American Society of Anaesthesiologists-physical status classifications are very non-specific and do not adequately predict adverse outcome. Improvements have been made such as the introduction of Charlson Comorbidity Index. Geriatric frailty is probably a better measure for patients resistance to stressors and physiological reserves. An increasing amount of evidence shows that geriatric frailty is a better predictor for adverse outcome after surgery, including gastric cancer surgery. Geriatric frailty can be assessed in a number of ways. Questionnaires such as the Groningen Frailty Indicator provide an ease and low cost method for gauging the presence of frailty in gastric cancer patients. This can then be used to provide a better preoperative risk assessment in these patients and improve decision making.

  20. [Aging and gynecologic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Arturo A

    2005-01-01

    The interrelation between cancer and ageing in women is emphasized, on its increased incidence, in their molecular background, into the particular biological characteristics of the different tumors and the effects of ageing in the affected women.

  1. Correlation between Fas and FasL proteins expression in normal gastric mucosa and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Czyżewska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The study’s objective was to assess the expressions of Fas and FasL proteins in gastric cancer in correlation with chosen clinicohistological parameters. Fas and FasL expression was analyzed in 68 patients with gastric cancer, using the immunohistochemical method. The expression of Fas was found to be lower in gastric cancer cells than in healthy mucosa, both in the lining epithelium and in glandular tubes (28% vs. 48% and 44%; p < 0.001. The expression of FasL was also markedly lower in cancer cells than in glandular tubes, yet higher than in the lining epithelium (51% vs. 73% and 14%; p < 0.01. Positive expressions of FasL and Fas were lower in less advanced gastric cancer cells (T1, T2, than in more advanced tumors (T3, T4, but only in the case of FasL was this difference statistically significant (p < 0.05. Our findings seem to confirm the theory of the impact of apoptotic disorders at the level of Fas receptor and FasL protein in the process of gastric cancer formation and growth, which is manifested in the varied expressions of these proteins in gastric cancer and in the normal lining and glandular epithelium of the stomach. However, the lack of significant differences in the expressions of Fas and FasL in correlation to other clinicohistological parameters indicates the existence of mechanisms that have a greater impact on the process of differentiation of gastric cancers. This in our opinion eliminates these proteins as prognostic factors. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 142–147

  2. Clinicopathological features and surgical safety of gastric cancer in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Lee, Dong Ho; Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Young Soo; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung

    2014-12-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, especially among the elderly. However little is known about gastric cancer in elderly patients. This study was designed to evaluate the specific features of gastric cancer in elderly patients. Medical records of 1,107 patients who had radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer between June 2005 and December 2009 were reviewed. They were divided into young (CA 19-9 (5.6%, 13.4%, 14.6%, P=0.001), advanced diseases (42.5%, 47.0%, and 57.6, P=0.014), and node metastasis (37.6%, 38.9%, 51.5%, P=0.029) were more common in the young-old and old-old age groups. There were no significant differences in Helicobacter pylori status (63.6%, 56.7%, 61.2%, P=0.324) between the three groups. Surgery-related complication rates were similar in the three groups (5.3%, 5.1%, 8.1%, P=0.497). Microsatellite instability (Pcancer without significant risk of complications. However, considering the more advanced disease and synchronous tumors among the elderly, care should be taken while deciding the extent of surgery for elderly gastric cancer.

  3. Role of symptoms in diagnosis and outcome of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers and the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Apart from Japan, where screening programmes have resulted in early diagnosis in asymptomatic patients, in most countries the diagnosis of gastric cancers is invariably made on account on dyspeptic and alarm symptoms, which may also be of prognostic significance when reported by the patient at diagnosis. However, their use as selection criteria for endoscopy seems to be inconsistent since alarm symptoms are not sufficiently sensitive to detect malignancies. In fact, the overall prevalence of these symptoms in dyspeptic patients is high, while the prevalence of gastro-intestinal cancer is very low. Moreover, symptoms of early stage cancer may be indistinguishable from those of benign dyspepsia, while the presence of alarm symptoms may imply an advanced and often inoperable disease. The features of dyspeptic and alarm symptoms may reflect the pathology of the tumour and be of prognostic value in suggesting site, stage and aggressiveness of cancer. Alarm symptoms in gastric cancer are independently related to survival and an increased number, as well as specific alarm symptoms, are closely correlated to the risk of death. Dysphagia, weight loss and a palpable abdominal mass appear to be major independent prognostic factors in gastric cancer, while gastro-intestinal bleeding, vomiting and also duration of symptoms, do not seem to have a relevant prognostic impact on survival in gastric cancer.

  4. Prolyl hydroxylase 3 inhibited the tumorigenecity of gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lei; Qu, Jianguo; Dang, Shengchun; Mao, Zhengfa; Wang, Xuqing; Fan, Xin; Sun, Kang; Zhang, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world, and it is very urgent to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Although HIF-1α is the most highly characterized target of prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD3), PHD3 has been shown to regulate several signal pathways independent of HIF-1α. Here, we found that the expression of PHD3 was decreased in the clinical gastric cancer samples and reversely correlated with tumor size and tumor stage. Over-expression of PHD3 in the gastric cancer cells significantly inhibited cell growth in vitro and in vivo, while knockdown the expression of PHD3 promoted the tumorigenecity of gastric cancer cells. Mechanistically, it showed that PHD3 downregulated the expression of beta-catenin and inhibited beta-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) signaling. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PHD3 inhibits gastric cancer by suppressing the beta-catenin/TCF signaling and PHD3 might be an important therapeutic target in gastric cancer.

  5. Cancer and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jacob K; Engholm, Gerda; Skytthe, Axel

    2016-01-01

    studies of cancer epidemiology and minimized the challenges often faced in many countries, such as uncertain identification of the study base, age misreporting, and low validity of the cancer diagnoses. However, methodological challenges still remain to be addressed, especially in cancer epidemiology...... studies among the elderly and the oldest-old. For example, a characteristic pattern for many cancer types is that the incidence increases up to a maximum at about ages 75-90 years and is then followed by a decline or a leveling off at the oldest ages. It has been suggested that the oldest individuals may...... be asymptomatic, or even insusceptible to cancer. An alternative interpretation is that this pattern is an artifact due to lower diagnostic intensity among the elderly and oldest-old caused by higher levels of co-morbidities in this age group. Currently, the available cancer epidemiology data are not able...

  6. Real-time determination of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hua Hu; Feng-Hua Chen; Yi-Rong Li; Lin Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To set up a real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay,to detect human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)messenger RNA in gastric carcinomas, and to evaluate quantitative determination of hTERT mRNA in the diagnostic value of gastric carcinomas, and to analyze the correlation between the expression level of hTERT mRNA and dinicopathological parameters in patients with gastric cancer.METHODS: A real-time quantitative RT-PCR (RQ-PCR)based on TaqMan fluorescence methodoloogy and the LightCyder system was used to quantify the full range of hTERT mRNA copy numbers in 35 samples of gastric carcinomas and corresponding adjacent non-cancerous tissues. The normalized hTERT (NhTERT) was standardized by quantifying the number of GAPDH transcripts as internal control and expressed as 100× (hTERT/GAPDH) ratio. Variables were analyzed by the Student's t-test, χ2 test and Fisher's exact test.RESULTS: NhTERT from gastric carcinomas and corresponding adjacent non-cancerous tissues was 6.27±0.89 and 0.93±0.18,respectively (t= 12.76, P<0.001). There was no significant association between gastric cancer hTERT mRNA expression level and patient's age, gender, tumor size, location and stage (pTNM), but a significant correlation was found between hTERT mRNA expression level in gastric carcinomas and the degree of differentiation.CONCLUSION: Quantitative determination of hTERT mRNA by RQ-PCR is a rapid and sensitive method. hTERT might be a potential biomarker for the early detection of gastric cancer.

  7. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW ANIMAL MODEL FOR GASTRIC CANCER STUDY BY ORTHOTO PIC IMPLANTATION OF GASTRIC CANCER CELLS INTO ATHYMIC NUDE MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾知真; 施尧; 萧树东; 江绍基; 张素胤; 殳裕华

    1992-01-01

    An animal model mimicking human gastric cancer by gastric wall implantation technique in athymic nude mice was reported. Two human gastric cancer cell lines. MKN-45 and MKN-28, were used in this study. All animals with gastric wall implantation of cancer cells of these two cell lines developed grossly visible gastric tumors after 3-4 weeks of implantation. Histopathological examination showed that tumors prirnarily grew at serosal side of stomach, and progressively invaded the gastric mucosa, but none showed metastasis in this study. All tumor-bearing animals died within 5-8 weeks after implantation. These results indicated that gastric wall of nude mice provided a good soil for growth and propagation of human gastric cancer cells. The model was useful for in vivo study on biological behavior of various types of human gastric cancers.

  8. New Perspectives in the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahlberg, Rolf; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Thuss-Patience, Peter

    2017-01-01

    available in non-Asia countries until recently. In Japan, S-1 in combination with cisplatin is the recommended first-line treatment in patients with gastric cancer. In Europe, the first trials with S-1 were disappointing due to high unacceptable incidences of adverse events. Pharmacokinetic studies showed...... differences in Asian and Caucasian patients; therefore, a new non-Asian study program was initiated, which led to the pivotal phase 3 trial First-Line Advanced Gastric Cancer Study (FLAGS). In FLAGS, 1,053 patients with advanced gastric cancer from 24 non-Asian countries were enrolled. S-1 plus cisplatin...... safety profile. This led to the approval of S-1 in combination with cisplatin in gastric cancer in Europe in 2011. This article reviews the mode of action of S-1, pivotal study results from an EU point of view, and future perspectives....

  9. Evaluation of life quality in patients with gastric remnant cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹曙明

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the health-related quality of life(HRQoL)and its influencing factors in patients with gastric remnant cancer(GRC).Methods A total of 130 patients received gastrectomy more than

  10. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: Is it promising?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas P Sutter; Henry Fechner

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. The therapeutic outcome of conventional therapies is inefficient. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a promising molecular alternative in the treatment of gastric cancer,including the replacement of defective tumor suppressor genes, the inactivation of oncogenes, the introduction of suicide genes, genetic immunotherapy, anti-angiogenetic gene therapy, and virotherapy. Improved molecular biological techniques and a better understanding of gastric carcinogenesis have allowed us to validate a variety of genes as molecular targets for gene therapy.This review provides an update of the new developments in cancer gene therapy, new principles, techniques,strategies and vector systems, and shows how they may be applied in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  11. Simultaneous laparoscopy-assisted resection for rectal and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongbo; Master, Jiafeng Fang; Chen, Tufeng; Zheng, Zongheng; Wei, Bo; Huang, Yong; Huang, Jianglong; Master, Haozhong Xu

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted surgery for either rectal or gastric cancer has been increasingly performed. However, simultaneous laparoscopy-assisted resection for synchronous rectal and gastric cancer is rarely reported in the literature. In our study, 3 cases of patients who received simultaneous laparoscopy-assisted resection for synchronous rectal and gastric cancer were recorded. The results showed that all 3 patients recovered well, with only 253 minutes of mean operation time, 57 mL of intraoperative blood loss, 5 cm of assisted operation incision, 4 days to resume oral intake, 12 days' postoperative hospital stay, and no complication or mortality. No recurrence or metastasis was found within the follow-up period of 22 months. When performed by surgeons with plentiful experience in laparoscopic technology, simultaneous laparoscopy-assisted resection for synchronous rectal and gastric cancer is safe and feasible, with the benefits of minimal trauma, fast recovery, and better cosmetic results, compared with open surgery.

  12. Increased expression of survivin in gastric cancer patients and in first degree relatives

    OpenAIRE

    J. Yu; Leung, W K; Ebert, M P A; Ng, E K W; Go, M Y Y; Wang, H.B.; Chung, S C S; Malfertheiner, P; Sung, J. J. Y.

    2002-01-01

    Survivin was recently described as an apoptosis inhibitor. Its pathogenic role in gastric cancer is largely unknown. Expression of survivin in gastric cancer and non-cancer first-degree relatives, and its association with apoptosis and cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression was investigated. Fifty gastric cancer, 30 non-cancer first-degree relatives, 20 normal controls and five gastric cancer cell lines were studied. Survivin and cyclo-oxygenase-2 were evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chai...

  13. Assessing risks for gastric cancer: New tools for pathologists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert M Genta; Massimo Rugge

    2006-01-01

    Although the Sydney Systems (original and updated) for the classification of gastritis have contributed substantially to the uniformity of the reporting of gastric conditions, they lack immediacy in conveying to the user information about gastric cancer risk. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the gastric lesions associated with an increased risk for cancer, and present the rationale for a proposal for new ways of reporting gastritis. In addition to the traditional histopathological data gathered and evaluated according to the Sydney System rules, pathologists could add an assessment expressed as grading and staging of the gastric inflammatory and atrophic lesions and integrate these findings with pertinent laboratory information on pepsinogens and gastrin levels. Such an integrated report could facilitate clinicians' approach to the management of patients with gastric conditions.

  14. Role of Notch signaling pathway in gastric cancer pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling pathway is activated dynamically during evolution playing significant role in cell fate determination and differentiation. It has been known that alterations of this pathway may lead to human malignancies, including gastric cancer. Despite a decline in the overall incidence, this disease still remains an important global health problem. Therefore, a better understanding of the molecular alterations underlying gastric cancer may contribute to the development of rationally desig...

  15. Gene Expression Profile Differences in Gastric Cancer and Normal Gastric Mucosa by Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanding Yu; Shenhua Xu; HangZhou Mou; Zhiming Jiang; Chihong Zhu; Xianglin Liu

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the difference of gene expression in gastric cancer (T) and normal tissue of gastric mucosa (C), and to screen for associated novel genes in gastric cancers by oligonucleotide microarrays.METHODS U133A (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) gene chip was used to detect the gene expression profile difference in T and C. Bioinformatics was used to analyze the detected results.RESULTS When gastric cancers were compared with normal gastric mucosa, a total of 270 genes were found with a difference of more than 9times in expression levels. Of the 270 genes, 157 were up-regulated (Signal Log Ratio [SLR] ≥3), and 113 were down-regulated (SLR ≤-3).Using a classification of function, the highest number of gene expression differences related to enzymes and their regulatory genes (67, 24.8%),followed by signal-transduction genes (43,15.9%). The third were nucleic acid binding genes (17, 6.3%), fourth were transporter genes (15, 5.5%)and fifth were protein binding genes (12, 4.4%). In addition there were 50genes of unknown function, accounting for 18.5%. The five above mentioned groups made up 56.9% of the total gene number.CONCLUSION The 5 gene groups (enzymes and their regulatory proteins, signal transduction proteins, nucleic acid binding proteins, transporter and protein binding) were abnormally expressed and are important genes for further study in gastric cancers.

  16. Correlation of PTPN11 polymorphism at intron 3 with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li ZHANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlation of protein-tyrosine-phosphatase nonreceptor-type 11(PTPN11 polymorphism at intron 3 with gastric cancer in Chinese population,and the feasibility and accuracy of employing mastrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrogram(MALDI-TOF-MS in genotyping of this SNP.Methods Two hundred and forty-seven patients with gastric cancer,212 cancer-free patients and 160 cord blood samples were enrolled in present study.Genotypes of PTPN11 G/A polymorphism at intron 3 were determined by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis,and direct sequencing of PCR products with 20 samples of the gene locus was done for checking the accuracy of MALDI-TOF-MS.Histological examination,Helicobacter pylori culture,rapid urease test,serum anti-H.pylori antibodies(ELISA and urease colloidal gold test were performed to evaluate H.pylori infection.Results Direct sequencing of 20 random selected samples were well consistent with the MALDI-TOF-MS results.The rates of H.pylori infection were 73.68% in gastric cancer patients and 75.47% in cancer-free patients,implying no significant difference between the two groups.The distributions of genotypes were in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium in both gastric cancer patients and controls.There were no significant differences in the genotype frequencies between the 2 groups(P>0.05.Compared with the GG genotype,GA+AA genotype could not influence the risk of gastric cancer.When stratified for status,PTPN11 polymorphism was not associated with age,gender and H.pylori infection states in both cancer patients and controls.Conclusion It seems that PTPN11 G/A polymorphism at intron 3 has no affection on the risk of gastric cancer in Chinese population.

  17. Gastric adenocarcinoma in common variable immunodeficiency: features of cancer and associated gastritis may be characteristic of the condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petris, Giovanni; Dhungel, Bal M; Chen, Longwen; Chang, Yu-Hui H

    2014-10-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The aim of the study was to determine the morphological features of CVID-associated gastric adenocarcinoma (CAGA) and of the background gastritis. The population of gastric cancer patients with CVID of Mayo Clinic in the period 2000-2010 was studied; 6 cases of CVID (2 males, 4 females, average age 47 years, age range 26-71 years) were found in 5793 patients with gastric cancer in the study period. Each patient underwent gastric resection for which histology slides were reviewed. Chronic gastritis variables, CVID-related findings, and features of the adenocarcinoma were recorded. CAGA was of intestinal type, with high number of intratumoral lymphocytes (ITLs). Cancer was diagnosed in younger patients than in the overall population of gastric cancer. Severe atrophic metaplastic pangastritis with extensive dysplasia was present in the background in 4 cases, with features of lymphocytic gastritis in 2 cases. Features of CVID (plasma cells paucity in 4 of 6 cases, lymphoid nodules prominent in four cases) could be detected. In summary, gastric adenocarcinoma at young age with ITLs, accompanied by atrophic metaplastic pangastritis, should alert the pathologist of the possibility of CAGA. It follows that, in presence of those characteristics, the search of CVID-associated abnormalities should be undertaken in the nonneoplastic tissues.

  18. Expression of gastric cancer-associated MG7 antigen in gastric cancer, precancerous lesions and H. pylori-associated gastric diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Li Guo; Ming Dong; Lan Wang; Li-Ping Sun; Yuan Yuan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the antigen MG7 antigen expression and gastric cancer as well as precancerous condition; to study the relationship between the MG7 antigen expression and H. pyloriinfection in benign gastric lesions in order to find out the effect of H. pylori infection on the process of gastric cancer development.METHODS: The level of MG7 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemical method in 383 gastric biopsied materials. The intestinal metaplasia was determined by histochemistry method. The H. pyloriinfection was determined by HE stain, PCR and ELISA in 291 specimens, among which only 34 cases of H. pylori-associated gastric lesions were followed up.RESULTS: The positive rate of MG7 expression in normal gastric mucosa, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and gastric cancer increased gradually in ascending order (P<0.01). The positive rate of MG7 antigen expression in type Ⅲ intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa was higher than that of type Ⅰand Ⅱ intestinal metaplasia, being highly significant (P<0.05).The positive rate of MG7 antigen expression in superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer increased gradually (11.9 %, 64.8 %, 91.2 %, P<0.01). There was no significant difference between H.pylori-negative and H. pyloripositive intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and dysplasia of gastric epithelium in the positive rate of MG7 antigen expression. There was no expression of MG7 antigen in H. pylori-negative superficial gastritis. The positive rate of MG7 expression in H. pylori-positive superficial gastritis was 20.5 %, and the difference between them was significant (P<0.05). During following up, one of the three H. pylori negative cases turned positive again, and its MG7 antigen expression turned to be stronger correspondingly. 3 of 31 H. pyloripositive cases were detected as early gastric cancer, among which one with "+++" MG7 antigen expression was diminished after H. pylori

  19. The effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on gastric cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chia Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Gastric cancer is a leading cause of death, particularly in the developing world. The literature reports individual socioeconomic status (SES or neighborhood SES as related to survival, but the effect of both has not been studied. This study investigated the effect of individual and neighborhood SES simultaneously on mortality in gastric cancer patients in Taiwan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A study was conducted of 3,396 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer between 2002 and 2006. Each patient was followed for five years or until death. Individual SES was defined by income-related insurance premium (low, moderate, and high. Neighborhood SES was based on household income dichotomized into advantaged and disadvantaged areas. Multilevel logistic regression model was used to compare survival rates by SES group after adjusting for possible confounding factors. RESULTS: In patients younger than 65 years, 5-year overall survival rates were lowest for those with low individual SES. After adjusting for patient characteristics (age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, gastric cancer patients with high individual SES had 68% risk reduction of mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR] of mortality, 0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.61. Patients aged 65 and above had no statistically significant difference in mortality rates by individual SES group. Different neighborhood SES did not statistically differ in the survival rates. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer patients aged less than 65 years old with low individual SES have higher risk of mortality, even under an universal healthcare system. Public health strategies, education and welfare policies should seek to correct the inequality in gastric cancer survival, especially in those with lower individual SES.

  20. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  1. Efficiency of photodynamic treatment in patients with early gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. V. Filonenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The experience of photodynamic therapy for early gastric cancer is described in the article. The treatment results in 68 patients who were excluded for convenient surgical treatment because of advanced age or severe co-morbidity are represented. 63 patients had single tumor, 5 patients – 2 tumors. Four Russian agents: photogem, photosens, radaсhlorin and alasens, were used for photodynamic therapy. The treatment session was performed under local anesthesia during routine endoscopy with diode laser with wavelength consistent with photosensitizer (photogem – 630 nm, photosens – 670 nm, alasens-induced protoporphyrin IX – 635 nm, radaсhlorin – 662 nm. The short-term results were analyzed 1 month after treatment according to endoscopy, morphological study, CT, ultrasound or endosonography. For 73 lesions complete regression was observed in 53 (72.6% and partial regression in 20 tumors (27.4%. The efficacy of photodynamic therapy was shown to be directly associated with tumor size. Thus, for tumors up to 1 cm regression occurred in 100% of cases, up to 1.5 cm – in 70.8%, up to 3 cm – in 65.2%, up to 5 cm – in 58.3%. The median survival rates accounted for 7.31 years, 3-year survival – 83±5%, 5-year - 69±8%. The experience showed that the developed method of photodynamic therapy was promising in treatment for early gastric cancer as an alternative to surgery. 

  2. Therapeutic mechanism of ginkgo biloba exocarp polysaccharides on gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Hua Xu; Hua-Sheng Chen; Bu-Chan Sun; Xiao-Ren Xiang; Yun-Fei Chu; Fan Zhai; Ling-Chang Jia

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the therapeutic mechanism of Ginkgo biloba exocarp polysaccharides (GBEP) on gastric cancer.METHODS: Thirty patients with gastric cancer were treated with oral GBEP capsules. The area of tumors was measured by electron gastroscope before and after treatment, then the inhibitory and effective rates were calculated. The ultrastructures of tumor cells were examined by transmissional electron microscope. Cell culture, MTT, flow cytometry were performed to observe proliferation, apoptosis and changes of relevant gene expression of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.RESULTS: Compared with the statement before treatment,GBEP capsules could reduce the area of tumors, and the effective rate was 73.4 %. Ultrastructural changes of the cells indicated that GBEP could induce apoptosis and differentiation in tumor cells of patients with gastric cancer.GBEP could inhibit the growth of human gastric cancer SGC7901 cells following 24-72 h treatment in vitro at 10-320 mg/L,which was dose- and time-dependent. GBEP was able to elevate the apoptosis rate and expression of c-los gene,but reduce the expression of c-myc and bcl-2 genes also in a dose-dependent manner.CONCLUSION: The therapeutic mechanism of GBEP on human gastric cancer may relate to its effects on the expression of c-myc, bcl-2 and c-los genes, which can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and differentiation of tumor cells.

  3. Robot-assisted laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Stefano; Franceschini, Franco; Patriti, Alberto; Roviello, Franco; Annecchiarico, Mario; Ceccarelli, Graziano; Coratti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Phase III evidence in the shape of a series of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses has shown that laparoscopic gastrectomy is safe and gives better short-term results with respect to the traditional open technique for early-stage gastric cancer. In fact, in the East laparoscopic gastrectomy has become routine for early-stage gastric cancer. In contrast, the treatment of advanced gastric cancer through a minimally invasive way is still a debated issue, mostly due to worries about its oncological efficacy and the difficulty of carrying out an extended lymphadenectomy and intestinal reconstruction after total gastrectomy laparoscopically. Over the last ten years the introduction of robotic surgery has implied overcoming some intrinsic drawbacks found to be present in the conventional laparoscopic procedure. Robot-assisted gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy has been shown to be safe and feasible for the treatment of gastric cancer patients. But unfortunately, most available studies investigating the robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer compared to laparoscopic and open technique are so far retrospective and there have not been phase III trials. In the present review we looked at scientific evidence available today regarding the new high-tech surgical robotic approach, and we attempted to bring to light the real advantages of robot-assisted gastrectomy compared to the traditional laparoscopic and open technique for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:28101302

  4. Emerging role of S-1 in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriseld Krasniqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer remains one of the most important malignancies worldwide in terms of incidence and mortality. The treatment is based on the combination of local surgery and radiation therapy as well as systemic chemotherapy and targeted molecules. Fluoropyrimidines and particularly 5-fluorouracil (FU represent still the backbone for gastric cancer chemotherapy and new molecular versions of this molecule have been brought to clinical practice in order to improve benefits and reduce adverse effects. S-1 is an oral prodrug of 5-FU, which has demonstrated high effectiveness for gastric cancer treatment and a favorable safety profile. Currently, there are geographic differences in the treatment of gastric cancer and in the use of S-1, which is a mainstay of gastric cancer management in Eastern countries, but is not part of the standard care in the rest of the world. In this review, we gathered data from phase I, II, and III trials of S-1 in gastric cancer, in order to define its real benefit-risk ratio and assess whether geographic differences in S-1 use are justified by unchangeable factors.

  5. [Present and future state of cancer screening for esophageal cancer and gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hirotaka; Nagahama, Ryuji; Yoshida, Misao

    2012-01-01

    Recently, endoscopic examinations have played a major role in the diagnosis and treatment in the field of gastroenterology. It is considered that endoscopy would be an important examination for cancer screening of the esophagus and the stomach. However, endoscopic services for cancer screening are in short supply. Furthermore, we have to take the complications and poor economic benefits of endoscopy in to consideration when we apply it as a practical cancer screening system. Thus, an effective primary screening system must be provided for the endoscopic screening of cancer of the esophagus and the stomach. People with a defect in aldehyde dehydrogenase-2(ALDH2)should be distinguished by their facial flushing in drinking and for their high risks of esophageal cancer. In cases with gastric cancer screening by endoscopy, an x-ray study is expected to be a primary screening because of its efficacy. It already has been recommended for population-based screening in Japanese guidelines for gastric cancer screening. In cases with opportunistic screening of gastric cancer, patients should be allowed to choose from several studies such as the x-ray study, direct endoscopy, and the so-called high risk screening of gastric cancer for estimating risks and planning of screening for gastric cancer.

  6. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer:An Asian enigma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kartar Singh; Uday C Ghoshal

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) has been etiologically linked to gastric cancer. H pylori infection is more frequent in less developed Asian countries like India,Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Thailand and is acquired at early age than in more developed Asian countries like Japan and China. Frequency of gastric cancer, however,is very low in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Thailand compared to that in Japan and China. Similar enigma has been reported from Africa as compared to the West.Seroprevalence of H pylori infection in adult populations of India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Thailand varies from 55% to 92%. In contrast, seroprevalence of H pylori in Chinese and Japanese adults is 44% and 55%,respectively. Annual incidence rate of gastric cancer in India, Bangladesh, and Thailand is 10.6, 1.3, 7.1 per 100000 populations, respectively; in contrast, that in China and Japan is 32-59 and 80-115 per 100 000 populations,respectively. Several studies from India failed to show higher frequency of H pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer than controls. Available evidences did not support difference in H pylori strains as an explanation for this enigma. Despite established etiological role of H pylori, situation is somewhat enigmatic in Asian countries because in countries with higher frequency of infection,there is lower rate of gastric cancer. Host's genetic makeup and dietary and environmental factors might explain this enigma. Studies are urgently needed to solve this issue.

  7. Differential expression of ZFX gene in gastric cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parvaneh Nikpour; Modjtaba Emadi-Baygi; Faezeh Mohammad-Hashem; Mohamad Reza Maracy; Shaghayegh Haghjooy-Javanmard

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer accounts for 8% of the total cancer cases and 10% of total cancer deaths worldwide. In Iran, gastric cancer is the leading cause of national cancer-related mortality. Most human cancers show substantial heterogeneity. The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has been proposed to reconcile this heterogeneity. ZFX encodes a member of the krueppel C2H2-type zinc-finger protein family that is required as a transcriptional regulator for self-renewal of stem cells. A total of 30 paired tissue gastric samples were examined for ZFX gene expression by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Although the relative expression of the gene was significantly high in 47% of the examined tumour tissues, its expression was low in the others (53%). There was a statistically significant association between the ZFX gene expression and different tumour types and grades. This is the first report that shows ZFX was differentially expressed in gastric cancer. Of note, it was overexpressed in diffused-type and grade III gastric tumoural tissues. Due to this, ZFX may have the potential to be used as a target for therapeutic interventions.

  8. Early onset gastric cancer: on the road to unravelling gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world and ranks second in terms of cancer-related death. It is thought to result from a combination of environmental factors and the accumulation of alterations due to increasing genetic instability, and consequently affects mainly older pat

  9. Mucin phenotype of gastric cancer and clinicopathology of gastric-type differentiated adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsutomu; Namikawa; Kazuhiro; Hanazaki

    2010-01-01

    Differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach is classified into gastric or intestinal phenotypes based on mucus expression. Recent advances in mucin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry have highlighted the importance of such a distinction, and it is important clinically to distinguish between gastricand intestinal-type differentiated adenocarcinoma. However, a clinical and pathological diagnosis of this type is often difficult in early gastric cancer because of histological similarities between a hyperp...

  10. Does Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer prevent gastric cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katsuhiro Mabe; Mikako Takahashi; Haruhumi Oizumi; Hideaki Tsukuma; Akiko Shibata; Kazutoshi Fukase; Toru Matsuda; Hiroaki Takeda; Sumio Kawata

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) eradication therapy for treatment of peptic ulcer on the incidence of gastric cancer. METHODS: A multicenter prospective cohort study was conducted between November 2000 and December 2007 in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. The study included patients with H pylori -positive peptic ulcer who decided themselves whether to receive H pylori eradication (eradication group) or conventional antacid therapy (non-eradication group). Incidence of gastric cancer in the two groups was determined based on the results of annual endoscopy and questionnaire surveys, as well as Yamagata Prefectural Cancer Registry data, and was compared between the two groups and by results of H pylori therapy. RESULTS: A total of 4133 patients aged between 13 and 91 years (mean 52.9 years) were registered, and 56 cases of gastric cancer were identified over a mean follow-up of 5.6 years. The sex- and age-adjusted incidence ratio of gastric cancer in the eradication group, as compared with the non-eradication group, was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.28-1.19) and ratios by follow-up period (< 1 year, 1-3 years, > 3 years) were 1.16 (0.27-5.00), 0.50 (0.17-1.49), and 0.34 (0.09-1.28), respectively. Longer follow-up tended to be associated with better prevention of gastric cancer, although not to a significant extent. No significant difference in incidence of gastric cancer was observed between patients with successful eradication therapy (32/2451 patients, 1.31%) and those with treatment failure (11/639 patients, 1.72%). Among patients with duodenal ulcer, which is known to be more prevalent in younger individuals, the incidence of gastric cancer was significantly less in those with successful eradication therapy (2/845 patients, 0.24%) than in those with treatment failure (3/216 patients, 1.39%). CONCLUSION: H pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer patients with a mean age of 52.9 years at registration did not significantly decrease the

  11. Coexpression of cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor and gastrin gene in human gastric tissues and gastric cancer cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Jiang Zhou; Man-Ling Chen; Qun-Zhou Zhang; Jian-Kun Hu; Wen-Ling Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the expression patterns of cholecystokininB (CCK-B)/gastrin receptor genes in matched human gastric carcinoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa of patients with gastric cancer, inflammatory gastric mucosa from patients with gastritis, normal stomachs from 2 autopsied patients and a gastric carcinoma cell line (SGC-7901), and to explore their relationship with progression to malignancy of human gastric carcinomas.METHODS: RT-PCR and sequencing were employed to detect the mRNA expression levels of CCK-B receptor and gastrin gene in specimens from 30 patients with gastric carcinoma and healthy bordering non-cancerous mucosa, 10 gastritis patients and normal stomachs from 2 autopsied patients as well as SGC-7901. The results were semi-quantified by normalizing it to the mRNA level of β-actin gene using Lab Image software. The sequences were analyzed by BLAST program. RESULTS: CCK-B receptor transcripts were detected in all of human gastric tissues in this study, including normal, inflammatory and malignant tissues and SGC-7901. However, the expression levels of CCK-B receptor in normal gastric tissues were higher than those in other groups (P<0.05),and its expressions did not correlate with the differentiation and metastasis of gastric cancer (P>0.05). On the other hand, gastrin mRNA was detected in SGC-7901 and in specimens obtained from gastric cancer patients (22/30) but not in other gastric tissues, and its expression was highly correlated with the metastases of gastric cancer (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Human gastric carcinomas and gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 cells coexpress CCK-B receptor and gastrin mRNA. Gastrin/CCK-B receptor autocrine or paracrine pathway may possibly play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer.

  12. Intake of nitrate and nitrite and the risk of gastric cancer: A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, A.J.M. van; Botterweck, A.A.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Klaveren, J.D. van; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    The association between the intake of nitrate or nitrite and gastric cancer risk was investigated in a prospective cohort study started in 1986 in the Netherlands, of 120,852 men and women aged 55-69 years. At baseline, data on dietary intake, smoking habits and other covariates were collected by me

  13. Endoscopic surveillance strategy after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsutomu; Nishida; Masahiko; Tsujii; Motohiko; Kato; Yoshito; Hayashi; Tomofumi; Akasaka; Hideki; Iijima; Tetsuo; Takehara

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of early gastric cancer(EGC)is important to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.Recent advances in endoscopic modalities and treatment devices,such as image-enhanced endoscopy and high-frequency generators,may make endoscopic treatment,such as endoscopic submucosal dissection,a therapeutic option for gastric intraepithelial neoplasia.Consequently,short-term outcomes of endoscopic resection(ER)for EGC have improved.Therefore,surveillance with endoscopy after ER for EGC is becoming more important,but how to perform endoscopic surveillance after ER has not been established,even though the follow-up strategy for more advanced gastric cancer has been outlined.Therefore,a surveillance strategy for patients with EGC after ER is needed.

  14. The accumulation of DNA demethylation in Sat α in normal gastric tissues with Helicobacter pylori infection renders susceptibility to gastric cancer in some individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masaaki; Suzuki, Koichi; Maeda, Takafumi; Kato, Takaharu; Kamiyama, Hidenori; Koizumi, Kei; Miyaki, Yuichiro; Okada, Shinichiro; Kiyozaki, Hirokazu; Konishi, Fumio

    2012-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is widely recognized as a risk factor for gastric cancer, but only a minority of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether DNA demethylation in non-cancerous gastric mucosa (NGM) significantly enhances susceptibility to gastric cancer. A total of 165 healthy volunteers, including 83 HP-positive and 82-negative individuals, as well as 83 patients with single and 18 with synchronous double gastric cancer (GC) were enrolled in this study. The relative demethylation levels (RDLs) of repetitive sequences, including Alu, LINE-1 and Sat α, were quantified by real-time methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The Alu RDL did not exhibit any differences within each respective group, whereas LINE-1 RDL was significantly elevated in cancer tissues compared with the NGM in the other groups (PSat α RDL correlated with HP infection and cancer development. Sat α RDL was significantly elevated in the NGM in HP-positive compared with HP-negative (PSat α RDL of the NGM in the total population increased in an age-dependent manner, it was significantly increased in a fraction of younger GC patients (Sat α RDL in the NGM compared with single GC (P=0.0014). In these two fractions, Sat α RDL in the NGM exhibited an inverse correlation with age. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the accumulation of DNA demethylation in Sat α RDL in the NGM with HP infection potentially renders susceptibility to gastric cancer in a fraction of GC patients younger than 45 years or in patients with multiple cancers.

  15. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  16. Local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinami, Shinichi; Funaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hideto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo

    2016-06-24

    The local resection of the stomach is an ideal method for preventing postoperative symptoms. There are various procedures for performing local resection, such as the laparoscopic lesion lifting method, non-touch lesion lifting method, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery. After the invention and widespread use of endoscopic submucosal dissection, local resection has become outdated as a curative surgical technique for gastric cancer. Nevertheless, local resection of the stomach in the treatment of gastric cancer in now expected to make a comeback with the clinical use of sentinel node navigation surgery. However, there are many issues associated with local resection for gastric cancer, other than the normal indications. These include gastric deformation, functional impairment, ensuring a safe surgical margin, the possibility of inducing peritoneal dissemination, and the associated increase in the risk of metachronous gastric cancer. In view of these issues, there is a tendency to regard local resection as an investigative treatment, to be applied only in carefully selected cases. The ideal model for local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer would be a combination of endoscopic full-thickness resection of the stomach using an ESD device and hand sutured closure using a laparoscope or a surgical robot, for achieving both oncological safety and preserved functions.

  17. LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF EARLY GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION This study was performed to check Laparoscopic Surgery in the management of early Gastric Cancer. For that we choose laparoscopic and laparoscopic Assisted Gastrectomies for 119 cases. It was performed during the period from June 1996 to February 2002 in Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, Japan. Male and female ratio was 2.78:1. The age range was 48-88 years (65.5. MATERIALS AND METHODS 1. Laparoscopic Intragastric Mucosal Resection (LIMR. 2. Local Resection by Lesion Lifting Method (LLM. 3. Laparoscopy-Assisted Distal Gastrectomy (LADG. 4. Intragastric Mucosal Resection through laparotomy. RESULTS OF THIS STUDY AFTER USING SURGICAL TECHNIQUES ARE AS FOLLOWS- 1. The tear was successfully closed by intragastric hand suturing technique. 2. All the planned laparoscopic procedures were completed in all the cases and the operation was finished after the confirmation of tumor free margins on frozen section biopsy specimen. 3. All resected specimen underwent detailed histopathologic examination. Subsequent diagnosis includes stomach cancer in 106 cases, duodenal cancer in 1 case and stomach adenoma in 5 cases. 8cases of stromal tumors were resected laparoscopically. 4. We have not lost even a single patient in follow up or due to mortality. Five year follow up is present in the first year group. 5. 06 patients who were diagnosed with EGC have been successfully treated with 4 laparoscopic techniques at our institute from June 1996 to February 2002. CONCLUSION We, in our study had no mortality or local recurrence to date but our follow up is obviously too short to draw any conclusions. If patients are selected properly, we on the basis of our study propose that laparoscopic procedures are curative.1,2 When performed by a skilled surgeon, laparoscopic resection is a safe and useful technique in the management of Early Gastric Cancer.

  18. Biology of cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, F F; Wilson, J; Blesch, K S; Kaesberg, P R; Miller, R; Sprott, R

    1991-12-01

    The greatest risk factor for cancer is aging. Human cancer incidence increases exponentially with advancing age. Cancer growth rate and potential for metastatic spread may be influenced by age-specific change in host response. Because cancer and aging are, thus, inextricably linked, the American Cancer Society should encourage submission of research proposals that address the mechanisms of aging and how aging alters cancer development.

  19. Localized gastric amyloidosis differentiated histologically from scirrhous gastric cancer using endoscopic mucosal resection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamata Tsugumasa

    2012-08-01

    resembling scirrhous gastric carcinoma. This case of localized gastric amyloidosis was differentiated from scirrhous gastric cancer after performing endoscopic mucosal resection without an invasive surgical resection, as endoscopic mucosal resection provided sufficient tissue specimens from the lesion to make an accurate histological evaluation.

  20. Case-Control Study of Dietary Pattern and Other Risk Factors for Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Naghizadeh Baghi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rates of gastric cancer reported from Ardabil Province of Iran, are among thehighest in the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for gastric cancer inArdabil Province.Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 128 adults with mean age of 56.5 ± 12.8 yrold in Ardebil City, Iran in 2010 – 2011. Forty-two people with gastric cancer and 86 healthypeople were recruited. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Fastingblood samples were taken for measurement of IgG and IgA indices against Helicobacter pylori infection.Data were analyzed using the Chi-square and Independent sample t-test.Results: Diet and H. pylori infection indices had the significant relationship with gastric cancer(P<0.05. Among dietary patterns, drinking hot tea, low intake of fresh vegetables and fruits, andunsaturated fat were the most significant risk factors (P<0.05. In gastric cancer patients, the levelsof serum IgG and IgA as indicator of H. pylori infection were significantly (P<0.05 higherthan the healthy subjects (IgG 37.7 ± 29.3 vs. 16.9 ± 11.1 U/ml and IgA 50.5 ± 44.7 vs. 22.9 ±15.8 U/ml. No significant relationship was observed between tobacco smoking and alcohol consumptionwith gastric cancer.Conclusion: Dietary pattern especially drinking hot tea and low consumption of unsaturated fat,fresh vegetables, and fruits, as well as H. pylori infection were the most important risk factors ingastric cancer patients.

  1. Airborne exposures and risk of gastric cancer: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl, Krister; Jansson, Catarina; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Adami, Johanna; Boffetta, Paolo; Lagergren, Jesper

    2007-05-01

    There is an unexplained male predominance among patients with gastric cancer, and many carcinogens are found in male-dominated dusty occupations. However, the relation between occupational exposures and risk of gastric cancer remains unclear. To investigate whether airborne occupational exposures might influence the risk of noncardia gastric cancer, we used a large, prospective cohort study of male Swedish construction workers. These workers were, during the period 1971-1993, regularly invited to health examinations by a nationwide occupational health service organization. Data on job titles and other variables were collected through self-administered questionnaires and forms completed by the health organization's staff. Industrial hygienists assessed 12 specific airborne occupational exposures for 200 job titles. Gastric cancer, death or emigration occurring during follow-up in 1971-2002 were identified by linkage to the Swedish registers of Cancer, Causes of Death and Total Population, respectively. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for attained age, tobacco smoking, calendar period and body mass, were derived from Cox regression. Among 256,357 cohort members, contributing 5,378,012 person-years at risk, 948 noncardia gastric cancers were identified. Increased risk of this tumor was found among workers exposed to cement dust (IRR 1.5 [95% CI 1.1-2.1]), quartz dust (IRR 1.3 [95% CI 1.0-1.7]) and diesel exhaust (IRR 1.4 [95% CI 1.1-1.9]). Dose-response relations were observed for these exposures. No consistent positive associations were found regarding exposure to asbestos, asphalt fumes, concrete dust, epoxy resins, isocyanates, metal fumes, mineral fibers, organic solvents or wood dust. In conclusion, this study provides some support to the hypothesis that specific airborne exposures increase the risk of noncardia gastric cancer.

  2. Expression of Fas ligand and Caspase-3 contributes to formation of immune escape in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Chuan Zheng; Jin-llin Sun; Zheng-Li Wei; Xue-Fei Yang; Yin-Chang Zhang; Yan Xin

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of Fas ligand (FasL) and Caspase-3expression in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer and molecular mechanisms of relevant immune escape.METHODS: FasL and Caspase-3 expression was studied in adjacent epithelial cells, cancer cells and lymphocytes of primary foci, and cancer cells of metastatic foci from 113 cases of gastric cancer by streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase (S-P) immunohistochemistry. Expression of both proteins in cancer cells of primary foci was compared with clinicopathological features of gastric cancer. The relationship between FasL expression in cancer cells and Caspase-3expression in cancer cells or infiltrating lymphocytes of primary foci was investigated.RESULTS: Cancer cells of primary foci expressed FasL in 53.98 % (61/113) of gastric cancers, more than their adjacent epithelial cells (34.51%, 39/113) (P=0.003, X2=8.681), while the expression of Caspase-3 in cancer cells of primary foci was detected in 32.74 % (37/113) of gastric cancers, less than in the adjacent epithelial cells (50.44 %, 57/113)(P=0.007, X2=7.286). Infiltrating lymphocytes of the primary foci showed positive immunoreactivity to Caspase-3 in 70.80 % (80/113) of gastric cancers, more than their corresponding adjacent epithelial cells (P=0.001, X2=10.635)or cancer cells of primary foci (P=0.000, X2=32.767). FasL was less expressed in cancer cells of metastases (51.16 %,22/43) than in those of the corresponding primary foci (81.58 %, 31/38) (P=0.003, X2=9.907). Conversely,Caspase-3 was more expressed in cancer cells of metastases (58.14 %, 25/43) than in those of the corresponding primary foci (34.21%, 13/38) (P=0.031, X2=4.638). FasL expression was significantly correlated with tumor size (P=0.035,rs=0.276), invasive depth (P=0.039, rs=0.195), metastasis (P=0.039, rs=0.195), differentiation (P=0.015, rs=0.228)and Lauren′s classification (P=0.038, rs=0.196), but not with age or gender of patients, growth pattern or TNM staging of gastric cancer

  3. Nutritional factors and gastric cancer in Zhoushan Islands, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiong-Liang Qiu; Kun Chen; Jian-Ning Zheng; Jian-Yue Wang; Li-Jun Zhang; Li-Ming Sui

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between nutrient intakes and high incidence rate of gastric cancer among residents in Zhoushan Islands.METHODS: A frequency-matched design of case-control study was used during the survey on dietary factors and gastric cancer in Zhoushan Islands, China. A total of 103 cases of gastric cancer diagnosed in 2001 were included in the study and 133 controls were randomly selected from the residents in Zhoushan Islands. A food frequency questionnaire was specifically designed for the Chinese dietary pattern to collect information on dietary intake. A computerized database of the dietary and other relative information of each participant was completed. Total calories and 15 nutrients were calculated according to the food composition table and their adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by gender using unconditional logistic regression models.RESULTS: High intakes of protein, saturated fat, and cholesterol were observed with the increased risk of gastric cancer particularly among males (ORQ4 vsQ1 were 10.3, 3.24, 2.76 respectively). While carbohydrate was a significant high-risk nutrient (ORQ4 vsQ1 = 14.8; Pfor linear trend = 0.024) among females. Regardless of their gender, the cases reported significantly higher daily intake of sodium mainly from salts. As to the nutrients of vitamins A and C, an inversed association with the risk of GC was found. Baseline characteristics of participants were briefly described.CONCLUSION: The findings from this study confirm the role of diet-related exposure in the etiology of gastric cancer from the point of view of epidemiology. An increased risk of gastric cancer is associated with high intakes of protein, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium,while consumption of polyunsaturated fat, vitamin A and ascorbic acid may have a protective effect against gastric cancer.

  4. Stathmin1 plays oncogenic role and is a target of microRNA-223 in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Kang

    Full Text Available Stathmin1 (STMN1 is a candidate oncoprotein and prognosis marker in several kinds of cancers. This study was aimed to analyze its expression and biological functions in gastric cancer. The expression of STMN1 was evaluated by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. The biological function of STMN1 was determined by MTT proliferation assays, monolayer colony formation and cell invasion assays using small interference RNA technique in gastric cancer cell lines. We also explored the regulation of STMN1 expression by microRNA-223. STMN1 was upregulated in gastric cancer cell lines and primary gastric adenocarcinomas. STMN1-positive tumors were more likely to be found in old age group and associated with p53 nuclear expression. In diffuse type gastric adenocarcinomas, STMN1 expression was correlated with age (p = 0.043, T stage (p = 0.004 and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.046. Expression of STMN1 in diffuse type gastric adenocarcinoma was associated with poor disease specific survival by univariate analysis (p = 0.01. STMN1 knockdown in AGS and MKN7 cell lines suppressed proliferation (p<0.001, reduced monolayer colony formation (p<0.001, inhibited cell invasion and migration ability (p<0.001 and induced G1 phase arrest. siSTMN1 could also suppress cell growth in vivo (p<0. 01. We finally confirmed that STMN1 is a putative downstream target of miR-223 in gastric cancer. Our findings supported an oncogenic role of STMN1 in gastric cancer. STMN1 might serve as a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  5. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  6. Clinical management of gastric cancer: results of a multicentre survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Feng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice guidelines in oncology-gastric cancer guidelines have been widely used to provide appropriate recommendations for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists' to the recommended guidelines. Methods A questionnaire asking the treatment options for gastric cancer cases was sent to 394 Chinese oncology specialists, including surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists working in hospitals joined in The Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of China. The questionnaire involved a series of clinical scenarios regarding the interpretation of surgery, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and advanced treatment planning of gastric cancer. Results Analysis of 358 respondents (91% showed variations between each specialization and from the recommended guidelines in the management approaches to specific clinical scenarios. The majority of specialists admitted that less than 50% of patients received multidisciplinary evaluation before treatment. The participants gave different responses to questions involving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and advanced settings, compared to the recommended guidelines. Conclusions These results highlight the heterogeneity of the treatment of gastric cancer. Surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists are not adhering to the recommended guidelines.

  7. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Daher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk.

  8. Prevalence of factor Ⅴ Leiden and prothrombin G20210A in patients with gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra Battistelli; Massimo Stefanoni; Alberto Genovese; Aurelio Vittoria; Roberto Cappelli; Franco Roviello

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the prevalence of the two commonest thrombophilic mutations, factor Ⅴ Leiden and prothrombin G20210A, in patients with gastric cancer.METHODS: One hundred and twenty-one patients with primary gastric carcinoma and 130 healthy subjects,comparable for age and sex, were investigated. Factor Ⅴ Leiden was detected by using polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion, and prothrombin G20210A gene mutation by allele-specific PCR.RESULTS: Among the 121 cancer patients, factor Ⅴ Leiden was found in 4 cases (GA genotype: 3.3%) and prothrombin G20210A in 10 cases (GA genotype: 8.3%).Of the 130 control subjects, factor Ⅴ Leiden was detected in 6 cases (GA genotype: 4.6%) and prothrombin G20210A in 8 cases (GA genotype: 6.1%). No double heterozygous carriers of both mutations were found in either group. The prevalence of both factor Ⅴ Leiden and prothrombin G20210A variant was not statistically different between the cancer patients and the healthy subjects.CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that, in gastric cancer, the risk factors of thrombophilic cancer state are on acquired rather than on a genetic basis and that prothrombin G20210A does not seem to be a cofactor in gastric cancer pathogenesis.

  9. Detection of free gastric cancer cell in peripheral and portal blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Ho Yoon; Lee, Jong Inn [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    In fact, there is no definite treatment modality after liver or hematogenous metastasis in the gastric cancer. So it is important to develop a new method to predict the high risk patients for systemic recurrence. If we can detect metastatic cell in circulation, it may be beneficial in assessing tumor progression, metastatic potential and prognosis. To establish the RT-PCR methodology for detection of CEA expressing cancer cells in peripheral and portal blood and to define the relationship between peripheral and portal blood detection rate of gastric cancer patients, we performed RT-PCR analysis with peripheral and portal blood samples from 24 patients with gastric cancer (stage Ia,b, n=3; stage II, n=2; stage IIIa, n=9; stage IIIb, n=7; stage IV, n=3) and checked serum CEA level preoperatively. Mean age was 49.2 years old and male : female was 1.2 : 2 (13:11 patients). The mean serum CEA level was 10.4 ng/ml and that was higher than normal in only 2 cases. There was no positive case of tumor cell in portal and peripheral blood using RT-PCR and CEA gene specific primer. Our results indicate that the incidence of circulating cancer cells is unexpectedly very low even in advanced gastric cancer patients. (author). 20 refs.

  10. Results of mass endoscopic examination for gastric cancer in Kamigoto Hospital, Nagasaki Prefecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine how the introduction of endoscopy to gastric cancer screening affected survival prognosis in a regional population.METHODS: The subjects comprised 4261 residents of Kamigoto, Nagasaki Prefecture, who underwent gastric X-ray examination for gastric cancer screening from 1991 to 1995, and all 7178 residents who underwent endoscopic examination for the same purpose from 1996to 2003. The analysis evaluated trends in age-adjusted gastric cancer mortality rates and standard mortality ratios (SMRs) among the Kamigoto residents.RESULTS: According to demographic statistics, the 1995 and 2000 age-adjusted gastric cancer mortality rates in Nagasaki Prefecture (per 100000 population) were 42.6 and 37.3 for males and 18.6 and 16.0 for females, while the corresponding rates in Kamigoto before and after the introduction of endoscopic screening were respectively 51.9 and 28.0, and 26.6 and 6.9. The data obtained in this study were divided into those for two periods,1990-1996 and 1997-2006, and SMRs were calculated separately for males and females. For the first period,the SMR was 1.04 (95% CI 0.50-1.58) for males and 1.54(95% CI 0.71-2.38) for females, while for the second period the SMR was 0.71 (95% CI 0.33-1.10) for males and 0.62 (95% CI 0.19-1.05) for females.CONCLUSION: Following the introduction of endoscopic examination, gastric cancer death rates decreased in Kamigoto.

  11. Gastric cancer-related information on the Internet: incomplete, poorly accessible, and overly commercial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane

    2011-02-01

    Patients increasingly use the Internet for gastric cancer information. However, the quality of the information is questionable. We evaluated the accuracy, completeness, accessibility, reliability, and readability of gastric cancer websites.

  12. Plant phytochemicals: potential anticancer agents against gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øverby, Anders; Zhao, Chun-Mei; Chen, Duan

    2014-12-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are plant phytochemicals derived from vegetables consumed by human. ITCs comprise potent anti-carcinogenic agents of which the consumption has been linked to a reduced risk of cancer at several locations in the body. However, the studies on coping with gastric cancer remain unsatisfied. In the present review, ITCs are discussed in this context as ITCs may target gastric tumorigenesis at multiple levels. ITCs are taken up in the stomach, exposing mucosal and muscle layer cells as well as affecting Helicobacter pylori residing in the stomach. The natural and potent anti-cancer ITCs from vegetables have a great potential against gastric cancer, a disease in need of new treatment or preventive modalities.

  13. Immunochemotherapy with levamisole for stage III gastric cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa,Hiroaki

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Levamisole (LMS was given to stage III gastric cancer patients starting three days before gastrectomy, at a does of 150 mg/day for three consecutive days every other week. Survival rates of these patients were compared with those of stage III gastric cancer patients previously operated in our Department who had not received levamisole. The background factors of both groups were matched as closely as possible. Both groups were concomitantly treated with mitomycin C and FT-207. The survival rate of the LMS group was significantly higher than that of the control group when the tumor had a diameter of 4.0-8.0 cm, cancer cells infiltrated to the gastric serosa, there were metastases within the regional lymph nodes, cancer cells slightly invaded the venous capillaren and there was moderate infiltration of the stroma.

  14. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer: Experiences in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Haeng Lee; Jae J Kim

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has been established as one of the treatment options for early gastric cancer (EGC). However, there are many uncertain areas such as indications of EMR, best treatment methods, management of complications and follow-up methods after the procedure. Most studies on this topic have been carried out by researchers in Japan. In Korea,gastric cancer is the most common malignant disease,and the second leading cause of cancer death. In these days, EMR for EGC is widely performed in many centers in Korea. In this review, we will provide an overview of the techniques and outcomes of EMR in Korea.

  15. Expression of ornithine decarboxylase in precancerous and cancerous gastric lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Pu Miao; Jian-Sheng Li; Hui-Yan Li; Shi-Ping Zeng; Ye Zhao; Jiang-Zheng Zeng

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in precancerous and cancerous gastric lesions.METHODS: We studied the expression of ODC in gastric mucosa from patients with chronic superficial gastritis (CSG, n = 32), chronic atrophic gastritis [CAG, n = 43;15 with and 28 without intestinal metaplasia (IM)],gastric dysplasia (DYS, n = 11) and gastric cancer (GC,n = 48) tissues using immunohistochemical staining. All 134 biopsy specimens of gastric mucosa were collected by gastroscopy.METHODS: The positive rate of ODC expression was 34.4%, 42.9%, 73.3%, 81.8% and 91.7% in cases with CSG, CAG without IM, CAG with IM, DYS and GC, respectively (P < 0.01), The positive rate of ODC expression increased in the order of CSG < CAG (without IM) < CAG (with IM) < DYS and finally, GC. In addition,ODC positive immunostaining rate was lower in welldifferentiated GC than in poorly-differentiated GC (P <0.05).CONCLUSION: The expression of ODC is positively correlated with the degree of malignity of gastric mucosa and development of gastric lesions. This finding indicates that ODC may be used as a good biomarker in the screening and diagnosis of precancerous lesions.

  16. Role of Vitamin C in Gastritis and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yildirim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C is essential for human health. It is synthesized by the enzymatic conversion of glucose in liver in most of the mammals but it should be taken by food in humans because of the deficiency of the functional L-gulonolactone oxidase enzyme. The average level of Vitamin C in gastric fluid is higher than the level in plasma and the reason for this is thought to be the secretion of Vitamin C to the stomach by an active mechanism. In gastroduodenal disease the concentration of Vitamin C in gastric fluid is found lower than the plasma level. The decrease of Vitamin C concentration in gastric fluid is associated with gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Ascorbic acid, known as a powerful antioxidant, is potentially important in prevention of gastric cancer. This prevention effect occurs as a result of removing nitrites and preventing formation of caarcinogenic N-nitroso compounds in gastric fluid. Vitamin C plays a role in development of many gastric pathologies such as chronic gastritis, atrophy, metaplasia and cancer. Expressing this role clearly may lead to new researches about prevention of these diseases by ascorbic acid replacement therapy; a low-priced and easily reached method.

  17. Clinical significance of MET in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikito; Inokuchi; Sho; Otsuki; Yoshitaka; Fujimori; Yuya; Sato; Masatoshi; Nakagawa; Kazuyuki; Kojima

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy has become the global standard treatment for patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric cancer(GC),although outcomes remain unfavorable.Many molecular-targeted therapies inhibiting signaling pathways of various tyrosine kinase receptors have been developed,and monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 have become standard therapy for GC.Hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor,c-MET(MET),play key roles in tumor growth through activated signaling pathways from receptor in GC cells.Genomic amplification of MET leads to the aberrant activation found in GC tumors and is related to survival in patients with GC.This review discusses the clinical significance of MET in GC and examines MET as a potential therapeutic target in patients with GC.Preclinical studies in animal models have shown that MET antibodies or smallmolecule MET inhibitors suppress tumor-cell proliferation and tumor progression in MET-amplified GC cells.These drugs are now being evaluated in clinical trials as treatments for metastatic or unresectable GC.

  18. Does stomach have mesentery? Learning from gastric cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This study will first confirm the existence of mesogastrium (gastric mesentery) and then examine its architecture and suggest improvements in the surgical methods for excision of gastric cancer.Methods:By employing video laparoscopy, a number of proximal segments of dorsal mesogastrium were found being extensively scattered around the pancreas. In this study, these segments were histologically analyzed and studied.Results:The structure of the mesogastrium was identiifed intraoperatively and then conifrmed both grossly and histologically atfer the operation. Conclusion:This study suggests for the first time a “Table Model” to describe the relationship between the stomach and gastric mesenteries.

  19. Gastric cancer : staging, treatment, and surgical quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Johannes Leen

    2012-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on several aspects of gastric cancer care: staging and prognostication, multimodality treatment, and surgical quality assurance. PART I - STAGING AND PROGNOSTICATION Cancer staging is one of the fundamental activities in oncology.6,7 For over 50 years, the

  20. Cancer of the esophagus and gastric cardia: recent advances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G.N.; Bartelink, H.; Bernards, R.A.; Giacone, G.; Lanschot, J.J. van; Offerhaus, G.J.; Peters, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer and cancer of the gastric cardia, in particular adenocarcinomas, have shown a rapid and largely unexplained increase in incidence in many developed countries around the world. These diseases have a poor prognosis and current therapies have a modest impact on survival. This review p

  1. Cancer of the esophagus and gastric cardia: recent advances.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, GN; Bartelink, H.; Bernards, R; Giaccone, G.; Lanschot, van JJ; Offerhaus, GJ; Peters, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer and cancer of the gastric cardia, in particular adenocarcinomas, have shown a rapid and largely unexplained increase in incidence in many developed countries around the world. These diseases have a poor prognosis and current therapies have a modest impact on survival. This review p

  2. IκBα polymorphism at promoter region (rs2233408 influences the susceptibility of gastric cancer in Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Joseph JY

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear factor of kappa B inhibitor alpha (IκBα protein is implicated in regulating a variety of cellular process from inflammation to tumorigenesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of rs2233408 T/C genotype in the promoter region of IκBα to gastric cancer and the association of this polymorphism with clinicopathologic variables in gastric cancer patients. Methods A population-based case-control study was conducted between 1999 and 2006 in Guangdong Province, China. A total of 564 gastric cancer patients and 566 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. rs2233408 genotypes in IκBα were analyzed by TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. Results Both rs2233408 T homozygote (TT and T heterozygotes (TC and TT had significantly reduced gastric cancer risk (TT: OR = 0.250, 95% CI = 0.069-0.909, P = 0.035; TC and TT: OR = 0.721, 95% CI = 0.530-0.981, P = 0.037, compared with rs2233408 C homozygote (CC. rs2233408 T heterozygotes were significantly associated with reduced risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer with ORs of 0.648 (95% CI = 0.459-0.916, P = 0.014, but not with the diffuse or mix type of gastric cancer. The association between rs2233408 T heterozygotes and gastric cancer appeared more apparent in the older patients (age>40 (OR = 0.674, 95% CI = 0.484-0.939, P = 0.02. rs2233408 T heterozygotes was associated with non-cardiac gastric cancer (OR = 0.594, 95% CI = 0.411-0.859, P = 0.006, but not with cardiac gastric cancer. However, rs2233408 polymorphism was not associated with the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Conclusions IκBα rs2233408 T heterozygotes were associated with reduced risk of gastric cancer, especially for the development of certain subtypes of gastric cancer in Chinese population.

  3. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions are altered after subtotal gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ching-Hung; Lin, Jaw-Town; Ho, Hsiu J; Lai, Zi-Lun; Wang, Chang-Bi; Tang, Sen-Lin; Wu, Chun-Ying

    2016-02-10

    Subtotal gastrectomy (i.e., partial removal of the stomach), a surgical treatment for early-stage distal gastric cancer, is usually accompanied by highly selective vagotomy and Billroth II reconstruction, leading to dramatic changes in the gastric environment. Based on accumulating evidence of a strong link between human gut microbiota and host health, a 2-year follow-up study was conducted to characterize the effects of subtotal gastrectomy. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequencing were analyzed before and after surgery. The results demonstrated that gastric microbiota is significantly more diverse after surgery. Ralstonia and Helicobacter were the top two genera of discriminant abundance in the cancerous stomach before surgery, while Streptococcus and Prevotella were the two most abundant genera after tumor excision. Furthermore, N-nitrosation genes were prevalent before surgery, whereas bile salt hydrolase, NO and N2O reductase were prevalent afterward. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document changes in gastric microbiota before and after surgical treatment of stomach cancer.

  4. Stathmin is a potential molecular marker and target for the treatment of gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaolin; Liu, Hairong; Liang, Jing; YIN, BEIBEI; XIAO, JUNJUAN; Li, Junwei; Feng, Dongfeng; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate the expression levels of stathmin in tissues of gastric cancer, and evaluate the therapeutic effects of stathmin antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) and/or docetaxel in human gastric cancer cells. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression levels of stathmin in gastric cancer and adjacent tissues. Stathmin ASODN was transfected into gastric cancer SGC 7901 cell lines. The cell proliferation was assessed with the MTT assay, a...

  5. Serum Helicobacter pylori NapA antibody as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jingjing Liu; Huimin Liu; Tingting Zhang; Xiyun Ren; Christina Nadolny; Xiaoqun Dong; Lina Huang; Kexin Yuan; Wenjing Tian; Yunhe Jia

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is strongly associated with gastric cancer. However, only a minority of infected individuals ever develop gastric cancer. This risk stratification may be in part due to differences among strains. The relationship between neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) and gastric cancer is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of NapA as a biomarker in gastric cancer. We used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the...

  6. Survival trends in gastric cancer patients of Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaoZhang; Ling—LingSun; Yan—LiMeng; Guang-YuSong; ]ing-.1ingHu; PingLu; BinJl

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To describe survival trends in patients in Northeast China diagnosed as gastric cancer. METHODS: A review of all inpatient and outpatient records of gastric cancer patients was conducted in the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University. All the gastric cancer patients who satisfied the inclusion criteria from January 1, 1980 through December 31, 2003 were included in the study. The main outcomes were based on median survival and 3-year and 5-year survival rates, by decade of diagnosis. RESULTS: From 1980 through 2003, the median survival for patients with gastric cancer (n = 1604) increased from 33 mo to 49 mo. The decade of diagnosis was not significantly associated with patient survival for gastric cancer (P = 0.084 for overall survival, and P = 0.150 for 5-year survival); however, the survival rate of the 2000s was remarkably higher than that of the 1980s (P = 0.019 for overall survival, and P = 0.027 for 5-year survival).CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference of survival among each period; however, the survival rate of the 2000s was remarkably higher than that of the 1980s.

  7. Robotic surgery for gastric cancer: a technical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyung, Woo Jin; Woo, Yanghee; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Minimally invasive gastric cancer surgery is gaining acceptance, especially in the treatment of patients with early gastric cancer. While offering patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic surgery is limited by several disadvantages such as altered operating view and lack of versatility in surgical instrumentation. Robotic surgery offers the surgeon the benefit of superior 3D visualization, the freedom of the EndoWrist function, and the tremble-filtered control of the four robotic arms. Due to the technical advantages of the robotic surgical system, robotic surgery may facilitate the expansion of minimally invasive surgery over laparoscopy. The application of robotic surgery for gastric cancer is increasing in experienced centers. Most reports of the robotic operating methods are only slightly modified from the laparoscopic technique. Robotic gastric cancer surgery including radical subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection is technically feasible and safe and results in similar short-term postoperative outcomes when compared to laparoscopic surgery. The role of robotic surgery in gastric cancer is promising but awaits further comparative studies of long-term results and cost-effectiveness.

  8. Second primary malignancies in adults with gastric cancer – A US population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binay Kumar Shah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple studies have examined the incidence of secondary primary malignancies (SPM in gastric cancer patients in Europe and Asia. This retrospective review was conducted to analyze risk of SPM in patients with gastric cancer diagnosed in the United States (US.Methods: We included adult patients diagnosed with gastric cancer from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Result (SEER 13 database. We calculated the risk of secondary primary malignancies in these patients using the multiple primary standardized incidence ratio (MP-SIR session of SEER*stat software and performed subset analyses of SPM with regard to age, sex, radiotherapy used, and latency period.Results: Among 33,720 patients, 1838 (5.45% developed 2019 secondary primary malignancies with an observed/expected (O/E ratio of 1.11 (95% confidence interval (CI = 1.06-1.16, p<.001 and an absolute excess risk (AER of 18.16 per 10,000 population. The median time to first SPM from the time of diagnosis of gastric cancer was 46.9 months (range 6-239 months. Significant excess risk was observed for gastrointestinal malignancies [O/E ratio 1.71 (CI = 1.59-1.84, p<.001], thyroid [O/E ratio 2.00 (CI = 1.37-2.8, p<.001] and pancreatic cancer [O/E ratio 1.60 (CI = 1.29-21.96, p<.001]. Risk of secondary melanoma, breast cancer and prostate cancer was lower than in the general population.Conclusions: The risk for secondary primary malignancies is significantly increased in adults with gastric cancer compared to the general population.

  9. Advances in TCM Treatment of Gastric Cancer and Studies on the Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴敏; 姚保泰

    2002-01-01

    @@ The significance of apoptosis in gastric cancer is now widely recognized, and the induction of apoptosis as a new approach to treat gastric cancer has aroused great interest. In recent years, studies on certain TCM drugs for treating gastric cancer and for inducing apoptosis have brought about great attention both at home and abroad. The following is a summary made in this aspect.

  10. The role of diet in gastric cancer: still an open question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Cappellani, Alessandro; Lleshi, Arben; Di Vita, Maria; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Bearz, Alessandra; Galvano, Fabio; Spina, Michele; Malaguarnera, Mariano; Tirelli, Umberto; Berretta, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    The risk of gastric cancer is often related to lifestyle and diet. There have been several studies on correlation between Nutrition and the risk of gastric cancer with different and sometimes contradictory results. Here we reviewed the role of nutrition as risk/protective factor in the development of gastric cancer.

  11. Current substance use in patients with gastric cancer in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabei S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders may affect patients suffering from cancer and substance use disorders. Objective: This study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of tobacco and opioid use in patients with gastric cancer in Shiraz, Fars Province and Southern Iran. Materials and Methods: In a hospital survey of 177 gastric cancer patients aged 24 years and more, a semistructured-interview was performed based on SDM-IV criteria during the year 2003. Results: The mean age of the patients was 58.13 (SD=14.03 years. Among the subjects, 50.9% (90 were tobacco dependent (61.5% men and 29.4% women, P < 0.001, while 10 (5.7% were opioid-dependent (7.3% men and 1.9% women, P =0.16. Tobacco and opioid-dependency were not significantly related to age groups, economical or occupational status. Mean ages of tobacco and opioid-dependants were not significantly different from nondependants. Conclusions: Tobacco and opioid dependency were common problems among gastric cancer patients. This report provides useful information for health planning. Men were at greater risk than women. Treatment programs should focus on all age-groups, all occupations and all income-levels.

  12. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer in the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offermans, Nadine S M; Vermeulen, Roel; Burdorf, Alex; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Keszei, András P; Peters, Susan; Kauppinen, Timo; Kromhout, Hans; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2014-10-15

    The evidence for an association between occupational asbestos exposure and esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer is limited. We studied this association specifically addressing risk differences between relatively low and high exposure, risk associated with cancer subtypes, the influence of potential confounders and the interaction between asbestos and smoking in relation to cancer risk. Using the Netherlands Cohort Study (n = 58,279 men, aged 55-69 years at baseline), asbestos exposure was estimated by linkage to a job-exposure matrix. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 187 esophageal, 486 gastric and 1,724 colorectal cancer cases were available for analysis. The models adjusted for age and family history of cancer showed that mainly (prolonged) exposure to high levels of asbestos was statistically significantly associated with risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), total and distal colon cancer and rectal cancer. For overall gastric cancer and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA), also exposure to lower levels of asbestos was associated. Additional adjustment for lifestyle confounders, especially smoking status, yielded non-significant associations with overall gastric cancer and GNCA in the multivariable-adjusted model, except for the prolonged highly exposed subjects (tertile 3 vs. never: HR 2.67, 95% CI: 1.11-6.44 and HR 3.35, 95% CI: 1.33-8.44, respectively). No statistically significant additive or multiplicative interaction between asbestos and smoking was observed for any of the studied cancers. This prospective population-based study showed that (prolonged) high asbestos exposure was associated with overall gastric cancer, EAC, GNCA, total and distal colon cancer and rectal cancer.

  13. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  14. Bursectomy for gastric cancer: What does the evidence indicate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Barreto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical resection of the bursa omentalis (radical bursectomy as part of a curative resection for gastric cancer has been advised for close to a century. However, the postulated associated morbidity and lack of a clear benefit in terms of survival preclude its routine use. To objectively review the available evidence on the role of bursectomy as part of a curative resection for gastric cancer. A systematic search of the scientific literature was carried out using Embase, PubMed, MedLine and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials for the years 1965-2013 to obtain access to all publications, especially randomized controlled trials (RCTs, systematic reviews and meta-analyses involving bursectomy in gastric cancer with the appropriate specific search terms, namely, “bursectomy,” “stomach cancer,” “gastric cancer,” “survival,” “morbidity,” “outcomes” and “RCTs”. Using the above search strategy, a total of 29 publications was retrieved of which five publications were identified describing bursectomy and its outcomes in gastric cancer. These included three retrospective cohort studies and two publications from a single RCT. Bursectomy do not appear to add the morbidity or mortality of the overall surgery. However, it did not appear to significantly improve overall survival neither in the retrospective cohort studies nor in the only RCT. The evidence to date is insufficient to suggest any additional benefit of routine bursectomy to a radical gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Results of an on-going RCT are awaited to determine if bursectomy may further improve overall survival in patients with advanced T-stage of disease.

  15. Late-onset peritoneal recurrence of advanced gastric cancer 20 years after primary resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohri Yasuhiko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Late onset of peritoneal recurrence of gastric cancer more than 10 years after surgery is extremely rare, and only three cases have been reported. We present the case of a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed finally with peritoneal recurrence of gastric cancer 20 years after primary curative resection. As a result of small-bowel obstruction caused by peritoneal recurrence, diverting ileostomy with partial ileal resection was performed. The resected specimen revealed tubular adenocarcinoma that resembled the primary gastric cancer. The clinical course after the second operation was unfavorable and systemic chemotherapy had no effect. He died at 62 years of age, 21 years and 7 months after initial gastrectomy. Immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, Ki-67, and p53 was performed to investigate the phenotype of primary and recurrence cancer. Protein expression of proliferation markers such as PCNA and Ki-67 was down-regulated, but p53 was overexpressed at the site of recurrence. These data suggest that late peritoneal recurrence has a low proliferation rate and is resistant to chemoradiotherapy. In conclusion, we present late onset of peritoneal recurrence of gastric cancer more than 20 years after primary surgery, and speculate on the mechanism of late-onset recurrence in our case.

  16. Trends in gastric cancer mortality and in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Samantha; Ferro, Ana; Bastos, Ana; Castro, Clara; Lunet, Nuno; Peleteiro, Bárbara

    2016-07-01

    Portugal has the highest gastric cancer mortality rates in Western Europe, along with high prevalences of Helicobacter pylori infection. Monitoring their trends is essential to predict the burden of this cancer. We aimed to quantify time trends in gastric cancer mortality in Portugal and in each administrative region, and to compute short-term predictions, as well as to describe the prevalence of H. pylori infection, through a systematic review. Joinpoint analyses were used to identify significant changes in sex-specific trends in gastric cancer age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) and to estimate annual percent changes (APC). The most recent trends were considered to compute estimates up to 2020 by adjusting Poisson regression models. We searched PubMed and IndexRMP to identify studies carried out in Portugal reporting the prevalence of H. pylori. Gastric cancer mortality has been decreasing in Portugal since 1971 in men (from ASMR=55.3/100 000; APC=-2.4, 95% confidence interval: -2.5 to -2.3) and since 1970 in women (from ASMR=28.0/100 000; APC=-2.8, 95% confidence interval: -2.9 to -2.7), although large regional differences were observed. Predicted ASMR for 2015 and 2020 were 18.8/100 000 and 16.7/100 000 for men and 8.5/100 000 and 7.4/100 000 for women, respectively. The prevalence of H. pylori varied from almost 5% at 0.5-2 years to just over 90% at 70 years or more. No consistent variation was observed since the 1990s. The downward trends in mortality rates are expected to remain in the next decades. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection across age groups and studies from different periods shows a large potential for decrease in the burden of gastric cancer in Portugal.

  17. Metastatic suppressor genes inactivated by aberrant methylation in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To screen out the differentially methylated DNA sequences between gastric primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes, test the methylation difference of gene PTPRG between primary gastric tumor and metastatic lymph nodes, and test the regulatory function of 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine which is an agent with suppression on methylation and the level of methylation in gastric cancer cell line.METHODS: Methylated DNA sequences in genome were enriched with methylated CpG islands amplification (MCA)to undergo representational difference analysis (RDA),with MCA production of metastatic lymph nodes as tester and that of primary tumor as driver. The obtained differentially methylated fragments were cloned and sequenced to acquire the base sequence, which was analyzed with bioinformatics. With methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and RT-PCR, methylation difference of gene PTPRG was detected between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes in 36 cases of gastric cancer.Methylation of gene PTPRG and its regulated expression were observed in gastric cancer cell line before and after being treated with methylation-suppressive agent.RESULTS: Nineteen differentially methylated sequences were obtained and located at 5' end, exons, introns and 3' end, in which KL59 was observed to be located at 9p21 as the first exon of gene p16 and KL22 to be located at promoter region of PRPRG. KL22, aS the probes, was hybridized with driver, tester and 3-round RDA products respectively with all positive signals except with the driver. Significant difference was observed in both methylation rate of gene PTPRG and PTPRG mRNA expression rate between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes. Demethylation of gene PTPRG, with recovered expression of PTPRG mRNA, was observed after gastric cancer cell line being treated with methylation-suppressive agent.CONCLUSION: Difference exists in DNA methylation between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes of gastric cancer, with MCA-RDA as one of the good analytical

  18. Totally Laparoscopic Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer Associated with Recklinghausen's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Sakaguchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the first case of gastric cancer associated with Recklinghausen's disease, which was successfully treated by a totally laparoscopic operation. A 67-year-old woman with Recklinghausen's disease was referred to this department to undergo surgical treatment for early gastric cancer. The physical examination showed multiple cutaneous neurofibromas throughout the body surface, which made an upper abdominal incision impossible. Laparoscopic surgery requiring only small incisions was well indicated, and a totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection was performed. Billroth I reconstruction was done intra-abdominally using a delta-shaped anastomosis. The patient followed a satisfactory postoperative course with no complications. Since the totally laparoscopic gastrectomy has many advantages over open surgery, it should therefore be preferentially used as a less invasive treatment in the field of gastric cancer.

  19. Correlation between hair selenium concentration and gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Wu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between hair selenium (Se) level and gastric cancer. Methods: Atomic fluorescence spectrophotometer(AFS) was used to detect the Se level in hair. Results: The Se concentration in patients with gastric cancer ranged from 0.25 to 2.33μg/g(0.825±0.51μg/g), and that of health individuals ranged from 4.23 to 9.21μg/g(6.29±1.68μg/g). The results showed that the Se concentration in the patients' hair was significantly lower than that in controls (P<0.01).Conclusion: There is a correlation between hair concentration and gastric cancer.

  20. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Lee, Chung Wa [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Cho, Chi Hin [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Francis Ka Leung [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Yu, Jun, E-mail: junyu@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu, E-mail: joesung@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2011-06-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D{sub 3} and p21{sup Waf1}, which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G{sub 1}-S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  1. The Effects of Dinner-to-Bed Time and Post-Dinner Walk on Gastric Cancer Across Different Age Groups: A Multicenter Case-Control Study in Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Le; Zhang, Xi; Lu, Jun; Dai, Jia-Xi; Lin, Ren-Qin; Tian, Fang-Xi; Liang, Bing; Guo, Yi-Nan; Luo, Hui-Yu; Li, Ni; Fang, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Ruo-Hua; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major killer throughout the world. Despite the dramatic decrease in GC over the last century, its etiology has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated the possible independent and combined effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk on the risk for GC across different age groups. A population-based, case-control study was conducted in southeast China, including 452 patients with GC and 465 age-, race-, and gender-matched controls. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information on demographic characteristics, dinner-to-bed time, post-dinner walk, and other behavioral factors. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk as well as their joint effect on the risk for GC across different age groups. Individuals with dinner-to-bed time time was, the higher was the risk for GC (Ptrend time and post-dinner walk on GC risk was detected (AOR = 1.862, 95% CIs = 1.584-3.885, synergy index [SI] = 2.654, 95% CIs = 2.27-3.912). Participants with dinner-to-bed time times likely to suffer from GC (AOR = 7.401, 95% CIs = 4.523-13.16) than those with dinner-to-bed time ≥4 hours who took such walk. The risk of GC due to dinner-to-bed time time 55 years old.

  2. Aging, immunity, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulop, Tamas; Larbi, Anis; Kotb, Rami; de Angelis, Flavia; Pawelec, Graham

    2011-06-01

    Age is the most important risk factor for tumorigenesis. More than 60% of new cancers and more than 70% of cancer deaths occur in elderly subjects >65 years. The immune system plays an important role in the battle of the host against cancer development. Deleterious alterations occur to the immune response with aging, termed immunosenescence. It is tempting to speculate that this waning immune response contributes to the higher incidence of cancer, but robust data on this important topic are few and far between. This review is devoted to discussing state of the art knowledge on the relationship between immunosenescence and cancer. Emerging understanding of the aging process at the molecular level is viewed from the perspective of this increased tumorigenesis. We also consider some of the most recent means to intervene in the modulation of immunosenescence to increase the ability of the immune system to fight against tumors. Future research will unravel new aspects of the immune response against tumors which will be modulable to decrease the burden of cancer in elderly individuals.

  3. Clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of early gastric cancer after gastrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-xiang; SHAO Qin-shu; YANG Qiong; WANG Yuan-yu; YANG Jin; ZHAO Zhong-kuo; XU Ji; YE Zai-yuan

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of lymph node metastasis (LNM) is important in early gastric cancer (EGC) and affects treatment decisions.However,the relationship between clinicopathological characteristics and LNM in EGC remains unclear.This study therefore explored favorable predictors of LNM in EGC.Methods A total of 716 specimens from gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy between 1996 and 2003 at Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital were reviewed.Forty-five cases were EGC,and clinicopathological characteristics such as gender,age,tumor size,location,gross type,differentiation,invasion depth,and vessel involvement were assessed to identify predictive factors for LNM and survival time.Results The overall cumulative 5-year survival rate of EGC patients was 88.92%.Among these,22.4% developed LNM,which was associated with a poor 5-year survival rate of only 72.7%.Patients with tumors larger than 2 cm in diameters,with depth of tumor invasion to the submucosa,and with positive lymphatic or nerve involvement were also inclined to have poorer survival performances.EGC limited to the mucosa but poorly differentiated also had a high risk for LNM.Multivariate analysis identified lymphatic invasion and tumor size as independent prognosis factors related to survival in EGC patients.Conclusions Careful planning is required in EGC patients at high risk of lymph node metastases.Endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection and laparoscopic partial gastrectomy should be cautiously used in EGC,and curative gastrectomy including lymphatic dissection and postoperative adjuvant therapy might be considered to improve the prognosis.

  4. Gastric cancer:current and evolving treatment landscape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijing Sun; Li Yan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric (including gastroesophageal junction) cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. In China, an estimated 420,000 patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer in 2011, ranking this malignancy the second most prevalent cancer type and resulting in near 300,000 deaths. The treatment landscape of gastric cancer has evolved in recent years. Although systemic chemotherapy is still the mainstay treatment of metastatic disease, the introduction of agents targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelia growth factor receptor has brought this disease into the molecular and personalized medicine era. The preliminary yet encouraging clinical effcacy observed with immune checkpoint inhibitors, e.g., anti-pro-grammed cell death protein 1/programmed death-ligand 1, will further shape the treatment landscape for gastric cancer. Molecular characterization of patients will play a critical role in developing new agents, as well as in imple-menting new treatment options for this disease.

  5. Gastric tube perforation after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubukata, Hideyuki; Nakachi, Takeshi; Tabuchi, Takanobu; Nagata, Hiroyuki; Takemura, Akira; Shimazaki, Jiro; Konishi, Satoru; Tabuchi, Takafumi

    2011-05-01

    We searched for cases of perforation of the gastric tube after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer by reviewing the literature. Only 13 cases were found in the English literature, and serious complications were seen in all cases, especially in cases of posterior mediastinal reconstruction. However, in the Japanese literature serious complications were also frequently seen in retrosternal reconstruction. Gastric tubes are at a higher risk of developing an ulcer than the normal stomach, including an ulcer due to Helicobacter pylori infection, insufficient blood supply, gastric stasis, and bile juice regurgitation. H. pylori eradication and acid-suppressive medications are important preventive therapies for ordinary gastric ulcers, but for gastric tube ulcers the effects of such treatments are still controversial. We tried to determine the most appropriate treatment to avoid serious complications in the gastric tubes, but we could not confirm an optimal route because each had advantages and disadvantages. However, at least in cases with severe atrophic gastritis due to H. pylori infection or a history of frequent peptic ulcer treatment, the antesternal route is clearly the best. Many cases of gastric tube ulcers involve no pain, and vagotomy may be one of the reasons for this absence of pain. Therefore, periodic endoscopic examination may be necessary to rule out the presence of an ulcer.

  6. Pathological Features of Gastric Cancer in Zhuanghe High-risk Area in China during 1992-2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Yue-hua; SUN Li-ping; LIU Yan-hou; HUANG he; SUN Guo-peng; WANG Quan-gang; YIN Yuan-jun; YUAN Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the pathological features and chronological changes of 1003 cases with gastric cancer in Zhuanghe high-risk area during 1992-2005 and the relationship between the changes and etiology factors in order tO make a clue for gastric cancer prevention. Methods:A total of 1003 gastric cancer specimens resected surgically between 1992-2005 in Zhuanghe Center Hospital were studied.The specimens were fixed in formalin and diagnosed by routine pathology. Results:The incidence of patients with gastric cancer was highest at age of 60-69,the next high was at age of 50-59 and it was significantly higher in male than in female(P<0.001),the ratio was 3.0∶1.During the past 14 years,there were 159(15.9%)EGC,195(19.4%)moderate and 649(64.7%)advanced gastric cancer detected.In macroscopical features,type Ⅲ remained dominant in EGC,the next was mixed type in EGC.In advanced gastric cancer the Borrmann's type Ⅲ remained the dominant,the next was type Ⅱ.For nodal metastasis,positive cases were decreasing and negative were increasing in EGC,moreover negative cases were higher than positive ones each year.There was no obvious trend in advanced cancer but positive cases were higher than negative ones each year.In histological features,papillary,moderately and poorly differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma remained downtrend,mucus adenocarcinoma and undifferentiation cancer remained uptrend year after year.The radio of intestinal to diffuse type decreased from 0.78 to 0.62 during the past 14 years. Conclusion:There were significant chorological trends of pathological characteristic of gastric cancer in Zhuanghe high-risk area during the past 14 years.

  7. Surveillance of gastric intestinal metaplasia for the prevention of gastric cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach is the second leading cause of cancer related death in the world. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is a recognised premalignant condition of the stomach. It has been described as occurring in up to one in five patients in western countries. Although there is a definite risk of progression from GIM to cancer, published guidelines and statements differ as to the utility and structure of surveillance programs for this condition.

  8. Long-Term Outcome of A Large Series of Gastric Cancer Patients in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-wen Wu; Zhao-de Bu; Ji Zhang; Xiang-qian Su; Yi Wang; Guang-wei Xu; Jia-fu Ji; Hong Yang; Yan-ning Li; Shuang-xi Li; Lian-hai Zhang; Zi-yu Li; Xiao-jiang Wu; Xiang-long Zong

    2010-01-01

    Objective:The outcome of gastric cancer treatment in China is relatively poor compared with those in Japan and Korea.Relevant factors are not quite clear till now.The aim of this study is to present data on gastric cancer patients from a single high volume cancer center of China and to illuminate relevant factors regarding unsatisfactory outcome.Methods:A total of 2312 consecutive pathologically proven gastric carcinoma patients were treated in Beijing Cancer Hospital from January 1995 to December 2005.Clinical information including demographic information,tumor characteristics,therapeutic experience and survival was retrieved from the Database specially designed for Gastric Cancer Collaborative Group,Beijing Cancer Hospital.Results:There were 1633 males and 679 females with a median age of 58.8 years(range 19-89).Merely 181 patients were in the early stage(7.8%).Curative resection was performed in less than 72% of the patients.The number of lymph nodes harvested varied from 0 to 71(average 9)while the median number of positive lymph node was 2(0-37).Only in 650patients the number of lymph nodes harvested was more than 14.At the end of follow-up,874 patients were still alive while1132 died.The 1,2,5,10-year overall survival were 68.50%,51.88%,36.83%,and 30.49%,respectively.Multivariate analysis demonstrated that TNM stage,tumor location,tumor size,surgery,and vascular invasion were independent prognostic factors.Conclusion:The outcome of gastric cancer in China is not as good as expected.Early detection and standardized curative resection should be prompted at present to improve the outcome.

  9. Current Status on Stem Cells and Cancers of the Gastric Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Hoffmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is still a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide in spite of declining incidence. Gastric cancers are, essentially, adenocarcinomas and one of the strongest risk factors is still infection with Helicobacter pylori. Within the last years, it became clear that gastric self-renewal and carcinogenesis are intimately linked, particularly during chronic inflammatory conditions. Generally, gastric cancer is now regarded as a disease resulting from dysregulated differentiation of stem and progenitor cells, mainly due to an inflammatory environment. However, the situation in the stomach is rather complex, consisting of two types of gastric units which show bidirectional self-renewal from an unexpectedly large variety of progenitor/stem cell populations. As in many other tumors, cancer stem cells have also been characterized for gastric cancer. This review focuses on the various gastric epithelial stem cells, how they contribute to self-renewal and which routes are known to gastric adenocarcinomas, including their stem cells.

  10. An Anticancer Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S can be synthesized in mammalian cells by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE and/or cystathionine β-synthase (CBS. Both CSE and CBS are expressed in rat gastric tissues but their role in human gastric neoplasia has been unclear. The aims of the present study were to detect CSE and CBS proteins in human gastric cancer and determine the effect of exogenous NaHS on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. We found that both CSE and CBS proteins were expressed in human gastric cancer cells and upregulated in human gastric carcinoma mucosa compared with those in noncancerous gastric samples. NaHS induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells by regulating apoptosis related proteins. Also, NaHS inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. An antigastric cancer role of H2S is thus indicated.

  11. Using gastric juice lncRNA-ABHD11-AS1 as a novel type of biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunben; Shao, Yongfu; Zhu, Mengying; Li, Qier; Yang, Fang; Lu, Xuwen; Xu, Chunjing; Xiao, Bingxiu; Sun, Yanke; Guo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play vital roles in tumorigenesis. However, the diagnostic values of most lncRNAs are largely unknown. To investigate whether gastric juice lncRNA-ABHD11-AS1 can be a potential biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer, 173 tissue samples and 130 gastric juice from benign lesion, gastric dysplasia, gastric premalignant lesions, and gastric cancer were collected. ABHD11-AS1 levels were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Then, the relationships between ABHD11-AS1 levels and clinicopathological factors of patients with gastric cancer were investigated. The results showed that ABHD11-AS1 levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in other tissues. Its levels in gastric juice from gastric cancer patients were not only significantly higher than those from cases of normal mucosa or minimal gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and gastric ulcers but also associated with gender, tumor size, tumor stage, Lauren type, and blood carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. More importantly, when using gastric juice ABHD11-AS1 as a marker, the positive detection rate of early gastric cancer patients was reached to 71.4 %. Thanks to the special origin of gastric juice, these results indicate that gastric juice ABHD11-AS1 may be a potential biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer.

  12. [Particular features of lymph dissection in operations for gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaitskiĭ, A N; Danilov, I N

    2008-01-01

    In order to optimize the technique of lymph dissection, a method of intraoperative mapping of lymph outflow tracts was used with a lymphotropic dye Blue patente V. It allowed better orientation during lymphodissection in operations for gastric cancer. The detection and investigation of the "signal" lymph node as the most probable object of lymphogenic metastazing can improve the accuracy of postoperative staging of gastric cancer. Visualization of the lymph nodes in the preparation made it possible to increase the number of lymph nodes sent for histological investigation.

  13. Fulminant amoebic colitis during chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noboru Hanaoka; Katsuhiko Higuchi; Satoshi Tanabe; Tohru Sasaki; Kenji Ishido; Takako Ae; Wasaburo Koizumi; Katsunori Saigenji

    2009-01-01

    A 52-year-old man had bloody stools during chemotherapy for gastric cancer. A colonoscopy revealed necrotizing ulcer-like changes. A biopsy confirmed the presence of amoebic trophozoites. Subsequently,peritonitis with intestinal perforation developed, and emergency peritoneal lavage and colostomy were performed. After surgery, endotoxin adsorption therapy was performed and metronidazole was given. Symptoms of peritonitis and colonitis resolved.with the progression of gastric cancer. The patient died 50 d after surgery. Fulminant amoebic colitis is very rarely associated with chemotherapy. Amoebic colitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who have bloody stools during chemotherapy.

  14. Significance of serum markers pepsinogen I and II for chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, N; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Fujita, I; Okuda, T; Mizutani, T; Kyono, S; Yamashita, K

    1993-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is closely correlated with gastric cancer and is predominant in Japan. Epidemiologically, food habits are the primary factor in both CAG and gastric cancer. Two potential serum markers for CAG have recently been investigated, i.e., the concentration of serum pepsinogen (PG) and the presence of serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori. Serum PG I and II and the PG I:PG II ratio have been reported to be useful as indicators of recurrent peptic ulcer and for screening of patients at risk from gastric cancer. In this study, we examined PG I and II in serum from 483 patients by RIA (DAINABOT), and endoscopic examination performed in the same patients before serological assay revealed CAG in 68, peptic ulcer in 91, and gastric cancer in 48. Analysis of the mean values according to patients age showed that CAG patients in their forties to eighties had low ( or = 70 ng/ml) levels, except for those in their seventies, and gastric cancer patients in their twenties to sixties had low (< 3.0) PG I:PG II ratios, except for those in their sixties. Thus serum PG assay has potential utility for detection of CAG, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer.

  15. The role of leptin in gastric cancer: clinicopathologic features and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Choi, Ho Soon; Yang, Sun Young; Park, Hyun Ki; Lee, Young Yiul; Lee, Oh Young; Yoon, Byung Chul; Hahm, Joon Soo; Paik, Seung Sam

    2014-04-18

    Obesity is associated with certain types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, it is still unclear whether obesity-related cytokine, leptin, is implicated in gastric cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of leptin in gastric cancer. The expression of leptin and its receptor, Ob-R, was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and was compared in patients with gastric adenoma (n=38), early gastric cancer (EGC) (n=38), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (n=38), as a function of their clinicopathological characteristics. Gastric cancer cell lines were studied to investigate the effects of leptin on the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways using MTT assays, immunoblotting, and inhibition studies. Leptin was expressed in gastric adenomas (42.1%), EGCs (47.4%), and AGCs (43.4%). Ob-R expression tended to increase from gastric adenoma (2%), through EGC (8%), to AGC (18%). Leptin induced the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by activating STAT3 and ERK1/2 and up-regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Blocking Ob-R with pharmacological inhibitors and by RNAi decreased both the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 and the leptin-induced expression of VEGF. Leptin plays a role in gastric cancer by stimulating the proliferation of gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways.

  16. Differential Expression of Motility-Related Protein-1 Gene in Gastric Cancer and Its Premalignant Lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaoXu; JieZheng; WentianLiu; JunXing; YanyunLi; XinGeng; WeimingZhang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify genes related to gastric cancer and to analyze their expression profiles in different gastric tissues. METHODS The differentially expressed cDNA bands were assayed by fluorescent differential display from gastric cancer specimens, matched with normal gastric mucosa and premalignant lesions. The motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) gene expression was studied by Northern blots and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in different kinds of gastric tissue. RESULTS A differentially expressed cDNA fragment showed lower expression in all gastric cancers compared to the normal gastric mucosa and premalignant lesions; and it was found to be homologous to the MRP-1/CD9 gene. Northern blot analysis confirmed the differential expression. RT-PCR analysis showed that the MRP-1/CD9 gene was expressed at a much lower rate in gastric cancers (0.31 +0.18) compared to the matched normal gastric tissue (0.49+0.24) and premalignant lesions (0.47+0.18)(P<0.05). Furthermore, its expression in intestinal-type of gastric cancer (0.38+0.16) was higher than that expressed in a diffuse-type of gastric cancer (0.22±0.17)(P<0.05). CCONCLUSION The MRP-1/CD9 gene expression was down-regulated in gastric cancer and its expression may be related to the carcinogenic process and histological type of gastric cancer.

  17. High levels of aromatic amino acids in gastric juice during the early stages of gastric cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early-stage gastric cancer is mostly asymptomatic and can easily be missed easily by conventional gastroscopy. Currently, there are no useful biomarkers for the early detection of gastric cancer, and their identification of biomarkers is urgently needed. METHODS: Gastric juice was obtained from 185 subjects that were divided into three groups: non-neoplastic gastric disease (NGD, advanced gastric cancer and early gastric cancer (EGC. The levels of aromatic amino acids in the gastric juice were quantitated using high-performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: The median values (25th to 75th percentile of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice were 3.8 (1.7-7.5 µg/ml, 5.3 (2.3-9.9 µg/ml and 1.0 (0.4-2.8 µg/ml in NGD; 19.4 (5.8-72.4 µg/ml, 24.6 (11.5-73.7 µg/ml and 8.3 (2.1-28.0 µg/ml in EGC. Higher levels of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice were observed in individuals of EGC groups compared those of the NGD group (NGD vs. EGC, P<0.0001. For the detection of EGC, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs of each biomarker were as follows: tyrosine, 0.790 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.703-0.877]; phenylalanine, 0.831 (95% CI, 0.750-0.911; and tryptophan, 0.819 (95% CI, 0.739-0.900. The sensitivity and specificity of phenylalanine were 75.5% and 81.4%, respectively, for detection of EGC. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that high levels of aromatic amino acids in the gastric juice were associated with gastric cancer (adjusted β coefficients ranged from 1.801 to 4.414, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: Increased levels of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice samples were detected in the early phase of gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in gastric juice could be used as biomarkers for the early detection of gastric cancer. A gastric juice analysis is an efficient, economical and convenient method for

  18. The role of leptin in gastric cancer: Clinicopathologic features and molecular mechanisms

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    Lee, Kang Nyeong [Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ho Soon, E-mail: hschoi96@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sun Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Healthcare Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Ki; Lee, Young Yiul; Lee, Oh Young; Yoon, Byung Chul; Hahm, Joon Soo [Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Seung Sam [Pathology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Leptin and Ob-R are expressed in gastric adenoma and early and advanced cancer. • Leptin is more likely associated with differentiated gastric cancer or cardia cancer. • Leptin proliferates gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways. - Abstract: Obesity is associated with certain types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, it is still unclear whether obesity-related cytokine, leptin, is implicated in gastric cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of leptin in gastric cancer. The expression of leptin and its receptor, Ob-R, was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and was compared in patients with gastric adenoma (n = 38), early gastric cancer (EGC) (n = 38), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (n = 38), as a function of their clinicopathological characteristics. Gastric cancer cell lines were studied to investigate the effects of leptin on the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways using MTT assays, immunoblotting, and inhibition studies. Leptin was expressed in gastric adenomas (42.1%), EGCs (47.4%), and AGCs (43.4%). Ob-R expression tended to increase from gastric adenoma (2%), through EGC (8%), to AGC (18%). Leptin induced the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by activating STAT3 and ERK1/2 and up-regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Blocking Ob-R with pharmacological inhibitors and by RNAi decreased both the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 and the leptin-induced expression of VEGF. Leptin plays a role in gastric cancer by stimulating the proliferation of gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways.

  19. OUR EXPERIENCE OF HYPERTHERMIC INTRAPERITONEAL CHEMOTHERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED GASTRIC CANCER

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    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Improvement of the results of treatment of patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. Material and methods. From the 2010–2014 we performed 30 surgeries using techniques HICT. Among patients there were 17 men and 13 women. The median of age was 50 years. Locally advanced gastric cancer (T4a-T4b was observed in 22 cases, including 4 patients in the emergency immunocytochemical study with peritoneal lavage detected cancer-free (Cyt + cells in the abdominal cavity. The group of patients with metastatic gastric cancer accounted for 8 patients. Narrow carcinomatosis (P1 was 4 cases, carcinomatosis (P2-P3 — 4. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in the study group was not carried out. In the control group No 1 (n = 51 performed surgery alone, without additional anticancer therapy. In the control group No 2 (n = 66, a combined treatment (surgery + chemotherapy. Results. Follow-up median was 25 months. Overall 1-year survival rate for all three groups was 55%, 39% and 52%, respectively. Median survival in the intervention group versus 21.4 months in the 8 and 12 months, respectively. The most effective HICT is shown for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. In the study group, median overall survival was 29 months. The survival rate of 1-, 2-, 3-year-old was equal to 68%, 61% and 42%. In the first control group, 1-year survival of 45%. None of the patients did not survive 2 years. In the second control group, one-year survival rate was 60%, 2-year survival is not. Results of treatment of metastatic gastric cancer proved to be more modest. In the main group the median survival was 10 months, compared with 6 and 7 months of the two control groups. There were no statistically significant differences. Conclusions. 1. Availability of limited dissemination, free cancer cells in the abdominal cavity, as well as a massive defeat of serous membrane of the stomach can be seen as indications for HICT in gastric cancer. 2. In

  20. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

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    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  1. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1 Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS damage. (2 Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3 Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4 Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8 and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  2. Function-preserving gastrectomy for gastric cancer in Japan

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    Nomura, Eiji; Okajima, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    Surgery used to be the only therapy for gastric cancer, and since its ability to cure gastric cancer was the focus of attention, less attention was paid to function-preserving surgery in gastric cancer, though it was studied for gastroduodenal ulcer. Maki et al developed pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for gastric ulcer in 1967. At the same time, the definition of early gastric cancer (EGC) was being considered, histopathological investigations of EGC were carried out, and the validity of modified surgery was sustained. After the development of H2-blockers, the number of operations for gastroduodenal ulcers decreased, and the number of EGC patients increased simultaneously. As a result, the indications for pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for EGC in the middle third of the stomach extended, and various alterations were added. Since then, many kinds of function-preserving gastrectomies have been performed and studied in other fields of gastric cancer, and proximal gastrectomy, jejunal pouch interposition, segmental gastrectomy, and local resection have been performed. On the other hand, from the overall perspective, it can be said that endoscopic resection, which was launched at almost the same time, is the ultimate function-preserving surgery under the current circumstances. The current function-preserving gastrectomies that are often performed and studied are pylorus-preserving gastrectomy and proximal gastrectomy. The reasons for this are that these procedures that can be performed with systemic lymph node dissection, and they include three important elements: (1) reduction of the extent of gastrectomy; (2) preservation of the pylorus; and (3) preservation of the vagal nerve. In addition, these operations are more likely to be performed with a laparoscopic approach as minimally invasive surgery. Of the above-mentioned three elements, reduction of the extent of gastrectomy is the most important in our view. Therefore, we should try to reduce the extent of gastrectomy

  3. Requirement for a standardised definition of advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Sol, Angelo; Trastulli, Stefano; Grassi, Veronica; Corsi, Alessia; Barillaro, Ivan; Boccolini, Andrea; DI Patrizi, Micol Sole; DI Rocco, Giorgio; Santoro, Alberto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Boselli, Carlo; Redler, Adriano; Noya, Giuseppe; Kong, Seong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Each year, ~988,000 new cases of stomach cancer are reported worldwide. Uniformity for the definition of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is required to ensure the improved management of patients. Various classifications do actually exist for gastric cancer, but the classification determined by lesion depth is extremely important, as it has been shown to correlate with patient prognosis; for example, early gastric cancer (EGC) has a favourable prognosis when compared with AGC. In the literature, the definition of EGC is clear, however, there is heterogeneity in the definition of AGC. In the current study, all parameters of the TNM classification for AGC reported in each previous study were individually analysed. It was necessary to perform a comprehensive systematic literature search of all previous studies that have reported a definition of ACG to guarantee homogeneity in the assessment of surgical outcome. It must be understood that the term 'advanced gastric cancer' may implicate a number of stages of disease, and studies must highlight the exact clinical TNM stages used for evaluation of the study.

  4. Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping In Gastric Cancer Surgery: Current Status

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    Bara Tivadar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymphonodular metastases remain an important predictive and prognostic factor in gastric cancer development. The precise determination of the lymphonodular invasion stage can be made only by extended intraoperative lymphadenectomy and histopathological examination. But the main controversy is the usefulness of extended lymph dissection in early gastric cancer. This increases the duration of the surgery and the complications rate, and it is unnecessary without lymphonodular invasion. The identification of the sentinel lymph nodes has been successfully applied for some time in the precise detection of lymph nodes status in breast cancer, malignant melanoma and the use for gastric cancer patients has been a controversial issue. The good prognosis in early gastric cancer had been a surgery challenge, which led to the establishment of minimally invasive individualized treatment and acceptance of sentinel lymph node mapping. The dual-tracer method, submucosally administered endoscopically is also recommended in sentinel lymph node biopsy by laparoscopic approach. There are new sophisticated technologies for detecting sentinel lymph node such as: infrared ray endoscopy, florescence imaging and near-infrared technology, carbon nanoparticles, which will open new perspectives in sentinel lymph nodes mapping.

  5. Survival nomogram for curatively resected Korean gastric cancer patients: multicenter retrospective analysis with external validation.

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    Bang Wool Eom

    Full Text Available A small number of nomograms have been previously developed to predict the individual survival of patients who undergo curative resection for gastric cancer. However, all were derived from single high-volume centers. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a nomogram for gastric cancer patients using a multicenter database.We reviewed the clinicopathological and survival data of 2012 patients who underwent curative resection for gastric cancer between 2001 and 2006 at eight centers. Among these centers, six institutions were randomly assigned to the development set, and the other two centers were assigned to the validation set. Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazard regression model was performed, and discrimination and calibration were evaluated by external validation.Multivariate analyses revealed that age, tumor size, lymphovascular invasion, depth of invasion, and metastatic lymph nodes were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. In the external validation, the concordance index was 0.831 (95% confidence interval, 0.784-0.878, and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square statistic was 3.92 (P = 0.917.We developed and validated a nomogram to predict 5-year overall survival after curative resection for gastric cancer based on a multicenter database. This nomogram can be broadly applied even in general hospitals and is useful for counseling patients, and scheduling follow-up.

  6. Serum Helicobacter pylori NapA antibody as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Tingting; Ren, Xiyun; Nadolny, Christina; Dong, Xiaoqun; Huang, Lina; Yuan, Kexin; Tian, Wenjing; Jia, Yunhe

    2014-02-20

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is strongly associated with gastric cancer. However, only a minority of infected individuals ever develop gastric cancer. This risk stratification may be in part due to differences among strains. The relationship between neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) and gastric cancer is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of NapA as a biomarker in gastric cancer. We used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the status of H. pylori infection. Indirect ELISA method was used for detection of NapA antibody titer in the serum of H. pylori infected individuals. Unconditional logistic regressions were adopted to analyze the variables and determine the association of NapA and gastric cancer. The results of study indicated serum H. pylori NapA antibody level were associated with a reduced risk for development of gastric cancer. It may be used in conjugation with other indicators for gastric cancer detection.

  7. A case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a Shih Tzu dog: successful treatment of early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Chun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Jee, Cho-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Moon, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Cho, Kyu-Woan; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Ha, Jeongim; Jung, Dong-In

    2014-07-01

    A 9-year-old castrated male Shih Tzu dog was referred to us, because of chronic vomiting. The patient's hematological, radiographic, ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological examinations were evaluated for diagnosis. Hematologic analysis indicated moderate anemia and azotemia. Based on the imaging studies, an oval-shaped mass was identified in the gastric pylorus area. A proliferative mass was found on endoscopic examination, and we performed biopsy using grasping forceps. The histopathological findings of the biopsy specimens indicated hypertrophic gastritis, and Y-U pyloroplasty was performed. However, histopathological examination of the surgically resected mass revealed tubular adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Then, carboplatin chemotherapy was performed 4 times for 13 weeks. Clinical signs, such as vomiting, were resolved gradually after surgery and chemotherapy, and the patient's condition was managed favorably until recently (30 months after surgery). This case report describes clinical features, imaging studies, endoscopic characteristics and histopathological and immunohistochemical features of gastric tubular adenocarcinoma as early gastric cancer in a dog.

  8. Methylation of PTCH1a gene in a subset of gastric cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Du; Hai-Rong Ye; Jun Gao; Wei Chen; Zhong-Chuan Wang; Hong-Hua Jiang; Ji Xu; Ji-We Zhang; Jian-Cheng Zhang; Long Cui

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To establish if PTCH1a transcriptional regulation region (TRR) is methylated in gastric cancer and its influence in gastric tumorigenesis. METHODS: The CpG islands in PTCH1a TRR were analyzed by Methyl Primer Express v1.0 software. The region from -643 to -355 bp (the transcription initiation site of PTCH1a was designated as 0) that contained 19 CpG sites was chosen for bisulfitesequencing PCR (BSP) and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) detection. The gastric cancer cell line AGS was treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC; 1 μmol/L) for 3 d. Alterations in PTCH1a TRR methylation in treated AGS cells was measured through BSP clone sequences, and their PTCH1 expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. The cell cycle and apoptosis were observed with flow cytometry through propidium iodide (PI) staining or annexin V/PI double staining. The prevalence of PTCH1a TRR methylation was investigated in 170 gastric cancer tissue samples and the adjacent normal tissues by MSP. The correlation of PTCH1a TRR methylation with PTCH1 expression or with patients' clinical features was analyzed. RESULTS: Methylation of PTCH1a TRR was observed in AGS cells and a subset of gastric cancer tissues (32%, 55/170), while no methylation amplification products were observed in any normal tissues by MSP. The methylation of PTCH1a TRR was correlated negatively with PTCH1 expression (Spearman's r = -0.380, P = 0.000). However, methylation of PTCH1a TRR was not related to the gastric cancer patients' clinical features, such as sex, age of onset, clinical stage, lymph node metastasis or histological grade. The methylation of PTCH1a TRR in AGS cells was almost converted to non-methylation after 5-Aza-dC treatment, which increased PTCH1 expression (5.3 ± 2.5 times; n = 3) and apoptosis rate (3.0 ± 0.26 times; P < 0.05; n = 3). CONCLUSION: Methylation of PTCH1a TRR is present in a subset of gastric cancers and correlated negatively with PTCH1 expression. This may be an early event in

  9. Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma: Evidence of age-dependence among a Mexican population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Herrera-Goepfert; Suminori Akiba; Chihaya Koriyama; Shan Ding; Edgardo Reyes; Tetsuhiko Itoh; Yoshie Minakami; Yoshito Eizuru

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate features of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) among a Mexican population.METHODS: Cases of primary gastric adenocarcinoma were retrieved from the files of the Departments of anatomic site of the gastric neoplasia was identified, and carcinomas were histologically classified as intestinal and diffuse types and subclassified as proposed by the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer. EBV-encoded small non-polyadenylated RNA-1 (EBER-1)in situ hybridization was conducted to determine the presence of EBV in neoplastic cells.RESULTS: We studied 330 consecutive, non-selected,primary gastric carcinomas. Among these, there were173 male and 157 female patients (male/female ratio1.1/1). EBER-1 was detected in 24 (7.3%) cases (male/female ratio: 1.2/1). The mean age for the entire group was 58.1 years (range: 20-88 years), whereas the mean age for patients harboring EBER-1-positive gastric carcinomas was 65.3 years (range: 50-84 years). Age and histological type showed statistically significant differences, when EBER-1-positive and -negative gastric carcinomas were compared. EBER-1 was detected in hyperplastic- and dysplastic-gastric mucosa surrounding two EBER-1-negative carcinomas, respectively.CONCLUSION: Among Latin-American countries, Mexico has the lowest frequency of EBVaGC. Indeed, the Mexican population >50 years of age was selectively affected. Ethnic variations are responsible for the epidemiologic behavior of EBVaGC among the worldwide population.

  10. Telomere length shortening in gastric mucosa is a field effect associated with increased risk of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Nakano, Naoko; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Telomere shortening occurs in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by oxidative injury and rapid cell turnover. Short telomeres initiate chromosomal instability and may eventually contribute to tumorigenesis. To evaluate telomere length as potential biomarker for gastric cancer (GC) risk, we measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in GC tissues and in non-neoplastic mucosa from patients with GC and without GC. We obtained of 217 GC patients matched biopsies from the GC and adjacent tissues as well as gastric biopsies of 102 subjects without GC. Relative telomere length was measured in genomic DNA by real-time PCR. Relative telomere length decreased gradually in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and positive gastric mucosa of GC free subjects compared with adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue from GC patients (4.03 ± 0.3 vs. 2.82 ± 0.19 vs. 0.82 ± 0.07 vs. 0.29 ± 0.09, P telomeres were found significantly more often than in that of GC free subjects (age, sex, and H. pylori adjusted odds ratio = 7.81, 95 % confidence interval = 4.71-12.9, P Telomere shortening in non-neoplastic mucosa was associated with chronic inflammation (P = 0.0018) and intestinal metaplasia (P telomere length and clinicopathological features of GC and overall survival. Telomere shortening in gastric mucosa reflects a field effect in an early stage of carcinogenesis and is associated with an increased risk of GC. Telomere length in GC is not associated with clinicopathological features or prognosis.

  11. Effects of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for oesophago-gastric cancer on neuro-muscular gastric function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, E Z H; Arasaradnam, R P; Jarvie, E M; James, S; Goodyear, S J; Borman, R A; Snead, D; Sanger, G J; Nwokolo, C U

    2012-12-01

    Delayed gastric emptying symptoms are often reported after chemotherapy. This study aims to characterise the effects of chemotherapy on gastric neuro-muscular function. Patients undergoing elective surgery for oesophago-gastric cancer were recruited. Acetylcholinesterase, nNOS, ghrelin receptor and motilin expressions were studied in gastric sections from patients receiving no chemotherapy (n = 3) or oesophageal (n = 2) or gastric (n = 2) chemotherapy. A scoring system quantified staining intensity (0-3; no staining to strong). Stomach sections were separately suspended in tissue baths for electrical field stimulation (EFS) and exposure to erythromycin or carbachol; three patients had no chemotherapy; four completed cisplatin-based chemotherapy within 6 weeks prior to surgery. AChE expression was markedly decreased after chemotherapy (scores 2.3 ± 0.7, 0.5 ± 0.2 and 0 ± 0 in non-chemotherapy, oesophageal- and gastric-chemotherapy groups (p gastric function.

  12. FGF19 Contributes to Tumor Progression in Gastric Cancer by Promoting Migration and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Daqi; Tian, Ruihua; Shi, Hailong; Chen, Xiangming; Liu, Wenzhi; Wei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Since patients are often diagnosed at a late stage, very few effective therapies are left in the arsenal. FGF19, as a hormone, has been reported to promote tumor growth in various types of cancer; however, its function in gastric cancer remains unknown. In the current study, we showed that FGF19 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is associated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. In addition, in vitro experiments demonstrated that FGF19 is able to enhance migration and invasion abilities of gastric cancer cells. Given its great potency in gastric cancer progression, FGF19 may be an effective target of treatment for advanced gastric cancer patients.

  13. Relationship between abnormality of FHIT gene and EBV infection in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Ping Xiao; Cheng-Bo Han; Xiao-Yun Mao; Jin-Yi Li; Lei Xu; Chang-Shan Ren; Yan Xin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the aberrant expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene and protein in gastric cancer, and to evaluate the role of FHIT gene and the relationship between FHIT gene and EBV infection in gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: FHIT transcripts were detected by nested RT PCR in 30 cases of gastric cancer and their products were sequenced. FHIT protein was detected by Western blot.EBV infection was detected by PCR method in 50 cases of gastric cancer.RESULTS: The wild type transcripts were detected in all 30 matched normal tissues of gastric cancer. Aberrant transcripts were found in 11/30 (36.7%) gastric cancerous tissues. Sequencing analysis of the aberrant fragments found an RT-PCR product missing exons 5-7 in one case of gastric cancer, and another product missing exons 4-7. Four of ten (40.0%) cases of primary gastric cancer showed absent or decreased expression of FHIT protein as compared with their matched normal tissues. EBV was detected in 5/50 (10%) gastric cancers, among which 4/5 (80%) had aberrant transcripts of FHIT gene. CONCLUSION: Loss of FHIT gene or FHIT protein p1ays an important role in carcinogenesis, development and progression of gastric cancer. EBV infection might influence carcinogenesis of gastric cancer by inducing the abnormality of FHIT gene.

  14. Correlation between pre-miR-146a C/G polymorphism and gastric cancer risk in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between pre-miR- 146a C/G polymorphism and gastric cancer risk. METHODS:We performed a hospital-based,case-control study using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in 608 individuals(304 gastric cancer patients and 304 age and sex matched cancer-free controls).RESULTS:The frequencies of pre-miR-146a C/G genotypes in the case group were significantly different from those in the control groups(P=0.037).Compared with CC genotype carriers,s...

  15. Biological role of β-arrestin1 in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of β-arrestin1 on proliferation,migration,invasion and apoptosis of human gastric cancer BGC-823 cell line. Methods The expression of β-arrestin1 in human gastric epithelial cell line GES, human gastric cancer cell line BGC-823, MKN-28 and SGC-7901 was detected

  16. Germline promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu-Yuan Wu; Zheng Zhang; Jing-Mei Wang; Wen-Wen Guo; Nong Xiao; Qiong He; Ya-Ping Wang; Yi-Mei Fan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore germline hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor genes MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a in suspected cases of hereditary gastric cancer (GC). METHODS: A group of 140 Chinese GC patients in whom the primary cancer had developed before the age of 60 or who had a familial history of cancer were screened for germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a tumor suppressor genes. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and modified by sodium bisulfite. The treated DNA was then subjected to bisulfite DNA sequencing for a specific region of the MLH1 promoter. The methylation status of CDH1 or P16INK4a was assayed using methylation- specific PCR. Clonal bisulfite allelic sequencing in positive samples was performed to obtain a comprehensive analysis of the CpG island methylation status of these promoter regions. RESULTS: Methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter was detected in the peripheral blood DNA of only 1/140 (0.7%) of the GC patient group. However, this methylation pattern was mosaic rather than the allelic pattern which has previously been reported for MLH1 in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients. We found that 10% of the MLH1 alleles in the peripheral blood DNA of this patient were methylated, consistent with 20% of cells having one methylated allele. No germline promoter methylation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a genes was detected. CONCLUSION: Mosaic germline epimutation of the MLH1 gene is present in suspected hereditary GC patients in China but at a very low level. Germline epimutation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a gene is not a frequent event.

  17. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy in high risk locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sang Hyuk; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyu Bo; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Yang, Han Kwang; Han, Sae Won; Oh, Do Youn; Im, Seok Ah; Bang, Yung Jue; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate treatment outcome of patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer after postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Between May 2003 and May 2012, thirteen patients who underwent postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer with resection margin involvement or adjacent structure invasion were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 10 patients. Median dose of radiation was 50.4 Gy (range, 45 to 55.8 Gy). The median follow-up duration for surviving patients was 48 months (range, 5 to 108 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 42% and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 28%. Major pattern of failure was peritoneal seeding with 46%. Loco-regional recurrence was reported in only one patient. Grade 2 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 54% of the patients. However, there was only one patient with higher than grade 3 toxicity. Despite reported suggested role of adjuvant radiotherapy with combination chemotherapy in gastric cancer, only very small portion of the patients underwent the treatment. Results from this study show that postoperative chemoradiotherapy provided excellent locoregional control with acceptable and manageable treatment related toxicity in patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer. Thus, postoperative chemoradiotherapy may improve treatment result in terms of locoregional control in these high risk patients. However, as these findings are based on small series, validation with larger cohort is suggested.

  18. Effect of cimetidine on survival after gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H; Knigge, U; Bülow, Steffen

    1988-01-01

    The effect of cimetidine on survival was investigated in 181 patients with gastric cancer. Immediately after operation or the decision not to operate, the patients were randomised in double-blind fashion to placebo or cimetidine 400 mg twice daily for two years or until death, with review every...

  19. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Carolina Batista Dantas; Marco Aurelio Santo; Roberto de Cleva; Rubens Antônio Aissar Sallum; Ivan Cecconello

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery.

  20. Screening Driving Transcription Factors in the Processing of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Construction of the transcriptional regulatory network can provide additional clues on the regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic applications in gastric cancer. Methods. Gene expression profiles of gastric cancer were downloaded from GEO database for integrated analysis. All of DEGs were analyzed by GO enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment. Transcription factors were further identified and then a global transcriptional regulatory network was constructed. Results. By integrated analysis of the six eligible datasets (340 cases and 43 controls, a bunch of 2327 DEGs were identified, including 2100 upregulated and 227 downregulated DEGs. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs showed that digestion was a significantly enriched GO term for biological process. Moreover, there were two important enriched KEGG pathways: cell cycle and homologous recombination. Furthermore, a total of 70 differentially expressed TFs were identified and the transcriptional regulatory network was constructed, which consisted of 566 TF-target interactions. The top ten TFs regulating most downstream target genes were BRCA1, ARID3A, EHF, SOX10, ZNF263, FOXL1, FEV, GATA3, FOXC1, and FOXD1. Most of them were involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Conclusion. The transcriptional regulatory network can help researchers to further clarify the underlying regulatory mechanisms of gastric cancer tumorigenesis.

  1. Prospective cohort study of comprehensive prevention to gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Qiang Guo; Peng Guan; Hai-Long Shi; Xuan Zhang; Bao-Sen Zhou; Yuan Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the preliminary effects of comprehensive prevention of gastric cancer in Zhuanghe County epidemiologically.METHODS: Stratified sampling and cluster sampling were applied to define the intervention group and the control group. The prospective cohort study was used for evaluating the effect of preventing gastric cancer. The relative risk (RR)and attributable risk percent (AR %) of intervention on gastric cancer death were calculated. Potential years of life lost (PLYY) of the disease was analyzed, and the RR and AR %of PYLL were calculated. Survival analysis was applied among the screened patients.RESULTS: In the first 4 years after intervening, the relative risk (RR) of intervention on death was 0.5059 (95 % CI:0.3462~0.7392,P<0.05) with significance statistically. AR %of the intervention on death was 49.41%. The RR of intervention on cumulative PYLL was 0.6778 (95 % CI:0.5604~0.8198,P<0.05) with statistic significance. AR %of the intervention on cumulative PYLL was 30.32 %. The four-year survival rate of the screened patients was 0.6751(95 % CI: 0.5298~0.9047).CONCLUSION: The initiative intervention results showed that the intervention approach used in the trial was effective, it reduced mortality and increased survival rate, and alleviated the adverse effect of gastric cancer on the health and life of screened population.

  2. Prophylactic total gastrectomy in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Linda; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    mutations in the CDH1 gene are however pathogenic and it is important to classify mutations before this major operation is performed. Probands from two Danish families with gastric cancer and a history suggesting HDGC were screened for CDH1 gene mutations. Two novel CDH1 gene mutations were identified...

  3. Relations between Phlegm and Generation and Development of Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Pinkang; Xu Ling; Sun Dazhi; Shi Jun; Qin Zhifeng; Lu Ye; Duan Shumin

    2008-01-01

    @@ In terms of various therapies for gastric cancer seriously affecting the human health,the therapeutic effect of chemotherapy should be further evaluated and radiotherapy is more applicable to the operation,and it is still difficult to evaluate the effects of various immunotherapies.With its advantages in treating tumor,TCM can accelerate post-operational recovery,decrease toxic side effects of radiochemotherapies,strengthen the sensitivity of tumor to radiotherapy and chemotherapy,increase immune function,reduce relapse and metastasis,and enhance survival quality and long-term therapeutic effects.Some purified anti-cancer Chinese drugs can play an important role in fighting against cancer.Theory and researches on gastric cancer dealt with phlegm are expounded as follows.

  4. Mucin secretion activity of gastric cancer as a prognostic factor: a clinicopathological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochen-Domin, Izolda; Zembala-Nożyńska, Ewa; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Lange, Dariusz; Nowara, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Gastric cancer is characterized by varying secretion of mucus. Mucin producing gastric carcinoma (MUC) is thought to be a histological subtype with a worse prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare the clinicopathological differences between MUC and other types of gastric carcinoma without secretion of mucus (NMUC). Material and methods We reviewed two groups of patients with pathologically confirmed gastric cancer: 34 patients with MUC and 36 cases with NMUC. Patients’ sex, age, tumor location, stage of disease and type in the Lauren classification were examined. We analyzed the presence of lymph node metastasis, peritoneal dissemination and liver metastasis. Additionally, treatment response, toxicity and survival rates were evaluated. Results We observed a statistically significant relationship between MUC subtype and patients’ sex: MUC was found mostly in women (p = 0.017). There were no significant differences between the two gastric cancer groups according to age, tumor location, size of tumor or stage of disease. In the NMUC group the rate of liver metastasis was significantly higher (p = 0.001). The overall survival rate and progression-free survival for MUC patients were lower than those for NMUC patients. There was no significant difference in survival rates between the two groups. In analysis of logistic regression we distinguished significantly advantageous (number of chemotherapy cycles) and disadvantageous parameters (advanced stage in TNM), which influenced the chemotherapy effect. Conclusions The MUC type itself is not an unequivocally negative prognostic agent. Poor prognosis was correlated with more advanced stages at diagnosis, particularly with dissemination of cancer. PMID:23788870

  5. Radiologic diagnosis of gastric cancer. A new outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portnoy, L.M.

    2006-07-01

    In our monograph we have tried to demonstrate the infeasibility of excluding radiological diagnosis, first and foremost the traditional X-ray examination, from the algorithm for diagnosing gastric cancer. We have produced convincing evidence and explanations for the indispensability of the X-ray, which should be used along with endoscopy. The current morphological and clinical characteristics of gastric cancer suggest that only the combined use of X-ray and endoscopy can change the discouraging situation with regard to relatively early diagnosis of the disease. Radical change is also very difficult without screening. Selective screening may become a reasonable alternative in countries with limited economic potential, Russia included. It is very important to attach greater importance to outpatient services in the attempt to improve the control of the disease. Diagnosis and treatment might thus be radically facilitated. Therefore, the tendency to minimize outpatient use of X-ray examinations works against improving the diagnosis of gastric cancer. All these aspects are discussed in detail in the monograph. Although the main purpose of the monograph is to describe the current role of the X-ray examination in the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the book also covers some problems related to the epidemiology and morphology of the disease in order to disprove the existing underestimation of X-ray potential in early diagnosis. While describing radiological diagnosis, we dwell on its methodological and semeiotic principles, as well as on the special importance of each method. These include the traditional radiological and ultrasonographic methods, computed tomography, and magnetic-resonance imaging. While we value these methods, above all MRI, unlike some other researchers, we rely not only on endoscopy but also on the traditional X-ray, because we believe it greatly increases the objective value of the findings and potentials of each separate method. A special chapter in the

  6. Noncoding Genomics in Gastric Cancer and the Gastric Precancerous Cascade: Pathogenesis and Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Sandoval-Bórquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death, whose patterns vary among geographical regions and ethnicities. It is a multifactorial disease, and its development depends on infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, host genetic factors, and environmental factors. The heterogeneity of the disease has begun to be unraveled by a comprehensive mutational evaluation of primary tumors. The low-abundance of mutations suggests that other mechanisms participate in the evolution of the disease, such as those found through analyses of noncoding genomics. Noncoding genomics includes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation of promoter sites, miRNAs, other noncoding RNAs in regulatory regions, and other topics. These processes and molecules ultimately control gene expression. Potential biomarkers are appearing from analyses of noncoding genomics. This review focuses on noncoding genomics and potential biomarkers in the context of gastric cancer and the gastric precancerous cascade.

  7. Omission of breakfast and risk of gastric cancer in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdalet-Olmedo, Monserrat; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Morales-Romero, Jaime; Montero-L de Guevara, Hilda; Machorro-Castaño, Álvaro Manuel; León-Córdoba, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate factors associated with gastric cancer (GC) in the Mexican population using a validated questionnaire. METHODS: We designed and validated in Spanish a Questionnaire to Find Factors Associated with Diseases of the Digestive Tract using GC as a model. A cross-sectional study using 49 subjects, with confirmed histopathological GC diagnosis, and 162 individuals without GC participated. Odds ratio and 95% CIs were estimated in univariate and multivariate analysis adjusted for possible confounding factors. In order to match age groups, a multivariate sub-analysis was performed in subjects ≥ 39 years of age and in females and males separately. RESULTS: In the univariate analysis, we found an association between GC and education to primary level or below, low socioeconomic status, the use of dental prostheses, omission of breakfast, consumption of very hot food and drink, addition of salt to prepared foods, consumption of salt-preserved foods and the pattern of alcohol consumption. We found protection against GC associated with the use of mouthwash, food refrigeration and regular consumption of fruit and vegetables. In the multivariate sub-analysis with subjects of ≥ 39 years, the omission of breakfast was identified as a risk factor for GC. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests an association between the omission of breakfast and the failure to refrigerate food with GC in the Mexican population. PMID:23444276

  8. Prognostic factors of T4 gastric cancer patients undergoing potentially curative resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoto Fukuda; Yasuyuki Sugiyama; Joji Wada

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic factors of T4 gas-tric cancer patients without distant metastasis who could undergo potentially curative resection. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 71 consecutive patients diagnosed with T4 gas-tric cancer and who underwent curative gastrectomy at our institutions. The clinicopathological factors that could be associated with overall survival were evalu-ated. The cumulative survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method, and univariate comparisons be-tween the groups were performed using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model and a step-wise procedure.RESULTS: The study patients comprised 53 men (74.6%) and 18 women (25.4%) aged 39-89 years (mean, 68.9 years). Nineteen patients (26.8%) had postoperative morbidity: pancreatic fistula developed in 6 patients (8.5%) and was the most frequent compli-cation, followed by anastomosis stricture in 5 patients (7.0%). During the follow-up period, 28 patients (39.4%) died because of gastric cancer recurrence, and 3 (4.2%) died because of another disease or accident. For all patients, the estimated overall survival was 34.1% at 5 years. Univariate analyses identified the following statis-tically significant prognostic factors in T4 gastric cancer patients who underwent potentially curative resection: peritoneal washing cytology (P < 0.01), number of met-astatic lymph nodes (P < 0.05), and venous invasion (P < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, only peritoneal wash-ing cytology was identified as an independent prognos-tic factor (HR = 3.62, 95% CI = 1.37-9.57) for long-term survival. CONCLUSION: Positive peritoneal washing cytology was the only independent poor prognostic factor for T4 gastric cancer patients who could be treated with potentially curative resection.

  9. Gastric Cancer: How Can We Reduce the Incidence of this Disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGastric cancer remains a prevalent disease worldwide with a poor prognosis. Helicobacter pylori plays a major role in gastric carcinogenesis. H. pylori colonization leads to chronic gastritis, which predisposes to atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and eventually gastr

  10. Correlation between myeloid-derived suppressor cells and gastric cancer begin with chronic gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立宁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between the ratio change of circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells(MDSCs) and cellular immune function in healthy volunteers,chronic gastritis patients,gastric intraepithelial neoplasia patients and gastric cancer patients

  11. NDRG1 expression is related to the progression and prognosis of gastric cancer patients through modulating proliferation, invasion and cell cycle of gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaojing; Xu, Xiaoyang; Ma, Jinguo; Xue, Xiaoying; Li, Zhenhua; Deng, Peng; Zhang, Shuanglong; Zhi, Yu; Chen, Jing; Dai, Dongqiu

    2014-09-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor gene in many different types of tumors, but its potential function and corresponding mechanism are not yet fully elucidated. This study aims to detect the possible function of NDRG1 in gastric cancer progression. In this study, 112 paired gastric cancer tissues and corresponding nonmalignant gastric tissues were utilized to identify the differential protein expression of NDRG1 by immunohistochemistry and its clinical significance was analyzed. Furthermore, 49 of 112 paired gastric specimens were used to detect the differential mRNA expression by real-time PCR. The over expression of NDRG1 in human gastric cancer cell line AGS by PcDNA3.1-NDRG1 transfection was utilized to detect the role of NDRG1 in regulating the biological behavior of gastric cancer. NDRG1 expression was significantly decreased in primary gastric cancer tissues, compared with its corresponding nonmalignant gastric tissues (p < 0.05), and its decreased expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p < 0.01), invasion depth (p < 0.01) and differentiation (p < 0.05). Additionally, the overall survival rate of gastric cancer patients with high expression of NDRG1 was higher than those with low expression during the follow-up period. NDRG1 overexpression suppressed cells proliferation, invasion and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer. Furthermore, the down-regulation of NDRG1 in gastric cancer metastatic progression was correlated to E-cadherin and MMP-9. Our results verify that NDRG1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene and may play an important role in the metastasis progression and prognosis of gastric cancer.

  12. miR-449 inhibits cell proliferation and is down-regulated in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bou Kheir, Tony; Futoma-Kazmierczak, Ewa; Jacobsen, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world and the second most prevalent cause of cancer related death. The development of gastric cancer is mainly associated with H. Pylori infection leading to a focus in pathology studies on bacterial and environmental factors, and to a lesser...

  13. Increased zinc finger protein zFOC1 transcripts in gastric cancer compared with normal gastric tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen, R L; Crabtree, J E; Yoshimura, T; Clayton, C L; Dixon, M F; Robinson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Screening of cDNA arrays of the IMAGE library identified human zFOC1 as a differentially expressed cDNA that was upregulated in KATO III gastric cancer cells following stimulation with the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

  14. Stomach cancer screening and preventive behaviors in relatives of gastric cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung Min Kang; Dong Wook Shin; Young Min Kwon; Sang Min Park; Min Sun Park; Jin Ho Park; Ki Young Son; Be Long Cho

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gastric cancer screening and preventive behaviors among the relatives of patients with gastric cancer [i.e., gastric cancer relatives (GCRs)]. METHODS: We examined the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005 (KNHANES Ⅲ) database and compared the gastric cancer screening and preventive behaviors of GCRs (n = 261) with those of non-GCRs (n = 454) and controls without a family history of cancer (n = 2842). RESULTS: The GCRs were more likely to undergo gastric cancer screening compared with the control group (39.2% vs 32.3%, adjusted odds ratio: 1.43, CI: 1.05-1.95), although the absolute screening rate was low. Dietary patterns and smoking rates did not differ significantly between the groups, and a high proportion of GCRs reported inappropriate dietary habits (i.e., approximately 95% consumed excessive sodium, 30% were deficient in vitamin C, and 85% were deficient in dietary fiber). CONCLUSION: The gastric cancer screening and preventive behaviors of GCRs have yet to be improved. To increase awareness among GCRs, systematic family education programs should be implemented.

  15. Transcatheter arterial embolization in gastric cancer patients with acute bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong-Il; Song, Ho-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-04-15

    The safety and clinical effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization for bleeding associated with unresectable gastric cancer was evaluated. Twenty-three patients with bleeding from unresectable gastric cancer underwent transcatheter arterial embolization. Of the 23 patients, eight showed signs of active bleeding, such as contrast extravasation or pseudoaneurysm, seven showed only tumor staining, and the remaining eight patients showed negative angiographic findings. All embolization procedures were successful without procedure-related complications. In all eight active bleeding patients, immediate hemostasis was achieved. The overall clinical success rate was 52% (12/23). Recurrent bleeding within 1 month occurred in one (8%) in 12 patients with initial clinical success. One patient showed partial splenic infarction after embolization of the splenic artery for active bleeding from the short gastric artery. Overall 30-day mortality rate was 43% (10/23). The median overall survival period was 38 days. In patients with bleeding from unresectable gastric cancer, transcatheter arterial embolization was found to be safe and effective for achieving immediate hemostasis for active bleeding. Although the clinical success rate was not high, the recurrent bleeding rate was low at 1 month post procedure. (orig.)

  16. SUZ12 Depletion Suppresses the Proliferation of Gastric Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjun Cui

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: SUZ12 and EZH2 are two main components of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 that is known to be of great importance in tumorigenesis. EZH2 has been reported to play a vital role in pathogenesis of human cancer. However, whether SUZ12 has equivalent roles in tumorigenesis has not been demonstrated. Here, we investigated a possible role of SUZ12 for the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. Methods: Western-blot analysis was used to detected the levels of SUZ12, H3K27me3, EZH2 and p27 in ten gastric cell lines. SUZ12 was depleted by RNA interference. Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. Luciferase assays was to analyze whether miR-200b directly regulate SUZ12. Results: We found that SUZ12 depletion mediated by RNA interference (RNAi led to a reduction of gastric cell numbers and arrested the cell cycle at G1/S point. As an important G1/S phase inhibitory gene, p27 is re-induced to some extent by SUZ12 knockdown. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SUZ12 was directly downregulated by miR-200b. Conclusion: We provide evidence suggesting that SUZ12 may be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  17. miR-449 inhibits cell proliferation and is down-regulated in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bou Kheir, Tony; Futoma-Kazmierczak, Ewa; Jacobsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world and the second most prevalent cause of cancer related death. The development of gastric cancer is mainly associated with H. Pylori infection leading to a focus in pathology studies on bacterial and environmental factors, and to a lesser...... malignancies. The current study is focused on identifying microRNAs involved in gastric carcinogenesis and to explore their mechanistic relevance by characterizing their targets....

  18. Effects of dietary intake and genetic factors on hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei Nan; Young-Jin Song; Hyo-Yung Yun; Joo-Seung Park; Heon Kim

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Hypermethylation of the promoter of the hMLH1gene, which plays an important role in mismatch repair during DNA replication, occurs in more than 30% of human gastric cancer tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of environmental factors, genetic polymorphisms of major metabolic enzymes, and microsatellite instability on hypermethylation of the promoter of the hMLH1 gene in gastric cancer.METHODS: Data were obtained from a hospital-based,case-control study of gastric cancer. One hundred and ten gastric cancer patients and 220 age- and sex-matched control patients completed a structured questionnaire regarding their exposure to environmental risk factors.Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter,polymorphisms of the GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1, CYP2E1,ALDH2 and L-myc genes, microsatellite instability and mutations of p53 and Ki-ras genes were investigated.RESULTS: Both smoking and alcohol consumption were associated with a higher risk of gastric cancer with hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter. High intake of vegetables and low intake of potato were associated with increased likelihood of gastric cancer with hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter. Genetic polymorphisms of the GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1, CYP2E1,ALDH2, and L-mycgenes were not significantly associated with the risk of gastric cancer either with or without hypermethylation in the promoter of the hMLH1 gene.Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 promoter was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI): 10 of the 14 (71.4%) MSI-positive tumors showed hypermethylation,whereas 28 of 94 (29.8%) the MSI-negative tumors were hypermethylated at the hMLH1 promoter region.Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter was significantly inversely correlated with mutation of the p53gene.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption may influence the development of hMLH1-positive gastric cancer. Most dietary factors and polymorphisms of GSTM1

  19. Preoperative treatment with radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastroesophageal junction cancer and unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratosa Ivica

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. To purpose of the study was to analyze the results of preoperative radiochemotherapy in patients with unresectable gastric or locoregionally advanced gastroesophageal junction (GEJ cancer treated at a single institution.

  20. Evaluation of contrast-enhanced helical hydro-CT in staging gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Zhou Wei; Jie-Ping Yu; Jun Li; Chang-Sheng Liu; Xiao-Hua Zheng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the helical computed tomography (CT) characteristics of gastric cancer and evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced helical hydro-CT (HHCT) in staging gastric cancer.METHODS: A total of 50 patients with gastric cancer were included in this study. The CT findings in them were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with pathologic findings at surgery. All patients were preoperatively imaged by plain and contrast-enhanced helical CT after orally ingesting 1 000-1 500 mL water. Peristalsis was minimized by intra-venous administration of spasmolytics.RESULTS: The foci of gastric cancer became more prominent in all the 50 patients and showed strong enhancement in contrast-enhanced HHCT. The tumor was located at the gastric cardia in 14 cases, at the gastric fundus in 3 cases, at the gastric body in 8 cases, at the gastric antrum in 4 cases, at the gastric fundus and the body in 8 cases, at the gastric body and antrum in 11 cases, and at three segments of the stomach in 2 cases.The CT features of gastric cancer were focal or diffuse mural thickening, soft tissue mass, cancerous ulcer, stenosis of stomach, infiltration to adjacent tissues, lymph node and distant metastases. Strong contrast enhancement of the gastric wall was closely related to gastric cancer. The accuracy rate of contrast-enhanced HHCT in staging gastric cancer was 86% (43/50). The detection rate of lymph node metastases by CT was 60% (12/20).CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced HHCT is a reliable method to diagnose and stage gastric cancer.

  1. The role of perioperative radiotherapy in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Paulo Batista

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is one of the most common neoplasms and a main cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Surgery remains the mainstay for cure and is considered for all patients with potentially curable disease. However, despite the fact that surgery alone usually leads to favorable outcomes in early stage disease, late diagnosis usually means a poor prognosis. In these settings, multimodal therapy has become the established treatment for locally advanced tumors, while the high risk of locoregional relapse has favored the inclusion of radiotherapy in the comprehensive therapeutic strategy. We provide a critical, non-systematic review of gastric cancer and discuss the role of perioperative radiation therapy in its treatment.

  2. Hereditary risk factors for the development of gastric cancer in younger patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbari Mohammad

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is believed that the development of gastric cancer (GC before the age of 50 has a hereditary basis. Blood group A and history of gastric cancer in first-degree relatives have been shown to be risk factors for GC. Methods In this case-control study, we enrolled patients with GC who were diagnosed before the age of 50. Patients who were diagnosed as having GC were selected. A total of 534 cases were found; of these, 44 diagnosed before the age of 50 were included in the case group. For the control group, 22 males and 22 females were randomly selected from the remaining subjects, who had diagnoses of GC after the age of 50. All the surviving patients and family members of the dead patients were interviewed about the history of cancer in the family and the age at which other family members developed cancer. The blood group of each subject was also obtained. Results forty-four cases under 50 years old (mean age: 36.2 years and forty-four controls (mean age: 67.1 years were enrolled in the study. At the time of the study, 59.1% of the study group and 50% of the control group were alive (P value = NS. In the study group, 68.1%, 13.6%, 13.6% and 4.5% had blood groups O, A, B and AB, respectively. In the control group the corresponding figures were 27.7%, 63.6%, 6.8% and 4.5%. First or second-degree relatives with cancer, including gastric (the most frequent, breast, lung, gynecological and hematological malignancies, were noted in 54.5% of the cases and 11.4% of the controls (p Conclusions It seems that the development of GC before the age of 50 is likely to be accompanied by familial susceptibility. Interestingly, our study showed a significant correlation between blood group O and the development of gastric cancer under the age of 50.

  3. Adenocarcinoma of the GEJ: gastric or oesophageal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüschoff, J

    2012-01-01

    According to WHO (2010) adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction (GEJ) are defined as tumors that cross the most proximal extent of the gastric folds regardless of where the bulk of the tumor lies. In addition, these neoplasms are now classified as esophageal cancers by UICC (2010). Recent studies, however, revealed two types of carcinogenesis in the distal oesophagus and at the GEJ, one of intestinal type (about 80 %) and the other of gastric type (about 20 %). These are characterized by marked differences in morphology, tumor stage at diagnosis, and prognosis. Furthermore, both cancer types show different targetable biomarker expression profiles such as Her2 in the intestinal and EGFR in the non-intestinal pathway indicating new therapy options. Due to the fact that carcinomas of the intestinal pathway were typically associated with Barrett's mucosa which was not the case in the non-intestinal-type tumors, this challenges the paradigm "no goblets no Barrett's". Moreover, even the cancer risk of intestinal-type metaplasia has seriously been questioned by a Danish population-based study where Barrett's mucosa turned out to be only a weak indicator of esophageal and GEJ cancer (1 case in 860 patients years). Thus, two biologically different types of cancer arise at the GEJ-esophageal and gastric type that open distinctive targeted treatment options and also question our current concept about the diagnostics of potential precursor lesions as well as the associated screening and surveillance strategy.

  4. Early gastric cancer in Menetrier’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes-Troche, Jose Maria; Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Starkman, Ivethe; De Anda, Jazmin; Arista-Nasr, Julian; Valdovinos-Diaz, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    Uncommon conditions such as pernicious anaemia and hypertrophic gastropathies have been considered as risk factors for gastric cancer; however, the exact increase in risk is unknown. Menetrier’s disease is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the stomach caused by an overexpression of tumour growth factor α, a ligand for the tyrokinase epidermal growth factor receptor, resulting in a selective expansion of surface mucous cells in the body and fundus of the stomach. There have been nearly 200 cases of Menetrier’s disease reported in the literature yet less than 15 have been associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, we report an early stage gastric adenocarcinoma detected incidentally in a patient recently diagnosed with Menetrier’s disease. PMID:21686802

  5. Prediction of the 10-year probability of gastric cancer occurrence in the Japanese population: the JPHC study cohort II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvat, Hadrien; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sawada, Norie; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-15

    Gastric cancer is a particularly important issue in Japan, where incidence rates are among the highest observed. In this work, we provide a risk prediction model allowing the estimation of the 10-year cumulative probability of gastric cancer occurrence. The study population consisted of 19,028 individuals from the Japanese Public Health Center cohort II who were followed-up from 1993 to 2009. A parametric survival model was used to assess the impact on the probability of gastric cancer of clinical and lifestyle-related risk factors in combination with serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody titres and pepsinogen I and pepsinogen II levels. Based on the resulting model, cumulative probability estimates were calculated and a simple risk scoring system was developed. A total of 412 cases of gastric cancer occurred during 270,854 person-years of follow-up. The final model included (besides the biological markers) age, gender, smoking status, family history of gastric cancer and consumption of highly salted food. The developed prediction model showed good predictive performance in terms of discrimination (optimism-corrected c-index: 0.768) and calibration (Nam and d'Agostino's χ(2) test: 14.78; p values = 0.06). Estimates of the 10-year probability of gastric cancer occurrence ranged from 0.04% (0.02, 0.1) to 14.87% (8.96, 24.14) for men and from 0.03% (0.02, 0.07) to 4.91% (2.71, 8.81) for women. In conclusion, we developed a risk prediction model for gastric cancer that combines clinical and biological markers. It might prompt individuals to modify their lifestyle habits, attend regular check-up visits or participate in screening programmes.

  6. Massive Endoscopic Screening for Esophageal and Gastric Cancers in a High-Risk Area of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianzhi Zheng

    Full Text Available This study aims to describe the findings from a massive endoscopic screening program in a high-risk area of China and to evaluate the prognosis of patients diagnosed through endoscopic screening compared with those diagnosed at usual hospital visits because of illness.In 2006, an early detection and treatment program was initiated in Yangzhong county, China. Local residents aged 40-69 years were eligible for free endoscopic screening. Endoscopic examination was performed with Lugol's iodine staining, followed by biopsies. Patients diagnosed with esophageal or gastric cancer were referred for treatment and followed to assess their long-term survival status.From 2006 through 2012, we screened 12453 participants, including 5334 (42.8% men and 7119 (57.2% women. The average age was 52.8 ± 8.0 years. We detected 166 patients with upper digestive tract cancers, including 106 cancers in the esophagus (detection rate: 0.85% and 60 cancers in the stomach (detection rate: 0.48%. Of these patients, 98.11% with esophageal cancer and 100% with gastric cancer were defined as at the early stage. In the process of follow-up, 17 patients died from cancer-related causes, and the median survival time was greater than 85 months. The overall survival rates for 1, 3 and 5 years were 98.0%, 90.0% and 89.0%, respectively. A significant positive effect was observed for the long-term survival of patients diagnosed through massive endoscopic screening.In a high-risk population, massive endoscopic screening can identify early stage carcinoma of esophageal and gastric cancers and improve patients' prognosis through early detection and treatment.

  7. Relationship between caga-positive Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of gastric cancer: a case control study in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

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    Gilmara Coelho Meine

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Although Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a class I carcinogen, the presence of infection is not a factor that alone is able to lead to gastric cancer, and one of the possible explanations for this is the existence of different strains of H. pylori with different degrees of virulence. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between cagA-positive H. pylori and gastric cancer, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the detection of this bacterial strain. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with gastric cancer were matched by sex and age (± 5 years with 58 patients without gastric cancer, submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All patients were evaluated for the status of infection by H. pylori (through urease test, histological analysis and PCR for the genes ureA and 16SrRNA and by cagA-positive strain (through PCR for cagA gene. RESULTS: Evaluating the presence of infection by cagA-positive H. pylori, it was verified that the rate of infection was significantly higher in the group with gastric cancer when compared with the matched controls, occurring in 62.1% and 29.3%, respectively (OR = 3.95; CI 95% 1.543-10.096. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between cagA-positive H. pylori strain and risk of gastric cancer.

  8. Comparative Study on Cancer Cell Apoptosis between Gastric and Intestinal-type Human Gastric Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Apoptosis of cancer cells between the gastric and intestinal-type human gastric carcinoma were compared in terms of the expression of oncogene MDM2 and CD68, the histological types, the infiltration depth, and lymph node metastasis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to stain apoptotic cells.Histochemical method(AB-PAS) was applied to stain mucus that is neutral or acidic in nature. Immunohistochemical method (SABC) was used to detect expression of MDM2 and CD6. The results showed that the mean apoptosis index (AI) of total 48 cases was 8.60±2.60. AI in the 30 intestinal type cases was significantly higher than that in the 18 gastric type cases (t=4.67, P<0.01). In the 30intestinal type cases, the spontaneous apoptosis index of MDM2 negative cases was significantly higher than that of the positive cases (t=7.16, P<0.01). And in the 18 gastric type cases, the same result was found. (t=11.39, P<0.01). The MDM2 positive ratio in gastric type cases was higher than that in intestinal type cases (x2=4.68, P<0.05). There is no significant difference in AI between cases of lymph node metastasis and non-metastasis cases in intestinal type cases (t=0.26, P>0.05). But in the gastric type cases, a significant difference existed (t=5.87, P<0.01). A significant difference in lymph node metastasis ratio was found between the two gastric carcinoma types (x2=4.48, P<0.05).The CD68 expression ratio in the 30 intestinal type cases was much lower than that in the 18 gastric type cases (t=4.29, P<0.01). AI of 25 MDM2-positive cases was much lower than that of the 23MDM2-negative cases (t=7.80, P<0.01). CD68 positive ratio in the 25 MDM2-negative cases was much lower than that in the 23 negative cases. The difference was statistically significant (t=10.90,P<0.01). Except for few cells scattering within the cancer nest, most CD68 positive cells infiltrated in the interstitium around the cancer

  9. Function of chloride intracellular channel 1 in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Fei Ma; Jun-Qiang Chen; Zhen Wang; Jin-Lu Liu; Bo-Pei Li

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of chloride intracellular channel 1 (CLIC1) on the cell proliferation,apoptosis,migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells.METHODS:CLIC1 expression was evaluated in human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MGC-803 by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Four segments of small interference RNA (siRNA) targeting CLIC1 mRNA and a no-sense control segment were designed by bioinformatics technology.CLIC1 siRNA was selected using Lipofectamine 2000 and transfected transiently into human gastric cancer SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cells.The transfected efficiency was observed under fluorescence microscope.After transfection,mRNA expression of CLIC1 was detected with RT-PCR and Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression.Proliferation was examined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and apoptosis was detected with flow cytometry.Polycarbonate membrane transwell chamber and Matrigel were used for the detection of the changes of invasion and migration of the two cell lines.RESULTS:In gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MGC-803,CLIC1 was obviously expressed and CLIC1 siRNA could effectively suppress the expression of CLIC1 protein and mRNA.Proliferation of cells transfected with CLIC1 siRNA3 was enhanced notably,and the highest proliferation rate was 23.3% (P =0.002) in SGC-7901 and 35.55% (P =0.001) in MGC-803 cells at 48 h.The G2/M phase proportion increased,while G0/G1 and S phase proportions decreased.The apoptotic rate of the CLIC1 siRNA3 group obviously decreased in both SGC-7901 cells (62.24%,P =0.000) and MGC-803 cells (52.67%,P =0.004).Down-regulation of CLIC1 led to the inhibition of invasion and migration by 54.31% (P =0.000) and 33.62% (P =0.001) in SGC-7901 and 40.74% (P =0.000) and 29.26% (P =0.002) in MGC-803.However,there was no significant difference between the mock group cells and the negative control group cells.CONCLUSION:High CLIC1 expression can efficiently inhibit proliferation and

  10. HOTTIP and HOXA13 are oncogenes associated with gastric cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuai; Liu, Junsong; Guo, Shaochun; He, Shicai; Qiu, Guanglin; Lu, Jing; Wang, Jin; Fan, Lin; Zhao, Wei; Che, Xiangming

    2016-06-01

    A long non-coding RNA named HOTTIP (HOXA transcript at the distal tip) coordinates the activation of various 5' HOXA genes which encode master regulators of development through targeting the WDR5/MLL complex. HOTTIP acts as an oncogene in several types of cancers, whereas its biological function in gastric cancer has never been studied. In the present study, we investigated the role of HOTTIP in gastric cancer. We found that HOTTIP was upregulated in gastric cancer cell lines. Knockdown of HOTTIP in gastric cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, downregulation of HOTTIP led to decreased expression of homeobox protein Hox-A13 (HOXA13) in gastric cancer cell lines. HOXA13 was involved in HOTTIP‑induced malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer cells. Our data showed that the levels of HOTTIP and HOXA13 were both markedly upregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with their counterparts in non-tumorous tissues. Furthermore, the expression levels of HOTTIP and HOXA13 were both higher in gastric cancer which was poorly differentiated, at advanced TNM stages and exhibited lymph node-metastasis. Spearman analyses indicated that HOTTIP and HOXA13 had a highly positive correlation both in non-tumor mucosae and cancer lesions. Collectively, these findings suggest that HOTTIP and HOXA13 play important roles in gastric cancer progression and provide a new insight into therapeutic treatment for the disease.

  11. Loss of FHIT expression in gastric mucosa of patients with family histories of gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krystyna Stec-Michalska; Slawomir Antoszczyk; Grazyna Klupinska; Barbara Nawrot

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To answer the question whether FHIT gene expression is affected by the family history of gastric carcinoma and the presence of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) in the gastric mucosa of patients with dyspepsia.METHODS: FHIT gene expression in two different topographic sites of the gastric mucosa of twenty-one patients with dyspepsia and with or without familial gastric carcinoma, infected or not infected with H pylori, was evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and IMAGE QUANT methods. A rapid urease test and histopathological examination were used to determine H pylori colonization.RESULTS: In the gastric mucosa of patients with family histories of gastric carcinoma, the amount of FHIT protein mRNA was reduced down to 32%, and for patients with H pylori colonization, to 24% in comparison to controls with dyspepsia and without cancer in the family. FHIT expression was independent of the topography of specimens (corpus vsantrum), and for the control patients it was less sensitive to infection with H pylori. A considerable statistical difference in FHIT levels was observed in the gastric mucosa from the corpus of patients with family histories of gastric carcinoma in respect to H pylori colonization (P = 0.06). Macroscopic evaluation of the gastric mucosa demonstrated that pathologic changes classified according to the Sydney system had no significant influence on FHIT expression within each tested group of patients.CONCLUSION: Loss of FHIT expression was observed in patients with dyspepsia and family histories of gastric carcinoma, especially those infected with H pylori. Such results may constitute an early indication of the development of gastric carcinoma, which is associated with family factors including heredity and H pylori infection. The loss of the FHIT gene may serve as a marker for early diagnosis and prevention of gastric carcinoma, especially in context of early monitoring of H pylori infection in individuals with a record of familial stomach

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer and early gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan Zhang; Nobutaka Yamada; Yun-Lin Wu; Min Wen; Takeshi Matsuhisa; Norio Matsukura

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histological features of gastric mucosa, including Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer and endoscopically found superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis,gastric ulcer.METHODS: The biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum, corpus and upper angulus of all the patients.Giemsa staining, improved toluidine-blue staining, and H pylori-specific antibody immune staining were performed as appropriate for the histological diagnosis of H pylori infection. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used for the histological diagnosis of gastric mucosa inflammation, gastric glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia and scored into four grades according to the Updated Sydney System.RESULTS: The overall prevalence of H pylori infection in superficial gastritis was 28.7%, in erosive gastritis 57.7%,in gastric erosion 63.3%, in gastric ulcer 80.8%, in early gastric cancer 52.4%. There was significant difference (P<0.05), except for the difference between early gastric cancer and erosive gastritis. H pylori infection rate in antrum, corpus, angulus of patients with superficial gastritis was 25.9%, 26.2%, 25.2%, respectively; in patients with erosive gastritis 46.9%, 53.5%, 49.0%,respectively; in patients with gastric erosion 52.4%, 61.5%,52.4%, respectively; in patients with gastric ulcer 52.4%,61.5%, 52.4%, respectively; in patients with early gastric cancer 35.0%, 50.7%, 34.6%, respectively. No significant difference was found among the different site biopsies in superficial gastritis, but in the other diseases the detected rates were higher in corpus biopsy (P<0.05). The grades of mononuclear cell infiltration and polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, in early gastric cancer patients, were significantly higher than that in superficial gastritis patients, lower than that in gastric erosion and gastric ulcer patients (P<0.01);however, there was no significant difference compared with erosive gastritis. The grades

  13. [Gastric cancer in the Honorio Delgado Regional Hospital in Arequipa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estremadoyro, O; Alvarez de Trillo, Y; Estremadoyro Stagnaro, L; Gamero Tejada, D

    1995-01-01

    We present the study of 120 cases of gastric carcinoma, observed in the Hospital Regional Honorio Delgado from Arequipa Peru, in 2683 gastroscopies, with 4.5% of incidence. We offer date of age, sex, race, occupation, antecedents, social-economic conditions, clinics, diagnosis, pathologies aspects and mortality.

  14. Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion for advanced gastric cancer

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    Zhi-yu CAO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the clinical effects of chemotherapy via arterial infusion in treatment of advanced gastric cancer.Methods Forty-seven patients with advanced gastric cancer were given chemotherapy via arterial infusion.Chemotherapy plan was as follows: 5-Fluorouracil(Fu 500mg/m2,cyclophosphamide(MMX 10mg/m2,Hydroxycamptothecin(HPT 20mg/m2,once per week,2 weeks as a course,a total of 2-3 courses.Results After chemotherapy via arterial infusion,complete remission(CR was achieved in 1 case,partial remission(PR in 28 cases,stabilization of disease(SD in 16 cases,progression of disease(PD was found in 2 cases,and rate with response(CR+PR was 61.7%.Four of 28 PR patients underwent tumorectomy,the pathology revealed the presence of cancer cells around the vascular vessels,manifesting karyopyknosis,karyorrhexis,coagulation and necrosis of cytoplasm,intercellular edema,hyperplasia of fibroblasts,inflammatory cell infiltration,thickening of endothelium,and thrombosis.One,two and three-year survival rates were 70.2%,14.9% and 2.1%,respectively.The average survival period was 17.2 months.Conclusion Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion,as a part of the combined treatment,is beneficial to the patients with unresectable advanced gastric cancer.

  15. [A case of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nushijima, Youichirou; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Sugimoto, Keishi; Nakaguchi, Kazunori; Kan, Kazuomi; Maruyama, Hirohide; Doi, Sadayuki; Okamura, Shu; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic gastric cancer is uncommon, and metastasis of colorectal cancer to the stomach is extremely rare. We report a case of metastatic gastric cancer that originated from transverse colon cancer. A 52-year-old woman underwent a left hemicolectomy and D3 lymph node dissection based on a diagnosis of transverse colon cancer. The pathology results were as follows: mucinous adenocarcinoma, type 2, 6 × 11 cm, ss, ly1 v1, pm (-), dm (-), n1 (+), P0, H0, M0, Stage IIIa. The patient received XELOX as postoperative adjuvant therapy for 6 months. One year and 3 months after the left hemicolectomy, gastroscopy revealed a submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach and an incipient cancer in the cardia of the stomach, and a colonoscopy revealed an incipient cancer in the transverse colon. An endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspiration biopsy of the submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach was performed. Histology showed that this tumor was a mucinous adenocarcinoma similar to the primary transverse colon cancer, which led to a diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer. Distant metastasis was not detected. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the incipient gastric cancer was performed, as were distal gastrectomy and partial colectomy. Peritoneal dissemination and para-aortic lymph node recurrence were detected 7 months after the second surgery.

  16. Overexpression of stathmin 1 is associated with poor prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Bin; Wu, Liang-Liang; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Ru-Peng; Wang, Chang-Li; Liang, Han

    2013-10-01

    Recently, stathmin 1 has been proposed to function as an oncogene based on some relevant studies in multiple types of human cancers. However, the role of stathmin 1 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of stathmin 1 as well as its association with overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression of stathmin 1 was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in gastric cancer and adjacent nontumor tissues. In addition, stathmin 1 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in paraffin samples from 210 primary gastric cancer patients. The expression levels of stathmin 1 mRNA and protein in gastric cancer tissues were both significantly higher than those in adjacent nontumor tissues. In addition, the expression of stathmin 1 is correlated with Lauren's classification, depth of invasion, lymph node metastases, and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage (all P stathmin 1 expression was associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients (P = 0.040). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only lymph node metastasis and TNM stage were the independent prognostic indicators for gastric cancer. Stathmin 1 expression status is not an independent prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer. Further subgroup analysis revealed that stathmin 1 expression was significantly correlated with prognosis in diffuse type gastric cancer. This research showed that the stathmin 1 overexpression might play an important role in the pathogenesis and subsequent progression of gastric cancer. Stathmin 1 could also be a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer, especially for diffuse type gastric cancer.

  17. NME2 reduces proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells to limit metastasis.

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    Yan-fei Liu

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and has a high rate of metastasis. We hypothesize that NME2 (Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase 2, which has previously been considered as an anti-metastatic gene, plays a role in the invasiveness of gastric cancer cells. Using a tissue chip technology and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that NME2 expression was associated with levels of differentiation of gastric cancer cells and their metastasis into the lymph nodes. When the NME2 gene product was over-expressed by ;in vitro stable transfection, cells from BGC823 and MKN45 gastric cancer cell lines had reduced rates of proliferation, migration, and invasion through the collagen matrix, suggesting an inhibitory activity of NME2 in the propagation and invasion of gastric cancer. NME2 could, therefore, severe as a risk marker for gastric cancer invasiveness and a potential new target for gene therapy to enhance or induce NME2 expression.

  18. IL-32: A Novel Pluripotent Inflammatory Interleukin, towards Gastric Inflammation, Gastric Cancer, and Chronic Rhino Sinusitis

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    Muhammad Babar Khawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A vast variety of nonstructural proteins have been studied for their key roles and involvement in a number of biological phenomenona. Interleukin-32 is a novel cytokine whose presence has been confirmed in most of the mammals except rodents. The IL-32 gene was identified on human chromosome 16 p13.3. The gene has eight exons and nine splice variants, namely, IL-32α, IL-32β, IL-32γ, IL-32δ, IL-32ε, IL-32ζ, IL-32η, IL-32θ, and IL-32s. It was found to induce the expression of various inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β as well as macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2 and has been reported previously to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of a number of inflammatory disorders, namely, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, gastric inflammation and cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In the current review, we have highlighted the involvement of IL-32 in gastric cancer, gastric inflammation, and chronic rhinosinusitis. We have also tried to explore various mechanisms suspected to induce the expression of this extraordinary cytokine as well as various mechanisms of action employed by IL-32 during the mediation and progression of the above said problems.

  19. Slit2 expression and its correlation with subcellular localization of β-catenin in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rongliang; Liu, Weiyan; Liu, Bingya; Xu, Ziping; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Ziping

    2013-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. Several signaling pathways are involved in gastric cancer development and progression. Slit2 was recently found to be involved in cancer; however, its expression pattern in gastric cancer has not been discovered yet. In the present study, we investigated the expression of Slit2 in human gastric cancer and its correlation with the expression and subcellular localization of β-catenin. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining revealed that Slit2 was highly expressed in human gastric cancer tissues, while it was low or weakly expressed in normal gastric tissues. The differences in clinicopathological features between different groups were determined using Pearson's χ2 test. Slit2 levels were significantly associated with differentiation, Lauren's classification, lymph node metastasis and TNM staging. Slit2 levels were positively correlated with β-catenin level in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. High levels of Slit2 were correlated with the membrane localization of β-catenin, and low levels of Slit2 were correlated with nuclear translocation of β-catenin in both gastric cancer tissues and cell lines assayed by IHC and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. Our data suggest that Slit2 was highly expressed in gastric cancer patients with less advanced clinicopathological features. Slit2 levels were correlated with β-catenin level and subcellular localization.

  20. History, Pathogenesis, and Management of Familial Gastric Cancer: Original Study of John XXIII's Family

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    Giovanni Corso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is associated with the E-cadherin germline mutations, but genetic determinants have not been identified for familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. The guidelines for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer are clearly established; however, there are no defined recommendations for the management of familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. Methods. In this study we describe Pope John XXIII's pedigree that harboured gastric cancer as well as six other family members. Family history was analysed according to the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium criteria, and gastric tumours were classified in accord with the last Japanese guidelines. Results. Seven out of 109 members in this pedigree harboured gastric cancer, affecting two consecutive generations. John XXIII's clinical tumour (cTN was classified as cT4bN3a (IV stage. In two other cases, gastric carcinomas were classified as intestinal histotype and staged as pT1bN0 and pT2N2, respectively. Conclusions. Pope John XXIII's family presents a strong aggregation for gastric cancer affecting almost seven members; it spreads through two consecutive generations. In absence of defined genetic causes and considering the increased risk of gastric cancer’s development in these families, as well as the high mortality rates and advanced stages, we propose an intensive surveillance protocol for asymptomatic members.

  1. Increased Serum Pepsinogen II Level as a Marker of Pangastritis and Corpus-Predominant Gastritis in Gastric Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarrat, Sadegh; Haj-Sheykholeslami, Arghavan

    2016-02-01

    Serum pepsinogen I and II are considered as indicators of changes in gastric morphology. Important publications from the last decades are reviewed with regard to the serum level of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of normal gastric mucosa, diffuse gastritis and its change to atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia as well as gastric cancer. Due to the low sensitivity of serum biomarkers for diagnosis of gastric cancer, especially at its early stage and the poor prognosis of the tumor at the time of diagnosis, its prevention by eradication of H. pylori remains the mandatory strategy. On the other hand, the severity of regression and non-reversibility of precancerous lesions and intestinal metaplasia in gastric mucosa through eradication of H. pylori make it necessary to diagnose diffuse gastritis at its early stage. Increased serum pepsinogen II compared to normal serum pepsinogen I seems to indicate the presence of diffuse gastritis without precancerous lesions suitable for eradication of H. pylori infection, when it is serologically positive. A diagram illustrates the strategy of this therapeutic measure depending on the age of people and the level of serum biomarkers in areas with high gastric cancer prevalence.

  2. Characteristic gene expression profiles in the progression from normal gastric epithelial cells to moderate gastric epithelial dysplasia and to gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mao-lan; DING Qi-chen; WU Xiang-song; MU Jia-sheng; YANG Jia-hua; ZHANG Wen-jie; CHEN Lei; LIU Ying-bin; ZHANG Jing-cheng; LI Song-gang; WU Wen-guang; RAO Long-hua; DONG Ping; GU Jun; LU Jian-hua; ZHANG Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer ranks high among the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide.This study was designed to explore key genes involved in the progression of normal gastric epithelial cells to moderate gastric epithelial dysplasia (mGED) and to gastric cancer.Methods Twelve pairs of mGED tissues,gastric cancer tissues,and normal gastric tissues were collected by gastroscopy.Total RNA was then extracted and purified.After the addition of fluorescent tags,hybridization was carried out on a Gene chip microarray slide.Significance analysis of microarrays was performed to determine significant differences in gene expression between the different tissue types.Results Microarray data analysis revealed totally 34 genes that were expressed differently:18 highly expressed (fold change>2; P<0.01) and 16 down-regulated (fold change >2; P <0.01).Of the 34 genes,24 belonged to several different functional categories such as structural molecule activity,extracellular regions,structural formation,cell death,biological adhesion,developmental processes,locomotion,and biological regulation that were associated with cancer.The remaining 10 genes were not involved in cancer research.Of these genes,the expression levels of Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP12),Caspase-associated recruitment domain 14 (CARD14),and Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1)were confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR.A two-way clustering algorithm divided the 36 samples into three categories and the overall correct classification efficiency was 80.6% (29/36).Almost all of these genes (31/34) showed constant changes in the process of normal gastric epithelial cells to mGED to gastric cancer.Conclusions The results of this study provided global gene expression profiles during the development and progression from normal gastric epithelial cells to mGED to gastric cancer.These data may provide new insights into the molecular pathology of gastric cancer which may be useful for the detection

  3. Successful enteral nutrition in the treatment of esophagojejunal fistula after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Portanova Michel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Esophagojejunal fistula is a serious complication after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. This study describes the successful conservative management in 3 gastric cancer patients with esophagojejunal fistula after total gastrectomy using total enteral nutrition. Methods Between January 2004 to December 2008, 588 consecutive patients with a proven diagnosis of gastric cancer were taken to the operation room to try a curative treatment. Of these, 173 underwent to...

  4. A Case of Gastric Cancer with Situs Inversus Totalis

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    Byoung Jo Suh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Situs inversus totalis (SIT is a rare congenital anomaly that refers to a completely reversed location of the abdominal and thoracic organs. We report the case of 50-year-old man with gastric cancer and SIT who was diagnosed during a screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy. A chest X-ray, abdominopelvic computed tomography, and 18F-fluoro2-deoxyglucose-D-glucose-positron emission tomography scans revealed SIT. We performed a radical subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection. Advanced surgical skill is required to perform a precise lymphadenectomy in a patient with SIT by visualizing the exact mirror image of the anatomy during the operation. The patient had an uneventful intra- and postoperative course and was followed up at the outpatient department without any evidence of recurrence. In conclusion, surgery in a patient with gastric cancer and SIT can be safely performed by paying attention to the inverted anatomic structures during the operation.

  5. Silencing of claudin-11 is associated with increased invasiveness of gastric cancer cells.

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    Rachana Agarwal

    Full Text Available Claudins are membrane proteins that play critical roles in tight junction (TJ formation and function. Members of the claudin gene family have been demonstrated to be aberrantly regulated, and to participate in the pathogenesis of various human cancers. In the present study, we report that claudin-11 (CLDN11 is silenced in gastric cancer via hypermethylation of its promoter region.Levels of CLDN11 methylation and mRNA expression were measured in primary gastric cancer tissues, noncancerous gastric mucosae, and cell lines of gastric origin using quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP and quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR, respectively. Analyses of paired gastric cancers and adjacent normal gastric tissues revealed hypermethylation of the CLDN11 promoter region in gastric cancers, and this hypermethylation was significantly correlated with downregulation of CLDN11 expression vs. normal tissues. The CLDN11 promoter region was also hypermethylated in all gastric cancer cell lines tested relative to immortalized normal gastric epithelial cells. Moreover, CLDN11 mRNA expression was inversely correlated with its methylation level. Treatment of CLDN11-nonexpressing gastric cancer cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored CLDN11 expression. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CLDN11 expression in normal gastric epithelial cells increased their motility and invasiveness.These data suggest that hypermethylation of CLDN11, leading to downregulated expression, contributes to gastric carcinogenesis by increasing cellular motility and invasiveness. A further understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of claudin proteins in gastric carcinogenesis will likely help in the identification of novel approaches for diagnosis and therapy of gastric cancer.

  6. [From gene to disease; E-cadherin and hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, J.H.F.M. de; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome associated with an early-onset, histologically diffuse, signet ring cell type gastric cancer and the occurrence of cancer at other anatomical sites, i.e. breast, colon, prostate and ovary. Inactivating germline mutations

  7. Cost-effectiveness of screening and treating Helicobacter pylori for gastric cancer prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); L. Sharp

    2013-01-01

    textabstractGastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. A meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials concluded that Helicobacter pylori eradication reduces gastric cancer incidence by 35%. Current consensus is that H. pylori screening and treatment is cost-

  8. Genome Sequence of a Helicobacter pylori Strain Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Intestinal Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Olguín-Ruiz, Gabriela Edith; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Torres-López, Roberto Carlos; Avilés-Jiménez, Francisco; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains are the major risk factor for gastric cancer. Strains vary in their content of disease-associated genes, so genome-wide analysis of cancer-isolated strains will help elucidate their pathogenesis and genetic diversity. We present the draft genome sequence of H. pylori isolated from a Mexican patient with intestinal gastric cancer. PMID:24459275

  9. Possible association between gastric cancer and bracken fern in Venezuela: an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Amelot, M E; Avendaño, M

    2001-01-15

    To explore a possible connection between specific environmental factors that might explain the high rates of stomach cancer in people living in the highlands of western Venezuela, an epidemiologic study was conducted in 2 regions of contrasting topography. The regions embrace 3 Andean states, Mérida, Táchira and Trujillo, and the vicinal lowland surrounding the Maracaibo lake basin of Zulia State. Statistical sanitary records from 1986 to 1996 comprising 5.5 million people in the study area indicated that age-sex-adjusted gastric cancer death rate per 100,000 people (DR) was up to 3.64 times higher in highland than lowland areas, although total cancer-related DRs were comparable in both regions. DRs of other less frequent cancers from the upper alimentary tract [esophagous (1.18/0.99) and mouth-throat (1.39/2.64)] showed comparable values in both regions as well as colorectal, breast, and uterus-cervix cancers, suggesting that the stomach cancer DRs were related to geographically determined factors. Comparison of some nutrition issues, incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in selected areas, the discovery of the bracken carcinogen ptaquiloside in milk from bracken-fed cows, the prevalence of this plant in mountain cattle households and pasturelands and the rates of bracken-evoked bovine enzootic hematuria led us to conclude that consumption of ptaquiloside-contaminated milk may contribute to human gastric cancer in the Andean states of Venezuela.

  10. Early or late antibiotic intervention prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhua; Lee, Dong Soo; Morrissey, Rhiannon; Aponte-Pieras, Jose R; Rogers, Arlin B; Moss, Steven F

    2014-12-01

    H. pylori infection causes gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Eradicating H. pylori prevents ulcers, but to what extent this prevents cancer remains unknown, especially if given after intestinal metaplasia has developed. H. pylori infected wild-type (WT) mice do not develop cancer, but mice lacking the tumor suppressor p27 do so, thus providing an experimental model of H. pylori-induced cancer. We infected p27-deficient mice with H. pylori strain SS1 at 6-8 weeks of age. Persistently H. pylori-infected WT C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Mice in the eradication arms received antimicrobial therapy (omeprazole, metronidazole and clarithromycin) either "early" (at 15 weeks post infection, WPI) or "late" at 45 WPI. At 70 WPI, mice were euthanized for H. pylori determination, histopathology and cytokine/chemokine expression. Persistently infected mice developed premalignant lesions including high-grade dysplasia, whereas those given antibiotics did not. Histologic activity scores in the eradication groups were similar to each other, and were significantly decreased compared with controls for inflammation, epithelial defects, hyperplasia, metaplasia, atrophy and dysplasia. IP-10 and MIG levels in groups that received antibiotics were significantly lower than controls. There were no significant differences in expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α or MIP-1β among the three groups. Thus, H. pylori eradication given either early or late after infection significantly attenuated gastric inflammation, gastric atrophy, hyperplasia, and dysplasia in the p27-deficient mice model of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, irrespective of the timing of antibiotic administration. This was associated with reduced expression of IP-10 and MIG.

  11. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  12. Expression of CD44v6 and Livin in gastric cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yi-zhi; FANG Tai-yong; XU Hai-gang; ZHUO Zhi-qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background CD44v6 plays an important role in invasion and metastasis of tumor,Livin has anti-apoptotic effects.The present study aimed to explore the expression and clinical significance of CD44v6 and Livin in gastric cancer tissue.Methods Streptavidin-peroxidase linked immunohistochemical method was used to determine the expression of CD44v6 and Livin in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal gastric tissues from 59 patients with histopathologically confirmed gastric cancer,and in gastric tissue specimens of 15 patients with gastric polyps,and 15 patients with chronic non-atrophic gastritis.The chi-square test was used for comparison of the relevant factors,Spearman's rank correlation test was applied for relationship among positive expression of the proteins.Results The expresion of CD44v6 was positive in 64.4% of the gastric cancer patients; 5.1%,0 and 13.3% in specimens of normal tissues adjacent to the cancer tissues,in gastric tissue specimens of patients with gastric polyps,and patients with chronic non-atrophic gastritis,respectively.The expression of Livin was positive in 52.5% of the gastric cancer tissues,6.8%,0 and 6.7% in the adjacent normal gastric tissue,specimens of patients with gastric polyps and chronic non-atrophic gastritis,respectively.The expression of CD44v6 was significantly correlated with the depth of invasion,the degree of differentiation,and lymphnode metastasis of gastric cancer (P <0.05).The positive expression rate of Livin protein was also significantly correlated with degree of differentiation of gastric cancer cells and metastasis to lymphnodes (P <0.05),but not correlated with the depth of invasion and pathological types (P >0.05).The expression of CD44v6 and Livin in the gastric cancer tissue was positively correlated (rs=0.286,P=-0.028).Conclusions The increased expression of CD44v6 and Livin in gastric cancer tissue may be closely related with development and progression of gastric cancer.CD44v6 and Livin

  13. Mutations in the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yibing Zhao; Hongyu Yang; Guoyu Chen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mutations in the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in gastric cancer.Methods: The mtDNA of D-loop region was amplified by PCR and sequenced in 20 samples from gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal membrane. Results: There were 7/20(35% ) mutations in the mtDNA of D-loop region in gastric cancer patients. There were four microsatellite instabilities among the 18 mutations. Nine new polymorphisms were identified in 20 patients. Conclusion: The mtDNA of Dloop region might be highly polymorphoric and the mutation rate is high in patients with gastric cancer.

  14. Enhanced proliferation, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of nicotine-promoted gastric cancer by periostin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Liu; Bao-An Liu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the contribution of periostin in nicotine-promoted gastric cancer cell proliferation, survival, invasion, drug resistance, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). METHODS: Gastric cancer cells were treated with nicotine and periostin protein expression was determined by immunoblotting. Periostin mRNA in gastric cancer cells was silenced using small interfering RNA (siRNA) techniques and periostin gene expression was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Gastric cancer cells transfected with control or periostin siRNA plasmid were compared in terms of cell proliferation using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Cell apoptosis was compared using annexin V-fluoresceine isothiocyanate and propidium iodine double staining. Tumor invasion was determined using the Boyden chamber invasion assay, and the EMT marker Snail expression was evaluated by immunoblotting. RESULTS: Nicotine upregulated periostin in gastric cancer cells through a COX-2 dependent pathway, which was blocked by the COX-2-specific inhibitor NS398. Periostin mRNA expression was decreased by ~87.2% by siRNA in gastric cancer cells, and stable periostinsilenced cells were obtained by G418 screening. Periostin- silenced gastric cancer cells exhibited reduced cell proliferation, elevated sensitivity to chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil, and decreased cell invasion and Snail expression (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Periostin is a nicotine target gene in gastric cancer and plays a role in gastric cancer cell growth, invasion, drug resistance, and EMT facilitated by nicotine.

  15. Multimodality management of resectable gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helen; Shum; Lakshmi; Rajdev

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach carries a poor prognosis and is the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. It is recommended that surgical resection with a D1 or a modified D2 gastrectomy(with at least 15 lymph nodes removed for examination), be performed in the United States, though D2 lymphadenectomies should be performed at experienced centers. A D2 lymphadenectomy is the recommended procedure in Asia. Although surgical resection is considered the definitive treatment, rates of recurrences are high, necessitating the need for neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy. This review article aims to outline and summarize some of the pivotal trials that have defined optimal treatment options for non-metastatic non-cardia gastric cancer. Some of the most notable trials include the INT-0116 trial, which established a benefit in concurrent chemoradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. This was again confirmed in the ARTIST trial, especially in patients with nodal involvement. Later, the Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy trial provided evidence for the use of perioperative chemotherapy. Targeted agents such as ramucirumab and trastuzumab are also being investigated for use in locally advanced gastric cancers after demonstrating a benefit in the metastatic setting. Given the poor response rate of this difficult disease to various treatment modalities, numerous studies are currently ongoing in an attempt to define a more effective therapy, some of which are briefly introduced in this review as well.

  16. Meta-analysis of intraperitoneal chemotherapy for gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Zhi Xu; You-Qing Zhan; Xiao-Wei Sun; Su-Mei Cao; Qi-Rong Geng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in patients undergoing curative resection for gastric cancer through literature review. METHODS: Medline (PubMed) (1980-2003/1), Embase (1980-2003/1), Cancerlit Database (1983-2003/1) and Chinese Biomedicine Database (1990-2003/1) were searched. Language was restricted to Chinese and English. The statistical analysis was performed by RevMan4.2 software provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. The results were expressed with odds ratio for the categorical variables. RESULTS: Eleven trials involving 1 161 cases were included. The pooled odds ratio was 0.51, with a 95% confidence interval (0.40-0.65). Intraperitoneal chemotherapy may benefit the patients after curative resection for locally advanced gastric cancer, and the combination of intraperitoneal chemotherapy with hyperthermia or activated carbon particles may provide more benefits to patients due to the enhanced antitumor activity of drugs. Sensitivity analysis and fail-safe number suggested that the result was comparatively reliable. However, of 11 trials, only 3 studies were of high quality. CONCLUSION: Intraperitoneal chemotherapy after curative resection for locally advanced gastric cancer may be beneficial to patients. Continuous multicenter, randomized, double blind, rigorously designed trials should be conducted to draw definitive conclusions.

  17. Current status and progress in gastric cancer with liver metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing; CHEN Lin

    2011-01-01

    Objective This review discusses the current status and progress in studies on gastric cancer with liver metastasis (GCLM), involving the routes, subtypes, and prognosis of GCLM; the genes and molecules associated with metastasis;the feasibility and value of each imaging modality; and current treatment options.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed published in English from 2005 to August 2010. The search terms were "gastric cancer" and "liver metastasis".Study selection Articles regarding the characteristics, diagnostic modalities, and vadous therapeutic options of GCLM were selected.Results The prognosis of GCLM is influenced by the clinicopathological characteristics of primary tumors, as well as the presence of liver metastases. Improved understanding of related genes and molecules will lead to the development of methods of early detection and targeted therapies. For the diagnosis of GCLM, each imaging modality has its relative benefits. There remains no consensus regarding therapeutic options.Conclusions Early detection and characterization of liver metastases is crucial for the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Multidisciplinary team discussions are required to design optimal treatment strategies, which should be based on the clinicopathological characteristics of each patient.

  18. Transabdominal ultrasonography in preoperative staging of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Ri Liao; Ying Dai; Ling Huo; Kun Yan; Lin Zhang; Hui Zhang; Wen Gao; Min-Hua Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the value of transabdominal ultrasonography (US) in the preoperative staging of gastric cancer.METHODS: A total of 198 patients with gastric cancer underwent preoperatively transabdominal US, depth of tumor infiltration was assessed in 125 patients, and lymph node metastasis was assessed in 106 patients.RESULTS: The staging accuracy of transabdominal US was 55.6%, 75.0%, 87.3% and 71.1% in T1, T2, T3 and T4 carcinomas, respectively. The overall accuracy was 77.6%.The detection rate for pancreatic invasion and liver invasion was 77.4%, 71.4%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity,accuracy of transabdominal US in assessment of lymph node metastasis were 77.6%, 64.1%, 72.6%, respectively.Various shapes such as round, ovoid, spindle were encountered in benign and malignant lymph nodes. Majority of both benign and malignant lymph nodes were hyperechoic and had a distinct border. Benign lymph nodes were smaller than malignant lymph nodes in length and width (P = 0.000,0.005). Irregular shape, fusional shape, infiltrative signs,inhomogenous echo were seen mainly in malignant lymph nodes (P = 0.045, 0.006, 0.027, 0.006).CONCLUSION: Transabdominal US is useful for preoperative staging in gastric cancer, although it is difficult to differentiate benign from malignant lymph nodes.

  19. Breast cancer biomarkers predict weight loss after gastric bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauter Edward R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has long been associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk and more recently with premenopausal breast cancer risk. We previously observed that nipple aspirate fluid (n levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA were associated with obesity. Serum (s levels of adiponectin are lower in women with higher body mass index (BMI and with breast cancer. We conducted a prospective study of obese women who underwent gastric bypass surgery to determine: 1 change in n- and s-adiponectin and nPSA after surgery and 2 if biomarker change is related to change in BMI. Samples (30-s, 28-n and BMI were obtained from women 0, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Findings There was a significant increase after surgery in pre- but not postmenopausal women at all time points in s-adiponectin and at 3 and 6 months in n-adiponectin. Low n-PSA and high s-adiponectin values were highly correlated with decrease in BMI from baseline. Conclusions Adiponectin increases locally in the breast and systemically in premenopausal women after gastric bypass. s-adiponectin in pre- and nPSA in postmenopausal women correlated with greater weight loss. This study provides preliminary evidence for biologic markers to predict weight loss after gastric bypass surgery.

  20. Differential expression of phospholipase C epsilon 1 is associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic inflammation plays a causal role in gastric tumor initiation. The identification of predictive biomarkers from gastric inflammation to tumorigenesis will help us to distinguish gastric cancer from atrophic gastritis and establish the diagnosis of early-stage gastric cancer. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCε1 is reported to play a vital role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of PLCε1 in the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firstly, the mRNA and protein expression of PLCε1 were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting in normal gastric mucous epithelial cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell lines AGS, SGC7901, and MGC803. The results showed both mRNA and protein levels of PLCε1 were up-regulated in gastric cancer cells compared with normal gastric mucous epithelial cells. Secondly, this result was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection in a tissue microarray including 74 paired gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Thirdly, an independence immunohistochemical analysis of 799 chronic atrophic gastritis tissue specimens demonstrated that PLCε1 expression in atrophic gastritis tissues were down-regulated since PLCε1 expression was negative in 524 (65.6% atrophic gastritis. In addition, matched clinical tissues from atrophic severe gastritis and gastric cancer patients were used to further confirm the previous results by analyzing mRNA and protein levels expression of PLCε1 in clinical samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: Our results suggested that PLCε1 protein may be a potential biomarker to distinguish gastric cancer from inflammation lesion, and could have great potential in applications such as diagnosis and pre-warning of early-stage gastric cancer.

  1. EXPRESSION OF MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-7 INVOLVING IN GROWTH, INVASION, METASTASIS AND ANGIOGENESIS OF GASTRIC CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑华川; 李晓晗; 孙晋民; 曹乾; 辛彦; 张荫昌

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) expression in caricinogenesisand progression of gastric cancer.Methods. We studied MMP-7 expression and microvessel density (MVD) in adjacent mucosa and pri-mary foci of 113 cases of gastric cancer by streptavidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase method using anti-MMP-7 and anti-CD34 antibodies. MMP-7 expression and mean MVD were compared with clinicopatholog-ical features of gastric cancer, with the relationship between MMP-7 expression and MVD concerned in gastric cancer.Results. MMP-7 showed positive expression in adjacent mucosa of gastric cancer (29.20%, 33/113),less than that in gastric cancer (69.03%, 78/113). MMP-7 expression in primary foci of gastric cancerwas positively correlated with tumor size, invasive depth, metastasis and TNM staging (P<0.05), but notwith differentiation or growth pattern of gastric cancer (P>0.05). Positive correlation of mean MVD withtumor size, invasive depth, metastasis and TNM staging was found (P<0.05), despite no relationshipbetween mean MVD and differentiation of gastric cancer (P>0.05). Mean MVD was dependent on MMP-7expression in gastric cancer (P<0.05).Conclusion. Up-regulated expression of MMP-7 played an important role in carcinogenesis and pro-gression by participating in growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer. MMP-7 ex-pression could be regarded as an effective and objective marker to reflect the biological behaviors of gas-tric cancer.

  2. DNA methylation and folate metabolism in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun Shi Zhu; Shu Dong Xiao; Zhi Ping Chen; Yao Shi; Jing Yuan Fang; Rong Rong Li; Joel B Masor

    2000-01-01

    AIM To investigate DNA methylation status in gastric cancer and its relationship with folate metabolism.METHODS Serum before operation, the gastric mucosa from the lesion, and the surrounding area inpatients with gastric cancer and the remote normal-appearing mucosa of the resected stomach were collectedrespectively. The serum folate, mucosal tissue folate, S-adenosylmethionine ( SAM ), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and the DNA methylation levels were determined.RESULTS The tissue folate was significantly lower than that in ulcers, especially in the surrounding andnormal mucosa (0.38±0.13, 0.50±0.17 vs 0.53±0.50, 0.79±0.82ng/mg protein, P < 0.01), and itdecreased gradually in the lesion areas. The DNA methylation status showed similar decreasing trend incancers compared with the methylation increasing trend in ulcers. The SAM level ascended in the lesion areaswith a higher. concentration in cancer mueosa (63.5±43.0 vs 25.9±11.9nmol/g tissue, P < 0.01 ). Theaccumulation of SAH in the surrounding and normal mucosa of cancers was observed (17.3±24.6, 15.5±8.6vs 14.6±4.2, 10.0±1.9nmol/g tissue, P < 0.05 - 0.01). There were significantly negative correlationsbetween tissue folate and the SAM and SAH levels in the three areas.CONCLUSION Patients with gastric cancer have the regional folate deficiency in the stomach mucosa,although the serum folate level remains normal. This disturbs the local SAM and SAH metabolism withaccumulation of SAH and DNA hypomethylation which has been known as an important molecularmechanism for carcinogenesis. Folic acid can modulate DNA methylation status by its effect in one-carbongroup metabolism and thus affect the process of the carcinogenesis. Therefore, this may be an access for theprevention of gastric cancer.

  3. Probing the O-glycoproteome of Gastric Cancer Cell Lines for Biomarker Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira Campos, Diana Alexandra; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Joana

    2015-01-01

    biomarker assays. However, the current knowledge of secreted and circulating O-glycoproteins is limited. Here, we used the COSMC KO "SimpleCell" (SC) strategy to characterize the O-glycoproteome of two gastric cancer SC lines (AGS, MKN45) as well as a gastric cell line (KATO III) which naturally expresses...... at least partially truncated O-glycans. Overall we identified 499 O-glycoproteins and 1,236 O-glycosites in gastric cancer SCs, and a total 47 O-glycoproteins and 73 O-glycosites in the KATO III cell line. We next modified the glycoproteomic strategy to apply it to pools of sera from gastric cancer...... with the STn glycoform were further validated as being expressed in gastric cancer tissue. A proximity ligation assay was used to demonstrate that CD44 was expressed with the STn glycoform in gastric cancer tissues. The study provides a discovery strategy for aberrantly glycosylated O-glycoproteins and a set...

  4. The inositide signaling pathway as a target for treating gastric cancer and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HongJun eKim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer and colorectal cancer are the leading cause of cancer mortality and have a dismal prognosis. The introduction of biological agents to treat these cancers has resulted in improved outcomes, and combination chemotherapy with targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents is regarded as standard therapy. Additional newly clarified mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to targeted agents require the development of new biologic agents. Aberrantly activation of the inositide signaling pathway by a loss of function PTEN mutation or gain of function mutation/amplification of PIK3CA is an oncogenic mechanism in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. Clinical trials with biologic agents that target the inositide signaling pathway are being performed to further improve treatment outcomes of patients with advanced gastric cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC. In this review we summarize the inositide signaling pathway and introduce targeted agents that inhibit abnormal activation of this signaling pathway and clinical trials currently being performed in patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer and metastatic CRC using molecular target agents.

  5. Changes of histology and expression of MMP-2 and nm23-H1 in primary and metastatic gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Bo Wang; Zhi-Nong Jiang; Miao-Ying Fan; Chao-Yang Xu; Wen-Jun Chen; Jian-Guo Shen

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the changes of histology and expression of MMP-2 and nm23-H1 in primary and metastatic gastric cancer.METHODS:One hundred and seventy-seven gastric cancer patients with lymph node and/or distal metastasis between 1997 and 2001 were reviewed.Differences in histology of the primary and metastatic gastric cancer were assessed.MMP-2 and nm23-H1 immunoreactivity was compared in 44 patients with tumor infiltration to the serosa layer.RESULTS:Poorly and moderately differentiated metastatic gastric cancer was found in 88.7% (157/177)and primary gastric cancer in 75.7% (134/177) of the patients.The histological type of metastatic gastric cancer that was not completely in accordance with the preponderant histology of primary gastric cancer was observed in 25 patients (14.1%).MMP-2 immunoreactivity in metastatic gastric cancer was significantly stronger than that in primary gastric cancer,while nm23-H1 immunoreactivity showed no difference in primary and metastatic gastric cancer.CONCLUSION:Metastatic gastric cancer presents more aggressive histological morphology and higher MMP-2 immunoreactivity than primary gastric cancer.This heterogeneity may elicit a possible mechanism of gastric cancer metastasis.

  6. Relationship between let-7a and gastric mucosa cancerization and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate let-7a expression and analyze the correlation between let-7a and progression of gastric mucosa cancerization. METHODS: The tissue microarray was constructed previously in 52 cases of human gastric carcinoma, 17 cases of chronic atrophic gastritis (atypical hyperplasia) and 11 cases of normal gastric tissue, and tissue microarrays combined with in situ hybridization were used to detect the expression of let-7a. RESULTS: The positive rates of let-7a in normal gastric tissue, chronic atroph...

  7. Localized amyloidosis of the stomach mimicking a superficial gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Miwako; Fujino, Yasuteru; Muguruma, Naoki; Murayama, Noriaki; Okamoto, Koichi; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 73-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of a depressed lesion in the stomach found by cancer screening gastroscopy. A barium upper gastrointestinal series showed an area of irregular mucosa measuring 15 mm on the anterior wall of the gastric body. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 15 mm depressed lesion on the anterior wall of the lower gastric body. We suspected an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma from the appearance and took some biopsies. However, histology of the specimens revealed amyloidal deposits in the submucosal layer without malignant findings. Congo red staining was positive for amyloidal protein and green birefringence was observed under polarized light microscopy. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL) amyloid type. There were no amyloid deposits in the colon or duodenum. Computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no remarkable findings. Thus, this case was diagnosed as a localized gastric amyloidosis characterized by AL type amyloid deposition in the mucosal or submucosal layer. As the clinical outcome of gastric AL amyloidosis seems favorable, this case is scheduled for periodic examination to recognize potential disease progression and has been stable for 2 years.

  8. Polymorphisms in mucin genes in the development of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong; Wen; Fang; Gao; Cheng-Jiang; Zhou; Yan-Bin; Jia

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer(GC) is the third leading cause of cancerrelated death worldwide.In areas of high prevalence,such as Japan,South Korea and China,most cases of GC are related to Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori),which involves well-characterized sequential stages,including infection,atrophic gastritis,intestinal metaplasia,dysplasia,and GC.Mucins are the most abundant highmolecular-weight glycoproteins in mucus,which is the first line of defense and plays a major role in blocking pathogenic factors.Normal gastric mucosa shows expression of MUC1,MUC5 AC and MUC6 that is specific to cell type.However,the specific pattern of MUC1,MUC5 AC and MUC6 expression is changed in gastric carcinogenesis,accompanied by de novo expression of secreted MUC2.Recent studies have provided evidence that variations in these mucin genes affect many steps of GC development,such as H.pylori infection,and gastric precancerous lesions.In this review,we focus on studies of the association between polymorphisms in mucin genes and development of GC.This information should be helpful for the early detection,surveillance,and treatment of GC.

  9. Regulation of RKIP function by Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika L Moen

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium that infects more than half of the world's population and is a major cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mechanisms that link H. pylori infection to gastric carcinogenesis are not well understood. In the present study, we report that the Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP has a role in the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. Western blot and luciferase transcription reporter assays demonstrate that the pathogenicity island of H. pylori rapidly phosphorylates RKIP, which then localizes to the nucleus where it activates its own transcription and induces apoptosis. Forced overexpression of RKIP enhances apoptosis in H. pylori-infected cells, whereas RKIP RNA inhibition suppresses the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori infection. While inducing the phosphorylation of RKIP, H. pylori simultaneously targets non-phosphorylated RKIP for proteasome-mediated degradation. The increase in RKIP transcription and phosphorylation is abrogated by mutating RKIP serine 153 to valine, demonstrating that regulation of RKIP activity by H. pylori is dependent upon RKIP's S153 residue. In addition, H. pylori infection increases the expression of Snail, a transcriptional repressor of RKIP. Our results suggest that H. pylori utilizes a tumor suppressor protein, RKIP, to promote apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  10. Gastric cancer development after the successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaname Uno; Katsunori Iijima; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer(GC) develops as a result of inflammationassociated carcinogenesis due to Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infection and subsequent defects in genetic/epigenetic events. Although the indication for eradication therapy has become widespread, clinical studies have revealed its limited effects in decreasing the incidence of GC. Moreover, research on biopsy specimens obtained by conventional endoscopy has demonstrated the feasibility of the restoration of some genetic/epigenetic alterations in the gastric mucosa. Practically, the number of sporadic cases of primary/metachronous GC that emerge after successful eradication has increased, while on-going guidelines recommend eradication therapy for patients with chronic gastritis and those with background mucosa after endoscopic resection for GC. Accordingly, regular surveillance of numerous individuals who have received eradication therapy is recommended despite the lack of biomarkers. Recently, the focus has been on functional reversibility after successful eradication as another cue to elucidate the mechanisms of restoration as well as those of carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa after H. pylori eradication. We demonstrated that Congo-red chromoendoscopy enabled the identification of the multifocal distribution of functionally irreversible mucosa compared with that of restored mucosa after successful eradication in individuals at extremely high risk for GC. Further research that uses functional imaging may provide new insights into the mechanisms of regeneration and carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa post-eradication and may allow for the development of useful biomarkers.

  11. Gastric cancer development after the successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-15

    Gastric cancer (GC) develops as a result of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis due to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and subsequent defects in genetic/epigenetic events. Although the indication for eradication therapy has become widespread, clinical studies have revealed its limited effects in decreasing the incidence of GC. Moreover, research on biopsy specimens obtained by conventional endoscopy has demonstrated the feasibility of the restoration of some genetic/epigenetic alterations in the gastric mucosa. Practically, the number of sporadic cases of primary/metachronous GC that emerge after successful eradication has increased, while on-going guidelines recommend eradication therapy for patients with chronic gastritis and those with background mucosa after endoscopic resection for GC. Accordingly, regular surveillance of numerous individuals who have received eradication therapy is recommended despite the lack of biomarkers. Recently, the focus has been on functional reversibility after successful eradication as another cue to elucidate the mechanisms of restoration as well as those of carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa after H. pylori eradication. We demonstrated that Congo-red chromoendoscopy enabled the identification of the multi-focal distribution of functionally irreversible mucosa compared with that of restored mucosa after successful eradication in individuals at extremely high risk for GC. Further research that uses functional imaging may provide new insights into the mechanisms of regeneration and carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa post-eradication and may allow for the development of useful biomarkers.

  12. Study of gastric cancer samples using terahertz techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected human gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and spectroscopic THz imaging at 201 and 590 GHz. The work shows that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, as well as 2-D transmission THz images are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  13. The direct effect of estrogen on cell viability and apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

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    Qin, Jian; Liu, Min; Ding, Qianshan; Ji, Xiang; Hao, Yarong; Wu, Xiaomin; Xiong, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiology researches indicated that gastric cancer is a male-predominant disease; both expression level of estrogen and expression pattern of estrogen receptors (ERs) influence its carcinogenesis. But the direct effect of estrogen on gastric cancer cells is still unclear. This study aimed to explore the direct effect of β-estradiol (E2) on gastric cancer cells. SGC7901 and BGC823 were treated with a serial of concentrations of E2. The survival rates of both the cell lines were significantly reduced, and the reduction of viability was due to apoptosis triggered by E2 treatment. Caspase 3 was activated in response to the increasing E2 concentration in both SGC7901 and BGC823. Cleaved Caspase 3 fragments were detected, and the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were reduced. Apoptosis was further confirmed by flow cytometry. The expression level of PEG10, an androgen receptor target gene, was reduced during E2 treatment. Both ERα and ERβ were expressed in these cell lines, and the result of bioinformatics analysis of gastric cancer from GEO datasets indicated that the expression levels of both ERα and ERβ were significantly higher in noncancerous gastric tissues than in gastric cancer tissues. Our research indicated that estrogen can reduce cell viability and promote apoptosis in gastric cancer cells directly; ERs expression level is associated with gastric cancer. Our research will help to understand the mechanism of gender disparity in gastric cancer.

  14. Evaluation of Outcome and Tolerability of Combination Chemotherapy with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin as First Line Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer

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    Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehri, Zahra; Bakhshipour, Ali Reza; Zivari, Ali; Danesh, Hossein Ali; Metanat, Hasan Ali; Karimkoshteh, Azra; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Rahimi, Hossein; Kiani, Zohre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination chemotherapy is accepted as a high efficacy treatment for gastric cancer, whereas choice of standard treatment is unclear. Multiple chemotherapeutic regimens have been used to achieve higher efficacy and lower toxicity. This study was designed to evaluate the treatment results of advanced gastric cancer with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin regimen. Subjects and Methods : All cases with documented gastric adenocarcinoma and advanced disease were candidates for receiving Xelox regimen (Capecitabine – 750 mg/m2/twice daily/ 1-14 days and Oxaliplatin 125 mg/m2 in 1st day). Results: Twenty five cases with advanced gastric cancer entered in study while 24 cases continued treatment protocol and were evaluated. Mean age was 59.5 ± 12.1 years (range: 20-75), male and female cases were 66.7% and 33.3%, respectively. All cases received at least four cycles of Xelox regimen. Overall response rate was 74.99% with 29.16% complete response. Overall survival rate was 13 ± 0.53 months and DFS (disease-free survival) was 6 ± 1.09 months. Extremities neuropathy (62.5%), headache (45.8%) and muscle cramps (29.2%) were the most common complains. Haematological changes were rare and 16.7% of cases had mild cytopenia. Treatment related death was not observed. Conclusion: Xelox regimen is a safe and highly effective first line treatment for gastric cancer; however, considering it as first line therapy needs larger studies. PMID:27928475

  15. Gene expression signature analysis identifies vorinostat as a candidate therapy for gastric cancer.

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    Sofie Claerhout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer-specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment.

  16. Survival analysis of gastric cancer patients using Cox model: a five year study

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    Biglarian A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer and known as the second cause of death due to cancers worldwide. Adenocarcinoma is the most fatal cancer in Iran and a patient with this kind of cancer, has a lower lifetime than others. In this research, the survival of patients with gastric carcinoma who were registered at Taleghani Hospital, were studied."n"nMethods: 291 patients with Gastric carcinoma who had received care, chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, at Taleghani Hospital in Tehran from 2002 to 2007 were studied as a historical cohort. Their survival rates and its relationship with 12 risk factors were assessed."n"nResults: Of the 291 patients with Gastric carcinoma, 70.1 percent were men and others (29.9% were women. The mean age of men was 62.26 years and of women was 59.32 years at the time of diagnosis. Most of patients (93.91% were advanced stage and metastasis. The Cox proportional hazards model showed that age at diagnosis, tumor stage and histology type with survival time had significant relationships (p=0.039, p=0.042 and p=0.032 respectively."n"n Conclusion: The five-year survival rate and median lifetime of gastric cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy are very

  17. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

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    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  18. Expression of TRAF6 and ubiquitin mRNA in skeletal muscle of gastric cancer patients

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    Sun Yuan-Shui

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR,-associated factor 6 (TRAF6,-and ubiquitin in gastric cancer patients. Methods Biopsies of the rectus abdominis muscle were obtained intra operatively from 102 gastric cancer patients and 29 subjects undergoing surgery for benign abdominal diseases, and muscle TRAF6 and ubiquitin mRNA expression and proteasome proteolytic activities were assessed. Results TRAF6 was significantly upregulated in muscle of gastric cancer compared with the control muscles. TRAF6 was upregulated in 67.65% (69/102 muscle of gastric cancer. Over expression of TRAF6 in muscles of gastric cancer were associated with TNM stage, level of serum albumin and percent of weight loss. Ubiquitin was significantly upregulated in muscle of gastric cancer compared with the control muscles. Ubiquitin was upregulated in 58.82% (60/102 muscles of gastric cancer. Over expression of ubiquitin in muscles of gastric cancer were associated with TNM (Tumor-Node-Metastasis stage and weight loss. There was significant relation between TRAF6 and ubiquitin expression. Conclusions We found a positive correlation between TRAF6 and ubiquitin expression, suggesting that TRAF6 may up regulates ubiquitin activity in cancer cachexia. While more investigations are required to understand its mechanisms of TRAF6 and ubiquitin in skeletal muscle. Correct the catabolic-anabolic imbalance is essential for the effective treatment of cancer cachexia.

  19. [Indications for and limitations of HpD photodynamic therapy for esophageal cancer and gastric cancer].

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    Mimura, S; Ichii, M; Imanishi, K; Otani, T; Okuda, S

    1988-04-01

    HpD photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed on 4 patients with superficial esophageal cancer, 20 patients with 22 early gastric cancer lesions and one patient with advanced gastric cancer. About 50 h before irradiation, 3 mg/kg of HpD or 1.3-2.5 mg/kg of Photofrin II was injected intravenously. The entire lesion including a 5-mm border of normal surrounding mucosa, was irradiated with an argon dye laser at 630nm wavelength with an output of 100-400mW at the tip of the fiber. Complete response (CR) to HpD-PDT was obtained in 2 of 2 mucosal esophageal cancers, and one of 2 submucosal lesions, totalling 3 of 4, and in 13 of 13 mucosal gastric cancers and 7 of 9 submucosal lesions totalling 20 of 22. The depths of cancer involvement were determined endoscopically. In Borrmann 1 lesion with muscularis externa involvement, in spite of two trials with HpD-PDT, only partial response (PR) was obtained. Tumor laser dose had to be more than 90 J/cm2, and in several cases combined hot biopsy with electrodiathermy and/or repeated HpD-PDT was needed to obtain CR. HpD-PDT is indicated for superficial esophageal cancer and depressed and/or assembled protuberant-type of early gastric cancer with poor risk.

  20. Diverging trends in recent population-based survival rates in oesophageal and gastric cancer.

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    Jesper Lagergren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survival trends in oesophageal and gastric cancer need to be updated. A nationwide Swedish population-based study in 1961-2009 was based on registry data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Relative survival rate, i.e. the ratio of the observed to the expected survival, adjusted for age, sex, and calendar period, and presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI, was the main outcome measure. The expected survival was calculated using the corresponding Swedish general population with no exclusions. The relative survival rates in oesophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma have improved since the 1990s (p for trend <0.001, but not in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma or gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma. The relative 5-year survival rates during the two recent periods 1990-1999 and 2000-2008 were 12.5% (95%CI 10.1%-14.9% and 10.3% (95%CI 8.5-12.0% for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 12.5% (95%CI 10.1%-14.9% and 14.6% (95%CI 12.6-16.6% for oesophageal adenocarcinoma, 11.1% (95%CI 9.6%-12.6% and 14.3% (95%CI 12.3-16.3% for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and 20.2% (95%CI 19.2%-21.1% and 19.0% (95%CI 17.7-20.2% for gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma. The 3-year survival in tumour stage III in 2004-2008 was about 25% for all four tumour types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The survival in oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma is increasing, but the lack of such increase in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma is a concern.

  1. Solitary AFP- and PIVKA-II-producing hepatoid gastric cancer with giant lymph node metastasis.

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    Iso, Yukihiro; Sawada, Tokihiko; Shimoda, Mitsugi; Rokkaku, Kyu; Ohkura, Yasuo; Kubota, Keiichi

    2005-01-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abdominal pain and an abdominal mass. The patient had anemia and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) (9630ng/mL) and PIVKA-II (91mAU/mL) levels. Roentgenographic examination revealed an extra-gastric tumor in the upper abdomen, and gastroscopy revealed Bormann type 2 gastric cancer in the lower portion of the stomach. The preoperative diagnosis was synchronous gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and surgery was performed. The extra-gastric tumor appeared to be an extra-hepatically growing HCC because the tumor was fed by vessels ramifying from the umbilical portion of the liver. Distal gastrectomy with resection of the extra-gastric tumor was performed, and histological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the gastric cancer was an AFP-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma and that the extra-gastric tumor was a lymph node metastasis. AFP-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma tends to metastasize to the regional lymph nodes and form a giant tumor. A giant tumor in the upper abdomen associated with gastric cancer may therefore be a clinical manifestation of AFP-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma.

  2. Maspin expression and its clinicopathological significance in tumorigenesis and progression of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-Chun Wang; Yan-Min Yang; Xiao-Han Li; Fang Dong; Yan Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate maspin expression in tumorigenesis and progression of gastric cancer and to explore its relevant molecular mechanisms.METHODS: Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues from normal mucosa (n=182), dysplasia (n=69), cancer (n=113) of the stomach were studied for maspin expression by immunohistochemistry. Microvessel density (MVD) in gastric cancer was labeled using anti-CD34 antibody. Maspin expression was compared with clinical parameters and MVD of tumors. Caspase-3 expression was also detected in gastric carcinoma by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between Caspase-3 and maspin expression was concerned as well.RESULTS: The positive rates of maspin expression were 79.8%(145/182), 75.4%(52/69) and 50.4%(57/113) in normal mucosa, dysplasia and cancer of the stomach,respectively. Cancer less frequently expressed maspin than normal mucosa and dysplasia (P<0.05). Maspin expression showed a significantly negative association with invasive depth, metastasis, Lauren's and Nakamura's classification (P<0.05), but not with tumor size, Borrmann's classification,growth pattern or TNM staging (P>0.05). The positive rate of Caspase-3 was significantly lower in gastric cancer than in normal gastric mucosa (P<0.05,32.7% vs 50.4%). It was noteworthy that maspin expression was negatively correlated with MVD, but positively correlated with expression of Caspase-3 in gastric cancer (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Down-regulated maspin expression is a late molecular event in gastric carcinogenesis. Reduced expression of maspin contributes to progression of gastric cancer probably by inhibiting cell adhesion, enhancing cell mobility,decreasing cell apoptosis and facilitating angiogenesis.Additionally altered expression of maspin underlies the molecular mechanism of differentiation of gastric cancer and supports the different histogenetic pathways of intestinal and diffuse gastric cancers. Maspin expression can be considered as an effective and objective

  3. Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: a distinct molecular subtype of the disease?

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    Alexandre Andrade dos Anjos Jácome

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Approximately 90% of the world population is infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Usually, it infects B lymphocytes, predisposing them to malignant transformation. Infection of epithelial cells occurs rarely, and it is estimated that about to 10% of gastric cancer patients harbor EBV in their malignant cells. Given that gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, with a global annual incidence of over 950,000 cases, EBV-positive gastric cancer is the largest group of EBV-associated malignancies. Based on gene expression profile studies, gastric cancer was recently categorized into four subtypes; EBV-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomically stable and chromosomal instability. Together with previous studies, this report provided a more detailed molecular characterization of gastric cancer, demonstrating that EBV-positive gastric cancer is a distinct molecular subtype of the disease, with unique genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, reflected in a specific phenotype. The recognition of characteristic molecular alterations in gastric cancer allows the identification of molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation and survival, with the potential to identify therapeutic targets. These findings highlight the enormous heterogeneity of gastric cancer, and the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in the disease, and provide a roadmap to implementation of genome-guided personalized therapy in gastric cancer. The present review discusses the initial studies describing EBV-positive gastric cancer as a distinct clinical entity, presents recently described genetic and epigenetic alterations, and considers potential therapeutic insights derived from the recognition of this new molecular subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma.

  4. Molecular targeted agents for gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

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    Oshima, Takashi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2012-04-01

    Despite recent improvements in surgical techniques and chemotherapy, advanced cancers of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) continue to have poor clinical outcomes. However, molecules intimately related to cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis have been studied as candidates for molecular targeted agents. Target molecules, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and P13k/Akt/mTor pathway, as well as the insulin-like growth factor receptor, c-Met pathways, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and other pathways are considered to be promising candidates for molecular targeted therapy for gastric and GEJ cancer. In this review we focus on the recent developments in targeting relevant pathways in these types of cancer.

  5. Surgery for gastric cancer: An evidence-based perspective

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    D'souza Melroy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a decreasing incidence, stomach cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Surgical resection offers the only chance for cure in this aggressive cancer. The surgical management of gastric cancer has witnessed numerous debates in the past decades. These include the extent of lymphadenectomy, extent of surgery, role of laparoscopic gastrectomy, and the impact of high volume of centers, on the outcome of surgery. This review attempts to address these controversies with an evidence-based perspective. A literature search in MEDLINE (www.pubmed.org has been performed with the relevant key words and corresponding MeSH terms. The search has been limited to English publications on human subjects. A manual search of the bibliographies has also been carried out, to identify the relevant publications for possible inclusion.

  6. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of SEREX-defined antigen NUCB2 in gastric epithelium, gastritis and gastric cancer

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    Z Kalnina

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available NUCB2 is an EF-hand Ca2+ binding protein that has been implicated in various physiological processes like calcium homeostasis, hypothalamic regulation of feeding and TNF receptor shedding. In our previous study we identified NUCB2 as a potential tumour antigen eliciting autoantibody responses in 5.4% of gastric cancer patients but not in the healthy individuals. The current study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NUCB2 immunogenicity and to gain an insight into the physiological functions of NUCB2 in the stomach. mRNA expression analysis demonstrated that NUCB2 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues, including lymphoid tissues, and downregulated in gastric tumours when compared with the adjacent relatively normal stomach tissues. The search for molecular alterations resulted in the identification of novel mRNA variants transcribed from an alternative promoter and expressed predominantly in gastric cancers. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels correspond to mRNA levels and revealed that NUCB2 is phosphorylated in gastric mucosa. Furthermore, a 55 kDa isoform, generated presumably by yet an unidentified post-translational modification was detected in gastric tumours and AGS gastric cancer cells but was absent in the relatively normal gastric mucosa and thereby might have served as a trigger for the immune response against NUCB2. Staining of stomach tissue microarray with anti-NUCB2 antibody revealed that it is expressed in the secretory granules of chief cells and in the cytoplasm of parietal cells in the functioning gastric glands which are lost in atrophic glands and tumour cells. Hence we propose that NUCB2 may be implicated in gastric secretion by establishing an agonist-releasable Ca2+ store in ER or Golgi apparatus, signalling via heterotrimeric Ga proteins and/or mediating the exocytosis of the secretory granules.

  7. Importance of early nutritional screening in patients with gastric cancer.

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    Gavazzi, Cecilia; Colatruglio, Silvia; Sironi, Alessandro; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Miceli, Rosalba

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the relationship between nutritional status, disease stage and quality of life (QoL) in 100 patients recently diagnosed with gastric carcinoma. The patients' nutritional status was investigated with anthropometric, biochemical, inflammatory and functional variables; and we also evaluated the nutritional risk with the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002. Oncological staging was standard. QoL was evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy questionnaire. The statistical correlation between nutritional risk score (NRS) and oncological characteristics or QoL was evaluated using both univariable and multivariable analyses. Weight loss and reduction of food intake were the most frequent pathological nutritional indicators, while biochemical, inflammatory and functional variables were in the normal range. According to NRS, thirty-six patients were malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. Patients with NRS ≥ 3 presented a significantly greater percentage of stage IV gastric cancer and pathological values of C-reactive protein, while no correlation was found with the site of tumour. NRS was negatively associated with QoL (P gastric cancer malnutrition is frequent at diagnosis and this is likely due to reduction in food intake. Moreover, NRS is directly correlated with tumour stage and inversely correlated with QoL, which makes it a useful tool to identify patients in need of an early nutritional intervention during oncological treatments.

  8. Mucin 1 Gene (MUC1 and Gastric-Cancer Susceptibility

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    Norihisa Saeki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is one of the major malignant diseases worldwide, especially in Asia. It is classified into intestinal and diffuse types. While the intestinal-type GC (IGC is almost certainly caused by Helicobacter pylori (HP infection, its role in the diffuse-type GC (DGC appears limited. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS on Japanese and Chinese populations identified chromosome 1q22 as a GC susceptibility locus which harbors mucin 1 gene (MUC1 encoding a cell membrane-bound mucin protein. MUC1 has been known as an oncogene with an anti-apoptotic function in cancer cells; however, in normal gastric mucosa, it is anticipated that the mucin 1 protein has a role in protecting gastric epithelial cells from a variety of external insults which cause inflammation and carcinogenesis. HP infection is the most definite insult leading to GC, and a protective function of mucin 1 protein has been suggested by studies on Muc1 knocked-out mice.

  9. Trefoil factors: Gastrointestinal-specific proteins associated with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ping; Ling, Hui; Lan, Gang; Liu, Jiao; Hu, Haobin; Yang, Ruirui

    2015-10-23

    Trefoil factor family (TFF), composed of TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3, is a cluster of secreted peptides characterized by trefoil domain (s) and C-terminal dimerization domain. TFF1, a gastric tumor suppressor, is a single trefoil peptide originally detected in breast cancer cell lines but expressed mainly in the stomach; TFF2, a candidate of gastric cancer suppressor with two trefoil domains, is abundant in the stomach and duodenal Brunner's glands; and TFF3 is another single trefoil peptide expressed throughout the intestine which can promote the development of gastric carcinoma. According to multiple studies, TFFs play a regulatory function in the mammals' digestive system, namely in mucosal protection and epithelial cell reconstruction, tumor suppression or promotion, signal transduction and the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis. Action mechanisms of TFFs remain unresolved, but the recent demonstration of a GKN (gastrokine) 2-TFF1 heterodimer implicates structural and functional interplay with gastrokines. This review aims to encapsulate the structural and biological characteristics of TFF.

  10. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K is overexpressed and associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer.

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    Yang, Ruirui; Zeng, Ying; Xu, Haifan; Chen, Zhuo; Xiang, Mengqin; Fu, Yun; Yin, Yufang; Zhong, Jing; Zeng, Min; Wang, Peihua; You, Qin; Zeng, Xi

    2016-08-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is one of the major pre-mRNA-binding proteins, that is involved in translational modifications. In our previous studies, we found that hnRNP K is associated with human gastric cancer. The protein levels of hnRNP K were detected in cell lines and tissue microarrays. The correlation between hnRNP K expression and patient survival rate was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. In addition, we also detected hnRNP K expression in preoperative and postoperative serum samples from patients with gastric cancer, and serum samples from healthy volunteers. We found that hnRNP K was overexpressed in the gastric cancer cell lines. The levels of hnRNP K were significantly elevated in the gastric cancer tissues compared with that noted in the tumor-adjacent gastric mucosal and normal gastric mucosal sampes, and hnRNP K expression was found to correlate with tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. However, the level of serum hnRNP K did not differ significantly between gastric cancer patients and healthy volunteers. We also found that patients whose tumors showed elevated expression of hnRNP K had poor survival. The present study suggests that hnRNP K is a promising tissue biomarker for diagnosing gastric cancer and is a prognostic indicator for patients with gastric cancer.

  11. [Immunohistochemical and histopathological study of expression of epidermal growth factor receptors in gastric cancer].

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    Kikkawa, K; Kato, M; Saitoh, Y

    1993-12-01

    To evaluate the importance of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in the growth and progression of human gastric cancer, we immunohistochemically stained EGFR in specimens of gastric cancer and compared the results with histopathological findings. Fresh frozen sections obtained from 65 cases of gastric cancer were stained by indirect immunostaining technique using Oncogene Scince Inc. Cat. No. GR01 (528 IgG reported by Kawamoto et al.) as anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody. Of the 65 cases of gastric cancer, 17 (26.2%) were EGFR-positive. In differentiated cancer, EGFR was positive in 15 of 28 cases (53.6%) of advanced cancer, and 1 of 14 (7.1%) of early stage cancer. In undifferentiated cancer, 1 of 15 cases (6.7%) of advanced cancer was positive, but all 8 cases of early stage cancer were negative. In differentiated cancer, EGFR was more frequently positive in cases of advanced cancer than in those of early stage cancer (p < 0.05). These results suggest that EGFR are expressed or increase in the transition process from early to advanced stage cancer in differentiated gastric cancer. In addition, the lower EGFR-positive rate in cases of undifferentiated cancer than in those of differentiated cancer suggests that an increase in EGFR is not needed for cancer growth in most cases of undifferentiated cancer.

  12. Sonic hedgehog pathway contributes to gastric cancer cell growth and proliferation.

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    Wan, Jianhua; Zhou, Ji; Zhao, Hailong; Wang, Mei; Wei, Zhuanqin; Gao, Hongyan; Wang, Yongzhong; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-04-01

    The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is commonly activated in gastrointestinal cancer. However, our understanding of the Shh pathway in gastric cancer remains limited. Here we examined the effects of cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of the Shh signaling pathway, on cell growth and proliferation in gastric primary cancer cells GAM-016 and the MKN-45 cell line. The results showed that the Shh signaling molecules SHH, PTCH, SMO, GLI1, and GLI2 were intact and activated in both types of cells. Furthermore, we observed that cyclopamine inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. An in vivo study using NOD/SCID mouse xenografts demonstrated that cyclopamine significantly prevented tumor growth and development. Our study indicated that Shh signaling pathway could promote gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumor development, and blocking this pathway may be a potential strategy in gastric cancer treatment.

  13. Environmental noise alters gastric myoelectrical activity: Effect of age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James S Castle; Jin-Hong Xing; Mark R Warner; Mark A Korsten

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of age and acoustic stress on gastric myoelectrical activity (GMA) and autonomic nervous system function,METHODS: Twenty-one male subjects (age range 22-71years, mean 44 years) were recruited and exposed, in random order, to three auditory stimuli (Hospital noise,conversation babble and traffic noise) after a 20-min baseline. All periods lasted 20 min and were interspersed with a 10 min of recovery. GMA was obtained using a Synectics Microdigitrapper. Autonomic nerve function was assessed by monitoring blood pressure and heart rate using an automatic recording device.RESULTS: Dominant power tended to decrease with increase of age (P<0.05). The overall percentage of three cycle per minute (CPM) activity decreased during exposure to hospital noise (12.0%, P < 0.05), traffic noise (13.9%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble(7.1%). The subjects in the younger group (< 50 years)showed a consistent reduction in the percentage of 3CPM activity during hospital noise (22.9%, P < 0.05),traffic noise (19.0%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble(15.5%). These observations were accompanied by a significant increase in bradygastria: hospital noise (P< 0.05) and traffic noise (P < 0.05). In contrast, the subjects over 50 years of age did not exhibit a significant decrease in 3 CPM activity. Regardless of age, noise did not alter blood pressure or heart rate.CONCLUSION: GMA changes with age. Loud noise can alter GMA, especially in younger individuals. Our data indicate that even short-term exposure to noise may alter the contractility of the stomach.

  14. High Diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori Genotypes in Patients with and without Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda López-Vidal; Sergio Ponce-de-León; Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas; Rafael Barreto-Zúñiga; Aldo Torre-Delgadillo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biops...

  15. Inflammatory response in laparoscopic vs. open surgery for gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Cecilie; Goetze, Jens Peter; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    lead to an increased susceptibility to complications and morbidity. The aim of this review was to investigate if laparoscopic surgery reduces the immunological response compared to open surgery in gastric cancer. METHODS: We conducted a literature search identifying relevant studies comparing......OBJECTIVE: Laparoscopic surgery may offer advantages compared to open surgery, such as earlier mobilization, less pain and lower post-surgical morbidity. Surgical stress is thought to be associated with the postoperative immunological changes in the body as an impaired immune function, which may...... laparoscopy or laparoscopic-assisted surgery with open gastric surgery. The main outcome was postoperative immunological status defined as surgical stress parameters, including inflammatory cytokines and blood parameters. RESULTS: We identified seven studies that addressed the immunological status in patients...

  16. [A case of early gastric cancer completely responding to adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Nakano, Mae; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Nakano, Masato; Ishikawa, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shinichi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Koyama, Yu; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-11-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with ascending colon cancer (cT3N1M0, Stage IIIa), which was found during examinations following a positive fecal occult blood test. The patient was also diagnosed with early gastric cancer (cT1a, N0, M0, Stage IA)during a preoperative gastroscopy examination. A laparoscopically assisted right colectomy and D3 lymphadenectomy was performed for the ascending colon cancer. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was Stage IIIb (pT3N2), he was administered in combination with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CapeOX) as adjuvant chemotherapy before the treatment for the colon cancer. After 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, we were unable to detect any gastric lesions at the same location using gastroscopy, and so diagnosed a clinical complete response. A follow-up gastroscopy 6 months later showed the same findings. The patient has had no recurrence of gastric cancer for 18 months after the initial operation. He will continue to be followed up closely using gastroscopy. In this case, CapeOX as adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer was also effective for early gastric cancer.

  17. Risk of gastric cancer by water source: evidence from the Golestan case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Eichelberger

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is the world's fifth most common cancer, and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Over 70% of incident cases and deaths occur in developing countries. We explored whether disparities in access to improved drinking water sources were associated with GC risk in the Golestan Gastric Cancer Case Control Study.306 cases and 605 controls were matched on age, gender, and place of residence. We conducted unconditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, marital status, education, head of household education, place of birth and residence, homeownership, home size, wealth score, vegetable consumption, and H. pylori seropositivity. Fully-adjusted ORs were 0.23 (95% CI: 0.05-1.04 for chlorinated well water, 4.58 (95% CI: 2.07-10.16 for unchlorinated well water, 4.26 (95% CI: 1.81-10.04 for surface water, 1.11 (95% CI: 0.61-2.03 for water from cisterns, and 1.79 (95% CI: 1.20-2.69 for all unpiped sources, compared to in-home piped water. Comparing unchlorinated water to chlorinated water, we found over a two-fold increased GC risk (OR 2.37, 95% CI: 1.56-3.61.Unpiped and unchlorinated drinking water sources, particularly wells and surface water, were significantly associated with the risk of GC.

  18. Metastatic gastric cancer – focus on targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Junco J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Judith Meza-Junco, Michael B SawyerDepartment of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gastric cancer (GC is currently the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide; unfortunately, most patients will present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Despite recent progress in diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, prognosis remains poor. A better understanding of GC biology and signaling pathways is expected to improve GC therapy, and the integration of targeted therapies has recently become possible and appears to be promising. This article focuses on anti-Her-2 therapy, specifically trastuzumab, as well as other epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists such as cetuximab, panitumub, matuzumab, nimotzumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib. Additionally, drugs that target angiogenesis pathways are also under investigation, particulary bevacizumab, ramucirumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, and cediranib. Other targeted agents in preclinical or early clinical development include mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors, anti-insulin-like growth factor, anti-heat shock proteins, and small molecules targeting Hedgehog signaling.Keywords: gastric cancer, targeted therapy, antiangiogenesis drugs, anti-EGFR drugs

  19. Clinical profile of gastric cancer in Khuzestan, southwest of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajiani Eskandar; Sarmast Shoshtari Mohammad Hossein; Masjedizadeh Rahim; Hashemi Jalal; Azmi Mehrdad; Tahereh Rajabi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the characteristics of epidemiological, clinical and survival patterns among patients with carcinoma of the stomach. METHODS: We retrospectively studied the characteristics of 186 gastric adenocarcinoma patients at Ahwaz Jundishapur University Hospitals (AJSUH) from September 1, 1996 to September 1, 2002. All the patients had histopathologicallyconfirmed malignancy. Demographic variables, family history of gastric cancer (GC), clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment-related variables were analyzed. Univariate analysis was performed with the log-rank test and multivariate analysis with Cox regression. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Male to female ratio was 2.6:1. The meanage was 60.6 years and 14% of the patients were younger than 40 years. Adenocarcinoma, gastric lymphoma, and gastric metastasis were found in 94.5%,2.3%, and 3% patients, respectively. There was an average of 6-mo delay between the initial symptoms and the diagnosis. Among adenocarcinoma groups, intestinal type was the commonest (55.9%) and the distal third was the most common localization (88.4%). One hundred and thirty-four patients (72.1%) were males. Thirty-one patients (17%) had a family history of GC. Surgery was performed in 90% of patients (non-curative).CONCLUSION: The epidemiological features of GC in south Iran mimic those in high-risk areas. There is a higher frequency of GC in young patients at our institution. Patients are detected and treated after a relatively long delay. Most patients present in advanced stages, which favors a poor overall survival. Family history of GC has a significant problem in our area. Studying the etiology of this cancer in south Iran and earlier diagnosis and subsequent better cares are recommended.

  20. Short-term and long-term risk factors in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlato, Giuseppe; Marrelli, Daniele; Accordini, Simone; Bencivenga, Maria; Di Leo, Alberto; Marchet, Alberto; Petrioli, Roberto; Zoppini, Giacomo; Muggeo, Michele; Roviello, Franco; de Manzoni, Giovanni

    2015-06-07

    While in chronic diseases, such as diabetes, mortality rates slowly increases with age, in oncological series mortality usually changes dramatically during the follow-up, often in an unpredictable pattern. For instance, in gastric cancer mortality peaks in the first two years of follow-up and declines thereafter. Also several risk factors, such as TNM stage, largely affect mortality in the first years after surgery, while afterward their effect tends to fade. Temporal trends in mortality were compared between a gastric cancer series and a cohort of type 2 diabetic patients. For this purpose, 937 patients, undergoing curative gastrectomy with D1/D2/D3 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer in three GIRCG (Gruppo Italiano Ricerca Cancro Gastrico = Italian Research Group for Gastric Cancer) centers, were compared with 7148 type 2 diabetic patients from the Verona Diabetes Study. In the early/advanced gastric cancer series, mortality from recurrence peaked to 200 deaths per 1000 person-years 1 year after gastrectomy and then declined, becoming lower than 40 deaths per 1000 person-years after 5 years and lower than 20 deaths after 8 years. Mortality peak occurred earlier in more advanced T and N tiers. At variance, in the Verona diabetic cohort overall mortality slowly increased during a 10-year follow-up, with ageing of the type 2 diabetic patients. Seasonal oscillations were also recorded, mortality being higher during winter than during summer. Also the most important prognostic factors presented a different temporal pattern in the two diseases: while the prognostic significance of T and N stage markedly decrease over time, differences in survival among patients treated with diet, oral hypoglycemic drugs or insulin were consistent throughout the follow-up. Time variations in prognostic significance of main risk factors, their impact on survival analysis and possible solutions were evaluated in another GIRCG series of 568 patients with advanced gastric cancer, undergoing

  1. Ion Chromatography Based Urine Amino Acid Profiling Applied for Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Fan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Amino acid metabolism in cancer patients differs from that in healthy people. In the study, we performed urine-free amino acid profile of gastric cancer at different stages and health subjects to explore potential biomarkers for diagnosing or screening gastric cancer. Methods. Forty three urine samples were collected from inpatients and healthy adults who were divided into 4 groups. Healthy adults were in group A (n=15, early gastric cancer inpatients in group B (n=7, and advanced gastric cancer inpatients in group C (n=16; in addition, two healthy adults and three advanced gastric cancer inpatients were in group D (n=5 to test models. We performed urine amino acids profile of each group by applying ion chromatography (IC technique and analyzed urine amino acids according to chromatogram of amino acids standard solution. The data we obtained were processed with statistical analysis. A diagnostic model was constructed to discriminate gastric cancer from healthy individuals and another diagnostic model for clinical staging by principal component analysis. Differentiation performance was validated by the area under the curve (AUC of receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves. Results. The urine-free amino acid profile of gastric cancer patients changed to a certain degree compared with that of healthy adults. Compared with healthy adult group, the levels of valine, isoleucine, and leucine increased (P<0.05, but the levels of histidine and methionine decreased (P<0.05, and aspartate decreased significantly (P<0.01. The urine amino acid profile was also different between early and advanced gastric cancer groups. Compared with early gastric cancer, the levels of isoleucine and valine decreased in advanced gastric cancer (P<0.05. A diagnosis model constructed for gastric cancer with AUC value of 0.936 tested by group D showed that 4 samples could coincide with it. Another diagnosis model for clinical staging with an AUC value of 0.902 tested by

  2. Identification of HRAS as cancer-promoting gene in gastric carcinoma cell aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao Yu; Liu, Wen Tao; Wu, Zhen Feng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jia Yun; Wu, Guan Nan; Yao, Xue Quan; Liu, Fu Kun; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the most lethal malignancies of cancers and its prognosis remains dismal due to the paucity of effective therapeutic targets. Herein, we showed that HRAS is markedly up-regulated in gastric carcinoma. Prognostic analysis indicated that HRAS expression might be a prognostic indicator for the survival of patients with gastric carcinoma. Ectopic expression of HRAS in gastric carcinoma cells accelerated proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, and clone formation ability of gastric carcinoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, HRAS over-expressing significantly promoted the tumorigenicity of gastric carcinoma cells in vivo whereas silencing endogenous HRAS caused opposite outcomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that HRAS enhanced gastric carcinoma aggressiveness by activating VEGFA/PI3K/AKT pathway and Raf-1 signaling. Together, our results provide new evidence that HRAS overexpression promotes the progression of gastric carcinoma and might represent a novel therapeutic target for its treatment. PMID:27725900

  3. Effects of combined octreotide and aspirin on the growth of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐承薇; 王春晖; 汤丽平

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the combination of octreotide and aspirin on the growth of gastric cancer. Methods Proliferation of gastric cancer cell lines treated with octreotide or aspirin was determined by 3 H-thymidine incorporation. After xenografts of human gastric cancer were implanted orthotropically in the stomach of nude mice, they were administered octreotide plus aspirin for 8 weeks. The mRNA of somatostatin receptor in the tissues of gastric carcinoma was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cyclooxygenase-2 in gastric cancer tissues was measured by immuno~histochemistry. Results Both octreotide and aspirin significantly reduced the 3 H-thymidine incorporation of gastric cancer cells. Xenografts in situ were found in all stomachs of nude mice except for two in the combination group. Either size or weight of tumors treated by octreotide, aspirin or in combination was significantly reduced as compared with that of controls. The inhibition rate for tumor was 60.6% (octreotide), 39.3% (aspirin), and 85.6% (in combination) respectively. No severe side effects were observed in any treated groups. Somatostatin receptor-2 and -3 were expressed in the transplanted gastric adenocarcinomas. Aspirin could down-regulate the strong expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in the tissue of gastric adenocarcinomas of nude mice.Conclusion A combination of octreotide and aspirin significantly inhibited proliferation of gastric cancer through mediation of somatosatin receptors and suppression of cyclooxygenase-2.

  4. Diagnostic model of saliva protein finger print analysis of patients with gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Zhi Wu; Ji-Guo Wang; Xiao-Li Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To explore the method for early diagnosis of gastric cancer by screening the expression spectrum of saliva protein in gastric cancer patients using mass spectrometry for proteomics. METHODS: Proportional peptide mass fingerprints were obtained by analysis based on proteomics matrixassisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/mass spectrometry. A diagnosis model was established using weak cation exchange magnetic beads to test saliva specimens from gastric cancer patients and healthy subjects. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed in the mass to charge ratio (m/z) peaks of four proteins (1472.78 Da, 2936.49 Da, 6556.81 Da and 7081.17 Da) between gastric cancer patients and healthy subjects. CONCLUSION: The finger print mass spectrum of saliva protein in patients with gastric cancer can be established using gastric cancer proteomics. A diagnostic model for distinguishing protein expression mass spectra of gastric cancer from non-gastriccancer saliva can be established according to the different expression of proteins 1472.78 Da, 2936.49 Da, 6556.81 Da and 7081.17 Da. The method for early diagnosis of gastric cancer is of certain value for screening special biological markers.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Eradication and Gastric Cancer: When Is the Horse Out of the Barn?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. de Vries; E.J. Kuipers; E.A.J. Rauws

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Therefore, H. pylori eradication may be an important approach in the prevention of gastric cancer. However, long-term data proving the efficacy of this approach are lacking. This report describes two patients who de

  6. Body iron status and gastric cancer risk in the EURGAST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Agudo, Antonio; Aranda, Núria; Arija, Victoria; Cross, Amanda J; Molina, Esther; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Siersema, Peter; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Saieva, Calogero; Naccarati, Alessio; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sjöberg, Klas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cadeau, Claire; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Tim; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Peeters, Petra H; Gavrila, Diana; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, José Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Jenab, Mazda; Zamora-Ros, Raúl; Freisling, Heinz; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Jakszyn, Paula

    2015-12-15

    Although it appears biologically plausible for iron to be associated with gastric carcinogenesis, the evidence is insufficient to lead to any conclusions. To further investigate the relationship between body iron status and gastric cancer risk, we conducted a nested case-control study in the multicentric European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The study included 456 primary incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases and 900 matched controls that occurred during an average of 11 years of follow-up. We measured prediagnostic serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and C-reactive protein, and further estimated total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and transferrin saturation (TS). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of gastric cancer by iron metrics were estimated from multivariable conditional logistic regression models. After adjusting for relevant confounders, we observed a statistically significant inverse association between gastric cancer and ferritin and TS indices (ORlog2  = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.72-0.88; OR10%increment  = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.78-0.97, respectively). These associations appear to be restricted to noncardia gastric cancer (ferritin showed a p for heterogeneity = 0.04 and TS had a p for heterogeneity = 0.02), and no differences were found by histological type. TIBC increased risk of overall gastric cancer (OR50 µg/dl  = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.02-1.2) and also with noncardia gastric cancer (p for heterogeneity = 0.04). Additional analysis suggests that time between blood draw and gastric cancer diagnosis could modify these findings. In conclusion, our results showed a decreased risk of gastric cancer related to higher body iron stores as measured by serum iron and ferritin. Further investigation is needed to clarify the role of iron in gastric carcinogenesis.

  7. Long-term risk of gastrointestinal cancers in persons with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, Kirstine K; Farkas, Dóra K; Pedersen, Lars; Lund, Jennifer L; Thomsen, Reimar W; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2016-06-01

    Peptic ulcer predicts gastric cancer. It is controversial if peptic ulcers predict other gastrointestinal cancers, potentially related to Helicobacter pylori or shared lifestyle factors. We hypothesized that gastric and duodenal ulcers may have different impact on the risk of gastrointestinal cancers. In a nationwide cohort study using Danish medical databases 1994-2013, we quantified the risk of gastric and other gastrointestinal cancers among patients with duodenal ulcers (dominantly H. pylori-related) and gastric ulcers (dominantly lifestyle-related) compared with the general population. We started follow-up 1-year after ulcer diagnosis to avoid detection bias and calculated absolute risks of cancer and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). We identified 54,565 patients with gastric ulcers and 38,576 patients with duodenal ulcers. Patient characteristics were similar in the two cohorts. The 1-5-year risk of any gastrointestinal cancer was slightly higher for gastric ulcers patients (2.1%) than for duodenal ulcers patients (2.0%), and SIRs were 1.38 (95% CI: 1.31-1.44) and 1.30 (95% CI: 1.23-1.37), respectively. The SIR of gastric cancer was higher among patients with gastric ulcer than duodenal ulcer (1.92 vs. 1.38), while the SIRs for other gastrointestinal cancers were similar (1.33 vs. 1.29). Compared with gastric ulcer patients, duodenal ulcer patients were at lower risk of smoking- and alcohol-related gastrointestinal cancers. The risk of nongastric gastrointestinal cancers is increased both for patients with gastric ulcers and with duodenal ulcers, but absolute risks are low. H. pylori may be less important for the development of nongastric gastrointestinal cancer than hypothesized.

  8. Angiogenesis in gastric mucosa: an important component of gastric erosion and ulcer healing and its impairment in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnawski, Andrzej S; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K

    2014-12-01

    Angiogenesis (also referred to as neovascularization-formation of new blood vessels from existing vessels) is a fundamental process essential for healing of tissue injury and ulcers because regeneration of blood microvessels is a critical requirement for oxygen and nutrient delivery to the healing site. This review article updates the current views on angiogenesis in gastric mucosa following injury and during ulcer healing, its sequential events, the underlying mechanisms, and the impairment of angiogenesis in aging gastric mucosa. We focus on the time sequence and ultrastructural features of angiogenesis, hypoxia as a trigger, role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling (VEGF), serum response factor, Cox2 and prostaglandins, nitric oxide, and importin. Recent reports indicate that gastric mucosa of aging humans and experimental animals exhibits increased susceptibility to injury and delayed healing. Gastric mucosa of aging rats has increased susceptibility to injury by a variety of damaging agents such as ethanol, aspirin, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because of structural and functional abnormalities including: reduced gastric mucosal blood flow, hypoxia, reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and survivin, and increased expression of early growth response protein 1 (egr-1) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Until recently, postnatal neovascularization was assumed to occur solely through angiogenesis sprouting of endothelial cells and formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing blood vessels. New studies in the last decade have challenged this paradigm and indicate that in some tissues, including gastric mucosa, the homing of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells to the site of injury can also contribute to neovascularization by a process termed vasculogenesis.

  9. Cancer Worry, Perceived Risk and Cancer Screening in First-Degree Relatives of Patients with Familial Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jenny; Hart, Tae L; Aronson, Melyssa; Crangle, Cassandra; Govindarajan, Anand

    2016-06-01

    Currently, there is a lack of evidence evaluating the psychological impact of cancer-related risk perception and worry in individuals at high risk for gastric cancer. We examined the relationships between perceived risk, cancer worry and screening behaviors among first-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with familial gastric cancer. FDRs of patients diagnosed with familial gastric cancer with a non-informative genetic analysis were identified and contacted. Participants completed a telephone interview that assessed socio-demographic information, cancer risk perception, cancer worry, impact of worry on daily functioning, and screening behaviors. Twenty-five FDRs completed the telephone interview. Participants reported high levels of comparative and absolute cancer risk perception, with an average perceived lifetime risk of 54 %. On the other hand, cancer-related worry scores were low, with a significant minority (12 %) experiencing high levels of worry. Study participants exhibited high levels of confidence (median = 70 %) in the effectiveness of screening at detecting a curable cancer. Participants that had undergone screening in the past showed significantly lower levels of cancer-related worry compared to those that had never undergone screening. In conclusion, individuals at high-risk for gastric cancer perceived a very high personal risk of cancer, but reported low levels of cancer worry. This paradoxical result may be attributed to participants' high levels of confidence in the effectiveness of screening. These findings highlight the importance for clinicians to discuss realistic risk appraisals and expectations towards screening with unaffected members of families at risk for gastric cancer, in an effort to help mitigate anxiety and help with coping.

  10. Relationship of Helicobacter pylori eradication with gastric cancer and gastric mucosal histological changes: a 10-year follow-up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Liya; Lin Sanren; Ding Shigang; Huang Xuebiao; Jin Zhu; Cui Rongli; Meng Lingmei

    2014-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is a common and potentially curable cause of gastric mucosa lesion.This study investigated the relationship of Hp infection with histological changes in gastric mucosa and gastric cancer in Hp-positive patients compared with Hp-eradication patients followed up for ten years.Methods From an initial group of 1 006 adults,552 Hp-positive subjects were randomly assigned to a treatment group (T;n=276) or a placebo group (P; n=276).In the randomized,double-blind,placebo-controlled,parallel trial,T group subjects received oral doses of omeprazole,amoxicillin and clarithromycin for 1 week; those in the P group received a placebo.One month after treatment ended,a 13C urea breath test was performed,and Hp was undetectable in 88.89% of the T group.All subjects were followed at 1,5,8,and 10 years after treatment,with endoscopy and biopsies for histological examination.Results Gastric mucosa inflammation was significantly milder in the T group than that in the P group one year after Hp eradication and this persisted for 10 years.Glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia (IM) had deteriorated in both groups during ten years.However,the increased score of glandular atrophy at both the gastric antrum and corpus,and IM only at the gastric antrum,in the P group was more obvious than that in the T group.During the 10 years,9 patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer (2 in the T group; 7 in the P group; P=0.176).When mucosal atrophy was absent at the gastric antrum and corpus when entering the study,the incidence of gastric cancer in the P group (n=6) was much higher than that in the T group (n=0,P=0.013).Conclusions Hp eradication may significantly diminish and help halt progression of gastric mucosal inflammation and delay the development of IM and atrophy gastritis.Hp eradication is helpful for reducing the risk for gastric cancer,especially in the early stage of Hp infection.