WorldWideScience

Sample records for age fracture mechanics

  1. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  2. Early Age Fracture Mechanics and Cracking of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lennart

    2003-01-01

    . The reasons are the increased autogenous deformation, the high rate of heat evolution and a higher brittleness of these concretes. Due to these adverse mechanisms the interest in the full description of the behavior of early age concrete has increased dramatically in the last two or three decades. Almost all...... the fictitious crack model and the aim has been experimentally to determine the fracture mechanical properties related to this model. The results provide interesting and important insight into the development of the fracture properties in early age. It is found that the characteristic length has moments of low...... values in early age, which means that the cracking sensibility is higher at those time points. The possible influence of time-dependent effects in the fracture mechanical properties on the cracking behavior in early age has also been investigated. The reason for this has been the known fact...

  3. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  4. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  5. Fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This book entitle ''Fracture Mechanics'', the first one of the monograph ''Materiologie'' is geared to design engineers, material engineers, non destructive inspectors and safety experts. This book covers fracture mechanics in isotropic homogeneous continuum. Only the monotonic static loading is considered. This book intended to be a reference with the current state of the art gives the fundamental of the issues under concern and avoids the developments too complicated or not yet mastered for not making reading cumbersome. The subject matter is organized as going from an easy to a more complicated level and thus follows the chronological evolution in the field. Similarly the microscopic scale is considered before the macroscopic scale, the physical understanding of phenomena linked to the experimental observation of the material preceded the understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of structures. In this latter field the relatively recent contribution of finite element computations with some analogy with the experimental observation is determining. However more sensitive analysis is not skipped

  6. Fracture mechanics evaluation for the cast duplex stainless steel after thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Shigeru [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore, we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years. (author)

  7. Fracture mechanics evaluation of cast duplex stainless steel after thermal aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tujikura, Y.; Urata, S.

    1999-01-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel, which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance and weldability, has conventionally been used. Cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix, and thermal aging after long-term service is known to decrease fracture toughness. Therefore, we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secure, even when such through-wall crack length is assumed to be as large as the fatigue crack length grown for a service period of up to 60 years. (orig.)

  8. Fracture mechanics evaluation of cast duplex stainless steel after thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tujikura, Y.; Urata, S. [Kansai Electr. Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan). General Office of Nucl. and Fossil Power Production

    1999-07-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel, which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance and weldability, has conventionally been used. Cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix, and thermal aging after long-term service is known to decrease fracture toughness. Therefore, we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secure, even when such through-wall crack length is assumed to be as large as the fatigue crack length grown for a service period of up to 60 years. (orig.)

  9. Fracture mechanics assessment of thermal aged nuclear piping based on the Leak-Before-Break concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Weiwei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Qian, Guian [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Wang, Rongshan; Lu, Feng; Zhang, Guodong; Xue, Fei; Chen, Zhilin [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of thermal aging on crack unstable tearing are studied. • The critical size of crack unstable tearing is calculated by different methods. • The critical failure models are compared. • The conservatism of J–T diagram is shown. - Abstract: The Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept has been accepted to design the primary piping system of the pressurized water reactor (PWR). Due to thermal aging of long term operation, the cast stainless steels (CSSs) which are used for the primary piping of PWR, suffer a significant loss of fracture toughness, and as a consequence the safety margin of the thermal aged pipe decreases. Therefore, the aged piping should be analyzed and validated by the LBB concept. In this paper, elastic–plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) assessments of the thermal aged piping are presented according to the LBB concept. The critical break size of crack unstable tearing is calculated by the EPFM method. The crack driving force diagram (J–a diagram), the stability assessment diagram (J–T diagram) and a numerical method are applied to calculate the critical crack size of crack break. The effects of thermal aging on the plastic limit load, J–T diagram, critical crack size of the EPFM and the critical failure mode are studied. The results show that the thermal aging effect decreases the maximum allowed J-integral at a certain ductile tearing modulus by more than 50% and it increases the flow stress and plastic limit load by 11.78%. The results based on the J–T diagram are about 40% conservative than those based on the direct numerical method for the high loading case. For the thermal aged piping, it is important to consider the competition failure modes between plastic collapse and unstable ductile tearing.

  10. User's manuals of probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis code for aged piping, PASCAL-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hiroto; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Onizawa, Kunio; Kato, Daisuke; Osakabe, Kazuya

    2010-03-01

    As a part of research on the material degradation and structural integrity assessment for aged LWR components, a PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) analysis code PASCAL-SP (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR - Stress Corrosion Cracking at Welded Joints of Piping) has been developed. This code evaluates the failure probabilities at welded joints of aged piping by a Monte Carlo method. PASCAL-SP treats stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue crack growth in piping, according to the approaches of NISA and JSME FFS Code. The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the latest knowledge in the SCC assessment and fracture criteria of piping. In addition, the accuracy of flaw detection and sizing at in-service inspection and residual stress distribution were modeled based on experimental data and introduced into PASCAL-SP. This code has been developed for a cross-check use by the regulatory body in Japan. In addition to this, this code can also be used for a research purpose by researchers in academia and industries. This report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of the code. (author)

  11. Fracture mechanical materials characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, K.; Planman, T.; Nevalainen, M.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental fracture mechanics development has been focused on the determination of reliable lower-bound fracture toughness estimates from small and miniature specimens, in particular considering the statistical aspects and loading rate effects of fracture mechanical material properties. Additionally, materials aspects in fracture assessment of surface cracks, with emphasis on the transferability of fracture toughness data to structures with surface flaws have been investigated. Further a modified crack-arrest fracture toughness test method, to increase the effectiveness of testing, has been developed. (orig.)

  12. PASCAL, Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Onizawa, Kunio; Li, Yinsheng; Kato, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    A - Description of program or function: PASCAL (PFM analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) is a PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) code for evaluating the failure probability of aged pressure components. PASCAL has been developed as a part of the JAERI's research program on aging and structural integrity of LWR components, in order to respond to the increasing need of the probabilistic methodology in the regulation and inspection of nuclear components with the objective to provide a rational tool for the evaluation of the reliability and integrity of structural components. In order to improve the accuracy and reliability of the analysis code, some new fracture mechanics models or computational techniques are introduced considering the recent progress in the state of the art and performance of PC. Thus some new analysis models and original methodologies were introduced in PASCAL such as the elastic-plastic fracture criterion based on R6 method, a new crack extension model of semi-elliptical crack evaluation and so on. Moreover a function to evaluate the effect of embrittlement recovery by annealing of irradiated RPV is also introduced in the code based on the USNRC R.G. 1.162(1996). The code has been verified through various failure analysis results and international PTS round robin analysis ICAS which had been organized by the Principal Working Group 3 of OECD/NEA/CSNI. In order to attain a high usability, PASCAL Ver.1 with GUI provides an exclusive FEM pre-processor Pre-PASCAL for generating the input load transient data, a GUI system for generating the input data for PASCAL main processor of main solver and post-processor for output data. - Pre-PASCAL: Pre-PASCAL is an exclusive 3-D FEM pre-processor for generating the input transient data provided with 3 RPV mesh models and two simple specimen mesh models, i.e. CT and CCP. Almost the same input data format with that of PASCAL main processor is used. Output data of temperature and stress distribution

  13. Fracture mechanics safety approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, E.; Schuler, X.; Eisele, U.

    2004-01-01

    Component integrity assessments require the knowledge of reliable fracture toughness parameters characterising the initiation of the failure process in the whole relevant temperature range. From a large number of fracture mechanics tests a statistically based procedure was derived allowing to quantify the initiation of fracture toughness as a function of temperature as a closed function as well as the temperature dependence of the cleavage instability parameters. Alternatively to the direct experimental determination one also can use a correlation between fracture toughness and notch impact energy. (orig.)

  14. Elevated temperature fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of fracture mechanics concepts to cracks at elevated temperatures is examined. Particular consideration is given to the characterisation of crack tip stress-strain fields and parameters controlling crack extension under static and cyclic loads. (author)

  15. Why ductile fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, the engineering application of fracture mechanics has been specific to a description of macroscopic fracture behavior in components and structural parts which remain nominally elastic under loading. While this approach, termed linear elastic fracture mechanics, has been found to be invaluable for the continuum analysis of crack growth in brittle and high strength materials, it is clearly inappropriate for characterizing failure in lower strength ductile alloys where extensive inelastic deformation precedes and accompanies crack initiation and subsequent propagation. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted in recent years toward the development of nonlinear or ductile fracture mechanics methodology to characterize fracture behavior under elastic/plastic conditions; an effort which has been principally motivated by problems in nuclear industry. In this paper, the concepts of ductile (elastic/plastic) fracture mechanics are introduced and applied to the problem of both stationary and nonstationary cracks. Specifically, the limitations inherent in this approach are defined, together with a description of the microstructural considerations and applications relevant to the failure of ductile materials by fracture, fatigue, and creep

  16. Classical fracture mechanics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalbe, K.H.; Heerens, J.; Landes, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.02 of this volume and is structured as follows: Test techniques; Analysis; Fracture behavior; Fracture toughness tests for nonmetals

  17. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  18. The fracture mechanism of uranium-niobium alloys near hypoeutectoid composition aged at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoying; Ren Dapeng; Yang Jianxiong; Jiang Guifen

    2006-01-01

    The microstructures and the crack propagation of uranium-niobium alloys near hypoeutectoid composition aged at temperature 200 degree C for 2 hours during a tension was investigated by means of in situ tension tests using TEM. The results show that the twinning planes inside and between the martensite laths move and merge, and then disintegrate in uranium-niobium alloys with monoclinic α structure during the tension. The crack propagation can be described as follows. Under the tension, the thinning zone which is locally plastically deformed emerges in the front of the crack tip. After the process of nucleation, growth and conjunction, the microvoids connect with the main crack, which results in the fracture. Neither of emission, propagation and movement of dislocation was observed during the tension. (authors)

  19. Fracture mechanics and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, M.G.; Morrell, R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on defects in ceramics, and the consequences of their presence for the application of fracture mechanics theories are reviewed. The complexities of microstructures, especially the multiphase nature, the crystallographic anisotropy and the resultant anisotropic physical properties, and the variation of microstructure and surface finish from point to point in real components, all lead to considerable uncertainties in the actual performance of any particular component. It is concluded that although the concepts of fracture mechanics have been and will continue to be most useful for the qualitative explanation of fracture phenomena, the usefulness as a predictive tool with respect to most existing types of material is limited by the interrelation between material microstructure and mechanical properties. At present, the only method of eliminating components with unsatisfactory mechanical properties is to proof-test them, despite the fact that proof-testing itself is limited in ability to cope with changes to the component in service. The aim of the manufacturer must be to improve quality and consistency within individual components, from component to component, and from batch to batch. The aim of the fracture specialist must be to study longer-term properties to improve the accuracy of behaviour predictions with a stronger data base. Materials development needs to concentrate on obtaining defect-free materials that can be translated into more-reliable products, using our present understanding of the influence of microstructure on strength and toughness

  20. Fracture mechanics and parapsychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, G. P.

    2010-08-01

    The problem of postcritical deformation of materials beyond the ultimate strength is considered a division of fracture mechanics. A simple example is used to show the relationship between this problem and parapsychology, which studies phenomena and processes where the causality principle fails. It is shown that the concept of postcritical deformation leads to problems with no solution

  1. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, Jens Peder

    Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high-strength......Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high......-strength concrete. Chapter 2 A description of the factors which influence the strength and cracking of concrete and high strength concrete is made. Then basic linear fracture mechanics is outlined followed by a description and evaluation of the models used to describe concrete fracture in tension. The chapter ends...... and the goveming equations are explicit and simple. These properties of the model make it a very powerful tool, which is applicable for the designing engineer. The method is also extended to reinforced concrete, where the results look very promising. The large experimental investigation on high-strength concrete...

  2. Age-related mechanical strength evolution of trabecular bone under fatigue damage for both genders: Fracture risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Kahla, Rabeb; Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Merzouki, Tarek

    2018-05-04

    Bone tissue is a living composite material, providing mechanical and homeostatic functions, and able to constantly adapt its microstructure to changes in long term loading. This adaptation is conducted by a physiological process, known as "bone remodeling". This latter is manifested by interactions between osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and can be influenced by many local factors, via effects on bone cell differentiation and proliferation. In the current work, age and gender effects on damage rate evolution, throughout life, have been investigated using a mechanobiological finite element modeling. To achieve the aim, a mathematical model has been developed, coupling both cell activities and mechanical behavior of trabecular bone, under cyclic loadings. A series of computational simulations (ABAQUS/UMAT) has been performed on a 3D human proximal femur, allowing to investigate the effects of mechanical and biological parameters on mechanical strength of trabecular bone, in order to evaluate the fracture risk resulting from fatigue damage. The obtained results revealed that mechanical stimulus amplitude affects bone resorption and formation rates, and indicated that age and gender are major factors in bone response to the applied loadings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  4. Mechanical properties of fracture zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leijon, B.

    1993-05-01

    Available data on mechanical characteristics of fracture zones are compiled and discussed. The aim is to improve the basis for adequate representation of fracture zones in geomechanical models. The sources of data researched are primarily borehole investigations and case studies in rock engineering, involving observations of fracture zones subjected to artificial load change. Boreholes only yield local information about the components of fracture zones, i.e. intact rock, fractures and various low-strength materials. Difficulties are therefore encountered in evaluating morphological and mechanical properties of fracture zones from borehole data. Although often thought of as macroscopically planar features, available field data consistently show that fracture zones are characterized by geometrical irregularities such as thickness variations, surface undulation and jogs. These irregularities prevail on all scales. As a result, fracture zones are on all scales characterized by large, in-plane variation of strength- and deformational properties. This has important mechanical consequences in terms of non-uniform stress transfer and complex mechanisms of shear deformation. Field evidence for these findings, in particular results from the underground research laboratory in Canada and from studies of induced fault slip in deep mines, is summarized and discussed. 79 refs

  5. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    the international workshop on concrete fracture, organised by A Carpinteri, at Torino ... The next question is how to bring the size effect into codes of practice on the ... analysis of the recent collapse of the World Trade Center in New York by Z P ...

  6. Probabilistic application of fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.

    1981-04-01

    The different methods used to evaluate the rupture probability of a pressure vessel are reviewed. Data collection and processing of all parameters necessary for fracture mechanics evaluation are presented with particular attention to the size distribution of defects in actual vessels. Physical process is followed during crack growth and unstable propagation, using LEFM (Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanism) and plastic instability. Results show that the final failure probability for a PWR pressure vessel is 3.5 10 -8 , and is due essentially to LOCAs for any break size. The weakest point is the internal side of the belt line

  7. Fracture mechanics model of fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, L.A.; Gommerstadt, B.Y.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    A model of the fragmentation process is developed, based on the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics, which predicts the average fragment size as a function of strain rate and material properties. This approach permits a unification of previous results, yielding Griffith's solution in the low-strain-rate limit and Grady's solution at high strain rates

  8. Fracture, aging and disease in bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    From a public health perspective, developing a detailed mechanistic understanding of the well-known increase in fracture risk of human bone with age is essential. This also represents a challenge from materials science and fracture mechanics viewpoints. Bone has a complex, hierarchical structure with characteristic features ranging from nanometer to macroscopic dimensions; it is therefore significantly more complex than most engineering materials. Nevertheless, by examining the micro-/nano-structural changes accompanying the process of aging using appropriate multiscale experimental methods and relating them to fracture mechanics data, it is possible to obtain a quantitative picture of how bone resists fracture. As human cortical bone exhibits rising ex vivo crack-growth resistance with crack extension, its fracture toughness must be evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior. While the crack initiation toughness declines with age, the more striking finding is that the crack-growth toughness declines even more significantly and is essentially absent in bone from donors exceeding 85 years in age. To explain such an age-induced deterioration in the toughness of bone, we evaluate its fracture properties at multiple length scales, specifically at the molecular and nanodimensions using pico-force atomic-force microscopy, nanoindentation and vibrational spectroscopies, at the microscale using electron microscopy and hard/soft x-ray computed tomography, and at the macroscale using R-curve measurements. We show that the reduction in crack-growth toughness is associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular involving crack bridging, and that this occurs at relatively coarse size-scales in the range of tens to hundreds of micrometers. Finally, we briefly describe how specific clinical treatments, e.g., with steroid hormones to treat various inflammatory conditions, can prematurely damage bone, thereby reducing its

  9. Fracture mechanics. With an introduction to micromechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.

    2006-01-01

    Concerned with the fundamental concepts and methods of fracture mechanics and micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics primarily focuses on the mechanical description of the fracture process; however, material specific aspects are also discussed. The presentation of continuum mechanical and phenomenological foundations is followed by an introduction into classical failure hypotheses. A major part of the book is devoted to linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Further subjects are creep fracture, dynamic fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, probabilistic fracture mechanics, failure of thin films and fracture of piezoelectric materials. The book also contains an extensive introduction into micromechanics. Self-contained and well-illustrated, this text serves as a graduate-level text and reference

  10. Influence of ageing on glass and resin bonding of dental glass-ceramic veneer adhesion to zirconia: A fracture mechanics analysis and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M V; Gee, C; Li, K C

    2018-04-26

    Adhesion plays a major role in the bonding of dental materials. In this study the adhesion of two glass-ceramic systems (IPS e.max and VITABLOCS) to a zirconia sintered substrate using a glass (for IPS e.max) and resin (VITABLOCS) before and after exposure to ageing for 14 days in distilled water at 37 °C are compared using two interfacial fracture mechanics tests, the 3 point bend Schwickerath (Kosyfaki and Swain, 2014; Schneider and Swain, 2015) and 4 point bend (Charalambides et al., 1989) approaches. Both tests result in stable crack extension from which the strain energy release rate (G, N/m or J/m 2 ) can be determined. In the case of the 3 PB test the Work of Fracture was also determined. In addition, the Schwickerath test enables determination of the critical stress for the onset of cracking to occur, which forms the basis of the ISO (ISO9693-2:2016) adhesion test for porcelain ceramic adhesion to zirconia. For the aged samples there was a significant reduction in the resin-bonded strengths (Schwickerath) and strain energy release rate (both 3 and 4 PB tests), which was not evident for the glass bonded specimens. Critical examination of the force-displacement curves showed that ageing of the resin resulted in a major change in the form of the curves, which may be interpreted in terms of a reduction in the critical stress to initiate cracking and also in the development of an R-curve. The extent of the reduction in strain energy release rate following ageing was greater for the Schwickerath test than the Charalambides test. The results are discussed in terms of; the basic mechanics of these two tests, the deterioration of the resin bonding following moisture exposure and the different dimensions of the specimens. These in-vitro results raise concerns regarding resin bonding to zirconia. The present study uses a novel approach to investigate the role of ageing or environmental degradation on the adhesive bonding of two dental ceramics to zirconia

  11. Deformation and fracture mechanics of engineering materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hertzberg, Richard W; Vinci, Richard Paul; Hertzberg, Jason L

    2012-01-01

    "Hertzberg's 5th edition of Deformation & Fracture Mechanics of Engineering Materials offers several new features including a greater number and variety of homework problems using more computational software...

  12. Fracture Mechanics: Inspirations from Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Taylor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Nature there are many examples of materials performing structural functions. Nature requires materials which are stiff and strong to provide support against various forces, including self-weight, the dynamic forces involved in movement, and external loads such as wind or the actions of a predator. These materials and structures have evolved over millions of years; the science of Biomimetics seeks to understand Nature and, as a result, to find inspiration for the creation of better engineering solutions. There has been relatively little fundamental research work in this area from a fracture mechanics point of view. Natural materials are quite brittle and, as a result, they have evolved several interesting strategies for preventing failure by crack propagation. Fatigue is also a major problem for many animals and plants. In this paper, several examples will be given of recent work in the Bioengineering Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin, investigating fracture and fatigue in such diverse materials as bamboo, the legs and wings of insects, and living cells.

  13. Theoretical aspects of fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, C.; Craster, R. V.

    1995-03-01

    In this review we try to cover various topics in fracture mechanics in which mathematical analysis can be used both to aid numerical methods and cast light on key features of the stress field. The dominant singular near crack tip stress field can often be parametrized in terms of three parameters K(sub I), K(sub II) and K(sub III) designating three fracture modes each having an angular variation entirely specified for the stress tensor and displacement vector. These results and contact zone models for removing the interpenetration anomaly are described. Generalizations of the above results to viscoelastic media are described. For homogeneous media with constant Poisson's ratio the angular variation of singular crack tip stresses and displacements are shown to be the same for all time and the same inverse square root singularity as occurs in the elastic medium case is found (this being true for a time varying Poisson ratio too). Only the stress intensity factor varies through time dependence of loads and relaxation properties of the medium. For cracks against bimaterial interfaces both the stress singularity and angular form evolve with time as a function of the time dependent properties of the bimaterial. Similar behavior is identified for sharp notches in viscoelastic plates. The near crack tip behavior in material with non-linear stress strain laws is also identified and stress singularities classified in terms of the hardening exponent for power law hardening materials. Again for interface cracks the near crack tip behavior requires careful analysis and it is shown that more than one singular term may be present in the near crack tip stress field. A variety of theory and applications is presented for inhomogeneous elastic media, coupled thermoelasticity etc. Methods based on reciprocal theorems and dual functions which can also aid in getting awkward singular stress behavior from numerical solutions are also reviewed. Finally theoretical calculations of fiber

  14. Recent trends in fracture and damage mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zybell, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of topics in fracture and damage mechanics. It presents historical perspectives as well as recent innovative developments, presented by peer reviewed contributions from internationally acknowledged authors.  The volume deals with the modeling of fracture and damage in smart materials, current industrial applications of fracture mechanics, and it explores advances in fracture testing methods. In addition, readers will discover trends in the field of local approach to fracture and approaches using analytical mechanics. Scholars in the fields of materials science, engineering and computational science will value this volume which is dedicated to Meinhard Kuna on the occasion of his 65th birthday in 2015. This book incorporates the proceedings of an international symposium that was organized to honor Meinhard Kuna’s contributions to the field of theoretical and applied fracture and damage mechanics.

  15. Intermetallic alloys: Deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, B.

    1988-01-01

    The state of the art in intermetallic alloys development with particular emphasis on deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour is documented. This review paper is prepared to lay the ground stones for a future work on mechanical property characterization and fracture behaviour of intermetallic alloys at GKSS. (orig.)

  16. Fracture mechanics of piezoelectric and ferroelectric solids

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Daining

    2013-01-01

    Fracture Mechanics of Piezoelectric and Ferroelectric Solids presents a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the fracture mechanics of piezoelectric/ferroelectric materials, which includes the theoretical analysis, numerical computations and experimental observations. The main emphasis is placed on the mechanics description of various crack problems such static, dynamic and interface fractures as well as the physical explanations for the mechanism of electrically induced fracture. The book is intended for postgraduate students, researchers and engineers in the fields of solid mechanics, applied physics, material science and mechanical engineering. Dr. Daining Fang is a professor at the School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, China; Dr. Jinxi Liu is a professor at the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Shijiazhuang Railway Institute, China.

  17. Physical fracture properties (fracture surfaces as information sources; crackgrowth and fracture mechanisms; exemples of cracks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meny, Lucienne.

    1979-06-01

    Fracture surfaces are considered as a useful source of informations: an introduction to fractography is presented; the fracture surface may be observed through X ray microanalysis, and other physical methods such as Auger electron spectroscopy or secundary ion emission. The mechanisms of macroscopic and microscopic crackgrowth and fracture are described, in the case of unstable fracture (cleavage, ductile with shear, intergranular brittleness) and of progressive crack propagation (creep, fatigue). Exemples of cracks are presented in the last chapter [fr

  18. Fracture mechanisms and fracture control in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wone-Chul

    Four basic failure modes--delamination, delamination buckling of composite sandwich panels, first-ply failure in cross-ply laminates, and compression failure--are analyzed using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and the J-integral method. Structural failures, including those at the micromechanical level, are investigated with the aid of the models developed, and the critical strains for crack propagation for each mode are obtained. In the structural fracture analyses area, the fracture control schemes for delamination in a composite rib stiffener and delamination buckling in composite sandwich panels subjected to in-plane compression are determined. The critical fracture strains were predicted with the aid of LEFM for delamination and the J-integral method for delamination buckling. The use of toughened matrix systems has been recommended for improved damage tolerant design for delamination crack propagation. An experimental study was conducted to determine the onset of delamination buckling in composite sandwich panel containing flaws. The critical fracture loads computed using the proposed theoretical model and a numerical computational scheme closely followed the experimental measurements made on sandwich panel specimens of graphite/epoxy faceskins and aluminum honeycomb core with varying faceskin thicknesses and core sizes. Micromechanical models of fracture in composites are explored to predict transverse cracking of cross-ply laminates and compression fracture of unidirectional composites. A modified shear lag model which takes into account the important role of interlaminar shear zones between the 0 degree and 90 degree piles in cross-ply laminate is proposed and criteria for transverse cracking have been developed. For compressive failure of unidirectional composites, pre-existing defects play an important role. Using anisotropic elasticity, the stress state around a defect under a remotely applied compressive load is obtained. The experimentally

  19. Mechanisms and multi-scale modelling of the brittle fracture modifications induced by thermal ageing of a pressurised water reactor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    The use of some PWR components at a relatively high temperature generates a drop of their fracture properties. This embrittlement is generally attributed to the segregation of some impurities at grains boundaries. This work aims at correlating the kinetics of this segregation to the embrittlement kinetics through a multi-scale approach, combining thermodynamical and micro-mechanical analysis. (author)

  20. Effect of natural aging on the microstructural regions, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and fracture in welded joints on API5L X52 steel pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas-Arista, Benjamín

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A characterization study was done to analyze how microstructural regions affect the mechanical properties, corrosion and fractography of the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, weld bead and base metal for pipe naturally aged for 21 years at 30 °C. Results showed that microstructures exhibited damage and consequently decrease in properties, resulting in over-aged due to service. SEM analysis showed that base metal presented coarse ferrite grain. Tensile test indicated that microstructures showed discontinuous yield. Higher tensile strength was obtained for weld bead, which exhibited a lower impact energy in comparison to that of HAZ and base metal associated with brittle fracture by trans-granular cleavage. The degradation of properties was associated with the coarsening of nano-carbides observed through TEM images analysis, which was confirmed by SEM fractography of tensile and impact fracture surfaces. The weld bead reached the largest void density and highest susceptibility to corrosion in H2S media when compared to those of the HAZ and base metal.Se realizó un estudio de caracterización para analizar cómo la microestructura afecta a las propiedades mecánicas, corrosión y fractura de la zona afectada por calor (ZAC, soldadura y metal base para tubería envejecida naturalmente durante 21 años a 30 °C. Los resultados indicaron que las microestructuras presentaron daño y consecuentemente reducción en propiedades mecánicas, como consecuencia del envejecimiento por servicio. El estudio mediante MEB mostró que el metal base presenta grano ferrítico grueso. La prueba de tensión indicó que las microestructuras mostraron fluencia discontinua. La mayor resistencia a la tracción se presentó en la soldadura, la cual alcanzó menor energía de impacto en comparación con la ZAC y metal base asociado con fractura frágil por clivaje transgranular. La degradación de las propriedades está en relación con el engrosamiento de nanocarburos observados a

  1. Test techniques for fracture mechanics testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalbe, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    Test methods for fracture mechanics tests are described. Two groups of techniques are distinguished: Those for measurement of stable crack growth and those for determination of the loading parameters. (orig.) [de

  2. Mechanical Behaviour of Materials Volume II Fracture Mechanics and Damage

    CERN Document Server

    François, Dominique; Zaoui, André

    2013-01-01

    Designing new structural materials, extending lifetimes and guarding against fracture in service are among the preoccupations of engineers, and to deal with these they need to have command of the mechanics of material behaviour. This ought to reflect in the training of students. In this respect, the first volume of this work deals with elastic, elastoplastic, elastoviscoplastic and viscoelastic behaviours; this second volume continues with fracture mechanics and damage, and with contact mechanics, friction and wear. As in Volume I, the treatment links the active mechanisms on the microscopic scale and the laws of macroscopic behaviour. Chapter I is an introduction to the various damage phenomena. Chapter II gives the essential of fracture mechanics. Chapter III is devoted to brittle fracture, chapter IV to ductile fracture and chapter V to the brittle-ductile transition. Chapter VI is a survey of fatigue damage. Chapter VII is devoted to hydogen embrittlement and to environment assisted cracking, chapter VIII...

  3. Probabilistic finite elements for fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besterfield, Glen

    1988-01-01

    The probabilistic finite element method (PFEM) is developed for probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM). A finite element which has the near crack-tip singular strain embedded in the element is used. Probabilistic distributions, such as expectation, covariance and correlation stress intensity factors, are calculated for random load, random material and random crack length. The method is computationally quite efficient and can be expected to determine the probability of fracture or reliability.

  4. Associations of early premenopausal fractures with subsequent fractures vary by sites and mechanisms of fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, R; Tuppurainen, M; Kroger, H; Alhava, E; Puntila, E

    1997-04-01

    In a retrospective population-based study we assessed whether and how self-reported former fractures sustained at the ages of 20-34 are associated with subsequent fractures sustained at the ages of 35-57. The 12,162 women who responded to fracture questions of the baseline postal enquiry (in 1989) of the Kuopio Osteoporosis Study, Finland formed the study population. They reported 589 former and 2092 subsequent fractures. The hazard ratio (HR), with 95% confidence interval (CI), of a subsequent fracture was 1.9 (1.6-2.3) in women with the history of a former fracture compared with women without such a history. A former low-energy wrist fracture was related to subsequent low-energy wrist [HR = 3.7 (2.0-6.8)] and high-energy nonwrist [HR = 2.4 (1.3-4.4)] fractures, whereas former high-energy nonwrist fractures were related only to subsequent high-energy nonwrist [HR = 2.8 (1.9-4.1)] but not to low-energy wrist [HR = 0.7 (0.3-1.8)] fractures. The analysis of bone mineral density (BMD) data of a subsample of premenopausal women who underwent dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) during 1989-91 revealed that those with a wrist fracture due to a fall on the same level at the age of 20-34 recorded 6.5% lower spinal (P = 0.140) and 10.5% lower femoral (P = 0.026) BMD than nonfractured women, whereas the corresponding differences for women with a former nonwrist fracture due to high-energy trauma were -1.8% (P = 0.721) and -2.4% (P = 0. 616), respectively. Our results suggest that an early premenopausal, low-energy wrist fracture is an indicator of low peak BMD which predisposes to subsequent fractures in general, whereas early high-energy fractures are mainly indicators of other and more specific extraskeletal factors which mainly predispose to same types of subsequent fractures only.

  5. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with volume 8, constitutes the proceedings of an international symposium on the fracture mechanics of ceramics. The topics discussed in this volume include the toughening of ceramics by whisker reinforcement; the mechanical properties of SiCwhisker-reinforced TZP; the fracture of brittle rock and oil shale under dynamic explosive loading; impact damage models of ceramic coatings used in gas turbine and diesel engines; the use of exploratory data analysis for the safety evaluation of structural ceramics; and proof testing methods for the reliability of structural ceramics used in gas turbines

  6. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-01-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years

  7. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  8. Mechanical properties and fracture of titanium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koketsu, Hideyuki; Taniyama, Yoshihiro; Yonezu, Akio; Cho, Hideo; Ogawa, Takeshi; Takemoto, Mikio; Nakayama, Gen

    2006-01-01

    Titanium hydrides tend to suffer fracture when their thicknesses reach a critical thickness. Morphology and mechanical property of the hydrides are, however, not well known. The study aims to reveal the hydride morphology and fracture types of the hydrides. Chevron shaped plate hydrides were found to be produced on the surface of pure titanium (Grade 1) and Grade 7 titanium absorbing hydrogen. There were tree types of fracture of the hydrides, i.e., crack in hydride layer, exfoliation of the layer and shear-type fracture of the hydride plates, during the growth of the hydrides and deformation. We next estimated the true stress-strain curves of the hydrides on Grade 1 and 7 titanium using the dual Vickers indentation method, and the critical strain causing the Mode-I fine crack by indentation. Fracture strength and strain of the hydrides in Grade 1 titanium were estimated as 566 MPa and 4.5%, respectively. Those of the hydride in Grade 7 titanium were 498 MPa and 16%. Though the fracture strains estimated from the plastic instability of true stress-strain curves were approximately the half of those estimated by finite element method, the titanium hydrides were estimated to possess some extent of toughness or plastic deformation capability. (author)

  9. Numerical methods in dynamic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskos, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of numerical methods for the solution of dynamic problems of fracture mechanics is presented. Finite difference, finite element and boundary element methods as applied to linear elastic or viscoelastic and non-linear elastoplastic or elastoviscoplastic dynamic fracture mechanics problems are described and critically evaluated. Both cases of stationary cracks and rapidly propagating cracks of simple I, II, III or mixed modes are considered. Harmonically varying with time or general transient dynamic disturbances in the form of external loading or incident waves are taken into account. Determination of the dynamic stress intensity factor for stationary cracks or moving cracks with known velocity history as well as determination of the crack-tip propagation history for given dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relation are described and illustrated by means of certain representative examples. Finally, a brief assessment of the present state of knowledge is made and research needs are identified

  10. Geometry, mechanics and transmissivity of rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanaro, F.

    2001-04-01

    This thesis work investigates methods and tools for characterising, testing and modelling the behaviour of rock fractures. Using a 3D-laser-scanning technique, the topography of the surfaces and their position with respect to one another are measured. From the fracture topography, fracture roughness, angularity and aperture are quantified; the major features used for characterisation. The standard deviations for the asperity heights, surface slopes and aperture are determined. These statistical parameters usually increase/decrease according to power laws of the sampling size, and sometimes reach a sill beyond which they become constant. Also the number of contact spots with a certain area decreases according to a power-law function of the area. These power-law relations reveal the self affine fractal nature of roughness and aperture. Roughness is 'persistent' while aperture varies between 'persistent' and 'anti-persistent' probably depending on the degree of match of the fracture walls. The fractal models for roughness, aperture and contact area are used to develop a constitutive model, based on contact mechanics, for describing the fracture normal and shear deformability. The experimental testing results of normal deformability are simulated well by the model whereas fracture shear deformability is not as well modelled. The model predicts well fracture dilation but is too stiff compared to rock samples. A mathematical description of the aperture pattern during shearing is also formulated. The mean value and covariance of the aperture in shearing is calculated and verifies reported observations. The aperture map of samples is inserted in a numerical program for flow calculation. The 'integral transform method' is used for solving the Reynolds' equation; it transforms the fracture transmissivity pattern into a frequency-based function. This closely resembles the power laws that describe fractals. This function can be described directly from the fractal properties of

  11. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  12. Role of fracture mechanics in modern technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sih, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The conference served as a forum not only for reviewing past concepts and technologies but it provided an opportunity for many of the designers, engineers and scientists to come forth with more advanced ideas so that fracture mechanics application can be broadened and employed more effectively to avoid unexpected failures that are annoying, costly and destructive of credibility of the engineering community in general

  13. Fractures and Rock Mechanics, Phase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Jakobsen, Finn; Madsen, Lena

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of the project is to combine geological descriptions of fractures, chalk types and rock mechanical properties in order to investigate whether the chosen outcrops can be used as analogues to reservoir chalks. This report deals with 1) geological descriptions of outcrop locality...

  14. Fractures and Rock Mechanics, Phase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havmøller, Ole; Krogsbøll, Anette

    1997-01-01

    The main objectives of the project are to combine geological description of fractures, chalk types and rock mechanical properties, and to investigate whether the chosen outcrops can be used as analogues to reservoir chalks. Five chalk types, representing two outcrop localities: Stevns...

  15. Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-05-07

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  16. The influence of isothermal ageing and subsequent hydrogen charging at room temperature on local mechanical properties and fracture characteristics of martensitic-bainitic weldments for power engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falat L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the effects of high temperature expositions and subsequent cathodic hydrogen charging of dissimilar martensitic/bainitic weldment on its local mechanical properties and fracture behaviour at room temperature. Circumferential welded joint under investigation was produced by tungsten inert gas welding of X10CrWMoVNb9-2 martensitic and 7CrMoVTiB10-10 bainitic steels tubes with Ni-based filler metal and the application of subcritical postweld heat treatment. Hardness profile measurements revealed pronounced hardness peaks in over-heated regions of the individual steels heat-affected zones which remained preserved also during subsequent expositions at 600°C for up to 5000 hours. Gradual microstructural degradation of these regions included precipitate coarsening and the formation of new secondary phases during thermal exposure. The combined effects of thermal and hydrogen embrittlement of the studied weldment resulted in deleterious effects on its tensile and fracture behaviour.

  17. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  18. Mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, D.W.; Raven, K.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report compiles and evaluates the hydrogeologic parameters describing the flow of groundwater and transport of solutes in fractured crystalline rocks. This report describes the processes of mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rocks, and compiles and evaluates the dispersion parameters determined from both laboratory and field tracer experiments. The compiled data show that extrapolation of the reliable test results performed over intermediate scales (10's of m and 10's to 100's of hours) to larger spatial and temporal scales required for performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock is not justified. The reliable measures of longitudinal dispersivity of fractured crystalline rock are found to range between 0.4 and 7.8 m

  19. Fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiman, S.W.; Chuck, L.; Mecholsky, J.J.; Shelleman, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramics can be formed over a wide range of PbTiO 3 /PbZrO 3 ratios and exist in a number of crystal structures. This study involved the use of various fracture mechanics techniques to determine critical fracture toughness, K /SUB IC/ , as a function of composition, microstructure, temperature, and electrical and thermal history. The results of these experiments indicate that variations in K /SUB IC/ are related to phase transformations in the material as well as to other toughening mechanisms such as twinning and microcracking. In addition, the strength and fracture toughness of selected PZT ceramics were determined using specimens in which a crack was introduced by a Vicker's hardness indentor. The variation of K /SUB IC/ with composition and microstructure was related to the extent of twin-crack interaction. Comparison of the plot of strength as a function of indentation load with that predicted from indentation fracture models indicates the presence of internal stresses which contribute to failure. The magnitude of these internal stresses has been correlated with electrical properties of the ceramic. Fractographic analysis was used to determine the magnitude of internal stresses in specimens failing from ''natural flaws.''

  20. Tibial Fractures in Alpine Skiing and Snowboarding in Finland: A Retrospective Study on Fracture Types and Injury Mechanisms in 363 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, A; Pakarinen, H; Jalkanen, J; Mälkiä, T; Handolin, L

    2016-09-01

    Alpine skiing and snowboarding share the hazards of accidents accounting for tibial fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture patterns and mechanisms of injury of tibial fractures taking place in downhill skiing and snowboarding. All patients with tibial fracture due to alpine skiing or snowboarding accident treated in four trauma centers next to the largest ski resorts in Finland were analyzed between 2006 and 2012. The hospital records were retrospectively reviewed for data collection: equipment used (skis or snowboard), age, gender, and mechanism of injury. Fractures were classified according to AO-classification. There were 342 skiing and 30 snowboarding related tibial fractures in 363 patients. Tibial shaft fracture was the most common fracture among skiers (n = 215, 63%), followed by proximal tibial fractures (n = 92, 27%). Snowboarders were most likely to suffer from proximal tibial fracture (13, 43%) or tibial shaft fracture (11, 37%). Snowboarders were also more likely than skiers to suffer complex AO type C fractures (23% vs 9%, p jumping (46%). The most important finding was the relatively high number of the tibial plateau fractures among adult skiers. The fracture patterns between snowboarding and skiing were different; the most common fracture type in skiers was spiral tibial shaft fracture compared to proximal tibial fractures in snowboarders. Children had more simple fractures than adults. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2016.

  1. Fracture mechanics evaluation of heavy welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, I.; Ericksson, C.W.; Zilberstein, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes some applications of nondestructive examination (NDE) and engineering fracture mechanics to evaluation of flaws in heavy welded structures. The paper discusses not only widely recognized linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis, but also methods of the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM), such as COD, J-integral, and Failure Assessment Diagram. Examples are given to highlight the importance of interaction between specialists providing input and the specialists performing the analysis. The paper points out that the critical parameters for as-welded structures when calculated by these methods are conservative since they are based on two pessimistic assumptions: that the magnitude of residual stress is always at the yield strength level, and that the residual stress always acts in the same direction as the applied (mechanical) stress. The suggestion is made that it would be prudent to use the COD or the FAD design curves for a conservative design. The appendix examines a J-design curve modified to include residual stresses

  2. The fracture properties and toughening mechanisms of bone and dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Kurt John

    The mechanical properties of bone and dentin and in particular their fracture properties, are the subject of intense research. The relevance of these properties is increasing as our population ages and fracture incidence impacts the lives of a greater portion of the population. A robust framework is needed to understand the fracture properties of bone and dentin to guide researchers as they attempt to characterize the effects of aging, disease, and pharmaceutical treatments on the properties of these mineralized tissues. In the present work, this framework is provided and applied to human bone, human dentin, and animal bone. In situ electron microscopy was also used to identify the salient toughening mechanisms in bone and dentin. It was found that bone and dentin are extrinsically toughened materials and consequently their fracture properties are best characterized utilizing a crack-growth resistance approach. A description of the different mechanical measurements commonly employed when using small animal models (rats and mice) to evaluate the influence of drug therapies on bone fragility is provided. A study where these properties were measured for a large population of wild-type rats and mice was also conducted. Given my findings, it was determined that for the most complete understanding of small animal bone it was necessary to measure strength and toughness. Strength measurements probe the flaw distribution and toughness measurements to evaluate the resistance to facture in the presence of a single dominant worst-case flaw.

  3. Cracking mechanism of shale cracks during fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X. J.; Zhan, Q.; Fan, H.; Zhao, H. B.; An, F. J.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we set up a model for calculating the shale fracture pressure on the basis of Huang’s model by the theory of elastic-plastic mechanics, rock mechanics and the application of the maximum tensile stress criterion, which takes into account such factors as the crustal stress field, chemical field, temperature field, tectonic stress field, the porosity of shale and seepage of drilling fluid and so on. Combined with the experimental data of field fracturing and the experimental results of three axis compression of shale core with different water contents, the results show that the error between the present study and the measured value is 3.85%, so the present study can provide technical support for drilling engineering.

  4. Early age fracture properties of microstructurally-designed mortars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Bella, Carmelo; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This paper compares the fracture properties as well as crack initiation and propagation of real and equivalent mortars. The development of the elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture energy at different hydration stages were determined by inverse analysis of load-displacement curves...... the two mortars. At early age, the moisture content has a considerable influence on the tensile strength and the fracture energy....

  5. Integration of fracture mechanics and NDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njo, D.H.; McDonald, N.R.; Nichols, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses issues concerning the effective assessment of the structural integrity of safety related components, principally the primary system, in operating nuclear power plants. The failure mode of greatest safety concern is fracture and this is usually assessed by fracture mechanics (FM) procedures. These require the choice and application of an appropriate analytical method based on a knowledge of the materials, loading and environmental conditions, and characteristics of such defects as have been identified by non destructive examination (NDE). The paper focuses on capabilities and limitations of the NDE procedures, FM methods and other input information which must be taken into account in practical circumstances as well as some problems encountered. It concludes that an integral approach requiring mutual understanding, dialogue and cooperation among the materials, FM and NDE experts is essential for effective and reliable structural integrity assessments

  6. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: mail@crism.ru; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-15

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  7. Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

    2008-06-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

  8. Mechanical Integrity of Canisters Using a Fracture Mechanics Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Tomofumi; Guoxiang Zhang; Lanru Jing [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Land and Water Resources Engineering

    2006-07-15

    This report presents the methods and results of a research project about numerical modeling of mechanical integrity of cast-iron canisters for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden, using combined boundary element (BEM) and finite element (FEM) methods. The objectives of the project are: 1) to investigate the possibility of initiation and growth of fractures in the cast-iron canisters under the mechanical loading conditions defined in the premises of canister design by Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB); 2) to investigate the maximum bearing capacity of the cast iron canisters under uniformly distributed and gradually increasing boundary pressure until plastic failure. Achievement of the two objectives may provide some quantitative evidence for the mechanical integrity and overall safety of the cast-iron canisters that are needed for the final safety assessment of the geological repository of the radioactive waste repository in Sweden. The geometrical dimension, distribution and magnitudes of loads and Material properties of the canisters and possible fractures were provided by the latest investigations of SKB. The results of the BEM simulations, using the commercial code BEASY, indicate that under the currently defined loading conditions the possibility of initiation of new fractures or growth of existing fractures (defects) are very small, due to the reasons that: 1) the canisters are under mainly compressive stresses; 2) the induced tensile stress regions are too small in both dimension and magnitude to create new fractures or to induce growth of existing fractures, besides the fact that the toughness of the fractures in the cast iron canisters are much higher that the stress intensity factors in the fracture tips. The results of the FEM simulation show a approximately 75 MPa maximum pressure beyond which plastic collapse of the cast-iron canisters may occur, using an elastoplastic Material model. This figure is smaller compared

  9. Introduction into technical application of fracture mechanics. 3. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckel, K.

    1991-01-01

    Technical components made out of metal material are liable to be defective. Cracks are the most dangerous defects. Based on fracture mechanics methods were developed which permit to estimate the proveness of cracks to intrate fracture. The present book is restricted to the standardised methods of fracture mechanics. Theoretical foundations of various concepts aspect under the fracture mechanics are given. Experimental methods of determining material characteristics of fracture mechanics are explained in detail as a profound knowledge of testing criteria is necessary in order to be able to a characteristic to a component. This book contains the latest level of standardised methods of fracture mechanics. It is meant for advanced students and engineers working in practice. Some fully calculated examples are used as an introduction into the thinking of fracture mechanics. (orig./MM) [de

  10. Impact of Injury Mechanisms on Patterns and Management of Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greathouse, S Travis; Adkinson, Joshua M; Garza, Ramon; Gilstrap, Jarom; Miller, Nathan F; Eid, Sherrine M; Murphy, Robert X

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms causing facial fractures have evolved over time and may be predictive of the types of injuries sustained. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of mechanisms of injury on the type and management of facial fractures at our Level 1 Trauma Center. The authors performed an Institutional Review Board-approved review of our network's trauma registry from 2006 to 2010, documenting age, sex, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, facial fracture patterns (nasal, maxillary/malar, orbital, mandible), and reconstructions. Mechanism rates were compared using a Pearson χ2 test. The database identified 23,318 patients, including 1686 patients with facial fractures and a subset of 1505 patients sustaining 2094 fractures by motor vehicle collision (MVC), fall, or assault. Nasal fractures were the most common injuries sustained by all mechanisms. MVCs were most likely to cause nasal and malar/maxillary fractures (P management. Age and number of fractures sustained were associated with operative intervention. Although there is a statistically significant correlation between mechanism of injury and type of facial fracture sustained, none of the mechanisms evaluated herein are statistically associated with surgical intervention. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, III.

  11. Use of fracture mechanics in engineering problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, C S

    1965-02-26

    If an engineering material containing a crack is subjected to a slowly increasing load, applied so that the crack tends to open, a small zone of plastic yielding develops at the crack tip. This zone increases in size with increasing load, and has the effect of resisting the tendency of the crack to extend. The basic concepts of fracture mechanics are outlined and the significance of crack toughness as measured by KDcU and KD1cU which relate the applied stress and crack size for unstable fracture prior to general yielding is discussed. The methods available for crack-toughness evaluation are indicated, and the mathematical expressions describing KDcU and KD1cU for a variety of geometrical situations are quoted. This approach to the design of fracture- resistant structures has been used in a number of fields in the U.S. and could be of value to the British steam turbine, aerospace, and pressure-vessel industries for design, inspection, and material selection. (64 refs.)

  12. Micro- and macroapproaches in fracture mechanics for interpreting brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekobori, T.; Konosu, S.; Ekobori, A.

    1980-01-01

    Classified are models of the crack growth mechanism, and in the framework of the fracture mechanics suggested are combined micro- and macroapproaches to interpreting the criterion of the brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth as fracture typical examples, when temporal processes are important or unimportant. Under the brittle fracture conditions the crack propagation criterion is shown to be brought with the high accuracy to a form analogous to one of the crack propagation in a linear fracture mechanics although it is expressed with micro- and macrostructures. Obtained is a good agreement between theoretical and experimental data

  13. Development of probabilistic fracture mechanics code PASCAL and user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Onizawa, Kunio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Li, Yinsheng; Kato, Daisuke [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    As a part of the aging and structural integrity research for LWR components, a new PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) code PASCAL (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) has been developed since FY1996. This code evaluates the failure probability of an aged reactor pressure vessel subjected to transient loading such as PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock). The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the recent development in the fracture mechanics methodologies and computer performance. The code has some new functions in optimized sampling and cell dividing procedure in stratified Monte Carlo simulation, elastic-plastic fracture criterion of R6 method, extension analysis models in semi-elliptical crack, evaluation of effect of thermal annealing and etc. In addition, an input data generator of temperature and stress distribution time histories was also prepared in the code. Functions and performance of the code have been confirmed based on the verification analyses and some case studies on the influence parameters. The present phase of the development will be completed in FY2000. Thus this report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of the code. (author)

  14. Technical report on micro-mechanical versus conventional modelling in non-linear fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    While conventional fracture mechanics is capable of predicting crack growth behaviour if sufficient experimental observations are available, micro-mechanical modelling can both increase the accuracy of these predictions and model phenomena that are inaccessible by the conventional theory such as the ductile-cleavage temperature transition. A common argument against micro-mechanical modelling is that it is too complicated for use in routine engineering applications. This is both a computational and an educational problem. That micro-mechanical modelling is unnecessarily complicated is certainly true in many situations. The on-going development of micro-mechanical models, computational algorithms and computer speed will however most probably diminish the computational problem rather rapidly. Compare for instance the rate of development of computational methods for structural analysis. Meanwhile micro-mechanical modelling may serve as a tool by which more simplified engineering methods can be validated. The process of receiving a wide acceptance of the new methods is probably much slower. This involves many steps. First the research community must be in reasonable agreement on the methods and their use. Then the methods have to be implemented into computer software and into code procedures. The development and acceptance of conventional fracture mechanics may serve as an historical example of the time required before a new methodology has received a wide usage. The CSNI Working Group on Integrity and Ageing (IAGE) decided to carry out a report on micro-mechanical modeling to promote this promising and valuable technique. The report presents a comparison with non-linear fracture mechanics and highlights key aspects that could lead to a better knowledge and accurate predictions. Content: - 1. Introduction; - 2. Concepts of non-linear fracture mechanics with point crack tip modelling; - 3. Micro-mechanical models for cleavage fracture; - 4, Micro-mechanical modelling of

  15. Three-dimensional effects in fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, F.G.

    1991-01-01

    An overall view of the pioneering theories and works, which enlighten the three-dimensional nature of fracture mechanics during the last years is given. the main aim is not an exhaustive reviewing but the displaying of the last developments on this scientific field in a natural way. This work attempts to envisage the limits of disregarding the three-dimensional behaviour in theories, analyses and experiments. Moreover, it tries to draw attention on the scant fervour, although increasing, this three-dimensional nature of fracture has among the scientific community. Finally, a constructive discussion is presented on the use of two-dimensional solutions in the analysis of geometries which bear a three-dimensional configuration. the static two-dimensional solutions and its applications fields are reviewed. also, the static three-dimensional solutions, wherein a comparative analysis with elastoplastic and elastostatic solutions are presented. to end up, the dynamic three-dimensional solutions are compared to the asymptotic two-dimensional ones under the practical applications point of view. (author)

  16. Probabilistic fracture mechanics applied for lbb case study: international benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, V.

    2015-01-01

    An application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to evaluate the structural integrity for a case study chosen from experimental Mock-ups of FP7 STYLE project is described. The reliability model for probabilistic structural integrity, focused on the assessment of TWC in the pipe weld under complex loading (bending moment and residual stress) has been setup. The basic model is the model of fracture for through-wall cracked pipe under elastic-plastic conditions. The corresponding structural reliability approach is developed with the probabilities of failure associated with maximum load for crack initiation, net-section collapse but also the evaluation the instability loads. The probabilities of failure for a through-wall crack in a pipe subject to pure bending are evaluated by using crude Monte Carlo simulations. The results from the international benchmark are presented for the mentioned case in the context of ageing and lifetime management of pressure boundary/pressure circuit component. (authors)

  17. Fracture mechanics performance of UF6 containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, M.E.; Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The main purpose of this work was to determine the fracture mechanics performance of UF 6 transport cylinders type ANSI N14.1.30B, which was made from ASTM A 516 Grade 70 steel. It was assumed an internal surface axial crack subjected to stresses due to service, proof and transport accident loads. The KUMAR-GERMAN-SHIH elastoplastic methodology gave adequate results for crack depth estimation. The results validate the leak-before-break criteria for service and proof conditions but not for accident ones. In the last case a non-destructive examination must be done in order to assure the absence of defects larger than one third of the cylinder wall thickness. (Author)

  18. Numerical modelling in non linear fracture mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viggo Tvergaard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Some numerical studies of crack propagation are based on using constitutive models that accountfor damage evolution in the material. When a critical damage value has been reached in a materialpoint, it is natural to assume that this point has no more carrying capacity, as is done numerically in the elementvanish technique. In the present review this procedure is illustrated for micromechanically based materialmodels, such as a ductile failure model that accounts for the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence, and a model for intergranular creep failure with diffusive growth of grain boundary cavities leading to micro-crack formation. The procedure is also illustrated for low cycle fatigue, based on continuum damage mechanics. In addition, the possibility of crack growth predictions for elastic-plastic solids using cohesive zone models to represent the fracture process is discussed.

  19. Fracture mechanics of concrete : Will applications start to emerge?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mier, J.G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Fracture mechanics of concrete has developed into an active field of research in the past decades. It promises a rational solution technique to structural problems in reinforced concrete in the limit state. Numerical tools have been developed on the basis of fracture mechanics theories. The question

  20. Finnie's notes on fracture mechanics fundamental and practical lessons

    CERN Document Server

    Dharan, C K H; Finnie, Iain

    2016-01-01

    This textbook consists primarily of notes by Iain Finnie who taught a popular course on fracture mechanics at the University of California at Berkeley. It presents a comprehensive and detailed exposition of fracture, the fundamentals of fracture mechanics and procedures for the safe design of engineering components made from metal alloys, brittle materials like glasses and ceramics, and composites. Interesting and practical problems are listed at the end of most chapters to give the student practice in applying the theory. A solutions manual is provided to the instructor. The text presents a unified perspective of fracture with a strong fundamental foundation and practical applications. In addition to its role as a text, this reference would be invaluable for the practicing engineer who is involved in the design and evaluation of components that are fracture critical. This book also: Presents details of derivations of the basic equations of fracture mechanics and the historical context of the development of f...

  1. Mechanics of the Delayed Fracture of Viscoelastic Bodies with Cracks: Theory and Experiment (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies on the deformation and delayed fracture of viscoelastic bodies due to slow subcritical crack growth are reviewed. The focus of this review is on studies of subcritical growth of cracks with well-developed fracture process zones, the conditions that lead to their critical development, and all stages of slow crack growth from initiation to the onset of catastrophic growth. Models, criteria, and methods used to study the delayed fracture of viscoelastic bodies with through and internal cracks are analyzed. Experimental studies of the fracture process zones in polymers using physical and mechanical methods as well as theoretical studies of these zones using fracture mesomechanics models that take into account the structural and rheological features of polymers are reviewed. Particular attention is given to crack growth in anisotropic media, the effect of the aging of viscoelastic materials on their delayed fracture, safe external loads that do not cause cracks to propagate, the mechanism of multiple-flaw fracture of viscoelastic bodies with several cracks and, especially, processes causing cracks to coalesce into a main crack, which may result in a break of the body. Methods and results of solving two- and three-dimensional problems of the mechanics of delayed fracture of aging and non-aging viscoelastic bodies with cracks under constant and variable external loads, wedging, and biaxial loads are given

  2. Dependence of fracture mechanical and fluid flow properties on fracture roughness and sample size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Y.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter study has been carried out to investigate the interdependence of mechanical and fluid flow properties of fractures with fracture roughness and sample size. A rough fracture can be defined mathematically in terms of its aperture density distribution. Correlations were found between the shapes of the aperture density distribution function and the specific fractures of the stress-strain behavior and fluid flow characteristics. Well-matched fractures had peaked aperture distributions that resulted in very nonlinear stress-strain behavior. With an increasing degree of mismatching between the top and bottom of a fracture, the aperture density distribution broadened and the nonlinearity of the stress-strain behavior became less accentuated. The different aperture density distributions also gave rise to qualitatively different fluid flow behavior. Findings from this investigation make it possible to estimate the stress-strain and fluid flow behavior when the roughness characteristics of the fracture are known and, conversely, to estimate the fracture roughness from an examination of the hydraulic and mechanical data. Results from this study showed that both the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the fracture are controlled by the large-scale roughness of the joint surface. This suggests that when the stress-flow behavior of a fracture is being investigated, the size of the rock sample should be larger than the typical wave length of the roughness undulations

  3. Complexity: a new paradigm for fracture mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Puzzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The so-called Complexity Sciences are a topic of fast growing interest inside the scientific community. Actually, researchers did not come to a definition of complexity, since it manifests itself in so many different ways [1]. This field itself is not a single discipline, but rather a heterogeneous amalgam of different techniques of mathematics and science. In fact, under the label of Complexity Sciences we comprehend a large variety of approaches: nonlinear dynamics, deterministic chaos theory, nonequilibrium thermodynamics, fractal geometry, intermediate asymptotics, complete and incomplete similarity, renormalization group theory, catastrophe theory, self-organized criticality, neural networks, cellular automata, fuzzy logic, etc. Aim of this paper is at providing insight into the role of complexity in the field of Materials Science and Fracture Mechanics [2-3]. The presented examples will be concerned with the snap-back instabilities in the structural behaviour of composite structures (Carpinteri [4-6], the occurrence of fractal patterns and selfsimilarity in material damage and deformation of heterogeneous materials, and the apparent scaling on the nominal mechanical properties of disordered materials (Carpinteri [7,8]. Further examples will deal with criticality in the acoustic emissions of damaged structures and with scaling in the time-to-failure (Carpinteri et al. [9]. Eventually, results on the transition towards chaos in the dynamics of cracked beams will be reported (Carpinteri and Pugno [10,11].

  4. [Mechanics analysis of fracture of orthodontic wires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeping; Sun, Xiaoye; Zhang, Longqi

    2003-03-01

    Fracture problem of orthodontic wires was discussed in this paper. The calculation formulae of bending stress and tensile stress were obtained. All main factors that affect bending stress and tensile stress of orthodontic wires were analyzed and discussed. It was concluded that the main causes of fracture of orthodontic wires were fatigue and static disruption. Some improving proposals for preventing fracture of orthodontic wires were put forward.

  5. Fracture mechanics behaviour of neutron irradiated Alloy A-286

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.

    The effect of fast-neutron irradiation on the fatigue-crack propagation and fracture toughness behaviour of Alloy A-286 was characterized using fracture mechanics techniques. The fracture toughness was found to decrease continuously with increasing irradiation damage at both 24 deg. C and 427 deg. C. In the unirradiated and low fluence conditions, specimens displayed appreciable plasticity prior to fracture, and equivalent Ksub(Ic) values were determined from Jsub(Ic) fracture toughness results. At high irradiation exposure levels, specimens exhibited a brittle Ksub(Ic) fracture mode. The 427 deg. C fracture toughness fell from 129 MPa√m in the unirradiated condition to 35 MPa√m at an exposure of 16.2 dpa (total fluence of 5.2x10 22 n/cm 2 ). Room temperature fracture toughness values were consistently 40 to 60 percent higher than the 427 deg. C values. Electron fractography revealed that the reduction in fracture resistance was attributed to a fracture mechanism transition from ductile microvoid coalescence to channel fracture. Fatigue-crack propagation tests were conducted at 427 deg. C on specimens irradiated at 2.4 dpa and 16.2 dpa. Crack growth rates at the lower exposure level were comparable to those in unirradiated material, while those at the higher exposure were slightly higher than in unirradiated material. (author)

  6. Characterization of fracture toughness of epoxy resin after hygrothermal aging

    KAUST Repository

    Quispe, Gustavo Q.

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of fracture toughness of epoxy resin after hygrothermal ageing Gustavo Quino Quispe The aim of this work is to characterize the e ects of hygrothermal aging in the plain strain fracture toughness of the epoxy system composed by cycloaliphatic epoxy resin and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA). For this, after having been under hygrothermal aging in a climatic chamber, epoxy samples were studied using ASTM D5045 fracture toughness test, and micrography and roughness measurements of the fracture surface. It is reported a rapid decrease of GIc and KIc during the rst 2 days. Moreover, a numerical model [13] was used to simulate and see with more detail the water absorption in the aged samples. From that, it was observed the heterogeneous distribution of water. Accordingly, it was proposed that the results should be correlated with the water content at the vicinity of the crack tip. Consequently, it was possible to obtain, by quasi-static simulations, the ideal load-displacement curves of crack propagation in the heterogeneous samples. Finally, another contribution of this work is the study of the fracture surface, that gives a clue of the relationship among the fracture energy, the appearance of microcracks in the fracture surface, and the roughness (Ra).

  7. Influence of the preparation design and artificial aging on the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, Gergo; Anastassova-Yoshida, Yana; Nothdurft, Frank Phillip; von See, Constantin; Pospiech, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and fracture behavior of monolithic zirconia crowns in accordance with the preparation design and aging simulation method. An upper first molar was prepared sequentially with three different preparation designs: shoulderless preparation, 0.4 mm chamfer and 0.8 mm chamfer preparation. For each preparation design, 30 monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated. After cementation on Cr-Co alloy dies, the following artificial aging procedures were performed: (1) thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML): 5000 cycles of thermal cycling 5℃-55℃ and chewing simulation (1,200,000 cycles, 50 N); (2) Low Temperature Degradation simulation (LTD): autoclave treatment at 137℃, 2 bar for 3 hours and chewing simulation; and (3) no pre-treatment (control group). After artificial aging, the crowns were loaded until fracture. The mean values of fracture resistance varied between 3414 N (LTD; 0.8 mm chamfer preparation) and 5712 N (control group; shoulderless preparation). Two-way ANOVA analysis showed a significantly higher fracture loads for the shoulderless preparation, whereas no difference was found between the chamfer preparations. In contrast to TCML, after LTD simulation the fracture strength of monolithic zirconia crowns decreased significantly. The monolithic crowns tested in this study showed generally high fracture load values. Preparation design and LTD simulation had a significant influence on the fracture strength of monolithic zirconia crowns.

  8. Fluid driven fracture mechanics in highly anisotropic shale: a laboratory study with application to hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehne, Stephan; Benson, Philip; Koor, Nick; Enfield, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The finding of considerable volumes of hydrocarbon resources within tight sedimentary rock formations in the UK led to focused attention on the fundamental fracture properties of low permeability rock types and hydraulic fracturing. Despite much research in these fields, there remains a scarcity of available experimental data concerning the fracture mechanics of fluid driven fracturing and the fracture properties of anisotropic, low permeability rock types. In this study, hydraulic fracturing is simulated in a controlled laboratory environment to track fracture nucleation (location) and propagation (velocity) in space and time and assess how environmental factors and rock properties influence the fracture process and the developing fracture network. Here we report data on employing fluid overpressure to generate a permeable network of micro tensile fractures in a highly anisotropic shale ( 50% P-wave velocity anisotropy). Experiments are carried out in a triaxial deformation apparatus using cylindrical samples. The bedding planes are orientated either parallel or normal to the major principal stress direction (σ1). A newly developed technique, using a steel guide arrangement to direct pressurised fluid into a sealed section of an axially drilled conduit, allows the pore fluid to contact the rock directly and to initiate tensile fractures from the pre-defined zone inside the sample. Acoustic Emission location is used to record and map the nucleation and development of the micro-fracture network. Indirect tensile strength measurements at atmospheric pressure show a high tensile strength anisotropy ( 60%) of the shale. Depending on the relative bedding orientation within the stress field, we find that fluid induced fractures in the sample propagate in two of the three principal fracture orientations: Divider and Short-Transverse. The fracture progresses parallel to the bedding plane (Short-Transverse orientation) if the bedding plane is aligned (parallel) with the

  9. Integration of NDE Reliability and Fracture Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S. R.; Heas!er, P. G.; Morris, C. J.; Pitman, S. G.; Selby, G. P.; Simonen, F. A.

    1981-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a four-phase program for measuring and evaluating the effectiveness and reliability of in-service inspection (lSI} performed on the primary system piping welds of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Phase I of the program is complete. A survey was made of the state of practice for ultrasonic rsr of LWR primary system piping welds. Fracture mechanics calculations were made to establish required nondestrutive testing sensitivities. In general, it was found that fatigue flaws less than 25% of wall thickness would not grow to failure within an inspection interval of 10 years. However, in some cases failure could occur considerably faster. Statistical methods for predicting and measuring the effectiveness and reliability of lSI were developed and will be applied in the "Round Robin Inspections" of Phase II. Methods were also developed for the production of flaws typical of those found in service. Samples fabricated by these methods wilI be used in Phase II to test inspection effectiveness and reliability. Measurements were made of the influence of flaw characteristics {i.e., roughness, tightness, and orientation) on inspection reliability. These measurernents, as well as the predictions of a statistical model for inspection reliability, indicate that current reporting and recording sensitivities are inadequate.

  10. Physical activity in middle-aged women and hip fracture risk: the UFO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, U; Nordström, P; Nilsson, J; Bucht, G; Björnstig, U; Hallmans, G; Svensson, O; Pettersson, U

    2011-02-01

    In a population-based case-control study, we demonstrate that middle-aged women who were active with walking or in different physical spare time activities were at lower risk of later sustaining a hip fracture compared to more sedentary women. In middle-aged women participating in the Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study, we investigated whether physical activity is associated with a subsequent decreased risk of sustaining a hip fracture. The UFO study is a nested case-control study investigating associations between bone markers, lifestyle, and osteoporotic fractures. We identified 81 female hip fracture cases that had reported lifestyle data before they sustained their fracture. Each case was compared with two female controls who were identified from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total cohort of 237 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 57.2 ± 5.0 years, and mean age at fracture was 65.4 ± 6.4 years. Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, weight, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects who were regularly active with walking or had a moderate or high frequency of physical spare time activities (i.e. berry/mushroom picking and snow shovelling) were at reduced risk of sustaining a hip fracture (OR 0.14; 95% CI; 0.05-0.53 for walking and OR 0.19; 95% CI; 0.08-0.46, OR 0.17, 95% CI; 0.05-0.64 for moderate and high frequency of spare time activities, respectively) compared to more sedentary women. An active lifestyle in middle age seems to reduce the risk of future hip fracture. Possible mechanisms may include improved muscle strength, coordination, and balance resulting in a decreased risk of falling and perhaps also direct skeletal benefits.

  11. Concepts and possibilities of fracture mechanics for fracture safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauel, J.

    1980-01-01

    In very tough materials for pressure vessels and pipelines of nuclear plants, cracking begins in a stable manner and only after macroscopic plastic deformations and crack blunting. It is possible to describe this elasto-plastic fracture behaviour and to quantify the safety margin compared to the assessment criteria based on linear elastic stressing and initiation by the concept of the J integral, the crack peak width and the crack resistance Jsub(R) curve. The numerous problems of details still open and the partly very limited validity range should not prevent the further investigation into the great possibilities of this concept and making greater use of the interpretation of large scale tests. (orig./RW) [de

  12. Fracture mechanics parameters for glasses: A compilation and correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiman, S.W.; Baker, T.L.; Wachtmann, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a computerized fracture mechanics data base and associated computer programs which permit extension and modification of data base as well as selection, plotting and curve fitting. Some preliminary results of correlations of fracture energy, gamma, with composition and elastic modulus are presented

  13. Sedimentary facies control on mechanical and fracture stratigraphy in turbidites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogata, Kei; Storti, Fabrizio; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Tinterri, Roberto; Bedogni, Enrico; Fetter, Marcos; Gomes, Leonardo; Hatushika, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    Natural fracture networks exert a first-order control on the exploitation of resources such as aquifers, hydrocarbons, and geothermal reservoirs, and on environmental issues like underground gas storage and waste disposal. Fractures and the mechanical stratigraphy of layered sequences have been

  14. Fracture mechanics and statistical mechanics of reinforced elastomeric blends

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Gert; Kaliske, Michael; Klüppel, Manfred; Schneider, Konrad; Vilgis, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Elastomers are found in many applications ranging from technology to daily life applications for example in tires, drive systems, sealings and print rollers. Dynamical operation conditions put extremely high demands on the performance and stability of these materials and their elastic and flow properties can be easily adjusted by simple manipulations on their elastic and viscous properties. However, the required service life suffers often from material damage as a result of wear processes such as abrasion and wear fatigue, mostly caused by crack formation and propagation. This book covers interdisciplinary research between physics, physical chemistry, material sciences and engineering of elastomers within the range from nanometres to millimetres and connects these aspects with the constitutive material properties. The different chapters describe reliable lifetime and durability predictions based on new fracture mechanical testing concepts and advanced material-theoretical methods which are finally implemented...

  15. Selection of pipeline steels with an engineering fracture mechanical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenbacka, N [Swedish State Power Board, Vaellingby

    1985-01-01

    Selection of pipeline steels is discussed on the basis of two mutually independent failure mechanisms: elastic fracture and plastic collapse. The presentation is restricted to axial flaws. A formal analysis shows that brittle fracture in modern pipelines has no high priority in design, since steels used today have a high fracture toughness. Instead, a case of practical concern is tha plastic collapse mode, where failure is flow stress controlled. Conditions governing this design case are specified. In conjunction with this, criterions for material selection with regard to fracture toughness is presented.

  16. Fracture mechanics as judgement criterion in reference publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholome, G.

    1976-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is applied in particular in ship and aeroplane construction, in astronautics, and in nuclear engineering. Around 1950, the high quality demands in nuclear engineering led to the first regulation for brittle-fracture-safe operation of thick-walled nuclear pressure vessels. These regulations are based on the brittle-fracture-plan (NDT concept). For reactor engineering this plan is applied in a simplified way, the so-called modified PORSE-diagram. The permissible operational stresses must be out of the range of brittle fracture margin which is defined by the NDT temperature extension limit. (RW) [de

  17. The Effect of Creep Aging on the Fatigue Fracture Behavior of 2524 Aluminum Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Wenke Li; Lihua Zhan; Lingfeng Liu; Yongqian Xu

    2016-01-01

    Normal temperature tensile and fatigue tests were adopted to test the mechanical performance and fatigue life of 2524 aluminum alloy under the three states of T3, artificial aging, and creep aging, and scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope were also used to observe the fatigue fracture morphology and aging precipitation features of the alloy under the above three states. Results showed that the alloy treated by creep aging can obtain higher fatigue life, but that t...

  18. Yield fracture mechanics. Report colloquium of the DFG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains 17 lectures, which were given at the Report Colloquium of the DFG at Bonn on November 5th 1992. The main points of yield fracture mechanics were: Theory, experiment technique, transferability, material and structure. (MM) [de

  19. Fracture Mechanics Prediction of Fatigue Life of Aluminum Highway Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Søren; Agerskov, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Fracture mechanics prediction of the fatigue life of aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined from fracture mechanics analyses and the results obtained have been compared with results from experimental investigations. The fati......Fracture mechanics prediction of the fatigue life of aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined from fracture mechanics analyses and the results obtained have been compared with results from experimental investigations...... against fatigue in aluminum bridges, may give results which are unconservative. Furthermore, it was in both investigations found that the validity of the results obtained from Miner's rule will depend on the distribution of the load history in tension and compression....

  20. Application of simulation techniques in the probabilistic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruyter van Steveninck, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation is applied on a model of the fracture mechanics in order to assess the applicability of this simulation technique in the probabilistic fracture mechanics. By means of the fracture mechanics model the brittle fracture of a steel container or pipe with defects can be predicted. By means of the Monte Carlo simulation also the uncertainty regarding failures can be determined. Based on the variations in the toughness of the fracture and the defect dimensions the distribution of the chance of failure is determined. Also attention is paid to the impact of dependency between uncertain variables. Furthermore, the influence of the applied distributions of the uncertain variables and non-destructive survey on the chance of failure is analyzed. The Monte Carlo simulation results agree quite well with the results of other methods from the probabilistic fracture mechanics. If an analytic expression can be found for the chance of failure, it is possible to determine the variation of the chance of failure, next to an estimation of the chance of failure. It also appears that the dependency between the uncertain variables has a large impact on the chance of failure. It is also concluded from the simulation that the chance of failure strongly depends on the crack depth, and therefore of the distribution of the crack depth. 15 figs., 7 tabs., 12 refs

  1. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of compact bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahau

    Bone is a composite composed mainly of organics, minerals and water. Most studies on the fracture toughness of bone have been conducted at room temperature. Considering that the body temperature of animals is higher than room temperature, and that bone has a high volumetric percentage of organics (generally, 35--50%), the effect of temperature on fracture toughness of bone should be studied. Single-edged V-shaped notched (SEVN) specimens were prepared to measure the fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib in water at 0, 10, 23, 37 and 50°C. The fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib were found to decrease from 7.0 to 4.3 MPa·m1/2 and from 5.5 to 4.1 MPa·m1/2, respectively, over a temperature range of 50°C. The decreases were attributed to inability of the organics to sustain greater stresses at higher temperatures. We studied the effects of water and organics on fracture toughness of bone using water-free and organics-free SEVN specimens at 23°C. Water-free and organics-free specimens were obtained by placing fresh bone specimen in a furnace at different temperatures. Water and organics significantly affected the fracture toughness of bone. Fracture toughness of the water-free specimens was 44.7% (bovine femur) and 32.4% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh-bone specimens. Fracture toughness of the organics-free specimens was 92.7% (bovine femur) and 91.5% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh bone specimens. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) is widely used to study bone. However, bone often has small to moderate scale yielding during testing. We used J integral, an elastic-plastic fracture-mechanics parameter, to study the fracture process of bone. The J integral of bovine femur increased from 6.3 KJ/mm2 at 23°C to 6.7 KJ/mm2 at 37°C. Although the fracture toughness of bovine bone decreases as the temperature increases, the J integral results show a contrary trend. The energy spent in advancing the crack beyond the linear

  2. Uncertainty analysis on probabilistic fracture mechanics assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, Rohit; Vinod, Gopika; Chandra, Vikas; Bhasin, Vivek; Babar, A.K.; Rao, V.V.S.S.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat-Raj, V.

    1999-01-01

    Fracture Mechanics has found a profound usage in the area of design of components and assessing fitness for purpose/residual life estimation of an operating component. Since defect size and material properties are statistically distributed, various probabilistic approaches have been employed for the computation of fracture probability. Monte Carlo Simulation is one such procedure towards the analysis of fracture probability. This paper deals with uncertainty analysis using the Monte Carlo Simulation methods. These methods were developed based on the R6 failure assessment procedure, which has been widely used in analysing the integrity of structures. The application of this method is illustrated with a case study. (author)

  3. Influence of Aging Conditions on Fatigue Fracture Behaviour of 6063 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiq Ahmed Siddiqui

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum - Magnesium - Silicon (Al-Mg-Si 6063 alloy was heat-treated using under aged, peak aged and overage temperatures. The numbers of cycles required to cause the fatigue fracture, at constant stress, was considered as criteria for the fatigue resistance. Moreover, the fractured surface of the alloy at different aging conditions was evaluated by optical microscopy and the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The SEM micrographs confirmed the cleavage surfaces with well-defined fatigue striations. It has been observed that the various aging time and temperature of the 6063 Al-alloy, produces different modes of fractures. The most suitable age hardening time and temperature was found to be between 4 to 5 hours and to occur at 460 K. The increase in fatigue fracture property of the alloy due to aging could be attributed to a vacancy assisted diffusion mechanism or due to pinning of dislocations movement by the precipitates produced during aging. However, the decrease in the fatigue resistance, for the over aged alloys, might be due to the coalescence of precipitates into larger grains.

  4. Application of fracture mechanics to fatigue in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghavami, K.

    1982-01-01

    The methods of application of fracture mechanics to predict fatigue crack propagation in welded structures and pressure vessels are described with the following objectives: i) To identify the effect of different variables such as crack tip plasticity, free surface, finite plate thickness, stress concentration and type of the structure, on the magnitude of stress intensity factor K in Welded joint. ii) To demonstrate the use of fracture mechanics for analysing fatigue crack propagation data. iii) To show how a law of fatigue crack propagation based on fracure mechanics, may be used to predict fatigue behavior of welded structures such as pressure vessel. (Author) [pt

  5. Japanese round robin analysis for probabilistic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S.; Handa, N.

    1991-01-01

    Recently attention is focused on the probabilistic fracture mechanics, a branch of fracture mechanics with probability theory for a rational mean to assess the strength of components and structures. In particular, the probabilistic fracture mechanics is recognized as the powerful means for quantitative investigation of significance of factors and rational evaluation of life on problems involving a number of uncertainties, such as degradation of material strength, accuracy and frequency of inspection. Comparison with reference experiments are generally employed to assure the analytical accuracy. However, accuracy and reliability of analytical methods in the probabilistic fracture mechanics are hardly verified by experiments. Therefore, it is strongly needed to verify the probabilistic fracture mechanics through the round robin analysis. This paper describes results from the round robin analysis of flat plate with semi-elliptic cracks on the surface, conducted by the PFM Working Group of LE Subcommittee of the Japan Welding Society under the contract of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and participated by Tokyo University, Yokohama National University, the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Corporation, Tokyo Electric Power Co. Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki Heavy Industry Co. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. (author)

  6. Primer: Fracture mechanics in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, E.T.; Server, W.L.; Kennedy, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This Primer is intended to familiarize utility engineers with the fracture mechanics technology and to provide the basis for a working knowledge of the subject. It is directed towards all the engineering disciplines that are involved either directly or indirectly with the structural reliability of electrical power generation equipment and systems. These engineering disciplines include such areas as: design and stress analysis, metallurgy and materials, nondestructive inspection and quality control, structural analysis and reliability engineering, chemical engineering and water chemistry control, and architectural engineering. This Primer does not provide a comprehensive, in-depth treatment of all the detailed aspects involved in fracture mechanics. It does, however, provide sufficient information and a common vocabulary that should enable engineers to: read and converse intelligently about the subject, understand and utilize ASME Codes and Regulatory Guides involving fracture mechanics, absorb technical information presented and discussed at various technical meetings, and begin to apply this technology towards actual engineering problems encountered in the course of their work. Example problems are provided to further enhance an understanding of fracture mechanics. Also, Appendix A describes fracture mechanics computer codes available through EPRI to analyze rotors, reactor pressure vessels and piping

  7. Thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, F.

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to model Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass regarding a nuclear waste re-depository. For this, a methodology of modeling was proposed and was applied to a real underground site (EDF site at Nouvelle Romanche). This methodology consists, in a first step, to determine hydraulic and mechanical REV. Beyond the greatest of these REV, development of a finite element code allows to model all the fractures in an explicit manner. The homogenized mechanical properties are determined in drained and undrained boundary conditions by simulating triaxial tests that represent rock mass subject to loading. These simulations allow to study the evolution of hydraulic and mechanical properties as a function of stress state. Drained and undrained boundary conditions enable to discuss the validity of assimilation of a fractured rock mass to a porous medium. The simulations lead to a better understanding of the behavior of the fractured rock masses and allow to show the dominant role of the shear behavior of the fractures on the hydraulic and mechanical homogenized properties. From a thermal point of view, as long as conduction is dominant, thermal properties of the rock mass are almost the same as those the intact rock. (author)

  8. The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media; Modelisation hydromecanique des milieux fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadiri, I

    2002-10-15

    The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media is quite complex. Simplifications are necessary for the modeling of such media, but, not always justified, Only permeable fractures are often considered. The rest of the network is approximated by an equivalent continuous medium. Even if we suppose that this approach is validated, the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the fractures and of the continuous medium are seldom known. Calibrations are necessary for the determination of these properties. Until now, one does not know very well the nature of measurements which must be carried out in order to carry on a modeling in discontinuous medium, nor elements of enough robust validation for this kind of modeling. For a better understanding of the hydro-mechanical phenomena in fractured media, two different sites have been selected for the work. The first is the site of Grimsel in Switzerland in which an underground laboratory is located at approximately 400 m of depth. The FEBEX experiment aims at the in-situ study of the consecutive phenomena due to the installation of a heat source representative of radioactive waste in the last 17 meters of the FEBEX tunnel in the laboratory of Grimsel. Only, the modeling of the hydro-mechanical of the excavation was model. The modeling of the Febex enabled us to establish a methodology of calibration of the hydraulic properties in the discontinuous media. However, this kind of study on such complex sites does not make possible to answer all the questions which arise on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the fractured media. We thus carried out modeling on an other site, smaller than the fist one and more accessible. The experimental site of Coaraze, in the Maritime Alps, is mainly constituted of limestone and fractures. Then the variation of water pressure along fractures is governed by the opening/closure sequence of a water gate. Normal displacement as well as the pore pressure along these fractures are recorded, and then

  9. The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadiri, I.

    2002-10-01

    The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media is quite complex. Simplifications are necessary for the modeling of such media, but, not always justified, Only permeable fractures are often considered. The rest of the network is approximated by an equivalent continuous medium. Even if we suppose that this approach is validated, the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the fractures and of the continuous medium are seldom known. Calibrations are necessary for the determination of these properties. Until now, one does not know very well the nature of measurements which must be carried out in order to carry on a modeling in discontinuous medium, nor elements of enough robust validation for this kind of modeling. For a better understanding of the hydro-mechanical phenomena in fractured media, two different sites have been selected for the work. The first is the site of Grimsel in Switzerland in which an underground laboratory is located at approximately 400 m of depth. The FEBEX experiment aims at the in-situ study of the consecutive phenomena due to the installation of a heat source representative of radioactive waste in the last 17 meters of the FEBEX tunnel in the laboratory of Grimsel. Only, the modeling of the hydro-mechanical of the excavation was model. The modeling of the Febex enabled us to establish a methodology of calibration of the hydraulic properties in the discontinuous media. However, this kind of study on such complex sites does not make possible to answer all the questions which arise on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the fractured media. We thus carried out modeling on an other site, smaller than the fist one and more accessible. The experimental site of Coaraze, in the Maritime Alps, is mainly constituted of limestone and fractures. Then the variation of water pressure along fractures is governed by the opening/closure sequence of a water gate. Normal displacement as well as the pore pressure along these fractures are recorded, and then

  10. Statistical fracture mechanics approach to the strength of brittle rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1981-06-01

    Statistical fracture mechanics concepts used in the past for rock are critically reviewed and modifications are proposed which are warranted by (1) increased understanding of fracture provided by modern fracture mechanics and (2) laboratory test data both from the literature and from this research. Over 600 direct and indirect tension tests have been performed on three different rock types; Stripa Granite, Sierra White Granite and Carrara Marble. In several instances assumptions which are common in the literature were found to be invalid. A three parameter statistical fracture mechanics model with Mode I critical strain energy release rate as the variant is presented. Methodologies for evaluating the parameters in this model as well as the more commonly employed two parameter models are discussed. The experimental results and analysis of this research indicate that surfacially distributed flaws, rather than volumetrically distributed flaws are responsible for rupture in many testing situations. For several of the rock types tested, anisotropy (both in apparent tensile strength and size effect) precludes the use of contemporary statistical fracture mechanics models

  11. The application of fracture mechanics on nodular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Blind, D.; Kockelmann, H.; Roos, E.; Eisele, U.

    1987-01-01

    A series of studies on predominantly thick-walled castings was the first attempt at a characterization of the material of ferritization-annealed ductile cast iron under aspects of fracture mechanics according to today's state of fracture-mechanics research and testing. As in static and dynamic tensile testing, ferritic cast iron meeting specifications was found to be tough down -40 0 C and below in fracture mechanical testing without substantial reduction of the corresponding characteristics at room temperature; this is true for a temperature range where the lowest point of impact notch work has been reached already. Impact-type stresses with and without notching resulted in enhanced deformation resistance and deformability in the longitudinal samples taken from tubes. (orig./DG) [de

  12. Interdisciplinary seminar on nondestructive testing and fracture mechanics. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings volume contains 17 lectures presented at a DGZfP seminar held in Berlin/Germany, 2-3 November 1998. Fracture mechanics data are of interest with respect to determining maximum permissible limits for non-destructive materials evaluation, and as quantitative NDE test results indicating existing materials flaws in a system component, delivering information for assessement of remaining service life and safety risks. The topics of lectures are: Quality concepts for welded joints; NDE for service life assessment of engine components, shown for evaluation of engine pales and disks; NDE and crack detection at pressurized gas cylinders; fracture mechanics requirements for NDE in nuclear installations, discussion of practical examples (T. Seidenkranz); failure of off-shore constructions seen in the light of a novel fracture mechanics technical code. (orig./CB) [de

  13. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  14. Computational aspects of nonlinear fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocks, W.; Cornec, A.; Scheider, I.

    2003-01-01

    The following contribution will essentially restrict to the application of the von Mises theory of incremental plasticity to cracked specimens and components. In particular, the classical parameters of EPFM, J and CTOD, as well as subsequently proposed parameters such as energy dissipation rate and crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) and the related computational aspects will be discussed. Some remarks follow on the 'local approach to fracture' which is based on continuum field quantities, namely stresses and strains, and the damage models of Gurson (1977) and Rousselier (1987), which have now found increasing application, will be briefly addressed in Section 3.03.4. The numerical modeling of decohesion and separation phenomena by 'cohesive elements' will be presented in Section 3.03.5. (orig.)

  15. Mechanical transport in two-dimensional networks of fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, H.K.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this research are to evaluate directional mechanical transport parameters for anisotropic fracture systems, and to determine if fracture systems behave like equivalent porous media. The tracer experiments used to measure directional tortuosity, longitudinal geometric dispersivity, and hydraulic effective porosity are conducted with a uniform flow field and measurements are made from the fluid flowing within a test section where linear length of travel is constant. Since fluid flow and mechanical transport are coupled processes, the directional variations of specific discharge and hydraulic effective porosity are measured in regions with constant hydraulic gradients to evaluate porous medium equivalence for the two processes, respectively. If the fracture region behaves like an equivalent porous medium, the system has the following stable properties: (1) specific discharge is uniform in any direction and can be predicted from a permeability tensor; and (2) hydraulic effective porosity is directionally stable. Fracture systems with two parallel sets of continuous fractures satisfy criterion 1. However, in these systems hydraulic effective porosity is directionally dependent, and thus, criterion 2 is violated. Thus, for some fracture systems, fluid flow can be predicted using porous media assumptions, but it may not be possible to predict transport using porous media assumptions. Two discontinuous fracture systems were studied which satisfied both criteria. Hydraulic effective porosity for both systems has a value between rock effective porosity and total porosity. A length-density analysis (LDS) of Canadian fracture data shows that porous media equivalence for fluid flow and transport is likely when systems have narrow aperture distributions. 54 references, 90 figures, 7 tables

  16. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Faidy, C.; Valeta, M.P.; Bhandari, S.; Guichard, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moinereau, D [Electricite de France, Dept. MTC, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Faidy, C [Electricite de France, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France); Valeta, M P [Commisariat a l` Energie Atomique, Dept. DMT, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bhandari, S; Guichard, D [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1997-09-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs.

  18. Applications of probabilistic fracture mechanics to FBR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, Genki; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Takenaka, Makoto; Hojo, Kiminobu; Kaguchi, Hitoshi.

    1991-01-01

    A probabilistic fracture mechanics code PCCF which could analyze half-elliptical crack behavior in a plate under creep-fatigue condition using nonlinear fracture mechanics parameters was developed. The effects of bending stress level on failure probability was studied using the PCCF as test analyses. As the results, failure mode was leakage not break in all cases analyzed in this study. It is shown that leak probability is sensitive to stress level and increase rapidly around yield stress of materials. (J.P.N.)

  19. Fracture mechanism of coronal teenage dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilov, P. E.; Kabanova, A. V.; Borodin, I. N.; Guo, J.; Zang, Z.

    2017-10-01

    The structure of coronal teenage dentin and the development of cracks in it are studied on microand nanolevels. The material is found to fail according to a ductile mechanism on a microlelvel and according to a ductile-brittle mechanism on a nanoscale. This behavior is similar to the failure of a polyethylene film and rubber, when significant elastic and irreversible deformation precedes crack growth. The viscoelastic behavior can be considered as the reaction of dentin to an applied mechanical load.

  20. Fracture mechanics based life assessment in petrochemical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norasiah Ab Kasim; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Ab Razak Hamzah; Shukri Mohd

    2004-01-01

    The increasing use of thick walled pressure vessels in petrochemical plants operating at high pressure under severe service conditions could lead to catastrophic failure. In the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), initial efforts are underway to apply fracture mechanics approach for assessment of significance of defects detected during periodic in service inspection (ISI) of industrial plants. This paper outlines the integrity management strategy based on fracture mechanics and proposes a new procedure for life assessment of petrochemical plants based on ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, BSI PD 6493:1991, BSI 6539:1994, BSI Standard 7910:1999 and API 579:2000. Essential relevant data required for the assessment is listed. Several methods available for determination of fracture toughness are reviewed with limitations in their application to petrochemical plants. A new non destructive method for determination of fracture toughness based on hardness testing and normalized key roughness curve is given. Results of fracture mechanics based life assessment conducted for 100 mm thick ammonia converter of Ni r o steel and 70 mm thick plat forming reactor vessel of ASTM A 38 7 grade B steel in operational fertilizer and petroleum refining plants are presented. (Author)

  1. Rheology and Fracture Mechanics of Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of food play an important role during manufacturing, storage, handling, and last but not least, during consumption. For an adequate understanding of the mechanical properties of liquid, liquid-like, soft solid, and solid foods, a basic understanding of relevant aspects of

  2. Comparative study of fracture mechanical test methods for concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lennart; Olesen, John Forbes

    2004-01-01

    and the interpretation, i.e. the analysis needed to extract the stress-crack opening relationship, the fracture energy etc. Experiments are carried out with each test configuration using mature, high performance concrete. The results show that the UTT is a highly complicated test, which only under very well controlled...... circumstances will yield the true fracture mechanical properties. It is also shown that both the three point bending test and the WST are well-suited substitutes for the uniaxial tension test.......This paper describes and compares three different fracture mechanical test methods; the uniaxial tension test (UTT), the three point bending test (TPBT) and the wedge splitting test (WST). Potentials and problems with the test methods will be described with regard to the experiment...

  3. Finite elements in fracture mechanics theory, numerics, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kuna, Meinhard

    2013-01-01

    Fracture mechanics has established itself as an important discipline of growing interest to those working to assess the safety, reliability and service life of engineering structures and materials. In order to calculate the loading situation at cracks and defects, nowadays numerical techniques like finite element method (FEM) have become indispensable tools for a broad range of applications. The present monograph provides an introduction to the essential concepts of fracture mechanics, its main goal being to procure the special techniques for FEM analysis of crack problems, which have to date only been mastered by experts. All kinds of static, dynamic and fatigue fracture problems are treated in two- and three-dimensional elastic and plastic structural components. The usage of the various solution techniques is demonstrated by means of sample problems selected from practical engineering case studies. The primary target group includes graduate students, researchers in academia and engineers in practice.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of renal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Roland; Melk, Anette

    2017-09-01

    Epidemiologic, clinical, and molecular evidence suggest that aging is a major contributor to the increasing incidence of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. The aging kidney undergoes complex changes that predispose to renal pathology. The underlying molecular mechanisms could be the target of therapeutic strategies in the future. Here, we summarize recent insight into cellular and molecular processes that have been shown to contribute to the renal aging phenotype.The main clinical finding of renal aging is the decrease in glomerular filtration rate, and its structural correlate is the loss of functioning nephrons. Mechanistically, this has been linked to different processes, such as podocyte hypertrophy, glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, and gradual microvascular rarefaction. Renal functional recovery after an episode of acute kidney injury is significantly worse in elderly patients. This decreased regenerative potential, which is a hallmark of the aging process, may be caused by cellular senescence. Accumulation of senescent cells could explain insufficient repair and functional loss, a view that has been strengthened by recent studies showing that removal of senescent cells results in attenuation of renal aging. Other potential mechanisms are alterations in autophagy as an important component of a disturbed renal stress response and functional differences in the inflammatory system. Promising therapeutic measures to counteract these age-related problems include mimetics of caloric restriction, pharmacologic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition, and novel strategies of senotherapy with the goal of reducing the number of senescent cells to decrease aging-related disease in the kidney. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The fluid mechanics of channel fracturing flows: experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashedi, Ahmadreza; Tucker, Zachery; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Hormozi, Sarah

    2017-11-01

    We show our preliminary experimental results on the role of fluid mechanics in channel fracturing flows, particularly yield stress fracturing fluids. Recent trends in the oil industry have included the use of cyclic pumping of a proppant slurry interspersed with a yield stress fracturing fluid, which is found to increase wells productivity, if particles disperse in a certain fashion. Our experimental study aims to investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for dispersing the particles (proppant) within a yield stress carrier fluid, and to measure the dispersion of proppant slugs in various fracturing regimes. To this end we have designed and built a unique experimental setup that resembles a fracture configuration coupled with a particle image/tracking velocimetry setup operating at micro to macro dimensions. Moreover, we have designed optically engineered suspensions of complex fluids with tunable yield stress and consistency, well controlled density match-mismatch properties and refractive indices for both X-rays and visible lights. We present our experimental system and preliminary results. NSF (Grant No. CBET-1554044- CAREER), ACS PRF (Grant No. 55661-DNI9).

  6. Draft fracture mechanics code case for American Society of Mechanical Engineers NUPACK rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.; Nickell, R.; Saegusa, T.

    2004-01-01

    The containment boundaries of most spent-fuel casks certified for use in the United States by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are constructed with stainless steel, a material that is ductile in an engineering sense at all temperatures and for which, therefore, fracture mechanics principles are not relevant for the containment application. Ferritic materials may fail in a nonductile manner at sufficiently low temperatures, so fracture mechanics principles may be applied to preclude nonductile fracture. Because of the need to transport and store spent nuclear fuel safely in all types of climatic conditions, these vessels have regulatory lowest service temperatures that range down to -40 C (-40 F) for transport application. Such low service temperatures represent a severe challenge in terms of fracture toughness to many ferritic materials. Linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics principles provide a methodology for evaluating ferritic materials under such conditions

  7. Approximative determination of failure probabilities in probabilistic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch-Oppermann, H.; Brueckner, A.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of using FORM in probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) is investigated. After a short review of the method and a description of some specific problems occurring in PFM applications, results obtained with FORM for the failure probabilities in a typical PFM problem (fatigue crack growth) are compared with those determined by a Monte Carlo simulation. (orig./HP)

  8. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  9. Use of fracture mechanics in the US industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landes, J.D. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2001-07-01

    The modern fracture mechanics technology began in the US in the 1960's. It was developed in response to failure problems that could not be explained by current technology. Some segments of the US industry were quick to embrace this new technology. The period of 1960 to middle 1980's marked a time of active fracture mechanics research in the US industry. From this various codes and assessment procedures have been developed to apply the fracture mechanics approach to evaluate the safety and reliability of critical structural components. This report discusses the US industry use of fracture mechanics. It considers the historical developments, some of the fracture mechanics tools that are available and present practices. Several different industry segments that have used the fracture mechanics approach are considered. These include aerospace, military, power generation, petrochemical and pipelines, metal producers, and construction/transportation. Their current use of the fracture mechanics methods involves the implementation of codes and procedures, the development of software packages, the use of outside consulting groups and some in-house research efforts. (orig.) [German] Die Entwicklung der modernen Bruchmechanik in den USA begann in den 1960er Jahren im Zusammenhang mit einer Reihe von Versagensfaellen, die auf konventionelle Weise nicht erklaert werden konnten. Die neuen Ansaetze wurden von einigen Branchen schnell aufgegriffen und weiterentwickelt. Die Periode von 1960 bis in die Mitte der 1980er Jahre markiert eine Zeit intensiver Forschungsarbeit in der amerikanischen Industrie. Eine Reihe von Codes und Vorschriften zur Bewertung der Sicherheit und Zuverlaessigkeit gefaehrdeter Strukturen hat ihren Ursprung in dieser Zeit. Der vorliegende Aufsatz thematisiert die Anwendung bruchmechanischer Methoden in der Industrie der USA anhand historischer Aspekte, des heute verfuegbaren Instrumentariums der Bauteilbewertung und der gaengigen Praxis bei der

  10. Comparative analysis of deterministic and probabilistic fracture mechanical assessment tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckmann, Klaus [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany); Saifi, Qais [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    Uncertainties in material properties, manufacturing processes, loading conditions and damage mechanisms complicate the quantification of structural reliability. Probabilistic structure mechanical computing codes serve as tools for assessing leak- and break probabilities of nuclear piping components. Probabilistic fracture mechanical tools were compared in different benchmark activities, usually revealing minor, but systematic discrepancies between results of different codes. In this joint paper, probabilistic fracture mechanical codes are compared. Crack initiation, crack growth and the influence of in-service inspections are analyzed. Example cases for stress corrosion cracking and fatigue in LWR conditions are analyzed. The evolution of annual failure probabilities during simulated operation time is investigated, in order to identify the reasons for differences in the results of different codes. The comparison of the tools is used for further improvements of the codes applied by the partners.

  11. Unique Mechanism of Chance Fracture in a Young Adult Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Birch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the first description of the Chance fracture in 1948, there have been few case reports ofunique mechanisms causing this classical flexion-extension injury to the spine in motor vehicleaccidents, sports injury, and falls. To our knowledge, this injury has not been reported from a fall withthe mechanistic forces acting laterally on the spine and with spinal support in place. We present a21-year-old male who slid down a flight of stairs onto his side wearing a heavy mountaineering stylebackpack, subsequently sustaining a Chance fracture of his first lumbar vertebrae.

  12. Fracture behavior and deformation mechanisms under fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutard, J.L.; Dupouy, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    We have established the out-of-pile and in-pile deformation mechanism maps of a 316 stainless steel irradiated in a fast reactor. The knowledge of the dominating deformation mechanism either in post irradiation creep experiments or during the in-pile steady state operating conditions allows to rationalize the apparent discrepancy between the very low out-of-pile ductility and the rather high plastic diametral strains which are obtained in the fast reactor environment without fracture

  13. Application of Fracture-Mechanics Approach to Gas Pipelines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin

    VII, č. 73 (2011), s. 480-487 ISSN 2010-376X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2052; GA ČR(CZ) GPP105/10/P555 Grant - others:GAMPO(CZ) FT-TA5/076 Program:FT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : axial crack * fracture-mechanics * J integral * pipeline wall Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  14. Probabilistic fracture mechanics of nuclear structural components. Consideration of transition from embedded crack to surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, Genki; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Kanto, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis of aged nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material. New interpolation formulas are first derived for both embedded elliptical surface cracks and semi-elliptical surface cracks. To investigate effects of transition from embedded crack to surface crack in PFM analyses, one of PFM round-robin problems set by JSME-RC111 committee, i.e. 'aged RPV under normal and upset operating conditions' is solved, employing the interpolation formulas. (author)

  15. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics study of thermal shock cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Nakazawa, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes thermal shock experiments conducted on a nuclear pressure vessel steel (A533 Grade B Class 1), an AISI304 steel and a tool steel (JIS SKD62) using both a new thermal shock test facility and method. Analysis of their quasi-static thermal stress intensity factors is performed on the basis of linear-elastic fracture mechanics; and a thermal shock fracture toughness value, Ksub(tsc) is evaluated. Then elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests are carried out in the same high temperature range of the thermal shock experiment, and a relation between the stretched zone width, SZW, formed as a result of the fatigue precrack tip plastic blunting and the J-integral is clarified. An elastic-plastic thermal shock fracture toughness value, Jsub(tsc), is evaluated from a critical value of the stretched zone width, SZWsub(tsc), at the initiation of the thermal shock cracking by using the relation between SZW and J. The Jsub(tsc) value is compared with an elastic-plastic fracture toughness value, Jsub(Ic), and the difference between these Jsub(tsc) and Jsub(Ic) values is discussed on the basis of fractography. (author)

  16. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of reactor vessels with low upper-shelf fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, K.K.

    1993-01-01

    A class of submerged-arc welds used in fabricating early reactor vessels has relatively high copper contents. Studies have shown that when such vessels are irradiated, the copper contributes to lowering the Charpy upper-shelf energy level. To address this concern, 10CFR50, Appendix G requires a fracture mechanics analysis to demonstrate an adequate margin of safety for continued service. The B and W Owners Group (B and WOG) has been accumulating J-resistance fracture toughness data for these weld metals. Based on a mathematical model derived from this B and WOG data base, the first Appendix G analysis was performed. Another important issue affecting reactor vessel integrity is pressurized thermal shock (PIS) transients. In the early 1980s, probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses were performed on a reactor vessel to determine the probability of failure under postulated accident scenarios. Results of such analyses were used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish the screening criteria for assessing reactor vessel integrity under PTS transient loads. This paper addresses the effect of low upper-shelf toughness on the probability of failure of reactor vessels under PTS loads. Probabilistic fracture mechanics codes were modified to include the low upper-shelf toughness model used in a reference and a series of analyses was performed using plant-specific material conditions and realistic PTS scenarios. The results indicate that low upper-shelf toughness has an insignificant effect on the probability of reactor vessel failures. This is mostly due to PTS transients being susceptible to crack initiation at low temperatures and not affected by upper-shelf fracture toughness

  17. Spatial distribution of the human enamel fracture toughness with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qinghua; Xu, Haiping; Song, Fan; Zhang, Lan; Zhou, Xuedong; Shao, Yingfeng; Huang, Dingming

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding of the fracture toughness (KIC) of human enamel and the changes induced by aging is important for the clinical treatment of teeth cracks and fractures. We conducted microindentation tests and chemical content measurements on molar teeth from "young" (18 ≤ age ≤ 25) and "old" (55 ≤ age) patients. The KIC and the mineral contents (calcium and phosphorus) in the outer, the middle, and the inner enamel layers within the cuspal and the intercuspal regions of the crown were measured through the Vickers toughness test and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The elastic modulus used for the KIC calculation was measured through atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation tests. In the outer enamel layer, two direction-specific values of the KIC were calculated separately (direction I, crack running parallel to the occlusal surface; direction II, perpendicular to direction I). The mean KIC of the outer enamel layer was lower than that of the internal layers (penamel layer, old enamel has a lower KIC, II and higher mineral contents than young enamel (penamel surface becomes more prone to cracks with aging partly due to the reduction in the interprismatic organic matrix observed with the maturation of enamel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclic Fracture Toughness of Railway Axle and Mechanisms of its Fatigue Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorochak Andriy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main regularities in fatigue fracture of the railway axle material - the OSL steel - are found in this paper. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack propagation are described and systematized, and a physical-mechanical interpretation of the relief morphology at different stages of crack propagation is proposed for fatigue cracks in specimens cut out of the surface, internal and central layers of the axle.

  19. Fracture mechanism of a dispersion-hardened molybdenum alloy with strong structural interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, A.D.; Malashenko, I.S.; Moiseev, V.F.; Pechkovskij, Eh.P.; Sul'zhenko, V.K.; Trefilov, V.I.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Ehlektrosvarki)

    1978-01-01

    Fracture mechanism in the two-phase Mo-15wt.%Nb-3.5 vol.% TiN alloy known to be of ''brittle matrix-strong interfaces'' type has been investigated depending on tensile test temperature. Several temperature intervals of fracture have been found, each of them having its own peculiarities. A scheme is suggested for fracture mechanism changes in dispersion-hardened alloys with strong interfaces. At low test temperatures brittle cleavage fracture takes place. With temperature increase fracture mechanisms change in the following way: brittle intergranular fracture; fracture of ''microvoid coalescence'' type; fracture typical for reinforced materials with ductile matrix; intergran laru fracture. Particles of strengthening phase have been shown to play different roles depending on the test temperature in the fracture of the alloys studied

  20. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown.

  1. Acoustic emission from zirconium alloys during mechanical and fracture testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.

    1986-10-01

    The application of acoustic emission during the mechanical and fracture testing of zirconium alloys is reviewed. Acoustic emission is successful in following delayed hydride cracking quantitatively. It is especially useful when great sensitivity is required. Application to fatigue, tensile deformation and stress corrosion cracking appears promising but requires more work to separate phenomena before it can be used quantitatively. This report is based on an invited review for the American Society of Non-Destructive Testing Handbook: Volume 5, Acoustic Emission Testing

  2. Special fracture mechanics specimens for multilayer plastic pipes testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutař, Pavel; Šestáková, Lucie; Knésl, Zdeněk; Nezbedová, E.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 8 (2009), s. 785-792 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0279; GA ČR GC101/09/J027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Multilayer plastic pipes * C-type specimen * K-calibration * Fracture toughness * Slow crack growth * Non-homogenous specimens Subject RIV: JL - Material s Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.667, year: 2009

  3. State-of-the-art report on piping fracture mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Olson, R.J.; Scott, P.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This report is an in-depth summary of the state-of-the-art in nuclear piping fracture mechanics. It represents the culmination of 20 years of work done primarily in the US, but also attempts to include important aspects from other international efforts. Although the focus of this work was for the nuclear industry, the technology is also applicable in many cases to fossil plants, petrochemical/refinery plants, and the oil and gas industry. In compiling this detailed summary report, all of the equations and details of the analysis procedure or experimental results are not necessarily included. Rather, the report describes the important aspects and limitations, tells the reader where he can go for further information, and more importantly, describes the accuracy of the models. Nevertheless, the report still contains over 150 equations and over 400 references. The main sections of this report describe: (1) the evolution of piping fracture mechanics history relative to the developments of the nuclear industry, (2) technical developments in stress analyses, material property aspects, and fracture mechanics analyses, (3) unresolved issues and technically evolving areas, and (4) a summary of conclusions of major developments to date.

  4. State-of-the-art report on piping fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Olson, R.J.; Scott, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report is an in-depth summary of the state-of-the-art in nuclear piping fracture mechanics. It represents the culmination of 20 years of work done primarily in the US, but also attempts to include important aspects from other international efforts. Although the focus of this work was for the nuclear industry, the technology is also applicable in many cases to fossil plants, petrochemical/refinery plants, and the oil and gas industry. In compiling this detailed summary report, all of the equations and details of the analysis procedure or experimental results are not necessarily included. Rather, the report describes the important aspects and limitations, tells the reader where he can go for further information, and more importantly, describes the accuracy of the models. Nevertheless, the report still contains over 150 equations and over 400 references. The main sections of this report describe: (1) the evolution of piping fracture mechanics history relative to the developments of the nuclear industry, (2) technical developments in stress analyses, material property aspects, and fracture mechanics analyses, (3) unresolved issues and technically evolving areas, and (4) a summary of conclusions of major developments to date

  5. A unified approach to elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neale, B.K.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1976-01-01

    To assess the integrity of a cracked structure, using materials data obtained from simple laboratory tests, it is essential to define materials properties which are independent of the shape and the size of the specimen and of the loading system applied to it. In those situations where either the specimen or the structure fails after significant yielding has taken place, there is considerable speculation about the materials parameters which are relevant. By extending the Griffith equation for the stability of a perfectly elastic cracked body, the authors derive a fracture criterion which is applicable in the post yield regime. Comparisons are made with procedures based on the J-contour integral, equivalent energy, and crack opening displacements and with the post yield fracture mechanics of Heald, Spink and Worthington, and Dowling and Townley. For certain materials, it is shown that the factor controlling crack initiation is the fracture toughness Ksub(1c), irrespective of the amount of prior plastic damage, and hence independent of the shape and size of the specimen tested. Load carrying capacity in the post yield regime cannot, however, be derived directly from a knowledge of fracture toughness; the ultimate tensile strength of the material is also relevant

  6. Results of fracture mechanics tests on PNC SUS 304 plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1985-08-01

    PNC provided SUS 304 plate to be irradiated in FFTF at about 400 0 C to a target fluence of 5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The actual irradiation included two basically different exposure levels to assure that information would be available for the exposure of interest. After irradiation, tensile properties, fatigue-crack growth rates and J-integral fracture toughness response were determined. These same properties were also measured for the unirradiated material so radiation damage effects could be characterized. This report presents the results of this program. It is expected that these results would be applicable for detailed fracture analysis of reactor components. Recent advances in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics enable reasonably accurate predictions of failure conditions for flawed stainless steel components. Extensive research has focused on the development of J-integral-based engineering approach for assessing the load carrying capacity of low-strength, high-toughness structural materials. Furthermore, Kanninen, et al., have demonstrated that J-integral concepts can accurately predict the fracture response for full-scale cracked structures manufactured from Type 304 stainless steel

  7. 35. Conference of the DVM Working Group on Fracture Processes: Advances in fracture and damage mechanics - simulation methods of fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Subjects of the meeting were: Simulation of fatigue crack growth in real strucures using FEA (M. Fulland, Paderborn); Modelling of ductile crack growth (W. Brocks, Geesthacht); Advances in non-local modelling of ductile damage (F. Reusch et al., Berlin, Dortmund); Fracture mechanics of ceramics (D. Munz, Karlsruhe); From materials testing to vehicle crash testing (J.G. Blauel, Freiburg); Analytical simulation of crack growth in thin-walled structures (U. Zerbst, Geesthacht); The influence of intrinsic stresses on fatigue crack growth (C. Dalle Donne etc., Cologne, Dortmund, Pisa, and M. Sander, Paderborn); Fracture mechanical strength calculation in case of mixed mode loads on cracks (H.A. Richard, Paderborn); Numeric simulation of intrinsic stresses during welding (C. Veneziano, Freiburg); New research fields of the Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (P. Gumbsch, Head of the Institute, Freiburg); Modern developments and advances in fracture and damage mechanics; Numeric and experimental simulation of crack propagation and damage processes; Exemplary damage cases; Fracture mechanics in product development; Failure characteristics of lightweight constructional materials and joints [de

  8. Development of Numerical Analysis Techniques Based on Damage Mechanics and Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon Suk; Lee, Dock Jin; Choi, Shin Beom; Kim, Sun Hye; Cho, Doo Ho; Lee, Hyun Boo

    2010-04-01

    The scatter of measured fracture toughness data and transferability problems among different crack configurations as well as geometry and loading conditions are major obstacles for application of fracture mechanics. To address these issues, recently, concerns on the local approach employing reliable micro-mechanical damage models are being increased again in connection with a progress of computational technology. In the present research, as part of development of fracture mechanical evaluation model for material degradation of reactor pressure boundary, several investigations on fracture behaviors were carried out. Especially, a numerical scheme to determine key parameters consisting both cleavage and ductile fracture estimate models was changed efficiently by incorporating a genetic algorithm. Also, with regard to the well-known master curve, newly reported methods such as bimodal master curve, randomly inhomogeneous master curve and single point estimation were reviewed to deal with homogeneous and inhomogeneous material characteristics. A series of preliminary finite element analyses was conducted to examine the element size effect on micro-mechanical models. Then, a new thickness correction equation was derived from parametric three-dimensional numerical simulations, which was founded on the current test standard, ASTM E1921, but could lead to get more realistic fracture toughness values. As a result, promising modified master curves as well as fracture toughness diagrams to convert data between pre-cracked V-notched and compact tension specimens were generated. Moreover, a user-subroutine in relation to GTN(Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) model was made by adopting Hill's 48 yield potential theory. By applying GTN model combined with the subroutine to small punch specimens, the effect of inhomogeneous properties on fracture behaviors of miniature specimens was confirmed. Therefore, it is anticipated that the aforementioned enhanced research results can be utilized

  9. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed

  10. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.

    2001-01-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed. (author)

  11. Effect of aging time and aging temperature on fatigue and fracture behavior of 6063 aluminum alloy under seawater influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, R.A.; Abdul-Wahab, S.A.; Pervez, T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes experimentally the effect of seawater corrosion, aging time, and aging temperature on the fatigue resistance property of 6063 aluminum alloy. The 6063 aluminum alloy that was used for the study was heat treated and soaked in seawater for different intervals of time between 2 and 30 weeks. It was found that the maximum fatigue resistance property in the 6063 aluminum alloy was observed when aged between 7 and 9 h and heat treated at temperatures between 160 o C and 200 o C. Generally at constant load, the results indicated that the number of cycles to fail the 6063 aluminum alloy decreased with increasing the soaking time in seawater. Moreover, fracture surfaces were considered and studied under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that the brittle fracture pattern tended to occur with the increase in aging time and temperature. The fatigue striations were observed very clearly at low and peak aging temperature. The increase in the fatigue resistance property with aging time was linked with the vacancies assisted diffusion mechanism and also by the hindering of dislocation movement by impure atoms

  12. OCA-P, PWR Vessel Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: OCA-P is a probabilistic fracture-mechanics code prepared specifically for evaluating the integrity of pressurized-water reactor vessels subjected to overcooling-accident loading conditions. Based on linear-elastic fracture mechanics, it has two- and limited three-dimensional flaw capability, and can treat cladding as a discrete region. Both deterministic and probabilistic analyses can be performed. For deterministic analysis, it is possible to conduct a search for critical values of the fluence and the nil-ductility reference temperature corresponding to incipient initiation of the initial flaw. The probabilistic portion of OCA-P is based on Monte Carlo techniques, and simulated parameters include fluence, flaw depth, fracture toughness, nil-ductility reference temperature, and concentrations of copper, nickel, and phosphorous. Plotting capabilities include the construction of critical-crack-depth diagrams (deterministic analysis) and a variety of histograms (probabilistic analysis). 2 - Method of solution: OAC-P accepts as input the reactor primary- system pressure and the reactor pressure-vessel downcomer coolant temperature, as functions of time in the specified transient. Then, the wall temperatures and stresses are calculated as a function of time and radial position in the wall, and the fracture-mechanics analysis is performed to obtain the stress intensity factors as a function of crack depth and time in the transient. In a deterministic analysis, values of the static crack initiation toughness and the crack arrest toughness are also calculated for all crack depths and times in the transient. A comparison of these values permits an evaluation of flaw behavior. For a probabilistic analysis, OCA-P generates a large number of reactor pressure vessels, each with a different combination of the various values of the parameters involved in the analysis of flaw behavior. For each of these vessels, a deterministic fracture

  13. Mechanical design optimization of bioabsorbable fixation devices for bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovald, Scott T; Khraishi, Tariq; Wagner, Jon; Baack, Bret

    2009-03-01

    Bioabsorbable bone plates can eliminate the necessity for a permanent implant when used to fixate fractures of the human mandible. They are currently not in widespread use because of the low strength of the materials and the requisite large volume of the resulting bone plate. The aim of the current study was to discover a minimally invasive bioabsorbable bone plate design that can provide the same mechanical stability as a standard titanium bone plate. A finite element model of a mandible with a fracture in the body region is subjected to bite loads that are common to patients postsurgery. The model is used first to determine benchmark stress and strain values for a titanium plate. These values are then set as the limits within which the bioabsorbable bone plate must comply. The model is then modified to consider a bone plate made of the polymer poly-L/DL-lactide 70/30. An optimization routine is run to determine the smallest volume of bioabsorbable bone plate that can perform and a titanium bone plate when fixating fractures of this considered type. Two design parameters are varied for the bone plate design during the optimization analysis. The analysis determined that a strut style poly-L-lactide-co-DL-lactide plate of 690 mm2 can provide as much mechanical stability as a similar titanium design structure of 172 mm2. The model has determined a bioabsorbable bone plate design that is as strong as a titanium plate when fixating fractures of the load-bearing mandible. This is an intriguing outcome, considering that the polymer material has only 6% of the stiffness of titanium.

  14. Season of birth and the risk of hip fracture in danish men and women aged 65+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Heitmann, Berit L; Eiken, Pia Agnete

    2012-01-01

    calculated fracture rates and relative risks. The analysis covered 541,109 men and 691,522 women. In women, we observed a small but statistically significant difference between fracture rates by season of birth for all age intervals expect the youngest (age 65-69). A similar pattern was seen in men...... an epidemiological analysis of hip fracture rates as a function of season of birth, age, and sex. We retrieved information on all hip fractures in the 9-year period between 1997 and 2005 in all men and women aged 65-95, excluded hip fractures that occurred in current and recent prednisolone users, and subsequently......, but this was only statistically significant in the two oldest age groups (age 85-89 and 90-95). These findings suggest that vitamin D availability in the first and second trimester of intrauterine life could have a small but lasting impact on bone health and the risk of osteoporotic fractures. Further studies...

  15. Photoelastic stress analysis assisted evaluation of fracture toughness in hydrothermally aged epoxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitarresi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work has investigated the fracture toughness of a model DGEBA epoxy system subject to Hidro-Thermal aging. A Photoelastic Stress Analysis technique has been implemented, showing the evolution of stresses arising throughout the water uptake process due to the non-uniform swelling of the material. Gravimetric and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analyses have further complemented the characterization, showing the onset of plasticization effects with aging. The correlation of all previous characterizations has allowed to conclude that an increase of KIC fracture toughness is obtained at the fully saturated condition. In particular Photoelasticity has also revealed the onset of relevant swelling induced stresses during the first stages of water absorption, leading to an increase of fracture toughness due to compressive stresses settling near the crack tip. A stress free condition is instead reestablished at the later stages of absorption, suggesting that the increased toughness of the saturated material is an effect of the modifications induced by aging on the polymer structure.

  16. An efficient hydro-mechanical model for coupled multi-porosity and discrete fracture porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xia; Huang, Zhaoqin; Yao, Jun; Li, Yang; Fan, Dongyan; Zhang, Kai

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is developed for coupled analysis of deforming fractured porous media with multiscale fractures. In this model, the macro-fractures are modeled explicitly by the embedded discrete fracture model, and the supporting effects of fluid and fillings in these fractures are represented explicitly in the geomechanics model. On the other hand, matrix and micro-fractures are modeled by a multi-porosity model, which aims to accurately describe the transient matrix-fracture fluid exchange process. A stabilized extended finite element method scheme is developed based on the polynomial pressure projection technique to address the displacement oscillation along macro-fracture boundaries. After that, the mixed space discretization and modified fixed stress sequential implicit methods based on non-matching grids are applied to solve the coupling model. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and application of the proposed method to capture the coupled hydro-mechanical impacts of multiscale fractures on fractured porous media.

  17. (Environmental and geophysical modeling, fracture mechanics, and boundary element methods)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L.J.

    1990-11-09

    Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.

  18. Defect vectors and path integrals in fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Several criteria have been proposed in Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics. One of the most interesting ones is the J 1 criterion where J 1 is a path integral surrounding the crack tip. Other path integrals (or surface integrals in 3D problems) can be used. But all these integrals are introduced on an elastic basis, though they are applied in plasticity. This paper shows that it is possible to introduce these integrals without any reference to the elastic behavior of the material. The method is based on the 'defect vector theory' which is an extension of the energy-momentum tensor theory. (orig.)

  19. Forecasts on service life by fracture mechanics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.

    1985-01-01

    The service life of many component parts can frequently be divided into the stages up to the formation of a crack and of crack propagation. This holds good of fatigue crack, stress corrosion crack, and also in many cases of creep. But often the crack propagation stage is the only one of interest for service life forecasts if cracks must be reckoned with already on putting parts into service. Cracks in welding constructions are typical examples. Crack- and -fracture mechanics deal with the laws underlying crack propagation and provide quantitative information on crack propagation behaviour. (orig./DG) [de

  20. Fatigue fracture of steel after mechanical and ultrasonic strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotskij, I.M.

    1978-01-01

    Fatigue fracture surfaces of samples after mechanical and ultrasonic strengthening have been studied metallographically and by electron fractography. Studied was the 40Kh steel hardened from 850 deg and then tempered at 180 deg or at 550 deg C. The ultrasound power was 25 kWt, the frequency was 20 kHz, the sample rotation velocity was 39.5 m/min. Mechanical and ultrasonic treatment was found to cause structural changes (formation of a white layer) and deformation of the material under the layer. The fatigue cracks were extending beyond the white layer; their propagation involved generation and coalescence of microcracks on account of segregation of carbides. It is concluded that mechanical and ultrasonic treatment should be used for increasing the fatigue strength of low and average strength materials rather than hardened or low-tempered ones

  1. Development of probabilistic fracture mechanics code PASCAL and user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Onizawa, Kunio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Li, Yinsheng; Kato, Daisuke [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    As a part of the aging and structural integrity research for LWR components, a new PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) code PASCAL (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) has been developed since FY1996. This code evaluates the failure probability of an aged reactor pressure vessel subjected to transient loading such as PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock). The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the recent development in the fracture mechanics methodologies and computer performance. The code has some new functions in optimized sampling and cell dividing procedure in stratified Monte Carlo simulation, elastic-plastic fracture criterion of R6 method, extension analysis models in semi-elliptical crack, evaluation of effect of thermal annealing and etc. In addition, an input data generator of temperature and stress distribution time histories was also prepared in the code. Functions and performance of the code have been confirmed based on the verification analyses and some case studies on the influence parameters. The present phase of the development will be completed in FY2000. Thus this report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of the code. (author)

  2. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hye Won; Yang, Byoung-Eun

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all Pabutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture.

  3. Fracture mechanisms in multilayer phosphorene assemblies: from brittle to ductile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-05-24

    The outstanding mechanical performance of nacre has stimulated numerous studies on the design of artificial nacres. Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has a crystalline in-plane structure and non-bonded interaction between adjacent flakes. Therefore, multi-layer phosphorene assemblies (MLPs), in which phosphorene flakes are piled up in a staggered manner, may exhibit outstanding mechanical performance, especially exceptional toughness. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the dependence of the mechanical properties on the overlap distance between adjacent phosphorene layers and the number of phosphorene flakes per layer. The results indicate that when the flake number is equal to 1, a transition of fracture patterns is observed by increasing the overlap distance, from a ductile failure controlled by interfacial friction to a brittle failure dominated by the breakage of covalent bonds inside phosphorene flakes. Moreover, the failure pattern can be tuned by changing the number of flakes in each phosphorene layer. The results imply that the ultimate strength follows a power law with the exponent -0.5 in terms of the flake number, which is in good agreement with our analytical model. Furthermore, the flake number in each phosphorene layer is optimized as 2 when the temperature is 1 K in order to potentially achieve both high toughness and strength. Moreover, our results regarding the relations between mechanical performance and overlap distance can be explained well using a shear-lag model. However, it should be pointed out that increasing the temperature of MLPs could cause the transition of fracture patterns from ductile to brittle. Therefore, the optimal flake number depends heavily on temperature to achieve both its outstanding strength and toughness. Overall, our findings unveil the fundamental mechanism at the nanoscale for MLPs as well as provide a method to design phosphorene-based structures with targeted properties

  4. Probabilistic fracture mechanics of nuclear structural components: consideration of transition from embedded crack to surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis of aged nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material. New interpolation formulas of three-dimensional stress intensity factors are presented for both embedded elliptical surface cracks and semi-elliptical surface cracks. To investigate effects of transition from embedded crack to surface crack in PFM analyses, one of the PFM round-robin problems set by JSME-RC111 committee (i.e. aged RPV under normal and upset operating conditions) is solved, employing the interpolation formulas. (orig.)

  5. [Is Mapuche ethnicity a risk factor for hip fracture in aged?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapunar, Jorge; Bravo, Paulina; Schneider, Hermann; Jiménez, Marcela

    2003-10-01

    Ethnic factors are involved in the risk for osteoporosis and hip fracture. To assess the effect of Mapuche ethnicity on the risk of hip fracture. A case control study. Cases were subjects over 55 years of age admitted, during one year, for hip fracture not associated to major trauma or tumors. Controls were randomly chosen from other hospital services and paired for age with cases. The magnitude of the association between ethnicity and hip fracture was expressed as odds ratio in a logistic regression model. In the study period, 156 cases with hip fracture were admitted. The proportion of subjects with Mapuche origin was significantly lower among cases than controls (11.8 and 26.5% respectively, p Mapuche ethnicity was associated with hip fracture with an odds radio of 0.14 (p = 0.03, 95% CI 0.03-0.8). In this sample, Mapuche ethnicity is a protective factor for hip fracture.

  6. Application of fracture mechanics to weldments; Bruchmechanische Bewertung von Schweissverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbst, U.; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung; Huebner, P. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Weldments have been a major topic of engineering fracture mechanics research for many years as it shows up in the immense number of scientific papers published recently. Part of this generated knowledge has already been implemented in some industrial codes and standards. The focussing on weldments has its own reason in the utmost importance of this class of components in many industrial fields, but also in its susceptibility to the formation of defects during manufacturing and cracks in service, which promotes the danger of component failure. The present report is addressed to designers and material testers to provide updated information on the present state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics application to weldments. (orig.) [German] Schweissverbindungen bilden seit vielen Jahren einen Schwerpunkt der anwendungsnahen bruchmechanischen Forschung, was seinen Niederschlag in einer nahezu unuebersehbaren Fuelle an wissenschaftlichen Publikationen findet. Ein Teil der Ergebnisse hat bereits Eingang in industrienahe bruchmechanische Bewertungsvorschriften gefunden. Die Konzentration auf Schweissverbindungen hat ihre Ursache in der immensen Bedeutung dieser Bauteilklasse fuer viele Gebiete der Volkswirtschaft, aber auch in ihrer besonderen Anfaelligkeit zur Rissbildung in der Fertigung und im Betrieb und damit hinsichtlich der Gefahr von Bauteilversagen. Der vorliegende Beitrag wendet sich an Konstrukteure und Werkstoffpruefer, die einen Einblick in den gegenwaertigen Stand der Ingenieurbruchmechanik an Schweissverbindungen gewinnen wollen. (orig.)

  7. Hot ductility and fracture mechanisms of a structural steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, J.; Cabrera, J. M.; Prado, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The hot ductility of a structural steel produced from scrap recycling has been studied to determine the origin of the transverse cracks in the corners that appeared in some billets. Samples extracted both from a billet with transverse cracks and from a billet with no external damage were tested. To evaluate the influence of residual elements and inclusions, the steel was compared to another one impurity free. Reduction in area of the samples tensile tested to the fracture was taken as a measure of the hot ductility. The tests were carried out at temperatures ranging from 1000 degree centigree to 650 degree centigree and at a strain rate of 1.10-3 s-1. The fracture surfaces of the tested samples were observed by scanning electron microscopy in order to determine the embrittling mechanisms that could be acting. The steel with residuals and impurities exhibited lower ductility values for a wider temperature range than the clean steel. The embrittling mechanisms also changed as compared to the impurity free steel. (Author)

  8. Fracturing Fluid Leak-off for Deep Volcanic Rock in Zhungeer Basin: Mechanism and Control Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Bo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep volcanic reservoir in Zhungeer Basin is buried in over 4000m depth, which is characterized by complex lithology (breccia, andesite, basalt, etc., high elastic modulus and massive natural fractures. During hydraulic fracturing, hydraulic fracture will propagate and natural fractures will be triggered by the increasing net pressure. However, the extension of fractures, especially natural fractures, would aggravate the leak-off effect of fracturing fluid, and consequently decrease the fracturing success rate. 4 out of 12 fracturing wells in the field have failed to add enough proppants due to fluid loss. In order to increase the success rate and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing for deep volcanic reservoir, based on theoretical and experimental method, the mechanism of fracturing fluid leak-off is deeply studied. We propose a dualistic proppant scheme and employ the fluid loss reducer to control the fluid leak-off in macro-fractures and micro-fractures respectively. The proposed technique remarkably improved the success rate in deep volcanic rock fracturing. It bears important theoretical value and practical significance to improve the hydraulic fracturing design for deep volcanic reservoir.

  9. CT for diagnosing fractures of the undersurface of the talus and mechanism of injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshimori; Nishi, Genzaburo; Tago, Kyoji; Tsuchiya, Daiji; Chiba, Takehiro; Okumura, Hisashi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Wada, Ikuo

    2000-01-01

    Talus fractures whose fracture lines extend to the subtalar joint, except fractures of the neck and the body of the talus, are defined as fractures of the lower portion of the talus. It is difficult to make a correctly diagnosis of inferior fractures of the talus by plain radiography or tomography alone. The author encountered 12 cases of inferior fractures of the talus between 1989 and 1997, and CT imaging in 2 directions, in the horizontal and frontal plane, was useful in making the diagnosis. The correct diagnosis rate was 100%, and differentiation of the site and extent of the fractures was possible. Based on the CT findings, the fractures were classified into 8 types (fractures of the lateral process of the talus, fractures of the medial tubercle, fractures of the posterior process, and combinations of the above, and comminuted fractures). The mechanism of the injuries was also investigated, and the fractures of the lateral process of the talus seemed to have been caused by excessive eversion force on the ankle joint, with the lateral process becoming trapped between the fibula and the calcaneus. Medial tubercle fractures also seemed to be caused by forcible inversion of the ankle, with the tip of the medial malleous impacting and the medial tubercle being trapped between it and the sustentaculum tali. The comminuted fractures seem to have been caused by axial compression added to various of external forces. (K.H.)

  10. CT for diagnosing fractures of the undersurface of the talus and mechanism of injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshimori; Nishi, Genzaburo; Tago, Kyoji; Tsuchiya, Daiji; Chiba, Takehiro; Okumura, Hisashi [Aichiken Koseiren Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Ikeda, Takeshi; Wada, Ikuo

    2000-02-01

    Talus fractures whose fracture lines extend to the subtalar joint, except fractures of the neck and the body of the talus, are defined as fractures of the lower portion of the talus. It is difficult to make a correctly diagnosis of inferior fractures of the talus by plain radiography or tomography alone. The author encountered 12 cases of inferior fractures of the talus between 1989 and 1997, and CT imaging in 2 directions, in the horizontal and frontal plane, was useful in making the diagnosis. The correct diagnosis rate was 100%, and differentiation of the site and extent of the fractures was possible. Based on the CT findings, the fractures were classified into 8 types (fractures of the lateral process of the talus, fractures of the medial tubercle, fractures of the posterior process, and combinations of the above, and comminuted fractures). The mechanism of the injuries was also investigated, and the fractures of the lateral process of the talus seemed to have been caused by excessive eversion force on the ankle joint, with the lateral process becoming trapped between the fibula and the calcaneus. Medial tubercle fractures also seemed to be caused by forcible inversion of the ankle, with the tip of the medial malleous impacting and the medial tubercle being trapped between it and the sustentaculum tali. The comminuted fractures seem to have been caused by axial compression added to various of external forces. (K.H.)

  11. Effect of step-aging on the fracture toughness of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Naotake

    1993-01-01

    Development and an application of a new high-low step-aging to improve the fracture toughness-strength balance of a Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al alloy are studied. The high-low step-aging of aging at higher temperatures followed by aging at lower temperatures produces bi-modal microstructure composed of coarse and fine alpha precipitates in beta matrix. It greatly improves fracture toughness-strength balance compared with aging at a single temperature. Homogeneous distribution of coarse alpha precipitates produced by adding pre-aging at 573K before the high-low step-aging tends to reduce the superiority of the bi-modal microstructure in fracture toughness. The improvement is provided by the formation of microcracks and voids in the coarse alpha precipitates and rugged crack propagation due to the uneven microstructure. The high-low step-aging is applied to a TIG weldment of the alloy to improve the mechanical properties of the weldment. In the TIG weldment, strength of a fusion zone becomes much higher than that of a base metal after aging at a single temperature because of different aging response. In the first high temperature aging of the high low step-aging, coarse alpha particles that strengthen little and suppress strengthening by fine alpha precipitation in low temperature re-aging, precipitate more in fusion zone than in base metal because of the enhancement of aging in fusion zone. Therefore, strengthening of fusion zone in re-aging is less than in the base metal, resulting in comparable strength between the fusion zone and the base metal after re-aging. The bi-modal microstructure produced by the step-aging also improves, the, fracture toughness of the fusion zone of the weldment

  12. Coupled Flow and Mechanics in Porous and Fractured Media*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M. J.; Newell, P.; Bishop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models describing subsurface flow through deformable porous materials are important for understanding and enabling energy security and climate security. Some applications of current interest come from such diverse areas as geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, hydro-fracturing for stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and modeling electrochemistry-induced swelling of fluid-filled porous electrodes. Induced stress fields in any of these applications can lead to structural failure and fracture. The ultimate goal of this research is to model evolving faults and fracture networks and flow within the networks while coupling to flow and mechanics within the intact porous structure. We report here on a new computational capability for coupling of multiphase porous flow with geomechanics including assessment of over-pressure-induced structural damage. The geomechanics is coupled to the flow via the variation in the fluid pore pressures, whereas the flow problem is coupled to mechanics by the concomitant material strains which alter the pore volume (porosity field) and hence the permeability field. For linear elastic solid mechanics a monolithic coupling strategy is utilized. For nonlinear elastic/plastic and fractured media, a segregated coupling is presented. To facilitate coupling with disparate flow and mechanics time scales, the coupling strategy allows for different time steps in the flow solve compared to the mechanics solve. If time steps are synchronized, the controller allows user-specified intra-time-step iterations. The iterative coupling is dynamically controlled based on a norm measuring the degree of variation in the deformed porosity. The model is applied for evaluation of the integrity of jointed caprock systems during CO2 sequestration operations. Creation or reactivation of joints can lead to enhanced pathways for leakage. Similarly, over-pressures can induce flow along faults. Fluid flow rates in fractures are strongly dependent on the

  13. Fatigue and fracture mechanics in pressure vessels and piping. PVP-Volume 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, H.S.; Wilkowski, G.; Takezono, S.; Bloom, J.; Yoon, K.; Aoki, S.; Rahman, S.; Nakamura, T.; Brust, F.; Yoshimura, S.

    1995-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and fatigue evaluations are an important part of the structural integrity analyses to assure safe operation of pressure vessels and piping components during their service life. The paper presented in this volume illustrate the application of fatigue and fracture mechanics techniques to assess the structural integrity of a wide variety of Pressure Vessels and Piping components. The papers are organized in six sections: (1) fatigue and fracture--vessels; (2) fatigue and fracture--piping; (3) fatigue and fracture--material property evaluations; (4) constraint effects in fracture mechanics; (5) probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses; and (6) user's experience with failure assessment diagrams. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this book

  14. Fracture mechanics of piezoelectric solids with interface cracks

    CERN Document Server

    Govorukha, Volodymyr; Loboda, Volodymyr; Lapusta, Yuri

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive study of cracks situated at the interface of two piezoelectric materials. It discusses different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces, in particular the cases of electrically permeable, impermeable, partially permeable, and conducting cracks. The book also elaborates on a new technique for the determination of electromechanical fields at the tips of interface cracks in finite sized piezoceramic bodies of arbitrary shape under different load types. It solves scientific problems of solid mechanics in connection with the investigation of electromechanical fields in piezoceramic bodies with interface cracks, and develops calculation models and solution methods for plane fracture mechanical problems for piecewise homogeneous piezoceramic bodies with cracks at the interfaces. It discusses the “open” crack model, which leads to a physically unrealistic oscillating singularity at the crack tips, and the contact zone model for in-plane straight interface cracks betw...

  15. A three-dimensional coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model for deformable fractured geothermal systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Paluszny, Adriana; Nick, Hamidreza M.

    2018-01-01

    A fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) finite element model is presented for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Fractures are modelled as surface discontinuities within a three-dimensional matrix. Non-isothermal flow through the rock matrix and fractures are defined and coupled to a mec......A fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) finite element model is presented for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Fractures are modelled as surface discontinuities within a three-dimensional matrix. Non-isothermal flow through the rock matrix and fractures are defined and coupled....... The model has been validated against several analytical solutions, and applied to study the effects of the deformable fractures on the injection of cold water in fractured geothermal systems. Results show that the creation of flow channelling due to the thermal volumetric contraction of the rock matrix...

  16. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  17. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 8. Microstructure, methods, design, and fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.H.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents information on the following topics: fracture mechanics and microstructures; non-lubricated sliding wear of Al 2 O 3 , PSZ and SiC; mixed-mode fracture of ceramics; some fracture properties of alumina-containing electrical porcelains; transformation toughening in the Al 2 O 3 -Cr 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 -HfO 2 system; strength toughness relationships for transformation toughened ceramics; tensile strength and notch sensitivity of Mg-PSZ; fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics; loading-unloading techniques for determining fracture parameters of brittle materials utilizing four-point bend, chevron-notched specimens; application of the potential drop technique to the fracture mechanics of ceramics; ceramics-to-metal bonding from a fracture mechanics perspective; observed changes in fracture strength following laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC; crack growth in single-crystal silicon; a fracture mechanics and non-destructive evaluation investigation of the subcritical-fracture process in rock; slow crack growth in sintered silicon nitride; uniaxial tensile fatigue testing of sintered silicon carbide under cyclic temperature change; and effect of surface corrosion on glass fracture

  18. The Effect of Creep Aging on the Fatigue Fracture Behavior of 2524 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenke Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal temperature tensile and fatigue tests were adopted to test the mechanical performance and fatigue life of 2524 aluminum alloy under the three states of T3, artificial aging, and creep aging, and scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope were also used to observe the fatigue fracture morphology and aging precipitation features of the alloy under the above three states. Results showed that the alloy treated by creep aging can obtain higher fatigue life, but that treated by artificial aging is lower than T3; T3 alloy is mainly dominated by GPB region. Meanwhile, the crystal boundary displays continuously distributed fine precipitated phases; after artificial aging and creep aging treatment, a large amount of needle-shaped S′ phases precipitate inside the alloy, while there are wide precipitated phases at the crystal boundary. Wide precipitation free zones appear at the crystal boundary of artificial-aging samples, but precipitation free zones at the alloy crystal boundary of creep aging become narrower and even disappear. It can be seen that creep aging can change the precipitation features of the alloy and improve its fatigue life.

  19. Hydro-thermo-mechanical response of a fractured rock block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, S.; Zyvoloski, G.

    1990-01-01

    Hydro-thermo-mechanical effects in fractured rocks are important in many engineering applications and geophysical processes. Modeling these effects is made difficult by the fact that the governing equations are nonlinear and coupled, and the problems to be solved are three dimensional. In this paper we describe a numerical code developed for this purpose. The code is finite element based to allow for complicated geometries, and the time differencing is implicit, allowing for large time steps. The use of state-of-the-art equation solvers has resulted in a practical code. The code is capable of fully three dimensional simulations, however, in this paper we consider only the case of two dimensional heat and mass flow coupled to one dimensional deformation. Partial verification of the code is obtained by comparison with published semianalytical results. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effects of matrix expansion, due to pore pressure and heating, on fracture opening due to fluid injection. 16 refs., 11 figs

  20. Wear resistance and fracture mechanics of WC-Co composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaytbay, Saleh; El-Hadek, Medhat

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing of WC-Co composites using the electroless precipitation method at different sintering temperatures of 1 100, 1 250, 1 350 and 1 500 C was successfully achieved. The chemical composition of the investigated materials was 90 wt.% WC with 10 wt.% Co, and 80 wt.% WC with 20 wt.% Co. The specific density, densification, and Vickers microhardness measurements were found to increase with increased sintering temperature for both the WC-Co compositions. The composites of tungsten carbide with 10 wt.% Co had a higher specific density and Vickers microhardness measurements than those for the composites of tungsten carbide with 20 wt.% Co. Composites with WC-10 wt.% Co had better wear resistance. The stress-strain and transverse rupture strength increased monotonically with the increase in sintering temperatures, agreeing with the material hardness and wear resistance behavior. Fractographical scanning electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surface demonstrated a rough characteristic conical shape failure in the direction of the maximum shear stress. A proposed mechanism for the formation of the conical fracture surface under compression testing is presented. (orig.)

  1. Femoral Neck Stress Fractures in Children Younger Than 10 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Matthew J; Hogue, Grant D; Heyworth, Benton E; Ackerman, Kathryn; Quinn, Bridget; Yen, Yi-Meng

    2017-03-01

    Femoral neck stress fractures are rare in healthy children, with only 9 cases previously reported. The present article reviews our institutional experience with femoral neck stress fractures in children younger than 10 years of age, to highlight the unique features of this condition. We undertook a retrospective review of clinical records of patients who had been treated at our institution for an idiopathic femoral neck stress fracture between 2000 and 2014. To focus on children rather than adolescents, the World Health Organization's definition of adolescent as a person between 10 and 19 years of age was used; we thereby limited our analysis to patients younger than 10 years of age. The study included 6 patients (3 males, 3 females) treated for an idiopathic femoral neck stress fracture, with a mean age at diagnosis of 7.7 years (range, 5.2 to 8.9 y). All patients presented with a limp, which worsened with activity and had persisted for a mean of 5 weeks (range, 2 to 9 wk). None of the patients had experienced an increase in activity level or sporting volume before symptom onset. On examination, 3 patients experienced pain with terminal hip flexion and 3 patients demonstrated pain-free hip range of motion. Plain radiography demonstrated inferior femoral neck cortical disruption, suggesting a compression-type stress fracture mechanism. The diagnosis was confirmed by cross-sectional imaging in all cases. All patients were initially treated with 6 to 8 weeks of non-weight-bearing followed by 4 to 6 weeks of partial weight-bearing, leading to complete healing in 4 patients. Two patients demonstrated incomplete healing and were managed with spica casting for an additional 6 weeks. Our case series illustrates the unique features of this rare condition in children, with a history and examination profile distinct from those of adolescents and adults. Compliance with weight-bearing restrictions is difficult in this population and hip spica casting may be required to permit

  2. Reliability of Source Mechanisms for a Hydraulic Fracturing Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, T.; Van der Baan, M.

    2016-12-01

    Non-double-couple components have been inferred for induced seismicity due to fluid injection, yet these components are often poorly constrained due to the acquisition geometry. Likewise non-double-couple components in microseismic recordings are not uncommon. Microseismic source mechanisms provide an insight into the fracturing behaviour of a hydraulically stimulated reservoir. However, source inversion in a hydraulic fracturing environment is complicated by the likelihood of volumetric contributions to the source due to the presence of high pressure fluids, which greatly increases the possible solution space and therefore the non-uniqueness of the solutions. Microseismic data is usually recorded on either 2D surface or borehole arrays of sensors. In many cases, surface arrays appear to constrain source mechanisms with high shear components, whereas borehole arrays tend to constrain more variable mechanisms including those with high tensile components. The abilities of each geometry to constrain the true source mechanisms are therefore called into question.The ability to distinguish between shear and tensile source mechanisms with different acquisition geometries is investigated using synthetic data. For both inversions, both P- and S- wave amplitudes recorded on three component sensors need to be included to obtain reliable solutions. Surface arrays appear to give more reliable solutions due to a greater sampling of the focal sphere, but in reality tend to record signals with a low signal to noise ratio. Borehole arrays can produce acceptable results, however the reliability is much more affected by relative source-receiver locations and source orientation, with biases produced in many of the solutions. Therefore more care must be taken when interpreting results.These findings are taken into account when interpreting a microseismic dataset of 470 events recorded by two vertical borehole arrays monitoring a horizontal treatment well. Source locations and

  3. Fracture mechanics of hydroxyapatite single crystals under geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libonati, Flavia; Nair, Arun K; Vergani, Laura; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-04-01

    Geometric confinement to the nanoscale, a concept that refers to the characteristic dimensions of structural features of materials at this length scale, has been shown to control the mechanical behavior of many biological materials or their building blocks, and such effects have also been suggested to play a crucial role in enhancing the strength and toughness of bone. Here we study the effect of geometric confinement on the fracture mechanism of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals that form the mineralized phase in bone. We report a series of molecular simulations of HAP crystals with an edge crack on the (001) plane under tensile loading, and we systematically vary the sample height whilst keeping the sample and the crack length constant. We find that by decreasing the sample height the stress concentration at the tip of the crack disappears for samples with a height smaller than 4.15nm, below which the material shows a different failure mode characterized by a more ductile mechanism with much larger failure strains, and the strength approaching that of a flaw-less crystal. This study directly confirms an earlier suggestion of a flaw-tolerant state that appears under geometric confinement and may explain the mechanical stability of the reinforcing HAP platelets in bone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Age-specific incidence of hip fracture in the elderly: a healthy decline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Green, C

    2012-02-01

    Hip fractures in the elderly are an important source of morbidity and mortality. The predicted increase in the number of hip fractures due to the increasing elderly population has not been universally observed. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of hip fractures over a twenty year period to determine if this rise is occurring in our region. All hip fractures from the unit over 20 years were identified. Population data for those over 65 in the catchment area of our hospital was acquired. The rate of fractures occurring each year relative to the population was determined. The results were split into age groups. There was a strong correlation between the population rise and number of fractures (p = 0.77). But there was no significant difference in the rate of fracture over time (p = 0.41). However, the average age at which fracture occurred increased by two years. In addition we show the overall trend in the rate of fractures decreases in the younger age groups and increases in the older age groups. Therefore, the predicted rapid increase in rate is not occurring. This probably reflects the strengthening of the economy in Ireland from the 1930\\'s onwards, leading to a healthier population.

  5. Nonlinear Fracture Mechanics and Plasticity of the Split Cylinder Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, John Forbes; Østergaard, Lennart; Stang, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    properties. This implies that the linear elastic interpretation of the ultimate splitting force in term of the uniaxial tensile strength of the material is only valid for special situations, e.g. for very large cylinders. Furthermore, the numerical analysis suggests that the split cylinder test is not well...... models are presented, a simple semi-analytical model based on analytical solutions for the crack propagation in a rectangular prismatic body, and a finite element model including plasticity in bulk material as well as crack propagation in interface elements. A numerical study applying these models...... demonstrates the influence of varying geometry or constitutive properties. For a split cylinder test in load control it is shown how the ultimate load is either plasticity dominated or fracture mechanics dominated. The transition between the two modes is related to changes in geometry or constitutive...

  6. Application of fracture-mechanics principles to austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalbe, K.H.; Cornec, A.; Baustian, K.

    1996-01-01

    Recent experimental and analytical work mainly carried out at GKSS and TH Darmstadt is used to check the usefulness of fracture mechanics methods as developed for more conventional materials, such as ferritic steels and aluminium alloys. Finite element calculations serve for quantifying J validity limits; they are a function of constraint conditions and strain hardening properties. Crack growth studies show the ability of the J-integral, the modified J-integral, J(M), and of the crack tip opening displacement, CTOD delta(5), to generate unique, i.e. size-independent, R-curves. It is also shown that the delta(5)-type CTOD technique yields values close to the standardised CTOD. Finally, the Engineering Treatment Model is used to estimate delta(5) and J as driving force parameters. Special attention is given to the power law representation of actual stress/strain curves. (author)

  7. ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics code OCA-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    The computer code OCA-P was developed at the request of the USNRC for the purpose of helping to evaluate the integrity of PWR pressure vessels during overcooling accidents (OCA's). The code can be used for both deterministic and probabilistic fracture-mechanics calculations, and consists essentially of OCA-II and a Monte Carlo routine similar to that developed by Strosnider et al. In the probabilistic mode OCA-P generates a large number of vessels (10 6 more or less), each with a different combination of the various values of the different parameters involved in the analysis of flaw behavior. For each of these vessels a deterministic fracture-mechanics analysis is performed (calculation of K/sub I/, K/sub Ic/, K/sub Ia/) to determine whether vessel failure takes place. The conditional probability of failure is simply the number of vessels that fail divided by the number of vessels generated. OCA-II is used for the deterministic analysis. Basic input to OCA-II includes, among other things, the primry-system pressure transient and the temperature transient for the coolant in the reactor-vessel downcomer. With this and additional information available OCA-II performs a one-dimensional thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution in the wall as a function of time and then a one-dimensional linear-elastic stress analysis. OCA-P has been checked against similar codes and is presently being used in the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Program for specific PWR plants

  8. Effect of hydro mechanical coupling on natural fracture network formation in sedimentary basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouraga, Zady; Guy, Nicolas; Pouya, Amade

    2018-05-01

    In sedimentary basin context, numerous phenomena, depending on the geological time span, can result in natural fracture network formation. In this paper, fracture network and dynamic fracture spacing triggered by significant sedimentation rate are studied considering mode I fracture propagation using a coupled hydro-mechanical numerical methods. The focus is put on synthetic geological structure under a constant sedimentation rate on its top. This model contains vertical fracture network initially closed and homogeneously distributed. The fractures are modelled with cohesive zone model undergoing damage and the flow is described by Poiseuille's law. The effect of the behaviour of the rock is studied and the analysis leads to a pattern of fracture network and fracture spacing in the geological layer.

  9. Microscale fracture mechanisms of a Cr3C2-NiCr HVOF coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Andrew L.; White, Ken W.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal spray coatings, often composed of heterogeneous, multiphase microstructures, may, consequently, exhibit complex fracture behavior. For such coating structures, conventional mechanical evaluation methods fail to isolate the contribution of microstructural features to the overall fracture behavior. For this reason, this study employed focused ion beam machined (FIB) microcantilever beams and FIB sectioning methods to study the fracture mechanisms important at the scale of the heterogeneous Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr thermal spray coating. We found three fracture modes, namely, intergranular matrix fracture, matrix/carbide interfacial fracture, and carbide cleavage. By comparison, microindentation-induced cracks, the frequency of crack deflection around carbides is significantly more prevalent at this much larger crack dimension. This mechanistic variation provides some insight into the specific role and limitations of the microcantilever beam technique for fracture characterization of composite microstructures.

  10. The effect of multiaxial stress state on creep behavior and fracture mechanism of P92 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yuan; Xu, Hong, E-mail: xuhong@ncepu.edu.cn; Ni, Yongzhong; Lan, Xiang; Li, Hongyuan

    2015-06-11

    The creep experiments on plain and double U-typed notched specimens were conducted on P92 steel at 650 °C. The notch strengthening effect was found in the notched specimens. Fracture appearance observed by scanning electron microscopy revealed that dimpled fracture for relatively blunt notched specimen, and dimpled fracture doubled with intergranular brittle fracture for relatively sharp notched specimen, which meant that fracture mechanism of P92 steel altered due to the presence of the notch. Meanwhile, based on Norton–Bailey and Kachanov–Robotnov constitutive models, a modified model was proposed. Finite element simulations were carried out to investigate the effect of multiaxial stress state on the creep behavior, fracture mechanism and damage evolvement of P92 steel. The simulation results agreed well with the fracture behaviors observed experimentally.

  11. Effective Hydro-Mechanical Properties of Fluid-Saturated Fracture Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, N.; Vinci, C.; Renner, J.; Steeb, H.

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of hydro-mechanical processes is essential for the characterization of liquid-resources as well as for many engineering applications. Furthermore, the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media finds application not only in geophysical exploration but also reservoir management. Fractures exhibit high-aspect-ratio geometries, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits. Motivated by this peculiar geometry, the investigation of the hydro-mechanically coupled processes is performed by means of a hybrid-dimensional modeling approach. The effective material behavior of domains including complex fracture patterns in a porous rock is assessed by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Classical balance equations are combined with a Poiseuille-type flow in the dimensionally reduced fracture. In the porous surrounding rock, the classical Biot-theory is applied. For simple geometries, our findings show that two main fluid-flow processes occur, leak-off from fractures to the surrounding rock and fracture flow within and between the connected fractures. The separation of critical frequencies of the two flow processes is not straightforward, in particular for systems containing a large number of fractures. Our aim is to model three dimensional hydro-mechanically coupled processes within complex fracture patterns and in particular determine the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics. Furthermore, the effect of asperities of the fracture surfaces on the fracture stiffness and on the hydraulic conductivity will be added to the approach.

  12. Rheological Characteristics of Cement Grout and its Effect on Mechanical Properties of a Rock Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quansheng; Lei, Guangfeng; Peng, Xingxin; Lu, Chaobo; Wei, Lai

    2018-02-01

    Grouting reinforcement, which has an obvious strengthening effect on fractured rock mass, has been widely used in various fields in geotechnical engineering. The rheological properties of grout will greatly affect its diffusion radius in rock fractures, and the water-cement ratio is an important factor in determining the grouting flow patterns. The relationship between shear stress and shear rate which could reflect the grout rheological properties, the effects of water-cement ratio, and temperature on the rheological properties of grouting was studied in the laboratory. Besides, a new method for producing fractured rock specimens was proposed and solved the problem of producing natural fractured rock specimens. To investigate the influences of grouting on mechanical properties of a rock fracture, the fractured rock specimens made using the new method were reinforced by grouting on the independent designed grouting platform, and then normal and tangential mechanical tests were carried out on fractured rock specimens. The results showed that the mechanical properties of fractured rock mass are significantly improved by grouting, the peak shear strength and residual strength of rock fractures are greatly improved, and the resistance to deformation is enhanced after grouting. Normal forces affect the tangential behavior of the rock fracture, and the tangential stress strength increases with normal forces. The strength and stability of fractured rock mass are increased by grouting reinforcement.

  13. Fracture propagation in sandstone and slate – Laboratory experiments, acoustic emissions and fracture mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Stoeckhert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fracturing of highly anisotropic rocks is a problem often encountered in the stimulation of unconventional hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs by hydraulic fracturing. Fracture propagation in isotropic material is well understood but strictly isotropic rocks are rarely found in nature. This study aims at the examination of fracture initiation and propagation processes in a highly anisotropic rock, specifically slate. We performed a series of tensile fracturing laboratory experiments under uniaxial as well as triaxial loading. Cubic specimens with edge lengths of 150 mm and a central borehole with a diameter of 13 mm were prepared from Fredeburg slate. An experiment using the rather isotropic Bebertal sandstone as a rather isotropic rock was also performed for comparison. Tensile fractures were generated using the sleeve fracturing technique, in which a polymer tube placed inside the borehole is pressurized to generate tensile fractures emanating from the borehole. In the uniaxial test series, the loading was varied in order to observe the transition from strength-dominated fracture propagation at low loading magnitudes to stress-dominated fracture propagation at high loading magnitudes.

  14. An evaluation of flexible intramedullary nail fixation in femoral shaft fractures in paediatric age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Roy, Sandip Kumar; Jha, Amrish Kumar; Chatterjee, Debdutta; Banerjee, Debabrata; Garg, Anant Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Sixty-two femoral shaft fractures in 60 patients treated by elastic intramedullary nailing with mean age of the patients being 9.2 years (range 5 years to 12 years) and average follow-up of 15 months (range 7 months to 60 months) are evaluated. Twenty-eight fractures were fixed with titanium elastic nail while 34 fractures were fixed with Enders nail. There were 40 midshaft fractures, 18 proximal femoral and 4 were fractures of distal third. Fracture patterns were transverse in 35, short oblique in 14 cases and 13 were spiral fractures. Mean age of union in this series was 17 weeks (range 12 weeks to 28 weeks). Ten cases had complications, 5 had nail tip irritation, 3 varus or valgus malalignment and 2 had delayed union. In this series, we did not have any non-union, refracture, limb length discrepancy or any major infection. The result demonstrates 100% union rate irrespective of the age, weight and height of the patient. Regardless of the site of fracture and their pattern, it united every time with elastic nail fixation. We did not find and mismatch in the results of fractures stabilised with titanium elastic nail with that of elastic stainless steel nail.

  15. Effect of Thermal Aging and Test Temperatures on Fracture Toughness of SS 316(N) Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, B. Shashank; Babu, M. Nani; Shanthi, G.; Moitra, A.; Sasikala, G.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of thermal aging and test temperatures on fracture toughness (J 0.2) of SS 316(N) weld material has been studied based on J-R curve evaluations. The aging of the welds was carried out at temperatures 370, 475 and 550 °C and for durations varying from 1000 to 20,000 h. The fracture toughness (J-R curve) tests were carried out at 380 and 550 °C for specimens after all aging conditions, including as-weld condition. The initiation fracture toughness (J 0.2) of the SS 316(N) weld material has shown degradation after 20,000-h aging durations and is reflected in all the test temperatures and aging temperatures. The fracture toughness after different aging conditions and test temperatures, including as-weld condition, was higher than the minimum specified value for this class of welds.

  16. Degradation of impact fracture during accelerated aging of weld metal on microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Arista, B.; Hallen, J. M.; Albiter, A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of accelerated aging on the toughness and fracture of the longitudinal weld metal on an API5L-X52 line pipe steel was evaluated by Charpy V-notch impact test, fracture analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Aging was performed at 250 degree centigrade for 100 to 1000 h. The impact results indicated a significant reduction in the fracture energy and impact toughness as a function of aging time, which were achieved by the scanning electron microscope fractography that showed a decrease in the vol fraction of microvoids by Charpy ductile failure with the aging time, which favored the brittle fracture by transgranular cleavage. The minimum vol fraction of microvoids was reached at 500 h due to the peak aged. The microstructural analysis indicated the precipitation of transgranular iron nano carbides in the aged specimens, which was related to the deterioration of toughness and change in the ductile to brittle behavior. (Author) 15 refs

  17. Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0652 TITLE: Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0652 Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...to stress fracture risk. In particular, in Study 1, we will perform advanced skeletal imaging along with gait-assessments in subjects with history of

  18. Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    interfacial fracture ) in CFRP was recently found in the fuselages of Dreamliner 787, and two types of cracks were found in the rib feet brackets...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0003 Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests Zhenjun Yang UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER...Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER EOARD 12-2100 5b. GRANT NUMBER F8655-12-1

  19. From fracture mechanics to damage mechanics: how to model structural deterioration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolet, S.; Lorentz, E.; Barbier, G.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling of structural deteriorations of thermo-mechanical origin is highly enhanced when using damage mechanics. Indeed, the latter offers both a fine description of the material behaviour and an ability to deal with any loading conditions, moving away the current limits of fracture mechanics. But new difficulties can arise, depending on the examined problem: if forecasts of rack initiation are well mastered, the study of crack propagation remains more complex and needs sophisticated modelizations, which are nevertheless on the point of being well understood too. (authors)

  20. Implications of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field to the PCI stress corrosion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1980-01-01

    Fractographic observations on irradiated Zircaloy cladding stress corrosion fracture surfaces are considered against the background of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field. Dimples have been observed on the fracture surfaces of failed cladding, even though the cracks in metallographic sections are tight, i.e., crack propagation is associated with a low crack tip opening angle. This result is interpreted as providing evidence for an environmentally assisted ductile mode of fracture. The presence of this fracture mode forms the basis of an argument, which adds further support for the view that power ramp stress corrosion cladding failures are caused by stress concentrations that produce stress gradients in the cladding. (orig.)

  1. Fracture-mechanical results of non-destructive testing - function, goals, methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herter, K.H.; Kockelmann, H.; Schuler, X.; Waidele, H.

    2004-01-01

    Non-destructive testing provides data for fracture-mechanical analyses, e.g. defect size and orientation. On the other hand, fracture-mechanical analyses may help to define criteria for non-destructive testing, e.g. sensitivity, inspection intervals and inspection sites. The criteria applied differ as a function of the safety relevance of a component. (orig.) [de

  2. Magnetic Resonance Enhancement Patterns at the Different Ages of Symptomatic Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Ja Yeon; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    To investigate the magnetic resonance (MR) enhancement patterns of symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCF) according to the fracture age, based on the successful single-level percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) cases. The study included 135 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced MR imaging and successful PVP from 2005 to 2010 due to a single- level osteoporotic VCF. Two radiologists blinded to the fracture age evaluated the MR enhancement patterns in consensus. The MR enhancement patterns were classified according to the enhancing proportion to the vertebral height and the presence or extent of a non-enhancing cleft within the enhancing area on sagittal plane. The Fisher' exact test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to assess the differences in the MR enhancement patterns according to the fracture age. Symptomatic VCFs show variable MR enhancement patterns in all fracture ages. A diffuse enhancing area can be seen in not only the hyperacute and acute VCFs but also the chronic symptomatic VCFs. Symptomatic VCFs having a segmental enhancing area were all included in the hyperacute or acute stage. Most symptomatic osteoporotic VCFs had a non-enhancing cleft in the enhanced vertebral body (128/135, 94.8%). There was no statistical difference of the enhancement pattern according to the fracture age. Symptomatic VCFs show variable MR enhancement patterns in all fracture ages. The most common pattern is a non-enhancing cleft within a diffuse enhanced vertebra.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Enhancement Patterns at the Different Ages of Symptomatic Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Ja Yeon; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Kang, Heung Sik

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the magnetic resonance (MR) enhancement patterns of symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCF) according to the fracture age, based on the successful single-level percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) cases. The study included 135 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced MR imaging and successful PVP from 2005 to 2010 due to a single- level osteoporotic VCF. Two radiologists blinded to the fracture age evaluated the MR enhancement patterns in consensus. The MR enhancement patterns were classified according to the enhancing proportion to the vertebral height and the presence or extent of a non-enhancing cleft within the enhancing area on sagittal plane. The Fisher' exact test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to assess the differences in the MR enhancement patterns according to the fracture age. Symptomatic VCFs show variable MR enhancement patterns in all fracture ages. A diffuse enhancing area can be seen in not only the hyperacute and acute VCFs but also the chronic symptomatic VCFs. Symptomatic VCFs having a segmental enhancing area were all included in the hyperacute or acute stage. Most symptomatic osteoporotic VCFs had a non-enhancing cleft in the enhanced vertebral body (128/135, 94.8%). There was no statistical difference of the enhancement pattern according to the fracture age. Symptomatic VCFs show variable MR enhancement patterns in all fracture ages. The most common pattern is a non-enhancing cleft within a diffuse enhanced vertebra.

  4. Optimal age of commencing and discontinuing thiazide therapy to protect against fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, C; Eiken, P; Vestergaard, P

    2016-01-01

    subjects. Ten-year crude and adjusted age-grouped hazard ratios (HRs) of fracture occurrence were stratified by age of commencing thiazides compared to non-exposure. Separate analyses were done on Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System (ATC) codes C03AA and C03AA + C03AB compiled. Ten...... occurrence. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively examine the optimal age for commencing and discontinuing thiazide therapy to protect from osteoporotic fractures. METHODS: A population-based, retrospective matched cohort study was done using national data of 2.93 million Danish......-year crude HRs of fracture occurrence for discontinuing vs. continuing thiazides were estimated and stratified by age for the two groups. RESULTS: For C03AB alone (97.1 % of thiazide prescriptions), adjusted 10-year HRs of fracture occurrence were significantly increased for thiazide commencement after age...

  5. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Dagang [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: bchen@cqu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ye, Wei [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Gou, Jihua [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Fan, Jinghong [Division of Mechanical Engineering, Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. • SEM observation shows that the roughness of the fracture surfaces of the three different directions of the bone are remarkably different. • The fractal dimensions of the different fracture surfaces of the bone are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. • The fracture energies of the different fracture directions are calculated based on their fractal models. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in

  6. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Dagang; Chen, Bin; Ye, Wei; Gou, Jihua; Fan, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. • SEM observation shows that the roughness of the fracture surfaces of the three different directions of the bone are remarkably different. • The fractal dimensions of the different fracture surfaces of the bone are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. • The fracture energies of the different fracture directions are calculated based on their fractal models. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in

  7. Undercut tolerances in industry from a fracture mechanic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steimbreger Ceferino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is an important damage mechanism that particularly affects welded components, since they are likely to present residual stresses, inhomogeneities and stress raisers. Assessment of cyclic load effects on welds has concerned both industries and scientist for decades; unexpected failure must be prevented and at the same time, structures must withstand design loads with minimum requirements of material. All these facts together with economic issues have lead to the creation of normative that rule designing and construction of welded components. Particularly, toe undercuts are generally found in large structures, and large scatter and disagreement exists towards their significance and effects. Documents usually limit only their depth without considering radius, width or length, and there is currently no explanation to that fact. Understanding the damaging process will also help to set less conservative tolerances, with consequent cost reduction due to less demanding inspection. The present paper deals with a fracture mechanic approach that uses the Resistance Curve concept to predict fatigue limit of welded components with undercuts. Results revealed that depth is the most influencing variable, and it can be used as the limiting parameter in design regulations. Moreover, good correlation was obtained with FAT values normally assigned to this kind of defect.

  8. Hydrogen embrittlement of titanium tested with fracture mechanics specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho-Mantila, I.; Rahko, P.

    1990-11-01

    Titanium is one of the possible canister materials for spent nuclear fuel. The aim of this study is to determine whether the hydrogen embrittlement of titanium could be a possible deterioration mechanism of titanium canisters. This experimental study was preceded by a literature review and an experimental study on crack nucleation. Tests in this study were carried out with hydrogen charged fracture mechanics specimens. The studied hydrogen contents were as received, 100 ppm, 200 ppm, 500 ppm and 700 ppm and the types of the studied titanium were ASTM Grades 2 and 12. Test methods were slow tensile test (0.027 mm/h) and fatigue test (stress ratio 0.7 or 0.8 and frequency 5 Hz). According to the literature titanium may be embrittled by hydrogen at slow strain rates and cracking may occur under sustained load. In this study no evidence of hydrogen embrittlement was noticed in slow strain rate tension with bulk hydrogen contents up to 700 ppm. The fatigue tests of titanium Grades 2 and 12 containing 700 ppm hydrogen showed even slower crack growth compared to the as received condition. Very high hydrogen contents well in eccess of 700 ppm on the surface of titanium can, however, facilitate surface crack nucleation and crack growth, as shown in the previous study

  9. The gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute fracture risk in Tromso, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Luai A.; Schirmer, Henrik; Bjornerem, Ashild; Emaus, Nina; Jorgensen, Lone; Stormer, Jan; Joakimsen, Ragnar M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim of this study is to estimate the gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute risks of non-vertebral and osteoporotic (included hip, distal forearm and proximal humerus) fractures in a large cohort of men and women. This is a population-based 10 years follow-up study of 26,891 subjects aged 25 years and older in Tromso, Norway. All non-vertebral fractures were registered from 1995 throughout 2004 by computerized search in radiographic archives. Absolute risks were estimated by life-table method taking into account the competing risk of death. The absolute fracture risk at each year of age was estimated for the next 10 years (10-year risk) or up to the age of 90 years (lifetime risk). The estimated 10-year absolute risk of all non-vertebral fracture was higher in men than women before but not after the age of 45 years. The 10-year absolute risk for non-vertebral and osteoporotic fractures was over 10%, respectively, in men over 65 and 70 years and in women over 45 and 50 years of age. The 10-year absolute risks of hip fractures at the age of 65 and 80 years were 4.2 and 18.6% in men, and 9.0 and 24.0% in women, respectively. The risk estimates for distal forearm and proximal humerus fractures were under 5% in men and 13% in women. The estimated lifetime risks for all fracture locations were higher in women than men at all ages. At the age of 50 years, the risks were 38.1 and 24.8% in men and 67.4 and 55.0% in women for all non-vertebral and osteoporotic fractures, respectively. The estimated gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute fracture risk were higher in Tromso than in other populations. The high lifetime fracture risk reflects the increased burden of fractures in this cohort

  10. User's manual and analysis methodology of probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis code PASCAL Ver.2 for reactor pressure vessel (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osakabe, Kazuya; Onizawa, Kunio; Shibata, Katsuyuki; Kato, Daisuke

    2006-09-01

    As a part of the aging structural integrity research for LWR components, the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis code PASCAL (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) has been developed in JAEA. This code evaluates the conditional probabilities of crack initiation and fracture of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under transient conditions such as pressurized thermal shock (PTS). The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the recent development in the fracture mechanics and computer performance. PASCAL Ver.1 has functions of optimized sampling in the stratified Monte Carlo simulation, elastic-plastic fracture criterion of the R6 method, crack growth analysis models for a semi-elliptical crack, recovery of fracture toughness due to thermal annealing and so on. Since then, under the contract between the Ministry of Economy, Trading and Industry of Japan and JAEA, we have continued to develop and introduce new functions into PASCAL Ver.2 such as the evaluation method for an embedded crack, K I database for a semi-elliptical crack considering stress discontinuity at the base/cladding interface, PTS transient database, and others. A generalized analysis method is proposed on the basis of the development of PASCAL Ver.2 and results of sensitivity analyses. Graphical user interface (GUI) including a generalized method as default values has been also developed for PASCAL Ver.2. This report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of PASCAL Ver.2. (author)

  11. An investigation of the mechanical and hydrologic behavior of tuff fractures under saturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, C.F.; Shotwell, L.R.

    1990-04-01

    The mechanical and hydrologic behavior of natural fractures in a partially welded tuff rock were investigated. Tuff cores, each containing part of the same natural fracture oriented subparallel to the core axis, were subjected a range of stress and hydraulic gradients while simultaneously monitoring changes in the fracture aperture and volumetric flow rate. The fractures were tested in three configurations: intact, mated, and offset. Fracture deformation was nonlinear over the stress range tested with permanent deformation and hysteresis occurring with each loading cycle. The offset samples had larger permanent deformation and significantly reduced normal stiffness at lower stress levels. The cubic flow law appears to be valid for the relatively undisturbed tuff fractures at the scale tested. The cubic law did not explain the observed hydraulic behavior of the offset fractures. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Investigation of translaminar fracture in fibrereinforced composite laminates---applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics and cohesive-zone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Fang

    With the extensive application of fiber-reinforced composite laminates in industry, research on the fracture mechanisms of this type of materials have drawn more and more attentions. A variety of fracture theories and models have been developed. Among them, the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and cohesive-zone model (CZM) are two widely-accepted fracture models, which have already shown applicability in the fracture analysis of fiber-reinforced composite laminates. However, there remain challenges which prevent further applications of the two fracture models, such as the experimental measurement of fracture resistance. This dissertation primarily focused on the study of the applicability of LEFM and CZM for the fracture analysis of translaminar fracture in fibre-reinforced composite laminates. The research for each fracture model consisted of two sections: the analytical characterization of crack-tip fields and the experimental measurement of fracture resistance parameters. In the study of LEFM, an experimental investigation based on full-field crack-tip displacement measurements was carried out as a way to characterize the subcritical and steady-state crack advances in translaminar fracture of fiber-reinforced composite laminates. Here, the fiber-reinforced composite laminates were approximated as anisotropic solids. The experimental investigation relied on the LEFM theory with a modification with respect to the material anisotropy. Firstly, the full-field crack-tip displacement fields were measured by Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Then two methods, separately based on the stress intensity approach and the energy approach, were developed to measure the crack-tip field parameters from crack-tip displacement fields. The studied crack-tip field parameters included the stress intensity factor, energy release rate and effective crack length. Moreover, the crack-growth resistance curves (R-curves) were constructed with the measured crack-tip field parameters

  13. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture: A rare injury mechanism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sprain of the ankle is undoubtedly a common injury during athletic activity, and the sprain can be also associated with fracture of the ankle. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture is a very rare condition, which is usually missed. Here, we are presenting a 37 years old female patient, who suffered injury secondary pressing on ...

  14. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  15. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Simulation of Solution-Treated AA 5754

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Singh, Akhilendra

    2017-10-01

    In this work, mechanical properties and fracture toughness of as-received and solution-treated aluminum alloy 5754 (AA 5754) are experimentally evaluated. Solution heat treatment of the alloy is performed at 530 °C for 2 h, and then, quenching is done in water. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, impact toughness, hardness, fatigue life, brittle fracture toughness (K_{Ic} ) and ductile fracture toughness (J_{Ic} ) are evaluated for as-received and solution-treated alloy. Extended finite element method has been used for the simulation of tensile and fracture behavior of material. Heaviside function and asymptotic crack tip enrichment functions are used for modelling of the crack in the geometry. Ramberg-Osgood material model coupled with fracture energy is used to simulate the crack propagation. Fracture surfaces obtained from various mechanical tests are characterized by scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for leak-before-break evaluation of light water reactor's piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinobu; Yagawa, Genki; Akiba, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Terutaka.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) analyses for quantitative evaluation of the likelihood of Leak-Before-Break (LBB) of Light Water Reactor's (LWR's) piping. The PFM analyses in general assume probabilistic distributions of initial crack size, applied stress cycles, crack growth laws, fracture criteria, leakage detection capability, defect inspection capability and so on. Referring to the deterministic procedure for LBB evaluation, most appropriate PFM models and data for LBB evaluation are discussed. Here the LBB index is newly proposed in order to quantitatively evaluate the likelihood of LBB. Through intensive sensitivity analyses, it is clarified that the LBB is more likely to occur for larger diameter pipe; the performance of leakage detection significantly affects the LBB likelihood; the LBB likelihood increases with plant's aging even conservatively assuming leak detection capability; the R6 method (Category 1, Option 1) for fracture criterion gives very conservative results; and In-Service Inspection (ISI) reduces the increase rate of failure probability than the failure probability itself. (author)

  17. Sandia National Laboratories cask drop test programme: a demonstration of fracture mechanics principles for the prevention of brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories recently completed a cask drop test programme. The aims of the programme were (1) to demonstrate the applicability of a fracture mechanics-based methodology for ensuring cask integrity, and (2) to assess the viability of using a ferritic materials for cask containment. The programme consisted of four phases: (i) materials characterisation; (ii) non-destructive examination of the cask; (iii) finite element analyses of the drop events; and (iv) a series of drop tests of a ductile iron cask. The first three phases of the programme provided information for fracture mechanics analyses and predictions for the drop test phase. The drop tests were nominally based upon the IAEA 9 m drop height hypothetical accident scenario although one drop test was from 18 m. All tests were performed in the side drop orientation at a temperature of -29 o C. A circumferential, mid-axis flaw was introduced into the cask body for each drop test. Flaw depth ranged from 19 to 76 mm. Steel saddles were welded to the side wall of the cask to enhance the stresses imposed upon the cask in the region of the introduced flaw. The programme demonstrated the applicability of a fracture mechanics methodology for predicting the conditions under which brittle fracture may occur and thereby the utility of fracture mechanics design for ensuring cask structural integrity by ensuring an appropriate margin of safety. Positive assessments of ductile iron for cask containment and the quality of the casting process for producing ductile iron casks were made. The results of this programme have provided data to support IAEA efforts to develop brittle fracture acceptance criteria for cask containment. (author)

  18. A study on probabilistic fracture mechanics for nuclear pressure vessels and piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, Genki; Yoshimura, Shinobu

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes some recent research activities on probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) for nuclear pressure vessels and piping (PV and P) performed by the RC111 research committee of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) under a subcontract of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). To establish standard procedures for evaluating failure probabilities of nuclear PV and P, we have set up the following three kinds of PFM round-robin problems on: (a) primary piping under normal operating conditions, (b) aged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under normal and upset operating conditions, and (c) aged RPV under pressurised thermal shock (PTS) events. The basic problems of the last one are chosen from some US benchmark problems such as EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) and US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) joint PTS benchmark problems. This paper summarizes some sensitivity studies on the three kinds of problems mainly varying material properties such as flow stress, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth rate, Cu content. Employed in this study are the PFM computer codes developed in Japan and USA. Failure probabilities of nuclear PV and P are quantitatively discussed in detail. (author)

  19. Influence of ageing, inclusions and voids on ductile fracture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The strain hardening capacity has a marked effect on void size, and is an indicator of fracture .... a model of ductile failure based on the concept that the critical step in the .... Ashby M F, Gandhi C and Taplin D M R 1979 Acta Metal. 27. 699.

  20. Defect forces, defect couples and path integrals in fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1979-07-01

    In this work, it is shown that the path integrals can be introduced without any reference to the material behavior. The method is based on the definition in a continuous medium of a set of vectors and couples having the dimension of a force or a moment. More precisely, definitions are given of volume defect forces, surface defect forces, volume defect couples, and surface defect couples. This is done with the help of the stress working variation of a particule moving through the solid. The most important result is: the resultant of all the defect forces included in a volume V is the J integral on the surface surrounding V and the moment resultant is the L integral. So these integrals are defined without any assumption on the material constitutive equation. Another result is the material form of the virtual work principle - defect forces are acting like conventional forces in the conventional principles of virtual work. This lead to the introduction of the energy momentum tensor and of the associated couple stress. Application of this method is made to fracture mechanics in studying the defect forces distribution around a crack [fr

  1. Probalistic Finite Elements (PFEM) structural dynamics and fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wing-Kam; Belytschko, Ted; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop computationally efficient methodologies for assessing the effects of randomness in loads, material properties, and other aspects of a problem by a finite element analysis. The resulting group of methods is called probabilistic finite elements (PFEM). The overall objective of this work is to develop methodologies whereby the lifetime of a component can be predicted, accounting for the variability in the material and geometry of the component, the loads, and other aspects of the environment; and the range of response expected in a particular scenario can be presented to the analyst in addition to the response itself. Emphasis has been placed on methods which are not statistical in character; that is, they do not involve Monte Carlo simulations. The reason for this choice of direction is that Monte Carlo simulations of complex nonlinear response require a tremendous amount of computation. The focus of efforts so far has been on nonlinear structural dynamics. However, in the continuation of this project, emphasis will be shifted to probabilistic fracture mechanics so that the effect of randomness in crack geometry and material properties can be studied interactively with the effect of random load and environment.

  2. Integration of nondestructive examination reliability and fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Bates, D.J.; Charlot, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The primary pressure boundaries (pressure vessels and piping) of nuclear power plants are in-service inspected (ISI) according to the rules of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. Ultrasonic techniques are normally used for these inspections, which are periodically performed on a sampling of welds. The Integration of Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability and Fracture Mechanics (FM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established to determine the reliability of current ISI techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this NRC program are to: 1) determine the reliability of ultrasonic ISI performed on commercial light-water reactor primary systems; 2) using probabilistic FM analysis, determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety and determine the level of inspection reliability required to ensure a suitably low failure probability; 3) evaluate the degree of reliability improvement that could be achieved using improved and advanced NDE techniques; and 4) based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties, formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code, Section XI, and Regulatory Requirements needed to ensure suitably low failure probabilities

  3. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  4. A calculational round robin in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen organisations participated in this elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) numerical analysis round robin which treated the same three-point bend problem as a similar round robin conducted by ASTM four years earlier. The work involved the calculation of overall deformation, J, CTOD and crack profile using plane strain elastic-plastic finite element analysis for a monotonically increasing load up to a maximum deformation which was far beyond the elastic regime. It was found that all of the elastic solutions were accurate to within a few per cent. In the elastic-plastic regime, however, there was a large scatter of the results, increasing with increasing plastic deformation and roughly of the same order as in the ASTM round robin which contained ten solutions. No significant progress has taken place in the state of the art of numerical EPFM analysis over the four-year interval. The reasons for this scatter and tentative conclusions on the most suitable numerical analysis methods in EPFM are discussed. (author)

  5. In situ grain fracture mechanics during uniaxial compaction of granular solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, R. C.; Lind, J.; Pagan, D. C.; Akin, M. C.; Herbold, E. B.

    2018-03-01

    Grain fracture and crushing are known to influence the macroscopic mechanical behavior of granular materials and be influenced by factors such as grain composition, morphology, and microstructure. In this paper, we investigate grain fracture and crushing by combining synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and three-dimensional x-ray diffraction to study two granular samples undergoing uniaxial compaction. Our measurements provide details of grain kinematics, contacts, average intra-granular stresses, inter-particle forces, and intra-grain crystal and fracture plane orientations. Our analyses elucidate the complex nature of fracture and crushing, showing that: (1) the average stress states of grains prior to fracture vary widely in their relation to global and local trends; (2) fractured grains experience inter-particle forces and stored energies that are statistically higher than intact grains prior to fracture; (3) fracture plane orientations are primarily controlled by average intra-granular stress and contact fabric rather than the orientation of the crystal lattice; (4) the creation of new surfaces during fracture accounts for a very small portion of the energy dissipated during compaction; (5) mixing brittle and ductile grain materials alters the grain-scale fracture response. The results highlight an application of combined x-ray measurements for non-destructive in situ analysis of granular solids and provide details about grain fracture that have important implications for theory and modeling.

  6. Fracturing mechanics before valve-in-valve therapy of small aortic bioprosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter; Engholt, Henrik; Tang, Mariann; Nybo, Rasmus F; Rasmussen, Per D; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2017-10-13

    Patients with degraded bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) who are not candidates for valve replacement may benefit from transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) therapy. However, in smaller-sized surgical BHV the resultant orifice may become too narrow. To overcome this, the valve frame can be fractured by a high-pressure balloon prior to VIV. However, knowledge on fracture pressures and mechanics are prerequisites. The aim of this study was to identify the fracture pressures needed in BHV, and to describe the fracture mechanics. Commonly used BHV of small sizes were mounted on a high-pressure balloon situated in a biplane fluoroscopic system with a high-speed camera. The instant of fracture was captured along with the balloon pressure. The valves were inspected for material protrusion and later dissected for fracture zone investigation and description. The valves with a polymer frame fractured at a lower pressure (8-10 atm) than those with a metal stent (19-26 atm). None of the fractured valves had elements protruding. VIV procedures in small-sized BHV may be performed after prior fracture of the valve frame by high-pressure balloon dilatation. This study provides tentative guidelines for expected balloon sizes and pressures for valve fracturing.

  7. Ageing mechanisms and associated lipid changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Katsiki, Niki; Pavlidis, Antonis; Bilianou, Helen; Goumas, George; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2014-01-01

    Ageing is related to slowdown/breakdown of the somatotropic axis (i.e. the somatopause) leading to many physiological changes. The somatopause is accompanied by DNA and other macromolecule damage, and is characterized by a progressive decline in vitality and tissue function. We still do not have a definitive understanding of the mechanism( s) of ageing. Several overlapping theories have been proposed such as: 1) The free radical theory, 2) Mitochondrial Ageing, 3) The Glycation Theory, 4) Protein Damage and Maintenance in Ageing, and, 5) DNA Damage and Repair. Furthermore, several models of ageing were introduced such as genetically programmed senescence, telomere shortening, genomic instability, heterochromatin loss, altered epigenetic patterns and long lived cells. There are certain lipid modifications associated with the somatopause, characterized mainly by an increase in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels in both genders. In this review we consider the mechanisms of ageing and the associated changes in lipid metabolism according to gender.

  8. Aging effects on fracture behavior of 63Sn37Pb eutectic solder during tensile tests under the SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Ying; Wang Chunqing; Li Mingyu; Bang Hansur

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of aging treatment on fracture behavior of Sn-Pb eutectic solder alloys at different loading rate regime during tensile tests under the scanning electron microscope. In high homologous temperature, the solder exhibit the creep behavior that could be confirmed through the phenomena of grain boundary sliding (GBS) to both as-cast and aged specimens. Owing to the large grain scale after high temperature storage, boundary behavior was limited to some extent for the difficulty in grain rotation and boundary migration. Instead, drastic intragranular deformation occurred. Also, the phase coarsening weakened the combination between lead-rich phase and tin matrix. Consequently, surface fragmentation was detected for the aged specimens. Furthermore, the fracture mechanism changed from intergranular dominated to transgranular dominated with increasing loading rate to both specimens during early stage

  9. Understanding cracking failures of coatings: A fracture mechanics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Ryong

    A fracture mechanics analysis of coating (paint) cracking was developed. A strain energy release rate (G(sub c)) expression due to the formation of a new crack in a coating was derived for bending and tension loadings in terms of the moduli, thicknesses, Poisson's ratios, load, residual strain, etc. Four-point bending and instrumented impact tests were used to determine the in-situ fracture toughness of coatings as functions of increasing baking (drying) time. The system used was a thin coating layer on a thick substrate layer. The substrates included steel, aluminum, polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), and Noryl. The coatings included newly developed automotive paints. The four-point bending configuration promoted nice transversed multiple coating cracks on both steel and polymeric substrates. The crosslinked type automotive coatings on steel substrates showed big cracks without microcracks. When theoretical predictions for energy release rate were compared to experimental data for coating/steel substrate samples with multiple cracking, the agreement was good. Crosslinked type coatings on polymeric substrates showed more cracks than theory predicted and the G(sub c)'s were high. Solvent evaporation type coatings on polymeric substrates showed clean multiple cracking and the G(sub c)'s were higher than those obtained by tension analysis of tension experiments with the same substrates. All the polymeric samples showed surface embrittlement after long baking times using four-point bending tests. The most apparent surface embrittlement was observed in the acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) substrate system. The impact properties of coatings as a function of baking time were also investigated. These experiments were performed using an instrumented impact tester. There was a rapid decrease in G(sub c) at short baking times and convergence to a constant value at long baking times. The surface embrittlement conditions and an embrittlement toughness

  10. Lithium Ion Battery Anode Aging Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agubra, Victor; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms such as lithium plating, growth of the passivated surface film layer on the electrodes and loss of both recyclable lithium ions and electrode material adversely affect the longevity of the lithium ion battery. The anode electrode is very vulnerable to these degradation mechanisms. In this paper, the most common aging mechanisms occurring at the anode during the operation of the lithium battery, as well as some approaches for minimizing the degradation are reviewed. PMID:28809211

  11. Dynamic fracture mechanics with electromagnetic force and its application to fracture toughness and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S.

    1986-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of the electromagnetic force to the determination of the dynamic fracture toughness of materials. Taken is an edge-cracked specimen which carries a transient electric current I and is simply supported in a uniform and steady magnetic field B. As a result of their interaction, the dynamic electromagnetic force occurs in the whole body of the specimen, which is then deformed to fracture in the opening mode of cracking. For the evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness, the extended J integral with the effects of the electromagnetic force and inertia is calculated using the dynamic finite-element method. To determine the dynamic crack-initiation point in the experiment, the electric potential method is used in the case of brittle fracture, and the electric potential and the J-R curve methods in the case of ductile fracture, respectively. Using these techniques, the dynamic fracture toughness values of nuclear pressure vessel steel A508 class 3 are evaluated over a wide temperature range. (author)

  12. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330 degrees C (535--625 degrees F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature ''normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at ''saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, Φ, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common ''lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Failure conditions from push out tests of a steel-concrete joint: fracture mechanics approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusák, Jan; Seitl, Stanislav; De Corte, W.; Helincks, P.; Boel, V.; De Schutter, G.

    488-489, - (2012), s. 710-713 ISSN 1013-9826. [International Conference on Fracture and Damage Mechanics - FDM 2011 /10./. Dubrovník, 19.09.2011-21.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Push out test * generalized linear elastic fracture mechanics * bi-material notch Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  14. The effect of aging on the fracture characteristics and ductility of self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beygi, Morteza H.A.; Kazemi, Mohammad T.; Nikbin, Iman M.; Vaseghi Amiri, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fracture properties of SCC were obtained using two different methods. • Results showed with increase of age the fracture toughness increases. • As SCC becomes older, brittleness number is almost doubled. • The Size effect curve showed SCC brittleness increases with increase of age. - Abstract: Good knowledge of fracture parameters and cracking behavior of self-compacting concrete (SCC) from early ages until the SCC becomes mature plays an important role in design of SCC structure and also in evaluation of durability and consequently prevention of damage. In this paper, variation of fracture parameters and corresponding ductility behavior of SCC at different ages (e.g. 3 days, 7 days, 28 days and 90 days) for SCC mixes with w/c ratios of 0.45 and 0.65 have been experimentally studied. To do so, three-point bending tests were carried out on 120 notched beams. Then, size effect method (SEM) and work of fracture method (WFM) were applied to interpret the results. The results of analyses indicated that as the concrete is aging from 3 days to 90 days: (a) fracture energies from SEM (G f ) and WFM (G F ) are increased: (b) effective size of the process zone (C f ) in SEM and characteristic length (L ch ) in WFM are considerably decreased indicating increase of concrete brittleness: (c) fracture surface of concrete passing through the aggregate is increased which is attributed to strength improvement of hardened cement paste and aggregate–paste transition zone: (d) fracture toughness is significantly increased: (e) brittleness number is almost doubled. Also, the ratio of G F /G f , which is applied for calibration of numerical models of cracking at different ages, is equal to 2.70

  15. The elasto plastic fracture mechanics in ductile metal sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Malik, M.N.; Naeem, A.; Haq, A.U.; Atkins, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    The crack initiation of propagation in ductile metal sheets are caused by various micro and macro changes taking place due to material properties, applied loads, shape of the indenter (tool geometry) and the environmental conditions. These microstructural failures are directly related to the atomic bonding, crystal lattices, grain boundary status, material flaws in matrix, inhomogeneities and anisotropy in the metal sheets. The Elasto-Plastic related energy based equations are applied to these Rigid Plastic materials to determine the onset of fracture in metal forming. The combined stress and strain criterion of a critical plastic work per unit volume is no more considered as a universal ductile fracture criterion, rather a critical plastic work per unit volume dependence on all sort of stresses (hydrostatic) are the required features for the sheet metal failure (fracture). In this present study, crack initiation and propagation are related empirically with fracture toughness and the application of the theory in industry to save energy. (author)

  16. Moisture desorption in mechanically masticated fuels: effects of particle fracturing and fuelbed compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse K. Kreye; J.Morgan Varner; Eric E. Knapp

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical mastication is increasingly used as a wildland fuel treatment, reducing standing trees and shrubs to compacted fuelbeds of fractured woody fuels. One major shortcoming in our understanding of these fuelbeds is how particle fracturing influences moisture gain or loss, a primary determinant of fire behaviour. To better understand fuel moisture dynamics, we...

  17. Cellular Mechanisms of Somatic Stem Cell Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yunjoon

    2014-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity rely on rare populations of somatic stem cells endowed with the potential to self-renew and differentiate. During aging, many tissues show a decline in regenerative potential coupled with a loss of stem cell function. Cells including somatic stem cells have evolved a series of checks and balances to sense and repair cellular damage to maximize tissue function. However, during aging the mechanisms that protect normal cell function begin to fail. In this review, we will discuss how common cellular mechanisms that maintain tissue fidelity and organismal lifespan impact somatic stem cell function. We will highlight context-dependent changes and commonalities that define aging, by focusing on three age-sensitive stem cell compartments: blood, neural, and muscle. Understanding the interaction between extrinsic regulators and intrinsic effectors that operate within different stem cell compartments is likely to have important implications for identifying strategies to improve health span and treat age-related degenerative diseases. PMID:24439814

  18. comparison of elastic-plastic FE method and engineering method for RPV fracture mechanics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yingxue; Zheng Bin; Zhang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    This paper described the FE analysis of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for a crack in RPV belt line using ABAQUS code. It calculated and evaluated the stress intensity factor and J integral of crack under PTS transients. The result is also compared with that by engineering analysis method. It shows that the results using engineering analysis method is a little larger than the results using FE analysis of 3D elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, thus the engineering analysis method is conservative than the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics method. (authors)

  19. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  20. Thermo-hydro-mechanical simulation of a 3D fractured porous rock: preliminary study of coupled matrix-fracture hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canamon, I.; Javier Elorza, F.; Ababou, R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a problem involving the modeling of coupled flow and elastic strain in a 3D fractured porous rock, which requires prior homogenization (up-scaling) of the fractured medium into an equivalent Darcian anisotropic continuum. The governing equations form a system of PDE's (Partial Differential Equations) and, depending on the case being considered, this system may involve two different types of 'couplings' (in a real system, both couplings (1) and (2) generally take place): 1) Hydraulic coupling in a single (no exchange) or in a dual matrix-fracture continuum (exchange); 2) Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical interactions between fluid flow, pressure, elastic stress, strain, and temperature. We present here a preliminary model and simulation results with FEMLAB R , for the hydraulic problem with anisotropic heterogeneous coefficients. The model is based on data collected at an instrumented granitic site (FEBEX project) for studying a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the Grimsel Test Site in the Swiss Alps. (authors)

  1. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: margolinbz@yandex.ru; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-15

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  2. Mechanisms of recharge in a fractured porous rock aquifer in a semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Ferdinando; Walton, Kenneth M.; Cherry, John A.; Parker, Beth L.

    2017-12-01

    Eleven porewater profiles in rock core from an upland exposed sandstone vadose zone in southern California, with thickness varying between 10 and 62 m, were analyzed for chloride (Cl) concentration to examine recharge mechanisms, estimate travel times in the vadose zone, assess spatial and temporal variability of recharge, and determine effects of land use changes on recharge. As a function of their location and the local terrain, the profiles were classified into four groups reflecting the range of site characteristics. Century- to millennium-average recharge varied from 4 to 23 mm y-1, corresponding to different average Cl concentrations in the vadose zone and in groundwater, the contribution of diffuse flow (estimated at 80%) and preferential flow (20%) to the total recharge was quantified. This model of dual porosity recharge was tested by simulating transient Cl transport along a physically based narrow column using a discrete fracture-matrix numerical model. Using a new approach based on partitioning both water and Cl between matrix and fracture flow, porewater was dated and vertical displacement rates estimated to range in the sandstone matrix from 3 to 19 cm y-1. Moreover, the temporal variability of recharge was estimated and, along each profile, past recharge rates calculated based on the sequence of Cl concentrations in the vadose zone. Recharge rates increased at specific times coincident with historical changes in land use. The consistency between the timing of land use modifications and changes in Cl concentration and the match between observed and simulated Cl concentration values in the vadose zone provide confidence in porewater age estimates, travel times, recharge estimates, and reconstruction of recharge histories. This study represents an advancement of the application of the chloride mass balance method to simultaneously determine recharge mechanisms and reconstruct location-specific recharge histories in fractured porous rock aquifers. The

  3. Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of IN-100 superalloy in high temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan T. Jovanović

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of a polycrystalline IN-100 superalloy have been investigated in the range from room temperature to 900°C. Optical microscopy (OM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM applying replica technique were used for microstructural investigation, whereas scanning electron microscopy (SEM was utilized for fracture study. High temperature tensile tests were carried out in vacuumed chamber. Results show that strength increases up to 700°C, and then sharply decreases with further increase in temperature. Elongation increases very slowly (6-7.5% till 500°C, then decreases to 4.5% at 900°C. Change in elongation may be ascribed to a change of fracture mechanism. Appearance of a great number of microvoids prevails up to 500°C resulting in a slow increase of elongation, whereas above this temperature elongation decrease is correlated with intergranular crystallographic fracture and fracture of carbides.

  4. Continuum and micro-mechanics treatment of constraint in fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Shih, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the fundamental concepts of the J-Q description of crack-tip fields, the fracture toughness locus and micromechanics approaches to predict the variability of macroscopic fracture toughness with constraint under elastic-plastic conditions. While these concepts derived from plane-strain considerations, initial applications in fully 3-D geometries are very promising. Computational results are presented for a surface cracked plate containing a 6:1 semi-elliptical, a=t/4 flaw subjected to remote uniaxial and biaxial tension. Crack-tip stress fields consistent with the J-Q theory are demonstrated to exist at each location along the crack front. The micromechanics model employs the J-Q description of crack-front stresses to interpret fracture toughness values measured on laboratory specimens for fracture assessment of the surface cracked plate. The computational results suggest only a minor effect of the biaxial loading on the crack tip stress fields and, consequently, on the propensity for fracture relative to the uniaxial loading. 45 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Aging and loading rate effects on the mechanical behavior of equine bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulin, Robb M.; Jiang, Fengchun; Vecchio, Kenneth S.

    2008-06-01

    Whether due to a sporting accident, high-speed impact, fall, or other catastrophic event, the majority of clinical bone fractures occur under dynamic loading conditions. However, although extensive research has been performed on the quasi-static fracture and mechanical behavior of bone to date, few high-quality studies on the fracture behavior of bone at high strain rates have been performed. Therefore, many questions remain regarding the material behavior, including not only the loading-rate-dependent response of bone, but also how this response varies with age. In this study, tests were performed on equine femoral bone taken post-mortem from donors 6 months to 28 years of age. Quasi-static and dynamic tests were performed to determine the fracture toughness and compressive mechanical behavior as a function of age at varying loading rates. Fracture paths were then analyzed using scanning confocal and scanning-electron microscopy techniques to assess the role of various microstructural features on toughening mechanisms.

  6. The use of fracture mechanics for the evaluation of NDE flaw acceptance standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alicino, A; Capurro, E; Ansaldo, Sp; Corvi, A [Ansaldo SpA, Genoa (Italy)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the use of fracture mechanics criteria to evaluate the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) flaw acceptance standards. The communication discusses the general schemes and the guidelines of the activity carried out. (TEC).

  7. Age, Sex, and Dose Effects of Nonbenzodiazepine Hypnotics on Hip Fracture in Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, David D; Zullo, Andrew R; Mor, Vincent; Lee, Yoojin; Berry, Sarah D

    2018-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration recommends a reduced dose of nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics in women, yet little is known about the age-, sex-, and dose-specific effects of these drugs on risk of hip fracture, especially among nursing home (NH) residents. We estimated the age-, sex-, and dose-specific effects of nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics on the rate of hip fracture among NH residents. Case-crossover study in US NHs. A total of 691 women and 179 men with hip fracture sampled from all US long-stay NH residents. Measures of patient characteristics were obtained from linked Medicare and the Minimum Data Set (2007-2008). The outcome was hospitalization for hip fracture with surgical repair. We estimated rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from conditional logistic regression models for nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (vs nonuse) comparing 0 to 29 days before hip fracture (hazard period) with 60 to 89 and 120 to 149 days before hip fracture (control periods). We stratified analyses by age, sex, and dose. The average RR of hip fracture was 1.7 (95% CI 1.5-1.9) for any use. The RR of hip fracture was higher for residents aged ≥90 years vs <70 years (2.2 vs 1.3); however, the CIs overlapped. No differences in the effect of the hypnotic on risk of hip fracture were evident by sex. Point estimates for hip fracture were greater with high-dose versus low-dose hypnotics (RR 1.9 vs 1.6 for any use), but these differences were highly compatible with chance. The rate of hip fracture in NH residents due to use of nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics was greater among older patients than among younger patients and, possibly, with higher doses than with lower doses. When clinicians are prescribing a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic to any NH resident, doses of these drugs should be kept as low as possible, especially among those with advanced age. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Subcritical fracture propagation in rocks: An examination using the methods of fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tensile rock fracture is presented with an emphasis on characterizing time dependent crack growth using the methods of fracture mechanics. Subcritical fracture experiments were performed in moist air on glass and five different rock types at crack velocities using the double torsion technique. The experimental results suggest that subcritical fracture resistance in polycrystals is dominated by microstructural effects. Evidence for gross violations of the assumptions of linear elastic fracture mechanics and double torsion theory was found in the tests on rocks. In an effort to obtain a better understanding of the physical breakdown processes associated with rock fracture, a series of nondestructive evaluation tests were performed during subcritical fracture experiments on glass and granite. Comparison of the observed process zone shape with that expected on the basis of a critical normal principal tensile stress criterion shows that the zone is much more elongated in the crack propagation direction than predicted by the continuum based microcracking model alone.

  9. Progress in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, P.C.; Zahalak, G.I.

    1980-01-01

    This paper surveys recent developments in the application of J-Integral methods to problems of elastic-plastic fracture. The analytical and experimental development of the J-Integral concept over the last ten years is reviewed briefly. Tearing instability theory is presented in general terms, and specific applications of the theory are discussed. Principles of fracture-proof design are shown to follow naturally from the tearing instability theory. These principles are illustrated first for simple structures, and then generalized to more complex configurations and loading conditions. Examples include multiple member tension structures, beams, frames, nuclear reactor pressure vessel nozzles and piping, and beams on elastic foundations. It is concluded that J-integral based methods offer the best immediate opportunity for the development of sound analytical techniques for treating important practical problems of elastic-plastic fracture

  10. Change of Charpy impact fracture behavior of precracked ferritic specimens due to thermal aging in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1985-12-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of sodium on the impact fracture behavior of precracked Charpy specimens made of HT-9 weldment. One set of samples was precracked prior to sodium aging and the other set was precracked after aging in sodium. Both set of specimens exhibited the same DBTT. Samples precracked prior to sodium exposure, however, showed a 40% reduction in the upper shelf energy (USE) as compared to the set precracked after aging. The results suggest that the fracture toughness of the material may be reduced if an existing crack was soaked in sodium at elevated temperature for a period of time

  11. Age-related hip fractures in men: clinical spectrum and short-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poór, G; Atkinson, E J; Lewallen, D G; O'Fallon, W M; Melton, L J

    1995-01-01

    Clinical spectrum, treatment and short-term outcomes were assessed among the 131 Rochester, Minnesota, men who contracted an initial hip fracture due to moderate trauma during 1978-89. Three-fourths of falls leading to hip fracture occurred indoors with little seasonality, and 91% of fractures were in men 65 years of age or older. The ratio of cervical to intertrochanteric femur fractures was 1.4:1, and there was a tendency toward more neurological conditions among the patients with cervical fractures. Hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement were mostly performed for cervical fractures, while internal fixation was preferred for intertrochanteric fractures. In-hospital mortality was 11.5%, and the 30-day case fatality rate was 16.0%. Age and postoperative deterioration of mental status significantly increased the risk of early death, the latter even after adjustment in a multivariate model, while comorbidity had a suggestive but not statistically significant influence on mortality. More than half the men were discharged to nursing homes, and 79% of the patients who survived at 1 year resided in nursing homes or intermediate care facilities or were attended by home care. Only 41% of survivors recovered their prefracture level of functioning and nearly 60% of patients limped and required a cane or walker. After implementation of the prospective payment system in 1984, the length of hospital stay was reduced, but there was no change in early mortality rates, in the duration of physical therapy following fracture or in attendance at nursing homes. The results of this population-based study demonstrate the strong impact of hip fractures on short-term outcomes in men.

  12. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  13. Generalized linear elastic fracture mechanics: an application to a crack touching the bimaterial interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Šestáková, L.; Hutař, Pavel; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 452-453, - (2011), s. 445-448 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB200410803; GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : generalized stress intensity factor * bimaterial interface * composite materials * strain energy density factor * fracture criterion * generalized linear elastic fracture mechanics Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  14. Incidence of traumatic long-bone fractures requiring in-hospital management: a prospective age- and gender-specific analysis of 4890 fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meling, Terje; Harboe, Knut; Søreide, Kjetil

    2009-11-01

    Musculoskeletal trauma represents a considerable global health burden; however, reliable population-based incidence data are lacking. Thus, we prospectively investigated the age- and sex-specific incidence patterns of long-bone fractures in a defined population. A 4-year prospective study of all long-bone fractures in a defined Norwegian population was carried out. The demographic data, as well as data on fracture type and location and mode of treatment were collected using recognised classification (e.g., AO/OTA - Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Orthopaedic Trauma Association; Gustilo-Anderson (GA) for open fractures). Age- and sex-adjusted incidences were calculated using population statistics. During the study period, 4890 long-bone fractures were recorded. The overall incidence per 100,000 per year was 406 with a 95% confidence interval (95%CI) of 395-417. The age-adjusted incidence for those lower than that for those >or=16 years (427; 95%CI: 414-440). The overall male incidence (337; 95%CI: 322-355) was lower than the female (476; 95%CI: 459-493), but the male:female ratio was 2:1 among those or=50 years. The upper limb fractures had an overall incidence of 159 (95%CI: 152-166), whereas the lower limb fracture incidence was 247 (95%CI: 238-256). Open fractures occurred in 3%, with an incidence of 13 (95%CI: 11-15). Paediatric fractures were more likely to be treated conservatively with only 8% requiring internal fixation, compared to 56% internal fixation in those >or=16 years of age. An increase in the use of angular stable plates occurred during the study period. This prospectively collected study of long-bone fractures in a defined population recognises age- and gender-specific fracture patterns. Boys predominate in the younger age group for which treatment is basically conservative. In the senior population, women and operative treatment predominate.

  15. Mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of defective phosphorene nanotubes under uniaxial tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2017-12-01

    The easy formation of vacancy defects and the asymmetry in the two sublayers of phosphorene nanotubes (PNTs) may result in brand new mechanical properties and failure behaviour. Herein, we investigate the mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of defective PNTs under uniaxial tension using molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulation results show that atomic vacancies cause local stress concentration and thus significantly reduce the fracture strength and fracture strain of PNTs. More specifically, a 1% defect concentration is able to reduce the fracture strength and fracture strain by as much as 50% and 66%, respectively. Interestingly, the reduction in the mechanical properties is found to depend on the defect location: a defect located in the outer sublayer has a stronger effect than one located in the inner layer, especially for PNTs with a small diameter. Temperature is also found to strongly influence the mechanical properties of both defect-free and defective PNTs. When the temperature is increased from 0 K to 400 K, the fracture strength and fracture strain of defective PNTs with a defect concentration of 1% are reduced further by 71% and 61%, respectively. These findings are of great importance for the structural design of PNTs as building blocks in nanodevices.

  16. Microstructures and mechanical properties of aging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, P.K.; Viswanathan, R.; Murty, K.L.; Simonen, E.P.; Frear, D.

    1993-01-01

    This book contains a collection of papers presented at the symposium on ''Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Aging Materials,'' that was held in Chicago, IL. November 2-5, 1992 in conjunction with the Fall Meeting of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS). The subjects of interest in the symposium included: (1) mechanisms of microstructural degradation, (2) effects of microstructural degradation on mechanical behavior, (3) development of life prediction methodology for in-service structural and electronic components, (4) experimental techniques to monitor degradation of microstructures and mechanical properties, and (5) effects of environment on microstructural degradation and mechanical properties. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  17. Mechanical properties and fracture behavior of single-layer phosphorene at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha, Zhen-Dong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Ding, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material beyond graphene, has attracted great attention in recent years due to its superior physical and electrical properties. However, compared to graphene and other 2D materials, phosphorene has a relatively low Young’s modulus and fracture strength, which may limit its applications due to possible structure failures. For the mechanical reliability of future phosphorene-based nanodevices, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene. Previous studies on the mechanical properties of phosphorene were based on first principles calculations at 0 K. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures. It is found that temperature has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of phosphorene. The fracture strength and strain reduce by more than 65% when the temperature increases from 0 K to 450 K. Moreover, the fracture strength and strain in the zigzag direction is more sensitive to the temperature rise than that in the armchair direction. More interestingly, the failure crack propagates preferably along the groove in the puckered structure when uniaxial tension is applied in the armchair direction. In contrast, when the uniaxial tension is applied in the zigzag direction, multiple cracks are observed with rough fracture surfaces. Our present work provides useful information about the mechanical properties and failure behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures. (paper)

  18. Clastic patterned ground in Lomonosov crater, Mars: examining fracture controlled formation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Alexander M.; Balme, Matthew R.; Patel, Manish R.; Hagermann, Axel

    2017-10-01

    The area surrounding Lomonosov crater on Mars has a high density of seemingly organised boulder patterns. These form seemingly sorted polygons and stripes within kilometre scale blockfields, patches of boulder strewn ground which are common across the Martian high latitudes. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the formation of clastic patterned ground on Mars. It has been proposed that these structures could have formed through freeze-thaw sorting, or conversely by the interaction of boulders with underlying fracture polygons. In this investigation a series of sites were examined to evaluate whether boulder patterns appear to be controlled by the distribution of underlying fractures and test the fracture control hypotheses for their formation. It was decided to focus on this suite of mechanisms as they are characterised by a clear morphological relationship, namely the presence of an underlying fracture network which can easily be evaluated over a large area. It was found that in the majority of examples at these sites did not exhibit fracture control. Although fractures were present at many sites there were very few sites where the fracture network appeared to be controlling the boulder distribution. In general these were not the sites with the best examples of organization, suggesting that the fracture control mechanisms are not the dominant geomorphic process organising the boulders in this area.

  19. Acetabular Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Correa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to her primary care physician (PCP with right hip pain after a mechanical fall. She did not lose consciousness or have any other traumatic injuries. She was unable to ambulate post-fall, so X-rays were ordered by her PCP. Her X-rays were concerning for a right acetabular fracture (see purple arrows, so the patient was referred to the emergency department where a computed tomography (CT scan was ordered. Significant findings: The non-contrast CT images show a minimally displaced comminuted fracture of the right acetabulum involving the acetabular roof, medial and anterior walls (red arrows, with associated obturator muscle hematoma (blue oval. Discussion: Acetabular fractures are quite rare. There are 37 pelvic fractures per 100,000 people in the United States annually, and only 10% of these involve the acetabulum. They occur more frequently in the elderly totaling an estimated 4,000 per year. High-energy trauma is the primary cause of acetabular fractures in younger individuals and these fractures are commonly associated with other fractures and pelvic ring disruptions. Fractures secondary to moderate or minimal trauma are increasingly of concern in patients of advanced age.1 Classification of acetabular fractures can be challenging. However, the approach can be simplified by remembering the three basic types of acetabular fractures (column, transverse, and wall and their corresponding radiologic views. First, column fractures should be evaluated with coronally oriented CT images. This type of fracture demonstrates a coronal fracture line running caudad to craniad, essentially breaking the acetabulum into two halves: a front half and a back half. Secondly, transverse fractures should be evaluated by sagittally oriented CT images. By definition, a transverse fracture separates the acetabulum into superior and inferior halves with the fracture line extending from anterior to posterior

  20. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330 degrees C (535-625 degrees F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to ∼58,000 h at 290-350 degrees C (554-633 degrees F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J IC are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common open-quotes predicted lower-boundclose quotes J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented

  1. Atomistic investigations on the mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of indium phosphide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pial, Turash Haque; Rakib, Tawfiqur; Mojumder, Satyajit; Motalab, Mohammad; Akanda, M A Salam

    2018-03-28

    The mechanical properties of indium phosphide (InP) nanowires are an emerging issue due to the promising applications of these nanowires in nanoelectromechanical and microelectromechanical devices. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) crystal structured InP nanowires (NWs) are presented under uniaxial tension at varying sizes and temperatures. It is observed that the tensile strengths of both types of NWs show inverse relationships with temperature, but are independent of the size of the nanowires. Moreover, applied load causes brittle fracture by nucleating cleavage on ZB and WZ NWs. When the tensile load is applied along the [001] direction, the direction of the cleavage planes of ZB NWs changes with temperature. It is found that the {111} planes are the cleavage planes at lower temperatures; on the other hand, the {110} cleavage planes are activated at elevated temperatures. In the case of WZ NWs, fracture of the material is observed to occur by cleaving along the (0001) plane irrespective of temperature when the tensile load is applied along the [0001] direction. Furthermore, the WZ NWs of InP show considerably higher strength than their ZB counterparts. Finally, the impact of strain rate on the failure behavior of InP NWs is also studied, and higher fracture strengths and strains at higher strain rates are found. With increasing strain rate, the number of cleavages also increases in the NWs. This paper also provides in-depth understanding of the failure behavior of InP NWs, which will aid the design of efficient InP NWs-based devices.

  2. Simulation of crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete by fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Li, Victor C.

    2004-01-01

    Mode I crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is simulated by a fracture mechanics approach. A superposition method is applied to calculate the crack tip stress intensity factor. The model relies on the fracture toughness of hardened cement paste (K IC ) and the crack bridging law, so-called stress-crack width (σ-δ) relationship of the material, as the fundamental material parameters for model input. As two examples, experimental data from steel FRC beams under three-point bending load are analyzed with the present fracture mechanics model. A good agreement has been found between model predictions and experimental results in terms of flexural stress-crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) diagrams. These analyses and comparisons confirm that the structural performance of concrete and FRC elements, such as beams in bending, can be predicted by the simple fracture mechanics model as long as the related material properties, K IC and (σ-δ) relationship, are known

  3. STAFAN, Fluid Flow, Mechanical Stress in Fractured Rock of Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: STAFAN (Stress And Flow Analysis) is a two-dimensional, finite-element code designed to model fluid flow and the interaction of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a fractured rock surrounding a nuclear waste repository. STAFAN considers flow behavior of a deformable fractured system with fracture-porous matrix interactions, the coupling effects of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a medium containing discrete joints, and the inelastic response of the individual joints of the rock mass subject to the combined fluid pressure and mechanical loading. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: STAFAN does not presently contain thermal coupling, and it is unable to simulate inelastic deformation of the rock mass and variably saturated or two-phase flow in the fractured porous medium system

  4. Elastic nailing of tibia shaft fractures in young children up to 10 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jeong; Oh, Chang-Wug; Park, Kyeong-Hyeon; Kim, Joon-Woo; Kim, Hee-June; Lee, Jong-Chul; Park, Il-Hyung

    2016-04-01

    Although tibia shaft fractures in children usually have satisfactory results after closed reduction and casting, there are several surgical indications, including associated fractures and soft tissue injuries such as open fractures. Titanium elastic nails (TENs) are often used for pediatric tibia fractures, and have the advantage of preserving the open physis. However, complications such as delayed union or nonunion are not uncommon in older children or open fractures. In the present study, we evaluated children up to 10 years of age with closed or open tibial shaft fractures treated with elastic nailing technique. A total of 16 tibia shaft fractures treated by elastic nailing from 2001 to 2013 were reviewed. The mean patient age at operation was 7 years (range: 5-10 years). Thirteen of 16 cases were open fractures (grade I: 4, grade II: 6, grade IIIA: 3 cases); the other cases had associated fractures that necessitated operative treatments. Closed, antegrade intramedullary nailing was used to insert two nails through the proximal tibial metaphysis. All patients were followed up for at least one year after the injury. Outcomes were evaluated using modified Flynn's criteria, including union, alignment, leg length discrepancies, and complications. All fractures achieved union a mean of 16.1 weeks after surgery (range: 11-26 weeks). No patient reported knee pain or experienced any loss of knee or ankle motion. There was a case of superficial infection in a patient with grade III open fracture. Three patients reported soft tissue discomfort due to prominent TEN tips at the proximal insertion site, which required cutting the tip before union or removing the nail after union. At the last follow-up, there were no angular or rotational deformities over 10° in either the sagittal or coronal planes. With the exception of one case with an overgrowth of 15 mm, no patient showed shortening or overgrowth exceeding 10mm. Among final outcomes, 15 were excellent and 1 was

  5. Sociomedical sequels and quality of life in patients of old age group with proximal femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Raskina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sociomedical significance of osteoporosis is determined by its sequels (vertebral and peripheral skeletal fractures that are responsible for high mortality and disability rates among persons in the old age group and accordingly for high material costs in the health care system.Objective: to study sociomedical sequels and quality of life in patients with proximal femoral fractures in the old age group.Subjects and methods. 956 patients with osteoporotic fractures were followed up. Major social sequels were traced in the patients 6, 12, and 24 months after femur fractures in relation to treatment options.Results. There were 10 (8.0% and 78 (66.7% bedridden patients in the surgical and medical treatment groups, respectively. Twenty four months after fracture, recovery of function was noted in 72 (57.6% and 32 (27.35% patients receiving surgical and medical treatment, respectively.Conclusion. The findings suggest that immediate and late sequels in patients with proximal femoral fractures depend on a treatment option.

  6. Histomorphometrical analysis on the effects of two therapeutic ultrasound intensities on fracture healing in aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeronimo Rafael Skau

    Full Text Available Introduction Experimental studies conducted in young animals show that therapeutic ultrasound (TUS has been successfully used to shorten the healing time of bone fractures. However, they were not found in the literature, studies comparing the effect of different intensities of UST in aged animals. Objective To test the efficacy of intensity 1.0 W/cm2 and of 0.5 W/cm2 in the consolidation of experimental fracture of the tibia from aged Wistar rats. Materials and methods Three groups of 15 month old rats were submitted to a midshaft osteotomy of the tibia and then, the hind member was immobilized with a metal splint and plaster of Paris, wrapping the knee and ankle joint. One group (L, received ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm2; the other group (I, were exposed to ultrasound at 1.0 W/cm2. One control group (C, did not receive the ultrasound. Fifteen animals (five from each group were euthanatized at the end of the first week and fifteen (five from each group at the end of the third week. The progress of the fracture healing was performed for each group by morphometric analysis of histological sections of the fracture region. Results and conclusion The results showed that fractures treated with ultrasound at 1.0 W/cm2 healed significantly faster than did the fractures treated with ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm2 and the control.

  7. Mechanical evaluation of hip pads to protect against fracture of elderly femurs in falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, Shigeru; Nakatsuchi, Hiroki; Goto, Naoko; Fujisaki, Kazuhiro; Nakatsuchi, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Hip fracture in the aged easily occurs by falls and may cause these persons to become bedridden. Hip pads are effective in protecting hip fracture as they directly deflect and absorb the impact forces by falls. It is necessary for the material and the structure of hip pads to be designed to realize both high impact absorption and compliance (comfort during wearing). In this report, an impact testing system was developed to test the impact absorbing performance of hip pad with air cushions designed by the research group. The impact absorbing performance was evaluated by the impact load, collision time, and maximum load. To confirm the effectiveness in protecting against hip fracture, an impact force was applied to the greater trochanter of the human femur and the degree of fracture was measured by X-ray examination. As a result, the hip pad with air cushions had a high impact absorbing performance and was sufficiently effective to protect against hip fracture.

  8. Psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in old age: a prospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, Janne; Puustinen, Juha; Piirtola, Maarit; Vahlberg, Tero; Kivelä, Sirkka-Liisa

    2010-07-06

    There is evidence that the use of any psychotropic and the concomitant use of two or more benzodiazepines are related to an increased risk of fractures in old age. However, also controversial results exist. The aim was to describe associations between the use of a psychotropic drug, or the concomitant use of two or more of these drugs and the risk of fractures in a population aged 65 years or over. This study was a part of a prospective longitudinal population-based study carried out in the municipality of Lieto, South-Western Finland. The objective was to describe gender-specific associations between the use of one psychotropic drug [benzodiazepine (BZD), antipsychotic (AP) or antidepressant (AD)] or the concomitant use of two or more psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in a population 65 years or over. Subjects were participants in the first wave of the Lieto study in 1990-1991, and they were followed up until the end of 1996. Information about fractures confirmed with radiology reports in 1,177 subjects (482 men and 695 women) during the follow-up was collected from medical records. Two follow-up periods (three and six years) were used, and previously found risk factors of fractures were adjusted as confounding factors separately for men and women. The Poisson regression model was used in the analyses. The concomitant use of two or more BZDs and the concomitant use of two or more APs were related to an increased risk of fractures during both follow-up periods after adjusting for confounding factors in men. No similar associations were found in women. The concomitant use of several BZDs and that of several APs are associated with an increase in the risk of fractures in older men. Our findings show only risk relations. We cannot draw the conclusion that these drug combinations are causes of fractures.

  9. A Rock Mechanics and Coupled Hydro mechanical Analysis of Geological Repository of High Level Nuclear Waste in Fractured Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Kibok

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a few case studies on fractured hard rock based on geological data from Sweden, Korea is one of a few countries where crystalline rock is the most promising rock formation as a candidate site of geological repository of high level nuclear waste. Despite the progress made in the area of rock mechanics and coupled hydro mechanics, extensive site specific study on multiple candidate sites is essential in order to choose the optimal site. For many countries concerned about the safe isolation of nuclear wastes from the biosphere, disposal in a deep geological formation is considered an attractive option. In geological repository, thermal loading continuously disturbs the repository system in addition to disturbances a recent development in rock mechanics and coupled hydro mechanical study using DFN(Discrete Fracture Network) - DEM(Discrete Element Method) approach mainly applied in hard, crystalline rock containing numerous fracture which are main sources of deformation and groundwater flow

  10. Fracture mechanics of polymer mortar made with recycled raw materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jurumenha,Marco Antonio Godoy; Reis,João Marciano Laredo dos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show that industrial residues could be used in construction applications so that production costs as well as environmental protection can be improved. The fracture properties of polymer mortar manufactured with recycled materials are investigated to evaluate the materials behaviour to crack propagation. The residues used in this work were spent sand from foundry industry as aggregate, unsaturated polyester resin from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) as matrix and po...

  11. Pseudoarthrosis following proximal humeral fractures: A possible mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooney, P.J.; Cockshott, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    A small series of four patients with pseudarthrosis of the proximal humeral shaft is reported. These patients all had restricted movement of the shoulder joint prior to the trauma, three as a result of rheumatoid arthritis and one due a surgical fusion of the glenohumeral joint. It is suggested that pseudarthrosis is more likely under these circumstances and that pursuit of union of the fracture in such patients may not always be necessary.

  12. Future trends in fracture mechanics: theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosbons, R.R.

    1978-05-01

    A brief description of the current methods available for the analysis of fracture in ductile materials is given. Crack-opening displacement, R-curves and J-integrals are discussed and their future incorporation into structural codes assessed. The current areas of research which will probably influence code making bodies are also described. Emphasis is made on J-integral theory and a description of its limitations and extensions. Numerical techniques for calculating J for complicated structure are outlined. (author)

  13. Fracture toughness of intermetallics using a micro-mechanical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerberich, W.W.; Venkataraman, S.K.; Hoehn, J.W.; Marsh, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    A novel technique for determining the fracture toughness of brittle intermetallics is presented, wherein very small samples are used and multiple tests are easily conducted on a flat polished surface. The fracture toughness of single crystal NiAl and polycrystalline Al 3 Sc are evaluated with this continuous microscratch technique at scratch rates ranging from 0.5 to greater than 100 μm s - . For comparison, small compact tension samples of (100) NiAl are evaluated at applied stress intensity rates ranging from 1.5 to 5,400 MPa-m 1/2 s -1 . Good comparison of microscratch toughness to compact tension K Ic values are obtained in this study for (001) NiAl, 10.6 vs. 10.0 MPa-m 1/2 , from the literature for (001) , 13.5 vs. 12.2 MPa-m 1/2 , and from the literature for polycrystalline Al 3 Sc, 3.5 vs. 3.1 MPa-m 1/2 . Also, the fracture toughness of both NiAl and Al 3 Sc are found to be strongly dependent on strain rate at room temperature with toughness dropping by an order of magnitude over a decade increase in rate. Possible reasons and implications to improving low temperature brittleness are discussed

  14. Fracture mechanical treatment of bridging stresses in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, T.; Munz, D.

    1993-12-01

    Failure of ceramic materials often starts from cracks which can originate at pores, inclusions or can be generated during surface treatment. Fracture occurs when the stress intensity factor of the most serious crack in a component reaches a critical value K lc , the fracture toughness of the material. In case of ideal brittle materials the fracture toughness is independent of the crack extension and, consequently, identical with the stress intensity factor K l0 necessary for the onset of stable crack growth. It is a well-known fact that failure of several ceramics is influenced by an increasing crack-growth resistance curve. Several effects are responsible for this behaviour. Crack-border interactions in the wake of the advancing crack, residual stress fields in the crack region of transformation-toughened ceramics, the generation of a micro-crack zone ahead the crack tip and crack branching. The effect of increasing crack resistance has consequences on many properties of ceramic materials. In this report the authors discuss the some aspects of R-curve behaviour as the representation by stress intensity factors or energies and the influence on the compliance using the bridging stress model. (orig.) [de

  15. Fracture Incidence and Characteristics in Young Adults Aged 18 to 49 Years: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Joshua N; Melton, L Joseph; Achenbach, Sara J; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Khosla, Sundeep; Amin, Shreyasee

    2017-12-01

    Although fractures in both the pediatric and, especially, the elderly populations have been extensively investigated, comparatively little attention has been given to the age group in between. Thus, we used the comprehensive (inpatient and outpatient) data resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to determine incidence rates for all fractures among young adult (age range, 18 to 49 years) residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, in 2009 to 2011, and compared the distribution of fracture sites and causes in this young adult cohort with those for older residents aged 50 years or older. During the 3-year study period, 2482 Olmsted County residents aged 18 to 49 years experienced 1 or more fractures. There were 1730 fractures among 1447 men compared with 1164 among 1035 women, and the age-adjusted incidence of all fractures was 66% greater among the men (1882 [95% confidence interval 1793-1971] versus 1135 [95% CI 1069-1201] per 100,000 person-years; p age ≥50 years who sustained a fracture in 2009 to 2011. Younger residents (aged 18 to 49 years), when compared with older residents (aged ≥50 years), had a greater proportion of fractures of the hands and feet (40% versus 18%) with relatively few fractures observed at traditional osteoporotic fracture sites (14% versus 43%). Vertebral fractures were still more likely to be the result of moderate trauma than at other sites, especially in younger women. In conclusion, whereas pediatric and elderly populations often fracture from no more than moderate trauma, young adults, and more commonly men, suffer fractures primarily at non-osteoporotic sites due to more significant trauma. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Mechanical strength and analysis of fracture of titanium joining submitted to laser and tig welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Gabrielli Piveta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the tensile strength and fracture mechanism of tungsten inert gas (TIG welds in cylindrical rods of commercially pure titanium (cp Ti with those of laser welds and intact samples. Thirty dumbbell-shaped samples were developed by using brass rods as patterns. The samples were invested in casings, subjected to thermal cycles, and positioned in a plasma arc welding machine under argon atmosphere and vacuum, and titanium was injected under vacuum/pressure. The samples were X-rayed to detect possible welding flaws and randomly assigned to three groups to test the tensile strength and the fracture mechanism: intact, laser welding, and TIG welding. The tensile test results were investigated using ANOVA, which indicated that the samples were statistically similar. The fracture analysis showed that the cpTi samples subjected to laser welding exhibited brittle fracture and those subjected to TIG welding exhibited mixed brittle/ductile fracture with a predominance of ductile fracture with the presence of microcavities and cleavage areas. Intact samples presented the characteristic straightening in the fracture areas, indicating the ductility of the material.

  18. Mechanical behavior and essential work of fracture of starch-based blown films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottez, M.; Chaki, S.; Soulestin, J.; Lacrampe, M. F.; Krawczak, P.

    2015-05-01

    A fracture mechanics approach (Essential Work of Fracture, EWF) was applied to assess the toughness of novel partly starch-grafted polyolefin blown films, compared to that of a neat polyethylene reference. Tests were performed on double-end notched samples. The digital image correlation method was used to monitor the deformation field around the notch. Regular tensile and tear tests were also carried out. The specific essential work of fracture is a characteristic which is much more sensitive to materials structural modifications than the tensile or tear properties.

  19. State of the Art Report on Fracture Mechanics (Fracture in the Creep Range). Volume 3: Appendices H - M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, E.G.; Musicco, G.G.; Pineau, A.

    1988-01-01

    A CEC State of the Art Report on Fracture Mechanics for Fast Breeder Reactors (Fracture below the Creep Range) has recently been published by Bhandari and coworkers (1984). There has also been a compilation of Creep Crack Growth Data from Germany, France and the U.K. for 304 and 316 stainles steel by Lloyd et al (1984). The present Report provides considerably more data and analytical techniques taken from Worldwide sources on creep crack initiation and propagation. Since the subject is moving quickly there is an emphasis on the most recent work; indeed research studies as yet unpublished are also included. The total Report is in 3 volumes. Volume 3 contains the most important and up-to-date information in some detail in Appendices H to M; this provides a sound base for the Report and for future workers

  20. State of the Art Report on Fracture Mechanics (Fracture in the Creep Range). Volume 2: Appendices A - G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, E.G.; Musicco, G.G.; Pineau, A.

    1988-01-01

    A CEC State of the Art Report on Fracture Mechanics for Fast Breeder Reactors (Fracture below the Creep Range) has recently been published by Bhandari and coworkers (1984). There has also been a compilation of Creep Crack Growth Data from Germany, France and the U.K. for 304 and 316 stainles steel by Lloyd et al (1984). The present Report provides considerably more data and analytical techniques taken from Worldwide sources on creep crack initiation and propagation. Since the subject is moving quickly there is an emphasis on the most recent work; indeed research studies as yet unpublished are also included. The total Report is in 3 volumes. Volume 2 contains the most important and up-to-date information in some detail in Appendices A to G; this provides a sound base for the Report and for future workers

  1. [Characteristics of falls producing hip fracture in an elderly population. Differences according to age and gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, F; Ruiz, D; López-Soto, A; Duaso, E; Chivite, D; Pérez-Castejón, J M

    2006-01-01

    The majority of hip fractures are produced because of a fall. We examined the characteristics associated with falls causing hip fracture in elderly patients. Characteristics of falls owing to hip fracture were analyzed in 410 consecutive patients admitted in 6 hospitals during the 2004. We evaluated the location, time and the possible cause of fall: intrinsic risk factor, extrinsic or combined. We evaluated 316 women (77%) and 94 men, mean age 81.9 years. Previous to the hip fracture, the mean BI was 77.5. The mean value of falls during the last year was 1.9. Previously to the fall that caused hip fracture, we found that 24% of the patients had fallen repeatedly (more than two falls). Usually falls were at home (68%) and during daytime (80%). In 45% of patients an intrinsic risk factor was considered the most likely cause, in 33% an extrinsic risk factor and in 22% a combination. The majority of falls owing to hip fracture in elderly people happen in daytime, at home and due to intrinsic risk factors. Efforts to identify elderly people at risk of fall should be stressed in order to establish preventive measures.

  2. Experimental and theoretical fracture mechanics applied to volcanic conduits and domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammonds, P.; Matthews, C.; Kilburn, C.; Smith, R.; Tuffen, H.; Meredith, P.

    2008-12-01

    We present an integrated modelling and experimental approach to magma deformation and fracture, which we attempt to validate against field observations of seismicity. The importance of fracture processes in magma ascent dynamics and lava dome growth and collapse are apparent from the associated seismicity. Our laboratory experiments have shown that brittle fracture of magma can occur at high temperature and stress conditions prevalent in the shallow volcanic system. Here, we use a fracture mechanics approach to model seismicity preceding volcanic eruptions. Starting with the fracture mechanics concept of a crack in an elastic body, we model crack growth around the volcanic conduit through the processes of crack interactions, leading either to the propagation and linkage of cracks, or crack avoidance and the inhibition of crack propagation. The nature of that interaction is governed by the temperature and plasticity of the magma. We find that fracture mechanics rules can account for the style of seismicity preceding eruptions. We have derived the changes in seismic b-value predicted by the model and interpret these in terms of the style of fracturing, fluid flow and heat transport. We compare our model with results from our laboratory experiments where we have deformed lava at high temperatures under triaxial stresses. These experiments were conducted in dry and water saturated conditions at effective pressures up to 10 MPa, temperatures up to 1000°C and strain rates from 10-4 s-1 to 10-6 s-1. The behaviour of these magmas was largely brittle under these conditions. We monitored the acoustic emission emitted and calculate the change in micro-seismic b-value with deformation. These we find are in accord with volcano seismicity and our fracture mechanics model.

  3. Fracture mechanical analysis of strengthened concrete tension members with one crack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A concrete tension member strengthened 2 with fiber reinforced polymer plates on two sides 3 is analyzed with non-linear fracture mechanics. The 4 analysis of the strengthened tension member incorpo5 rates cohesive properties for both concrete and inter6 face between concrete and strengthening...... the structural classification parameters, is inves13 tigated in a non-dimensional analysis, and found to 14 depend strongly on the ratio between interfacial and 15 concrete fracture energies....

  4. Gender-specific hip fracture risk in community-dwelling and institutionalized seniors age 65 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterwald, M; Sidelnikov, E; Orav, E J; Dawson-Hughes, B; Theiler, R; Egli, A; Platz, A; Simmen, H P; Meier, C; Grob, D; Beck, S; Stähelin, H B; Bischoff-Ferrari, H A

    2014-01-01

    In this study of acute hip fracture patients, we show that hip fracture rates differ by gender between community-dwelling seniors and seniors residing in nursing homes. While women have a significantly higher rate of hip fracture among the community-dwelling seniors, men have a significantly higher rate among nursing home residents. Differences in gender-specific hip fracture risk between community-dwelling and institutionalized seniors have not been well established, and seasonality of hip fracture risk has been controversial. We analyzed detailed data from 1,084 hip fracture patients age 65 years and older admitted to one large hospital center in Zurich, Switzerland. In a sensitivity analysis, we extend to de-personalized data from 1,265 hip fracture patients from the other two large hospital centers in Zurich within the same time frame (total n = 2,349). The denominators were person-times accumulated by the Zurich population in the corresponding age/gender/type of dwelling stratum in each calendar season for the period of the study. In the primary analysis of 1,084 hip fracture patients (mean age 85.1 years; 78% women): Among community-dwelling seniors, the risk of hip fracture was twofold higher among women compared with men (RR = 2.16; 95% CI, 1.74-2.69) independent of age, season, number of comorbidities, and cognitive function; among institutionalized seniors, the risk of hip fracture was 26% lower among women compared with men (RR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.63-0.95) adjusting for the same confounders. In the sensitivity analysis of 2,349 hip fracture patients (mean age 85.0 years, 76% women), this pattern remained largely unchanged. There is no seasonal swing in hip fracture incidence. We confirm for seniors living in the community that women have a higher risk of hip fracture than men. However, among institutionalized seniors, men are at higher risk for hip fracture.

  5. Mechanical and mathematical models of multi-stage horizontal fracturing strings and their application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanghua Lian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-stage SRV fracturing in horizontal wells is a new technology developed at home and abroad in recent years to effectively develop shale gas or low-permeability reservoirs, but on the other hand makes the mechanical environment of fracturing strings more complicated at the same time. In view of this, based on the loading features of tubing strings during the multi-stage fracturing of a horizontal well, mechanical models were established for three working cases of multiple packer setting, open differential-pressure sliding sleeve, and open ball-injection sliding sleeve under a hold-down packer. Moreover, mathematical models were respectively built for the above three cases. According to the Lame formula and Von Mises stress calculation formula for the thick-walled cylinder in the theory of elastic mechanics, a mathematical model was also established to calculate the equivalent stress for tubing string safety evaluation when the fracturing string was under the combined action of inner pressure, external squeezing force and axial stress, and another mathematical model was built for the mechanical strength and safety evaluation of multi-stage fracturing strings. In addition, a practical software was developed for the mechanical safety evaluation of horizontal well multi-stage fracturing strings according to the mathematical model developed for the mechanical calculation of the multi-packer string in horizontal wells. The research results were applied and verified in a gas well of Tahe Oilfield in the Tarim Basin with excellent effects, providing a theoretical basis and a simple and reliable technical means for optimal design and safety evaluation of safe operational parameters of multi-stage fracturing strings in horizontal wells.

  6. Correlation between high resolution sequence stratigraphy and mechanical stratigraphy for enhanced fracture characteristic prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kharusi, Laiyyan M.

    Sequence stratigraphy relates changes in vertical and lateral facies distribution to relative changes in sea level. These relative changes in carbonates effect early diagenesis, types of pores, cementation and dissolution patterns. As a result, in carbonates, relative changes in sea level significantly impact the lithology, porosity, diagenesis, bed and bounding surfaces which are all factors that control fracture patterns. This study explores these relationships by integrating stratigraphy with fracture analysis and petrophysical properties. A special focus is given to the relationship between mechanical boundaries and sequence stratigraphic boundaries in three different settings: (1) Mississippian strata in Sheep Mountain Anticline, Wyoming, (2) Mississippian limestones in St. Louis, Missouri, and (3) Pennsylvanian limestones intermixed with elastics in the Paradox Basin, Utah. The analysis of these sections demonstrate that a fracture hierarchy exists in relation to the sequence stratigraphic hierarchy. The majority of fractures (80%) terminate at genetic unit boundaries or the internal flooding surface that separates the transgressive from regressive hemicycle. Fractures (20%) that do not terminate at genetic unit boundaries or their internal flooding surface terminate at lower order sequence stratigraphic boundaries or their internal flooding surfaces. Secondly, the fracture spacing relates well to bed thickness in mechanical units no greater than 0.5m in thickness but with increasing bed thickness a scatter from the linear trend is observed. In the Paradox Basin the influence of strain on fracture density is illustrated by two sections measured in different strain regimes. The folded strata at Raplee Anticline has higher fracture densities than the flat-lying beds at the Honaker Trail. Cemented low porosity rocks in the Paradox Basin do not show a correlation between fracture pattern and porosity. However velocity and rock stiffness moduli's display a slight

  7. Quality in rehabilitation after a working age person has sustained a fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Marianne; Hvalsoe, Berit; Poulsen, Jeppe Rosengaard

    2013-01-01

    Research in quality of rehabilitation has mostly concerned patients with chronic diseases, but the aim of the present study was to investigate what constitutes good quality in rehabilitation after a person has sustained a fracture at working age, from both patients' and therapists' perspectives....

  8. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive

  9. Two-parameter fracture mechanics: Theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F.

    1993-02-01

    A family of self-similar fields provides the two parameters required to characterize the full range of high- and low-triaxiality crack tip states. The two parameters, J and Q, have distinct roles: J sets the size scale of the process zone over which large stresses and strains develop, while Q scales the near-tip stress distribution relative to a high triaxiality reference stress state. An immediate consequence of the theory is this: it is the toughness values over a range of crack tip constraint that fully characterize the material's fracture resistance. It is shown that Q provides a common scale for interpreting cleavage fracture and ductile tearing data thus allowing both failure modes to be incorporated in a single toughness locus. The evolution of Q, as plasticity progresses from small scale yielding to fully yielded conditions, has been quantified for several crack geometries and for a wide range of material strain hardening properties. An indicator of the robustness of the J-Q fields is introduced; Q as a field parameter and as a pointwise measure of stress level is discussed

  10. Numerical Analysis and Experimental Study of Hard Roofs in Fully Mechanized Mining Faces under Sleeve Fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitao Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sudden falls of large-area hard roofs in a mined area release a large amount of elastic energy, generate dynamic loads, and cause disasters such as impact ground pressure and gas outbursts. To address these problems, in this study, the sleeve fracturing method (SFM was applied to weaken a hard roof. The numerical simulation software FLAC3D was used to develop three models based on an analysis of the SFM working mechanism. These models were applied to an analysis of the fracturing effects of various factors such as the borehole diameter, hole spacing, and sleeve pressure. Finally, the results of a simulation were validated using experiments with similar models. Our research indicated the following: (1 The crack propagation directions in the models were affected by the maximum principal stress and hole spacing. When the borehole diameter was fixed, the fracturing pressure increased with increasing hole spacing. In contrast, when the fracturing pressure was fixed, the fracturing range increased with increasing borehole diameter; (2 The most ideal fracturing effect was found at a fracturing pressure of 17.6 MPa in the model with a borehole diameter of 40 mm and hole spacing of 400 mm. The results showed that it is possible to regulate the falls of hard roofs using the SFM. This research may provide a theoretical basis for controlling hard roofs in mining.

  11. Thermo-hydro-mechanical simulation of a 3D fractured porous rock: preliminary study of coupled matrix-fracture hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canamon, I.; Javier Elorza, F. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Dept. de Matematica Aplicada y Metodos Informaticas, ETSI Minas (UPM) (Spain); Ababou, R. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), 31 (France)

    2007-07-01

    We present a problem involving the modeling of coupled flow and elastic strain in a 3D fractured porous rock, which requires prior homogenization (up-scaling) of the fractured medium into an equivalent Darcian anisotropic continuum. The governing equations form a system of PDE's (Partial Differential Equations) and, depending on the case being considered, this system may involve two different types of 'couplings' (in a real system, both couplings (1) and (2) generally take place): 1) Hydraulic coupling in a single (no exchange) or in a dual matrix-fracture continuum (exchange); 2) Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical interactions between fluid flow, pressure, elastic stress, strain, and temperature. We present here a preliminary model and simulation results with FEMLAB{sup R}, for the hydraulic problem with anisotropic heterogeneous coefficients. The model is based on data collected at an instrumented granitic site (FEBEX project) for studying a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the Grimsel Test Site in the Swiss Alps. (authors)

  12. Workshop on multifactor aging mechanisms and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, V. K.

    1992-10-01

    There have been considerable efforts to understand the aging and failure mechanisms of insulation in electrical systems. However, progress has been slow because of the complex nature of the subject particularly when dealing with multiple stresses e.g. electrical, thermal, mechanical, radiation, humidity and other environmental factors. When an insulating material is exposed to just one stress factor e.g. electric field, one must devise test(s) which are not only economically efficient and practical but which take into account the nature of electric field (ac, dc and pulsed), duration and level or field strength, and field configurations. Any additional stress factor(s) make the matrix of measurements and the understanding of resulting degradation processes more complex, time consuming and expensive.

  13. Aging behavior and mechanical properties of maraging steels in the presence of submicrocrystalline Laves phase particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, A.; Ghavidel, M.R. Zamanzad; Nedjad, S. Hossein; Heidarzadeh, A.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2011-01-01

    Cold rolling and annealing of homogenized Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo-Ti-Cr maraging steels resulted in the formation of submicrocrystalline Fe 2 (Mo,Ti) Laves phase particles. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, tensile and hardness tests were used to study the microstructure, aging behavior and mechanical properties of the annealed steels. The annealed microstructures showed age hardenability during subsequent isothermal aging at 753 K. Ultrahigh fracture stress but poor tensile ductility was obtained after substantial age hardening in the specimens with 2% and 4% chromium. Increasing chromium addition up to 6% toughened the aged microstructure at the expense of the fracture stress by increasing the volume fraction of retained austenite. The Laves phase particles acted as crack nucleation sites during tensile deformation. - Highlights: → Laves phases dispersed in a BCC iron matrix by annealing of cold rolled samples. → The samples showed age hardenability during subsequent isothermal aging at 753 K. → Ultrahigh fracture stress but poor ductility was obtained after age hardening. → Increasing chromium addition toughened the aged microstructure. → Laves phase particles acting as crack nucleation sites during tensile deformation.

  14. Tensile and fracture behavior of boron and carbon modified Ti-15-3 alloys in aged conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, R., E-mail: rajdeepsarkar@dmrl.drdo.in [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Ghosal, P.; Nandy, T.K. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Ray, K.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2016-02-22

    This work illustrates the effect of boron and carbon addition on the mechanical behavior of a beta Ti alloy, Ti–15V–3Cr–3Al–3Sn (Ti-15-3), in differently aged conditions. The alloys were prepared by consumable vacuum arc melting followed by forging and hot rolling. These were subsequently solution treated and aged at different temperatures above 500 °C for 8 h. Standard tensile and plane strain fracture toughness tests were carried out to understand the mechanical behavior of the alloys and its correlation with the microstructural features characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Both the boron- and the carbon-containing alloys exhibit improved strength with comparable elongation to failure values as compared to the base Ti-15-3 alloy. The presence of TiB and TiC precipitates in a matrix of fine α with β results in lower fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) in the boron- and carbon-containing alloys as compared to the base alloy. However, at higher aging temperatures K{sub IC} improves due to more tortuous crack path because of the presence of coarse α-phase. An empirical relationship has been proposed correlating K{sub IC} with the volume fraction, size and interspacing of α in these alloys.

  15. Relationships between fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Sanderson, D. J.; Rotevatn, A.

    2018-01-01

    Fracture systems comprise many fractures that may be grouped into sets based on their orientation, type and relative age. The fractures are often arranged in a network that involves fracture branches that interact with one another. Interacting fractures are termed geometrically coupled when they share an intersection line and/or kinematically coupled when the displacements, stresses and strains of one fracture influences those of the other. Fracture interactions are characterised in terms of the following. 1) Fracture type: for example, whether they have opening (e.g., joints, veins, dykes), closing (stylolites, compaction bands), shearing (e.g., faults, deformation bands) or mixed-mode displacements. 2) Geometry (e.g., relative orientations) and topology (the arrangement of the fractures, including their connectivity). 3) Chronology: the relative ages of the fractures. 4) Kinematics: the displacement distributions of the interacting fractures. It is also suggested that interaction can be characterised in terms of mechanics, e.g., the effects of the interaction on the stress field. It is insufficient to describe only the components of a fracture network, with fuller understanding coming from determining the interactions between the different components of the network.

  16. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of reactor vessel for pressurized thermal shock: the effect of residual stress and fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sung Gyu; Jin, Tae Eun; Jhung, Myung Jo; Choi, Young Hwan

    2003-01-01

    The structural integrity of the reactor vessel with the approaching end of life must be assured for pressurized thermal shock. The regulation specifies the screening criteria for this and requires that specific analysis be performed for the reactor vessel which is anticipated to exceed the screening criteria at the end of plant life. In case the screening criteria is exceeded by the deterministic analysis, probabilistic analysis must be performed to show that failure probability is within the limit. In this study, probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of the reactor vessel for pressurized thermal shock is performed and the effects of residual stress and master curve on the failure probability are investigated

  17. Variate generation for probabilistic fracture mechanics and fitness-for-service studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is conducting studies in Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics. These studies are being conducted as part of a fitness-for-service programme in support of CANDU reactors. The Monte Carlo analyses, which form part of the Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics studies, require that variates can be sampled from probability density functions. Accurate pseudo-random numbers are necessary for accurate variate generation. This report details the principles of variate generation, and describes the production and testing of pseudo-random numbers. A new algorithm has been produced for the correct performance of the lattice test for the independence of pseudo-random numbers. Two new pseudo-random number generators have been produced. These generators have excellent randomness properties and can be made fully machine-independent. Versions, in FORTRAN, for VAX and CDC computers are given. Accurate and efficient algorithms for the generation of variates from the specialized probability density functions of Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics are given. 38 refs

  18. Fracture processes and mechanisms of crack growth resistance in human enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Devendra; Park, Saejin; Quinn, George D.; Arola, Dwayne

    2010-07-01

    Human enamel has a complex micro-structure that varies with distance from the tooth’s outer surface. But contributions from the microstructure to the fracture toughness and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance have not been explored in detail. In this investigation the apparent fracture toughness of human enamel and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance were evaluated using the indentation fracture approach and an incremental crack growth technique. Indentation cracks were introduced on polished surfaces of enamel at selected distances from the occlusal surface. In addition, an incremental crack growth approach using compact tension specimens was used to quantify the crack growth resistance as a Junction of distance from the occlusal surface. There were significant differences in the apparent toughness estimated using the two approaches, which was attributed to the active crack length and corresponding scale of the toughening mechanisms.

  19. Coupled hydrological-mechanical effects due to excavation of underground openings in unsaturated fractured rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montazer, P.

    1985-01-01

    One of the effects of excavating an underground opening in fractured rocks is a modification of the state of the stress in the rock mass in the vicinity of the opening. This effect causes changes in the geometry of the cross sections of the fracture planes, which in turn results in modification of the hydrologic properties of the fractures of the rock mass. The significance of the orientation of the fractures and their stiffness on the extent of the modification of the hydrologic properties as a result of excavation of underground openings is demonstrated. A conceptual model is presented to illustrate the complexity of the coupled hydrological-mechanical phenomena in the unsaturated zone. This conceptual model is used to develop an investigative program to assess the extent of the effect at a proposed repository site for storing high-level nuclear wastes

  20. Hydraulic and mechanical properties of natural fractures in low-permeability rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrack-Nolte, L.J.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive laboratory study of the mechanical displacement, permeability, and void geometry of single rock fractures in a quartz monzonite are summarized and analyzed. A metal-injection technique was developed that provided quantitative data on the precise geometry of the void spaces between the fracture surfaces and the areas of contact at different stresses. At effective stresses of less than 20 MPa fluid flow was proportional to the mean fracture aperture raised to a power greater than 3. As stress was increased, contact area was increased and void spaces become interconnected by small tortuous channels that constitute the principal impediment to fluid flow. At effective stresses higher than 20 MPa, the mean fracture aperture continued to diminish with increasing stress, but this had little effect on flow because the small tortuous flow channels deformed little with increasing stress

  1. Laboratory mechanical parameters of composite resins and their relation to fractures and wear in clinical trials-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Ilie, Nicoleta; Hickel, Reinhard; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro; Rousson, Valentin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate a range of mechanical parameters of composite resins and compare the data to the frequency of fractures and wear in clinical studies. Based on a search of PubMed and SCOPUS, clinical studies on posterior composite restorations were investigated with regard to bias by two independent reviewers using Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized trials. The target variables were chipping and/or fracture, loss of anatomical form (wear) and a combination of both (summary clinical index). These outcomes were modelled by time and material in a linear mixed effect model including random study and experiment effects. The laboratory data from one test institute were used: flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength, and fracture toughness (all after 24-h storage in distilled water). For some materials flexural strength data after aging in water/saliva/ethanol were available. Besides calculating correlations between clinical and laboratory outcomes, we explored whether a model including a laboratory predictor dichotomized at a cut-off value better predicted a clinical outcome than a linear model. A total of 74 clinical experiments from 45 studies were included involving 31 materials for which laboratory data were also available. A weak positive correlation between fracture toughness and clinical fractures was found (Spearman rho=0.34, p=0.11) in addition to a moderate and statistically significant correlation between flexural strength and clinical wear (Spearman rho=0.46, p=0.01). When excluding those studies with "high" risk of bias (n=18), the correlations were generally weaker with no statistically significant correlation. For aging in ethanol, a very strong correlation was found between flexural strength decrease and clinical index, but this finding was based on only 7 materials (Spearman rho=0.96, p=0.0001). Prediction was not consistently improved with cutoff values. Correlations between clinical and laboratory

  2. Prediction of retained residual stresses in laboratory fracture mechanics specimens extracted from welded components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurlston, R.G.; Sherry, A.H.; James, P.; Sharples, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of weld material fracture toughness properties is important for the structural integrity assessment of engineering components. However, welds can contain high levels of residual stress and these can be retained in fracture mechanics specimens, particularly when machined from non-stress relieved welds. Retained residual stresses can make the measurement of valid fracture toughness properties difficult. This paper describes the results of analytical work undertaken to investigate factors that can influence the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses retained in fracture mechanics specimen blanks extracted from as-welded ferritic and austenitic stainless steel plates. The results indicate that significant levels of residual stress can be retained in specimen blanks prior to notching, and that the magnitude and distribution of stress is dependent upon material properties, specimen geometry and size, and extraction location through the thickness of the weld. Finite element modelling is shown to provide a useful approach for estimating the level and distributions of retained residual stresses. A new stress partitioning approach has been developed to estimate retained stress levels and results compare favourably with FE analysis and available experimental data. The approach can help guide the selection of specimen geometry and machining strategies to minimise the level of residual stresses retained in fracture mechanics specimen blanks extracted from non stress-relieved welds and thus improve the measurement of weld fracture toughness properties. - Highlights: • A simplified method for generating realistic weld residual stresses has been developed. • It has been shown that significant levels of residual stress can be retained within laboratory fracture mechanics specimens. • The level and distribution is dependant upon material, specimen type, specimen size and extraction location. • A method has been developed to allow estimates of the

  3. Deformation Mechanisms and Fracture of Ni-Based Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesz S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The cracking of materials and fracture surface is of great practical and academic importance. Over the last few years the development of the fractography of crystalline alloys resulted in a useful tool for the prediction or failure analysis. Many attempts have been made to observe cracks using optical microscopy, X-ray topography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Of these techniques, the resolution of optical microscopy and X-ray topography is too poor. By contrast, the resolution of TEM is high enough for detailed information to be obtained. However, in order to apply TEM observations, a thin foil specimen must be prepared, and it is usually extremely difficult to prepare such a specimen from a pre-selected region containing a crack.

  4. Fracture mechanics of polymer mortar made with recycled raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Godoy Jurumenha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to show that industrial residues could be used in construction applications so that production costs as well as environmental protection can be improved. The fracture properties of polymer mortar manufactured with recycled materials are investigated to evaluate the materials behaviour to crack propagation. The residues used in this work were spent sand from foundry industry as aggregate, unsaturated polyester resin from polyethylene terephthalate (PET as matrix and polyester textile fibres from garment industry, producing an unique composite material fully from recycled components with low cost. The substitution of fresh by used foundry sand and the insertions of textile fibres contribute to a less brittle behaviour of polymer mortar.

  5. The mechanical benefit of medial support screws in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical advantages of medial support screws (MSSs in the locking proximal humeral plate for treating proximal humerus fractures. METHODS: Thirty synthetic left humeri were randomly divided into 3 subgroups to establish two-part surgical neck fracture models of proximal humerus. All fractures were fixed with a locking proximal humerus plate. Group A was fixed with medial cortical support and no MSSs; Group B was fixed with 3 MSSs but without medial cortical support; Group C was fixed with neither medial cortical support nor MSSs. Axial compression, torsional stiffness, shear stiffness, and failure tests were performed. RESULTS: Constructs with medial support from cortical bone showed statistically higher axial and shear stiffness than other subgroups examined (P<0.0001. When the proximal humerus was not supported by medial cortical bone, locking plating with medial support screws exhibited higher axial and torsional stiffness than locking plating without medial support screws (P ≤ 0.0207. Specimens with medial cortical bone failed primarily by fracture of the humeral shaft or humeral head. Specimens without medial cortical bone support failed primarily by significant plate bending at the fracture site followed by humeral head collapse or humeral head fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic reduction with medial cortical support was the stiffest construct after a simulated two-part fracture. Significant biomechanical benefits of MSSs in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures were identified. The reconstruction of the medial column support for proximal humerus fractures helps to enhance mechanical stability of the humeral head and prevent implant failure.

  6. Fracture resistance of zirconia-based implant abutments after artificial long-term aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahhaf, Abdulaziz; Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Vach, Kirstin; Kohal, Ralf-Joachim

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the survival rate, fracture strength, bending moments, loading to fracture and fracture modes of different designs of zirconia abutments after dynamic loading with thermocycling, and compare these values to titanium abutments. A total of 80 abutment samples were divided into 5 test groups of 16 samples in each group. The study included the following groups, "Group 1" CAD/CAM produced all-zirconia abutments, "Group 2" titanium abutments, "Group 3" zirconia-abutments adhesively luted to a titanium base, "Group 4" prefabricated all-zirconia abutments and "Group 5" zirconia-abutments glass soldered to a titanium base. Half the number of samples in each group was exposed to 1.2 million loading cycles (5-years simulation) in the chewing simulator. The samples that survived the artificial aging were later tested for fracture strength in a universal testing machine. The remaining 8 samples of the group were directly tested for fracture strength. All samples exposed to the 5-years artificial aging survived except of six samples in one group (Group 1). The surviving samples were later fracture tested in the universal testing machine. The bending moments (Ncm) values were as follow: Exposed groups: "Group 1" 94.5Ncm; "Group 2" 599.2Ncm; "Group 3" 477.5Ncm; "Group 4" 314.4Ncm; "Group 5" 509.4Ncm. Non-exposed groups: "Group 1" 269.3Ncm; "Group 2" 474.2Ncm; "Group 3" 377.6Ncm; "Group 4" 265.4Ncm; "Group 5" 372.4Ncm. Except in Group 1, the values were higher in the exposed groups, although, statistically there was no difference (p>0.05). The one-piece ZrO2-abutment group (Group 1 and Group 4) exhibited lower values, while the two-piece ZrO2-abutment groups (Group 3 and Group 5) showed similar values and fracture modes like the titanium abutment group. The titanium abutment group showed the highest values of bending moments among all groups. The implant-abutment connection area appeared to influence the bending moment value and the fracture mode of the tested

  7. [Application of anterior percutaneous screw fixation in treatment of odontoid process fractures in aged people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng; Dou, Hai-cheng; Ni, Wen-fei; Huang, Qi-shan; Wang, Xiang-yang; Xu, Hua-zi; Chi, Yong-long

    2011-03-01

    To explore the efficacy of anterior percutaneous screw fixation in the treatment of odontoid process fractures in aged people. From February 2001 to April 2009, 15 elderly patients with odontoid fracture were treated with anterior percutaneous screw fixation,including 13 males and 2 females; the average age was 69.3 years (ranged, 60 to 86 years). According to Anderson classification, there were 10 patients with type II fractures (type II A in 7 cases, type II B in 3 cases, based on Eysel and Roosen classification), 4 patients with shallow type III fractures, 1 patient with deep type III fractures. Thirteen patients were fresh fractures, 2 patients were obsolete fractures. All patients had varying degrees of neck or shoulder pain, and limit activity of neck. There were 4 patients with neural symptoms including 2 grade D and 2 grade C according to Frankel classification. All the patients were followed up and were assessed by radiology. Clinical examination included neck activity, neurological function and the degree of neck pain. Radiology examinations including anteroposterior, lateral, open mouth position and flexion-extension radiographs of cervical vertebra were performed. After surgery, all patients were followed up,and the duration ranged from 6 to 60 months (averaged 31.3 months). Two patients died of other diseases during the follow-up period (18 and 22 months after surgery respectively). All patients got satisfactory results, and all screws were in good position. As the screw was too long, esophagus was compressed by screw tail in one case. One case showed fibrous union, 12 cases had achieved solid bony union, 2 cases showed nonunion without clinical symptoms. The rotation of neck in 3 cases was mildly limited,the neck function of the remaining patients were normal. Four patients with symptoms nerve injuries improved after operation (Frankel E in 3 cases, Frankel D in 1 case). The symptom of neck pain had a significant improvement after surgery (P process

  8. Active commuting reduces the risk of wrist fractures in middle-aged women-the UFO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, U; Nordström, P; Nilsson, J; Hallmans, G; Svensson, O; Bergström, U; Pettersson-Kymmer, U

    2013-02-01

    Middle-aged women with active commuting had significantly lower risk for wrist fracture than women commuting by car/bus. Our purpose was to investigate whether a physically active lifestyle in middle-aged women was associated with a reduced risk of later sustaining a low-trauma wrist fracture. The Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study is a population-based nested case-control study investigating associations between lifestyle and fragility fractures. From a cohort of ~35,000 subjects, we identified 376 female wrist fracture cases who had reported data regarding their commuting habits, occupational, and leisure physical activity, before they sustained their fracture. Each fracture case was compared with at least one control drawn from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total of 778 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 54.3 ± 5.8 years, and mean age at fracture was 60.3 ± 5.8 years. Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, body mass index, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects with active commuting (especially walking) were at significantly lower risk of sustaining a wrist fracture (OR 0.48; 95 % CI 0.27-0.88) compared with those who commuted by car or bus. Leisure time activities such as dancing and snow shoveling were also associated with a lower fracture risk, whereas occupational activity, training, and leisure walking or cycling were unrelated to fracture risk. This study suggests that active commuting is associated with a lower wrist fracture risk, in middle-aged women.

  9. Trajectory of social isolation following hip fracture: an analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toby O; Dainty, Jack R; MacGregor, Alex

    2018-01-01

    social isolation is defined as a lack of meaningful and sustained communication or interactions with social networks. There is limited understanding on the prevalence of social isolation and loneliness in people following hip fracture and no previous understanding of how this changes over time. to determine the prevalence and trajectory of social isolation and loneliness before a hip fracture, during the recovery phase and a minimum of 2 years post-hip fracture in an English population. data were from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) cohort (2004/5-2014/15). The sample comprised of 215 participants who had sustained a hip fracture. Measures of social isolation and loneliness were analysed through multilevel modelling to determine their trajectories during three-time intervals (pre-fracture; interval at hip fracture and recovery; minimum 2 years post-fracture). The prevalence of social isolation and loneliness were determined pre- and post-fracture. prevalence of social isolation was 19% post-hip fracture and loneliness 13% post-hip fracture. There was no statistically significant change in social isolation pre-fracture compared to a minimum of 2 years post-fracture (P = 0.78). Similarly, there was no statistically significant change in loneliness pre-fracture compared to a minimum of 2 years post-fracture (P = 0.12). this analysis has determined that whilst social isolation and loneliness do not change over time following hip fracture, these remain a significant problem for this population. Interventions are required to address these physical and psychological health needs. This is important as they may have short and longer term health benefits for people post-hip fracture. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Pacheco Lameira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n=10: Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM; Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM; Bi-layer crowns (BL. Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37°C, and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P=.05 indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM=3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM=3561.5 N ± 991.6, which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6. There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength.

  11. Computational simulation for creep fracture properties taking microscopic mechanism into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    Relationship between creep crack growth rate and microscopic fracture mechanism i.e., wedge-type intergranular, transgranular and cavity-type intergranular crack growth, has been investigated. The growth rate of wedge-type and transgranular creep crack could be characterized by creep ductility. Creep damages formed ahead of the cavity-type crack tip accelerated the crack growth rate. Based on the experimental results, FEM code that simulates creep crack growth has been developed by taking the fracture mechanism into account. The effect of creep ductility and void formation ahead of the crack tip on creep crack growth behavior could be simulated. (author)

  12. Proceedings of the 20th meeting of the working group on fracture mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains 41 contributions presented at the 20th meeting of the working group on fracture mechanisms. The contributions dealt with the following topics: 1.) mechanical and test fundamentals of crack initiating corrosion processes; 2.) crack formation in water and seawater; 3.) crack formation in the process industry; 4.) hydrogen-induced crack formation; 5.) stress and crack corrosion of rustproof cast alloys; 6.) corrosion-induced crack formation at high temperatures; 7.) experimental and numerical studies on fracture behaviour. 30 contributions were separately integrated in the data base 'ENERGY'. (MM) [de

  13. Combining NDE and fracture mechanics by artifical intelligence expert systems techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucciardi, A.N.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a PC-based expert system for non-destructive evaluation. Software tools from the expert systems subfield of artificial intelligence are being used to combine both NDE and fracture mechanics algorithms into one, unified package. The system incorporates elements of computer-enhanced ultrasonic signal processing, featuring artificial intelligence learning capability, state-of-the-art fracture mechanics analytical tools, and all relevant metallurgical and design data necessary to emulate the decisions of the panel(s) of experts typically involved in generating and dispositioning NDE data

  14. Investigation on fracture behavior and mechanisms of DGEBF toughened by CTBN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lulu; Tan, Yefa; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Li; Xiao, Chufan

    2018-05-01

    Carboxyl-terminated butadiene-co-acrylonitrile (CTBN) was used as the toughener to improve the mechanical performance and fracture toughness of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) by prereacted approach. The results show that the chemical bonding interface was formed between DGEBF and CTBN particles in the prepolymerization reaction process, which remarkably enhances the fracture toughness of the composites. Based on the qualitative and quantitative analyses, it shows the main toughening mechanisms are the plastic shear banding effect resulted from the plastic deformation of the EP matrix and the plastic void expansion because of the debonding of CTBN particles from the EP matrix.

  15. Validation of a fracture mechanics approach to nuclear transportation cask design through a drop test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), under contract to the Department of Energy, is conducting a research program to develop and validate a fracture mechanics approach to cask design. A series of drop tests of a transportation cask is planned for the summer of 1986 as the method for benchmarking and, thereby, validating the fracture mechanics approach. This paper presents the drop test plan and background leading to the development of the test plan including structural analyses, material characterization, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques necessary for defining the test plan properly

  16. An Overview of Innovative Strategies for Fracture Mechanics at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Engineering fracture mechanics has played a vital role in the development and certification of virtually every aerospace vehicle that has been developed since the mid-20th century. NASA Langley Research Center s Durability, Damage Tolerance and Reliability Branch has contributed to the development and implementation of many fracture mechanics methods aimed at predicting and characterizing damage in both metallic and composite materials. This paper presents a selection of computational, analytical and experimental strategies that have been developed by the branch for assessing damage growth under monotonic and cyclic loading and for characterizing the damage tolerance of aerospace structures

  17. Mechanisms of aging and fatigue in ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genenko, Yuri A. [Sonderforschungsbereich 595, Institut für Materialwissenschaft, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Glaum, Julia [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Hoffmann, Michael J. [Institut für keramische Werkstoffe, Haid-und-Neu Str. 7, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Albe, Karsten, E-mail: albe@mm.tu-darmstadt.de [Sonderforschungsbereich 595, Institut für Materialwissenschaft, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Experiments on aging and fatigue of bulk ferroelectrics are thoroughly reviewed. • Lead-based PZT and lead-free BNT–BT and KNN materials are covered. • Various fatigue regimes and factors are classified. • Defect associate formation and alignment are analyzed by density functional theory. • Emerging of internal bias field is studied within drift-diffusion approach. - Abstract: A comprehensive review of aging and fatigue phenomena in bulk polycrystalline ferroelectrics is presented. Three material classes are covered, namely the most widely used Pb[Zr{sub 1−x}Ti{sub x}]O{sub 3} (PZT) ceramics and lead-free materials, including those based on bismuth sodium titanate Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} (BNT) and alkali niobate [K{sub x}Na{sub 1−x}]NbO{sub 3} (KNN). Aging is studied in poled and unpoled states both experimentally and theoretically. The variety of different loading regimes for fatigue includes DC electric field, unipolar, sesquipolar and bipolar cycling and all these differently combined with mechanical loading at different frequencies and temperatures. The role of device geometries and electrode materials is addressed and models describing charge migration and defect dipole re-orientation are discussed in the context of recent experimental studies.

  18. Mechanisms of aging and fatigue in ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genenko, Yuri A.; Glaum, Julia; Hoffmann, Michael J.; Albe, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments on aging and fatigue of bulk ferroelectrics are thoroughly reviewed. • Lead-based PZT and lead-free BNT–BT and KNN materials are covered. • Various fatigue regimes and factors are classified. • Defect associate formation and alignment are analyzed by density functional theory. • Emerging of internal bias field is studied within drift-diffusion approach. - Abstract: A comprehensive review of aging and fatigue phenomena in bulk polycrystalline ferroelectrics is presented. Three material classes are covered, namely the most widely used Pb[Zr 1−x Ti x ]O 3 (PZT) ceramics and lead-free materials, including those based on bismuth sodium titanate Bi 1/2 Na 1/2 TiO 3 (BNT) and alkali niobate [K x Na 1−x ]NbO 3 (KNN). Aging is studied in poled and unpoled states both experimentally and theoretically. The variety of different loading regimes for fatigue includes DC electric field, unipolar, sesquipolar and bipolar cycling and all these differently combined with mechanical loading at different frequencies and temperatures. The role of device geometries and electrode materials is addressed and models describing charge migration and defect dipole re-orientation are discussed in the context of recent experimental studies

  19. Fracture mechanics of thin wall cylindrical pressure vessels: an interim review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Olson, N.J.

    1977-08-01

    The report is a result of activities in the LMFBR Fuel Rod Transient Performance Program sponsored by the LMFBR Branch of the Division of Project Management, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. One of the objectives is to develop predictions relative to the length, direction, and rate of growth of cladding rips subsequent to (or concurrent with) the initial cladding breach during unprotected transients. To provide a basis for evaluation, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories has reviewed most available fracture mechanics assessments relative to thin-wall cylindrical pressure vessels. The purpose of the report is to review the various fracture mechanics models and to describe the pertinent fracture parameters. It is intended to provide a formal basis for assessing future analytical predictions of fracture behavior of materials exposed to transient LMFBR thermal and mechanical loading conditions. In addition, the report is expected to provide reference material for evaluating or developing experimental programs required to properly address the problem of predicting fracture behavior of materials during transient events

  20. Rock mechanics in the disposal of radioactive wastes by hydraulic fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClain, W C

    1968-01-01

    The ultimate capacity of a hydraulic-fracturing waste disposal facility is governed primarily by the integrity of the rocks overlying the injected wastes. The objective of this study is to analyze theoretically the stresses and strains generated by the injected wastes in an effort to understand the behavior of the system sufficiently well that the failure mechanism can be predicted and the capacity of the injection well estimated. The surface uplifts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's fracturing site were compared with theoretical curves obtained by assuming the uplifts to be inversely analogous to the subsidence which occurs over mining excavations. This analysis, based on assumptions of homogeneity, isotropy, and linear elasticity, provided considerable insight into the mechanics of the process. The most probable mechanism of failure of the rock appears to be by the formation of a vertical instead of a horizontal fracture. Fracture orientation is controlled primarily by the orientation of the principal stress field in the rock. Each successive waste injection slightly modifies this stress field toward a condition more favorable to the formation of a vertical fracture. (16 refs.)

  1. Crack-jump mechanism of microvein formation and its implications for stress cyclicity during extension fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Riccardo; Hancock, Paul L.

    1998-11-01

    It is well accepted and documented that faulting is produced by the cyclic behaviour of a stress field. Some extension fractures, such as veins characterised by the crack-seal mechanism, have also been presumed to result from repeated stress cycles. In the present note, some commonly observed field phenomena and relationships such as hackle marks and vein and joint spacing, are employed to argue that a stress field can also display cyclic behaviour during extensional fracturing. Indeed, the requirement of critical stress conditions for the occurrence of extensional failure events does not accord with the presence of contemporaneously open nearby parallel fractures. Therefore, because after each fracture event there is stress release within the surrounding volume of rock, high density sets of parallel extensional fractures also strongly support the idea that rocks undergo stress cyclicity during jointing and veining. A comparison with seismological data from earthquakes with dipole mechanical solutions, confirms that this process presently occurs at depth in the Earth crust. Furthermore, in order to explain dense sets of hair-like closely spaced microveins, a crack-jump mechanism is introduced here as an alternative to the crack-seal mechanism. We also propose that as a consequence of medium-scale stress cyclicity during brittle deformation, the re-fracturing of a rock mass occurs in either one or the other of these two possible ways depending on the ratio between the elastic parameters of the sealing material and those of the host rock. The crack-jump mechanism occurs when the former is stronger.

  2. Nonlinear fracture mechanics investigation on the ductility of reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carpinteri

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a numerical algorithm based on the finite element method is proposed for the prediction of the mechanical response of reinforced concrete (RC beams under bending loading. The main novelty of such an approach is the introduction of the Overlapping Crack Model, based on nonlinear fracture mechanics concepts, to describe concrete crushing. According to this model, the concrete dam- age in compression is represented by means of a fictitious interpenetration. The larger is the interpenetration, the lower are the transferred forces across the damaged zone. The well-known Cohesive Crack Model in tension and an elastic-perfectly plastic stress versus crack opening displacement relationship describing the steel reinforcement behavior are also integrated into the numerical algorithm. The application of the proposed Cohesive-Overlapping Crack Model to the assessment of the minimum reinforcement amount neces- sary to prevent unstable tensile crack propagation and to the evaluation of the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, permits to predict the size-scale effects evidenced by several experimental programs available in the literature. According to the obtained numerical results, new practical design formulae and diagrams are proposed for the improvement of the current code provisions which usually disregard the size effects.

  3. An experimental analysis of fracture mechanisms by acoustic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afin d'analyser le comportement mécanique globale de l'assemblage, des essais de traction .... named as Groups A, B and C (Tab. 5). Table.1: Mechanical properties of epoxy matrix Vicotex 914. Table.2: Mechanical properties of fibers T300. Young. 's modul us. E. Poisson's ratio. Ν shear modulus. G. Tensile strength yield.

  4. Mechanical properties of highly defective graphene: from brittle rupture to ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Lanqing; Wei, Ning; Zheng, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Defects are generally believed to deteriorate the superlative performance of graphene-based devices but may also be useful when carefully engineered to tailor the local properties and achieve new functionalities. Central to most defect-associated applications is the defect coverage and arrangement. In this work, we investigate, by molecular dynamics simulations, the mechanical properties and fracture dynamics of graphene sheets with randomly distributed vacancies or Stone–Wales defects under tensile deformations over a wide defect coverage range. With defects presented, an sp–sp 2 bonding network and an sp–sp 2 –sp 3 bonding network are observed in vacancy-defected and Stone–Wales-defected graphene, respectively. The ultimate strength degrades gradually with increasing defect coverage and saturates in the high-ratio regime, whereas the fracture strain presents an unusual descending–saturating–improving trend. In the dense vacancy defect situation, the fracture becomes more plastic and super-ductility is observed. Further fracture dynamics analysis reveals that the crack trapping by sp–sp 2 and sp–sp 2 –sp 3 rings and the crack-tip blunting account for the ductile fracture, whereas geometric rearrangement on the entire sheet for vacancy defects and geometric rearrangement on the specific defect sites for Stone–Wales defects account for their distinctive rules of the evolution of the fracture strain. (paper)

  5. Mechanical properties of highly defective graphene: from brittle rupture to ductile fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lanqing; Wei, Ning; Zheng, Yongping

    2013-12-20

    Defects are generally believed to deteriorate the superlative performance of graphene-based devices but may also be useful when carefully engineered to tailor the local properties and achieve new functionalities. Central to most defect-associated applications is the defect coverage and arrangement. In this work, we investigate, by molecular dynamics simulations, the mechanical properties and fracture dynamics of graphene sheets with randomly distributed vacancies or Stone-Wales defects under tensile deformations over a wide defect coverage range. With defects presented, an sp-sp(2) bonding network and an sp-sp(2)-sp(3) bonding network are observed in vacancy-defected and Stone-Wales-defected graphene, respectively. The ultimate strength degrades gradually with increasing defect coverage and saturates in the high-ratio regime, whereas the fracture strain presents an unusual descending-saturating-improving trend. In the dense vacancy defect situation, the fracture becomes more plastic and super-ductility is observed. Further fracture dynamics analysis reveals that the crack trapping by sp-sp(2) and sp-sp(2)-sp(3) rings and the crack-tip blunting account for the ductile fracture, whereas geometric rearrangement on the entire sheet for vacancy defects and geometric rearrangement on the specific defect sites for Stone-Wales defects account for their distinctive rules of the evolution of the fracture strain.

  6. OCA-P, a deterministic and probabilistic fracture-mechanics code for application to pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1984-05-01

    The OCA-P code is a probabilistic fracture-mechanics code that was prepared specifically for evaluating the integrity of pressurized-water reactor vessels when subjected to overcooling-accident loading conditions. The code has two-dimensional- and some three-dimensional-flaw capability; it is based on linear-elastic fracture mechanics; and it can treat cladding as a discrete region. Both deterministic and probabilistic analyses can be performed. For the former analysis, it is possible to conduct a search for critical values of the fluence and the nil-ductility reference temperature corresponding to incipient initiation of the initial flaw. The probabilistic portion of OCA-P is based on Monte Carlo techniques, and simulated parameters include fluence, flaw depth, fracture toughness, nil-ductility reference temperature, and concentrations of copper, nickel, and phosphorous. Plotting capabilities include the construction of critical-crack-depth diagrams (deterministic analysis) and various histograms (probabilistic analysis)

  7. Effects of chemical alteration on fracture mechanical properties in hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, O. A.; Eichhubl, P.; Olson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fault and fracture networks often control the distribution of fluids and heat in hydrothermal and epithermal systems, and in related geothermal and mineral resources. Additional chemical influences on conduit evolution are well documented, with dissolution and precipitation of mineral species potentially changing the permeability of fault-facture networks. Less well understood are the impacts of chemical alteration on the mechanical properties governing fracture growth and fracture network geometry. We use double-torsion (DT) load relaxation tests under ambient air conditions to measure the mode-I fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical fracture growth index (SCI) of variably altered rock samples obtained from outcrop in Dixie Valley, NV. Samples from southern Dixie Valley include 1) weakly altered granite, characterized by minor sericite in plagioclase, albitization and vacuolization of feldspars, and incomplete replacement of biotite with chlorite, and 2) granite from an area of locally intense propylitic alteration with chlorite-calcite-hematite-epidote assemblages. We also evaluated samples of completely silicified gabbro obtained from the Dixie Comstock epithermal gold deposit. In the weakly altered granite KIC and SCI are 1.3 ±0.2 MPam1/2 (n=8) and 59 ±25 (n=29), respectively. In the propylitic assemblage KIC is reduced to 0.6 ±0.1 MPam1/2 (n=11), and the SCI increased to 75 ±36 (n = 33). In both cases, the altered materials have lower fracture toughness and higher SCI than is reported for common geomechanical standards such as Westerly Granite (KIC ~1.7 MPam1/2; SCI ~48). Preliminary analysis of the silicified gabbro shows a significant increase in fracture toughness, 3.6 ±0.4 MPam1/2 (n=2), and SCI, 102 ±45 (n=19), compared to published values for gabbro (2.9 MPam1/2 and SCI = 32). These results suggest that mineralogical and textural changes associated with different alteration assemblages may result in spatially variable rates of fracture

  8. Microscale fracture mechanisms of a Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr HVOF coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Andrew L., E-mail: Andrew.robertson99987@gmail.com; White, Ken W.

    2017-03-14

    Thermal spray coatings, often composed of heterogeneous, multiphase microstructures, may, consequently, exhibit complex fracture behavior. For such coating structures, conventional mechanical evaluation methods fail to isolate the contribution of microstructural features to the overall fracture behavior. For this reason, this study employed focused ion beam machined (FIB) microcantilever beams and FIB sectioning methods to study the fracture mechanisms important at the scale of the heterogeneous Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr thermal spray coating. We found three fracture modes, namely, intergranular matrix fracture, matrix/carbide interfacial fracture, and carbide cleavage. By comparison, microindentation-induced cracks, the frequency of crack deflection around carbides is significantly more prevalent at this much larger crack dimension. This mechanistic variation provides some insight into the specific role and limitations of the microcantilever beam technique for fracture characterization of composite microstructures.

  9. Effects of fibre content on mechanical properties and fracture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    cost. The most important factors that affect the short fibres reinforcement are ... made with conventional techniques, including single or twin screw extruding (Li et al 2005), wet ball-milling mixing (Song et al 2002) and high-speed mechanical.

  10. An experimental analysis of fracture mechanisms by acoustic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work is focused on the study of the evolution of damage mode and failure mechanisms of woven composite bolted assembly carbon fiber/epoxy. In the present paper three configurations are studied [0°,45°,0°,45°], [0°,45°,0°,45°]s and [0°,45°,0°,45,0°]s. In order to analyze a global mechanical behavior of the assembly, ...

  11. 2016 Accomplishments. Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Forging process effects on the fracture toughness properties of tritium-precharged stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-01

    Forged austenitic stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for pressure vessels designed to contain tritium at high pressure. These steels are highly resistant to tritium-assisted fracture but their resistance can depend on the details of the forging microstructure. During FY16, the effects of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the fracture toughness properties of tritium-exposed-and-aged Type 304L stainless steel were studied. Forgings were produced from a single heat of steel using four types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy-rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The objective of the study was to characterize the J-Integral fracture toughness properties as a function of the industrial strain rate and temperature. The second objective was to measure the effects of tritium and decay helium on toughness. Tritium and decay helium effects were measured by thermally precharging the as-forged specimens with tritium gas at 34.5 MPa and 350°C and aging for up to five years at -80°C to build-in decay helium prior to testing. The results of this study show that the fracture toughness properties of the as-forged steels vary with forging strain rate and forging temperature. The effect is largely due to yield strength as the higher-strength forgings had the lower toughness values. For non-charged specimens, fracture toughness properties were improved by forging at 871°C versus 816°C and Screw-Press forgings tended to have lower fracture toughness values than the other forgings. Tritium exposures reduced the fracture toughness values remarkably to fracture toughness values averaging 10-20% of as-forged values. However, forging strain rate and temperature had little or no effect on the fracture toughness after tritium precharging and aging. The result was confirmed by fractography which indicated that fracture modes

  12. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for the life extension estimate of the high flux isotope reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The state of the vessel steel embrittlement as a result of neutron irradiation can be measured by its increase in the nil ductility temperature (NDT). This temperature is sometimes referred to as the brittle-ductile transition temperature (DBT) for fracture. The life extension of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel is calculated by using the method of fracture mechanics. A new method of fracture probability calculation is presented in this paper. The fracture probability as a result of the hydrostatic pressure test (hydrotest) is used to determine the life of the vessel. The hydrotest is performed in order to determine a safe vessel static pressure. It is then followed by using fracture mechanics to project the safe reactor operation time from the time of the satisfactory hydrostatic test. The life extension calculation provides the following information on the remaining life of the reactor as a function of the NDT increase: (1) the life of the vessel is determined by the probability of vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest at several hydrotest pressures and vessel embrittlement conditions, (2) the hydrotest time interval vs the NDT increase rate, and (3) the hydrotest pressure vs the NDT increase rate. It is understood that the use of a complete range of uncertainties of the NDT increase is equivalent to the entire range of radiation damage that can be experienced by the vessel steel. From the numerical values for the probabilities of the vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest, it is estimated that the reactor vessel life can be extended up to 50 EFPY (100 MW) with the minimum vessel operating temperature equal to 85 degrees F

  13. Forming limit and fracture mechanism of ferritic stainless steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Le; Barlat, Frederic; Ahn, Deok Chan; Bressan, Jose Divo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Forming limit curves of two ferritic stainless steel sheets were well predicted. → Failure occurs by necking in uniaxial and plane strain tension for both materials. → Failure occurs by shearing in balanced biaxial tension for both materials. → Strain rate sensitivity does not affect the limit strains a lot for both materials. → Strain rate sensitivity likely influences the failure mode for both materials. - Abstract: In this work, the forming limit curves (FLCs) of two ferritic stainless steel sheets, AISI409L and AISI430, were predicted with the Marciniak-Kuczynski (MK) and Bressan-William-Hill (BWH) models, combined with the Yld2000-2d yield function and the Swift hardening law. Uniaxial tension, disk compression and hydraulic bulge tests were performed to determine the yield loci and hardening curves of both materials. Meanwhile, the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) coefficient was measured through uniaxial tension tests carried out at different strain rates. Out-of-plane stretching tests were conducted in sheet specimens to obtain the surface limit strains under different linear strain paths. Micrographs of the specimens fractured in different stress states were obtained by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The overall results show that the BWH model can predict the FLC better than the MK model, and that the SRS does not have much effect on the limit strains for both materials. The predicted FLCs and micrograph analysis both indicate that failure occurs by surface localized necking in uniaxial and plane strain tension states, whereas it occurs by localized shearing in the through thickness direction in balanced biaxial tension state.

  14. Effect of orientation on the in vitro fracture toughness ofdentin: The role of toughening mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-01-28

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture thatencompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure anddefines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research nthe response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/ordisease.

  15. Burning properties and mechanical integrity of aged gun propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Klerk, W.P.C. de

    2017-01-01

    Conventional gun propellants exhibit the phenomenon of nitrocellulose (NC) decomposition. Besides an effect on thermal stability of propellants, decomposition of NC has an effect on the mechanical integrity of the propellant grains. Enhanced grain fracture may lead to unacceptable changes of the

  16. Correction of fatigue parameters of concrete using approximation of mechanical-Fracture parameters in time

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimonová, H.; Keršner, Z.; Seitl, Stanislav; Pryl, D.; Pukl, R.

    -, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-59 ISSN 1213-3116 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/11/0833 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : fatigue * concrete * correction * fracture parameters Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  17. Applications and limits of application of fracture mechanics methods in assessing the safety of components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlberg, R.

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of fracture mechanics calculations and experimental investigations, it is shown how cracks of different shape and location behave under given static and cyclic loads. In particular, component safety with regard to spontaneous failure and crack growth behaviour in different components are discussed. [de

  18. The relationship of microstructure and temperature to fracture mechanics parameters in reaction bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, H.M.; Dalgleish, B.J.; Pratt, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The development of physical properties in reaction bonded silicon nitride has been investigated over a range of temperatures and correlated with microstructure. Fracture mechanics parameters, elastic moduli, strength and critical defect size have been determined. The nitrided microstructure is shown to be directly related to these observed properties and these basic relationships can be used to produce material with improved properties. (orig.) [de

  19. NDE and fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom-head weld indications in a BWR reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) and the fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom head welds in a BWR. The NDE equipment is presented, together with the geometry of evaluated flaw regions. After the fracture mechanics evaluation, it appeared that the plant results fulfilled the usual conditions, and the plant was allowed to operate one more year. (TEC).

  20. Mechanism and patterns of cervical spine fractures-dislocations in vertebral artery injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the fracture patterns and mechanism of injury, based on subaxial cervical spine injury classification system (SLIC, on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT of cervical spine predictive of vertebral artery injury (VAI. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of 320 patients who were admitted with cervical spine injury in our level I regional trauma center over a period of two years (April 2010 to April 2012. Diagnosis of VAI was based on hyperintensity replacing the flow void on a T2-weighted axial image. NCCT images of the selected 43 patients with MRI diagnosis of VAI were then assessed for the pattern of injury. The cervical spinal injuries were classified into those involving the C1 and C2 and subaxial spine. For the latter, SLIC was used. Results: A total of 47 VAI were analyzed in 43 patients. Only one patient with VAI on MRI had no detectable abnormality on NCCT. C1 and C2 injuries were found in one and six patients respectively. In subaxial injuries, the most common mechanism of injury was distraction (37.5% with facet dislocation with or without fracture representing the most common pattern of injury (55%. C5 was the single most common affected vertebral level. Extension to foramen transversarium was present in 20 (42.5% cases. Conclusion: CT represents a robust screening tool for patients with VAI. VAI should be suspected in patients with facet dislocation with or without fractures, foramina transversarium fractures and C1-C3 fractures, especially type III odontoid fractures and distraction mechanism of injury.

  1. Interlocking Friction Governs the Mechanical Fracture of Bilayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gang Seob; Wang, Shanshan; Qin, Zhao; Martin-Martinez, Francisco J; Warner, Jamie H; Buehler, Markus J

    2018-04-24

    A molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) layered system is a two-dimensional (2D) material, which is expected to provide the next generation of electronic devices together with graphene and other 2D materials. Due to its significance for future electronics applications, gaining a deep insight into the fundamental mechanisms upon MoS 2 fracture is crucial to prevent mechanical failure toward reliable applications. Here, we report direct experimental observation and atomic modeling of the complex failure behaviors of bilayer MoS 2 originating from highly variable interlayer frictions, elucidated with in situ transmission electron microscopy and large-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations. Our results provide a systematic understanding of the effects that different stacking and loading conditions have on the failure mechanisms and crack-tip behaviors in the bilayer MoS 2 systems. Our findings unveil essential properties in fracture of this 2D material and provide mechanistic insight into its mechanical failure.

  2. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Backman, Marie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Williams, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, B. Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klasky, Hilda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  3. Study on the mechanism of seepage flow in the grouting for multiple fractured model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishigaki, Makoto; Mikake, Shin-ichiro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of study is to improve the grouting method for fractured rock masses. In this paper, the results on the fundamental phenomenon for grasping the properties of grouting injection and seepage flow are discussed. The case of grouting stage is studied about the multiple hydraulic fractured apertures in the injected borehole. So the theory on the mechanism is constructed, and experiment is executed in order to verify the availability of the theory. From the results, it is shown that Bernoulli's law is able to prove the behavior of the grouting. And the theoretical evaluation is executed on the experiential procedure of the grouting. (author)

  4. The use of the J* integral for non-linear fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellen, T.K.

    1976-09-01

    The Griffith energy balance criterion, first postulated over 50 years ago, is still the basis of linear elastic fracture mechanics. From this, accurate numerical methods for establishing stress intensity factors and energy release rates have been developed. One such method involves path independent contour integrals about the crack tip. An improved contour integral, designated J* is discussed, and shown to have distinct advantages over others in non-linear strain situations. A number of examples are shown including fractures in thermo-plastic and creep situations. (author)

  5. Generalised fracture mechanics approach to the interfacial failure analysis of a bonded steel-concrete joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Corte, W.; Helincks, P.; Boel, V.; Klusák, Jan; Seitl, Stanislav; De Schutter, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 42 (2017), s. 147-160 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18702S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Epoxy adhesive * Fracture mechanics * Interfacial properties * Numerical study * Push-out test * Steel-concrete joint Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  6. Rock mechanics issues and research needs in the disposal of wastes in hydraulic fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, T.W.; McClain, W.C.

    1984-07-01

    The proposed rock mechanics studies outlined in this document are designed to answer the basic questions concerning hydraulic fracturing for waste disposal. These questions are: (1) how can containment be assured for Oak Ridge or other sites; and (2) what is the capacity of a site. The suggested rock mechanics program consists of four major tasks: (1) numerical modeling, (2) laboratory testing, (3) field testing, and (4) monitoring. These tasks are described

  7. The mechanics of tessellations - bioinspired strategies for fracture resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratzl, Peter; Kolednik, Otmar; Fischer, F Dieter; Dean, Mason N

    2016-01-21

    Faced with a comparatively limited palette of minerals and organic polymers as building materials, evolution has arrived repeatedly on structural solutions that rely on clever geometric arrangements to avoid mechanical trade-offs in stiffness, strength and flexibility. In this tutorial review, we highlight the concept of tessellation, a structural motif that involves periodic soft and hard elements arranged in series and that appears in a vast array of invertebrate and vertebrate animal biomaterials. We start from basic mechanics principles on the effects of material heterogeneities in hypothetical structures, to derive common concepts from a diversity of natural examples of one-, two- and three-dimensional tilings/layerings. We show that the tessellation of a hard, continuous surface - its atomization into discrete elements connected by a softer phase - can theoretically result in maximization of material toughness, with little expense to stiffness or strength. Moreover, the arrangement of soft/flexible and hard/stiff elements into particular geometries can permit surprising functions, such as signal filtering or 'stretch and catch' responses, where the constrained flexibility of systems allows a built-in safety mechanism for ensuring that both compressive and tensile loads are managed well. Our analysis unites examples ranging from exoskeletal materials (fish scales, arthropod cuticle, turtle shell) to endoskeletal materials (bone, shark cartilage, sponge spicules) to attachment devices (mussel byssal threads), from both invertebrate and vertebrate animals, while spotlighting success and potential for bio-inspired manmade applications.

  8. Practical application of fracture mechanics with consideration of multiaxiality of stress state to degraded nuclear piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Blind, D.; Herter, K.H.; Eisele, U.; Schuler, X.

    1995-01-01

    Within the scope of a research project nuclear piping components (T-branches and elbows) with dimensions like the primary coolant lines of PWR plants were investigated. In addition to the experimental full scale tests, extensive numerical calculations by means of the finite element method (FEM) as well as fracture mechanics analyses were performed. The applicability of these methods was verified by comparison with the experimental results. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters as well as the calculated component stress enabled a statement on crack initiation. The failure behavior could be evaluated by means of the multiaxiality of stress state in the ligament (gradient of the quotient of the multiaxiality of stress state q). With respect to practical application on other pressurized components it is shown how to use the procedure (e.g. in a LBB analysis). A quantitative assessment with regard to crack initiation is possible by comparison of the effective crack initiation value J ieff with the calculated component stress. If the multiaxiality of stress state and the q gradient in the ligament of the fracture ligament of the fracture mechanics specimen and the pressurized component to be evaluated is comparable a quantitative assessment is possible as for crack extension and maximum load. If there is no comparability of the gradients a qualitative assessment is possible for the failure behavior

  9. Analysis of the applicability of fracture mechanics on the basis of large scale specimen testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.; Sulc, J.; Anikovskij, V.; Dragunov, Y.; Rivkin, E.; Filatov, V.

    1988-01-01

    The verification is dealt with of fracture mechanics calculations for WWER reactor pressure vessels by large scale model testing performed on the large testing machine ZZ 8000 (maximum load of 80 MN) in the Skoda Concern. The results of testing a large set of large scale test specimens with surface crack-type defects are presented. The nominal thickness of the specimens was 150 mm with defect depths between 15 and 100 mm, the testing temperature varying between -30 and +80 degC (i.e., in the temperature interval of T ko ±50 degC). Specimens with a scale of 1:8 and 1:12 were also tested, as well as standard (CT and TPB) specimens. Comparisons of results of testing and calculations suggest some conservatism of calculations (especially for small defects) based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, according to the Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Codes which use the fracture mechanics values from J IC testing. On the basis of large scale tests the ''Defect Analysis Diagram'' was constructed and recommended for brittle fracture assessment of reactor pressure vessels. (author). 7 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  10. Flexible parallel implicit modelling of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical processes in fractured rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine B.

    2017-09-01

    Theory and numerical implementation describing groundwater flow and the transport of heat and solute mass in fully saturated fractured rocks with elasto-plastic mechanical feedbacks are developed. In our formulation, fractures are considered as being of lower dimension than the hosting deformable porous rock and we consider their hydraulic and mechanical apertures as scaling parameters to ensure continuous exchange of fluid mass and energy within the fracture-solid matrix system. The coupled system of equations is implemented in a new simulator code that makes use of a Galerkin finite-element technique. The code builds on a flexible, object-oriented numerical framework (MOOSE, Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) which provides an extensive scalable parallel and implicit coupling to solve for the multiphysics problem. The governing equations of groundwater flow, heat and mass transport, and rock deformation are solved in a weak sense (either by classical Newton-Raphson or by free Jacobian inexact Newton-Krylow schemes) on an underlying unstructured mesh. Nonlinear feedbacks among the active processes are enforced by considering evolving fluid and rock properties depending on the thermo-hydro-mechanical state of the system and the local structure, i.e. degree of connectivity, of the fracture system. A suite of applications is presented to illustrate the flexibility and capability of the new simulator to address problems of increasing complexity and occurring at different spatial (from centimetres to tens of kilometres) and temporal scales (from minutes to hundreds of years).

  11. The effect of inferomedial screw on postoperative shoulder function and mechanical alignment in proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Murat; Desteli, Engin Eren; İmren, Yunus; Üztürk, Ali; Kılıç, Mesut; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical and radiologic results of locking plate fixation with or without inferomedial screw (IMS) in surgically treated proximal humerus fractures. Thirty-six patients with displaced proximal humerus fractures from two centers were operated using locking plate. All of the fractures were classified according to the Neer classification. In 18 of the cases, an additional IMS running through the medial curvature of the surgical neck was used. There was no significant difference among both groups in terms of height, gender, weight, and mechanism of injury. The fractures were evaluated according to the radiographic and functional findings during follow-up period of 14 months in average (range 8-32 months). At the end of first year, shoulder radiographs were received and shoulder examinations were performed using ASES scores. Humeral head-shaft angles were measured by true AP projections. Head-shaft angle measurements were categorized as varus if 145. Mean time for fracture healing was 18 weeks. Complete union was achieved in 35 patients by the end of 6 months. In one of the 18 displaced proximal humerus fractures of IMS (+) group, the head-shaft angle was measured to be <125, whereas six patients had varus deviation in IMS (-) group at follow-up (p < 0.05). Mean ASES scores of IMS (+) group and IMS (-) group were 58.21 ± 5.82 and 38.61 ± 3.44, respectively (p < 0.001). Use of inferomedial screw running through the medial curvature of surgical neck prevents varus deformity and improves functional outcome after surgical treatment for proximal humerus fractures.

  12. Mechanical and fracture properties at impact loading of selected steels for nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchar, J.; Bilek, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The possibilities are briefly characterized of experimental research of mechanical and fracture properties of steels used in nuclear power engineering. Attention is paid to plastic deformation and the assessment of fracture formation during impact loading. The results are reported for steels 15Kh2MFA and 10GN2MFA. For steel 15Kh2MFA the effect was also studied of neutron radiation at different temperatures. From the theory developed for non-irradiated material 10GN2MFA, a prediction is made within the original model of the fracture stress value for steel 15Kh2MFA in both non-irradiated and irradiated states. The conclusion is arrived at that the existing methods of assessing steel properties at impact load allow obtaining knowledge of all significant effects during actual stress, this using only small specimens of the materials. (Z.M.). 4 figs., 8 refs

  13. Nontraumatic Fracture of the Femoral Condylar Prosthesis in a Total Knee Arthroplasty Leading to Mechanical Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish N. Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of fatigue fracture of the femoral component in a cruciate-retaining cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA. A 64-year-old man had undergone a primary TKA for osteoarthritis 10 years previously at another institution using the PFC-Sigma prosthesis. The patient recovered fully and was back to his regular activities. He presented with a history of sudden onset pain and locking of the left knee since the preceding three months. There was no history of trauma, and the patient was mobilizing with difficulty using crutches. Radiographs revealed fracture of the posterior condyle of the femoral prosthesis. Revision surgery was performed as an elective procedure revealing the broken prosthesis. The TC3RP-PFC revision prosthesis was used with a medial parapatellar approach. The patient recovered fully without any squeal. Mechanical failure of the knee arthroplasty prosthesis is rare, and nontraumatic fracture of the femoral metallic component has not been reported before.

  14. Nontraumatic fracture of the femoral condylar prosthesis in a total knee arthroplasty leading to mechanical failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Girish N; Quah, Conal; Bagouri, Elmunzar; Badhe, Nitin P

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a case of fatigue fracture of the femoral component in a cruciate-retaining cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A 64-year-old man had undergone a primary TKA for osteoarthritis 10 years previously at another institution using the PFC-Sigma prosthesis. The patient recovered fully and was back to his regular activities. He presented with a history of sudden onset pain and locking of the left knee since the preceding three months. There was no history of trauma, and the patient was mobilizing with difficulty using crutches. Radiographs revealed fracture of the posterior condyle of the femoral prosthesis. Revision surgery was performed as an elective procedure revealing the broken prosthesis. The TC3RP-PFC revision prosthesis was used with a medial parapatellar approach. The patient recovered fully without any squeal. Mechanical failure of the knee arthroplasty prosthesis is rare, and nontraumatic fracture of the femoral metallic component has not been reported before.

  15. Combined loading effects on the fracture mechanics behavior of line pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, R.E.; Cravero, S.; Ernst, H.A. [Tenaris Group, Campana (Argentina). SIDERCA R and D Center

    2009-12-19

    For certain applications, pipelines may be submitted to biaxial loading situations. In these cases, it is not clear the influence of the biaxial loading on the fracture mechanics behavior of cracked pipelines. For further understanding of biaxial loading effects, this work presents a numerical simulation of ductile tearing in a circumferentially surface cracked pipe under biaxial loading using the computational cell methodology. The model was adjusted with experimental results obtained in laboratory using single edge cracked under tension (SENT) specimens. These specimens appear as the better alternative to conventional fracture specimens to characterize fracture toughness of cracked pipes. The negligible effect of biaxial loadings on resistance curves was demonstrated. To guarantee the similarities of stress and strains fields between SENT specimens and cracked pipes subjected to biaxial loading, a constraint study using the J-Q methodology and the h parameter was used. The constraint study gives information about the characteristics of the crack-tip conditions. (author)

  16. Fracture Mechanics Assessment for Different Notch Sizes Using Finite Element Analysis Based on Ductile Failure Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Keun Hyung; Jeon, Jun Young; Han, Jae Jun; Nam, Hyun Suk; Lee, Dae Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, notch defects are evaluated using fracture mechanics. To understand the effects of notch defects, FE analysis is conducted to predict the limit load and J-integral for middle-cracked and single-edge cracked plates with various sizes of notch under tension and bending. As the radius of the notch increases, the energy release rate also increases, although the limit load remains constant. The values of fracture toughness(J{sub IC}) of SM490A are determined for various notch radii through FE simulation instead of conducting an experiment. As the radius of the notch increases, the energy release rate also increases, together with a more significant increase in fracture toughness. To conclude, as the notch radius increases, the resistance to crack propagation also increases.

  17. The Role of Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes on Fracture Mechanism of Epoxy Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hooshiar Sadegian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the role of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on fracture mechanism of epoxy nanocomposites, a series of tensile standard specimens reinforced with different carbon nanotube contents (0, 0.3, 0.6 and 1 wt% were produced. The fracture surfaces of the produced nanocomposites were evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results show that the surface fracture of epoxy nanocomposites comprised of three regions, i.e. mirror, transition and final propagation zones. The extension of all zones depends strongly on curing agent as well asMWCNTs content. The mirror zone is disappeared as curing agent and MWCNTs content increases, while the transition zone depends on the nucleation rate of secondary microcrack. The pattern of final propagation zone becomes coarser as MWCNTs are added to epoxy system.

  18. Metallurgical characteristics and fracture mechanical properties of unirradiated Kori-1 RPV weld: Linde 80, WF-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, B. S.; Oh, Y. J.; Chi, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, D. G.; Yoon, J. H.; Oh, J. M.

    2000-07-01

    The fracture toughness transition properties of the low upper shelf weld, Linde 80 WF-233, of Kori-1 RPV were evaluated by the master curve method, which is designated by ASTM E 1921, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T o , for ferritic steels in the transition range'. The reference temperature, T o =-83 deg C, was determined by PCVN specimens at -90 deg C. This value is similar to that of other high copper welds. The initial RT NDT was conservatively estimated as -26 deg F from the current fracture toughness results. From the studies on the chemistry and microstructure, the fracture mechanical properties of WF-233 weld is convincingly not worse than WF-70 and 72W welds

  19. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  20. The Mechanisms of Dispersion Strengthening and Fracture in Al-based XD (TM) Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, R. M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of reinforcement size, volume fraction, and matrix deformation behavior on room and elevated temperature strength, and the fracture toughness of metal matrix composites of both pure aluminum and Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg with 0 to 15 vol percent TiB2 were examined. Higher TiB2 volume fractions increased the tensile yield strength both at room and elevated temperatures, and reduced the elongation to fracture. Tensile tests also indicate that small particles provided a greater increase in strength for a given volume fraction than larger particles, whereas elongation to fracture appeared to be insensitive to reinforcement size. The fracture toughness of the Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg alloys decreased rapidly with TiB2 additions of 0 to 5 vol percent and more slowly with TiB2 additions of 5 to 15 vol percent. Fracture toughness appears to be independent of TiB2 particle size. The isothermal-aging response of the precipitation strengthened Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg alloys was not altered by the presence of TiB2.

  1. The association between type of spine fracture and the mechanism of trauma: A useful tool for identifying mechanism of trauma on legal medicine field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghakhani, Kamran; Kordrostami, Roya; Memarian, Azadeh; Asl, Nahid Dadashzadeh; Zavareh, Fatemeh Noorian

    2018-05-01

    Determining the association between mechanism of trauma, and the type of spine column fracture is a useful approach for exactly describing spine injury on forensic medicine field. We aimed to determine mechanism of trauma based on distribution of the transition of spinal column fractures. This cross-sectional survey was performed on 117 consecutive patients with the history of spinal trauma who were admitted to emergency ward of Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in Tehran, Iran from April 2015 to March 2016. The baseline characteristics were collected by reviewing the hospital recorded files. With respect to mechanism of fracture, 63.2% of fractures were caused by falling, 30.8% by collisions with motor vehicles, and others caused by the violence. Regarding site of fracture, lumbosacral was affected in 47.9%, thoracic in 29.9%, and cervical in 13.7%. Regarding type of fracture, burst fracture was the most common type (71.8%) followed by compressive fracture (14.5%). The site of fracture was specifically associated with the mechanism of injury; the most common injuries induced by falling from height were found in lumbosacral and cervical sites, and the most frequent injuries by traffic accidents were found in thoracic site; also the injuries following violence were observed more in lumbar vertebrae. The burst fractures were more revealed in the patients affected by falling from height and by traffic accidents, and both burst and compressive fractures were more observed with the same result in the patients injured with violence (p = 0.003). The type of spine fracture due to trauma is closely associated with the mechanism of trauma that can be helpful in legal medicine to identify the mechanism of trauma in affected patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Subsurface Defects in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Joggles Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Song, Kyongchan

    2011-01-01

    Coating spallation events have been observed along the slip-side joggle region of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels. One potential contributor to the spallation event is a pressure build up within subsurface voids or defects due to volatiles or water vapor entrapped during fabrication, refurbishment, or normal operational use. The influence of entrapped pressure on the thermo-mechanical fracture-mechanics response of reinforced carbon-carbon with subsurface defects is studied. Plane-strain simulations with embedded subsurface defects are performed to characterize the fracture mechanics response for a given defect length when subjected to combined elevated-temperature and subsurface-defect pressure loadings to simulate the unvented defect condition. Various subsurface defect locations of a fixed-length substrate defect are examined for elevated temperature conditions. Fracture mechanics results suggest that entrapped pressure combined with local elevated temperatures have the potential to cause subsurface defect growth and possibly contribute to further material separation or even spallation. For this anomaly to occur, several unusual circumstances would be required making such an outcome unlikely but plausible.

  3. Fracture of the proximal tibia after revision total knee arthroplasty with an extensor mechanism allograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gregg R; Levine, Harlan B; Sporer, Scott M; Hartzband, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    Extensor mechanism reconstruction with an extensor mechanism allograft (EMA) remains one of the most reliable methods for treating the extensor mechanism deficient total knee arthroplasty. We report 3 patients who were treated with an EMA who sustained a proximal tibial shaft fracture. In all 3 cases, a short tibial component was present that ended close to the level of the distal extent of the bone block. When performing an EMA, it is important to recognize that the tibial bone block creates a stress riser and revision to a long-stemmed tibial component should be strongly considered to bypass this point to minimize the risk of fracture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Local approach on mixed-mode ductile fracture of an aged stainless steel 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, K.L.; Marini, B.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of the structural integrity of the fast breeder reactor vessel, the local approach of fracture is applied to the ductile crack initiation under mixed-mode I+II loading for a 316L type stainless steel thermally aged for 1000 hours at 700 deg C. Experimental and numerical tests are performed on axisymmetric notched specimens, compact tension specimens and disymmetric four-point bend specimens. From elastoplastic finite element analyses, the damage variables are evaluated with various models: the Beremin model, the McClintock model, the Guennouni-Francois model and the Lemaitre model. The critical values of damage variable obtained on simple tensile specimens and axisymmetric notched specimens are used for the prediction of crack initiation under mixed-mode loading. The damage variable at crack initiation seems to be rather dependent on the fracture mode related to the stress triaxiality and the brittle fracture of banded ferrite of the aged material. The results are compared with those of the J values at crack initiation. (author). 9 ref., 2 figs

  5. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yuhu [PPPL; Calzolaio, Ciro [Univ of Geneva; Senatore, Carmine [Univ of Geneva

    2014-08-01

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanical loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.

  6. Effect of the build orientation on the mechanical properties and fracture modes of SLM Ti–6Al–4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonelli, M., E-mail: M.Simonelli@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Tse, Y.Y. [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Tuck, C. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-20

    Recent research on the additive manufacturing (AM) of Ti alloys has shown that the mechanical properties of the parts are affected by the characteristic microstructure that originates from the AM process. To understand the effect of the microstructure on the tensile properties, selective laser melted (SLM) Ti–6Al–4V samples built in three different orientations were tensile tested. The investigated samples were near fully dense, in two distinct conditions, as-built and stress relieved. It was found that the build orientation affects the tensile properties, and in particular the ductility of the samples. The mechanical anisotropy of the parts was discussed in relation to the crystallographic texture, phase composition and the predominant fracture mechanisms. Fractography and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) results indicate that the predominant fracture mechanism is intergranular fracture present along the grain boundaries and thus provide and explain the typical fracture surface features observed in fracture AM Ti–6Al–4V.

  7. Effect of the build orientation on the mechanical properties and fracture modes of SLM Ti–6Al–4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonelli, M.; Tse, Y.Y.; Tuck, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on the additive manufacturing (AM) of Ti alloys has shown that the mechanical properties of the parts are affected by the characteristic microstructure that originates from the AM process. To understand the effect of the microstructure on the tensile properties, selective laser melted (SLM) Ti–6Al–4V samples built in three different orientations were tensile tested. The investigated samples were near fully dense, in two distinct conditions, as-built and stress relieved. It was found that the build orientation affects the tensile properties, and in particular the ductility of the samples. The mechanical anisotropy of the parts was discussed in relation to the crystallographic texture, phase composition and the predominant fracture mechanisms. Fractography and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) results indicate that the predominant fracture mechanism is intergranular fracture present along the grain boundaries and thus provide and explain the typical fracture surface features observed in fracture AM Ti–6Al–4V

  8. The fracture mechanics of steam turbine electron beam welded rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Increased steam turbine unit ratings presupposes that steelmakers are capable of manufacturing larger and larger rotor components. However, there are few steelmakers in the world capable of manufacturing monobloc rotors for high rated turbines, which limits the choice of supplier. Most nuclear turbine rotors have a composite arrangement and are made either by shrinking discs on a shaft or using elements welded together. Those in favour of welding have applied a classical socalled ''submerged'' method using a filler metal. However welding can also be performed by using an Electron Beam in a vacuum room without a filler metal. This technique has many advantages: mechanical characteristics of the joint are identical to those of the base material after tempering without heat affected zones. Moreover, parts are only very slightly deformed during welding. Two steam turbine rotors have been produced in this way. This paper described the destructive tests carried out in the four Electron Beam (EB) welds (two on each rotor)

  9. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical property of thermally aged stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X.Y. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Zhu, P. [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., 1788 Xihuan Road, 215004 Suzhou (China); Ding, X.F. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Lu, Y.H., E-mail: lu_yonghao@mater.ustb.edu.cn [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Shoji, T. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aoba AramakiAobaku, 980-8579 Sendai (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical property change of E308L stainless steel weld overlay cladding aged at 400 °C for 400, 1000 and 5000 h were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and small punch test (SPT). The results indicated that thermal aging had no obvious effect on the volume fraction of ferrite, but can cause microstructural evolution by spinodal decomposotion and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite phase. Spinodal decomposition took place after aging up to 1000 h, while G-phase formed along dislocations, and growed up to 2–11 nm after aging for 5000 h. The total energy for inducing deformation and fracture by the small punch tests decreased with the increase of thermal aging time, and this decline was associated with spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation. Plastic deformation of the aged ferrite proceeded via formation of curvilinear slip bands. Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands. The hardening of the ferrite and high stress concentration on δ/γ phase interface resulted in brittle fracture and phase boundary separation after thermal aging. - Highlights: •Spinodal decomposition took place after long-term therml aging at 400 °C. •Dislocations were the preferable sites for G-phase formation aged at 400 °C for 5000 h. •Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation induced reduction of small punch energy. •Thermal aging led to brittle fracture and phase boundary separation. •Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands in the aged ferrite phase.

  10. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical property of thermally aged stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, X.Y.; Zhu, P.; Ding, X.F.; Lu, Y.H.; Shoji, T.

    2017-01-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical property change of E308L stainless steel weld overlay cladding aged at 400 °C for 400, 1000 and 5000 h were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and small punch test (SPT). The results indicated that thermal aging had no obvious effect on the volume fraction of ferrite, but can cause microstructural evolution by spinodal decomposotion and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite phase. Spinodal decomposition took place after aging up to 1000 h, while G-phase formed along dislocations, and growed up to 2–11 nm after aging for 5000 h. The total energy for inducing deformation and fracture by the small punch tests decreased with the increase of thermal aging time, and this decline was associated with spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation. Plastic deformation of the aged ferrite proceeded via formation of curvilinear slip bands. Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands. The hardening of the ferrite and high stress concentration on δ/γ phase interface resulted in brittle fracture and phase boundary separation after thermal aging. - Highlights: •Spinodal decomposition took place after long-term therml aging at 400 °C. •Dislocations were the preferable sites for G-phase formation aged at 400 °C for 5000 h. •Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation induced reduction of small punch energy. •Thermal aging led to brittle fracture and phase boundary separation. •Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands in the aged ferrite phase.

  11. Study on predicting residual life of elevator links by fracture mechanics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Helin; Zhang Yi; Deng Zengjie [China National Petroleum Corp., Xi`an, Shaanxi (China). Tubular Goods Research Center; Jin Dazeng [Xi`an Jiaotong Univ., Xi`an, Shaanxi (China)

    1995-12-31

    On the basis of investigation, failure and fracture analysis of elevator links, residual life prediction of links using fracture mechanics approach is studied, and mechanical properties, fracture toughness value K{sub IC} and fatigue crack propagation rage da/dN of the steel for elevator links are determined. Using the relation between stress intensity factor K{sub I} and the strain-energy release rate, the two-dimensional conversion thickness finite element method has been used to calculate the stress intensity factors K{sub I} for dangerous sections in the ring part of links. Furthermore, the reliability of calculations of the finite element stress intensity factors K{sub I} for dangerous sections of elevator links and the residual life computation for links are verified by fatigue tests of actual links. Finally, the experimental verification of computed results by 150T link fractured at site indicates that the computed critical crack lengths and residual life tally well with those measured and meet the needs of oil drilling.

  12. Comparison of the prognosis among different age groups in elderly patients with hip fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagino Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The outcome of treatment of hip fractures in different age groups in the elderly population is largely unknown. Hence, we stratified elderly patients with hip fracture into age groups and compared the prognosis in various age groups. Materials and Methods: Among 459 patients with hip fracture treated at our hospital from 1997, 430 patients aged 65 years or above at the time of injury were studied. The patients comprised 98 males and 332 females and the ages at injury ranged from 65 to 103 years (mean 83.4 years. There were 167 cases of femoral neck fracture and 263 cases of trochanteric fractures. Surgery was performed in 383 cases, while 47 cases were treated conservatively. The subjects were classified by age into young-old for those aged 65-74 years (group A, n = 55, middle-old for those aged 75-84 years (group B, n = 172, old-old for those aged 85-94 (group C, n = 180, and oldest-old for those aged 95 years or above (group D, n = 23. The functional and survival prognosis at discharge in each group was investigated. Results: Numbers of patients who were ambulatory at discharge among those ambulatory before injury were 43 of 49 (87.8% in group A, 113 of 152 (74.3% in group B, 86 of 138 (62.3% in group C, and 5 of 14 (35.7% in group D, showing worse recovery of walking ability as age advanced. Among those ambulatory before injury, 42 patients in group A, 139 patients in group B, 130 patients in group C, and 12 patients in group D underwent surgery and of these patients, 38 patients (90.5% in group A, 109 patients (78.4% in group B, 83 patients (63.8% in group C, and 5 patients (41.7% in group D were ambulatory at discharge. On the other hand, the numbers of patients who were ambulatory at discharge among those receiving conservative treatment were 5 of 7 (71.4% in group A, 4 of 13 (30.8% in group B, 3 of 8 (37.5% in group C, and 0 of 2 (0% in group D, showing better walking ability in surgical patients than in conservatively treated

  13. Monitoring and modeling the aging mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, Yann; Courtois, Alexis; Ghavamian, Charles

    2006-09-01

    origin of these cracks might be caused by differential drying shrinkage for the cracks near the raft and by deviated post-tensioning near the material hatch. The bi-directional prestress limits the cracks opening when the containment is over-pressurized. However, under sustained loads, concrete creep leads to a loss of prestress due to the deformation compatibility between the grouted tendons the concrete mass. Thus the safety margin shall be affected since cracks opening may become larger with time. In order to optimize the extent of reparation, it is therefore compulsory to improve the prediction of the long-time mechanical behavior of the containment. This task requires: - the improvement of the delayed behavior understanding, the so-called aging mechanism, the development of realistic, i.e. less conservative, models specifically designed for the very specific loading conditions of the inner containment; - the integration of monitored data in the numerical or analytical simulation; - the evaluation of the impact of the concrete damage and the loss of prestress on the hydraulic behavior. The paper addresses the following items: inner containment description and in-situ monitoring; concrete shrinkage and creep modeling; laboratory testing; numerical computation and comparison with monitored data; introducing monitored data in the computation; impact of damage on the leak tightness of the containment wall. The communication illustrates the general strategy adopted by EDF in order to assess the long-term integrity of NPP inner concrete containment vessel. All analysis and computation are performed on the standard zone of the concrete vessel. On-going research and development programs are focused on the refinement of the methodology and their application to more realistic numerical model of large-scale structure

  14. Role of BMI and age in predicting pathologic vertebral fractures in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lun; Liu, Yao-Chung; Wu, Chia-Hung; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chiu, Hsun-I; Lee, Gin-Yi; Lee, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Pei; Lin, Ting-Wei; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2018-04-01

    Vertebral fractures affect approximately 30% of myeloma patients and lead to a poor impact on survival and life quality. In general, age and body mass index (BMI) are reported to have an important role in vertebral fractures. However, the triangle relationship among age, BMI, and vertebral fractures is still unclear in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) patients. This study recruited consecutive 394 patients with NDMM at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2015. Risk factors for vertebral fractures in NDMM patients were collected and analyzed. The survival curves were demonstrated using Kaplan-Meier estimate. In total, 301 (76.4%) NDMM patients were enrolled in the cohort. In the median follow-up period of 18.0 months, the median survival duration in those with vertebral fractures ≥ 2 was shorter than those with vertebral fracture BMI BMI ≥ 24.0 kg/m 2 (adjusted RR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.44-5.43). In multivariable logistic regression, BMI BMI ≥ 24.0 kg/m 2 (adjusted OR, 6.05; 95% CI, 2.43-15.08). Among age stratifications, patients with both old age and low BMI were at a greater risk suffering from increased vertebral fractures, especially in patients > 75 years and BMI BMI. Elder patients with low BMI should consider to routinely receive spinal radiographic examinations and regular follow-up. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Ten-year incident osteoporosis-related fractures in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study - comparing site and age-specific risks in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Jerilynn C; Langsetmo, Lisa; Lentle, Brian C; Berger, Claudie; Goltzman, David; Kovacs, Christopher S; Kaiser, Stephanie M; Adachi, Jonathan D; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Anastassiades, Tassos; Towheed, Tanveer; Josse, Robert G; Brown, Jacques P; Leslie, William D; Kreiger, Nancy

    2015-02-01

    Population-based incident fracture data aid fracture prevention and therapy decisions. Our purpose was to describe 10-year site-specific cumulative fracture incidence by sex, age at baseline, and degree of trauma with/without consideration of competing mortality in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study adult cohort. Incident fractures and mortality were identified by annual postal questionnaires to the participant or proxy respondent. Date, site and circumstance of fracture were gathered from structured interviews and medical records. Fracture analyses were stratified by sex and age at baseline and used both Kaplan-Meier and competing mortality methods. The baseline (1995-97) cohort included 6314 women and 2789 men (aged 25-84 years; mean±SD 62±12 and 59±14, respectively), with 4322 (68%) women and 1732 (62%) men followed to year-10. At least one incident fracture occurred for 930 women (14%) and 247 men (9%). Competing mortality exceeded fracture risk for men aged 65+years at baseline. Age was a strong predictor of incident fractures especially fragility fractures, with higher age gradients for women vs. men. Major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) (hip, clinical spine, forearm, humerus) accounted for 41-74% of fracture risk by sex/age strata; in women all MOF sites showed age-related increases but in men only hip was clearly age-related. The most common fractures were the forearm for women and the ribs for men. Hip fracture incidence was the highest for the 75-84 year baseline age-group with no significant difference between women 7.0% (95% CI 5.3, 8.9) and men 7.0% (95% CI 4.4, 10.3). There are sex differences in the predominant sites and age-gradients of fracture. In older men, competing mortality exceeds cumulative fracture risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Benchmark on residual stress modeling in fracture mechanics assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Deschanels, H.; Chapuliot, S.; Le Delliou, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of development in analytical defect assessment methods for the RSE-M and RCC-MRx codes, new work on the consideration of residual stresses is initiated by AREVA, CEA and EDF. The first step of this work is the realization of a database of F.E. reference cases. To validate assumptions and develop a good practice guideline for the consideration of residual stresses in finite element calculations, a benchmark between AREVA, CEA and EDF is going-on. A first application presented in this paper focuses on the analysis of the crack initiation of aged duplex stainless steel pipes submitted to an increasing pressure loading. Residual stresses are related to pipe fabrication process and act as shell bending condition. Two tests were performed: the first with an internal longitudinal semi-elliptical crack and the second with an external crack. The analysis first focuses on the ability to accurately estimate the measured pressure at the crack initiation of the two tests. For that purpose, the comparison of results obtained with different methods of taking into account the residual stresses (i.e. thermal fields or initial strain field). It then validates post-treatment procedures for J or G determination, and finally compares of the results obtained by the different partners. It is then shown that the numerical models can integrate properly the impact of residual stresses on the crack initiation pressure. Then, an excellent agreement is obtained between the different numerical evaluations of G provided by the participants to the benchmark so that best practice and reference F.E. solutions for residual stresses consideration can be provided based on that work. (authors)

  17. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  18. Ipsilateral simultaneous fracture of the trochlea involving the lateral end clavicle and distal end radius: a rare combination and a unique mechanism of injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta RK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Isolated trochlea fracture in adults is a rare surgical entity as compared to its capitellar counterpart. It has been only mentioned sporadically in the literature as case reports. Fracture of the trochlea is accompanied by other elbow injuries like elbow dislocation, capitellum fracture, ulnar fracture and extraarticular condylar fracture. Here we report a unique case of isolated displaced trochlea fracture associated with fractures of the lateral end clavicle and the distal end radius. We propose a unique mechanism for this rare combination of injuries: typical triad of injury, i.e. fracture of the distal end radius with trochlea and fracture of the lateral end of the clavicle. Nonoperative treatment is recommended for undisplaced humeral trochlea fractures; but for displaced ones, anatomical reduction and internal fixation are essential to maintain the congruous trochleacoronoid articulation and hence to maintain the intrinsic stability of the elbow. Key words: Isolated trochlea fracture; Clavicle; Radius fractures

  19. Investigations on the influence of the stress state on fracture-mechanical values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, P.

    1979-01-01

    Fracture toughness obtained from specimen can be applied to construction elements only when the same stress state exists. In standardised fracture-mechanical tests plain strain is realised. Using the stress intensity factor, a critical crack length or a critical load can be obtained. Above these values a crack propagates in an unstable way. The specimen are tested under uni-axial load. In this paper investigations have been made whether a biaxial load increases the stress state over the plain strain and whether consequently a decrease of the critical fracture toughness and a shift of the temperatures Tsub(g)sub(y) and Tsub(s) results which characterise the fracture behaviour of steel. In order to answer these questions the tests were made which induced due to their geometry an additional nominal stress parallel to the crack front in spite of uni-axial loading. The results were compared with those from specimen without an additional nominal stress and having in their cross section under same test conditions nearly the same plain strain. The fracture toughness of both specimen types were compared at temperatures between 142 K and 252 K and correlated to other material-characterising values. The tests were completed by stress analysis and by comparing the crack opening displacement. Due to the additional stress, Tsub(g)sub(y) was found to be 20 K higher than for the reference specimen. The fracture toughness decreases significantly in certain temperature ranges. The plastic stress concentration factor was comperatively higher and the remaining plastic crack opening decreases up to 25%. (orig.) [de

  20. Review of Mechanisms and Theories of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Azari

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Several factors have incentive role for study of aging which includes increasing of the average and maximum of human life span, the increase in percentage of elderly in the societies and proportion of the national expenditure utilized by them. The Recent views of aging indicating that aging is extremely a complex multifactorial process despite of earlier views about definite cause aging like gene or decline of a key factor(1. This brief review tries to inspect aging at the molecular, cellular, and systemic levels; and consider interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Evolutionary theories argue that aging results from a decline in the force of natural selection. On the other hand, molecular theories emphasis on the genetically regulation of aging and argue that aging results from changing in genes. There are cellular theories that telomere theory is most famous. Stress induced aging is in this group too. free radical theory is next known way for cellular damages. Finally, we see systemic theories that contain two main groups, neuroendocrine and immunologic theories.

  1. The application of fracture mechanics to the safety assessment of transport casks for radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zencker, U.; Mueller, K.; Droste, B.; Roedel, R.; Voelzke, H.

    2004-01-01

    BAM is the German responsible authority for the mechanical and thermal design safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials. The assessment has to cover the brittle fracture safety proof of package components made of potentially brittle materials. This paper gives a survey of the regulatory and technical requirements for such an assessment according to BAM's new ''Guidelines for the Application of Ductile Cast Iron for Transport and Storage Casks for Radioactive Materials''. Based on these guidelines higher stresses than before can become permissible, but it is necessary to put more effort into the safety assessment procedure. The fundamentals of such a proof with the help of the methods of fracture mechanics are presented. The recommended procedure takes into account the guidelines of the IAEA Advisory Material which are based on the prevention of crack initiation. Examples of BAM's research and safety assessment practices are given. Recommendations for further developments towards package designs with higher acceptable stress levels will be concluded

  2. Fracture mechanics based design for radioactive material transport packagings -- Historical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D.; Sorenson, K.; McConnell, P.

    1998-04-01

    The use of a fracture mechanics based design for the radioactive material transport (RAM) packagings has been the subject of extensive research for more than a decade. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has played an important role in the research and development of the application of this technology. Ductile iron has been internationally accepted as an exemplary material for the demonstration of a fracture mechanics based method of RAM packaging design and therefore is the subject of a large portion of the research discussed in this report. SNL's extensive research and development program, funded primarily by the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Transportation, Energy Management and Analytical Services (EM-76) and in an auxiliary capacity, the office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, is summarized in this document along with a summary of the research conducted at other institutions throughout the world. In addition to the research and development work, code and standards development and regulatory positions are also discussed

  3. The COD concept and its application to fracture mechanical evaluation of cracked components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kockelmann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive literature study, this report critically evaluates the current state of experiences with the COD concept in fracture mechanics. First the concept is explained and the procedure of materials testing with a view to fracture mechanics is discussed in detail with emphasis on: The definition of crack shape modification; the procedure to detect crack modification, with subsequent comparison; the determination of material characteristics; the impact on the characteristics of the crack tip opening and the dispersion of results. The correlation between crack tip opening characteristics and notch impact strength is explained, and the methods applied for analysis of the streses affecting the structural components are shown. The design-based and failure threshold curves and the treatment of real crack geometries are also discussed. Problems still to be solved are shown. (orig./HP) [de

  4. PECVD low-permittivity organosilicate glass coatings: Adhesion, fracture and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Youbo; Xiang Yong [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tsui, Ting Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nanotechnology Institute, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada); Vlassak, Joost J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: vlassak@esag.harvard.edu

    2008-10-15

    The structure and mechanical behavior of organosilicate glass (OSG) coatings have been analyzed as a function of composition and UV irradiation time. A decrease in the OSG carbon content results in more networking bonds and increased connectivity; UV irradiation increases the connectivity by severing weak terminal bonds and stabilizes the network through local bond rearrangements. These structure modifications lead to a significant improvement in the stiffness, hardness, and fracture energy of these coatings. The networking bond density and mean connectivity number correlate well with the mechanical behavior of the OSG films, although network bond density weighted by bond energy is a more appropriate measure. The adhesion energy of silicon nitride to OSG is significantly higher than the cohesive energy of the OSG as a result of interface densification and crack-tip shielding. Subcritical fracture measurements in aqueous environments show that the detrimental effect of water on adhesion surpasses the effect of network connectivity.

  5. Fracture mechanical evaluation of high temperature structure and creep-fatigue defect assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Jae Han

    2004-02-01

    This study proposed the evaluation procedure of high temperature structures from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics on the cylindrical structure applicable to the KALIMER, which is developed by KAERI. For the evaluation of structural integrity, linear and non-linear fracture mechanics parameters were analyzed. Parameters used in creep defect growth applicable to high temperature structure of liquid metal reactor and the evaluation codes with these parameters were analyzed. The evaluation methods of defect initiation and defect growth which were established in R5/R6 code(UK), JNC method (Japan) and RCC-MR A16(France) code were analyzed respectively. The evaluation procedure of leak before break applicable to KALIMER was preliminarily developed and proposed. As an application example of defect growth, the creep-fatigue defect growth on circumferential throughwall defect in high temperature cylindrical structure was evaluated by RCC-MR A16 and this application technology was established.

  6. Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Properties of NiAl Intermetallic Alloy with Different Copper Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Hsing Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior and fracture characteristics of NiAl intermetallic alloy containing 5~7 at% Cu are investigated at room temperature under strain rates ranging from 1 × 10−3 to 5 × 103 s−1. It is shown that the copper contents and strain rate both have a significant effect on the mechanical behavior of the NiAl alloy. Specifically, the flow stress increases with an increasing copper content and strain rate. Moreover, the ductility also improves as the copper content increases. The change in the mechanical response and fracture behavior of the NiAl alloy given a higher copper content is thought to be the result of the precipitation of β-phase (Ni,CuAl and γ'-phase (Ni,Cu3Al in the NiAl matrix.

  7. A variationally coupled FE-BE method for elasticity and fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. Y.; Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.

    1991-01-01

    A new method for coupling finite element and boundary element subdomains in elasticity and fracture mechanics problems is described. The essential feature of this new method is that a single variational statement is obtained for the entire domain, and in this process the terms associated with tractions on the interfaces between the subdomains are eliminated. This provides the additional advantage that the ambiguities associated with the matching of discontinuous tractions are circumvented. The method leads to a direct procedure for obtaining the discrete equations for the coupled problem without any intermediate steps. In order to evaluate this method and compare it with previous methods, a patch test for coupled procedures has been devised. Evaluation of this variationally coupled method and other methods, such as stiffness coupling and constraint traction matching coupling, shows that this method is substantially superior. Solutions for a series of fracture mechanics problems are also reported to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  8. Effect of Process Parameters on Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Al-Cu-Mg Alloy after Creep Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Zhan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A set of creep aging tests at different aging temperatures and stress levels were carried out for Al-Cu-Mg alloy, and the effects of creep aging on strength and fatigue fracture behavior were studied through tensile tests and fatigue crack propagation tests. The microstructures were further analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results show that temperature and stress can obviously affect the creep behavior, mechanical properties, and fatigue life of Al-Cu-Mg alloy. As the aging temperature increases, the fatigue life of alloy first increases, and then decreases. The microstructure also displays a transition from the Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatsky (GPB zones to the precipitation of S phase in the grain interior. However, the precipitation phases grow up and become coarse at excessive temperatures. Increasing stress can narrow the precipitation-free zone (PFZ at the grain boundary and improve the fatigue life, but overhigh stress can produce the opposite result. In summary, the fatigue life of Al-Cu-Mg alloy can be improved by fine-dispersive precipitation phases and a narrow PFZ in a suitable creep aging process.

  9. Ovarian Aging : Mechanisms and Clinical Consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, F. J.; Soules, M. R.; Fauser, B. C.

    Menopause is the final step in the process referred to as ovarian ageing. The age related decrease in follicle numbers dictates the onset of cycle irregularity and the final cessation of menses. The parallel decay in oocyte quality contributes to the gradual decline in fertility and the final

  10. A fracture mechanics model for iodine stress corrosion crack propagation in Zircaloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crescimanno, P.J.; Campbell, W.R.; Goldberg, I.

    1984-01-01

    A fracture mechanics model is presented for iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy tubing. The model utilizes a power law to relate crack extension velocity to stress intensity factor, a hyperbolic tangent function for the influence of iodine concentration, and an exponential function for the influence of temperature and material strength. Comparisons of predicted to measured failure times show that predicted times are within a factor of two of the measured times for a majority of the specimens considered

  11. A fracture mechanics study of tungsten failure under high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Muyuan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of fusion devices is highly dependent on plasma-facing components. Tungsten is the most promising candidate material for armors in plasma-facing components in ITER and DEMO. However, the brittleness of tungsten below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is very critical to the reliability of plasma-facing components. In this work, thermo-mechanical and fracture behaviors of tungsten are predicted numerically under fusion relevant thermal loadings.

  12. Non–double-couple mechanisms of microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šílený, Jan; Hill, D. P.; Eisner, L.; Cornet, F. H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 114, B8 (2009), B08307/1-B08307/15 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120502; GA ČR GA205/09/0724 Grant - others:EC(XE) MTKI-CT-2004-517242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : microearthquakes * source mechanisms * hydraulic fracturing Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2009

  13. The effect of crack propagation mechanism on the fractal dimension of fracture surfaces in steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Strnadel, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3-4 (2008), s. 726-738 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0646; GA AV ČR IAA200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : low-alloyed steel * fracture surface * fractography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.713, year: 2008

  14. Effects of local mechanical and fracture properties on LBB behavior of a dissimilar metal welded joint in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, L.Y.; Wang, G.Z., E-mail: gzwang@ecust.edu.cn; Xuan, F.Z.; Tu, S.T.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Effect of local mechanical and fracture properties on LBB behavior were investigated. • Considering local mechanical properties leads to slightly high LBB curve. • Use of fracture resistance of base or weld will produce non-conservative LBB result. • Local fracture properties of interface region cannot be ignored in LBB analysis. - Abstract: In this paper, three-dimensional finite element models with and without considering local mechanical properties were built for a dissimilar metal welded joint (DMWJ) connected the safe end to pipe-nozzle of a reactor pressure vessel. The inner circumferential surface cracks were postulated at the interface of A508 steel and buttering Alloy52Mb. Based on the elastic–plastic fracture mechanics theory of J-integral, the crack growth stability was analyzed. The effects of the local mechanical and fracture resistance properties on LBB behavior were investigated. The results show that considering local mechanical properties leads to slightly high LBB curve. For the A508/Alloy52Mb interface region cracks in the DMWJ, if the fracture resistance curve of base metal A508 or the buttering Alloy52Mb is used, the non-conservative (unsafe) LBB assessment result will be produced. With increasing the applied bending moment, the degree of un-conservatism in LBB behavior becomes large. Therefore, to obtain accurate LBB assessment results, the local fracture resistance properties of the interface region should be used.

  15. The Particle Shape of WC Governing the Fracture Mechanism of Particle Reinforced Iron Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zulai; Wang, Pengfei; Shan, Quan; Jiang, Yehua; Wei, He; Tan, Jun

    2018-06-11

    In this work, tungsten carbide particles (WC p , spherical and irregular particles)-reinforced iron matrix composites were manufactured utilizing a liquid sintering technique. The mechanical properties and the fracture mechanism of WC p /iron matrix composites were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The crack schematic diagram and fracture simulation diagram of WC p /iron matrix composites were summarized, indicating that the micro-crack was initiated both from the interface for spherical and irregular WC p /iron matrix composites. However, irregular WC p had a tendency to form spherical WC p . The micro-cracks then expanded to a wide macro-crack at the interface, leading to a final failure of the composites. In comparison with the spherical WC p , the irregular WC p were prone to break due to the stress concentration resulting in being prone to generating brittle cracking. The study on the fracture mechanisms of WC p /iron matrix composites might provide a theoretical guidance for the design and engineering application of particle reinforced composites.

  16. Comparisons of non-destructive examination standards in the framework of fracture mechanics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reale, S.; Corvi, A.

    1993-01-01

    One of the aims of the various Engineering Standards related to Non-destructive Examination (NDE) is to identify and limit some characteristics of defects in a structure, since the degree of damage of a structure can be associated with these defect characteristics. One way that the damage level can be evaluated is by means of Fracture Mechanics. The objective of the present paper is to compare and identify the differences in the flaw acceptance criteria of national NDE Standards so as to suggest some guidelines for a future common European Standard. This paper examines the Standards adopted in France (RCC-MR), Germany (DIN), Italy (ASME) and the UK (BSI). It concentrates on both ultrasonic and radiographic inspection methods. The flaw acceptance criteria in these standards relating to non-destructive tests performed on a component during manufacturing are compared and evaluated by the Fracture Mechanics CEGB R6 procedure. General guidelines and results supporting the significance of the Fracture Mechanics approach are given. (Author)

  17. Flexible parallel implicit modelling of coupled thermal–hydraulic–mechanical processes in fractured rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cacace

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Theory and numerical implementation describing groundwater flow and the transport of heat and solute mass in fully saturated fractured rocks with elasto-plastic mechanical feedbacks are developed. In our formulation, fractures are considered as being of lower dimension than the hosting deformable porous rock and we consider their hydraulic and mechanical apertures as scaling parameters to ensure continuous exchange of fluid mass and energy within the fracture–solid matrix system. The coupled system of equations is implemented in a new simulator code that makes use of a Galerkin finite-element technique. The code builds on a flexible, object-oriented numerical framework (MOOSE, Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment which provides an extensive scalable parallel and implicit coupling to solve for the multiphysics problem. The governing equations of groundwater flow, heat and mass transport, and rock deformation are solved in a weak sense (either by classical Newton–Raphson or by free Jacobian inexact Newton–Krylow schemes on an underlying unstructured mesh. Nonlinear feedbacks among the active processes are enforced by considering evolving fluid and rock properties depending on the thermo-hydro-mechanical state of the system and the local structure, i.e. degree of connectivity, of the fracture system. A suite of applications is presented to illustrate the flexibility and capability of the new simulator to address problems of increasing complexity and occurring at different spatial (from centimetres to tens of kilometres and temporal scales (from minutes to hundreds of years.

  18. Incorporation of Interfacial Intermetallic Morphology in Fracture Mechanism Map for Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Kumar, P.; Dutta, I.; Sidhu, R.; Renavikar, M.; Mahajan, R.

    2014-01-01

    A fracture mechanism map (FMM) is a powerful tool which correlates the fracture behavior of a material to its microstructural characteristics in an explicit and convenient way. In the FMM for solder joints, an effective thickness of the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) layer ( t eff) and the solder yield strength ( σ ys,eff) are used as abscissa and ordinate axes, respectively, as these two predominantly affect the fracture behavior of solder joints. Earlier, a definition of t eff, based on the uniform thickness of IMC ( t u) and the average height of the IMC scallops ( t s), was proposed and shown to aptly explain the fracture behavior of solder joints on Cu. This paper presents a more general definition of t eff that is more widely applicable to a range of metallizations, including Cu and electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG). Using this new definition of t eff, mode I FMM for SAC387/Cu joints has been updated and its validity was confirmed. A preliminary FMM for SAC387/Cu joints with ENIG metallization is also presented.

  19. An interbubble fracture mechanism of blister formation on helium-irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes a new model of surface blister formation in which a blister is nucleated by the interbubble fracture of highly overpressurized helium bubbles. As in other gas-driven models, the internal release of helium then provides the driving force for blister lid deformation. The high pressures required for the suggested mode of fracture are a result of the difficulty, experienced by the bubbles in acquiring vacancies. By considering the bubble growth mechanisms, the critical conditions for interbubble fracture are shown to depend on the helium dose and energy, the bubble size, and their depth in the irradiated material. These parameters and other aspects of blister formation are discussed on the basis of the proposed model. One important result concerns the position of the fracture plane; because of the usual displacement of damage and helium peaks relative to depth, this plane can lie well beyond the helium peak. Thus, the disagreement inherent in previous gas models between helium range and measured blister lid thickness values can be resolved without recourse to lateral stress arguments. (Auth.)

  20. Decoupling damage mechanisms in acid-fractured gas/condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, R.C.; Walters, D.A. [Taurus Reservoir Solutions Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Settari, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Rahim, Z.; Ahmed, M.S. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-07-01

    The Khuff is a gas condensate field located 11,500 feet beneath the producing Ghawar oil field in Saudi Arabia. Wells are mainly acid fracture stimulated following drilling with excellent fracture conductivity and length properties. The wells experience a quick production loss however, after tie-in which eventually stabilizes after two to five months. In order to identify the source of productivity loss, such as near well liquid dropout, fracture conductivity loss, reservoir permeability loss due to increased effective stress, a study of a well in the Khuff field was conducted. The study reviewed basic geomechanical and reservoir properties and identified the mechanisms of production loss. The paper presented the methodology, data and preliminary analysis, relative permeability and results of the history matching. It was concluded that traditional production type curves in cases with changing skin may indicate that transient flow is occurring when boundary effects are felt. In addition, stress dependent fracture conductivity and reservoir permeability can be modeled with simpler pressure dependent functions for relatively low overall loss in reservoir pressure. 30 refs., 25 figs., 1 appendix.

  1. Coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical modeling of hydraulic fracturing in quasi-brittle rocks using BPM-DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Tomac

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved understanding of coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical (HTM hydraulic fracturing of quasi-brittle rock using the bonded particle model (BPM within the discrete element method (DEM. BPM has been recently extended by the authors to account for coupled convective–conductive heat flow and transport, and to enable full hydro-thermal fluid–solid coupled modeling. The application of the work is on enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs, and hydraulic fracturing of hot dry rock (HDR is studied in terms of the impact of temperature difference between rock and a flowing fracturing fluid. Micro-mechanical investigation of temperature and fracturing fluid effects on hydraulic fracturing damage in rocks is presented. It was found that fracture is shorter with pronounced secondary microcracking along the main fracture for the case when the convective–conductive thermal heat exchange is considered. First, the convection heat exchange during low-viscosity fluid infiltration in permeable rock around the wellbore causes significant rock cooling, where a finger-like fluid infiltration was observed. Second, fluid infiltration inhibits pressure rise during pumping and delays fracture initiation and propagation. Additionally, thermal damage occurs in the whole area around the wellbore due to rock cooling and cold fluid infiltration. The size of a damaged area around the wellbore increases with decreasing fluid dynamic viscosity. Fluid and rock compressibility ratio was found to have significant effect on the fracture propagation velocity.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of adult stem cell aging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudolph, K. Lenhard

    2010-01-01

    "There is growing evidence that adult stem cells age. This process can result in alterations in the number and function of stem cells, leading to distinct phenotypic outcomes in different organ systems...

  3. Hydro-mechanical coupled simulation of hydraulic fracturing using the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Dong Joon

    This thesis presents the development and validation of an advanced hydro-mechanical coupled finite element program analyzing hydraulic fracture propagation within unconventional hydrocarbon formations under various conditions. The realistic modeling of hydraulic fracturing is necessarily required to improve the understanding and efficiency of the stimulation technique. Such modeling remains highly challenging, however, due to factors including the complexity of fracture propagation mechanisms, the coupled behavior of fracture displacement and fluid pressure, the interactions between pre-existing natural and initiated hydraulic fractures and the formation heterogeneity of the target reservoir. In this research, an eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) scheme is developed allowing for representation of single or multiple fracture propagations without any need for re-meshing. Also, the coupled flows through the fracture are considered in the program to account for their influence on stresses and deformations along the hydraulic fracture. In this research, a sequential coupling scheme is applied to estimate fracture aperture and fluid pressure with the XFEM. Later, the coupled XFEM program is used to estimate wellbore bottomhole pressure during fracture propagation, and the pressure variations are analyzed to determine the geometry and performance of the hydraulic fracturing as pressure leak-off test. Finally, material heterogeneity is included into the XFEM program to check the effect of random formation property distributions to the hydraulic fracture geometry. Random field theory is used to create the random realization of the material heterogeneity with the consideration of mean, standard deviation, and property correlation length. These analyses lead to probabilistic information on the response of unconventional reservoirs and offer a more scientific approach regarding risk management for the unconventional reservoir stimulation. The new stochastic approach

  4. Fracturing Fluid Leak-off for Deep Volcanic Rock in Zhungeer Basin: Mechanism and Control Method

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Bo; Cheng Hao; He Yidong; Fu Yanming

    2017-01-01

    The deep volcanic reservoir in Zhungeer Basin is buried in over 4000m depth, which is characterized by complex lithology (breccia, andesite, basalt, etc.), high elastic modulus and massive natural fractures. During hydraulic fracturing, hydraulic fracture will propagate and natural fractures will be triggered by the increasing net pressure. However, the extension of fractures, especially natural fractures, would aggravate the leak-off effect of fracturing fluid, and consequently decrease the ...

  5. Correlating Scatter in Fatigue Life with Fracture Mechanisms in Forged Ti-6242Si Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, V.; Pilchak, A. L.; Jha, S. K.; Porter, W. J.; John, R.; Larsen, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    Unlike the quasi-static mechanical properties, such as strength and ductility, fatigue life can vary significantly (by an order of magnitude or more) for nominally identical material and test conditions in many materials, including Ti-alloys. This makes life prediction and management more challenging for components that are subjected to cyclic loading in service. The differences in fracture mechanisms can cause the scatter in fatigue life. In this study, the fatigue fracture mechanisms were investigated in a forged near- α titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si, which had been tested under a condition that resulted in life variations by more than an order of magnitude. The crack-initiation and small crack growth processes, including their contributions to fatigue life variability, were elucidated via quantitative characterization of fatigue fracture surfaces. Combining the results from quantitative tilt fractography and electron backscatter diffraction, crystallography of crack-initiating and neighboring facets on the fracture surface was determined. Cracks initiated on the surface for both the shortest and the longest life specimens. The facet plane in the crack-initiating grain was aligned with the basal plane of a primary α grain for both the specimens. The facet planes in grains neighboring the crack-initiating grain were also closely aligned with the basal plane for the shortest life specimen, whereas the facet planes in the neighboring grains were significantly misoriented from the basal plane for the longest life specimen. The difference in the extent of cracking along the basal plane can explain the difference in fatigue life of specimens at the opposite ends of scatter band.

  6. Studying physical properties of deformed intact and fractured rocks by micro-scale hydro-mechanical-seismicity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziperchikolaee, Samin

    The pore pressure variation in an underground formation during hydraulic stimulation of low permeability formations or CO2 sequestration into saline aquifers can induce microseismicity due to fracture generation or pre-existing fracture activation. While the analysis of microseismic data mainly focuses on mapping the location of fractures, the seismic waves generated by the microseismic events also contain information for understanding of fracture mechanisms based on microseismic source analysis. We developed a micro-scale geomechanics, fluid-flow and seismic model that can predict transport and seismic source behavior during rock failure. This model features the incorporation of microseismic source analysis in fractured and intact rock transport properties during possible rock damage and failure. The modeling method considers comprehensive grains and cements interaction through a bonded-particle-model. As a result of grain deformation and microcrack development in the rock sample, forces and displacements in the grains involved in the bond breakage are measured to determine seismic moment tensor. In addition, geometric description of the complex pore structure is regenerated to predict fluid flow behavior of fractured samples. Numerical experiments are conducted for different intact and fractured digital rock samples, representing various mechanical behaviors of rocks and fracture surface properties, to consider their roles on seismic and transport properties of rocks during deformation. Studying rock deformation in detail provides an opportunity to understand the relationship between source mechanism of microseismic events and transport properties of damaged rocks to have a better characterizing of fluid flow behavior in subsurface formations.

  7. Study of Aging-Induced Degradation of Fracture Resistance of Alloy 617 Toward High-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya Narayan; Moitra, A.; Bhaskar, Pragna; Sasikala, G.; Dasgupta, Arup; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    For the Alloy 617, the effect of aging on the fracture energy degradation has been investigated after aging for different time periods at 1023 K (750 °C). A sharp reduction in impact energy (by 55 pct vis-à-vis the as-received material) after 1000 hours of aging, as evaluated from room-temperature Charpy impact tests, has been observed. Further aging up to 10,000 hours has led to a degradation of fracture energy up to 78 pct. Fractographic examinations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have revealed a change in fracture mode from fibrous-ductile for the un-aged material to intergranular mode for the aged one. The extent of intergranular fracture increases with the increasing aging time, indicating a tendency of the material to undergo grain boundary embrittlement over long-term aging. Analysis of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs along with selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns for the samples aged at 10,000 hours revealed finely dispersed γ' precipitates of size 30 to 40 nm, rich in Al and Ti, along with extensive precipitation of M23C6 at the grain boundaries. In addition, the presence of Ni3Si of size in the range of 110 to 120 nm also has been noticed. The extensive precipitation of M23C6 at the grain boundaries have been considered as a major reason for aging-induced embrittlement of this material.

  8. Prediction of forming limit in hydro-mechanical deep drawing of steel sheets using ductile fracture criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S.-T.; Chang, H.-J.; Oh, K. H.; Han, H. N.

    2006-04-01

    It has been observed that the forming limit curve at fracture (FLCF) of steel sheets, with a relatively higher ductility limit have linear shapes, similar to those of a bulk forming process. In contrast, the FLCF of sheets with a relatively lower ductility limit have rather complex shapes approaching the forming limit curve at neck (FLCN) towards the equi-biaxial strain paths. In this study, the FLCFs of steel sheets were measured and compared with the fracture strains predicted from specific ductile fracture criteria, including a criterion suggested by the authors, which can accurately describe FLCFs with both linear and complex shapes. To predict the forming limit for hydro-mechanical deep drawing of steel sheets, the ductile fracture criteria were integrated into a finite element simulation. The simulation, results based on the criterion suggested by authors accurately predicted the experimetal, fracture limits of steel sheets for the hydro-mechanical deep drawing process.

  9. Computational implementation of the multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model for salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koteras, J.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Multi-Mechanism Deformation (M-D) model for creep in rock salt has been used in three-dimensional computations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a potential waste, repository. These computational studies are relied upon to make key predictions about long-term behavior of the repository. Recently, the M-D model was extended to include creep-induced damage. The extended model, the Multi-Mechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, is considerably more complicated than the M-D model and required a different technology from that of the M-D model for a computational implementation

  10. The Mechanical and Fracturing of Rockburst in Tunnel and Its Acoustic Emission Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxin Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of acoustic emission (AE is associated with rock failure and rock fracturing. In order to investigate the influence of tectonic stress on rockburst in tunnel, a biaxial loading experiment system was used in this study. The excavation operation is undertaken at the center of samples to monitor the tunnel forming process in situ, and the different horizontal stresses can be studied by using the AE monitoring technique. The dynamical fracturing process of the tunnel model was summarized, and the timing parameters of AE signals in rockburst stages were obtained. The curves of AE energy and cumulative AE energy with time show a “step-like” rising trend before the occurrence of rockburst. The evolution of macro- and mesocracks is captured, and the mechanical conditions for a “V-shaped” rockburst pit are derived. As the horizontal stress increases, the effect of excavation unloading becomes more pronounced, and the damage caused by the rockburst intensifies. In the early stage of rockburst evolution, the fracturing type follows a model of tensile-shear mix model. A positive relationship between the ratio of shear fracturing type and the horizontal stress can be noted when the rock is about to burst, and the high intensity and the high energy released of from the rock-fracturing event have become evident. Thus, the results indicate that one should focus on monitoring both sides of the surrounding rock of the tunnel so as to extract the characteristics of the process of tunnel in tunnel. The applications of biaxial loading system and during an excavation operation provide a useful tool to simulate the rock burst in tunnel at an engineering site.

  11. Thermo-hydro-mechanical modelling of fractured rock masses application to radioactive wastes storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillod, E.

    1995-01-01

    This work belongs to the Decovalex project (international cooperative project for the development of coupled models and their validation against experiments in nuclear waste isolation) of thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) modeling of fractured rock massifs inside which high level radioactive waste disposal sites are simulated. The mathematical laws controlling the behaviour of the environment are resolved analytically in the case of a continuous environment (definition of an equivalent environment) and numerically if the environment is discontinuous (modeling of joints behaviour). The coupled THM models strongly influence the behaviour of a model. Modeling performed with the UDEC code shows the importance of HM couplings depending on whether the calculations are made in permanent or transient regime, and the influence of the loading path in the case of TM modeling. The geometry of fractures also influences the behaviour of the model. Studying the connexity of a fractures network allows to determine its degree of homogeneity. The comparison between two methods, continuous environment and discontinuous environment, has been carried out by determining the permeability tensor and the stress-deformation relations on fractured test-samples. It shows the differences in behaviour between an homogenized environment and a discrete environment. Finally two exercises of THM modeling of radioactive waste disposal sites illustrate the researches carried out. A far field model has permitted to compare the results obtained with calculation codes using different logics. The second model, a near field one, focusses more on the importance played by fracturing on the behaviour of the massif. The high density of the reference network has required some mathematical developments, in order to determine the representative equivalent volume (continuous approaches), and some mathematical analyses, to correctly simplify the environment (discontinuous approaches). These methods and analyses are

  12. Auckland City Hospital's Ortho-Geriatric Service: an audit of patients aged over 65 with fractured neck of femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimalasena, Bodhi; Harris, Roger

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this audit were to collect the Minimum Data Set outlined by the Australia New Zealand Hip Fracture Registry (ANZHFR), assess patient characteristics, analyse process of care, and evaluate how this compares to NICE guidelines for hip fracture care, as well as to Auckland Hospital data from 2007. Retrospective case record audit of patients with fractured neck of femur aged 65 years and over admitted under Orthopaedics over a 4-month period in 2013. Ninety-one patients were audited; mean age was 83 years, 68% were female. Both inpatient and 30-day mortality was 5%. 120-day mortality was 15%. Seventy-six percent of patients were admitted from ED within the national health target prescribed period of 6 hours. Only one patient was treated non-surgically. Eighty-six percent had surgery within 48 hours of admission. Eighty-two percent of patients had rehabilitation and treatment by Older People's Health. Of those living at home pre-fracture, 76% returned home on discharge. Thirty-seven percent of patients were able to walk unaided prior to hip fracture, but only 1% on discharge. Average overall length of stay was 22 days. Bisphosphonates were prescribed for 56% of patients. Compared to 2007, Auckland City Hospital has demonstrated a significant improvement in the rate of provision of timely surgery for hip fracture patients. Most patients are receiving the guideline recommended fracture-specific surgical interventions. The assessment and treatment of osteoporosis needs further attention.

  13. Scaphoid fractures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdobranski Đorđe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Scaphoid fractures are rare in childhood. Diagnosis is very difficult to establish because carpal bones are not fully ossified. In suspected cases comparative or delayed radiography is used, as well as computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and bone scintigraphy. Majority of scaphoid fractures are treated conservatively with good results. In case of delayed fracture healing various types of treatment are available. Objective. To determine the mechanism of injury, clinical healing process, types and outcome of treatment of scaphoid fractures in children. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed patients with traumatic closed fracture of the scaphoid bone over a ten-year period (2002-2011. The outcome of the treatment of “acute” scaphoid fracture was evaluated using the Mayo Wrist Score. Results. There were in total 34 patients, of mean age 13.8 years, with traumatic closed fracture of the scaphoid bone, whose bone growth was not finished yet. Most common injury mechanism was fall on outstretched arm - 76% of patients. During the examined period 31 children with “acute” fracture underwent conservative treatment, with average immobilization period of 51 days. Six patients were lost to follow-up. In the remaining 25 patients, after completed rehabilitation, functional results determined by the Mayo Wrist Score were excellent. Conclusion. Conservative therapy of “acute” scaphoid fractures is an acceptable treatment option for pediatric patients with excellent functional results.

  14. A New Approach to the Modeling and Analysis of Fracture through Extension of Continuum Mechanics to the Nanoscale

    KAUST Repository

    Sendova, T.; Walton, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the analysis of the partial differential equations arising from a new approach to modeling brittle fracture based on an extension of continuum mechanics to the nanoscale. It is shown that ascribing constant surface tension

  15. Bilateral iatrogenic maxillary fractures after dental treatment in two aged horses

    OpenAIRE

    Widmer, A; Fürst, A; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R; Makara, M; Geyer, H; Kummer, M

    2010-01-01

    This clinical report describes two horses with bilateral maxillary fractures following dental treatment. The fractures occurred during dental treatment by a veterinarian, and both had rostral, transverse, and complete bilateral maxillary fractures with instability and minimal displacement. The fractures were repaired using bilateral intraoral wiring with the patients under general anesthesia. The postoperative period was without complications and the fractures healed as expected. Maxillary fr...

  16. A novel Lagrangian approach for the stable numerical simulation of fault and fracture mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, Andrea; Ferronato, Massimiliano, E-mail: massimiliano.ferronato@unipd.it; Janna, Carlo; Teatini, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    The simulation of the mechanics of geological faults and fractures is of paramount importance in several applications, such as ensuring the safety of the underground storage of wastes and hydrocarbons or predicting the possible seismicity triggered by the production and injection of subsurface fluids. However, the stable numerical modeling of ground ruptures is still an open issue. The present work introduces a novel formulation based on the use of the Lagrange multipliers to prescribe the constraints on the contact surfaces. The variational formulation is modified in order to take into account the frictional work along the activated fault portion according to the principle of maximum plastic dissipation. The numerical model, developed in the framework of the Finite Element method, provides stable solutions with a fast convergence of the non-linear problem. The stabilizing properties of the proposed model are emphasized with the aid of a realistic numerical example dealing with the generation of ground fractures due to groundwater withdrawal in arid regions. - Highlights: • A numerical model is developed for the simulation of fault and fracture mechanics. • The model is implemented in the framework of the Finite Element method and with the aid of Lagrange multipliers. • The proposed formulation introduces a new contribution due to the frictional work on the portion of activated fault. • The resulting algorithm is highly non-linear as the portion of activated fault is itself unknown. • The numerical solution is validated against analytical results and proves to be stable also in realistic applications.

  17. A novel Lagrangian approach for the stable numerical simulation of fault and fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franceschini, Andrea; Ferronato, Massimiliano; Janna, Carlo; Teatini, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The simulation of the mechanics of geological faults and fractures is of paramount importance in several applications, such as ensuring the safety of the underground storage of wastes and hydrocarbons or predicting the possible seismicity triggered by the production and injection of subsurface fluids. However, the stable numerical modeling of ground ruptures is still an open issue. The present work introduces a novel formulation based on the use of the Lagrange multipliers to prescribe the constraints on the contact surfaces. The variational formulation is modified in order to take into account the frictional work along the activated fault portion according to the principle of maximum plastic dissipation. The numerical model, developed in the framework of the Finite Element method, provides stable solutions with a fast convergence of the non-linear problem. The stabilizing properties of the proposed model are emphasized with the aid of a realistic numerical example dealing with the generation of ground fractures due to groundwater withdrawal in arid regions. - Highlights: • A numerical model is developed for the simulation of fault and fracture mechanics. • The model is implemented in the framework of the Finite Element method and with the aid of Lagrange multipliers. • The proposed formulation introduces a new contribution due to the frictional work on the portion of activated fault. • The resulting algorithm is highly non-linear as the portion of activated fault is itself unknown. • The numerical solution is validated against analytical results and proves to be stable also in realistic applications.

  18. Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Water Leak-Off Process during Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The water leak-off during hydraulic fracturing in shale gas reservoirs is a complicated transport behavior involving thermal (T, hydrodynamic (H, mechanical (M and chemical (C processes. Although many leak-off models have been published, none of the models fully coupled the transient fluid flow modeling with heat transfer, chemical-potential equilibrium and natural-fracture dilation phenomena. In this paper, a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC model based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, thermo-poroelastic rock mechanics, and non-isothermal chemical-potential equations is presented to simulate the water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The THMC model takes into account a triple-porosity medium, which includes hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and shale matrix. The leak-off simulation with the THMC model involves all the important processes in this triple-porosity medium, including: (1 water transport driven by hydraulic, capillary, chemical and thermal osmotic convections; (2 gas transport induced by both hydraulic pressure driven convection and adsorption; (3 heat transport driven by thermal convection and conduction; and (4 natural-fracture dilation considered as a thermo-poroelastic rock deformation. The fluid and heat transport, coupled with rock deformation, are described by a set of partial differential equations resulting from the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The semi-implicit finite-difference algorithm is proposed to solve these equations. The evolution of pressure, temperature, saturation and salinity profiles of hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and matrix is calculated, revealing the multi-field coupled water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The influences of hydraulic pressure, natural-fracture dilation, chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis on water leak-off are investigated. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of the

  19. Plastic fracture mechanics prediction of fracture instability in a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending - 1. J-integral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-11-01

    A method of evaluating the J-integral for a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending is proposed. The method allows a J-resistance curve to be evaluated directly from the load-displacement record obtained in a pipe fracture experiment. It permits an analysis for fracture instability in a circumferential crack growth using a J-resistance curve and the tearing modulus parameter. The influence of the system compliance on fracture instability is discussed in conjunction with the latter application. The importance of using a J-resistance curve that is consistent with the type of constraint for a given application is emphasized. The possibility of a pipe fracture emanating from a stress corrosion crack in the heat-affected zones of girth-welds in Type 304 stainless steel pipes was investigated. The J-resistance curve was employed. A pipe fracture experiment was performed using a spring-loaded four-point bending system that simulated an 8.8-m long section of unsupported 102-mm-dia pipe. An initial through-wall crack of length equal to 104 mm was used. Fracture instability was predicted to occur between 15.2 and 22.1 mm of stable crack growth at each tip. In the actual experiment, the onset of fracture instability occurred beyond maximum load at an average stable crack growth of 11.7 to 19 mm at each tip. 24 refs.

  20. Plastic fracture mechanics prediction of fracture instability in a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending - 1. J-integral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    A method of evaluating the J-integral for a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending is proposed. The method allows a J-resistance curve to be evaluated directly from the load-displacement record obtained in a pipe fracture experiment. It permits an analysis for fracture instability in a circumferential crack growth using a J-resistance curve and the tearing modulus parameter. The influence of the system compliance on fracture instability is discussed in conjunction with the latter application. The importance of using a J-resistance curve that is consistent with the type of constraint for a given application is emphasized. The possibility of a pipe fracture emanating from a stress corrosion crack in the heat-affected zones of girth-welds in Type 304 stainless steel pipes was investigated. The J-resistance curve was employed. A pipe fracture experiment was performed using a spring-loaded four-point bending system that simulated an 8.8-m long section of unsupported 102-mm-dia pipe. An initial through-wall crack of length equal to 104 mm was used. Fracture instability was predicted to occur between 15.2 and 22.1 mm of stable crack growth at each tip. In the actual experiment, the onset of fracture instability occurred beyond maximum load at an average stable crack growth of 11.7 to 19 mm at each tip. 24 refs

  1. Additional Stress And Fracture Mechanics Analyses Of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  2. Trochanteric fractures. Classification and mechanical stability in McLaughlin, Ender and Richard osteosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrlin, K.; Stroemberg, T.; Lidgren, L.; Walloee, A.; Pettersson, H.

    Four hundred and thirty trochanteric factures operated upon with McLaughlin, Ender or Richard's osteosynthesis were divided into 6 different types based on their radiographic appearance before and immediately after reposition with special reference to the medial cortical support. A significant correlation was found between the fracture type and subsequent mechanical complications where types 1 and 2 gave less, and types 4 and 5 more complications. A comparison of the various osteosyntheses showed that Richard's had significantly fewer complications than either the Ender or McLaughlin types. For Richard's osteosynthesis alone no correlation to fracture type could be made because of the small number of complications in this group.

  3. A novel Lagrangian approach for the stable numerical simulation of fault and fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Andrea; Ferronato, Massimiliano; Janna, Carlo; Teatini, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    The simulation of the mechanics of geological faults and fractures is of paramount importance in several applications, such as ensuring the safety of the underground storage of wastes and hydrocarbons or predicting the possible seismicity triggered by the production and injection of subsurface fluids. However, the stable numerical modeling of ground ruptures is still an open issue. The present work introduces a novel formulation based on the use of the Lagrange multipliers to prescribe the constraints on the contact surfaces. The variational formulation is modified in order to take into account the frictional work along the activated fault portion according to the principle of maximum plastic dissipation. The numerical model, developed in the framework of the Finite Element method, provides stable solutions with a fast convergence of the non-linear problem. The stabilizing properties of the proposed model are emphasized with the aid of a realistic numerical example dealing with the generation of ground fractures due to groundwater withdrawal in arid regions.

  4. Probabilistic Fatigue Life Prediction of Bridge Cables Based on Multiscaling and Mesoscopic Fracture Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiang Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue fracture of bridge stay-cables is usually a multiscale process as the crack grows from micro-scale to macro-scale. Such a process, however, is highly uncertain. In order to make a rational prediction of the residual life of bridge cables, a probabilistic fatigue approach is proposed, based on a comprehensive vehicle load model, finite element analysis and multiscaling and mesoscopic fracture mechanics. Uncertainties in both material properties and external loads are considered. The proposed method is demonstrated through the fatigue life prediction of cables of the Runyang Cable-Stayed Bridge in China, and it is found that cables along the bridge spans may have significantly different fatigue lives, and due to the variability, some of them may have shorter lives than those as expected from the design.

  5. Isolated rib fractures in geriatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Elmistekawy, Elsayed M.; Hammad, Abd Almohsen M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of this study was to investigate the short-term outcomes in patients older than 60 years with isolated rib fractures and admitted to emergency hospital. Materials and Methods: This study included patients who were 60 years old or more and sustained blunt chest injury and had isolated rib fractures. The following data were obtained from the medical records: age, gender, number of fracture ribs, side of fracture ribs, mechanism and nature of injury, preexisting medical...

  6. Tracing ancient hydrogeological fracture network age and compartmentalisation using noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Oliver; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Fellowes, Jonathan; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; McDermott, Jill M.; Holland, Greg; Mabry, Jennifer C.; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2018-02-01

    We show that fluid volumes residing within the Precambrian crystalline basement account for ca 30% of the total groundwater inventory of the Earth (> 30 million km3). The residence times and scientific importance of this groundwater are only now receiving attention with ancient fracture fluids identified in Canada and South Africa showing: (1) microbial life which has existed in isolation for millions of years; (2) significant hydrogen and hydrocarbon production via water-rock reactions; and (3) preserving noble gas components from the early atmosphere. Noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) abundance and isotopic compositions provide the primary evidence for fluid mean residence time (MRT). Here we extend the noble gas data from the Kidd Creek Mine in Timmins Ontario Canada, a volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit formed at 2.7 Ga, in which fracture fluids with MRTs of 1.1-1.7 Ga were identified at 2.4 km depth (Holland et al., 2013); to fracture fluids at 2.9 km depth. We compare here the Kidd Creek Mine study with noble gas compositions determined in fracture fluids taken from two mines (Mine 1 & Mine 2) at 1.7 and 1.4 km depth below surface in the Sudbury Basin formed by a meteorite impact at 1.849 Ga. The 2.9 km samples at Kidd Creek Mine show the highest radiogenic isotopic ratios observed to date in free fluids (e.g. 21Ne/22Ne = 0.6 and 40Ar/36Ar = 102,000) and have MRTs of 1.0-2.2 Ga. In contrast, resampled 2.4 km fluids indicated a less ancient MRT (0.2-0.6 Ga) compared with the previous study (1.1-1.7 Ga). This is consistent with a change in the age distribution of fluids feeding the fractures as they drain, with a decreasing proportion of the most ancient end-member fluids. 129Xe/136Xe ratios for these fluids confirm that boreholes at 2.4 km versus 2.9 km are sourced from hydrogeologically distinct systems. In contrast, results for the Sudbury mines have MRTs of 0.2-0.6 and 0.2-0.9 Ga for Mines 1 and 2 respectively. While still old compared to almost all

  7. National trends of incidence, treatment, and hospital charges of isolated C-2 fractures in three different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Sunil; Kalakoti, Piyush; Murray, Richard; Nixon, Menarvia; Missios, Symeon; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2015-04-01

    Incidence of C-2 fracture is increasing in elderly patients. Patient age also influences decision making in the management of these fractures. There are very limited data on the national trends of incidence, treatment interventions, and resource utilization in patients in different age groups with isolated C-2 fractures. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence, treatment, complications, length of stay, and hospital charges of isolated C-2 fracture in patients in 3 different age groups by using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. The data were obtained from NIS from 2002 to 2011. Data on patients with closed fractures of C-2 without spinal cord injury were extracted using ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 805.02. Patients with isolated C-2 fractures were identified by excluding patients with other associated injuries. The cohort was divided into 3 age groups: 80 years. Incidence, treatment characteristics, inpatient/postoperative complications, and hospital charges (mean and total annual charges) were compared between the 3 age groups. A total of 10,336 patients with isolated C-2 fractures were identified. The majority of the patients were in the very elderly age group (> 80 years; 42.3%) followed by 29.7% in the 65- to 80-year age group and 28% in age group. From 2002 to 2011, the incidence of hospitalization significantly increased in the 65- to 80-year and > 80-year age groups (p age group (p = 0.287). Overall, 21% of the patients were treated surgically, and 12.2% of the patients underwent nonoperative interventions (halo and spinal traction). The rate of nonoperative interventions significantly decreased over time in all age groups (p age groups had a greater risk of inpatient/postoperative complications, nonroutine discharges, and longer hospitalization. The mean hospital charges were significantly higher in older age groups (p age groups. Simultaneously, there has been a steadily decreasing trend in the preference for nonoperative

  8. Racing performance after arthroscopic removal of apical sesamoid fracture fragments in Thoroughbred horses age < 2 years: 151 cases (1989--2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, L V; Bramlage, L R; Mohammed, H O; Embertson, R M; Ruggles, A J; Hopper, S A

    2007-01-01

    Studies on arthroscopic removal of apical proximal sesamoid fracture fragments in Thoroughbred (TB) horses age > or = 2 years have reported a high success rate. However, there are no reports documenting the racing prognosis of TB horses that undergo such surgery as weanlings or yearlings. To describe the incidence of apical proximal sesamoid fractures in immature TB horses, age fractures in 151 TB weanlings and yearlings. The medical records of TB horses age fracture fragments were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained from race records. Student's t tests were used to compare performance variables of operated racehorses to that of their maternal siblings. Ninety-two percent (139/151) of fractures occurred in the hindlimbs and 8% (11/151) in the forelimbs (fracture of both fore- and hindlimb, n = 1). Horses with forelimb fractures had a greatly reduced probability of racing (55%) compared to those with hindlimb fractures (86%). Overall, 84% of the horses raced post operatively and had performance records similar to that of their maternal siblings, 78% (787/1006) of which raced. Arthroscopic removal of apical proximal sesamoid fracture fragments in TB weanlings and yearlings carries an excellent prognosis for racing in horses with hindlimb fractures and a reduced prognosis in those with forelimb fractures. Medial fractures of the forelimb carry the worst prognosis. The determination of prognosis increases knowledge on apical sesamoid bone fractures and potential for arthroscopic restoration of the ability to race; and enables the value of yearlings for subsequent sale to be established.

  9. A rock mechanics study of fracture zone 2 at the Finnsjoen site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leijon, B.; Ljunggren, C.

    1992-01-01

    Comprehensive field investigations at the Finnsjoen study site have revealed a subhorizontal zone, termed Zone 2, that exhibits anomalous characteristics in terms of high hydraulic conductivity, governing the groundwater transport pattern on a regional scale. The present study provides an assessment of the characteristics of Zone 2. Thus, estimates of the deformational characteristics of the zone, based on available borehole information, show that the zone forms a diffuse and rather moderate mechanical contrast to the surrounding bedrock. As also verified by stress measurement results, major stress anomalies attributable to the zone are therefore not to be expected. Bound estimates of stress conditions during periods of glaciation and deglaciation are also derived, and possible impacts of these loadings on the fracture zone are discussed. It is concluded that glaciation represents stable conditions, whilst the complex loading mechanisms encountered during deglaciation may trigger reactivation of structures at shallow depth. Taking the above results as an example, implications of a feature like Zone 2 on the integrity of a hypothetical repository are discussed in more general terms. Considering the likely spatial extension of the mechanical disturbances related to the repository excavations and the fracture zone respectively, it is suggested that a mutual distance of the order of one hundred metres is sufficient to avoid mechanical interaction. (au)

  10. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to reactor pressure vessel safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, V.; Pitner, P.

    1995-06-01

    Among all the components of a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear power plant, the reactor vessel is of major importance for safety. The integrity of this structure must be guaranteed in all circumstances, even in the case of the most severe accidents, and its mechanical state can be decisive for the lifetime of the plant. The brittle rupture would be the most important of all potential hazards if the irradiation effects were not consistent with predictions. The interest of having a reliable and precise method of evaluating the available safety margins and the integrity of this component led Electricite de France (EDF) to carry out a probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. The probabilistic model developed by integration of the uncertainties in the usual fracture mechanics equations is presented. A special focus is made on the problem of coupling thermo-mechanical finite element calculations and reliability analysis. The use of a finite element code can be associated with prohibitive computation times when it is invoked numerous times during simulations sequences or complex iterative procedures. The response surface method is used. It provides an approximation of the response from a reduced number of original data. The global approach is illustrated on an example corresponding to a specific accidental transient. A validation of the obtained results is also carried out through the comparison with an equivalent model without coupling. (author)

  11. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seok Woo; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Lee, Hyun-Wook; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Ryu, Ill; /Brown U.; Nix, William D.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Gao, Huajian; /Brown U.; Cui, Yi; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2015-06-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Herein, we demonstrate physical/mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515. SLAC-PUB-16300 2 lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high performance Li-ion batteries.

  12. Mechanical properties and microstructure of long term thermal aged WWER 440 RPV steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolluri, M., E-mail: kolluri@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kryukov, A. [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, 107140 Moscow (Russian Federation); Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hähner, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Petrosyan, V. [Armenian Scientific Research Institute for Nuclear Plant Operation (ARMATOM), 0027 Yerevan (Armenia); Sevikyan, G. [Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP), 0911, Metsamor, Armavir Marz (Armenia); Szaraz, Z. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-04-01

    The integrity assessment of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is essential for the safe and Long Term Operation (LTO) of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Hardening and embrittlement of RPV caused by neutron irradiation and thermal ageing are main reasons for mechanical properties degradation during the operation of an NPP. The thermal ageing-induced degradation of RPV steels becomes more significant with extended operational lives of NPPs. Consequently, the evaluation of thermal ageing effects is important for the structural integrity assessments required for the lifetime extension of NPPs. As a part of NRG's research programme on Structural Materials for safe-LTO of Light Water Reactor (LWR) RPVs, WWER-440 surveillance specimens, which have been thermal aged for 27 years (∼200,000 h) at 290 °C in a surveillance channel of Armenian-NPP, are investigated. Results from the mechanical and microstructural examination of these thermal aged specimens are presented in this article. The results indicate the absence of significant long term thermal ageing effect of 15Cr2MoV-A steel. No age hardening was detected in aged tensile specimens compared with the as-received condition. There is no difference between the impact properties of as-received and thermal aged weld metals. The upper shelf energy of the aged steel remains the same as for the as-received material at a rather high level of about 120 J. The T{sub 41} value did not change and was found to be about 10 °C. The microstructure of thermal aged weld, consisting carbides, carbonitrides and manganese-silicon inclusions, did not change significantly compared to as-received state. Grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus in long term aged weld is not significant either which has been confirmed by the absence of intergranular fracture increase in the weld. Negligible hardening and embrittlement observed after such long term thermal ageing is attributed to the optimum chemical composition of 15Cr2MoV-A for high

  13. The Pellini test as a brittle fracture criterion for components and for the determination of the application limits of fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, H.D.

    1976-01-01

    Linear-elastic fracture mechanics have made it possible to make the brittle behaviour of cracks in components accessible for a description. The concepts envisaging an extension to yield point mechanics as well, which would allow the behaviour of cracks with large plastic deformations at the tip of the crack to be described, are at present not perfected enough yet to be applied in practice. The Pellini concept with its semi-quantitative statements closes at present this gap. (orig./RW) [de

  14. Consideration on the Mechanism of Microwave Emission Due to Rock Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tadashi; Sugita, Seiji; Yoshida, Shingo; Maeda, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Microwave emission due to rock fracture was found at 300 MHz, 2 GHz, and 22 GHz, and its power was calibrated in laboratory for the first time in the world. The observed waveform is impulsive, and contains correspondent frequency component inside the envelope at each frequency band. At such high frequencies, the electro-magnetic signal power can be calibrated as a radiating wave with high accuracy. Accordingly, it was verified that a substantial power is emitted. The microwave emission phenomena were also observed on occasions of hypervelocity impact, and esteemed as phenomena generally associated with material destruction. Earthquakes and volcanic activities are association with rock fractures so that the microwave is expected to be emitted. Actually, the e emission was confirmed by the data analysis of the brightness temperature obtained by a remote sensing satellite, which flew over great earthquakes of Wuenchan and Sumatra, and great volcanic eruptions of Reventador and Chanten. It is important to show the microwave emission during rock fracture in natural phenomena. Therefore, the field test to detect the microwave due to the collapse of a crater cliff was planned and persecuted at the volcano of Miyake-jima about 100 km south of Tokyo. Volcanic activity may be more convenient than an earthquake because of the known location and time. As a result, they observed the microwave emission which was strongly correlated with the cliff collapses. Despite of the above-mentioned phenomenological fruits, the reason of the microwave emission is not fixed yet. We have investigated the mechanism of the emission in consideration of the obtained data in rock fracture experiments so far and the study results on material destruction by hypervelocity impact. This paper presents the proposal of the hypothesis and resultant discussions. The microwave sensors may be useful to monitor natural hazards such as an earthquake or a volcanic eruption, because the microwave due to rock

  15. Fracture mechanics behavior of a Ni-Fe superalloy sheath for superconducting fusion magnets. Pt. 1. Property measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobler, R.L.; Hwang, I.S.; Steeves, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.2 see ibid., p.269-79 (1997). A seamless extruded conduit for superconductor cabling was fabricated and subjected to mechanical tests. The conduit is made of a nickel-iron alloy having aging and thermal contraction characteristics comparable with Nb 3 Sn conductors. The conduit in liquid helium at 4 K retains its ductility and offers high strength, toughness, and fatigue resistance. Specimens with surface cracks in tension offer substantial fracture resistance for the practical case of crack propagation in the through-wall direction. Fatigue tests indicate that surface cracks adopt a nearly semicircular shape as they grow through the conduit wall (L-S orientation) at rates in the power-law region that are no faster than rates in the transverse direction (L-T orientation). The serviceability of this material is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Fracture Mechanisms of Zirconium Diboride Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics under Pulse Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Bragov, Anatolii M.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.; Lomunov, Andrei K.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Vaganova, Irina K.

    2015-06-01

    Mechanisms of failure in ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTC) based on zirconium diboride under pulse loading were studied experimentally by the method of SHPB and theoretically using the multiscale simulation method. The obtained experimental and numerical data are evidence of the quasi-brittle fracture character of nanostructured zirconium diboride ceramics under compression and tension at high strain rates and the room temperatures. Damage of nanostructured porous zirconium diboride -based UHTC can be formed under stress pulse amplitude below the Hugoniot elastic limit. Fracture of nanostructured ultra-high temperature ceramics under pulse and shock-wave loadings is provided by fast processes of intercrystalline brittle fracture and relatively slow processes of quasi-brittle failure via growth and coalescence of microcracks. A decrease of the shear strength can be caused by nano-voids clusters in vicinity of triple junctions between ceramic matrix grains and ultrafine-grained ceramics. This research was supported by grants from ``The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program'' and also N. I. Lobachevski State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Grant of post graduate mobility).

  17. Mechanical Property Measurements and Fracture Propagation Analysis of Longmaxi Shale by Micro-CT Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyue Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and fracture propagation of Longmaxi shale loading under uniaxial compression were measured using eight cylindrical shale specimens (4 mm in diameter and 8 mm in height, with the bedding plane oriented at 0° and 90° to the axial loading direction, respectively, by micro computed tomography (micro-CT. Based on the reconstructed three-dimensional (3-D CT images of cracks, different stages of the crack growth process in the 0° and 90° orientation specimen were revealed. The initial crack generally occurred at relatively smaller loading force in the 0° bedding direction specimen, mainly in the form of tensile splitting along weak bedding planes. Shear sliding fractures were dominant in the specimens oriented at 90°, with a small number of parallel cracks occurring on the bedding plane. The average thickness and volume of cracks in the 90° specimen is higher than those for the specimen oriented at 0°. The geometrical characterization of fractures segmented from CT scan binary images shows that a specific surface area correlates with tortuosity at the different load stages of each specimen. The 3-D box-counting dimension (BCD calculations can accurately reflect crack evolution law in the shale. The results indicate that the cracks have a more complex pattern and rough surface at an orientation of 90°, due to crossed secondary cracks and shear failure.

  18. Low-temperature embrittlement and fracture of metals with different crystal lattices – Dislocation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Chernov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of a low-temperature embrittlement (cold brittleness and dislocation mechanisms for formation of the temperature of a ductile-brittle transition and brittle fracture of metals (mono- and polycrystals with various crystal lattices (BCC, FCC, HCP are considered. The conditions for their formation connected with a stress-deformed state and strength (low temperature yield strength as well as the fracture breaking stress and mobility of dislocations in the top of a crack of the fractured metal are determined. These conditions can be met for BCC and some HCP metals in the initial state (without irradiation and after a low-temperature damaging (neutron irradiation. These conditions are not met for FCC and many HCP metals. In the process of the damaging (neutron irradiation such conditions are not met also and the state of low-temperature embrittlement of metals is absent (suppressed due to arising various radiation dynamic processes, which increase the mobility of dislocations and worsen the strength characteristics.

  19. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to the reliability analysis of pressure-bearing reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, W.; Roehrich, E.; Wellein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Since no failures in the primary reactor components have been reported so far, it is impossible to estimate the failure probability of those components just by means of statistics. Therefore the way of probabilistic fracture mechanics has been proposed. Here the material properties, the loads and the crack distributions are treated as statistical variables with certain distributions. From the distributions of these data probability density functions can be established for the loading of a component (e.g. the stress intensity factor) as well as for the resistance of this component (e.g. the fracture toughness). From these functions the failure probability for a given failure mode (e.g. brittle fracture) is easily obtained either by the application of direct integration procedures which are shortly reviewed here, or by the use of Monte Carlo techniques. The most important part of the concept is the collection of a sufficiently large amount of raw data from different sources (departments within the company or external). These data need to be processed so that they can be transformed into probability density functions. The method of data collection and processing in terms of histograms, plots of probability density functions etc, is described. The choice of the various types of distribution functions is discussed. As an example the derivation of the probability density function for cracks of a given size in a component is presented. (Auth.)

  20. Hip Fractures in Long-Term Care: Is the Excess Explained by the Age and Gender Distribution of the Residents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Crilly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study compares hip fracture rates in Long Term Care (LTC residents with those in the community to determine if their high rate of fracturing reflects the extreme age and predominantly female nature of that population. Methods. Hospital discharge data in London Ontario (population 350,000 and Statistics Canada data were used to correct the hip fracture rate in the LTC setting for age and gender. Results. The risk of hip fracture is 1.8 times greater in LTC than in the community for people of similar age and gender. The rate in women is 1.5 times higher whereas in men it is 4.3 times higher. In the oldest residents, the risk in men exceeds that of women in LTC. Conclusion. The high hip fracture rate in LTC is not just a reflection of the age and predominantly female nature of this population. The oldest men in LTC are a particularly high risk group, deserving more attention.

  1. Effect of Birth Cohort on Risk of Hip Fracture: Age-Specific Incidence Rates in the Framingham Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yuqing; Kiel, Douglas P.; Hannan, Marian T.; Felson, David T.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined the effect of birth cohort on incidence rates of hip fracture among women and men in the Framingham Study. Methods. Age-specific incidence rates of first hip fracture were presented according to tertile of year of birth for 5209 participants of the Framingham Study, a population-based cohort followed since 1948. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios were calculated by Cox regression to assess the relation between birth cohort and hip fracture incidence. Results. An increasing trend in hip fracture incidence rates was observed with year of birth for women (trend, P = .05) and men (trend, P = .03). Relative to those born from 1887 to 1900 (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.0), age-specific incidence rates were greatest in the most recent birth cohort, born from 1911 to 1921 (IRR = 1.4 for women, IRR = 2.0 for men), and intermediate in those born from 1901 to 1910 (IRR = 1.2 for women, IRR = 1.5 for men). Conclusions. Results suggest risk of hip fracture is increasing for successive birth cohorts. Projections that fail to account for the increase in rates associated with birth cohort underestimate the future public health impact of hip fracture in the United States. PMID:11988460

  2. Treatment of femur fractures in young children: a multicenter comparison of flexible intramedullary nails to spica casting in young children aged 2 to 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Gordon, J Eric; Sabatini, Coleen S; Keeler, Kathryn A; Lehmann, Charles L; O'Donnell, June C; Seehausen, Derek A; Luhmann, Scott J; Arkader, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Spica casting is the standard of care for femur fractures in children up to 6 years of age. The indications for surgery are controversial. We sought to compare immediate spica casting (Spica) and flexible intramedullary nailing [titanium elastic nailing (TEN)] in a group of children ages 2 to 6 years. We hypothesized that young children can be successfully treated with flexible nails, resulting in faster return to ambulation and an equivalent complication rate when compared with spica casting. This was a multicenter retrospective review of 215 patients, 141 treated with immediate spica casting, and 74 treated with elastic nails. Patient demographics, fracture characteristics, mechanism of injury, associated injuries, outcomes, and complications were recorded and compared between the 2 groups. Patients in the elastic nailing group were more likely to be injured as a pedestrian struck by an automobile (Spica 8% vs. TEN 26%, P=0.001), and had increased rates of associated injuries (Pcasting with shorter time to independent ambulation and full activities. Fractures associated with a high-energy mechanism are especially appropriate for consideration of treatment with TEN. Level III, this was a retrospective comparative study.

  3. Colloid and radionuclide retention mechanisms in fractured rock under near-natural flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delos, A.; Schaefer, T.; Geckeis, H.; Guimera, J.; Carrera, J.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Experiments in fractured host rock (Grimsel Test Site, GTS, Switzerland) revealed that the colloid relevance for actinide migration is high due to the specific geochemical groundwater conditions [1]. However, even under such conditions it is found that retention of colloids and colloid-borne actinides becomes significant under near-natural groundwater flow rates (1-10 m/a) [2]. Underlying mechanisms of colloid and radionuclide retention are not well understood up to now. The present study co-funded by the NoE ACTINET-6 focuses on (i) the kinetics of actinide-colloid interactions and (ii) the relevance of matrix diffusion as a competition process to other retention mechanisms which affect the actinides behavior in fractured rock systems such as the Grimsel granodiorite. Colloid migration is studied with well defined model colloids as e.g. fluorescence dyed carboxylated polystyrene particles, and natural colloids extracted from bentonite (FEBEX) and from fracture filling material (GTS). In order to study the influence of matrix porosity on actinides migration, those experiments are performed in columns of well defined geometry filled with microporous unmodified silica spheres, porous ceramic material and natural fracture filling material from the GTS. The behaviour of actinides (Pu(IV) and Am(III)) sorbed onto bentonite colloids is investigated in column and batch experiments. All experiments are performed under anoxic conditions. Colloid characterization methods used in this study include the combination of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD), fluorimetry and field flow fractionation (FFF). Experimental results and their application to the parametrisation of reactive colloid transport models are discussed. [1] Geckeis H, Schaefer T, Hauser W, Rabung T, Missana T, Degueldre C, Moeri A, Eikenberg J, Fierz T, Alexander WR (2004) Results of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retention experiment

  4. Variation of mechanical properties due to hygrothermal ageing and permanent changes upon redrying in clay/epoxy nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamim, Salah Uddin Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    Epoxy polymers are an important class of material for use in various applications. Due to their hydrophilic nature, epoxy resins tend to absorb moisture. Absorption of moisture degrades the functional, structural and mechanical properties. For polymers, moisture absorption can lead to both reversible and irreversible changes. In this study, the combined effect of moisture and elevated temperature on the mechanical properties of Epon 862 and its nanocomposites were investigated. The extent of permanent damage on fracture toughness and flexural properties of epoxy, due to the aggressive degradation provided by hygrothermal ageing, was determined by drying the epoxy and their clay/epoxy nanocomposites after moisture absorption. From the investigation it was found out that, clay can help in reducing the negative effect of hygrothermal ageing. Significant permanent damage was observed for fracture toughness and modulus, while the extent of permanent damage was less significant for flexural strength. Failure mechanism of this nanocomposites were studied by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  5. The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics to thermally stressed welded components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1981-01-01

    Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics techniques are applied to components constructed from brittle materials and operating at low or ambient temperatures. It is argued that these techniques can justifiably be applied to components at high temperature provided that stresses are thermally induced, self-equilibrating and cyclic. Such loading conditions occur for example in an LMFBR and a simple welded detail containing a crevice is taken as an example. Theoretical and experimental estimates of crack growth in this component are compared and good agreement is shown. (author)

  6. Testing smooth and notched samples for identification of brittle material fracture mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barinov, S.M.; Ivanov, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanical tests of cermet made of LaCrO 3 and Cr powder mixture in 3:2 mass ratio were conducted in LaCrO 3 -Cr system. Powder mixtures were exposed to static pressing and sintering (sintered cermets) or to high-speed pressing with following thermal treatment (high-speed pressing cermets). It is shown, that nonlinear deformation strength at deformation of brittle material smooth and notched samples allows to evaluate properly correlation of microplasticity and microcracking at brittle powder materials fracture

  7. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  8. Adaptation of OCA-P, a probabilistic fracture-mechanics code, to a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.G.; Cheverton, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    The OCA-P probabilistic fracture-mechanics code can now be executed on a personal computer with 512 kilobytes of memory, a math coprocessor, and a hard disk. A user's guide for the particular adaptation has been prepared, and additional importance sampling techniques for OCA-P have been developed that allow the sampling of only the tails of selected distributions. Features have also been added to OCA-P that permit RTNDT to be used as an ''independent'' variable in the calculation of P

  9. The Fracture Mechanical Markov Chain Fatigue Model Compared with Empirical Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gansted, L.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    The applicability of the FMF-model (Fracture Mechanical Markov Chain Fatigue Model) introduced in Gansted, L., R. Brincker and L. Pilegaard Hansen (1991) is tested by simulations and compared with empirical data. Two sets of data have been used, the Virkler data (aluminium alloy) and data...... established at the Laboratory of Structural Engineering at Aalborg University, the AUC-data, (mild steel). The model, which is based on the assumption, that the crack propagation process can be described by a discrete Space Markov theory, is applicable to constant as well as random loading. It is shown...

  10. Three-dimensional elastic--plastic stress and strain analyses for fracture mechanics: complex geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellucci, H.J.

    1975-11-01

    The report describes the continuation of research into capability for three-dimensional elastic-plastic stress and strain analysis for fracture mechanics. A computer program, MARC-3D, has been completed and was used to analyze a cylindrical pressure vessel with a nozzle insert. A method for generating crack tip elements was developed and a model was created for a cylindrical pressure vessel with a nozzle and an imbedded flaw at the inside nozzle corner. The MARC-3D program was again used to analyze this flawed model. Documentation for the use of the MARC-3D computer program has been included as an appendix

  11. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to optimize the maintenance of PWR steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, P.; Riffard, T.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes the COMPROMIS code developed by Electricite de France (EDF) to optimize the tube bundle maintenance of steam generators (SG). The model, based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, makes it possible to quantify the influence of in-service inspections and maintenance work on the risk of an SG tube rupture, taking all significant parameters into account as random variables (initial defect size distribution, reliability of nondestructive detection and sizing, crack initiation and propagation, critical sizes, leak before risk of break, etc). (authors). 14 figs., 4 tabs., 12 refs

  12. Fracture mechanical analysis of relevant transients in the pressure vessel of Atucha I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saavedra, Fernando M.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of the applied stress intensity factor K I for 10 relevant transients of the nuclear power station Atucha I obtained from thermohydraulic data is analyzed according to the methodology proposed in Section XI of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Vast knowledge was thus obtained about basic concepts of fracture mechanics and its application to remanent life of nuclear components. Basic knowledge which commands the performance of nuclear power stations was also obtained, especially that related to the Atucha I utility [es

  13. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to estimate the risk of rupture of PWR steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, P.; Riffard, T.; Granger, B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the COMPROMIS code developed by Electricite de France (EDF) to optimize the tube bundle maintenance of steam generators. The model, based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, makes it possible to quantify the influence of in-service inspections and maintenance work on the risk of an SG tube rupture, taking all significant parameters into account as random variables (initial defect size distribution, reliability of non-destructive detection and sizing, crack initiation and propagation, critical sizes, leak before risk of break, etc.). (authors). 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Twenty years of fracture mechanics and flaw evaluation applications in the ASME Nuclear Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardella, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a retrospective on the development and applications of fracture mechanics-based toughness requirements and flaw evaluation methodology in Sections III and XI of the ASME Code. Section III developments range from the rules and requirements for thick section Class 1 pressure vessels to thinner section components in other Classes. Section XI applications include flaw acceptance standards and evaluation methodology for various components ranging from pressure vessels to thins section piping of carbon and austenitic steels. The experience gained in operating plant applications of these rules and procedures are also discussed

  15. Integrity evaluation of power plant components by fracture mechanics and related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.; Vanderglas, M.L.; Davies, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    Power plant components can be subject to unexpected failures with serious consequences, unless careful attention is paid to minute crack defects and their possible growth. The Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics approach to structural integrity evaluation, as it appears in the ASME Code, is discussed. Projects related to material data generation and the development of structural analysis methods to make the above method usable are described. Several integrity-related questions outside the scope of the Code guidelines are documented, concluding with comments on possible future developments

  16. Strength and fracture mechanism of iron reinforced tricalcium phosphate cermet fabricated by spark plasma sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Serhii; Horynová, Miroslava; Casas-Luna, Mariano; Diaz-de-la-Torre, Sebastian; Dvořák, Karel; Celko, Ladislav; Kaiser, Jozef; Montufar, Edgar B

    2018-05-01

    The present work studies the microstructure and mechanical performance of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) based cermet toughened by iron particles. A novelty arises by the employment of spark plasma sintering for fabrication of the cermet. Results showed partial transformation of initial alpha TCP matrix to beta phase and the absence of oxidation of iron particles, as well as a lack of chemical reaction between TCP and iron components during sintering. The values of compressive and tensile strength of TCP/Fe cermet were 3.2 and 2.5 times, respectively, greater than those of monolithic TCP. Fracture analysis revealed the simultaneous action of crack-bridging and crack-deflection microstructural toughening mechanisms under compression. In contrast, under tension the reinforcing mechanism was only crack-bridging, being the reason for smaller increment of strength. Elastic properties of the cermet better matched values reported for human cortical bone. Thereby the new TCP/Fe cermet has potential for eventual use as a material for bone fractures fixation under load-bearing conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Refinement and fracture mechanisms of as-cast QT700-6 alloy by alloying method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-qiang Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The as-cast QT700-6 alloy was synthesized with addition of a certain amount of copper, nickel, niobium and stannum elements by alloying method in a medium frequency induction furnace, aiming at improving its strength and toughness. Microstructures of the as-cast QT700-6 alloy were observed using a scanning-electron microscope (SEM and the mechanical properties were investigated using a universal tensile test machine. Results indicate that the ratio of pearlite/ferrite is about 9:1 and the graphite size is less than 40 μm in diameter in the as-cast QT700-6 alloy. The predominant refinement mechanism is attributed to the formation of niobium carbides, which increases the heterogeneous nucleus and hinders the growth of graphite. Meanwhile, niobium carbides also exist around the grain boundaries, which improve the strength of the ductile iron. The tensile strength and elongation of the as-cast QT700-6 alloy reach over 700 MPa and 6%, respectively, when the addition amount of niobium is 0.8%. The addition of copper and nickel elements contributed to the decrease of eutectoid transformation temperature, resulting in the decrease of pearlite lamellar spacing (about 248 nm, which is also beneficial to enhancing the tensile strength. The main fracture mechanism is cleavage fracture with the appearance of a small amount of dimples.

  18. Modeling and additive manufacturing of bio-inspired composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, Leon S; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-07-07

    Flaws, imperfections and cracks are ubiquitous in material systems and are commonly the catalysts of catastrophic material failure. As stresses and strains tend to concentrate around cracks and imperfections, structures tend to fail far before large regions of material have ever been subjected to significant loading. Therefore, a major challenge in material design is to engineer systems that perform on par with pristine structures despite the presence of imperfections. In this work we integrate knowledge of biological systems with computational modeling and state of the art additive manufacturing to synthesize advanced composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties. Supported by extensive mesoscale computer simulations, we demonstrate the design and manufacturing of composites that exhibit deformation mechanisms characteristic of pristine systems, featuring flaw-tolerant properties. We analyze the results by directly comparing strain fields for the synthesized composites, obtained through digital image correlation (DIC), and the computationally tested composites. Moreover, we plot Ashby diagrams for the range of simulated and experimental composites. Our findings show good agreement between simulation and experiment, confirming that the proposed mechanisms have a significant potential for vastly improving the fracture response of composite materials. We elucidate the role of stiffness ratio variations of composite constituents as an important feature in determining the composite properties. Moreover, our work validates the predictive ability of our models, presenting them as useful tools for guiding further material design. This work enables the tailored design and manufacturing of composites assembled from inferior building blocks, that obtain optimal combinations of stiffness and toughness.

  19. Constitutive relations in plasticity, damage and fracture mechanics based on a work property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marigo, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is devoted to restrictions imposed by a work property of Drucker-Iliushin's type on the general class of mechanical systems with an elastic range which contains plastic, damaged and cracked media. The analysis is purely mechanical and quasi-static. Starting from very weak assumptions relative to this constitutive class, we obtain a fundamental inequality which generalizes Hill's maximal work principle. So we can justify, for instance: the convexity of the elastic domain and the normality rule of the plastic strain rate in stress space for the infinitesimal and some finite plasticity theories, Griffith's criterion in brittle fracture mechanics, and we obtain some original results for elastic and elastic plastic damaged materials. It must be noted that the procedure is purely deductive, the assumptions are explicit and the results are implications

  20. Fracture mechanics model of stone comminution in ESWL and implications for tissue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza; Sturtevant, Bradford

    2000-07-01

    Focused shock waves administered during extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) cause stone fragmentation. The process of stone fragmentation is described in terms of a dynamic fracture process. As is characteristic of all brittle materials, fragmentation requires nucleation, growth and coalescence of flaws, caused by a tensile or shear stress. The mechanisms, operative in the stone, inducing these stresses have been identified as spall and compression-induced tensile microcracks, nucleating at pre-existing flaws. These mechanisms are driven by the lithotripter-generated shock wave and possibly also by cavitation effects in the surrounding fluid. In this paper, the spall mechanism has been analysed, using a cohesive-zone model for the material. The influence of shock wave parameters, and physical properties of stone, on stone comminution is described. The analysis suggests a potential means to exploit the difference between the stone and tissue physical properties, so as to make stone comminution more effective, without increasing tissue damage.

  1. A fracture- mechanics calculation of crack growth rate for a gas turbine blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaei, M.; Karimi, R.

    2002-01-01

    The existence of thermo-mechanical stresses, due to the frequent start-ups and shutdowns of gas turbines. Combined with high working temperatures may cause creep and fatigue failure of the blades. This paper describes a fracture-mechanics life assessment of a gas turbine blade. Initially, the distributions of thermal and mechanical stresses were obtained by using the finite element method. Accordingly; the crack modeling was performed in a high stress region at the suction side surface of the blade. Several crack growth increments were observed and the related crack tip parameters were calculated. Finally; the creep-fatigue crack growth in each cycle was calculated and the total number of start-stop cycles was determined

  2. Mechanisms of Deformation and Fracture of Thin Coatings on Different Substrates in Instrumented Indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, G. M.; Smolin, A. Yu.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2018-04-01

    Mechanical properties of thin surface layers and coatings are commonly studied using instrumented indentation and scratch testing, where the mechanical response of the coating - substrate system essentially depends on the substrate material. It is quite difficult to distinguish this dependence and take it into account in the course of full-scale experiments due to a multivariative and nonlinear character of the influence. In this study the process of instrumented indentation of a hardening coating formed on different substrates is investigated numerically by the method of movable cellular automata. As a result of modeling, we identified the features of the substrate material influence on the derived mechanical characteristics of the coating - substrate systems and the processes of their deformation and fracture.

  3. Source Mechanisms of Low Frequency Seismicity in a Hydraulic Fracturing Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, M.; Daniel, G.; Hubans, F.; Gouedard, P.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, long-period long-duration (LPLD) events have been observed during hydraulic fracturing of hydrocarbon reservoirs (Das & Zoback, 2013). LPLDs are low-amplitude signals lasting from tens of seconds to minutes. Their source mechanisms are not fully understood. However, as they are remarkably similar in character to tectonic tremors it has been suggested that they may also have comparable source models. Current models suggest that a tectonic tremor consists of numerous slow-slip earthquakes superposed on each other to form continuous waveforms (Shelley et al., 2007). These slow-slip earthquakes are thought to be a result of shear slip on faults close to failure with low confining pressure, most likely due to the presence of fluid with pore pressures close to lithostatic pressures (Peng & Gomberg, 2010). This study aims to further understand the source mechanism of LPLDs. A hydraulic fracturing dataset containing thousands of located microseismic earthquakes (MEQs) and numerous LPLDs is presented. The MEQs are located around the injection stages whereas the LPLDs are clustered in a limited region within the reservoir. This clustering suggests that LPLDs can only be generated where the conditions in the reservoir are favorable. These results correspond with the possibility that LPLDs are manifestations of slow-slip, with the source locations confined by variations in the mechanical properties of the reservoir. To test this hypothesis a further understanding of the mechanisms of LPLDs and the stress field in which they occur is needed. However, calculating focal mechanisms for LPLDs is difficult due to their emergent onset and lack of clear phases. Consequently, LPLDs must be put into context with the observed MEQs. We will present the spatial distribution of the focal mechanisms of the MEQs and analyze our findings with respect to the occurrence of the LPLD events.

  4. Aging precipitation behavior and its influence on mechanical properties of Mn18Cr18N austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fengming; Li, Yajie; He, Wenwu; Zhao, Xiaodong; Chen, Huiqin

    2017-11-01

    The aging precipitation behavior in Mn18Cr18N austenitic stainless steel was investigated at temperatures from 600 °C to 900 °C. During isothermal aging treatment, the primary precipitate was Cr2N with a = 0.478 nm and c = 0.444 nm, and it preferentially nucleates along initial grain boundaries and gradually grows towards the interior of grains in discontinuous cellular way. Meanwhile, a small amount of granular face-centred cubic M23C6 with a = 1.066 nm also were observed, which mainly form along grain boundaries. The effect of these precipitates on mechanical properties of the alloy was studied. It was found that precipitates result in degeneration of the matrix hardness. Meanwhile, the SEM morphologies of aged tensile sample show that the brittle fracture predominates during deformation, i.e. the fracture mode transforms from intergranular fracture to transgranular fracture with the increasing of aging time. Compared with the solution-treated sample, the strength of the aged tensile samples slightly decreases and plasticity remarkably deteriorates.

  5. Shared molecular and cellular mechanisms of premature ageing and ageing-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubben, Nard; Misteli, Tom

    2017-10-01

    Ageing is the predominant risk factor for many common diseases. Human premature ageing diseases are powerful model systems to identify and characterize cellular mechanisms that underpin physiological ageing. Their study also leads to a better understanding of the causes, drivers and potential therapeutic strategies of common diseases associated with ageing, including neurological disorders, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Using the rare premature ageing disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a paradigm, we discuss here the shared mechanisms between premature ageing and ageing-associated diseases, including defects in genetic, epigenetic and metabolic pathways; mitochondrial and protein homeostasis; cell cycle; and stem cell-regenerative capacity.

  6. Study of mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of synthetic fibers nylon-and-polyester type, used in engineering products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Sergio Gomes

    2009-01-01

    Fibers are groups formed by molecular-chain-oriented filaments. Fibers play a fundamental role in human being's daily life and they can be found in several forms and geometries, such as filaments, yarns, beams, rope, fabric, composite, coatings, others. They are used in various segments such as civil, mechanical, electrical, electronics, military, naval, nautical, aviation, health, medicine, environment, communications, safety, space, others. Fibers are divided into two distinct classes: natural and chemical ones, which cover synthetic and man-made sub-classes. They can be produced from several materials, such as wool, cotton, rayon, flax, silk, rock, nylon, polyester, polyethylene, poly-propylene, aramid, glass, carbon, steel, ceramic, others. Globally, the participation of chemical fibers corresponds to approximately 59,9%, and the synthetic fiber polyester, the most used one, represents approximately 63% of the world market. Vital needs have led to the development of multi-function fibers and the focus has changed in the last 10 years with the use of nano technology for environmental responsibility and smart fibers. The study of mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of fibers is of great relevance for characterization and understanding of causes as consequence of failures. For such reason, it was selected technical fabrics made of high performance synthetic fiber nylon-and-polyester type, used in engineered products such as tires, belts, hoses and pneumatic springs, which have been analyzed in each processing phase. Fiber samples were extracted after each processing phase to be analyzed, by traction destructive tests and scanning electron microscopy. The results of analysis of mechanical properties showed loss of resistance to temperature and multi axial stress during fiber processing phase. Through microscopy tests, it was possible to find contamination, surface stains, plastic deformations, scaling, variations in the fracture faces of the filaments and

  7. Numerical simulation of the heat extraction in EGS with thermal-hydraulic-mechanical coupling method based on discrete fractures model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhi-xue; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yi; Yao, Jun; Wang, Hao-xuan; Lv, Shuhuan; Sun, Zhi-lei; Huang, Yong; Cai, Ming-yu; Huang, Xiaoxue

    2017-01-01

    The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) creates an artificial geothermal reservoir by hydraulic fracturing which allows heat transmission through the fractures by the circulating fluids as they extract heat from Hot Dry Rock (HDR). The technique involves complex thermal–hydraulic–mechanical (THM) coupling process. A numerical approach is presented in this paper to simulate and analyze the heat extraction process in EGS. The reservoir is regarded as fractured porous media consisting of rock matrix blocks and discrete fracture networks. Based on thermal non-equilibrium theory, the mathematical model of THM coupling process in fractured rock mass is used. The proposed model is validated by comparing it with several analytical solutions. An EGS case from Cooper Basin, Australia is simulated with 2D stochastically generated fracture model to study the characteristics of fluid flow, heat transfer and mechanical response in geothermal reservoir. The main parameters controlling the outlet temperature of EGS are also studied by sensitivity analysis. The results shows the significance of taking into account the THM coupling effects when investigating the efficiency and performance of EGS. - Highlights: • EGS reservoir comprising discrete fracture networks and matrix rock is modeled. • A THM coupling model is proposed for simulating the heat extraction in EGS. • The numerical model is validated by comparing with several analytical solutions. • A case study is presented for understanding the main characteristics of EGS. • The THM coupling effects are shown to be significant factors to EGS's running performance.

  8. Origins and ages of fracture fluids in the South African Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, A. W.; Warr, O.; Borgonie, G.; Linage-Alvarez, B.; Kuloyo, O.; Magnabosco, C.; Lau, M.; Erasmus, M.; Cason, E. D.; van Heerden, E.; Kieft, T. L.; Mabry, J.; Onstott, T. C.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal fracture fluids can remain isolated for millions (Myr) to billions of years (Gyr), and contain information on paleohydrogeology, subsurface ecology, and conservative components that may elucidate the atmospheric evolution of the early Earth [1-3]. Stable isotope analyses of water combined with isotopic analyses of the dissolved noble gases provide insight into the history of aqueous fracture fluids. We report stable isotope and noble gas data for fracture fluids from 5 different sites in the Witwatersrand Basin and Bushveld Igneous Province, South Africa. We determine radiogenic noble gas residence times ranging from thousands of years to tens of millions of years. The oldest sample, from Masimong Mine, has a water stable isotopic composition close to the global meteoric water line (GMWL), indicating its preservation in the crust and making it one of the oldest recorded paleometeoric waters. The δ2H and δ18O of water in this sample and similar age samples from the same mining district [1,4] require isotopically depleted groundwater recharge compared to modern precipitation. This could reflect a recharge regime at a higher paleolatitude, elevation, or with higher rainfall, established up to tens of Myr ago, and perhaps similar to the recharge regime in the modern Lesotho Highlands [5]. These data suggest that groundwater isotopes may provide useful paleoclimatic information for many Myr. As hypothesized, such paleometeoric water samples lack 124-128Xe enrichments reported from Gyr age groundwaters discovered on the Canadian Shield [3] and in Archean fluid inclusions [6], providing an important control set and reaffirming that those samples record the evolution of ancient atmospheric Xe rather than subsurface alteration. [1] Lippmann, J. et al. (2003) GCA 67, 4597-4619. [2] Lin, L.-H. (2006) et al. Science 314, 479-482. [3] Holland, G. et al. (2013) Nature 497, 357-360. [4] Lippmann-Pipke, J. et al. (2011) Chem. Geol. 283, 287-296. [5] West, A. G. et al

  9. Continuum Damage Mechanics A Continuum Mechanics Approach to the Analysis of Damage and Fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Murakami, Sumio

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in engineering and technology have brought about serious and enlarged demands for reliability, safety and economy in wide range of fields such as aeronautics, nuclear engineering, civil and structural engineering, automotive and production industry.  This, in turn, has caused more interest in continuum damage mechanics and its engineering applications.   This book aims to give a concise overview of the current state of damage mechanics, and then to show the fascinating possibility of this promising branch of mechanics, and to provide researchers, engineers and graduate students with an intelligible and self-contained textbook.   The book consists of two parts and an appendix.  Part I  is concerned with the foundation of continuum damage mechanics.  Basic concepts of material damage and the mechanical representation of damage state of various kinds are described in Chapters 1 and 2.  In Chapters 3-5, irreversible thermodynamics, thermodynamic constitutive theory and its application ...

  10. Analysis and modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical phenomena in 3D fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canamon Valera, I.

    2006-11-01

    This doctoral research was conducted as part of a joint France-Spain co-tutelage PhD thesis in the framework of a bilateral agreement between two universities, the Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse (INPT) and the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM). It concerns a problem of common interest at the national and international levels, namely, the disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological repositories. The present work is devoted, more precisely, to near-field hydrogeological aspects involving mass and heat transport phenomena. The first part of the work is devoted to a specific data interpretation problem (pressures, relative humidities, temperatures) in a multi-barrier experimental system at the scale of a few meters - the 'Mock-Up Test' of the FEBEX project, conducted in Spain. Over 500 time series are characterized in terms of spatial, temporal, and/or frequency/scale-based statistical analysis techniques. The time evolution and coupling of physical phenomena during the experiment are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn concerning the behavior and reliability of the sensors. The second part of the thesis develops in more detail the 3-Dimensional (3D) modeling of coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical phenomena in a fractured porous rock, this time at the scale of a hundred meters, based on the data of the 'In-Situ Test' of the FEBEX project conducted at the Grimsel Test Site in the Swiss Alps. As a first step, a reconstruction of the 3D fracture network is obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, taking into account through optimization the geomorphological data collected around the FEBEX gallery. The heterogeneous distribution of traces observed on the cylindrical wall of the tunnel is fairly well reproduced in the simulated network. In a second step, we develop a method to estimate the equivalent permeability of a many-fractured block by extending the superposition method of Ababou et al. [1994] to the case where the permeability of the rock matrix is not

  11. A general mixed mode fracture mechanics test specimen: The DCB-specimen loaded with uneven bending moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jørgensen, K.; Jacobsen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    A mixed mode specimen is proposed for fracture mechanics characterisation of adhesive joints, laminates and multilayers. The specimen is a double cantilever beam specimen loaded with uneven bending moments at the two free beams. By varying the ratiobetween the two applied moments, the full mode...... glass-fibre laminates was studied. The mixed mode fracture resistance increased with increasing crack length due to fibre bridging, eventually reaching asteady-state level (R-curve behaviour). The steady-state fracture toughness level increased with increasing tangential crack opening displacement....

  12. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine W Chong

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49. Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02. The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured

  13. Plastic fracture mechanics prediction of fracture instability in a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending--1. J-integral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    A method of evaluating the J-integral for a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending is proposed. The method allows a J-resistance curve to be evaluated directly from the load-displacement record obtained in a pipe fracture experiment. This method also permits an analysis for fracture instability in a circumferential crack growth using a J-resistance curve and the tearing modulus parameter. The importance of using a J-resistance curve that is consistent with the type of constraint for a given application is emphasized. 18 refs

  14. Strain rate effects on the mechanical properties and fracture mode of skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Michael; Tovar, Nick; Yoo, Daniel [Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry (United States); Sobieraj, Micheal [Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Joint Diseases (United States); Gupta, Nikhil [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, NYU-Poly (United States); Branski, Ryan C. [Dept of Otolaryngology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Coelho, Paulo G., E-mail: pc92@nyu.edu [Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the mechanical response of beagle sartorius muscle fibers under strain rates that increase logarithmically (0.1 mm/min, 1 mm/min and 10 mm/min), and provide an analysis of the fracture patterns of these tissues via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Muscle tissue from dogs' sartorius was excised and test specimens were sectioned with a lancet into sections with nominal length, width, and thickness of 7, 2.5 and 0.6 mm, respectively. Trimming of the tissue was done so that the loading would be parallel to the direction of the muscle fiber. Samples were immediately tested following excision and failures were observed under the SEM. No statistically significant difference was observed in strength between the 0.1 mm/min (2.560 ± 0.37 MPa) and the 1 mm/min (2.702 ± 0.55 MPa) groups. However, the 10 mm/min group (1.545 ± 0.50 MPa) had a statistically significant lower strength than both the 1 mm/min group and the 0.1 mm/min group with p < 0.01 in both cases. At the 0.1 mm/min rate the primary fracture mechanism was that of a shear mode failure of the endomysium with a significant relative motion between fibers. At 1 mm/min this continues to be the predominant failure mode. At the 10 mm/min strain rate there is a significant change in the fracture pattern relative to other strain rates, where little to no evidence of endomysial shear failure nor of significant motion between fibers was detected.

  15. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  16. Nanostructure evolution and mechanical property changes during aging of a super duplex stainless steel at 300 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Niklas, E-mail: niklas.pettersson@swerea.se [Swerea KIMAB AB, P.O. Box 7047, SE-164 07 Kista (Sweden); Wessman, Sten [Swerea KIMAB AB, P.O. Box 7047, SE-164 07 Kista (Sweden); Thuvander, Mattias [Department of Applied Physics Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Hedström, Peter; Odqvist, Joakim [Department of Material Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, Rachel F.A. [The Swedish Steel Producers' Association, Box 1721, SE-111 87 Stockholm (Sweden); Hertzman, Staffan [Outokumpu Stainless Research Foundation, Brinellvägen 23, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-10-28

    The nanostructure evolution and the corresponding changes in mechanical properties of a super duplex stainless steel 2507 (UNS S32750) during aging at 300 °C up to 12,000 h have been investigated. Microstructural studies using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography show that subtle Cr concentration fluctuations develop during aging. The amplitude of the concentration fluctuations is proportional to the hardness of the ferrite phase, and it is also proportional to the decrease in room temperature impact toughness during aging. The fracture behaviour of the alloy changes gradually from ductile to cleavage fracture, upon aging. The cracks were found to propagate through the ferrite phase, partly along deformation twin interfaces, and delamination between the austenite and ferrite phases was observed.

  17. On aging factors, aging mechanisms and their combinations in the primary circuit of NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, T.; Brumovsky, M.

    1993-01-01

    Ageing is the dominating problem of elder nuclear power plant (NPP) components but still can not be neglected even for the newest ones. Ageing may express itself in different ways: irradiated steel parts may become embrittled, chromium alloy steels may decompose, fatigue life may become exhausted so that cracks may be formed and finally, corrosion attack may result in stress corrosion cracking. However, even synthetics and rubber parts may become inelastic, swell, shrink or crack, electric contacts may be oxydised, or isolations may lose their high electric resistance. Therefore, experts in the different components and their materials have collected and published not only plenty of observations, but also a number of more or less systematic approaches. A general picture, however, still seems to be lacking, due to the fact that ageing factors and mechanisms are not defined and used properly, i.e. - ageing factors act because of the service conditions of the components, as well as the characteristics of the materials which provoke ageing mechanisms - ageing mechanisms cause the changing of properties of the materials involved - combinations of single ageing mechanisms, which can be double, triple or multiple, change and accelerate the ageing process - the consequence of ageing mechanisms is the altering of the properties of the material depending on the lifetime. In this paper we shall try to show a systematic approach to a potential ageing analysis concerning the main metallic components of primary circuits of NPP's - connection between ageing factors, ageing mechanisms and their consequences/effects on component behaviour

  18. Structure, thermal and fracture mechanical properties of benzoxazine-modified amine-cured DGEBA epoxy resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available First, traditional diamine hardeners of epoxy resins (EP were checked as potential accelerators for the benzoxazine (BOX homopolymerization. It was established that the acceleration effect depends on both the type and amount of the diamine compounds. In the follow-up work amine-curable diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA type EP was modified with BOX keeping the EP/BOX ratio constant (75/25 wt.%. The amine hardeners, added in the EP in stoichiometric amounts, were of aliphatic and aromatic nature, viz. diethylenetriamine (DETA, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (DDM, and their 1/1 mixture. The thermal, viscoelastic, flexural and fracture mechanical properties of the EP/BOX hybrids were determined and compared to those of the reference EPs. Based on dynamic-mechanical thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy the formation of co-network between EP and BOX was concluded. Homopolymerized BOX was built in the network in nanoscaled inclusions and it was associated with internal antiplasticization. Incorporation of BOX improved the charring, enhanced the flexural modulus and strength, and reduced the glass transition of the parent EP. The fracture toughness and energy were not improved by hybridization with BOX.

  19. The application of fracture mechanics to the safety assessment of transport casks for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zencker, U.; Mueller, K.; Droste, B.; Roedel, R.; Voelzke, H.

    2004-01-01

    BAM is the responsible authority in Germany for the assessment of the mechanical and thermal design safety of packages for the transport of radioactive materials. The assessment has to cover the brittle fracture safety 'proof of package' for components made of potentially brittle materials. This paper gives a survey of the regulatory and technical requirements for such an assessment according to BAM's new 'Guidelines for the application of ductile cast iron for transport and storage casks for radioactive materials'. Based on these guidelines, higher stresses than before will be permissible, but it is necessary to put more effort into the safety assessment procedure. The fundamentals of such a proof using the methods of fracture mechanics are presented. The recommended procedure takes into account the guidelines of the IAEA's advisory material which are based on the prevention of crack initiation. Examples of BAM's research and safety assessment practices are given. Recommendations for further developments towards package designs with higher acceptable stress levels will conclude the paper. (author)

  20. A mechanism for the production of ultrafine particles from concrete fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Nassib; Rohan Jayaratne, E; Johnson, Graham R; Alroe, Joel; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga; Cravigan, Luke; Faghihi, Ehsan Majd; Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia

    2017-03-01

    While the crushing of concrete gives rise to large quantities of coarse dust, it is not widely recognized that this process also emits significant quantities of ultrafine particles. These particles impact not just the environments within construction activities but those in entire urban areas. The origin of these ultrafine particles is uncertain, as existing theories do not support their production by mechanical processes. We propose a hypothesis for this observation based on the volatilisation of materials at the concrete fracture interface. The results from this study confirm that mechanical methods can produce ultrafine particles (UFP) from concrete, and that the particles are volatile. The ultrafine mode was only observed during concrete fracture, producing particle size distributions with average count median diameters of 27, 39 and 49 nm for the three tested concrete samples. Further volatility measurements found that the particles were highly volatile, showing between 60 and 95% reduction in the volume fraction remaining by 125 °C. An analysis of the volatile fraction remaining found that different volatile material is responsible for the production of particles between the samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mean load effect on fatigue of welded joints using structural stress and fracture mechanics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Cheol; Jin, Tae Eun; Dong, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear welded structures during design life, the fatigue life has to be evaluated by fatigue analysis procedures presented in technical codes such as ASME B and PV Code Section III. However, existing fatigue analysis procedures do not explicitly consider the presence of welded joints. A new fatigue analysis procedure based on a structural stress/fracture mechanics approach has been recently developed in order to reduce conservatism by erasing uncertainty in the analysis procedure. A recent review of fatigue crack growth data under various mean loading conditions using the structural stress/fracture mechanics approach, does not consider the mean loading effect, revealed some significant discrepancies in fatigue crack growth curves according to the mean loading conditions. In this paper, we propose the use of the stress intensity factor range ΔK characterized with loading ratio R effects in terms of the structural stress. We demonstrate the effectiveness in characterizing fatigue crack growth and S-N behavior using the well-known data. It was identified that the S-N data under high mean loading could be consolidated in a master S-N curve for welded joints

  2. Reliability calculation of cracked components using probabilistic fracture mechanics and a Markovian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical reliability calculation of cracked construction components under cyclical fatigue stress can be done with the help of models of probabilistic fracture mechanics. An alternative to the Monte Carlo simulation method is examined; the alternative method is based on the description of failure processes with the help of a Markov process. The Markov method is traced back directly to the stochastic parameters of a two-dimensional fracture mechanics model, the effects of inspections and repairs also being considered. The probability of failure and expected failure frequency can be determined as time functions with the transition and conditional probabilities of the original or derived Markov process. For concrete calculation, an approximative Markov chain is designed which, under certain conditions, is capable of giving a sufficient approximation of the original Markov process and the reliability characteristics determined by it. The application of the MARKOV program code developed into an algorithm reveals sufficient conformity with the Monte Carlo reference results. The starting point of the investigation was the 'Deutsche Risikostudie B (DWR)' ('German Risk Study B (DWR)'), specifically, the reliability of the main coolant line. (orig./HP) [de

  3. On the estimation of the steam generator maintenance efficiency by the means of probabilistic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizelj, L.

    1994-10-01

    In this report, an original probabilistic model aimed to assess the efficiency of particular maintenance strategy in terms of tube failure probability is proposed. The model concentrates on axial through wall cracks in the residual stress dominated tube expansion transition zone. It is based on the recent developments in probabilistic fracture mechanics and accounts for scatter in material, geometry and crack propagation data. Special attention has been paid to model the uncertainties connected to non-destructive examination technique (e.g., measurement errors, non-detection probability). First and second order reliability methods (FORM and SORM) have been implemented to calculate the failure probabilities. This is the first time that those methods are applied to the reliability analysis of components containing stress-corrosion cracks. In order to predict the time development of the tube failure probabilities, an original linear elastic fracture mechanics based crack propagation model has been developed. It accounts for the residual and operating stresses together. Also, the model accounts for scatter in residual and operational stresses due to the random variations in tube geometry and material data. Due to the lack of reliable crack velocity vs load data, the non-destructive examination records of the crack propagation have been employed to estimate the velocities at the crack tips. (orig./GL) [de

  4. Elastic-plastic Fracture Mechanics Assessment of nozzle corners submitted to thermal shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapuliot, S.; Marie, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a simplified analytical scheme for the elastic-plastic Fracture Mechanics Assessment of large nozzle corners. Within that frame, following the specific numerical effort performed for the definition of a Stress Intensity Factor compendium, complementary elastic-plastic developments are proposed here for the consideration of the thermal shock loading in the elastic-plastic domain: this type of loading is a major loading for massive structures such as nozzle corners of large components. Thus, an important numerical was performed in order to extend the applicability domain of existing analytical schemes to those complex geometries. The final formulation is a simple one, applicable to a large variety of materials and geometrical configurations as long as the structure is large and the defect remains small in comparison to the internal radius of the nozzle. - Highlights: • Fracture Mechanics Assessment of large nozzle corners. • Elastic-plastic Stress Intensity Factor determination under thermal shock loading. • Semi-analytical schemes for J calculation.

  5. The use of fracture mechanics methodologies for NDT results evaluation and comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reale, S.

    1995-01-01

    In the general frame of analysing the interactions amongst the information from non destructive evaluation (NDE) and the methodologies to assess the integrity of a defective structure (such as fracture mechanics), the aim of the paper is to analyse and compare, in terms of indices related to safety margins, NDE results from round robin testing trials to acheive assessments of capabilities and limitations.A structural integrity/fracture mechanics approach for evaluating and comparing results from non destructive techniques is presented. Safety factors can be associated to flaws detected and characterized by inspections (estimated flaws) and to flaws actually present (reference flaws). The mismatch between safety factors associated to estimated flaws and safety factors associated to reference flaws can be used to assess capabilities and limitations of procedures and techniques in use for inspections.As an example, to show how the above procedure is applied and its potential as a method of data evaluation and comparison, the NDE results produced by the PISC (project for the inspection of steel components) activity have been considered. (orig.)

  6. Strontium Is Incorporated into the Fracture Callus but Does Not Influence the Mechanical Strength of Healing Rat Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüel, Annemarie; Olsen, Jakob; Birkedal, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    in callus bone mineral content (P\\0.05). However, after 8 weeks of healing, no difference was found in either callus volume or bone mineral content. SrR did not influence maximum load or stiffness of the fractures after either 3 or 8 weeks of healing. EDX showed that Sr was incorporated into the callus...

  7. Thermo-mechanically coupled fracture analysis of shape memory alloys using the extended finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatefi Ardakani, S.; Ahmadian, H.; Mohammadi, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the extended finite element method is used for fracture analysis of shape memory alloys for both cases of super elastic and shape memory effects. Heat generation during the forward and reverse phase transformations can lead to temperature variation in the material because of strong thermo-mechanical coupling, which significantly influences the SMA mechanical behavior. First, the stationary crack mode is studied and the effects of loading rate on material behavior in the crack tip are examined. Then, the crack propagation analysis is performed in the presence of an initial crack by adopting a weighted averaging criterion, where the direction of crack propagation is determined by weighted averaging of effective stresses at all the integration points in the vicinity of the crack tip. Finally, several numerical examples are analyzed and the obtained results are compared with the available reference results.

  8. Layered Manufacturing of Dental Ceramics: Fracture Mechanics, Microstructure, and Elemental Composition of Lithography-Sintered Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Yurdanur; Aysan Meriç, İpek; Ekren, Orhun

    2018-02-11

    To compare the fracture mechanics, microstructure, and elemental composition of lithography-based ceramic manufacturing with pressing and CAD/CAM. Disc-shaped specimens (16 mm diameter, 1.2 mm thick) were used for mechanical testing (n = 10/group). Biaxial flexural strength of three groups (In-Ceram alumina [ICA], lithography-based alumina, ZirkonZahn) were determined using the "piston on 3-ball" technique as suggested in test Standard ISO-6872. Vickers hardness test was performed. Fracture toughness was calculated using fractography. Results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunnett T3 (α = 0.05). Weibull analysis was conducted. Polished and fracture surface characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used for elemental analysis. Biaxial flexural strength of ICA, LCM alumina (LCMA), and ZirkonZahn were 147 ± 43 MPa, 490 ± 44 MPa, and 709 ± 94 MPa, respectively, and were statistically different (P ≤ 0.05). The Vickers hardness number of ICA was 850 ± 41, whereas hardness values for LCMA and ZirkonZahn were 1581 ± 144 and 1249 ± 57, respectively, and were statistically different (P ≤ 0.05). A statistically significant difference was found between fracture toughness of ICA (2 ± 0.4 MPa⋅m 1/2 ), LCMA (6.5 ± 1.5 MPa⋅m 1/2 ), and ZirkonZahn (7.7 ± 1 MPa⋅m 1/2 ) (P ≤ 0.05). Weibull modulus was highest for LCMA (m = 11.43) followed by ZirkonZahn (m = 8.16) and ICA (m = 5.21). Unlike LCMA and ZirkonZahn groups, a homogeneous microstructure was not observed for ICA. EDS results supported the SEM images. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that LCM seems to be a promising technique for final ceramic object manufacturing in dental applications. Both the manufacturing method and the material used should be improved. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Fracture mechanics in new designed power module under thermo-mechanical loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand Camille

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-mechanically induced failure is a major reliability issue in the microelectronic industry. On this account, a new type of Assembly Interconnected Technology used to connect MOSFETs in power modules has been developed. The reliability is increased by using a copper clip soldered on the top side of the chip, avoiding the use of aluminium wire bonds, often responsible for the failure of the device. Thus the new designed MOSFET package does not follow the same failure mechanisms as standard modules. Thermal and power cycling tests were performed on these new packages and resulting failures were analyzed. Thermo-mechanical simulations including cracks in the aluminium metallization and intermetallics (IMC were performed using Finite Element Analysis in order to better understand crack propagation and module behaviour.

  10. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This report provides the proceedings of a Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing that was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on October 23-25, 1992. The meeting was jointly sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In particular, the International Working Group (IWG) on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (LMNPP) was the IAEA sponsor, and the Principal Working Group 3 (PWG-3) (Primary System Component Integrity) of the Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) was the NEA's sponsor. This meeting was preceded by two prior international activities that were designed to examine the state-of-the-art in fracture analysis capabilities and emphasized applications to the safety evaluation of nuclear power facilities. The first of those two activities was an IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing that was held at the Staatliche Materialprufungsanstalt (MPA) in Stuttgart, Germany, on May 25-27, 1988; the proceedings of that meeting were published 1991.1 The second activity was the CSNI/PWG-3's Fracture Assessment Group's Project FALSIRE (Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments). The proceedings of the FALSIRE workshop that was held in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on May 8-10, 1990, was recently published by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Those previous activities identified capabilities and shortcomings of various fracture analysis methods based on analyses of six available large-scale experiments. Different modes of fracture behavior, which ranged from brittle to ductile, were considered. In addition, geometry, size, constraint and multiaxial effects were considered. While generally good predictive capabilities were demonstrated for brittle fracture, issues were identified relative to predicting fracture behavior at higher

  11. Incidence and mechanism of neurological deficit after thoracolumbar fractures sustained in motor vehicle collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourabh; Beck, Chad; Yoganandan, Narayan; Rao, Raj D

    2015-10-09

    OBJECT To determine the incidence of and assess the risk factors associated with neurological injury in motor vehicle occupants who sustain fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. METHODS In this study, the authors queried medical, vehicle, and crash data elements from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN), a prospectively gathered multicenter database compiled from Level I trauma centers. Subjects had fractures involving the T1-L5 vertebral segments, an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of ≥ 3, or injury to 2 body regions with an AIS score of ≥ 2 in each region. Demographic parameters obtained for all subjects included age, sex, height, body weight, and body mass index. Clinical parameters obtained included the level of the injured vertebra and the level and type of spinal cord injury. Vehicular crash data included vehicle make, seatbelt type, and usage and appropriate use of the seatbelt. Crash data parameters included the principal direction of force, change in velocity on impact (ΔV), airbag deployment, and vehicle rollover. The authors performed a univariate analysis of the incidence and the odds of sustaining spinal neurological injury associated with major thoracolumbar fractures with respect to the demographic, clinical, and crash parameters. RESULTS Neurological deficit associated with thoracolumbar fracture was most frequent at extremes of age; the highest rates were in the 0- to 10-year (26.7% [4 of 15]) and 70- to 80-year (18.4% [7 of 38]) age groups. Underweight occupants (OR 3.52 [CI 1.055-11.7]) and obese occupants (OR 3.27 [CI 1.28-8.31]) both had higher odds of sustaining spinal cord injury than occupants with a normal body mass index. The highest risk of neurological injury existed in crashes in which airbags deployed and the occupant was not restrained by a seatbelt (OR 2.35 [CI 0.087-1.62]). Reduction in the risk of neurological injuries occurred when 3-point seatbelts were used correctly in conjunction with the

  12. Effect of Hygrothermal Aging on the Mechanical Properties of Fluorinated and Nonfluorinated Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamim, Salah U; Singh, Raman P

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophilic nature of epoxy polymers can lead to both reversible and irreversible/permanent changes in epoxy upon moisture absorption. The permanent changes leading to the degradation of mechanical properties due to combined effect of moisture and elevated temperature on EPON 862, Nanomer I.28E, and Somasif MAE clay-epoxy nanocomposites are investigated in this study. The extent of permanent degradation on fracture and flexural properties due to the hygrothermal aging is determined by drying the epoxy and their clay-epoxy nanocomposites after moisture absorption. Significant permanent damage is observed for fracture toughness and flexural modulus, while the extent of permanent damage is less significant for flexural strength. It is also observed that permanent degradation in Somasif MAE clay-epoxy nanocomposites is higher compared to Nanomer I.28E clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that both clays retained their original chemical structure after the absorption-desorption cycle without undergoing significant changes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the fracture surfaces provide evidence that Somasif MAE clay particles offered very little resistance to crack propagation in case of redried specimens when compared to Nanomer I.28E counterpart. The reason for the observed higher extent of permanent degradation in Somasif MAE clay-epoxy system has been attributed to the weakening of the filler-matrix interface.

  13. Hydrologic mechanisms governing fluid flow in partially saturated, fractured, porous tuff at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1984-10-01

    In contrast to the saturated zone where fluid moves rapidly along fractures, the fractures (with apertures large relative to the size of matrix pores) will desaturate first during drainage process and the bulk of fluid flow would be through interconnected pores in the matrix. Within a partially drained fracture, the presence of a relatively continuous air phase will produce practically an infinite resistance to liquid flow in the direction parallel to the fracture. The residual liquid will be held by capillary force in regions around fracture contact areas where the apertures are small. Normal to the fracture surfaces, the drained portion of the fractures will reduce the effective area for liquid flow from one matrix block to another matrix block. A general statistical theory is constructed for flow along the fracture and for flow between the matrix blocks to the fractures under partially saturated conditions. Results are obtained from an aperture distribution model for fracture saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and effective matrix-fracture flow areas as functions of pressure. Drainage from a fractured tuff column is simulated. The parameters for the simulations are deduced from fracture surface characteristics, spacings and orientations based on core analyses, and from matrix characteristics curve based on laboratory measurements. From the cases simulated for the fractured, porous column with discrete vertical and horizontal fractures and porous matrix blocks explicitly taken into account, it is observed that the highly transient changes from fully saturated conditions to partially saturated conditions are extremely sensitive to the fracture properties. However, the quasi-steady changes of the fluid flow of a partially saturated, fractured, porous system could be approximately simulated without taking the fractures into account. 22 references, 16 figures