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Sample records for ag111 surfaces synchrotron

  1. Structure and growth of dotriacontane films on SiO_2 and Ag(111) surfaces: synchrotron X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, H.; Trogisch, S.; Taub, H.;

    2004-01-01

    We report synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of the structure and growth mode of dotriacontane (n-C32H(66) or C32) films adsorbed on Ag(111) and SiO2-coated Si(100) substrates. On the SiO2 surface, the X-ray measurements confirm a structural model of the...

  2. First-principles study of surface plasmons on Ag(111) and H/Ag(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Jun; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Linear-response time-dependent density functional theory is used to investigate the relation between molecular bonding and surface plasmons for the model system H/Ag(111). We employ an orbital-dependent exchange-correlation functional to obtain a correct description of the Ag 3d band, which is cr...

  3. Point defects in epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongsheng; Feng, Haifeng; Du, Yi; Chen, Jian; Wu, Kehui; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Silicene, a counterpart of graphene, has achieved rapid development due to its exotic electronic properties and excellent compatibility with the mature silicon-based semiconductor technology. Its low room-temperature mobility of ∼100 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, however, inhibits device applications such as in field-effect transistors. Generally, defects and grain boundaries would act as scattering centers and thus reduce the carrier mobility. In this paper, the morphologies of various point defects in epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) surfaces have been systematically investigated using first-principles calculations combined with experimental scanning tunneling microscope (STM) observations. The STM signatures for various defects in epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) surface are identified. In particular, the formation energies of point defects in Ag(111)-supported silicene sheets show an interesting dependence on the superstructures, which, in turn, may have implications for controlling the defect density during the synthesis of silicene. Through estimating the concentrations of various point defects in different silicene superstructures, the mystery of the defective appearance of \\sqrt{13}× \\sqrt{13} and 2\\sqrt{3}× 2\\sqrt{3} silicene in experiments is revealed, and 4 × 4 silicene sheet is thought to be the most suitable structure for future device applications.

  4. Hindered rotational physisorption states of H2 on Ag(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisada, Y; Kasai, H

    2015-07-15

    We have investigated the physisorption states of H2 on Ag(111) surfaces. To clarify the accurate adsorption properties of H2 on Ag(111), we performed first-principles calculations based on spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) with the semiempirical DFT-D2 method and the newly-developed exchange functional with the non-local correlation functional vdW-DF2 (rev-vdW-DF2). We constructed exhaustive potential energy surfaces, and revealed that non-negligible out-of-plane potential anisotropy with a perpendicular orientation preference exists even for H2 physisorption on planar Ag(111), as predicted by previous results of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption experiments. Therefore, the molecular rotational ground states of ortho-H2 split into two energy levels in the anisotropic potential. The obtained adsorption energy and the number of bound states, including the zero-point energies and the rotational energy shift, agree with diffractive and rotationally mediated selective adsorption scattering resonance measurements. The origin of the potential anisotropy on Ag(111) is a combination of the London dispersion interaction and the virtual transition of the metal electron to the unoccupied molecular state. PMID:26151425

  5. Long-range surface faceting induced by chemisorption of PTCDA on stepped Ag(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Stefan; Schöll, Achim; Umbach, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    The organic molecule PTCDA preferentially adsorbs on steps of vicinal Ag(111) surfaces and bunches them to well defined facet planes. These depend on coverage and annealing temperature and are independent of the nominal step direction and angle of inclination of the unreconstructed initial surface. We study the development of the facets and present a map of all 16 types of facets in a stereographic triangle of 35° off the [111]-direction. The faceting mechanism is interpreted as orientational phase separation originating from different bonding strengths of PTCDA on various facets. The faceting drives the system to the minimum of its surface free energy.

  6. Unconventional Fermi surface spin patterns in the (Bi/Pb/Sb)/Ag(111) surface alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Fabian; Dil, Hugo [Physik Institut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Swiss Light Source PSI (Switzerland); Petrov, Vladimir [Physics Institute St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Patthey, Luc [Swiss Light Source PSI (Switzerland); Osterwalder, Juerg [Physik Institut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    By a controllable change in the stoichiometry of the long range ordered mixed surface alloy (Bi/Pb/Sb)/Ag(111) the Rashba and Fermi energy can be tuned over a wide range. We show by spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy that the spin structure of the individual surface state bands remain unaffected despite the random intermixing of the adatoms. We further report on the observation of unconventional Fermi surface spin textures. These spin textures are found when the Fermi energy lies between the crossing point and the apex of the Rashba type Kramer's pair. The results will be discussed in the context of spin transport.

  7. Self-assembled rows of Ni porphyrin dimers on the Ag(111) surface

    OpenAIRE

    SENGE, Mathias; SERGEEVA, NATALIA

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED The growth and ordering of 5-(10,15,20-triphenylporphyrinatonickel(II))dimer (NiTPP-dimer) molecules on the Ag(111) surface have been investigated using scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). At one monolayer (ML) coverage the NiTPP-dimer forms a well-ordered close-packed molecular layer in which the porphyrin molecules have a flat orientation with the molecular plane lying parallel to the substrate. STM and LEED data obt...

  8. Interference of spin states in photoemission from Sb/Ag(111) surface alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Fabian; Osterwalder, Juerg; Hugo Dil, J [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Petrov, Vladimir [St Petersburg Polytechnical University, 29 Polytechnicheskaya Street, 195251 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mirhosseini, Hossein; Henk, Juergen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Patthey, Luc, E-mail: jan-hugo.dil@psi.ch [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-02-23

    Using a three-dimensional spin polarimeter we have gathered evidence for the interference of spin states in photoemission from the surface alloy Sb/Ag(111). This system features a small Rashba-type spin splitting of a size comparable to the momentum broadening of the quasiparticles, thus causing an intrinsic overlap between states with orthogonal spinors. Besides a small spin polarization caused by the spin splitting, we observe a large spin polarization component in the plane normal to the quantization axis of the Rashba effect. Strongly suggestive of coherent spin rotation, this effect is largely independent of the photon energy and photon polarization. (fast track communication)

  9. Diffusion of Cu adatoms and dimers on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mińkowski, Marcin; Załuska-Kotur, Magdalena A.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion of Cu adatoms and dimers on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces is analyzed based on ab initio surface potentials. Single adatom diffusion is compared with dimer diffusion on both surfaces. Surface geometry makes the adatoms jump alternately between two states in the same way in both systems, whereas dimers undergo more complex diffusion process that combines translational and rotational motion. Small difference in the surface lattice constant between Cu and Ag crystals results in a completely different energy landscape for dimer jumps. As an effect the character of diffusion process changes. Homogeneous Cu dimer diffusion is more difficult and dimers rather rotate within single surface cell, whereas diffusion over Ag surface is faster and happens more smoothly. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient and its parameters: energy barrier and prefactor is calculated and compared for both surfaces.

  10. Surface-state enhancement of tunneling thermopower on the Ag(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro; Kelly, Simon J; Cerdá, Jorge I

    2014-12-23

    Thermoelectric effects in tunnel junctions are currently being revisited for their prospects in cooling and energy harvesting applications, and as sensitive probes of electron transport. Quantitative interpretation of these effects calls for advances in both theory and experiment, particularly with respect to the electron transmission probability across a tunnel barrier which encodes the energy dependence and the magnitude of tunneling thermopower. Using noble metal surfaces as clean model systems, we demonstrate a comparatively simple and quantitative approach where the transmission probability is directly measured experimentally. Importantly, we estimate not only thermovoltage, but also its energy and temperature dependencies. We have thus resolved surface-state enhancement of thermovoltage, which manifests as 10-fold enhancement of thermopower on terraces of the Ag(111) surface compared to single-atom step sites and surface-supported nanoparticles. To corroborate experimental analysis, the methodology was applied to the transmission probability obtained from first-principles calculations for the (111) surfaces of the three noble metals, finding good agreement between overall trends. Surface-state effects themselves point to a possibility of achieving competitive performance of all-metal tunnel junctions when compared to molecular junctions. At the same time, the approach presented here opens up possibilities to investigate the properties of nominally doped or gated thermoelectric tunnel junctions as well as temperature gradient in nanometer gaps.

  11. Incommensurate growth of Co thin film on close-packed Ag(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Sukanta; Menon, Krishna Kumar S. R.

    2016-05-01

    Growth of ultrathin Co layers on close-packed Ag(111)were investigated by means of Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy(ARPES) techniques. The close-packed hexagonal face of Co(0001), exhibits a lattice misfit about 13% with Ag(111) surface which manipulates the growth to be incommensurate up to a certain thickness. The strain field causes aperiodic height undulation in the sub-angstrom regime of the film which was confirmed by p(1 × 1) LEED pattern along with a 6-fold moiré reconstruction pattern in the lower film thickness (up to ˜2ML). The evolution of the LEED pattern was studied with increasing film coverage. Lattice strain was measured with respect to the relative positions of these double spots as a functionof film thickness. Almost a constant strain (˜13%) in the full range of film thickness explains the moiré pattern formation in order to stabilize the incommensurate growth. For higher film coverages, an epitaxial well-ordered commensurate growth was observed. Core level and valance band electronic structures of these films were studied by XPS and ARPES techniques.

  12. Relaxation of surface stress induced by an organic adsorbate: PTCDA on vicinal Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollinger, Florian; Vrdoljak, Pavo; Fertig, Dominik; Schmitt, Stefan; Kumpf, Christian; Schoell, Achim; Umbach, Eberhard [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Tian, Zhen; Sander, Dirk; Kirschner, Juergen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Self-organization of metallic surfaces on large scales can be induced by the adsorption of organic molecules and has been observed in several experiments. One example is the growth of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on stepped (8.5 -vicinal) Ag(111) surfaces. At elevated temperatures, the adsorbate molecules lead to a bunching of substrate steps, which agglomerate to facets of critical sizes. The facets arrange in a coverage-dependent grating-like pattern on a mesoscopic length scale. The resulting order requires a long-range interaction which is mediated by the substrate. It can be explained by a change of surface stress induced by the adsorbate layer. Experimentally, such a change is directly accessible by an optical cantilever bending technique. We monitored the bending of a faceting thin Ag(10 8 7) crystal with this method in order to quantify the occurring relaxation of surface stress.

  13. Tetracene confinement in L-methionine gratings on the Ag(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgel, José I.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Ecija, D.; Auwärter, W.; Barth, J. V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a direct study on the positioning and mobility of tetracene molecules in self-assembled methionine nanogratings on the Ag(111) surface. Our scanning tunneling microscopy observations reveal the preferential arrangement of isolated tetracene units within substrate stripes framed by one-dimensional methionine supramolecular rows, under the influence of long-range indirect interactions. However, the orientational order of the rod-like tetracene species is induced by the epitaxial fit to the underlying surface atomic lattice; and preferential alignment with the tetracene axes along the direction of the methionine grating could not be achieved. In scanning tunneling microscopy measurements under perturbative conditions, we find a one-dimensional diffusion of the confined tetracene along the direction of the molecular axis and restricted by the methionine gratings for non-parallel orientations.

  14. Structures of Adatom Clusters on Ag(111) Surface by Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-Hua; LIU Qing-Wei; LI Yu-Fen; ZHUANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the structures of Ag adatom clusters supported on the metal Ag(111) surface using the genetic algorithm (GA). The atomic interactions are modelled by the surface-embedded-atom method. The lowest-energy structures of adatom clusters with sizes n = 3-20 are obtained, in which n = 7, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19 are the magic numbers.Furthermore, we give a series of structures with energies close to the lowest energy (the lower-energy isomers), and the structure features are studied in detail. Except for some magic clusters and small clusters, every configuration of adatom clusters generally has two distinct adsorption ways, so the isomers always appear in pairs.

  15. Dehydrocyclization of peripheral alkyl groups in porphyrins at Cu(100) and Ag(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher G.; Wang, Miao; Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Kesmodel, Larry L.; Tait, Steven L.

    2016-11-01

    The self-assembly of organic and metal-organic species at metal surfaces is a topic of high interest for applications that can benefit from tunable surface functionalization through organic building block design. As the complexity of molecular building blocks increases to direct ordering and function, thermal stability of the adsorbate often increases opening up new surface-catalyzed reaction pathways. We report dehydrocyclization of octaethylporphyrin to tetrabenzoporphyrin on the Cu(100) and Ag(111) surfaces at 500-600 K. Dehydrocyclization of smaller species is not typically observed on these surfaces at low pressure due to short adsorption lifetimes. The dehydrocyclization of peripheral ethyl groups forms benzo groups which then undergo additional dehydrogenation. The reaction products are characterized by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These results extend our understanding of reaction pathways that may be encountered as molecular building blocks increase in size and complexity on relatively inert surfaces.

  16. Nature of free-electron-like states in PTCDA molecules adsorbed on an Ag(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Mats; Dyer, Matthew [Surface Science Research Centre, University of Liverpool, L69 3BX Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Advances in molecular assembly experiments on metal surfaces and potential applications arising from them call for a better understanding of the electronic structure at the interface of metals and organic systems. There is a high interest in delocalized electronic states, because of their potential use in molecular and opto-electronics applications. Recently, unoccupied, free-electron-like states arising in mono layers of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules adsorbed on an Ag(111) surface at energies close to the Fermi energy have been observed by scanning tunneling and photoemission spectroscopies. So as to reveal the nature of these delocalized states we have carried out a density functional study of the electronic structure and local density of states of these systems. We show that the observed free-electron state originates from a Shockley surface state (SS) at the zone centre of the bare surface. The SS is shifted up by the interaction with the organic overlayer.

  17. Change in surface states of Ag(111) thin films upon adsorption of a monolayer of PTCDA organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The change in the electronic structure of silver thin films of different thicknesses with the Ag( 111) orientation due to the interaction with an adsorbed monolayer of ordered organic molecules of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) has been investigated in terms of density functional theory. It has been shown that one of the two surface states of the pure films transforms into an unocc upied interface state due to the interaction so that all the main features of the initial state are retained. The relation of the resulting state to the unoccupied state experimentally observed in the PTCDA/Ag( 111 ) system by scanning tunneling and two-photon photoemission spectroscopy has been discussed.

  18. C60 chain phases on ZnPc/Ag(111) surfaces: Supramolecular organization driven by competing interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, W; Liu, Q; Dougherty, D B; Cullen, W G; Reutt-Robey, J E; Weeks, J; Robey, S W

    2015-03-14

    Serpentine chain C60 phases were observed in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of C60 layers on zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) or pentacene covered Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces. This low-density, quasi-one-dimensional organization contrasts starkly with the close-packed hexagonal phases observed for C60 layers on bare metal substrates. STM was employed to perform a detailed investigation of these chain structures for C60/ZnPc/Ag(111) heterolayers. Motivated by the similarity of these chain phases, and the chain and stripe organization occurring in dipole-fluid systems, we investigated a model based on competing van der Waals attractions and electrostatic repulsions between C60 molecules as an explanation for the driving force behind these monolayer phases. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed significant charge transfer to C60 from the Ag(111) substrate, through the intervening ZnPc layer, inducing electrostatic interactions between C60 molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with attractive van der Waals interactions plus repulsive dipole-dipole interactions reproduced the C60 chain phases with dipole magnitudes consistent with DFT calculations. PMID:25770499

  19. Manipulation of the surface density of states of Ag(111) by means of resonators: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J.; Moro-Lagares, María; Serrate, D.; Aligia, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the density of surface Shockley states of Ag(111) probed by the differential conductance G (V )=d I /d V by a scanning-tunneling microscope (STM) can be enhanced significantly at certain energies and positions introducing simple arrays of Co or Ag atoms on the surface, in contrast to other noble-metal surfaces. Specifically we have studied resonators consisting of two parallel walls of five atoms deposited on the clean Ag(111) surface. A simple model in which the effect of the adatoms is taken into account by an attractive local potential and a small hybridization between surface and bulk at the position of the adatoms explains the main features of the observed G (V ) and allows us to extract the proportion of surface and bulk states sensed by the STM tip. These results might be relevant to engineer the surface spectral density of states, to study the effects of surface states on the Kondo effect, and to separate bulk and surface contributions in STM studies of topological surface states.

  20. Surface stress and its consequences: In-situ study of PTCDA induced faceting of vicinal Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollinger, Florian; Vrdoljak, Pavo; Schmitt, Stefan; Kumpf, Christian; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, Wuerzburg (Germany); Tian, Zhen; Sander, Dirk; Kirschner, Juergen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany); Umbach, Eberhard [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, Wuerzburg (Germany); Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Adsorption of organic molecules on vicinal metal surfaces is known to promote faceting and self-organized ordering on mesoscopic scales. The adsorption of PTCDA on vicinal Ag(111) surfaces leads to grating-like structures after annealing. The system PTCDA/Ag(10 8 7) was investigated using two complementary techniques: An optical cantilever bending technique sensitive to changes in surface stress and spot-profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) to monitor the development of the interface structure during faceting. The data was compared to the related, non-faceting system PTCDA on Ag(111). Overall, we find a surface stress change of 0.7 N/m due to the PTCDA-induced faceting, whereas the adsorption of PTCDA without faceting induces a change of 0.4 N/m. Moreover, the data allows an explicit and unambiguous correlation of the surface stress change to the structural and morphological evolution of the interface during the adsorption of the PTCDA adlayer. In conclusion, the results provide experimental evidence for significant surface stress induced by an organic adsorbate and for its importance for faceting and long-range ordering at metal-organic interfaces.

  1. Ultrafast electronic response of Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces: From early excitonic transients to saturated image potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkin, V. M.; Lazić, P.; Došlić, N.; Petek, H.; Gumhalter, B.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of attosecond to femtosecond screening and emergent potentials that govern the dynamics and energetics of electrons and holes excited in the various stages of multiphoton photoemission processes and control the photoelectron yield in recently reported experiments [X. Cui, C. Wang, A. Argondizzo, S. Garrett-Roe, B. Gumhalter, and H. Petek, Nat. Phys. 10, 505 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2981]. The study is focused on the dynamical screening of holes created in preexistent quasi-two-dimensional Shockley state bands on Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces and of electrons excited to the intermediate and emerging screened states. Using the formalism of self-consistent electronic response, we analyze first the effects of screening on the dynamics of photoexcited electrons and holes and then of the Coulomb correlated photoexcited pair. Special attention is paid to the correlated primary electron-hole states, which commence as transient surface excitons and develop in the course of screening into uncorrelated electrons and holes propagating in the image potential and surface state bands, respectively. The obtained results enable to establish a consistent picture of transient electron dynamics at Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces that are becoming accessible by the time-, energy-, and momentum-resolved pump-probe multiphoton photoelectron spectroscopies.

  2. Adsorbate-induced facetting reconstruction and self-organized domain patterning of vicinal Ag(111) surfaces; Adsorbatinduzierte richtungsabhaengige Facettierung und selbstorganisierte Domaenen-Musterbildung auf vizinalen Ag(111)-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Stefan

    2007-02-05

    This thesis investigates structural aspects of adsorbate-induced facetting of vicinal Ag(111) surfaces. It is mainly based on scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) experiments performed under UHV conditions. The planar dye-molecule perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxilicacid-dianhydride (PTCDA) adsorbs preferentially at the step edges of the 8.5 Ag(111) vicinal surfaces used in the experiments. It causes a facetting reconstruction by the formation of (111) terraces and facets with a high step density. Moreover, two distinct preferential inclinations of facets were observed, which can only be explained by the selective influence of the adsorbate superstructure. In terms of thermodynamics, the facetting reconstruction can be described as an orientational phase separation, adapted to the constraints of planar surfaces. This concept is capable of explaining the local facetting phenomena. The formalism used predicts an important role of nucleation kinetics. This aspect is taken into account by introducing an additional phase of mobile molecules (2D molecular gas), which cannot be measured directly. Furthermore, strong arguments for the appearance of a critical island size for the PTCDA/ Ag(111) superstructure were found. This work presents structural information of all stable superstructures of PTCDA on vicinal Ag(111) surfaces. Altogether 16 such superstructures were found, 3 of which had been observed and published before. Density and commensurability were found to systematically depend on the step-structure. The two preferred inclinations of facets are related to two characteristic types of domain boundaries of the herringbone superstructure to the adjacent (111)-terrace. On the (111) terraces, small islands of metastable superstructures were found. Facets and (111) terraces form a regular grating-like domain pattern with a variable structural width of 5 to 75 nm. STM measurements show direct evidence for a long-range interaction

  3. Luminescence from 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride on Ag(111) surface excited by tunneling electrons in scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Daisuke; Yamada, Taro; Kawai, Maki

    2008-07-01

    The electronic excitations induced with tunneling electrons into adlayers of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on Ag(111) have been investigated by in situ fluorescence spectroscopy in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A minute area of the surface is excited by an electron tunneling process in STM. Fluorescence spectra strongly depend on the coverage of PTCDA on Ag(111). The adsorption of the first PTCDA layer quenches the intrinsic surface plasmon originated from the clean Ag(111). When the second layer is formed, fluorescence spectra are dominated by the signals from PTCDA, which are interpreted as the radiative decay from the manifold of first singlet excited state (S(1)) of adsorbed PTCDA. The fluorescence of PTCDA is independent of the bias polarity. In addition, the fluorescence excitation spectrum agrees with that by optical excitation. Both results indicate that S(1) is directly excited by the inelastic impact scattering of electrons tunneling within the PTCDA adlayer. PMID:18624490

  4. Direct Visualization of Surface Phase of Oxygen Molecules Physisorbed on the Ag(111) Surface: A Two-dimensional Quantum Spin System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shunji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Imada, Hiroshi; Kim, Yousoo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    Oxygen molecule (O2) is one of the smallest molecular magnets with an S = 1 quantum spin. This makes O2 attractive as a building block of low-dimensional (LD) quantum spin systems. Recently, the existence of a spin in physisorbed O2 on Ag(111) was confirmed by the ortho-para conversion of molecular hydrogen. Therefore, there is a strong need for STM-based techniques with single-molecule resolution in order to verify the potential of the O2/Ag(111) for LD quantum spin systems. Here we report the real-space observation of oxygen molecules physisorbed on an Ag(111) surface by using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. A well-ordered O2 structure was observed, and the lattice was distorted from an isosceles triangular lattice. The distortion can be explained by the competition between the magnetic and elastic instabilities of the O2 lattice. In differential tunneling conductance spectra, we found no feature of the Kondo resonance at 4.7 K; in contrast, the physisorbed O2 on Ag(110) showed a clear Kondo resonance at 18 K. Based on these observations, we discuss the realization of an S = 1 two-dimensional antiferromagnetic quantum spin system.

  5. Slow positrons in metal single crystals. I. Positronium formation at Ag(100), Ag(111), and Cu(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1980-07-01

    Monoenergetic positrons, with an incident energy of 0 --5 keV, were focused onto Ag(100), Ag(111), and Cu(111) surfaces with submonolayer contamination, and positronium formation was studied as a function of sample temperature from 300 to 1200 K. The data were fitted with a simple positron diffusion model including surface and vacancy trapping, assuming that positronium is formed only at the surface. The formation of part of the positronium fraction is found to be a temperature-activated process which is identified as detrapping from a surface state, and an estimate of the binding energy in this trap is deduced. The diffusion length is found to be only slightly temperature dependent between room temperature and the onset of vacancy trapping. At the higher sample temperatures positron trapping at thermally generated vacancies is observed by the decrease in the positron diffusion length at the higher incident voltages. A vacancy formation energy is extracted from the data and is generally found to be lower than the values obtained from bulk measurements.

  6. Theoretical study of PTCDA adsorbed on the coinage metal surfaces, Ag(111), Au(111) and Cu(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaner, L; Nabok, D; Puschnig, P; Ambrosch-Draxl, C [Chair of Atomistic Modelling and Design of Materials, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Zojer, E [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: lorenz.romaner@unileoben.ac.at

    2009-05-15

    A thorough understanding of the adsorption of molecules on metallic surfaces is a crucial prerequisite for the development and improvement of functionalized materials. A prominent representative within the class of {pi}-conjugated molecules is 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) which, adsorbed on the Ag(111), Au(111) or Cu(111) surfaces, shows characteristic trends for work-function modification, alignment of molecular levels with the substrate Fermi energy and binding distances. We carried out density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate to what extent these trends can be rationalized on a theoretical basis. We used different density functionals (DF) including a fully non-local van der Waals (vdW) DF capable of describing dispersion interactions. We show that, rather independent of the DF, the calculations yield level alignments and work-function modifications consistent with ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy when the monolayer is placed onto the surfaces at the experimental distances (as determined from x-ray standing wave experiments). The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital is occupied on the Ag and Cu surfaces, whereas it remains unoccupied on the Au surface. Simultaneously, the work function increases for Ag but decreases for Cu and Au. Adsorption distances and energies, on the other hand, depend very sensitively on the choice of the DF. While calculations in the local density approximation bind the monolayer consistently with the experimental trends, the generalized gradient approximation in several flavors fails to reproduce realistic distances and energies. Calculations employing the vdW-DF reveal that substantial bonding contributions arise from dispersive interactions. They yield reasonable binding energies but larger binding distances than the experiments.

  7. Theoretical study of PTCDA adsorbed on the coinage metal surfaces, Ag(111), Au(111) and Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thorough understanding of the adsorption of molecules on metallic surfaces is a crucial prerequisite for the development and improvement of functionalized materials. A prominent representative within the class of π-conjugated molecules is 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) which, adsorbed on the Ag(111), Au(111) or Cu(111) surfaces, shows characteristic trends for work-function modification, alignment of molecular levels with the substrate Fermi energy and binding distances. We carried out density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate to what extent these trends can be rationalized on a theoretical basis. We used different density functionals (DF) including a fully non-local van der Waals (vdW) DF capable of describing dispersion interactions. We show that, rather independent of the DF, the calculations yield level alignments and work-function modifications consistent with ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy when the monolayer is placed onto the surfaces at the experimental distances (as determined from x-ray standing wave experiments). The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital is occupied on the Ag and Cu surfaces, whereas it remains unoccupied on the Au surface. Simultaneously, the work function increases for Ag but decreases for Cu and Au. Adsorption distances and energies, on the other hand, depend very sensitively on the choice of the DF. While calculations in the local density approximation bind the monolayer consistently with the experimental trends, the generalized gradient approximation in several flavors fails to reproduce realistic distances and energies. Calculations employing the vdW-DF reveal that substantial bonding contributions arise from dispersive interactions. They yield reasonable binding energies but larger binding distances than the experiments.

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of the adsorption of fumaramide [2]rotaxane on Au(111) and Ag(111) surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendoza, S.M.; Whelan, C.M.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Zerbetto, F.; Gatti, F.; Kay, E.R.; Leigh, D.A.; Lubomska, Monika; Rudolf, Petra

    2005-01-01

    Thin films of fumaramide [2] rotaxane, a mechanically interlocked molecule composed of a macrocycle and a thread in a "bead and thread" configuration, were prepared by vapor deposition on both Ag(111) and Au(111) substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution electron-energy-

  9. PTCDA induced faceting of a vicinal Ag(111) surface: an in-situ LEEM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Marchetto, Helder; Sala, Alessandro; Freund, Hajo [Fritz-Haber-Institut, Abt. CP, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Pollinger, Florian; Schmitt, Stefan; Maier, Florian C.; Reinert, Friedrich T. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, EP II, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Umbach, Eberhard [Universitaet Wuerzburg, EP II, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Adsorption of organic molecules on vicinal metal surfaces is known to promote faceting and self-organized ordering on mesoscopic scales. In the temperature range between 400 K and 620 K the adsorption of PTCDA on a Ag(10 8 7) surface has been studied in-situ and in real-time by LEEM (low energy electron microscopy) and LEED, using the SMART microscope. The deposition of one organic layer leads to grating-like structures. The direct observation reveals a two-step process: first, facets with an angle of ca. 25 inclination are formed with (111) orientated areas in between, whereas only the facets are covered by PTCDA. In a second step the bare (111) areas are covered by PTCDA, forming a complete monolayer. The temperature dependence of the structure sizes and the influence of inhomogeneity in the initial substrate step density are discussed.

  10. The molecular dynamic study of anharmonic effects at Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces in the presence of Cu- and Ag-trimer island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zulfiqar Ali [Department of Physics, Hazara University, Mansehra 21300 (Pakistan); Hayat, Sardar Sikandar, E-mail: sikandariub@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Hazara University, Mansehra 21300 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63120 (Pakistan); Rehman, Z. [Department of Physics, Hazara University, Mansehra 21300 (Pakistan); Bouafia, Farida [LMPM, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Sidi Bel Abbes, Sidi Bel Abbes 22000 (Algeria)

    2014-05-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) technique based on semi-empirical potentials, is used to carry out the diffusion of Cu- and Ag-trimer on Cu- and Ag(111) surface at 300, 500 and 700 K temperatures. The constant energy MD simulation elaborates the anharmonic effects at the surface such as fissures, dislocations and vacancy creation, in the presence of island. The fissures and dislocations formed are in the range of 1.5–4 Å and 1–7 Å, respectively, from the island's position. The Cu and Ag islands both diffuse easily on Cu(111) surface, manipulate that the trend of diffusion is faster on Cu surface as compared to Ag surface. The process of breaking and opening of the island has also been observed. Moreover, a surface atom popped-up at 700 K by creating a vacancy near the Cu island on Ag surface. The rate of diffusion increases with the increase in temperature, both for homo- and hetero-cases.

  11. XPS of oxygen atoms on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces: accurate study with SAC/SAC-CI combined with dipped adcluster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    O1s core-electron binding energies (CEBE) of the atomic oxygens on different Ag surfaces were investigated by the symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method combined with the dipped adcluster model, in which the electron exchange between bulk metal and adsorbate is taken into account properly. Electrophilic and nucleophilic oxygens (O(elec) and O(nuc)) that might be important for olefin epoxidation in a low-oxygen coverage condition were focused here. We consider the O1s CEBE as a key property to distinguish the surface oxygen states, and series of calculation was carried out by the Hartree-Fock, Density functional theory, and SAC/SAC-CI methods. The experimental information and our SAC/SAC-CI results indicate that O(elec) is the atomic oxygen adsorbed on the fcc site of Ag(111) and that O(nuc) is the one on the reconstructed added-row site of Ag(110) and that one- and two-electron transfers occur, respectively, to the O(elec) and O(nuc) adclusters from the silver surface.

  12. van der Waals-corrected Density Functional Theory simulation of adsorption processes on noble-metal surfaces: Xe on Ag(111), Au(111), and Cu(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The DFT/vdW-WF2s1 method based on the generation of localized Wannier functions, recently developed to include the van der Waals interactions in the Density Functional Theory and describe adsorption processes on metal surfaces by taking metal-screening effects into account, is applied to the case of the interaction of Xe with noble-metal surfaces, namely Ag(111), Au(111), and Cu(111). The study is also repeated by adopting the DFT/vdW-QHO-WF variant relying on the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator model which describes well many-body effects. Comparison of the computed equilibrium binding energies and distances, and the $C_3$ coefficients characterizing the adatom-surface van der Waals interactions, with available experimental and theoretical reference data shows that the methods perform well and elucidate the importance of properly including screening effects. The results are also compared with those obtained by other vdW-corrected DFT schemes, including PBE-D, vdW-DF, vdW-DF2, rVV10, and by the simpler Local Dens...

  13. Van Der Waals-Corrected Density Functional Theory Simulation of Adsorption Processes on Noble-Metal Surfaces: Xe on Ag(111), Au(111), and Cu(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi; Ambrosetti, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The DFT/vdW-WF2s1 method based on the generation of localized Wannier functions, recently developed to include the van der Waals interactions in the density functional theory and describe adsorption processes on metal surfaces by taking metal-screening effects into account, is applied to the case of the interaction of Xe with noble-metal surfaces, namely Ag(111), Au(111), and Cu(111). The study is also repeated by adopting the DFT/vdW-QHO-WF variant relying on the quantum harmonic oscillator model which describes well many body effects. Comparison of the computed equilibrium binding energies and distances, and the C_3 coefficients characterizing the adatom-surface van der Waals interactions, with available experimental and theoretical reference data shows that the methods perform well and elucidates the importance of properly including screening effects. The results are also compared with those obtained by other vdW-corrected DFT schemes, including PBE-D, vdW-DF, vdW-DF2, rVV10, and by the simpler local density approximation and semi-local (PBE) generalized gradient approximation approaches.

  14. Quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics modeling of core-electron binding energies of methanol and methyl nitrite on Ag(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytynoja, T.; Li, X.; Jänkälä, K.; Rinkevicius, Z.; Ågren, H.

    2016-07-01

    We study a newly devised quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics (QMCMM) method for the calculation of core-electron binding energies in the case of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. This yet untested methodology is applied to systems with monolayer of methanol/methyl nitrite on an Ag(111) surface at 100 K temperature. It was found out that the studied C, N, and O 1s core-hole energies converge very slowly as a function of the radius of the metallic cluster, which was ascribed to build up of positive charge on the edge of the Ag slab. Further analysis revealed that an extrapolation process can be used to obtain binding energies that deviated less than 0.5 eV against experiments, except in the case of methanol O 1s where the difference was as large as 1.8 eV. Additional QM-cluster calculations suggest that the latter error can be connected to the lack of charge transfer over the QM-CMM boundary. Thus, the results indicate that the QMCMM and QM-cluster methods can complement each other in a holistic picture of molecule-adsorbate core-ionization studies, where all types of intermolecular interactions are considered.

  15. Quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics modeling of core-electron binding energies of methanol and methyl nitrite on Ag(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytynoja, T; Li, X; Jänkälä, K; Rinkevicius, Z; Ågren, H

    2016-07-14

    We study a newly devised quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics (QMCMM) method for the calculation of core-electron binding energies in the case of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. This yet untested methodology is applied to systems with monolayer of methanol/methyl nitrite on an Ag(111) surface at 100 K temperature. It was found out that the studied C, N, and O 1s core-hole energies converge very slowly as a function of the radius of the metallic cluster, which was ascribed to build up of positive charge on the edge of the Ag slab. Further analysis revealed that an extrapolation process can be used to obtain binding energies that deviated less than 0.5 eV against experiments, except in the case of methanol O 1s where the difference was as large as 1.8 eV. Additional QM-cluster calculations suggest that the latter error can be connected to the lack of charge transfer over the QM-CMM boundary. Thus, the results indicate that the QMCMM and QM-cluster methods can complement each other in a holistic picture of molecule-adsorbate core-ionization studies, where all types of intermolecular interactions are considered. PMID:27421423

  16. Exploring Ag(111) Substrate for Epitaxially Growing Monolayer Stanene: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junfeng; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Stanene, a two-dimensional topological insulator composed of Sn atoms in a hexagonal lattice, is a promising contender to Si in nanoelectronics. Currently it is still a significant challenge to achieve large-area, high-quality monolayer stanene. We explore the potential of Ag(111) surface as an ideal substrate for the epitaxial growth of monolayer stanene. Using first-principles calculations, we study the stability of the structure of stanene in different epitaxial relations with respect to Ag(111) surface, and also the diffusion behavior of Sn adatom on Ag(111) surface. Our study reveals that: (1) the hexagonal structure of stanene monolayer is well reserved on Ag(111) surface; (2) the height of epitaxial stanene monolayer is comparable to the step height of the substrate, enabling the growth to cross the surface step and achieve a large-area stanene; (3) the perfect lattice structure of free-standing stanene can be achieved once the epitaxial stanene monolayer is detached from Ag(111) surface; and finally (4) the diffusion barrier of Sn adatom on Ag(111) surface is found to be only 0.041 eV, allowing the epitaxial growth of stanene monolayer even at low temperatures. Our above revelations strongly suggest that Ag(111) surface is an ideal candidate for growing large-area, high-quality monolayer stanene.

  17. Monolayer solid of N-2/Ag(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruch, L.W.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1998-01-01

    An incommensurate monolayer solid of N-2/Ag(111) is modeled using extensive molecular-dynamics simulations. The conditions treated range from the low-temperature orientationally ordered solid to the melting of the solid. The properties are evaluated as a function of spreading pressure. Comparison...... is made to recent experimental data for N-2/Ag(111) and to results for N-2 adsorbed on graphite. Cu(110), and MgO(001). [S0163-1829(98)02715-5]....

  18. 苯乙烯在Ag(111)和Ag(110)表面环氧化反应结构敏感性的理论研究%Theoretical Investigation of Structure-Sensitivity of Styrene Epoxidation on Ag(111) and Ag(110) Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晨; 魏子章; 吕永康; 邢斌; 王贵昌

    2013-01-01

    The selective oxidation of styrene on oxygen-covered Ag(110) and Ag(111) surfaces is studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the periodic slab model. On the Ag(110) surface, a pre-adsorbed oxygen atom prefers the 3-fold hol ow site (3h) with an adsorption energy of-3.59 eV. On the Ag(111) surface, the most stable adsorption site for a pre-adsorbed oxygen atom is the fcc site, and the adsorption energy is-3.69 eV. The reaction process of the selective oxidation of styrene includes two steps: the formation of surface intermediates (branched oxametal acycle and linear oxametal acycle) and the subsequent formation of different products. The calculated results show that the formation of styrene oxide via the linear oxametal acycle (i.e., the pre-adsorbed atomic oxygen bound to the methylene group in styrene) is the favorable reaction mechanism on both Ag(110) and Ag(111) surfaces. The reaction barriers for the different reaction steps of styrene epoxidation on the Ag(110) surface are general y higher than those on the Ag(111) surface. Moreover, the micro-kinetic simulation results indicate that the relative selectivity towards the formation of styrene oxide on the Ag(111) surface is much higher than that on the Ag(110) surface (0.38 vs 0.003) because the energy barrier for the styrene epoxidation is smal er than that for the formation of phenyl acetaldehyde and its combustion intermediate on Ag(111) surface. The reverse trends occurred on the Ag(110) surface.%  采用密度泛函理论(DFT)对苯乙烯在Ag(110)表面和Ag(111)表面的环氧化反应进行了计算研究.经计算,在Ag(110)表面预吸附氧原子更易吸附在3重穴位(3h),吸附能为-3.59 eV;在Ag(111)表面预吸附氧原子的最稳定吸附位是fcc位,吸附能为-3.69 eV.苯乙烯的环氧化反应过程首先经过一个金属中间体,然后再进一步反应变为产物,其中经过直链中间体较支链中间体更加有利. Ag(110)面的反应活化能一般大于Ag

  19. Self-assembled structures of 4‧-([2,2‧:6‧,2″-terpyridine]-4‧-yl)-[1,1‧-phenyl]-4-carboxylic acid molecules induced by metal atoms on ag(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jie; Lu, Yan; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Li

    2016-07-01

    The self-assembled supramolecular structures of 4‧-([2,2‧:6‧,2″-terpyridine]-4‧-yl)-[1,1‧-phenyl]-4-carboxylic acid (Y) molecules on Ag(111) surface induced by metal elements have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. After annealing, the as-deposited monolayer of Y molecules shows four kinds of well-ordered structures due to the competition between dipole interaction, hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interaction. Introduced Cu atoms drive ordered monolayer into a self-assembled supramolecular structure with bright spots. Deposited Ag atoms cause the monolayer change to a windmill shape self-assembled supramolecular structure. Though the Cu and Ag are in the same group of the periodic table, a Cu atom connects two COOH groups and an Ag atom trends to bind to three COOH groups during the formation of metal-organic bonding within both induced structures. Such result suggests that the self-assembled structures formed by metal-organic coordination bonding can be controlled by choosing the number of metal-organic coordination bonds, which can be helpful to design metal-organic molecular architectures comprising functional building blocks.

  20. 2PPE measurements of PTCDA on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, Christian; Hoefer, Ulrich [Fachbereich Physik und Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Sachs, Soenke; Schoell, Achim; Umbach, Eberhard [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, D- 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Electron transfer at a metal-molecule interface plays an important role in many chemical disciplines, ranging from molecular electronics to surface photochemistry. We present measurements using time-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) to probe the energetics and dynamics of electronically excited states in epitaxial 3,4,9,10perylenetetracarboxylic acid-dianhydride (PTCDA) thin films on a Ag(111) surface for a thickness range from one to ten monolayers. These measurements allow the identification and determination of the energetic positions for the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), and LUMO+1. Angle-resolved 2PPE-measurements show a weak dispersion for the LUMO of {proportional_to}150 meV. Our experiments indicate that the excitation process for the LUMO is mainly done by electrons from the Ag(111) substrate. Time-resolved measurements probing the dynamics of the system show an increasing of lifetime for the LUMO for increasing layer thickness from 40 to 80 fs.

  1. The dissolution of Ag(111) electrodes investigated by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T K

    1998-01-01

    voltammetric methods. This remained evident for varying extents of silver dissolution. Ag(111) electrodes were oxidised in 0.1 M KCIO sub 4 solutions by a single swept ORC of 0.77x10 sup - sup 3 C cm sup - sup 2. The final rest potential of the Ag(111) working electrode was over the potential range of -36 mV to 114 mV versus the SCE where the silver islands of the reformed surface are believed to be unstable. Results show that a majority of silver islands of all sizes are stable with time, whereas the silver islands with irregular shapes tended to evolve to exhibit higher degrees of spherical geometry. Additionally, the position of the silver islands did not remain constant during the acquisition of STM images. Results from in situ STM demonstrated that the underlying step-terrace morphology of the Ag(111) electrodes did not remain constant with time. Both macroscale and nanoscale changes to the Ag(111) electrode surface were observed. It is concluded that this is due to the transport of material along and fr...

  2. Raman analysis of first monolayers of PTCDA on Ag(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a Raman spectroscopic analysis of the bonding properties of organic molecules on Ag(111) surfaces as a model system for organic semiconductor/metal contacts. The planar molecule 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylicacid-dianhydride (PTCDA) is used in the present study due to its high electronic mobility and thermal stability. Vibrational signatures of the first monolayer in direct contact with the metal, especially the modes at 1310 and 1575 cm-1, are found to be shifted to lower frequencies. First principles calculations result in corresponding mode patterns, which are essentially located in the centre of the molecule thus indicating the area, where major metal interaction takes place. Furthermore, upon annealing at 450 K the vibrational frequencies of the second monolayer are modified with respect to bulk PTCDA, which reflect particular changes of the bonding situation of this layer. For subsequent layers bulk-like behaviour is observed

  3. Investigation of unoccupied electronic states in PTCDA/Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, Soenke; Krause, Stefan; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany). Experimentelle Physik II; Schwalb, Christian; Marks, Manuel; Hoefer, Ulrich [Universitaet Marburg (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Umbach, Eberhard [Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany). Experimentelle Physik II; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Energetics, momentum and time evolution of electronic states in organic semiconductors and at their interfaces are fundamental properties that strongly determine the performance in electronic applications. All of these properties can be explored with two-photon photoelectron (2PPE) spectroscopy for occupied and in particular for unoccupied electronic states. In the archetypal system perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) on single crystal Ag(111) surfaces considerable differences between the electronic states of chemisorbed monolayer films and multilayer films are eminent. These differences, which are due to the altered chemical environment of PTCDA- and as well Ag-derived states in the vicinity of the interface, can be tracked with 2PPE. A new unoccupied interface state at the Ag/PTCDA interface with a free-electron like dispersion and comparatively short lifetime is detected that influences the charge injection characteristics considerably. The results of the 2PPE spectroscopy are compared to the results of complementary spectroscopies like UPS, IPES, and STS.

  4. Ab initio study of origin and properties of a metal-organic interface state of the PTCDA/Ag(111) system

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitsev, N. L.; Nechaev, I. A.; P. M. Echenique; Chulkov, E. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed study of a monolayer film of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on Ag(111) (the PTCDA/Ag(111) system). The study is done within density functional theory with the use of the periodic slab model. The slab is chosen to contain a PTCDA monolayer film on a silver thin film of different thicknesses (6, 9, and 12 layers) with the (111) orientation. We show that one of two surface states of the pure Ag(111) films transforms into an unoccupied interface s...

  5. Atomic structure of "multilayer silicene" grown on Ag(111): Dynamical low energy electron diffraction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuaki; Shirasawa, Tetsuroh; Lin, Chun-Liang; Nagao, Ryo; Tsukahara, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Toshio; Arafune, Ryuichi; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the atomic structure of the "multilayer silicene" grown on the Ag(111) single crystal surface by using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We measured the intensity of the LEED spot as a function of the incident electron energy (I-V curve) and analyzed the I-V curve using a dynamical LEED theory. We have found that the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag model well reproduces the I-V curve whereas the models consisting of the honeycomb structure of Si do not. The bias dependence of the STM image of multilayer silicene agrees with that of the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag reconstructed surface. Consequently, we have concluded that the multilayer silicene grown on Ag(111) is identical to the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag reconstructed structure.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of graphene nanoflakes on Au(111) and Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Julia; Leicht, Philipp; Blumenschein, Felix; Gragnaniello, Luca; Fonin, Mikhail; Marsoner Steinkasserer, Lukas Eugen; Paulus, Beate; Voloshina, Elena; Dedkov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the electronic properties of graphene nanoflakes on Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy as well as density functional theory calculations. Quasiparticle interference mapping allows for the clear distinction of substrate-derived contributions in scattering and those originating from graphene nanoflakes. Our analysis shows that the parabolic dispersion of Au(111) and Ag(111) surface states remains unchanged with the band minimum shifted to higher energies for the regions of the metal surface covered by graphene, reflecting a rather weak interaction between graphene and the metal surface. The analysis of graphene-related scattering on single nanoflakes yields a linear dispersion relation E(k), with a slight p-doping for graphene/Au(111) and a larger n-doping for graphene/Ag(111). The obtained experimental data (doping level, band dispersions around EF, and Fermi velocity) are very well reproduced within DFT-D2/D3 approaches, which provide a detailed insight into the site-specific interaction between graphene and the underlying substrate. PMID:27002297

  7. Two-dimensional pentacene:3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride supramolecular chiral networks on Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Huang, Han; Fu, Yuanxi; Zhang, Hong Liang; Ma, Jing; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2008-09-17

    Self-assembly of the binary molecular system of pentacene and 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on Ag(111) has been investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, molecular dynamics (MD), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) pentacene:PTCDA supramolecular chiral networks are observed to form on Ag(111). The 2D chiral network formation is controlled by the strong interfacial interaction between adsorbed molecules and the underlying Ag(111), as revealed by MD and DFT calculations. The registry effect locks the adsorbed pentacene and PTCDA molecules into specific adsorption sites due to the corrugation of the potential energy surface. The 2D supramolecular networks are further constrained through the directional CO...H-C multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the anhydride groups of PTCDA and the peripheral aromatic hydrogen atoms of the neighboring pentacene molecules. PMID:18722423

  8. Electron dynamics at the PTCDA/Ag(111) interface studied with 2PPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Manuel; Schwalb, Christian; Hoefer, Ulrich [Fachbereich Physik und Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Sachs, Soenke; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany). Experimentelle Physik II; Umbach, Eberhard [Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany). Experimentelle Physik II; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    We investigated epitaxial grown PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid-dianhydride) on the Ag(111) surface as model system for a metal-organic interface by means of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE). In the presence of thin PTCDA films, an unoccupied state with an effective electron mass of 0.39 m{sub e} is observed in the projected band gap of Ag 0.6 eV above E{sub F}. Its inelastic electronic lifetime is {approx_equal}50 fs and the state has an appreciable metallic character, significantly exceeding that of the image-potential states. We assign the new state to a mixture of the former Ag(111) Shockley surface state and the LUMO+1 of the first PTCDA monolayer (ML). In contrast to this interface state, which changes only weakly with PTCDA coverage, the binding energy of the first image-potential state shows a strong dependence. It increases by 135 meV for 1 ML, compared to clean Ag(111), but with absorption of the second ML, a subsequent drop of -70 meV relative to the clean surface occurs. A similar coverage dependence can be seen in the effective electron mass, which decreases by 20% from the first to the second PTCDA layer.

  9. Magnetic and electronic structure of Mn nanostructures on Ag(111) and Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardias, R.; Bezerra-Neto, M. M.; Ribeiro, M. S.; Bergman, A.; Szilva, A.; Eriksson, O.; Klautau, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    We present results of the electronic and magnetic structure of Mn nanowires adsorbed on Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces. For finite Mn nanowires on Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces, our ab initio results show that the large difference between the spin-orbit splitting of these two surfaces leads to completely different magnetic configurations. The magnetic ordering for Mn nanowires adsorbed on Ag(111) is governed by the strong exchange interaction between Mn adatoms. For Mn nano-chains on Au(111), the competition between Heisenberg and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions leads to a complex magnetic structure of the clusters considered here. Among the more conspicuous results we note a spin-spiral helical type for the nanowire with seven atoms, and a complex magnetic configuration incommensurate with the substrate lattice for a double-sized Mn wire. The effect of the structural relaxation is also investigated, showing sensitivity of the exchange interactions to the bond distance to the substrate. We also demonstrate that small changes in the band filling of these Mn chains results in drastically different changes of the interatomic exchange. Finally, we show that dispersion of the electronic energy spectrum is possible even in nanostructures with bounded spatial extension.

  10. Imaging and manipulation of a polar molecule oil Ag(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Rong; Braun, K.F.; Tang, H.;

    2001-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to image and laterally manipulate isolated phosphangulene molecules on Ag(111) at 6 K. Atomic-resolution images clearly revealed three characteristic types of appearances (three-lobed, fish and bump shape) for the adsorbed molecules, which could c...

  11. Imaging and manipulation of a polar molecule on Ag(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, R.; Braun, K.F.; Tang, H.;

    2001-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to image and laterally manipulate isolated phosphangulene molecules on Ag(111) at 6 K. Atomic-resolution images clearly revealed three characteristic types of appearances (three-lobed, fish and bump shape) for the adsorbed molecules, which could c...

  12. From hydrogen bonding to metal coordination and back: Porphyrin-based networks on Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studener, F; Müller, K; Marets, N; Bulach, V; Hosseini, M W; Stöhr, M

    2015-03-14

    The self-assembly of a metal-free porphyrin bearing two pyridyl coordinating sites and two pentyl chains at trans meso positions was investigated under ultrahigh vacuum on a Ag(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The STM measurements revealed a well-ordered close-packed structure with a rhombic unit cell for coverages ≤1 monolayer with their molecular plane parallel to the surface. The growth direction of the molecular islands is aligned along the step edges, which are restructured due to molecule-substrate interactions. The shorter unit cell vector of the molecular superstructure follows the〈1-10〉direction of the Ag(111) substrate. Hydrogen bonds between pyridyl and pyrrole groups of neighboring molecules as well as weak van der Waals forces between the pentyl chains stabilize the superstructure. Deposition of cobalt atoms onto the close-packed structure at room temperature leads to the formation of a hexagonal porous network stabilized by metal-ligand bonding between the pyridyl ligands and the cobalt atoms. Thermal annealing of the Co-coordination network at temperatures >450 K results in the transformation of the hexagonal network into a second close-packed structure. Changes in the molecule-substrate interactions due to metalation of the porphyrin core with Co as well as intermolecular interactions can explain the observed structural transformations. PMID:25770515

  13. From hydrogen bonding to metal coordination and back: Porphyrin-based networks on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studener, F., E-mail: f.studener@rug.nl; Müller, K.; Stöhr, M., E-mail: m.a.stohr@rug.nl [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747AG Groningen (Netherlands); Marets, N.; Bulach, V., E-mail: bulach@unistra.fr; Hosseini, M. W., E-mail: hosseini@unistra.fr [Laboratoire de Tectonique Moléculaire, UMR UDS-CNRS 7140, Université de Strasbourg, 4 rue Blaise Pascal, 67070 Strasbourg (France)

    2015-03-14

    The self-assembly of a metal-free porphyrin bearing two pyridyl coordinating sites and two pentyl chains at trans meso positions was investigated under ultrahigh vacuum on a Ag(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The STM measurements revealed a well-ordered close-packed structure with a rhombic unit cell for coverages ≤1 monolayer with their molecular plane parallel to the surface. The growth direction of the molecular islands is aligned along the step edges, which are restructured due to molecule-substrate interactions. The shorter unit cell vector of the molecular superstructure follows the 〈1-10〉 direction of the Ag(111) substrate. Hydrogen bonds between pyridyl and pyrrole groups of neighboring molecules as well as weak van der Waals forces between the pentyl chains stabilize the superstructure. Deposition of cobalt atoms onto the close-packed structure at room temperature leads to the formation of a hexagonal porous network stabilized by metal-ligand bonding between the pyridyl ligands and the cobalt atoms. Thermal annealing of the Co-coordination network at temperatures >450 K results in the transformation of the hexagonal network into a second close-packed structure. Changes in the molecule-substrate interactions due to metalation of the porphyrin core with Co as well as intermolecular interactions can explain the observed structural transformations.

  14. Electron spectroscopy of organic heterointerfaces: SnPc/PTCDA/Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greif, Michael; Haeming, Marc; Wiessner, Michael; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Reinert, Friedrich [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); FZK Karlsruhe, Gemeinschaftslabor fuer Nanoanalytik, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Heterointerfaces between different organic molecules are an issue of great technologic relevance. However, structurally well-defined ultrathin interfaces which are suited for the investigation with surface sensitive techniques are difficult to prepare. In order to exploit its potential as a model system in this respect we have investigated hetero-layers consisting of tin-phthalocyanine (SnPc) and perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) deposited on clean Ag(111) surfaces with photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS), X-ray absorption and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The spectroscopic signatures of the two compounds can be distinguished unambiguously in the core and valence spectra. For ultra-thin SnPc layers deposited on a single layer of PTCDA on Ag(111) structural information can be derived from angle resolved XPS and NEXAFS. The data indicates that a closed monomolecular layer of flat lying SnPc is established. This is corroborated by the UPS spectra which show a characteristic splitting of the SnPc HOMO signal due to dimer formation only for SnPc coverages beyond one layer. Moreover, LEED was applied in order to investigate the lateral ordering.

  15. Dynamical bi-stability of single-molecule junctions: A combined experimental/theoretical study of PTCDA on Ag(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Brumme, Thomas; Neucheva, Olga; Toher, Cormac; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Weiss, Christian; Temirov, Ruslan; Greuling, Andreas; Kaczmarski, Marcin; Rohlfing, Michael; Tautz, Stefan; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a molecular junction consisting of a PTCDA molecule between the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a Ag(111) surface have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Repeated switching of a PTCDA molecule between two conductance states is studied by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy for the first time, and is found to be dependent on the tip-substrate distance and the applied bias. Using a minimal model Hamiltonian approach combined with density-fun...

  16. Dynamical bistability of single-molecule junctions: A combined experimental and theoretical study of PTCDA on AG(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Brumme, T.; Neucheva, O.A.; Cuniberti, G.; Toher, C.; Gutiérrez, R.; Weiss, C.(Theory Center, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA, 23606, U.S.A.); Temirov, R.; Greuling, A.; M. Kaczmarski; Rohlfing, M.; Tautz, F. S.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a molecular junction consisting of a PTCDA molecule between the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a Ag(111) surface have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Repeated switching of a PTCDA molecule between two conductance states is studied by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy for the first time and is found to be dependent on the tip-substrate distance and the applied bias. Using a minimal model Hamiltonian approach combined with density-func...

  17. The nature of the observed free-electron-like state in a PTCDA monolayer on Ag(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Matthew S.; Persson, Mats

    2009-01-01

    A free-electron like band has recently been observed in a monolayer of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride) molecules on Ag(111) by two-photon photoemission [Schwalb et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 146801 (2008)] and scanning tunneling spectroscopy [Temirov et al., Nature 444, 350 (2006)]. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that the observed free-electron like band originates from the Shockley surface state band being dramatically shifted up in energy by the ...

  18. Current-induced switching of PTCDA on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neucheva, Olga; Weiss, Christian; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, Frank Stefan [Institut fuer Bio- und Nanosysteme (IBN-3), Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); JARA-Fundamental of Future Information Technology, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    A low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LT-STM) has been used to investigate electron transport through a single PTCDA molecule on Ag(111). Under certain conditions, one of the carboxylic oxygen atoms of the PTCDA molecule establishes a chemical bond with the STM tip, forming a covalently bound single molecular junction. In this contribution, we investigate the process of contact formation as a function of parameters such as distance, bias voltage and electrical current through the molecular junction. In a narrow distance and voltage interval, bistable switching of the oxygen atom between a high- and low-conductance state is observed. The implications of this observation are discussed.

  19. Electronic structure of ultra thin organic hetero-interfaces - SnPc/PTCDA/Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoell, Achim; Haeming, Marc; Greif, Michael; Wiessner, Michael [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Reinert, Friedrich [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Gemeinschaftslabor fuer Nanoanalytik, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    While the interfaces of molecules to a substrate have been studied extensively, knowledge about the interface between different molecular compounds is still relatively scarce. This is to some extend caused by the fact that these interfaces, which are of great relevance for opto-electronic devices consisting out of multiple organic compounds, are more complicated to access experimentally. Structurally well defined model systems, which allow for a systematic and detailed investigation of the interface characteristics, are thus of great importance. In this work we provide data from x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy on the organic heterolayer system tin-phthalocyanine (SnPc)/perylen-tetracarboxylicacid dianhydride (PTCDA). We show, that SnPc, prepared on a Ag(111) surface precovered by a monolayer of PTCDA, forms a well defined interface with a closed first layer of flat lying molecules. Moreover, the bonding of the SnPc molecules to the PTCDA interlayer is clearly non-covalent and a detailed inspection of the valence spectra shows that the respective molecular signatures can be distinguished well. The SnPc/PTCDA/Ag(111) system is thus well-suited for further investigations employing complicated techniques.

  20. Polymorphism in Self-Assembled Structures of 9-Anthracene Carboxylic Acid on Ag(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface self-assembly process of 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (AnCA on Ag(111 was investigated using STM. Depending on the molecular surface density, four spontaneously formed and one annealed AnCA ordered phases were observed, namely a straight belt phase, a zigzag double-belt phase, two simpler dimer phases, and a kagome phase. The two high-density belt phases possess large unit cells on the scale length of 10 nm, which are seldom observed in molecular self-assembled structures. This structural diversity stems from a complicated competition of different interactions of AnCA molecules on metal surface, including intermolecular and molecular-substrate interactions, as well as the steric demand from high molecular surface density.

  1. DFT study of PTCDA on Ag(111) including a STM tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greuling, Andreas; Kaczmarski, Marcin; Rohlfing, Michael [Universitaet Osnabrueck, Fachbereich Physik, Barbarastrasse 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Any progress in the field of molecular electronics requires a detailed knowledge of conduction through molecules. As a prerequisite, detailed knowledge of the geometrical structure of a model system like the system PTCDA on Ag(111) probed with a STM tip is of big importance. In experiment it is possible to peel the PTCDA from the surface by using a STM tip above a corner oxygen atom. Furthermore, the molecule flips from the surface to the tip and back under certain tip-surface distance and voltage conditions. Here, we investigate these mechanisms by employing ab initio calculations applying the widely used SIESTA code. Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the Local Density Approximation (LDA) we present calculated geometries for the process of peeling of the molecule. Additionally we show tip-surface interaction potentials also considering the influence of a homogeneous electrical field.

  2. Slow positron studies on single crystals of Ag(100), Ag(111) and Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoenergetic positrons were employed to examine positronium formation as a function of sample temperature (300 to 1200 K) and incident energy (0 to 5 keV) on Ag(100), Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces with submonolayer contamination. In these metals at the higher temperatures, positronium formation becomes the dominant process. A one-dimensional diffusion model is fit to the data as a function of incident energy. Th positronium fraction is found to be an activated process and is identified as detrapping from a surface state and an estimate of the depth of this trap is extracted. The diffusion length is found to be temperature independent before the onset of vacancy trapping. At the higher temperatures vacancy trapping is observed by the decrease in the positron diffusion length at the higher incident voltages. A vacancy formation energy is extracted from the data and is generally lower than the accepted bulk values. 18 references

  3. Investigation of the electron dynamics at the PTCDA/Ag(111)-interface; Untersuchung der Elektronendynamik an der PTCDA-Ag (111) - Grenzflaeche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, Christian

    2008-12-17

    In this work the electron dynamics at the PTCDA/Ag(111) interface have been studied with time- and angleresolved Two-photon photoemission (2PPE) as well as time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). The first part of this work concentrates on the characterization of an unoccupied electronic state, that develops 0.6 eV above the Fermi level due to the adsorption of the PTCDA molecules, whereas the shockley surface state of the clean surface vanishes. The measurements clearly identify this state as an interface state that is located between the metal surface and the first layer of the molecules. Dispersion measurements yield an effective mass of this state of 0.39 m{sub e} at the Gamma-point and show backfolding at the zone boundaries of the rectangular PTCDA unit cell. Time-resolved measurements show a surprisingly short lifetime of t=54 fs, clearly indicating a strong coupling of the state with the metal. This behaviour can be explained by a shift of the shockley surface state. This for the clean Ag(111)-surface normally occupied state shifts above the Fermi level because of the highly polarizable PTCDA molecules. Calculations with a one dimensional model potential support this interpretation. Angleresolved lifetime measurements as a function of parallel momentum show a correlation of the decay dynamics of the interface state with the measured bandstructure. The observed drop of the lifetime for larger parallel momentum is significantly smaller as expected for the pure shockley state. This behaviour can be explained due to a hybridisation of the shockley state with the LUMO+1 of the first PTCDA monolayer for k parallel >>0. The second part of this work deals with the intramolecular excitation at the PTCDA/Ag(111) interface after excitation with laser pulses with 2.33 eV and 4.66 eV photon energy. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements show a strong rise in the PL-lifetime as a function of PTCDA coverage, that can be explained by an increase in the crystallinity of

  4. Two-photon Photoemission of Organic Semiconductor Molecules on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Aram [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Angle- and time-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) was used to study systems of organic semiconductors on Ag(111). The 2PPE studies focused on electronic behavior specific to interfaces and ultrathin films. Electron time dynamics and band dispersions were characterized for ultrathin films of a prototypical n-type planar aromatic hydrocarbon, PTCDA, and representatives from a family of p-type oligothiophenes.In PTCDA, electronic behavior was correlated with film morphology and growth modes. Within a fewmonolayers of the interface, image potential states and a LUMO+1 state were detected. The degree to which the LUMO+1 state exhibited a band mass less than a free electron mass depended on the crystallinity of the layer. Similarly, image potential states were measured to have free electron-like effective masses on ordered surfaces, and the effective masses increased with disorder within the thin film. Electron lifetimes were correlated with film growth modes, such that the lifetimes of electrons excited into systems created by layer-by-layer, amorphous film growth increased by orders of magnitude by only a few monolayers from the surface. Conversely, the decay dynamics of electrons in Stranski-Krastanov systems were limited by interaction with the exposed wetting layer, which limited the barrier to decay back into the metal.Oligothiophenes including monothiophene, quaterthiophene, and sexithiophene were deposited on Ag(111), and their electronic energy levels and effective masses were studied as a function of oligothiophene length. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO decreased with increasing chain length, but effective mass was found to depend on domains from high- or low-temperature growth conditions rather than chain length. In addition, the geometry of the molecule on the surface, e.g., tilted or planar, substantially affected the electronic structure.

  5. The nature of the observed free-electron-like state in a PTCDA monolayer on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Matthew S; Persson, Mats, E-mail: msd30@liv.ac.u [Surface Science Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    A free-electron-like band has recently been observed in a monolayer of 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules on Ag(111) by two-photon photoemission (Schwalb et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 146801) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (Temirov et al 2006 Nature 444 350). Using density functional theory calculations, we find that the observed free-electron-like band originates from the Shockley surface state band being dramatically shifted up in energy by the interaction with the adsorbed molecules, while it also acquires a substantial admixture with a molecular band.

  6. The nature of the observed free-electron-like state in a PTCDA monolayer on Ag(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A free-electron-like band has recently been observed in a monolayer of 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules on Ag(111) by two-photon photoemission (Schwalb et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 146801) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (Temirov et al 2006 Nature 444 350). Using density functional theory calculations, we find that the observed free-electron-like band originates from the Shockley surface state band being dramatically shifted up in energy by the interaction with the adsorbed molecules, while it also acquires a substantial admixture with a molecular band.

  7. Influence of the adsorption geometry of PTCDA on Ag(111) on the tip–molecule forces in non-contact atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Gernot Langewisch; Jens Falter; André Schirmeisen; Harald Fuchs

    2014-01-01

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) adsorbed on a metal surface is a prototypical organic–anorganic interface. In the past, scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy studies of PTCDA adsorbed on Ag(111) have revealed differences in the electronic structure of the molecules depending on their adsorption geometry. In the work presented here, high-resolution 3D force spectroscopy measurements at cryogenic temperatures were performed on a surface area tha...

  8. Tailoring metal-organic hybrid interfaces: heteromolecular structures with varying stoichiometry on Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Henneke, Caroline; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F. Stefan; Kumpf, Christian

    2015-02-01

    The physical properties of interfaces between organic semiconductors and metal surfaces crucially influence the performance of organic electronic devices. In order to enable the tailoring of such metal-organic hybrid interfaces we study the adsorption of heteromolecular thin films containing the prototypical molecules copper-II-phthalocyanine (CuPc) and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) on the Ag(111) surface. Here, we demonstrate how the lateral order can be tuned by changing the relative coverage of both adsorbates on the surface. The layer growth has been studied in real time with low energy electron microscopy, and—for different stoichiometries—the geometric properties of three heteromolecular submonolayer phases have been investigated using high resolution low energy electron diffraction and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. Furthermore, we have used a theoretical approach based on van der Waals and electrostatic potentials in order to reveal the influence of the intermolecular and the molecule-substrate interactions on the lateral order of heteromolecular films.

  9. Thermal and Electronic Fluctuations of Flexible Adsorbed Molecules: Azobenzene on Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Liu, Wei; Poltavsky, Igor; Stecher, Thomas; Oberhofer, Harald; Reuter, Karsten; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the thermal and electronic collective fluctuations that contribute to the finite-temperature adsorption properties of flexible adsorbates on surfaces on the example of the molecular switch azobenzene C12 H10 N2 on the Ag(111) surface. Using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, we obtain the free energy of adsorption that accurately accounts for entropic contributions, whereas the inclusion of many-body dispersion interactions accounts for the electronic correlations that govern the adsorbate binding. We find the adsorbate properties to be strongly entropy driven, as can be judged by a kinetic molecular desorption prefactor of 1024 s-1 that largely exceeds previously reported estimates. We relate this effect to sizable fluctuations across structural and electronic observables. A comparison of our calculations to temperature-programed desorption measurements demonstrates that finite-temperature effects play a dominant role for flexible molecules in contact with polarizable surfaces, and that recently developed first-principles methods offer an optimal tool to reveal novel collective behavior in such complex systems.

  10. Reactivity of Ultra-Thin ZnO Films Supported by Ag(111) and Cu(111): A Comparison to ZnO/Pt(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Q.; B. Liu; McBriarty, M.; Martynova, Y.; Groot, I. de; Wang, S.; Bedzyk, M.; Shaikhutdinov, S.; Freund, H.

    2014-01-01

    We studied structure and reactivity of ZnO(0001) ultrathin films grown on Ag(111) and Cu(111) single crystal surfaces. Structural characterization was carried out by scanning tunneling microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and temperature programmed desorption. The CO oxidation behavior of the films was studied at low temperature (450 K) at near atmospheric pressures using gas chromatography. For ZnO/Cu(111), it is shown that under reaction conditions ZnO r...

  11. Growth and ordering of Ni(II) diphenylporphyrin monolayers on Ag(111) and Ag/Si(111) studied by STM and LEED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The room temperature self-assembly and ordering of (5,15-diphenylporphyrinato)nickel(II) (NiDPP) on the Ag(111) and Ag/Si(111)-(√3 × √3)R30° surfaces have been investigated using scanning tunnelling microscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The self-assembled structures and lattice parameters of the NiDPP monolayer are shown to be extremely dependent on the reactivity of the substrate, and probable molecular binding sites are proposed. The NiDPP overlayer on Ag(111) grows from the substrate step edges, which results in a single-domain structure. This close-packed structure has an oblique unit cell and consists of molecular rows. The molecules in adjacent rows are rotated by approximately 17° with respect to each other. In turn, the NiDPP molecules form three equivalent domains on the Ag/Si(111)-(√3 × √3)R30° surface, which follow the three-fold symmetry of the substrate. The molecules adopt one of three equivalent orientations on the surface, acting as nucleation sites for these domains, due to the stronger molecule-substrate interaction compared to the case of the Ag(111). The results are explained in terms of the substrate reactivity and the lattice mismatch between the substrate and the molecular overlayer. (paper)

  12. UV photo-dissociation and photodesorption of N{sub 2}O on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Watanabe, Kazuo; Menzel, Dietrich; Freund, Hans-Joachim, E-mail: watanabe@fhi-berlin.mpg.d [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-03-03

    Nanosecond laser induced photoreactions of N{sub 2}O adsorbed on Ag(111) have been studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and mass-selected, angle-dependent time-of-flight (MS-TOF) measurements of neutral desorbing particles. N{sub 2}O molecules in the first monolayer are thermally inert but photo-dissociate into N{sub 2} + O, or photodesorb molecularly or dissociatively, at photon energies above 3.5 eV. We have found that TOF spectra of photodesorbed N{sub 2} as well as of N{sub 2}O measured at hnu = 4.7 eV consist of two velocity components. The desorption flux of the fastest component of N{sub 2}O peaks approx 25 deg. off the surface normal, whereas the others are directed in the surface normal. Origins and photo-excitation as well as photodesorption mechanisms of the N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} signals are discussed.

  13. Interface dipoles of organic molecules on Ag(111) in hybrid density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Oliver T.; Atalla, Viktor; Moll, Nikolaj; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the molecular acceptors 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA), 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) and 4,5,9,10-pyrenetetraone (PYTON) on Ag(111) using density-functional theory (DFT). For two groups of the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE(α, ω)) family of exchange-correlation functionals (ω = 0 and 0.2 Å) we study the isolated components as well as the combined systems as a function of the amount of exact-exchange (α). We find that hybrid functionals favour electron transfer to the adsorbate. Comparing with experimental work function data, for α ≈ 0.25 we report a notable but small improvement over (semi) local functionals for the interface dipole. Although Kohn-Sham eigenvalues are only approximate representations of ionization energies, incidentally, at this value also the density of states agrees well with the photoelectron spectra. However, increasing α to values for which the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital matches the experimental electron affinity in the gas phase worsens both the interface dipole and the density of states. Our results imply that semi-local DFT calculations may often be adequate for conjugated organic molecules on metal surfaces and that the much more computationally demanding hybrid functionals yield only small improvements.

  14. Self-Assembly of Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) Films on Ag(111) in the Monolayer Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhuebel, Tino; Gruenewald, Marco; Sojka, Falko; Kera, Satoshi; Bussolotti, Fabio; Ueba, Takahiro; Ueno, Nobuo; Rouillé, Gaël; Forker, Roman; Fritz, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) is a promising candidate as a component of highly efficient organic photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes. The structural properties of thin films of this particular lander-type molecule on Ag(111) were investigated by complementary techniques. Highly ordered structures were obtained, and their mutual alignment was characterized by means of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal two slightly different arrangements within the first monolayer (ML), both describable as specific herringbone patterns with two molecules per unit cell whose dibenzoperiflanthene framework is parallel to the surface. In contrast, single DBP molecules in the second ML were imaged with much higher intramolecular resolution, resembling the shape of the frontier orbitals in the gas phase as calculated by means of density functional theory (DFT). Further deposition leads to the growth of highly ordered bilayer islands on top of the first ML with identical unit cell dimensions and orientation but slightly inclined molecules. This suggests that the first ML acts as a template for the epitaxial growth of further layers. Simultaneously, a significant number of second-layer molecules mainly located at step edges or scattered over narrow terraces do not form highly ordered aggregates. PMID:26844381

  15. Interface dipoles of organic molecules on Ag(111) in hybrid density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the molecular acceptors 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA), 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) and 4,5,9,10-pyrenetetraone (PYTON) on Ag(111) using density-functional theory (DFT). For two groups of the Heyd–Scuseria–Ernzerhof (HSE(α, ω)) family of exchange-correlation functionals (ω = 0 and 0.2 Å) we study the isolated components as well as the combined systems as a function of the amount of exact-exchange (α). We find that hybrid functionals favour electron transfer to the adsorbate. Comparing with experimental work function data, for α ≈ 0.25 we report a notable but small improvement over (semi) local functionals for the interface dipole. Although Kohn–Sham eigenvalues are only approximate representations of ionization energies, incidentally, at this value also the density of states agrees well with the photoelectron spectra. However, increasing α to values for which the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital matches the experimental electron affinity in the gas phase worsens both the interface dipole and the density of states. Our results imply that semi-local DFT calculations may often be adequate for conjugated organic molecules on metal surfaces and that the much more computationally demanding hybrid functionals yield only small improvements. (paper)

  16. Quasi-freestanding epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) by oxygen intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi; Zhuang, Jincheng; Wang, Jiaou; Li, Zhi; Liu, Hongsheng; Zhao, Jijun; Xu, Xun; Feng, Haifeng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui; Wang, Xiaolin; Dou, Shi Xue

    2016-07-01

    Silicene is a monolayer allotrope of silicon atoms arranged in a honeycomb structure with massless Dirac fermion characteristics similar to graphene. It merits development of silicon-based multifunctional nanoelectronic and spintronic devices operated at room temperature because of strong spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, until now, silicene could only be epitaxially grown on conductive substrates. The strong silicene-substrate interaction may depress its superior electronic properties. We report a quasi-freestanding silicene layer that has been successfully obtained through oxidization of bilayer silicene on the Ag(111) surface. The oxygen atoms intercalate into the underlayer of silicene, resulting in isolation of the top layer of silicene from the substrate. In consequence, the top layer of silicene exhibits the signature of a 1 × 1 honeycomb lattice and hosts massless Dirac fermions because of much less interaction with the substrate. Furthermore, the oxidized silicon buffer layer is expected to serve as an ideal dielectric layer for electric gating in electronic devices. These findings are relevant for the future design and application of silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices. PMID:27532041

  17. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy at the SnPc/Ag(111) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuermann, C.; Haeming, M.; Kroeger, I.; Stadler, C.; Kumpf, C.; Schoell, A.; Reinert, F.; Umbach, E. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Phthalocyanines are interesting for applications in organic devices due to the potential of tailoring their properties by introducing different metal ligands into the heterocycle. Some derivates offer the potential of tuning the work function of metal contacts due to an intrinsic dipole moment. We present a high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy study on SnPc submonolayers on Ag(111). Based on a structural analysis, which shows the existence of different adsorption phases with different orientation of the molecular dipoles depending on temperature and coverage, the PES data indicate a significant effect on the surface work function. The valence and core spectra allow identifying a covalent interaction at the interface with the appearance of a new state at EF. Moreover, the data provide evidence for a systematic weakening of the interfacial interaction with increasing coverage. This is accompanied by a constriction of the substrate-adsorbate charge transfer, which becomes evident from an analysis of the core level line shapes. As a consequence, a comprehensive description of the electronic structure in the contact regime, of the resulting interface dipole, and of work function effects needs to account not only for structural properties such as the intrinsic molecular geometry, but also for intermolecular- and interfacial interactions which may involve significant charge transfer.

  18. Structural and electronic properties of thin organic heterointerfaces SnPc/PTCDA/Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeming, Mark; Sauer, Christoph; Greif, Michael; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, Wuerzburg (Germany); Reinert, Friedrich [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, Wuerzburg (Germany); KIT, Gemeinschaftslabor fuer Nanoanalytik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Knowledge about the structural and electronic properties of organic heterointerfaces is of vital importance for electronic devices based on organic semiconductors. Yet information about these systems is still scarce due to difficulties in preparing well defined interfaces. With tin-phtalocyanine (SnPc) deposited on a Ag(111) surface precovered by perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) we present a well suited model system to gain insight into such heterointerfaces. Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) as well as near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) studies are applied in order to gain both structural and electronic information. Distinct features in core-level and valence spectra allow us to unambiguously distinguish between both molecules. We show clear evidence that SnPc forms a flat lying wetting layer on top of PTCDA with a mainly physisorptive character. Moreover a rigid level shift of all spectroscopic SnPc features with respect to the homomolecular SnPc films is observed, similar to what is known for Schottky contacts, which corresponds to a change in work function. We demonstrate that the built-in electric field at the interface can be explained by the formation of an interface dipole, which extends over several adsorbate monolayers.

  19. Substrate dependent bonding distances of PTCDA - A comparative XSW study on Cu(111) and Ag(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlach, A; Sellner, S.; Schreiber, F.; Koch, N; Zegenhagen, J.

    2006-01-01

    We study the adsorption geometry of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) on Ag(111) and Cu(111) using X-ray standing waves. The element-specific analysis shows that the carbon core of the molecule adsorbs in a planar configuration, whereas the oxygen atoms experience a non-trivial and substrate dependent distortion. On copper (silver) the carbon rings resides 2.66 A (2.86 A) above the substrate. In contrast to the conformation on Ag(111), where the carboxylic oxygen atoms are...

  20. Surface Reactions Studied by Synchrotron Based Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbek, J.

    1998-11-03

    The goal of this article is to illustrate the use of synchrotron radiation for investigating surface chemical reactions by photoelectron spectroscopy. A brief introduction and background information is followed by examples of layer resolved spectroscopy, oxidation and sulfidation of metallic, semiconducting and oxide surfaces.

  1. A theoretical study of a ZnO graphene analogue: adsorption on Ag(111) and hydrogen transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demiroglu, Ilker; Illas, Francesc; Bromley, Stefan T [Department de Quimica Fisica and Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona (UB), C/MartI i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Stradi, Daniele, E-mail: s.bromley@ub.edu [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-24

    A single sheet of zinc oxide (ZnO) based on the same flat two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal topology as graphene, but with alternating neighbouring Zn and O atoms in place of carbon atoms, is studied theoretically. Following experimental studies, the adsorption of 2D-ZnO with the Ag(111) surface is investigated using density functional theory, with and without a semi-empirical correction for dispersive interactions, and with classical interatomic potentials. The interaction of H atoms with the hexagonal Zn{sub 3}O{sub 3} rings of 2D-ZnO is given special attention where multi-centre bond formation is observed to significantly assist the transport of H atoms through the 2D-ZnO sheet.

  2. A theoretical study of a ZnO graphene analogue: adsorption on Ag(111) and hydrogen transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiroglu, Ilker; Stradi, Daniele; Illas, Francesc; Bromley, Stefan T

    2011-08-24

    A single sheet of zinc oxide (ZnO) based on the same flat two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal topology as graphene, but with alternating neighbouring Zn and O atoms in place of carbon atoms, is studied theoretically. Following experimental studies, the adsorption of 2D-ZnO with the Ag(111) surface is investigated using density functional theory, with and without a semi-empirical correction for dispersive interactions, and with classical interatomic potentials. The interaction of H atoms with the hexagonal Zn(3)O(3) rings of 2D-ZnO is given special attention where multi-centre bond formation is observed to significantly assist the transport of H atoms through the 2D-ZnO sheet.

  3. Surface modification of fluorocarbon polymers by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, K; Matsui, S; Ideta, T; Ishigaki, H

    2003-01-01

    The surface modification of a poly (tetrafluoroethylene) sheet was carried out by synchrotron radiation in the soft X-ray region. The poly (tetrafluoroethylene) substrate was exposed to synchrotron radiation while varying the substrate temperature from room temperature to 200degC. The contact angle of the modified surfaces with a water drop decreased from 96deg to 72deg by the irradiation at room temperature, while the contact angle increased to 143deg by the irradiation at the substrate temperature of 200degC. Scanning electron microscopy suggested that this repellence was ascribable to the microstructure of the poly (tetrafluoroethylene) surface. We succeeded in controlling the wettability of the poly (tetrafluoroethylene) surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic by irradiation of the soft X-ray light. (author)

  4. Two-photon Photo-emission of Ultrathin Film PTCDA Morphologies on Ag(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Aram

    2008-01-01

    Morphology- and layer-dependent electronic structure and dynamics at the PTCDA/Ag(111) interface have been studied with angle-resolved two-photon photoemission. In Stranski-Krastanov growth modes, the exposed wetting layer inhibited the evolution of the vacuum level and valence band to bulk values. For layer-by-layer growth, we observed the transition of electron structure from monolayer to bulk values within eight monolayers. Effective masses and lifetimes of the conduction band and the n=1 ...

  5. Untersuchung der Elektronendynamik an der PTCDA/Ag(111)-Grenzfläche

    OpenAIRE

    Schwalb, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wird die Elektronendynamik an der PTCDA/Ag(111)-Grenzfläche mit Hilfe von zeit- und winkelaufgelöster Zweiphotonen-Photoemission (2PPE) sowie zeitaufgelöster Photolumineszenz-Spektroskopie (PL) untersucht. Der erste Teil der Arbeit widmet sich der Charakterisierung eines unbesetzten elektronischen Zustands, der sich durch die Adsorption der PTCDA-Moleküle 0.6 eV oberhalb der Fermienergie ausbildet, während ...

  6. Surface, interface and bulk materials characterization using Indus synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation sources, providing intense, polarized and stable beams of ultra violet, soft and hard x-ray photons, are having great impact on physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and other areas research. In particular synchrotron radiation has revolutionized materials characterization techniques by enhancing its capabilities for investigating the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of solids. The availability of synchrotron sources and necessary instrumentation has led to considerable improvements in spectral resolution and intensities. As a result, application scope of different materials characterization techniques has tremendously increased particularly in the analysis of solid surfaces, interfaces and bulk materials. The Indian synchrotron storage ring, Indus-1 and Indus-2 are in operation at RRCAT, Indore. The UGC-DAE CSR with the help of university scientist had designed and developed an angle integrated photoelectron spectroscopy (AlPES) beam line on Indus-1 storage ring of 450 MeV and polarized light beam line for soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAS) on Indus-2 storage ring of 2.5 GeV. (author)

  7. Normal-incidence x-ray standing-wave determination of the adsorption geometry of PTCDA on Ag(111): Comparison of the ordered room-temperature and disordered low-temperature phases

    OpenAIRE

    Hauschild, A.; Temirov, R.; Soubatch, S.; Bauer, O.; Schöll, A.; Cowie, B.C.C.; Lee, T. -L.; Tautz, F. S.; Sokolowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Normal incidence x-ray standing wave (NIXSW) experiments have been performed for monolayers of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) adsorbed on the Ag(111) surface. Two phases were analyzed: the low-temperature phase (LT phase), which is disordered and obtained for deposition at substrate temperatures below 150 K, and the ordered phase, which is obtained for deposition at room temperature (RT phase). From the NIXSW analysis the vertical bonding distances to the Ag surface wer...

  8. A study of the O/Ag(111) system with scanning tunneling microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at ambient pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Christian; Eren, Baran; Lechner, Barbara A. J.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of O2 with the Ag(111) surface was studied with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the pressure range from 10- 9 Torr to 1 atm at room temperature and with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) up to 0.3 Torr O2 in the temperature range from RT to 413 K. STM images show that the Ag(111) surface topography is little affected in regions with large flat terraces, except for the appearance of mobile features due to oxygen atoms at pressures above 0.01 Torr. In regions where the step density is high, the surface became rough under 0.01 Torr of O2, due to the local oxidation of Ag. Various chemical states of oxygen due to chemisorbed, oxide and subsurface species were identified by XPS as a function of pressure and temperature. The findings from the STM images and XPS measurements indicate that formation of an oxide phase, the thermodynamically stable form at room temperature under ambient O2 pressure, is kinetically hindered in the flat terrace areas but proceeds readily in regions with high-step density.

  9. The adsorption geometry of PTCDA on Ag(111). An NIXSW study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauschild, Annegret

    2007-12-14

    The bonding lengths of a large pi-conjugated molecule which was adsorbed on a metal surface were determined for the first molecular layer. The system consisting of the organic molecules 3,4,9,10-Perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) grown on a silver(111) surface was investigated. PTCDA on Ag(111) appears in two phases in the first layer: The commensurate long range ordered monolayer at room temperature (RT phase) is a stable phase, whereas the disordered phase which is grown at temperatures below 160 K (LT phase) is a metastable phase. The bonding distance of the molecules from the surface is an indication for the bonding strength. Distortions of the molecules from the planar geometry give additional information on the bonding mechanism. Using NIXSW, the vertical distance of the molecules was investigated by the core-level C1s transition. Since carbon is the main element of the molecules, its vertical distance corresponds to the averaged molecular distance. Furthermore, the distances of the oxygen atoms of the molecules were determined by using the O1s transition. In the molecule, two types of chemically different oxygen atoms exist: the four outer carboxylic oxygen atoms and the two inner anhydride oxygen atoms. For the first time, this chemical shift of one atom sort within a molecule was utilized for a separation of the photoemission spectra which were taken in a standing wave experiment. Within this work, different vertical positions for atoms of the same element could be identified. For the RT phase an average molecular bonding distance of 2.86 A was measured. For the LT phase the corresponding value is 2.80 A. Thus, the molecules in the LT phase are 0.06 A closer to the Ag surface than the molecules in the RT phase, this result clearly is significant. In the LT phase, a stronger intramolecular distortion was observed, the oxygen atoms lie 0.14 A below the carbon core, whereas the molecules in the RT phase do not exhibit such a strong distortion, the

  10. Late growth stages and post-growth diffusion in organic epitaxy: PTCDA on Ag(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, B.; Duerr, A. C.; Schreiber, F.; Dosch, H.; Seeck, O.H.

    2004-01-01

    The late growth stages and the post-growth diffusion of crystalline organic thin films have been investigated for 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on Ag(111), a model system in organic epitaxy. In situ x-ray measurements at the anti-Bragg point during the growth show intensity oscillations followed by a time-independent intensity which is independent of the growth temperature. At T > 350 K, the intensity increases after growth up to a temperature-dependent saturation value...

  11. Growth and structure of the organic molecule PTCDA on Ag(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Bärbel

    2002-01-01

    Thin 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) films with the average thickness d between 50 and 200 Å, and the deposition rate F between 1 and 10 Å/min, have been deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on Ag(111). The films have been studied by atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It has been found that their structural and morphological properties vary significantly with the growth conditions. A transition from relatively smooth films to island growth on top of 2 wetting...

  12. Electronic structure at the perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride/Ag(111) interface studied with two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Sönke; Schwalb, Christian H; Marks, Manuel; Schöll, Achim; Reinert, Friedrich; Umbach, Eberhard; Höfer, Ulrich

    2009-10-14

    The electronic structure of the prototype metal/organic contact 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on a Ag(111)-surface has been investigated using time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (2PPE). Our analysis addresses particularly the nature of the interface state (IS) emerging at the interface due to the substrate-adsorbate interaction [C. H. Schwalb, S. Sachs, M. Marks et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 146801 (2008)]. Its free-electron-like dispersion and a possible backfolding at the surface Brillouin zone boundaries are discussed. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments reveal the inelastic electron lifetime along the dispersion parabola and show its decrease for increasing parallel momentum. The temperature dependence of the peak linewidth indicates a coupling of the IS to molecular vibrations. Moreover, additional aspects are addressed, such as the determination of the electron attenuation length of photoelectrons for low kinetic energy originating from the IS and the work function change of the sample upon PTCDA adsorption with very high energy resolution. PMID:19831458

  13. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-15

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-{mu}m length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  14. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-μm length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  15. 3D-force-spectroscopy and -dissipation data of an organic-inorganic interface: PTCDA on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Daniel-Alexander; Langewisch, Gernot; Fuchs, Harald; Schirmeisen, Andre [CeNTech (Center for Nanotechnology) and Institute of Physics, University of Muenster (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Organic semiconductors have attracted intensive research over the last years. Especially the adsorption of {pi}-conjugated organic molecules on metal substrates in view of potential applications in organic and molecular electronics gained a lot of interest. One of the most studied molecules is 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) and it has been investigated on a wide range of substrates. Noncontact atomic force microscopy (ncAFM) experiments with PTCDA adsorbed on Cu(111) revealed, that the intramolecular contrast of PTCDA-molecules depends strongly on the local adsorption environment. Here we present experimental ncAFM results of 3-dimensional force and dissipation spectroscopy experiments of PTCDA adsorbed on Ag(111) with submolecular resolution. The dissipation is understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip and is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip-sample system. Therefore the dissipation signal can reveal information about the mechanical properties of individual molecules.

  16. Dynamics of electron transport at the PTCDA/Ag(111)-interface studied with time-resolved 2PPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, Christian; Marks, Manuel B.; Hoefer, Ulrich [Fachbereich Physik, Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Sachs, Soenke; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Umbach, Eberhard [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Time-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) is able to provide very detailed information about the electronic structure and the dynamics of electron transfer processes of well-ordered interfaces between organic semiconductors and metals. As a model system we have investigated thin epitaxial PTCDA films on Ag(111). A dispersing unoccupied state with an effective electron mass of 0.39 m{sub e} at the anti {gamma}-point emerges 0.6 eV above the metallic Fermi level E{sub F}. Its short lifetime of 55 fs is a clear indication that this state has a strong overlap with the metal and essentially originates from an upshift of the Shockley surface state of the Ag substrate. In order to investigate the role of the interface state for charge carrier injection, we populate the LUMO of PTCDA in films of varying thickness and simultaneously record fluorescence and photoemission spectra. A long lived component observed in the 2PPE signal close to E{sub F} clearly correlates with film thickness and fluorescence lifetime.

  17. Vermessung von Dispersion und Elektronendynamik der NTCDA/Ag(111) Grenzflächenzustände mittels 2-Photonen-Photoemission

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Vermessung der Bildpotentialzustände sowie des Interfacezustands an der NTCDA/Ag(111)-Grenzfläche im Vergleich zum wohlbekannten PTCDA/Ag(111)-Modellsystem. Untersucht werden sowohl die Dispersion als auch die Elektronendynamik der Zustände.

  18. Influence of the adsorption geometry of PTCDA on Ag(111) on the tip–molecule forces in non-contact atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langewisch, Gernot; Falter, Jens; Fuchs, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Summary Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) adsorbed on a metal surface is a prototypical organic–anorganic interface. In the past, scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy studies of PTCDA adsorbed on Ag(111) have revealed differences in the electronic structure of the molecules depending on their adsorption geometry. In the work presented here, high-resolution 3D force spectroscopy measurements at cryogenic temperatures were performed on a surface area that contained a complete PTCDA unit cell with the two possible geometries. At small tip-molecule separations, deviations in the tip-sample forces were found between the two molecule orientations. These deviations can be explained by a different electron density in both cases. This result demonstrates the capability of 3D force spectroscopy to detect even small effects in the electronic properties of organic adsorbates. PMID:24611130

  19. Influence of the adsorption geometry of PTCDA on Ag(111) on the tip-molecule forces in non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langewisch, Gernot; Falter, Jens; Schirmeisen, André; Fuchs, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) adsorbed on a metal surface is a prototypical organic-anorganic interface. In the past, scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy studies of PTCDA adsorbed on Ag(111) have revealed differences in the electronic structure of the molecules depending on their adsorption geometry. In the work presented here, high-resolution 3D force spectroscopy measurements at cryogenic temperatures were performed on a surface area that contained a complete PTCDA unit cell with the two possible geometries. At small tip-molecule separations, deviations in the tip-sample forces were found between the two molecule orientations. These deviations can be explained by a different electron density in both cases. This result demonstrates the capability of 3D force spectroscopy to detect even small effects in the electronic properties of organic adsorbates. PMID:24611130

  20. Influence of the adsorption geometry of PTCDA on Ag(111 on the tip–molecule forces in non-contact atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Langewisch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA adsorbed on a metal surface is a prototypical organic–anorganic interface. In the past, scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy studies of PTCDA adsorbed on Ag(111 have revealed differences in the electronic structure of the molecules depending on their adsorption geometry. In the work presented here, high-resolution 3D force spectroscopy measurements at cryogenic temperatures were performed on a surface area that contained a complete PTCDA unit cell with the two possible geometries. At small tip-molecule separations, deviations in the tip-sample forces were found between the two molecule orientations. These deviations can be explained by a different electron density in both cases. This result demonstrates the capability of 3D force spectroscopy to detect even small effects in the electronic properties of organic adsorbates.

  1. Dynamics of Spatially Confined Bisphenol A Trimers in a Unimolecular Network on Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Julian A; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Fischer, Sybille; Oh, Seung Cheol; Saǧlam, Özge; Diller, Katharina; Duncan, David A; Allegretti, Francesco; Klappenberger, Florian; Stöhr, Martin; Maurer, Reinhard J; Reuter, Karsten; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V

    2016-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) aggregates on Ag(111) shows a polymorphism between two supramolecular motifs leading to formation of distinct networks depending on thermal energy. With rising temperature a dimeric pairing scheme reversibly converts into a trimeric motif, which forms a hexagonal superstructure with complex dynamic characteristics. The trimeric arrangements notably organize spontaneously into a self-assembled one-component array with supramolecular BPA rotors embedded in a two-dimensional stator sublattice. By varying the temperature, the speed of the rotors can be controlled as monitored by direct visualization. A combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and dispersion-corrected density-functional tight-binding (DFTB-vdW(surf)) based molecular modeling reveals the exact atomistic position of each molecule within the assembly as well as the driving force for the formation of the supramolecular rotors. PMID:26849384

  2. Formation of complex wedding-cake morphologies during homoepitaxial film growth of Ag on Ag(111): atomistic, step-dynamics, and continuum modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Maozhi [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); Han, Yong [Institute of Physical Research and Technology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Thiel, P A [Departments of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering and Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Evans, J W [Department of Mathematics and Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2009-02-25

    An atomistic lattice-gas model is developed which successfully describes all key features of the complex mounded morphologies which develop during deposition of Ag films on Ag(111) surfaces. We focus on this homoepitaxial thin film growth process below 200 K. The unstable multilayer growth mode derives from the presence of a large Ehrlich-Schwoebel step-edge barrier, for which we characterize both the step-orientation dependence and the magnitude. Step-dynamics modeling is applied to further characterize and elucidate the evolution of the vertical profiles of these wedding-cake-like mounds. Suitable coarse-graining of these step-dynamics equations leads to instructive continuum formulations for mound evolution.

  3. Processes of adsorption/desorption of iodides and cadmium cations onto/from Ag(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR D. JOVIĆ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the adsorption/desorption processes of iodides and cadmium cations in the presence of iodides onto/from Ag(111 were investigated. It was shown that both processes were complex, characterized by several peaks on the cyclic voltammograms (CVs. By PeakFit analysis of the recorded CVs and subsequent fitting of the obtained peaks by the Frumkin adsorption isotherm, the interaction parameter (f and the Gibbs energy of adsorption (DGads for each adsorbed phase were determined. In the case of iodide adsorption, four peaks were characterized by negative values of f, indicating attractive lateral interaction between the adsorbed anions, while two of them possessed value of f < –4, indicating phase transition processes. The adsorption/desorption processes of cadmium cations (underpotential deposition – UPD of cadmium in the presence of iodide anions was characterized by two main peaks, each of them being composed of two or three peaks with negative values of f. By the analysis of charge vs. potential dependences obtained either from the CVs or current transients on potentiostatic pulses, it was concluded that adsorbed iodides did not undergo desorption during the process of Cd UPD, but became replaced by Cd ad-atoms and remained adsorbed on top of a Cd layer and/or in between Cd the ad-atoms.

  4. Complex Stoichiometry reordering of PTCDA on Ag(111) upon K Intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, G. P.; Baby, A.; Zwick, C.; Gruenewald, M.; Forker, R.; Fritz, T.; Fratesi, G.; Hofmann, O. T.; Zojer, E.

    Alkali metal atoms are a simple yet efficient n-type dopant of organic semiconductors. However, the molecular crystal structures need be controlled and well understood in order to optimize the electronic properties (charge carrier density and mobility) of the target material. Here, we report that potassium intercalation into PTCDA monolayer domains on a Ag(111) substrate induces distinct stoichiometry-dependent structural reordering processes, resulting in highly ordered and large KxPTCDA domains. The emerging structures are analyzed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy (STHM), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) as a function of the stoichiometry and by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Large stable monolayer domains are found for x=2,4. The epitaxy types for all intercalated stages are determined as point-on-line. The K atoms adsorb in the vicinity of the oxygen atoms of the PTCDA molecules, and their positions are determined with sub-Angstrom precision. This is a crucial prerequisite for the prospective assessment of the electronic properties of such composite films, as they depend on the mutual alignment between donor atoms and acceptor molecules.

  5. Adsorption of bay-substituted perylene bisimide dyes on Ag(111) investigated by PES and NEXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, Markus; Krause, Stefan; Haeming, Marc; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany). Experimentelle Physik II; Schmidt, Ruediger; Wuerthner, Frank [Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany). Institut fuer Organische Chemie; Reinert, Friedrich [Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany). Experimentelle Physik II; Gemeinschaftslabor fuer Nanoanalytik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Perylene tetracarboxylic acid bisimides (PBI) are among the best available n-conducting organic materials. Halogen substituents attached to the perylene bay positions change the molecular structure by introducing a twist angle into the usually planar perylene backbone. This influences the optical properties, the stacking of the molecules, as well as the electronic properties. Moreover, the molecular conformation is also expected to effect the interaction with metal contacts, an aspect of crucial importance for electronic devices. We report on a high resolution photoemission (PES) and x-ray absorption (NEXAFS) study of the electronic structure and the molecular orientation of ultra-thin films of the planer PBI-H{sub 4}, and the core twisted PBI-Cl{sub 4} on Ag(111) substrates. In the monolayer regime, substantial changes in the UPS and XPS data with respect to the bulk samples clearly indicate a covalent interaction at the interface. In the valence regime charge transfer induced occupied states are observed at the Fermi-level. This is corroborated by the NEXAFS results, which allow probing a possible change of the molecular conformation due to the interfacial interaction.

  6. Adsorption geometry and interface states: Relaxed and compressed phases of NTCDA/Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, P.; Zaitsev, N. L.; Namgalies, A.; Tonner, R.; Nechaev, I. A.; Tautz, F. S.; Höfer, U.; Sánchez-Portal, D.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical modeling of metal-organic interfaces represents a formidable challenge, especially considering the delicate balance of various interaction mechanisms and the large size of the involved molecular species. In the present study, the energies of interface states, which are known to display a high sensitivity to the adsorption geometry and electronic structure of the deposited molecular species, have been used to test the suitability and reliability of current theoretical approaches. Two well-ordered overlayer structures (relaxed and compressed monolayers) of 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (NTCDA) on Ag(111) have been investigated using two-photon photoemission to derive precise interface-state energies for these closely related systems. The experimental values are reproduced by our density-functional theory (DFT) calculations with two approaches to treat dispersion interactions (semi-empirical correction DFT-D3 and parametrized functional optB88) and basis set approaches (localized numerical atomic orbitals, plane waves) with remarkable accuracy. Our results underline the trustworthiness and some of the limitations of current DFT-based methods regarding the description of geometric and electronic properties of metal-organic interfaces.

  7. Evidence for graphite-like hexagonal AlN nanosheets epitaxially grown on single crystal Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipas, P.; Kassavetis, S.; Tsoutsou, D.; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Golias, E.; Giamini, S. A.; Grazianetti, C.; Chiappe, D.; Molle, A.; Fanciulli, M.; Dimoulas, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrathin (sub-monolayer to 12 monolayers) AlN nanosheets are grown epitaxially by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Ag(111) single crystals. Electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy provide evidence that AlN on Ag adopts a graphite-like hexagonal structure with a larger lattice constant compared to bulk-like wurtzite AlN. This claim is further supported by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy indicating a reduced energy bandgap as expected for hexagonal AlN.

  8. Thermal stability and partial dewetting of crystalline organic thin films: 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride on Ag(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, B.; Dürr, A. C.; Schreiber, F.; Dosch, H.; Seeck, O

    2003-01-01

    The thermal stability and dewetting effects of crystalline organic thin films on inorganic substrates have been investigated for a model system for organic epitaxy, 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on Ag(111). The thin films deposited under a variety of growth conditions have been annealed stepwise and studied by in situ x-ray diffraction and noncontact atomic force microscopy. It has been found that comparatively smooth films deposited at temperatures T(g)less than or sim...

  9. Adsorption of the ionic liquid [BMP][TFSA] on Au(111 and Ag(111: substrate effects on the structure formation investigated by STM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Uhl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to resolve substrate effects on the adlayer structure and structure formation and on the substrate–adsorbate and adsorbate–adsorbate interactions, we investigated the adsorption of thin films of the ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium-bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide [BMP][TFSA] on the close-packed Ag(111 and Au(111 surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy, under ultra high vacuum (UHV conditions in the temperature range between about 100 K and 293 K. At room temperature, highly mobile 2D liquid adsorbate phases were observed on both surfaces. At low temperatures, around 100 K, different adsorbed IL phases were found to coexist on these surfaces, both on silver and gold: a long-range ordered (‘2D crystalline’ phase and a short-range ordered (‘2D glass’ phase. Both phases exhibit different characteristics on the two surfaces. On Au(111, the surface reconstruction plays a major role in the structure formation of the 2D crystalline phase. In combination with recent density functional theory calculations, the sub-molecularly resolved STM images allow to clearly discriminate between the [BMP]+ cation and [TFSA]− anion.

  10. Site-specific dissociation dynamics of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} on Ag(111) and Co(0001) and the validity of the site-averaging model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xixi [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiang, Bin [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Xie, Daiqian, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Dissociative chemisorption of polyatomic molecules on metal surfaces involves high-dimensional dynamics, of which quantum mechanical treatments are computationally challenging. A promising reduced-dimensional approach approximates the full-dimensional dynamics by a weighted average of fixed-site results. To examine the performance of this site-averaging model, we investigate two distinct reactions, namely, hydrogen dissociation on Co(0001) and Ag(111), using accurate first principles potential energy surfaces (PESs). The former has a very low barrier of ∼0.05 eV while the latter is highly activated with a barrier of ∼1.15 eV. These two systems allow the investigation of not only site-specific dynamical behaviors but also the validity of the site-averaging model. It is found that the reactivity is not only controlled by the barrier height but also by the topography of the PES. Moreover, the agreement between the site-averaged and full-dimensional results is much better on Ag(111), though quantitative in neither system. Further quasi-classical trajectory calculations showed that the deviations can be attributed to dynamical steering effects, which are present in both reactions at all energies.

  11. Ambient pressure oxidation of Ag(111) surfaces : an in-situ X-ray study

    OpenAIRE

    Reicho, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of metals plays an outstanding role in everyday life. Typical phenomena are the formation of rust on steel or oxide scales on copper, showing up as a green patina. The formation of metal oxides is not always an unwanted process. The functionality of many materials is directly related to their controlled oxidation. The most prominent examples are passivating oxide layers on stainless steel. Relevant for this thesis are industrially applied heterogeneous catalytic reactions for th...

  12. Effects of rotational-symmetry breaking on physisorption of ortho- and para-H2 on Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Toshiki; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2014-04-11

    Quantum-state-selective thermal desorption of H2 weakly physisorbed on Ag(111) demonstrates significantly different desorption features between the nuclear-spin modifications. An energy shift due to the rotational-symmetry breaking induced by an anisotropic interaction affects not only the enthalpy but also the entropy of adsorption. The preexponential factor for desorption of the ortho-H2 is about three times as large as that of the para-H2. The entropy difference indicates a perpendicular orientation preference of anisotropic physisorption potential, which also suggests the importance of partial hybridization interaction for weak physisorption.

  13. Synchrotron radiation applied to the study of heterogeneous model catalyst surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of synchrotron radiation-based experimental techniques for the characterization of model catalyst surfaces is reviewed. The planar model systems considered are distinguished by their heterogeneous surface character. Prototypical examples are discussed to illustrate various aspects of model catalyst surfaces and they include oxide thin films on metal single crystal substrates, metal nanoparticles deposited on ordered oxide films, thin layers of oxides on oxide substrates, heterogeneous bimetallic surfaces and metal single crystal surfaces decorated by oxide nanoparticles. (author)

  14. Impact of a molecular wetting layer on the structural and optical properties of tin(II)-phthalocyanine multilayers on Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenewald, Marco; Peuker, Julia; Meissner, Matthias; Sojka, Falko; Forker, Roman; Fritz, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    We investigate ultrathin highly ordered layers of tin(II)-phthalocyanine (SnPc) on top of a monolayer (ML) of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on Ag(111). The films are analyzed structurally by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) as well as optically using differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). We find that the first ML of SnPc is entirely rearranged upon bilayer (BL) formation, yielding a commensurate registry in higher-order coincidence with the underlying PTCDA lattice. SnPc layers adsorbed on top self-assemble in further BLs. Within each BL the molecules are arranged pairwise, i.e., stacked as physical dimers, providing a characteristic absorption spectrum with strongly redshifted components compared to SnPc monomers. This altered spectral envelope mainly originates from strong orbital overlap of stacked molecules within each BL. In contrast, adjacent BLs show only weak orbital overlap, which is responsible for an additional redshift of the low-energy transition band. Our results demonstrate that a simple modification of the metal substrate surface, e.g., by a PTCDA wetting layer, has beneficial effects on structural ordering of SnPc multilayers adsorbed on top. The impact on the optical absorption spectrum manifests in a narrow and intense absorption peak in the near-infrared spectral region which is significantly less pronounced if the PTCDA layer is omitted.

  15. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of liquid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Pershan, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented.......A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented....

  16. Chemical transformations drive complex self-assembly of uracil on close-packed coinage metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Fischer, Sybille; Reichert, Joachim; Diller, Katharina; Blobner, Florian; Klappenberger, Florian; Allegretti, Francesco; Seitsonen, Ari P; Barth, Johannes V

    2012-03-27

    We address the interplay of adsorption, chemical nature, and self-assembly of uracil on the Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces as a function of molecular coverage (0.3 to 1 monolayer) and temperature. We find that both metal surfaces act as templates and the Cu(111) surface acts additionally as a catalyst for the resulting self-assembled structures. With a combination of STM, synchrotron XPS, and NEXAFS studies, we unravel a distinct polymorphism on Cu(111), in stark contrast to what is observed for the case of uracil on the more inert Ag(111) surface. On Ag(111) uracil adsorbs flat and intact and forms close-packed two-dimensional islands. The self-assembly is driven by stable hydrogen-bonded dimers with poor two-dimensional order. On Cu(111) complex structures are observed exhibiting, in addition, a strong annealing temperature dependence. We determine the corresponding structural transformations to be driven by gradual deprotonation of the uracil molecules. Our XPS study reveals unambiguously the tautomeric signature of uracil in the contact layer and on Cu(111) the molecule's deprotonation sites. The metal-mediated deprotonation of uracil and the subsequent electron localization in the molecule determine important biological reactions. Our data show a dependence between molecular coverage and molecule-metal interaction on Cu(111), as the molecules tilt at higher coverages in order to accommodate a higher packing density. After deprotonation of both uracil N atoms, we observe an adsorption geometry that can be understood as coordinative anchoring with a significant charge redistribution in the molecule. DFT calculations are employed to analyze the surface bonding and accurately describe the pertaining electronic structure.

  17. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  18. Complex Stoichiometry-Dependent Reordering of 3,4,9,10-Perylenetetracarboxylic Dianhydride on Ag(111) upon K Intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Christian; Baby, Anu; Gruenewald, Marco; Verwüster, Elisabeth; Hofmann, Oliver T; Forker, Roman; Fratesi, Guido; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Zojer, Egbert; Fritz, Torsten

    2016-02-23

    Alkali metal atoms are frequently used for simple yet efficient n-type doping of organic semiconductors and as an ingredient of the recently discovered polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors. However, the incorporation of dopants from the gas phase into molecular crystal structures needs to be controlled and well understood in order to optimize the electronic properties (charge carrier density and mobility) of the target material. Here, we report that potassium intercalation into the pristine 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer domains on a Ag(111) substrate induces distinct stoichiometry-dependent structural reordering processes, resulting in highly ordered and large KxPTCDA domains. The emerging structures are analyzed by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy (ST[H]M), and low-energy electron diffraction as a function of the stoichiometry. The analysis of the measurements is corroborated by density functional theory calculations. These turn out to be essential for a correct interpretation of the experimental ST[H]M data. The epitaxy types for all intercalated stages are determined as point-on-line. The K atoms adsorb in the vicinity of the oxygen atoms of the PTCDA molecules, and their positions are determined with sub-Ångström precision. This is a crucial prerequisite for the prospective assessment of the electronic properties of such composite films, as they depend rather sensitively on the mutual alignment between donor atoms and acceptor molecules. Our results demonstrate that only the combination of experimental and theoretical approaches allows for an unambiguous explanation of the pronounced reordering of KxPTCDA/Ag(111) upon changing the K content. PMID:26718635

  19. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review about the use of micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces as a tool for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of soft matter and biological materials. Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data

  20. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardo, Angelo [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Di Fabrizio, Enzo [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); BIONEM Lab at University Magna Graecia, Campus Salvatore Venuta, Viale Europa 88100, Germaneto-Catanzaro (Italy); Limongi, Tania [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Marinaro, Giovanni [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Riekel, Christian, E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-06-10

    A comprehensive review about the use of micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces as a tool for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of soft matter and biological materials. Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data.

  1. Monochromator on a synchrotron undulator source for liquid surface studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Freund, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    For liquid surface studies a monochromatic beam of relative bandwidth between 0.1% and 1% at a variable angle in the vertical plane between 0-degrees and 10-degrees is needed. The beam should be like a sheet some tens of mu-m thick and some mm wide, and as intense as possible. We discuss a monoch...

  2. Surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation; Hoshako reiki ni yoru hyomenko hanno process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Materials Research; Yoshigoe, A. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Urisu, T. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Institute for Molecular Science

    1997-08-20

    This paper introduces the surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation, and its application. A synchrotron radiation process using soft X-rays contained in electron synchrotron radiated light as an excited light source has a possibility of high-resolution processing because of its short wave length. The radiated light can excite efficiently the electronic state of a substance, and can induce a variety of photochemical reactions. In addition, it can excite inner shell electrons efficiently. In the aspect of its application, it has been found that, if radiated light is irradiated on surfaces of solids under fluorine-based reaction gas or Cl2, the surfaces can be etched. This technology is utilized practically. With regard to radiated light excited CVD process, it may be said that anything that can be deposited by the ordinary plasma CVD process can be deposited. Its application to epitaxial crystal growth may be said a nano processing application in thickness direction, such as forming an ultra-lattice structure, the application being subjected to expectation. In micromachine fabricating technologies, a possibility is searched on application of a photo reaction process of the radiated light. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...... antiferroelectric double layers develop that can be distinguished from the bulk single layer structure. A model is developed that separates the electron density in a contribution from the molecular form factor, and from the structure factor of the mono- and the bilayers, respectively. It shows that (i) the first...

  4. Adsorbatinduzierte richtungsabhängige Facettierung und selbstorganisierte Domänen-Musterbildung auf vizinalen Ag(111)-Oberflächen

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit den strukturellen Aspekten einer adsorbat-induzierten Facettierung von vizinalen Ag(111)-Oberflächen. Bei dem Adsorbat handelte es sich um das organische Molekül Perylen-3,4,9,10-Tetracarbonsäure-Dianhydrid (PTCDA). Die Experimente wurden unter Ultrahochvakuum-Bedingungen durchgeführt, die Charakterisierung erfolgte hauptsächlich mit den Messmethoden Rastertunnelmikroskopie (STM) und niederenergetische Elektronenbeugung (LEED). Das planare Farbstoff...

  5. Photoelektronenspektroskopische Untersuchungen zur Adsorption und Reaktivität von Co(II)-, Zn(II)- und Fe(II)-Porphyrinen auf Ag(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Flechtner, Ken-Dominic

    2007-01-01

    Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden verschiedene Metalloporphyrinschichten im Ultrahochvakuum auf Ag(111) bezüglich der Wechselwirkung mit der Silberoberfläche, der In Situ Herstellung solcher Metalloporphyrinschichten und der Koordination kleiner Moleküle in Axialposition untersucht. Das Ultrahochvakuum eröffnet dabei die Möglichkeit, die Eigenschaften, wie Reaktivität oder elektronische Struktur der Metalloporphyrine im lösungsmittelfreien Zustand zu studieren, d.h. störungsfrei zu cha...

  6. In situ nonlinear optical spectroscopy of electron-phonon couplings at alkali-doped C{sub 60}/Ag(111) interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakudji, Ernest [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Physics Department, University of Kinshasa (UNIKIN), Kinshasa (CD); Silien, Christophe [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Lis, Dan; Cecchet, Francesca; Thiry, Paul A.; Peremans, Andre; Caudano, Yves [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Nouri, Abdelkader [Laboratoire Materiaux, Ecole Normale Superieure d' Enseignement Technique (ENSET), Oran 31000 (Algeria)

    2010-08-15

    We use doubly resonant, infrared-visible sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (DR-SFG) to probe vibrational and electronic properties of C{sub 60} and K-doped C{sub 60} monolayers adsorbed on Ag(111) single crystal under ultra-high vacuum (UHV). We recorded the interface SFG spectra for five visible wavelengths. We observe a strong dependence of the SFG intensity of the totally symmetric A{sub g}(2) mode of the fullerene while scanning the visible wavelength, due to the DR-SFG phenomenon. The SFG intensity of the A{sub g}(2) mode is the strongest at 488 nm and at 532 nm for the pure and fully doped monolayers, respectively. These results demonstrate the occurrence of electron-phonon couplings at the C{sub 60}/Ag(111) and saturated K/C{sub 60}/Ag(111) interfaces. They enable us to determine the energy of the coupled electronic transition and to link the electronic resonance to the h{sub u} (HOMO) to t{sub 1g} (LUMO + 1) transition of C{sub 60}. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaro, G.; Accardo, A.; Benseny-Cases, N.; Burghammer, M.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Cotte, M.; Dante, S.; De Angelis, F.; Di Cola, E.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Hauser, C.; Riekel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments.

  8. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanostructure fabricated by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of gold nanoparticles in an electroplating solution containing gold (I) trisodium disulphite under synchrotron X-ray radiation was investigated. The nanoparticles grew and aggregated into clusters with increasing radiation time. This behavior is explained by evaluating the effect of Derjaguin-Landau-Verweyand-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions combining repulsive electrostatic and attractive van der Waals forces on the particle deposition process. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4,4′ -bipyridine (4bpy) in aqueous solution was measured using gold nanoparticles immobilized on silicon substrates under systematically-varied X-ray exposure. The substrates provided an in situ SERS spectrum for 1 nM 4bpy. This demonstration creates new opportunities for chemical and environmental analyses through simple SERS measurements. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were produced by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation. • The gold nanoparticles grew and aggregated into the higher-order nanostructure. • The behavior is qualitatively explained by analytical estimation. • The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of 4,4′-bipyridine (4bpy) was demonstrated. • The substrate fabricated in a suitable condition provides in situ SERS for 1 nM 4bpy

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanostructure fabricated by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu, E-mail: yamaguti@lasti.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Matsumoto, Takeshi [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Okada, Ikuo; Sakurai, Ikuya [Synchrotoron Radiation Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Utsumi, Yuichi [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The deposition of gold nanoparticles in an electroplating solution containing gold (I) trisodium disulphite under synchrotron X-ray radiation was investigated. The nanoparticles grew and aggregated into clusters with increasing radiation time. This behavior is explained by evaluating the effect of Derjaguin-Landau-Verweyand-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions combining repulsive electrostatic and attractive van der Waals forces on the particle deposition process. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4,4′ -bipyridine (4bpy) in aqueous solution was measured using gold nanoparticles immobilized on silicon substrates under systematically-varied X-ray exposure. The substrates provided an in situ SERS spectrum for 1 nM 4bpy. This demonstration creates new opportunities for chemical and environmental analyses through simple SERS measurements. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were produced by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation. • The gold nanoparticles grew and aggregated into the higher-order nanostructure. • The behavior is qualitatively explained by analytical estimation. • The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of 4,4′-bipyridine (4bpy) was demonstrated. • The substrate fabricated in a suitable condition provides in situ SERS for 1 nM 4bpy.

  11. Application of X-rays and Synchrotron X Rays to Residual Stress Evaluation Near Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nondestructive residual stress analysis can be performed using diffraction methods. The easiest accessible radiation is characteristic X radiation that has a penetration depth of ∼10 microm suitable for the determination of the residual stresses in near-surface layers. Special techniques have been developed, e.g., with respect to in situ analyses of the stress state in oxide layers and the residual stress analysis in coarse grained zones of steel welds or annealed Ni-base alloys. Depending on the size of the gauge volume, neutron diffraction can provide information at depths of tens of millimetres of steel and many tens of millimetres of Al. An alternative to the use of the characteristic synchrotron radiation is the use of a high-energy polychromatic beam in an energy dispersive arrangement, which gives access to higher penetration depths at still gauge volumes as small as 100 microm x 100 microm x 1 mm in steel rods of 15-mm diameter. The combination of neutrons with conventional X rays and monochromatic and polychromatic synchrotron radiation allows for a comprehensive investigation of the phase composition, the texture, and the residual stresses

  12. Self-assembled two-dimensional nanoporous molecular arrays and photoinduced polymerization of 4-bromo-4′-hydroxybiphenyl on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Qian; He, Jing Hui [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Singapore-Peking University Research Centre for a Sustainable Low-Carbon Future, 1 CREATE Way, #15-01, CREATE Tower, Singapore 138602 (Singapore); Zhang, Jia Lin [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wu, Kai [Singapore-Peking University Research Centre for a Sustainable Low-Carbon Future, 1 CREATE Way, #15-01, CREATE Tower, Singapore 138602 (Singapore); BNLMS, SKLSCUSS, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, Guo Qin [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Singapore-Peking University Research Centre for a Sustainable Low-Carbon Future, 1 CREATE Way, #15-01, CREATE Tower, Singapore 138602 (Singapore); National University of Singapore (Suzhou) Research Institute, Suzhou (China); Wee, Andrew Thye Shen [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Chen, Wei, E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Singapore-Peking University Research Centre for a Sustainable Low-Carbon Future, 1 CREATE Way, #15-01, CREATE Tower, Singapore 138602 (Singapore); National University of Singapore (Suzhou) Research Institute, Suzhou (China); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2015-03-14

    Self-assembled two-dimensional molecular arrays and photoinduced polymerization of 4-bromo-4′-hydroxybiphenyl on Ag(111) were studied using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy combined with density functional theory calculations. Square-like self-assembled structures of 4-bromo-4′-hydroxybiphenyl stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen and halogen bonds were transformed into hexagonal nanopores of biphenyl biradicals by 266 nm UV laser irradiation at 80 K. The biradicals further coupled to each other and formed covalently linked polyphenylene polymer chains at room temperature.

  13. Assessment of barium sulphate formation and inhibition at surfaces with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precipitation of barium sulphate from aqueous supersaturated solutions is a well-known problem in the oil industry often referred to as 'scaling'. The formation and growth of barite on surfaces during the oil extraction process can result in malfunctions within the oil facilities and serious damage to the equipment. The formation of barium sulphate at surfaces remains an important topic of research with the focus being on understanding the mechanisms of formation and means of control. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) was used to investigate the formation of barium sulphate on a stainless steel surface. The effect of Poly-phosphinocarboxylic acid (PPCA) and Diethylenetriamine-penta-methylenephosphonic acid (DETPMP) which are two commercial inhibitors for barium sulphate was examined. The in situ SXRD measurements allowed the identification of the crystal faces of the deposited barite in the absence and presence of the two inhibitors. The preferential effect of the inhibitors on some crystal planes is reported and the practical significance discussed.

  14. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  15. 3-D surface profile measurements of large x-ray synchrotron radiation mirrors using stitching interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stitching interferometry, using small-aperture, high-resolution, phase-measuring interferometry, has been proposed for quite some time now as a metrology technique to obtain 3-dimensional profiles of surfaces of oversized optical components and substrates. The aim of this work is to apply this method to the specific case of long grazing-incidence x-ray mirrors, such as those used in beamlines at synchrotron radiation facilities around the world. Both fabrication and characterization of these mirrors would greatly benefit from this technique because it offers the potential for providing measurements with accuracy and resolution better than those obtained using existing noncontact laser profilers, such as the long trace profiler (LTP). Measurement data can be used as feedback for computer-controlled fabrication processes to correct for possible topography errors. The data can also be used for simulating and predicting mirror performance under realistic conditions. A semiautomated stitching system was built and tested at the X-ray Optics Metrology Laboratory of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial objective was to achieve a measurement sensitivity on the order of 1 (micro)rad rms. Preliminary tests on a 1 m-long x-ray mirror showed system repeatability of less than 0.6 (micro)rad rms. This value is comparable to that of a conventional LTP. The measurement accuracy was mostly affected by environmental perturbations and system calibration effects. With a fully automated and improved system (to be built in the near future), we expect to achieve measurement sensitivity on the order of 0.0 (micro)rad rms or better. In this paper, after a brief review of basic principles and general technical difficulties and challenges of the stitching technique, a detailed description of the measurement setup is given and preliminary results obtained with it are analyzed and discussed

  16. Study of strong enhancement of synchrotron radiation via surface plasma waves excitation by particle-in-cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation is strongly enhanced by the resonant excitation of surface plasma waves (SPWs). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that energy conversion efficiency from laser to radiation in the case of SPWs excitation is about 18.7%, which is improved by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with that of no SPWs excitation. Besides the high energy conversion efficiency, the frequency spectrum and the angular distribution of the radiation are also improved in the case of SPWs excitation because of the quasi-static magnet field induced by surface plasma waves excitation

  17. Study of strong enhancement of synchrotron radiation via surface plasma waves excitation by particle-in-cell simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, K. Q. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, C. Y., E-mail: zhengcy@iapcm.ac.cn; Cao, L. H.; He, X. T., E-mail: xthe@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Wu, Dong [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Liu, Z. J. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-11-02

    Synchrotron radiation is strongly enhanced by the resonant excitation of surface plasma waves (SPWs). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that energy conversion efficiency from laser to radiation in the case of SPWs excitation is about 18.7%, which is improved by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with that of no SPWs excitation. Besides the high energy conversion efficiency, the frequency spectrum and the angular distribution of the radiation are also improved in the case of SPWs excitation because of the quasi-static magnet field induced by surface plasma waves excitation.

  18. In situ synchrotron IR study relating temperature and heating rate to surface functional group changes in biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtania, Kawnish; Tanner, Joanne; Kabir, Kazi Bayzid; Rajendran, Sharmen; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Three types of woody biomass were investigated under pyrolysis condition to observe the change in the surface functional groups by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) technique with increasing temperature under two different (5 and 150°C/min) heating rates. The experiments were carried out in situ in the infrared microscopy beamline (IRM) of the Australian Synchrotron. The capability of the beamline made it possible to focus on single particles to obtain low noise measurements without mixing with KBr. At lower heating rate, the surface functional groups were completely removed by 550°C. In case of higher heating rate, a delay was observed in losing the functional groups. Even at a high temperature, significant number of functional groups was retained after the higher heating rate experiments. This implies that at considerably high heating rates typical of industrial reactors, more functional groups will remain on the surface.

  19. Construction of the undulator beamline equipped with a UHV-STM for observations of synchrotron-radiation-stimulated surface reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An undulator beamline equipped with a UHV-scanning tunneling electron microscopy (STM) system has been designed and constructed at the UVSOR facility to investigate synchrotron-radiation-stimulated reactions. Using this undulator beamline, we have observed irradiation effects on the hydrogen terminated-(H-) Si(1 1 1) surfaces in atomic scale. The small protrusions, which are assigned to the rest-atom with missing H, appeared on the monohydride surface after irradiation. The density of them monotonically increased with irradiation dose. This phenomenon has been observed almost independent on the Si 2p core electron excitation threshold, indicating the significant contribution of the valence electron excitations to the Si-H bond dissociations

  20. Fast in situ phase and stress analysis during laser surface treatment: a synchrotron x-ray diffraction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, V; Gibmeier, J; Wilde, F; Staron, P; Rössler, R; Wanner, A

    2012-11-01

    An in situ stress analysis by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction was carried out during laser surface hardening of steel. A single exposure set-up that based on a special arrangement of two fast silicon strip line detectors was established, allowing for fast stress analysis according to the sin(2)ψ x-ray analysis method. For the in situ experiments a process chamber was designed and manufactured, which is described in detail. First measurements were carried out at the HZG undulator imaging beamline (IBL, beamline P05) at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III, DESY, Hamburg (Germany). The laser processing was carried out using a 6 kW high power diode laser system. Two different laser optics were compared, a Gaussian optic with a focus spot of ø 3 mm and a homogenizing optic with a rectangular spot dimension of 8 × 8 mm(2). The laser processing was carried out using spot hardening at a heating-/cooling rate of 1000 K/s and was controlled via pyrometric temperature measurement using a control temperature of 1150 °C. The set-up being established during the measuring campaign allowed for this first realization data collection rates of 10Hz. The data evaluation procedure applied enables the separation of thermal from elastic strains and gains unprecedented insight into the laser hardening process. PMID:23206092

  1. Fast in situ phase and stress analysis during laser surface treatment: a synchrotron x-ray diffraction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, V; Gibmeier, J; Wilde, F; Staron, P; Rössler, R; Wanner, A

    2012-11-01

    An in situ stress analysis by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction was carried out during laser surface hardening of steel. A single exposure set-up that based on a special arrangement of two fast silicon strip line detectors was established, allowing for fast stress analysis according to the sin(2)ψ x-ray analysis method. For the in situ experiments a process chamber was designed and manufactured, which is described in detail. First measurements were carried out at the HZG undulator imaging beamline (IBL, beamline P05) at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III, DESY, Hamburg (Germany). The laser processing was carried out using a 6 kW high power diode laser system. Two different laser optics were compared, a Gaussian optic with a focus spot of ø 3 mm and a homogenizing optic with a rectangular spot dimension of 8 × 8 mm(2). The laser processing was carried out using spot hardening at a heating-/cooling rate of 1000 K/s and was controlled via pyrometric temperature measurement using a control temperature of 1150 °C. The set-up being established during the measuring campaign allowed for this first realization data collection rates of 10Hz. The data evaluation procedure applied enables the separation of thermal from elastic strains and gains unprecedented insight into the laser hardening process.

  2. Surface spin-polarized currents generated in topological insulators by circularly polarized synchrotron radiation and their photoelectron spectroscopy indication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikin, A. M.; Klimovskikh, I. I.; Filyanina, M. V.; Rybkina, A. A.; Pudikov, D. A.; Kokh, K. A.; Tereshchenko, O. E.

    2016-08-01

    A new method for generating spin-polarized currents in topological insulators has been proposed and investigated. The method is associated with the spin-dependent asymmetry of the generation of holes at the Fermi level for branches of topological surface states with the opposite spin orientation under the circularly polarized synchrotron radiation. The result of the generation of holes is the formation of compensating spin-polarized currents, the value of which is determined by the concentration of the generated holes and depends on the specific features of the electronic and spin structures of the system. The indicator of the formed spin-polarized current can be a shift of the Fermi edge in the photoelectron spectra upon photoexcitation by synchrotron radiation with the opposite circular polarization. The topological insulators with different stoichiometric compositions (Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.8Se1.2 and PbBi2Se2Te2) have been investigated. It has been found that there is a correlation in the shifts and generated spin-polarized currents with the specific features of the electronic spin structure. Investigations of the graphene/Pt(111) system have demonstrated the possibility of using this method for other systems with a spin-polarized electronic structure.

  3. Synchrotron-Radiation Photoemission Study of Electronic Structures of a Cs-Doped Rubrene Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Lu, Meng-Han; Chu, Yu-Ya; Pi, Tun-Wen

    Using synchrotron-radiation photoemission spectroscopy, we have studied the electronic structure of a cesium-doped rubrene thin film. The addition of cesium atoms causes the movement of the valence-band spectra and the change in line shapes at different concentration that can be separated into four different stages. In the first stage, the cesium atoms continuously diffuse into the substrate, and the Fermi level moves in the energy gap as a result of an electron transferred from the cesium to the rubrene. The second stage, in which the shifts of the spectra are interrupted, is characterized by the introduction of two in-gap states. When increasing doping of cesium into the third stage, the spectra move again; whereas, the line shapes maintain at the stoichiometric ratio of one. In the fourth stage, new in-gap states appear, which are the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and HOMO+1 states of (rubrene)2- anion.

  4. Observation and modeling of conformational molecular structures driving the self-assembly of tri-adamantyl benzene on Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmettes, Bastien; Estrampes, Nicolas; Coudret, Christophe; Roussel, Thomas J; Faraudo, Jordi; Coratger, Roland

    2016-07-27

    The self-organization of tri-adamantyl (TAB) benzene molecules has been investigated using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM). The molecular structures have also been studied using molecular modeling. In particular, these calculations have been performed on large areas (1000 nm(2)) from the atomic structure of the molecular building block, combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte-Carlo (MC) approaches. These investigations show that the structure of the molecule and its flexibility allow for the formation of different networks as a function of surface coverage. The calculations demonstrate that the stability of the largest structures is obtained through the increase of the interfacial energy induced by the rotation of the adamantyl groups, a behavior whose consequences explain the subtle contrasts observed in the experimental STM images. PMID:26667964

  5. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on Synchrotron Radiation contains the appendix to the Daresbury Annual Report 1987/88. The appendix is mainly devoted to the scientific progress reports on the work at the Synchrotron Radiation Source in 1987/8. The parameters of the Experimental Stations and the index to the Scientific Reports are also included in the appendix. (U.K.)

  6. Interplay of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions in self-assembled molecular surface nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnadt, Joachim; Xu, Wei; Vang, Ronnie Thorbjørn;

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid (NDCA) molecules on the Ag(110), Cu(110), and Ag(111) surfaces at room temperature has been studied by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Further supporting results were obtained using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and soft X......-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). On the Ag(110) support, which had an average terrace width of only 15 nm, the NDCA molecules form extended one-dimensional (1-D) assemblies, which are oriented perpendicular to the step edges and have lengths of several hundred nanometres. This shows that the assemblies have a......-edge crossing is not observed when the molecules are adsorbed on the isotropic Ag(111) or more reactive Cu(110) surfaces. On Ag(111), similar 1-D assemblies are formed to those on Ag(110), but they are oriented along the step edges. On Cu(110), the carboxylic groups of NDCA are deprotonated and form covalent...

  7. New Analytical Methods for the Surface/ Interface and the Micro-Structures in Advanced Nanocomposite Materials by Synchrotron Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nakamae

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical methods of surface/interface structure and micro-structure in advanced nanocomposite materials by using the synchrotron radiation are introduced. Recent results obtained by the energy-tunable and highly collimated brilliant X-rays, in-situ wide angle/small angle X-ray diffraction with high accuracy are reviewed. It is shown that small angle X-ray scattering is one of the best methods to characterize nanoparticle dispersibility, filler aggregate/agglomerate structures and in-situ observation of hierarchical structure deformation in filled rubber under cyclic stretch. Grazing Incidence(small and wide angle X-ray Scattering are powerful to analyze the sintering process of metal nanoparticle by in-situ observation as well as the orientation of polymer molecules and crystalline orientation at very thin surface layer (ca 7nm of polymer film. While the interaction and conformation of adsorbed molecule at interface can be investigated by using high energy X-ray XPS with Enough deep position (ca 9 micron m.

  8. Selective surface functionalization of polystyrene induced by synchrotron or UV radiation in the presence of oxygen or acrylic acid vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient surface functionalization of Polystyrene (PS) thin films by electromagnetic radiation in combination with a reactive gaseous atmosphere was obtained. Monochromatic synchrotron (SR) or polychromatic UV radiation were used as excitation sources. When SR was used, O2 was introduced after irradiation into the UHV chamber. UV irradiation was carried out keeping a constant flow of O2 or acrylic acid (AA) vapors during the photolysis. FTIR-ATR and XPS-NEXAFS spectra were obtained at the UFRGS and the LNLS, Campinas respectively. PS films were functionalized by monochromatic SR and then expose to O2 at specific transitions such us C 1s →σ*C-C excitation. It was found a high rate of COO, C=O and C-O groups at the surface (> 70%). UV-assisted treatment in the presence of AA vapors showed that an efficient polymerization process took place, such as, it was observed in previous AA low pressure RF plasma treatments. UV-assisted functionalization has the advantage of lower costs and simple set-up compared to plasma treatments. (author)

  9. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray topography of surface strain in large-diameter silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawado, S; Iida, S; Yamaguchi, S; Kimura, S; Hirose, Y; Kajiwara, K; Chikaura, Y; Umeno, M

    2002-05-01

    Using a 300 mm-wide monochromatic X-ray beam obtained at beamline BL20B2 of SPring-8, the difference in surface-strain distribution caused by various steps of silicon-wafer manufacturing, i.e. slicing, lapping, etching, grinding and polishing, was studied. The asymmetric 511 reflection of 21.45 keV X-rays, incident at a glancing angle of 0.26 degrees, was used to obtain topographs over the whole surface of a 200 mm-diameter (100) CZ silicon wafer. Differences in crystallinity and in warp between the surfaces at different steps of the manufacturing process (firstly after the lapping following the slicing, and then after successive etching, grinding and polishing) were clearly observed. The former gave a topographic image over the whole area with a one-shot exposure because of their wide rocking curves (50-70 arcsec FWHM), which indicate poor crystallinity. The latter, on the other hand, showed sharper curves (4-5 arcsec FWHM), which indicate good crystallinity in local areas, and the existence of warp, and therefore required step scanning of omega-rotation to cover the whole surface in topography measurements. The effect of each step in the process is also discussed.

  10. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work at the Daresbury SRS has of necessity been interrupted this year (1991/92) due to the incorporation of Wiggler II. However, considerable beamtime was awarded before the shutdown and the major part of this appendix is concerned with the progress reports of the research undertaken then. The reports have been organised under the following broad headings: Molecular Science (19 papers), Surface and Materials Science (169 papers), Biological Science (85 papers), Instrumental and Technique Developments (13 papers) and Accelerator Physics (3 papers). It is hoped that in time the number of contributions on accelerator physics will grow to reflect the in-house activity on, for example, accelerator improvement and design. The research reports are preceded by the Annual Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Facilities Committee, which outlines the research highlights identified by that Committee (also included are details of the current membership of the SRFC and the chairmen of the Beamtime Allocation Panels). Following the reports are the specifications for the beamlines and stations. This year Section 3 contains 289 reports (nearly 100 more than last year) and the number of publications, generated by scientists and engineers who have used or are associated with Daresbury Laboratory facilities, has topped 500 for the first time. (author)

  11. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed account of the research work associated with the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory, United Kingdom, in 1984/85, is presented in the Appendix to the Laboratory's Annual Report. (U.K.)

  12. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given on the work involving the Synchrotron Radiation Division of the Daresbury Laboratory during the period January 1981 - March 1982. Development of the source, beamlines and experimental stations is described. Progress reports from individual investigators are presented which reveal the general diversity and interdisciplinary nature of the research which benefits from access to synchrotron radiation and the associated facilities. Information is given on the organisation of the Division and publications written by the staff are listed. (U.K.)

  13. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on synchrotron radiation is the appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) annual report, 1985/86. The bulk of the volume is made up of the progress reports for the work carried out during the year under review using the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at Daresbury. The Appendix also contains: the scientific programmes at the the SRS, progress on beamlines, instrumentation and computing developments, and activities connected with accelerator development. (U.K.)

  14. Supramolecular nanostructuring of silver surfaces via self-assembly of [60]fullerene and porphyrin modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifazi, Davide; Kiebele, Andreas; Stöhr, Meike; Cheng, Fuyong; Jung, Thomas; Diederich, Francois; Spillmann, Hannes

    2007-01-01

    Recent achievements in our laboratory toward the "bottom-up" fabrication of addressable multicomponent molecular entities obtained by self-assembly of C-60 and porphyrins on Ag(100) and Ag(111) surfaces are described.. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on ad-layers constituting monomeric a

  15. Stress distribution in mechanically surface treated Ti-2.5Cu determined by combining energy-dispersive synchrotron and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical surface treatments such as shot peening (SP) or ball-burnishing (BB) induce plastic deformation close to the surface resulting in work-hardening and compressive residual stresses. It enhances the fatigue performance by retarding or even suppressing micro-crack growth from the surface into the interior. SP and BB were carried out on a solution heat treated (SHT) Ti-2.5Cu. The investigations of compressive and balancing tensile residual stresses need a combination of energy-dispersive synchrotron (ED) and neutron diffraction. Essential for the stress distribution is the stress state before surface treatments which was determined by neutron diffraction. Results show that the maximum compressive stress and its depth play an important role to improve the fatigue performance.

  16. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the activities in synchrotron radiation and related areas at Daresbury Laboratory during 1989/90. The number and scope of the scientific reports submitted by external users and in-house staff is a reflection of the large amount of scheduled beamtime and high operating efficiency achieved at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) during the past year. Over 4000 hours of user beam were available, equivalent to about 80% of the total scheduled time. Many of the reports collected here illustrate the increasing technical complexity of the experiments now being carried out at Daresbury. Provision of the appropriate technical and scientific infrastructure and support is a continuing challenge. The development of the Materials Science Laboratory together with the existing Biological Support Laboratory will extend the range of experiments which can be carried out on the SRS. This will particularly facilitate work in which the sample must be prepared or characterised immediately before or during an experiment. The year 1989/90 has also seen a substantial upgrade of several stations, especially in the area of x-ray optics. Many of the advantages of the High Brightness Lattice can only be exploited effectively with the use of focusing optics. As the performance of these stations improves, the range of experiments which are feasible on the SRS will be extended significantly. (author)

  17. Acceleration of electrons by a laser pulse at its output onto an optical surface of the vacuum – transparent medium interface. Laser synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskiy, M. Yu

    2016-05-01

    We consider the electron dynamics in the field of an electromagnetic wave produced at the vacuum – transparent medium interface upon reflection from the boundary, close to total internal reflection. The propagation velocity of a constant phase of the electromagnetic wave along the interface can vary from c/n to infinity (c is the speed of light in vacuum, and n is the refractive index of the medium at the interface). In this case, there emerge regions of positive and negative phases of the field with wavelengths, approximately equal to half the wavelength of the original laser beam, which can propagate at a speed close to that of light in vacuum. If a beam of relativistic electrons propagates along the surface, they can gain energy and accelerate, as well as radiate. With closed trajectories of electron motion, a laser synchrotron will be implemented as a result of many acceleration cycles.

  18. In-situ synchrotron micro-diffraction study of surface, interface, grain structure, and strain/stress evolution during Sn whisker/hillock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Fei; Jadhav, Nitin; Buchovecky, Eric; Bower, Allan F.; Chason, Eric; Liu, Wenjun; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Ice, Gene E.; Xu, Ruqing

    2016-03-01

    We have performed X-ray synchrotron micro-diffraction measurements to study the processes controlling the formation of hillocks and whiskers in Sn layers on Cu. The studies were done in real-time on Sn layers that were electro-deposited immediately before the X-ray measurements were started. This enabled a region of the sample to be monitored from the as-deposited state until after a hillock feature formed. In addition to measuring the grain orientation and deviatoric strain (via Laue diffraction), the X-ray fluorescence was monitored to quantify the evolution of the Sn surface morphology and the formation of intermetallic compound (IMC) at the Sn-Cu interface. The results capture the simultaneous growth of the feature and the corresponding film stress, grain orientation, and IMC formation. The observations are compared with proposed mechanisms for whisker/hillock growth and nucleation.

  19. Surface-Controlled Mono/Diselective ortho C-H Bond Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Yang, Biao; Lin, Haiping; Aghdassi, Nabi; Miao, Kangjian; Zhang, Junjie; Zhang, Haiming; Li, Youyong; Duhm, Steffen; Fan, Jian; Chi, Lifeng

    2016-03-01

    One of the most charming and challenging topics in organic chemistry is the selective C-H bond activation. The difficulty arises not only from the relatively large bond-dissociation enthalpy, but also from the poor reaction selectivity. In this work, Au(111) and Ag(111) surfaces were used to address ortho C-H functionalization and ortho-ortho couplings of phenol derivatives. More importantly, the competition between dehydrogenation and deoxygenation drove the diversity of reaction pathways of phenols on surfaces, that is, diselective ortho C-H bond activation on Au(111) surfaces and monoselective ortho C-H bond activation on Ag(111) surfaces. The mechanism of this unprecedented phenomenon was extensively explored by scanning tunneling microscopy, density function theory, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Our findings provide new pathways for surface-assisted organic synthesis via the mono/diselective C-H bond activation. PMID:26853936

  20. A chemically inert Rashba split interface electronic structure of C60, FeOEP and PTCDA on BiAg2/Ag(111) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fields of organic electronics and spintronics have the potential to revolutionize the electronics industry. Finding the right materials that can retain their electrical and spin properties when combined is a technological and fundamental challenge. We carry out the study of three archetypal organic molecules in intimate contact with the BiAg2 surface alloy. We show that the BiAg2 alloy is an especially suited substrate due to its inertness as support for molecular films, exhibiting an almost complete absence of substrate–molecular interactions. This is inferred from the persistence of a completely unaltered giant spin-orbit split surface state of the BiAg2 substrate, and from the absence of significant metallic screening of charged molecular levels in the organic layer. Spin-orbit split states in BiAg2 turn out to be far more robust to organic overlayers than previously thought. (paper)

  1. A chemically inert Rashba split interface electronic structure of C60, FeOEP and PTCDA on BiAg2/Ag(111) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Maren C.; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Schaffert, Johannes; Bobisch, Christian A.; Möller, Rolf; Ortega, J. Enrique; Walter, Andrew L.

    2014-04-01

    The fields of organic electronics and spintronics have the potential to revolutionize the electronics industry. Finding the right materials that can retain their electrical and spin properties when combined is a technological and fundamental challenge. We carry out the study of three archetypal organic molecules in intimate contact with the BiAg2 surface alloy. We show that the BiAg2 alloy is an especially suited substrate due to its inertness as support for molecular films, exhibiting an almost complete absence of substrate-molecular interactions. This is inferred from the persistence of a completely unaltered giant spin-orbit split surface state of the BiAg2 substrate, and from the absence of significant metallic screening of charged molecular levels in the organic layer. Spin-orbit split states in BiAg2 turn out to be far more robust to organic overlayers than previously thought.

  2. Measurement methods for surface oxides on SUS 316L in simulated light water reactor coolant environments using synchrotron XRD and XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Non-destructive characterization of surface oxide on austenitic stainless steels. ► The layer structures of surface oxides were measured by ex situ XRD and XRF. ► An autoclave was newly designed for in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. ► Instability of hematite was investigated by in situ measurements. -- Abstract: Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescent (XRF) measurement techniques have been used for non-destructive characterization of surface oxide films on Type 316L austenitic stainless steels that were exposed to simulated primary water environments of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR). The layer structures of the surface spinel oxides were revealed ex situ after oxidation by measurements made as a function of depth. The layer structure of spinel oxides formed in simulated PWR primary water should normally be different from that formed in simulated BWR water. After oxidation in the simulated BWR environment, the spinel oxide was observed to contain NiFe2O4 at shallow depths, and FeCr2O4 and Fe3O4 at deeper depths. By contrast, after oxidation in the simulated PWR primary water environment, a Fe3O4 type spinel was observed near the surface and FeCr2O4 type spinel near the interface with the metal substrate. Furthermore, by in situ measurements during oxidation in the simulated BWR environment, it was also demonstrated that the ratio between spinel and hematite Fe2O3 can be changed depending on the water condition such as BWR normal water chemistry or BWR hydrogen water chemistry

  3. Measurement methods for surface oxides on SUS 316L in simulated light water reactor coolant environments using synchrotron XRD and XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masashi, E-mail: m-wat@fri.niche.tohoku.ac.jp [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yonezawa, Toshio, E-mail: t-yonezawa@fri.niche.tohoku.ac.jp [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shobu, Takahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayoh 679-5184 (Japan); Shoji, Tetsuo [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Non-destructive characterization of surface oxide on austenitic stainless steels. ► The layer structures of surface oxides were measured by ex situ XRD and XRF. ► An autoclave was newly designed for in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. ► Instability of hematite was investigated by in situ measurements. -- Abstract: Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescent (XRF) measurement techniques have been used for non-destructive characterization of surface oxide films on Type 316L austenitic stainless steels that were exposed to simulated primary water environments of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR). The layer structures of the surface spinel oxides were revealed ex situ after oxidation by measurements made as a function of depth. The layer structure of spinel oxides formed in simulated PWR primary water should normally be different from that formed in simulated BWR water. After oxidation in the simulated BWR environment, the spinel oxide was observed to contain NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} at shallow depths, and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at deeper depths. By contrast, after oxidation in the simulated PWR primary water environment, a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} type spinel was observed near the surface and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} type spinel near the interface with the metal substrate. Furthermore, by in situ measurements during oxidation in the simulated BWR environment, it was also demonstrated that the ratio between spinel and hematite Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be changed depending on the water condition such as BWR normal water chemistry or BWR hydrogen water chemistry.

  4. Smectic-A Order at the Surface of a Nematic Liquid Crystal: Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Als-Nielsen, J.; Christensen, F.; Pershan, Peter S.

    1982-01-01

    A novel geometry in which it is possible to do x-ray diffraction from a horizontal surface of fluids is applied to liquid crystals. A large-diameter drop of octyloxycyanobiphenyl (8OCB) on a glass plate treated for homeotropic alignment yields perfect alignment of the smectic-A layers at the top surface over an area of several square millimeters. The surface in the bulk nematic as well as in the isotropic phase was found to consist of smectic-A layers with a penetration depth equal to the lon...

  5. Lattice-Directed Formation of Covalent and Organometallic Molecular Wires by Terminal Alkynes on Ag Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Qiwei; Xiao, Lianghong; Shang, Jian; Zhou, Xiong; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yongfeng; Shao, Xiang; Li, Jianlong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Guo Qin; Tang, Hao; Zhao, Dahui; Wu, Kai

    2015-06-23

    Surface reactions of 2,5-diethynyl-1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene on Ag(111), Ag(110), and Ag(100) were systematically explored and scrutinized by scanning tunneling microscopy, molecular mechanics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. On Ag(111), Glaser coupling reaction became dominant, yielding one-dimensional molecular wires formed by covalent bonds. On Ag(110) and Ag(100), however, the terminal alkynes reacted with surface metal atoms, leading to one-dimensional organometallic nanostructures. Detailed experimental and theoretical analyses revealed that such a lattice dependence of the terminal alkyne reaction at surfaces originated from the matching degree between the periodicities of the produced molecular wires and the substrate lattice structures. PMID:25990647

  6. Reconstruction of surface morphology from coherent scattering of 'white' synchrotron radiation in hard X-ray regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy Dispersive Reflectometry (EDR) beamline at BESSY II provides ''white'' X-rays in the useful energy range of 5< E<20 keV. In this work I measured the coherent reflectivity data at EDR bending magnet beamline at BESSY II from various surfaces. Technologically smooth wafers of semiconducting materials of Si and GaAs are used as ''trivial'' samples to determine the so called apparatus function. In addition I measured coherent reflectivity maps from thin film of highly scattering material of Pt with high atom number, Z=78 and patterned semiconducting surface like a GaAs surface grating which provides a certain periodicity in the measured scattering intensity. Finally I measured the surface speckles from a spatially confined Si wafer under the constraint that the size of the sample is smaller than the footprint of the incoming beam at the sample position. To reconstruct surface morphology from coherent reflectivity data is a typical inverse problem. Conventional phase retrieval algorithms like Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm, error reduction (ER) algorithm, hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm are used in earlier work by other authors. I modified the conventional GS algorithm and ER algorithm which takes into account the additional Fresnel propagator term and also the illumination function at the sample position. I tested the modified algorithm successfully for a model surface in the form of a surface grating. I used the modified algorithm to reconstruct surface morphology from various static speckle measurements I performed at EDR beamline. The surface profiles reconstructed for different samples from the data at different energies (below the critical energy for the material at a particular incident angle) show almost the same roughness behavior for surface height with mean roughness of ∝1 nm. With the static speckle data I measured I could retrieve a one-dimensional picture of the sample surface with spatial resolution of ∝15 μm. The reconstruction of the

  7. Double hydrogen bond mediating self-assembly structure of cyanides on metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongping; Xiang, Feifei; Lu, Yan; Wei, Sheng; Li, Chao; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lacheng; Wang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Cyanides with different numbers of -C≡N, 1,2,4,5-Tetracyanobenzene (TCNB) and 2,3-Dicyanonaphthalene (2,3-DCN) deposited on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces, have been investigated by room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (RTSTM), respectively. High resolution STM images show double hydrogen bond is the main driving force to form variety of self-assembly structures, indicating the double hydrogen bond affects the electron distribution of cyanides and leads to a more stable structure with lower energy. In addition, the difference between Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces in their lattice structure induces a bigger assembly structural change of 2,3-DCN than that of 1,2,4,5-TCNB, which confirms the fact that the opposite double hydrogen bond formation formed by 1,2,4,5-TCNB is more stable than the neighboring double hydrogen bond formation formed by molecule 2,3-DCN.

  8. Synchrotron radiation - Applications in the earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, W. A.; Brown, G. E., Jr.

    Synchrotron-radiation sources and their characteristics are overviewed along with recent synchrotron-based research on earth materials and future earth-science applications utilizing the next generation of synchrotron-radiation sources presently under construction. Focus is placed on X-ray scattering studies of earth materials (crystalline and noncrystalline) under ambient conditions, diffraction studies of earth materials at high pressures and/or temperatures, spectroscopic studies, primarily X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and spatially resolved X-ray fluorescence studies of compositional variations in earth materials. It is noted that other synchrotron-based methods, such as X-ray tomography and topography may become important in characterizing earth materials, while soft X-ray/vacuum ultraviolet radiation from synchrotron sources can be applied to problems involving the structural environments of low-atomic-number elements and the characterization of surface reactions of minerals with liquids and gases.

  9. Physical and Chemical Properties of Ce₁-xZrxO₂ Nanoparticles and Ce₁-xZrxO₂ (111) Surfaces: Synchrotron-based Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J A.; Wang, X; Liu, Gang; Hanson, Jonathan; Hrbek, Jan; Peden, Charles HF.; Iglesias-Juez, A; Fernández-García, M

    2005-03-16

    In this article, we review a series of studies that use synchrotron-based techniques (high-resolution photoemission, time-resolved x-ray diffraction, and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy) to investigate the physical and chemical properties of Ce?-xZrxO? nanoparticles and Ce?-xZrxO? (111) surfaces (x ? 0.5). Ce O? and Ce?-xZrxO? particles in sizes between 3 and 7 nm were synthesized using a novel microemulsion method. The results of XANES (O K-edge, Ce and Zr LIII-edges) indicate that the Ce?-xZrxO? nanoparticles and Ce?-xZrxO? (111) surfaces have very similar electronic properties. For these systems, the lattice constant decreased with increasing Zr content, varying from 5.40 ? in CeO? to 5.27 ? in Ce???Zr???O?. Within the fluorite structure, the Zr atoms exhibited structural perturbations that led to different types of Zr-O distances and non-equivalent O atoms in the Ce?-xZrxO? compounds. The Ce?-xZrxO? nanoparticles were more reactive towards H? and SO? than the Ce?-xZrxO? (111) surfaces. The Ce?-xZrxO? (111) surfaces did not reduce in hydrogen at 300 C. At temperatures above 250 C, the Ce?-xZrxO? nanoparticles reacted with H? and water evolved into gas phase. XANES showed the generation of Ce??cations without reduction of Zr??. There was an expansion in the unit cell of the reduced nanoparticles probably as a consequence of a partial Ce??? Ce?? transformation and the sorption of hydrogen into the bulk of the material. S K-edge XANES spectra pointed to SO? as the main product of the adsorption of SO? on the Ce?-xZrxO? nanoparticles and Ce?-xZrxO? (111) surfaces. Full dissociation of SO? was seen on the nanoparticles but not on the Ce?-xZrxO? (111) surfaces. The metal cations at corner and edge sites of the Ce?-xZrxO? nanoparticles probably play a very important role in interactions with the H? and SO? molecules.

  10. The Australian synchrotron; Le synchrotron australien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhi, R

    2005-06-15

    This document recalls the historical aspects of the Australian Synchrotron which will be implemented in 2007. It presents then the objectives of this program, the specifications of the ring and the light lines. (A.L.B.)

  11. The Self-Assembly of Nano-Objects Code: Applications to supramolecular organic monolayers adsorbed on metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Roussel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The Self-Assembly of Nano-Objects (SANO) code we implemented demonstrates the ability to predict the molecular self-assembly of different structural motifs by tuning the molecular building blocks as well as the metallic substrate. It consists in a two-dimensional Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo (GCMC) approach developed to perform atomistic simulations of thousands of large organic molecules self-assembling on metal surfaces. Computing adsorption isotherms at room temperature and spanning over the characteristic sub-micrometric scales, we confront the robustness of the approach with three different well-known systems: ZnPcCl8 on Ag(111), CuPcF16 on Au(111) and PTBC on Ag(111). We retrieve respectively their square, oblique and hexagonal supramolecular tilling. The code incorporates generalized force fields to describe the molecular interactions, which provides transferability and versatility to many organic building blocks and metal surfaces.

  12. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  13. Synchrotron radiation: science & applications

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda, Miguel A. G.

    2015-01-01

    This general talk is devoted to briefly introduce the main uses and applications of synchrotron radiation. An initial introduction will be dedicated to describe a synchrotron as a Large Facility devoted to produce photons that will be used to carry out excellent science. The five outstanding main characteristics of synchrotron radiation are: i) High brilliance and collimation ii) Wavelength tunability iii) Beamsize tunability iv) Defined polarization v) Time structure vi)...

  14. Synchrotron characterization of functional tin dioxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domashevskaya, E. P., E-mail: ftt@phys.vsu.ru; Chuvenkova, O. A.; Turishchev, S. Yu. [Voronezh State University, Voronezh (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    Wire-like crystals of tin dioxide were synthesized by a gas-transport technique. The wires, of mainly nanometric diameters, were characterized by spectroscopy and microscopy techniques with the use of highly brilliant and intense synchrotron radiation. We studied the influence of the surface chemical state and the oxygen vacancies on the atomic and electronic structure of the nanowires. The surface of the nanowires is covered by a few nanometers of tin suboxides. The lack of oxygen over the surface layers leads to specific sub-zone formation in a gap, as shown by synchrotron studies.

  15. Switching orientation of adsorbed molecules: Reverse domino on a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatz, C. R.; Esat, T.; Wagner, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.; Jakob, P.

    2016-01-01

    A thus far unknown phase of 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (NTCDA) on Ag(111), characterized by an all perpendicular orientation of the planar molecules and bound to the Ag substrate through the carboxyl oxygen atoms has been identified using infrared absorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Its formation process requires second layer NTCDA to squeeze into empty spaces between relaxed monolayer NTCDA molecules. Remarkably, this process causes initially parallel oriented NTCDA to likewise adopt the new, highly inclined adsorption geometry. According to our SPA-LEED and STM findings, the new phase displays a distinct long range order and shows a pronounced tendency to form 1D rows or narrow islands. We suggest that extra NTCDA preferentially transforms into the upright configuration close to existing islands and attaches to them, i.e. the transformation process proceeds in a directed and recurrent manner (reverse domino scenario). Identical processing starting with a compressed NTCDA/Ag(111) monolayer leads to a purely parallel oriented bilayer, that is, the NTCDA monolayer phase is retained and merely acts as a passive template for bilayer NTCDA. The new vertical NTCDA phase represents an unusual molecular system with π-orbitals oriented parallel to a metal surface. A substantially reduced coupling of these orbitals to Ag(111) electronic levels is conjectured, which will have a major impact on intermolecular couplings and electronically excited state lifetimes.

  16. CO Chemisorption at Metal Surfaces and Overlayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Morikawa, Y.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1996-01-01

    A database of ab initio calculations of the chemisorption energy of CO over Ni(111), Cu(111), Ru(0001), Pd(111), Ag(111), Pt(111), Au(111), Cu3Pt(111), and some metallic overlayer structures is presented. The trends can be reproduced with a simple model describing the interaction between the metal...... d states and the CO 2 pi* and 5 sigma states, renormalized by the metal sp continuum. Our model rationalizes the results by Rodriguez and Goodman [Science 257, 897 (1992)] showing a strong correlation between the CO chemisorption energy and the surface core level shift....

  17. Role of intermolecular interactions on the electronic and geometric structure of a large Pi-conjugated molecule adsorbed on a metal surface

    OpenAIRE

    Kilian, L.; Hauschild, A.; Temirov, R.; Soubatch, S.; Schoell, A.; Bendounan, A.; Reinert, F.; Lee, T. L.; Tautz, F. S.; Sokolowski, M.; Umbach, E

    2008-01-01

    The organic semiconductor molecule 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) exhibits two adsorption states on the Ag(111) surface: one in a metastable disordered phase, prepared at low temperatures, the other in the long-range ordered monolayer phase obtained at room temperature. Notably, the two states differ substantial in their vertical bonding distances, intramolecular distortions, and electronic structures. The difference is explained by intermolecular interactions, which ar...

  18. Grazing incidence synchrotron radiation optics: correlation of performance with metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image distortions produced by a cylinder mirror at the National Synchrotron Light Source are compared with performance predictions based on measurements of surface slope errors in the millimeter spatial period regime made with an optical surface profiler

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discussion research being conducted at the National Synchrotron light source. In particular, this report contains operations summaries; symposia, workshops, and projects; NSLS highlights; and abstracts of science at the NSLS

  20. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Winick, Herman

    2003-01-01

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, micr...

  1. Compact synchrotron light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weihreter, Ernst

    1996-01-01

    This book covers a new niche in circular accelerator design, motivated by the promising industrial prospects of recent micromanufacturing methods - X-ray lithography, synchrotron radiation-based micromachining and microanalysis techniques. It describes the basic concepts and the essential challenges for the development of compact synchrotron radiation sources from an accelerator designer's point of view and gives an outline of the actual state of the art. The volume is intended as an introduction and as a reference for physicists, engineers and managers involved in this rapidly developing fiel

  2. RF gymnastics in synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R

    2011-01-01

    The RF systems installed in synchrotrons can be used to change the longitudinal beam characteristics. 'RF gymnastics' designates manipulations of the RF parameters aimed at providing such non-trivial changes. Some keep the number of bunches constant while changing bunch length, energy spread, emittance, or distance between bunches. Others are used to change the number of bunches. After recalling the basics of longitudinal beam dynamics in a hadron synchrotron, this paper deals with the most commonly used gymnastics. Their principle is described as well as their performance and limitations.

  3. RF Gymnastics in Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R

    2005-01-01

    The RF systems installed in synchrotrons can be used to change the longitudinal beam characteristics. "RF gymnastics" designates manipulations of the RF parameters aimed at providing such non-trivial changes. Some keep the number of bunches constant while changing bunch length, energy spread, emittance or distance between bunches. Others are used to change the number of bunches. After recalling the basics of longitudinal beam dynamics in a hadron synchrotron, this paper deals with the most commonly used gymnastics. Their principle is described as well as their performance and limitations.

  4. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  5. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  6. Effect of strain on surface diffusion and nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brune, Harald; Bromann, Karsten; Röder, Holger;

    1995-01-01

    The influence of strain on diffusion and nucleation has been studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and effective-medium theory for Ag self-diffusion on strained and unstrained (111) surfaces. Experimentally, the diffusion barrier is observed to be substantially lower on a pseudomorphic...... Ag monolayer on Pt(111), 60 meV, compared to that on Ag(111), 97 meV. The calculations show that this strong effect is due to the 4.2% compressive strain of the Ag monolayer on Pt. It is shown that in general isotropic two-dimensional strain as well as its relief via dislocations have a drastic...

  7. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Gupta, Sayan; Zhan, Chenyang; Chance, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  8. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S. [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Ullman 315, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)]. E-mail: marinkov@bnl.gov; Gupta, Sayan [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Ullman 315, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Zhan, Chenyang [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Ullman 315, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Chance, Mark R. [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Ullman 315, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  9. Weak competing interactions control assembly of strongly bonded TCNQ ionic acceptor molecules on silver surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changwon; Rojas, Geoffrey A.; Jeon, Seokmin; Kelly, Simon J.; Smith, Sean C.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Yoon, Mina; Maksymovych, Petro

    2014-09-01

    The energy scales of interactions that control molecular adsorption and assembly on surfaces can vary by several orders of magnitude, yet the importance of each contributing interaction is not apparent a priori. Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is an archetypal electron acceptor molecule and it is a key component of organic metals. On metal surfaces, this molecule also acts as an electron acceptor, producing negatively charged adsorbates. It is therefore rather intriguing to observe attractive molecular interactions in this system that were reported previously for copper and silver surfaces. Our experiments compared TCNQ adsorption on noble metal surfaces of Ag(100) and Ag(111). In both cases we found net attractive interactions down to the lowest coverage. However, the morphology of the assemblies was strikingly different, with two-dimensional islands on Ag(100) and one-dimensional chains on Ag(111) surfaces. This observation suggests that the registry effect governed by the molecular interaction with the underlying lattice potential is critical in determining the dimensionality of the molecular assembly. Using first-principles density functional calculations with a van der Waals correction scheme, we revealed that the strengths of major interactions (i.e., lattice potential corrugation, intermolecular attraction, and charge-transfer-induced repulsion) are all similar in energy. The van der Waals interactions, in particular, almost double the strength of attractive interactions, making the intermolecular potential comparable in strength to the diffusion potential and promoting self-assembly. However, it is the anisotropy of local intermolecular interactions that is primarily responsible for the difference in the topology of the molecular islands on Ag(100) and Ag(111) surfaces. We anticipate that the intermolecular potential will become more attractive and dominant over the diffusion potential with increasing molecular size, providing new design strategies for the

  10. Delocalized π state between molecules through a surface confined pseudodihydrogen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lan; Li, Hui; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2010-11-26

    When 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) and coronene molecules coadsorb on the Ag(111) surface, one-dimensional PTCDA molecular oligomers with efficient electronic connection via noncovalent bonds are observed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. Density functional theory calculations indicate the neighboring PTCDA molecules form oligomers due to strong PTCDA-metal interactions, which result in overlapping of π orbitals and pseudodihydrogen surface bonds between molecules. Our results provide a potential approach for electron transport from molecule to molecule directly through noncovalent bond. PMID:21231400

  11. Observation of selective surface element substitution in FeTe0.5Se0.5 superconductor thin film exposed to ambient air by synchrotron radiation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nian; Liu, Chen; Zhao, Jia-Li; Lei, Tao; Wang, Jia-Ou; Qian, Hai-Jie; Wu, Rui; Yan, Lei; Guo, Hai-Zhong; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2016-09-01

    A systematic investigation of oxidation on a superconductive FeTe0.5Se0.5 thin film, which was grown on Nb-doped SrTiO3 (001) by pulsed laser deposition, has been carried out. The sample was exposed to ambient air for one month for oxidation. Macroscopically, the exposed specimen lost its superconductivity due to oxidation. The specimen was subjected to in situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements following cycles of annealing and argon ion etching treatments to unravel what happened in the electronic structure and composition after exposure to air. By the spectroscopic measurements, we found that the as-grown FeTe0.5Se0.5 superconductive thin film experienced an element selective substitution reaction. The oxidation preferentially proceeds through pumping out the Te and forming Fe-O bonds by O substitution of Te. In addition, our results certify that in situ vacuum annealing and low-energy argon ion etching methods combined with spectroscopy are suitable for depth element and valence analysis of layered structure superconductor materials. Project supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. 1G2009312311750101) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375228, 11204303, and U1332105).

  12. Engineering application of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synchrotron radiation which is generated when the circular motion of fast electrons is carried out in vacuum has been studied as the source of X-ray and ultraviolet ray for physical property research, but recently attention has been paid to its industrial application. In this report, from the viewpoint of how to utilize the properties of synchrotron radiation to electronic industries, the recent trend of research is explained. Synchrotron radiation is the electromagnetic waves radiated in the tangential direction to their track when the electrons at the velocity close to light velocity carry out acceleration motion. The synchrotron radiation generator is an electron storage ring. Synchrotron radiation is the beam having good parallelism, concentrating in the orbit plane of electrons, and is led to respective experimental devices with beam lines. Synchrotron radiation lithography has become the start of its industrial application. The process technology being excited by synchrotron radiation, the evaluation of materials using synchrotron radiation, small synchrotron radiation generators and the new sources of light are reported. Synchrotron radiation is the important technological field developed by the joint work of physics and engineering in the latter half of 20th century, following semiconductors, lasers and superconductivity. (K.I.)

  13. The synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron Radiation is a fantastic source of electromagnetic radiation the energy spectrum of which spreads continuously from the far infrared to hard X-rays. For this reason a wide part of the scientific community, fundamentalists as well as industry, is concerned by its use. We shall describe here the main properties of this light source and give two examples of application in the field of characterization of materials: EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) and X-ray fluorescence. (author). 8 figs., 21 refs

  14. Selective surface functionalization of polystyrene induced by synchrotron or UV radiation in the presence of oxygen or acrylic acid vapors; Funcionalizacao superficial seletiva de poliestireno induzida por radiacao sincrotron ou ultravioleta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Felipe; Kuhn, Sidiney; Weibel, Daniel E., E-mail: felipekessler@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IQ/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil) Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Fisico-Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Efficient surface functionalization of Polystyrene (PS) thin films by electromagnetic radiation in combination with a reactive gaseous atmosphere was obtained. Monochromatic synchrotron (SR) or polychromatic UV radiation were used as excitation sources. When SR was used, O{sub 2} was introduced after irradiation into the UHV chamber. UV irradiation was carried out keeping a constant flow of O{sub 2} or acrylic acid (AA) vapors during the photolysis. FTIR-ATR and XPS-NEXAFS spectra were obtained at the UFRGS and the LNLS, Campinas respectively. PS films were functionalized by monochromatic SR and then expose to O{sub 2} at specific transitions such us C 1s {yields}{sigma}{sup *}{sub C-C} excitation. It was found a high rate of COO, C=O and C-O groups at the surface (> 70%). UV-assisted treatment in the presence of AA vapors showed that an efficient polymerization process took place, such as, it was observed in previous AA low pressure RF plasma treatments. UV-assisted functionalization has the advantage of lower costs and simple set-up compared to plasma treatments. (author)

  15. Reconstruction of surface morphology from coherent scattering of ''white'' synchrotron radiation in hard X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant, Tushar

    2009-07-01

    Energy Dispersive Reflectometry (EDR) beamline at BESSY II provides ''white'' X-rays in the useful energy range of 5surfaces. Technologically smooth wafers of semiconducting materials of Si and GaAs are used as ''trivial'' samples to determine the so called apparatus function. In addition I measured coherent reflectivity maps from thin film of highly scattering material of Pt with high atom number, Z=78 and patterned semiconducting surface like a GaAs surface grating which provides a certain periodicity in the measured scattering intensity. Finally I measured the surface speckles from a spatially confined Si wafer under the constraint that the size of the sample is smaller than the footprint of the incoming beam at the sample position. To reconstruct surface morphology from coherent reflectivity data is a typical inverse problem. Conventional phase retrieval algorithms like Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm, error reduction (ER) algorithm, hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm are used in earlier work by other authors. I modified the conventional GS algorithm and ER algorithm which takes into account the additional Fresnel propagator term and also the illumination function at the sample position. I tested the modified algorithm successfully for a model surface in the form of a surface grating. I used the modified algorithm to reconstruct surface morphology from various static speckle measurements I performed at EDR beamline. The surface profiles reconstructed for different samples from the data at different energies (below the critical energy for the material at a particular incident angle) show almost the same roughness behavior for surface height with mean roughness of {proportional_to}1 nm. With the static speckle data I measured I could retrieve a one-dimensional picture of the sample surface with spatial

  16. Synchrotron-based XPS studies of AlGaN and GaN surface chemistry and its relationship to ion sensor behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Soft X-ray was used to study the surface chemistry of GaN and AlGaN. • The surface chemistry and sensor behaviour were investigated. • The oxide of aluminum is significantly more reactive than gallium. • The Cl− ions are greater in GaN samples compared to AlGaN samples. - Abstract: Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the fundamental surface chemistry of both AlGaN and GaN surfaces in the context of understanding the behaviour of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as chemical field-effect transistor (CHEMFET) ion sensors. AlGaN and GaN samples were subjected to different methods of oxide growth (native oxide and thermally grown oxide) and chemical treatment conditions. Our investigations indicate that the etching of the oxide layer is more pronounced with AlGaN compared to GaN. Also, we observed that chloride ions have a greater tendency to attach to the GaN surface relative to the AlGaN surface. Furthermore, chloride ions are comparatively more prevalent on surfaces treated with 5% HCl acid solution. The concentration of chloride ions is even higher on the HCl treated native oxide surface resulting in a very clear deconvolution of the Cl 2p1/2 and Cl 2p3/2 peaks. For GaN and AlGaN surfaces, a linear response (e.g. source-drain current) is typically seen with variation in pH of buffered solutions with constant reference electrode voltage at the surface gate; however, an inverted bath-tub type response (e.g. a maximum at neutral pH and lower values at pH values away from neutral) and a general tendency to negative charge selectivity has been also widely reported. We have shown that our XPS investigations are consistent with the different sensor response reported in the literature for these CHEMFET devices and may help to explain the differing response of these materials

  17. Synchrotron-based XPS studies of AlGaN and GaN surface chemistry and its relationship to ion sensor behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khir, Farah Liyana Muhammad, E-mail: 21001899@student.uwa.edu.au [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Myers, Matthew, E-mail: Matt.Myers@csiro.au [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, Kensington, Western Australia 6151 (Australia); Podolska, Anna [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Exploration Geophysics, Curtin University of Technology, 26 Dick Perry Avenue, ARRC, Kensington, Western Australia 6151 (Australia); Sanders, Tarun Maruthi [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Baker, Murray V., E-mail: murray.baker@uwa.edu.au [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Nener, Brett D., E-mail: brett.nener@uwa.edu.au [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Parish, Giacinta, E-mail: giacinta.parish@uwa.edu.au [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Soft X-ray was used to study the surface chemistry of GaN and AlGaN. • The surface chemistry and sensor behaviour were investigated. • The oxide of aluminum is significantly more reactive than gallium. • The Cl{sup −} ions are greater in GaN samples compared to AlGaN samples. - Abstract: Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the fundamental surface chemistry of both AlGaN and GaN surfaces in the context of understanding the behaviour of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as chemical field-effect transistor (CHEMFET) ion sensors. AlGaN and GaN samples were subjected to different methods of oxide growth (native oxide and thermally grown oxide) and chemical treatment conditions. Our investigations indicate that the etching of the oxide layer is more pronounced with AlGaN compared to GaN. Also, we observed that chloride ions have a greater tendency to attach to the GaN surface relative to the AlGaN surface. Furthermore, chloride ions are comparatively more prevalent on surfaces treated with 5% HCl acid solution. The concentration of chloride ions is even higher on the HCl treated native oxide surface resulting in a very clear deconvolution of the Cl 2p{sub 1/2} and Cl 2p{sub 3/2} peaks. For GaN and AlGaN surfaces, a linear response (e.g. source-drain current) is typically seen with variation in pH of buffered solutions with constant reference electrode voltage at the surface gate; however, an inverted bath-tub type response (e.g. a maximum at neutral pH and lower values at pH values away from neutral) and a general tendency to negative charge selectivity has been also widely reported. We have shown that our XPS investigations are consistent with the different sensor response reported in the literature for these CHEMFET devices and may help to explain the differing response of these materials.

  18. Synchrotron light beam and a synchrotron light experiment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, about two years ago, the requirements of synchrotron light beam in respective measuring instruments were discussed. Then, also the arrangement (lattice) of a storage ring, the nature of synchrotron light beam, a synchrotron light experiment facility and the arrangement of the beam lines were studied. During the period of two years since then, due to the changes in the circumstances, the design of the lattice was altered. Accordingly, the arrangement of the beam lines and of measuring instruments were largely changed. At this point, the results of discussions in various meetings are described, though they may still be subject to future changes, with due consideration to beam, environment and beam lines required for the design of the measuring instruments: (1) storage ring and synchrotron light beam, (2) requirements on small beam size and beam stability, (3) a synchrotron light experiment facility. (J.P.N.)

  19. Two-photon photoemission investigation of electronic and dynamical properties of alkali atoms adsorbed on noble metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sametoglu, Vahit

    We present a systematic time-resolved two-photon photoemission study of the electronic and dynamical properties of Li through Cs adsorbed on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. A fundamental problem in surface science is how to describe the electronic structure of a chemisorption interface based on the intrinsic properties of the interacting materials. Because of their simple s-electron structure, elements of the alkali atom group comprise paradigmatic adsorbates in many theories of chemisorption, whereas the complementary experimental studies are sparse and incomplete. Through a combination of spectroscopic and femtosecond time-resolved surface measurements, we are able to probe systematically the binding energies, symmetries, and electron and nuclear relaxation dynamics of the initially unoccupied alkali atom resonances. As a prelude, we study the two-photon photoemission process occurring at the bare Ag(111) surface. We develop a quantitative model for two-photon photoemission process, where the nonresonant and k-dependent two-photon absorption between the lower and upper sp-bands is modeled by the optical Bloch equations, and the angle-dependent intensities are described by the Fresnel equations. Our two-photon photoemission spectra of Li through Cs chemisorbed Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces reveal two resonances with the m = 0 and m = +/-1 symmetry ('m' is the projection of the orbital angular momentum 'l' onto the surface plane). For the m = 0 resonance, which is derived from the hybridization of the ns and npz orbitals of alkali atoms, we find a binding energy of 1.84--1.99 eV below the vacuum level, which is independent of the alkali atom period, and tunes with coverage in a universal manner. At 0.3--0.7 eV higher energy, we discover and identify the m = +/-1 resonance by its characteristic angular intensity distribution, which derives from the antisymmetry of the npx and npy orbitals. We implement a quantitative model for the alkali atom chemisorption based on the

  20. Surface Pourbaix diagrams and oxygen reduction activity of Pt, Ag and Ni(111) surfaces studied by DFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2008-01-01

    but not in acidic PEM fuel cells. Based on density functional theory calculations we investigate the electrochemically most stable surface structures as a function of pH and electrostatic potential for Pt(111), Ag(111) and Ni(111), and we construct surface Pourbaix diagrams. We study the oxygen reduction reaction...... (ORR) on the different surface structures and calculate the free energy of the intermediates. We estimate their catalytic activity for ORR by determining the highest potential at which all ORR reaction steps reduce the free energy. We obtain self-consistency in the sense that the surface is stable...... under the potential at which that particular surface can perform ORR. Using the self consistent surfaces, the activity of the very reactive Ni surface changes dramatically, whereas the activity of the more noble catalysts Pt and Ag remains unchanged. The reason for this difference is the oxidation...

  1. Synchrotron radiation source Indus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indus-1 is a 450 MeV electron storage ring for the production of the synchrotron radiation in VUV range with a critical wavelength of 61 A. In this paper we discuss the synchrotron radiation source Indus-1 and report some results of its present performance. Besides, results of beam lifetime studies are also reported. (author)

  2. Induction synchrotron and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An RF synchrotron has been the indispensable device for nuclear physics and high energy physics experiments so far. Instead of this conventional accelerator, an induction synchrotron has been proposed and its demonstration is going to be done in the near future. The induction synchrotron is capable of accelerating a super-bunch of 1 μs long. A new generation of proton driver or hadron collider accommodating super-bunches, which claims to increase their luminosity ten times larger, is under consideration. Key devices to realize the novel induction synchrotron are a pulse modulator and induction accelerating cavity being operated at 1 MHz rep-rate. The concept and characteristics of the induction synchrotron are presented including the outline of R and D works. (author)

  3. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures

  4. From monomer to monolayer: a global optimisation study of (ZnO)n nanoclusters on the Ag surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiroglu, Ilker; Woodley, Scott M; Sokol, Alexey A; Bromley, Stefan T

    2014-12-21

    We employ global optimisation to investigate how oxide nanoclusters of increasing size can best adapt their structure to lower the system energy when interacting with a realistic extended metal support. Specifically, we focus on the (ZnO)@Ag(111) system where experiment has shown that the infinite Ag(111)-supported ZnO monolayer limit corresponds to an epitaxially 7 : 8 matched graphene-like (Zn(3)O(3))-based hexagonal sheet. Using a two-stage search method based on classical interatomic potentials and then on more accurate density functional theory, we report global minina candidate structures for Ag-supported (ZnO)n cluster with sizes ranging from n = 1-24. Comparison with the respective global minina structure of free space (ZnO)n clusters reveals that the surface interaction plays a decisive role in determining the lowest energy Ag-supported (ZnO)n cluster structures. Whereas free space (ZnO)n clusters tend to adopt cage-like bubble structures as they grow larger, Ag-supported (ZnO)n clusters of increasing size become progressively more like planar cuts from the infinite graphene-like ZnO single monolayer. This energetic favourability for planar hexagonal Ag-supported clusters over their 3D counterparts can be partly rationalised by the ZnO-Ag(111) epitaxial matching and the increased number of close interactions with the Ag surface. Detailed analysis shows that this tendency can also be attributed to the capacity of 2D clusters to distort to improve their interaction with the Ag surface relative to more rigid 3D bubble cluster isomers. For the larger sized clusters we find that the adsorption energies and most stable structural types appear to be rather converged confirming that our study makes a bridge between the Ag-supported ZnO monomer and the infinite Ag-supported ZnO monolayer.

  5. Mechanism of degradation of surface hardening at elevated temperature in TiAlV-alloys by in situ synchrotron radiation diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Berberich, F; Kreissig, U; Schell, N; Mücklich, A

    2003-01-01

    The surface hardness of the technically important alloy Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) can be improved by nitrogen implantation. The structural mechanisms of hardening and of the stability of the improved hardness at elevated temperatures are studied. Ion implanted (II) and plasma immersion ion implanted (PII) samples were used. The formation of small TiN crystallites was detected in the as-implanted state, but only for the II samples a considerable surface hardness increase (factor 3) is observed. The in situ XRD experiments showed, that the TiN phase is stable up to temperatures of 650 deg. C for both types of implantation. At higher temperature Ti sub 2 N is formed which is stable up to 770 deg. C. ERDA results indicate a diffusion of nitrogen into the bulk material. The redistribution of N is responsible for the hardness changes: a slight decrease for II samples but an improvement by a factor of 2.5 for PII samples. The improvements/degradations of hardness and wear are discussed in correlation with the nitrogen depth ...

  6. Regions compete for French synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Ten regions in France have placed bids to host the planned national synchrotron Soleil. Leading contenders include a joint bid from Ile-de-France and Essonne for Orsay, offering FF 1 billion towards the construction costs (2 paragraphs).

  7. Computational studies of experimentally observed structures of sulfur on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, Dominic

    2011-09-01

    First-principles electronic structure calculations were carried out to examine the experimentally observed structures of sulfur on close packed surfaces of a number of important metals - Ag(111), Cu(111), Ni(111), Pt(111), Rh(111), Re(0001) and Ru(0001). At low coverages ({le} 1/3 ML), the prediction is consistent with the typical pattern of preferred sulfur occupancy of threefold hollow sites, notably the fcc site on the (111) surfaces and the hcp site on the (0001) surfaces. Theoretical confirmation for the existence of pure sulfur overlayer phases on Pt(111), Rh(111), Re(0001) and Ru(0001) at higher coverages (> 1/3 ML) was provided. For the ({radical}7 x {radical}7) phase seen on Ag(111), the most preferred structure identified for adsorbed S trimer consists of an S atom on the top site bonded to two S atoms situated on the nearest neighbor off-bridge site positions. Among the different densely packed mixed sulfur-metal overlayer models suggested for the ({radical}7 x {radical}7) phase on Cu(111), the structure which consists of metal and S atoms in a hexagonal-like arrangement on the top substrate was found to be the most energetically favorable. For the (5{radical}3 x 2) phase on Ni(111), the calculations confirm the existence of clock-reconstructed top layer metal atoms onto which sulfur atoms are adsorbed.

  8. Synchrotron Emission on the Largest Scales: Radio Detection of the Cosmic-Web

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shea D. Brown

    2011-12-01

    Shocks and turbulence generated during large-scale structure formation are predicted to produce large-scale, low surface-brightness synchrotron emission. On the largest scales, this emission is globally correlated with the thermal baryon distribution, and constitutes the `synchrotron cosmic-web’. I present the observational prospects and challenges for detecting this faint emission with upcoming SKA pathfinders.

  9. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., 7844 Vervain Ct., Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Macrander, A. T. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08536 (United States); Baronova, E. O. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); George, K. M.; Kotick, J. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  10. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background

  11. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, N. R.; Macrander, A. T.; Hill, K. W.; Baronova, E. O.; George, K. M.; Kotick, J.

    2015-10-01

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal's x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal's local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  12. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernik, R.J. [Daresbury Lab., Warrington, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school.

  13. Vacuum chambers full of ideas for the Swedish synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    CERN’s Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group has contributed to the development of vacuum chambers for the MAX IV synchrotron, which has just been officially opened in Sweden.   A section of the new 3 GeV MAX IV synchrotron at the time of installation. In the centre of the magnets you can see the vacuum chamber developed in collaboration with CERN. (Photo: Marek Grabski, MAX IV Vacuum group) On 21 June, the King and the Prime Minister of Sweden officially opened MAX IV, a brand-new synchrotron in Lund, Sweden. The summer solstice, the longest day of the year, was deliberately chosen for the ceremony: MAX IV, a cutting-edge synchrotron, will deliver the brightest X-rays ever produced to more than 2000 users. Some 1500 kilometres away, a team at CERN followed the opening ceremony with a touch of pride. The Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group in the Technology department (TE-VSC) participated in the construction of this new synchrotron. Its contribution lies at the very hea...

  14. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alexander W.; /SLAC; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving

  15. Vacuum design of advanced and compact synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains papers dealing with the following main topics: Vacuum considerations for synchrotron radiation sources; Machine design; Compact light sources for x-ray lithography; Surface cleaning and conditioning; Ion trapping, gas desorption, lifetime; Wigglers, undulators chamber design; and General conditioning of pumps, machines and gauges

  16. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs

  17. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  18. LNLS - Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory Activity Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This activity report highlight the activities as follows: atomic local order of hafnium and silicon in dielectric films; development of bio absorbent for arsenite; insights into enzyme-substrate interaction; investigation of metastable phases in zirconia-ceria nano-ceramics by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction; lattice distortion effects on magneto-structural phase transition of Mn As; mechanism of orbital ordering in transition-metal oxides; organic molecules in star-forming regions; spatially ordered In P dots grown on compositionally modulated In Ga P layers; structural insights into {beta}-Xylosidase from Trichoderma reesei, and surface random alloys studied by synchrotron based photoelectron diffraction.

  19. Synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics

    CERN Document Server

    Pechkova, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the current state of research in both synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics from different laboratories worldwide. The book presents recent research results in the most advanced methods of synchrotron radiation analysis, protein micro- and nano crystallography, X-ray scattering and X-ray optics, coherent X-Ray diffraction, and laser cutting and contactless sample manipulation are described in details. The book focuses on biological applications and highlights important aspects such as radiation damage and molecular modeling.

  20. The influence of surface structure on H4SiO4 oligomerization on rutile and amorphous TiO2 surfaces: an ATR-IR and synchrotron XPS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yantao; Swedlund, Peter J; McIntosh, Grant J; Cowie, Bruce C C; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Metson, James B

    2012-12-11

    Silicic acid (H(4)SiO(4)) is ubiquitous in natural aquatic systems. Applications of TiO(2) in these systems will be influenced by H(4)SiO(4) sorption and oligomerization reactions on the TiO(2) surface, and this can affect many aspects of TiO(2) reactivity. The spatial arrangement of sorption sites on a metal oxide surface can promote specific lateral interactions, such as oligomerization, between sorbed species. In this work we explore the relationship between surface structure and interfacial H(4)SiO(4) oligomerization by quantifying the extent of H(4)SiO(4) sorption and oligomerization on three TiO(2) phases; a rutile phase having well-developed (110) faces (R180), a rutile phase with poorly developed (110) faces (R60), and an amorphous TiO(2) (TiO(2(am))). The in situ ATR-IR spectra measured over time as 0.2 mM H(4)SiO(4) reacted with TiO(2) were quite different on the three TiO(2) phases. The percentage of the surface H(4)SiO(4) that was present as oligomers increased over time on all phases, but after 20 h almost all H(4)SiO(4) on the R180 surface was oligomeric, while the H(4)SiO(4) on TiO(2(am)) was predominantly monomeric. The extent of H(4)SiO(4) oligomerization on R60 was intermediate. When the TiO(2) phases reacted with 1.5 mM H(4)SiO(4) the ATR-IR spectra showed oligomeric silicates dominating the surface of all three TiO(2) phases; however, after 20 h the percentage of the surface H(4)SiO(4) present as three-dimensional polymers was ∼30, 10, and 0% on R180, R60, and TiO(2(am)) respectively. The Si 2s photoelectron peak binding energy (BE) and the H(4)SiO(4) surface coverage (Γ(Si)) were measured by XPS over a range of Γ(Si). For any given Γ(Si) the Si 2s BE's were in the order R180 > R60 > TiO(2(am)). A higher Si 2s BE indicates a greater degree of silicate polymerization. The ATR-IR and XPS results support the existing model for interfacial H(4)SiO(4) oligomerization where linear trimeric silicates are formed by insertion of a solution H(4)SiO(4

  1. DESY: Synchrotron and storage rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    An improvement programme has been under way for several years at the 7.5 GeV électron synchrotron at DESY. In particular it has been designed to increase the accelerated beam intensity, to achieve better quality of the ejected électron beams and photon beams and to improve machine reliability.

  2. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhol, J.M.; Chavanne, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Weckert, E. [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg (Germany)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  3. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  4. Synchrotron radiation in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review on the several experimental techniques (XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, IRRS, etc...) which, utilizing of synchrotron radiation can be applied in glass structural studies, is presented. The major part of these techniques can be also used for studies of other materials such as polymers, metals, etc... (L.C.)

  5. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs

  6. Role of functional groups in surface bonding of planar π-conjugated molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Oliver; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Willenbockel, Martin; Reckien, Werner; Heinrich Schmitz, Christoph; Fiedler, Benjamin; Soubatch, Serguei; Bredow, Thomas; Tautz, Frank Stefan; Sokolowski, Moritz

    2012-12-01

    The trends in the bonding mechanism of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) to the Ag(111), Ag(100), and Ag(110) surfaces were analyzed on the basis of data obtained from x-ray standing waves and dispersion-corrected density functional theory. Of importance are the attractive local O-Ag bonds on the anhydride groups. They are the shorter, the more open the surface is, and lead even to partly repulsive interactions between the perylene core and the surface. In parallel, there is an increasing charge donation from the Ag surface into the π system of the PTCDA. This synergism explains the out-of-plane distortion of the adsorbed PTCDA and the surface buckling.

  7. Review Article: Structures of phthalocyanine molecules on surfaces studied by STM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This review mainly focuses on progress recently achieved in the growth of phthalocyanine molecules on single-crystal surfaces of sub-monolayer up to few-monolayer thin films studied by scanning tunneling microscopy in our groups. On metallic surfaces such as Au(111, Ag(111 and Cu(111, molecular superstructures are determined by combining directional intermolecular interactions caused by symmetry reduction, molecule-substrate interactions and indirect long-range interactions due to quantum interference of surface state electrons. On semiconducting TiO2 surface, molecular assembling structures are dictated by the strong molecule-substrate interaction. However, on insulating NaCl film, molecule-molecule interaction dominates over the molecule-NaCl coupling, leading to molecular growth behavior. Knowledge obtained from these studies would help people better understand the physicochemical properties of the phthalocyanine molecules at surfaces so that their new applications could be further explored and uncovered in the future.

  8. Fermi surface mapping and heavy hermion behaviour in ARPES on CePt{sub 5} and CeAg{sub 5} surface alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, Holger; Klein, Markus; Nuber, Andreas; Ziroff, Johannes; Mulazzi, Mattia; Reinert, Friedrich [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Hayashi, H.; Jiang, Jian [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Shimada, Kenya [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Assaad, F.F. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission we studied ordered cerium surface alloys on Pt(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. We present light polarization dependent bandstructure and Fermi surfaces for several photon energies including Ce 4d-4f resonant photoemission. In the CePt{sub 5} surface alloy, we show the temperature dependence of the Cerium 4f electron spectral weight near the Fermi level. There we observed the opening of a hybridisation gap between the flat 4f Cerium band and one strongly dispersing Pt conduction band that has a strong temperature dependence. The comparison to LDA+DMFT calculations based on an NCA solver shows the on-set of the coherent heavy fermion state at low temperature below the Kondo temperature of the material.

  9. Global structure search for molecules on surfaces: Efficient sampling with curvilinear coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautgasser, Konstantin; Panosetti, Chiara; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J

    2016-08-28

    Efficient structure search is a major challenge in computational materials science. We present a modification of the basin hopping global geometry optimization approach that uses a curvilinear coordinate system to describe global trial moves. This approach has recently been shown to be efficient in structure determination of clusters [C. Panosetti et al., Nano Lett. 15, 8044-8048 (2015)] and is here extended for its application to covalent, complex molecules and large adsorbates on surfaces. The employed automatically constructed delocalized internal coordinates are similar to molecular vibrations, which enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures. By introducing flexible constraints and local translation and rotation of independent geometrical subunits, we enable the use of this method for molecules adsorbed on surfaces and interfaces. For two test systems, trans-β-ionylideneacetic acid adsorbed on a Au(111) surface and methane adsorbed on a Ag(111) surface, we obtain superior performance of the method compared to standard optimization moves based on Cartesian coordinates.

  10. Global structure search for molecules on surfaces: Efficient sampling with curvilinear coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautgasser, Konstantin; Panosetti, Chiara; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J.

    2016-08-01

    Efficient structure search is a major challenge in computational materials science. We present a modification of the basin hopping global geometry optimization approach that uses a curvilinear coordinate system to describe global trial moves. This approach has recently been shown to be efficient in structure determination of clusters [C. Panosetti et al., Nano Lett. 15, 8044-8048 (2015)] and is here extended for its application to covalent, complex molecules and large adsorbates on surfaces. The employed automatically constructed delocalized internal coordinates are similar to molecular vibrations, which enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures. By introducing flexible constraints and local translation and rotation of independent geometrical subunits, we enable the use of this method for molecules adsorbed on surfaces and interfaces. For two test systems, trans-β-ionylideneacetic acid adsorbed on a Au(111) surface and methane adsorbed on a Ag(111) surface, we obtain superior performance of the method compared to standard optimization moves based on Cartesian coordinates.

  11. Estimation of presampling modulation transfer function in synchrotron radiation microtomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The spatial resolution achieved by recent synchrotron radiation microtomographs should be estimated from the modulation transfer function (MTF) on the micrometer scale. Step response functions of a synchrotron radiation microtomograph were determined by the slanted edge method by using high-precision surfaces of diamond crystal and ion-milled aluminum wire. Tilted reconstruction was introduced to enable any edge to be used as the slanted edge by defining the reconstruction pixel matrix in an arbitrary orientation. MTFs were estimated from the step response functions of the slanted edges. The obtained MTFs coincided with MTF values estimated from square-wave patterns milled on the aluminum surface. Although x-ray refraction influences should be taken into account to evaluate MTFs, any flat surfaces with nanometer roughness can be used to determine the spatial resolutions of microtomographs.

  12. Multipole correction in large synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of correcting dynamic nonlinearities due to the multipole content of a synchrotron such as the Superconducting Super Collider is discussed. The method uses lumped multipole elements placed at the center (C) of the accelerator half-cells as well as elements near the focusing (F) and defocusing (D) quads. In a first approximation, the corrector strengths follow Simpson's Rule. Correction of second-order sextupole nonlinearities may also be obtained with the F, C, and D octupoles. Correction of nonlinearities by about three orders of magnitude are obtained, and simple solutions to a fundamental problem in synchrotrons are demonstrated. Applications to the CERN Large Hadron Collider and lower energy machines, as well as extensions for quadrupole correction, are also discussed

  13. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved

  14. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  15. Surface-Guided Formation of an Organocobalt Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Peter B; Hellwig, Raphael; Paintner, Tobias; Lattelais, Marie; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Casado Aguilar, Pablo; Deimel, Peter S; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yi-Qi; Allegretti, Francesco; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Reichert, Joachim; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Barth, Johannes V; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Klappenberger, Florian

    2016-05-01

    Organocobalt complexes represent a versatile tool in organic synthesis as they are important intermediates in Pauson-Khand, Friedel-Crafts, and Nicholas reactions. Herein, a single-molecule-level investigation addressing the formation of an organocobalt complex at a solid-vacuum interface is reported. Deposition of 4,4'-(ethyne-1,2-diyl)dibenzonitrile and Co atoms on the Ag(111) surface followed by annealing resulted in genuine complexes in which single Co atoms laterally coordinated to two carbonitrile groups undergo organometallic bonding with the internal alkyne moiety of adjacent molecules. Alternative complexation scenarios involving fragmentation of the precursor were ruled out by complementary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to density functional theory analysis, the complexation with the alkyne moiety follows the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model for a two-electron-donor ligand where an alkyne-to-Co donation occurs together with a strong metal-to-alkyne back-donation. PMID:27059261

  16. Threedimensional microfabrication using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For fabricating microstructures with extreme structural heights a technology has been developed which is based on deep-etch lithography and subsequent replication processes. A particularly high precision is achieved if the lithographic process is carried out by means of synchrotron radiation. Electroforming and molding processes are used for the replication of microstructures from a large variety of materials. The field of application comprises sensors, electrical and optical microconnectors, components for fluid technology, microfiltration systems and novel composite materials. (author)

  17. Proposals for synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since it was first applied in the 1960's synchrotron radiation from an accelerating electron beam has been gaining popularity as a powerful tool for research and development in a wide variety of fields of science and technology. By now there are some 20 facilities operating either parasitically or dedicatedly for synchrotron radiation research in different parts of the world. In addition there are another 20 facilities either in construction or in various stages of proposal and design. The experiences gained from the operating facilities and the recent development of insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators as radiation sources led to a new set of requirements on the design of synchrotron radiation storage rings for optimum utility. The surprisingly uniform applicability and unanimous acceptance of these criteria give assurance that they are indeed valid criteria derived form mature considerations and experiences. Instead of describing the design of each of these new facilities it is, thus, more effective to discuss these desirable design features and indicate how they are incorporated in the design using machines listed as examples. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Beam diagnostics with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation is often used to measure the dimensions of an electron beam. The transverse size is obtained from an image of the beam cross section formed by means of the emitted synchrotron radiation. Because of the small natural opening angle the resolution is limited by diffraction. The angular spread of the particles in the beam can be measured by observing the radiation directly. Here, the resolution is limited by the natural opening angle of the emitted light. Measuring both beam cross section and angular spread gives the emittance of the beam. However, in most cases only one of these two parameters is observed and the other deduced from the known particle beam optics at the source of the radiation. Usually one observes radiation emitted in long bending magnets. However, short magnets and undulators are also useful sources for these measurements. For practical reasons the beam diagnostics is carried out using visible or ultraviolet light. This part of the spectrum is usually far below the critical frequency, and corresponding approximations can be applied. Synchrotron radiation is an extremely useful tool for diagnostics in electron (or positron) rings. In some cases it has also served in proton rings using special magnets. (author)

  19. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Silvia; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Longo, Renata; Olivo, Alessandro; Poropat, Paolo; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palma, Ludovico D.; Castelli, Edoardo

    2002-05-01

    A feasibility study of breast CT with synchrotron radiation is currently being carried on at Elettra, the Trieste synchrotron radiation facility. Breast CT cannot be implemented easily with conventional radiographic tubes, due to the high dose that would be delivered to the breast by a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The possibility of tuning the beam energy, available at a synchrotron radiation beamline, allows a significant reduction in the delivered dose, and at the same time the use of monochromatic beams avoids beam hardening artifacts on the reconstructed image. Images of in vitro breast tissue samples have been acquired by means of a high efficiency linear array detector coupled to a VLSI single photon counting readout electronics. The pixel width, determining the pixel size of the reconstructed image, is 200 micrometers , while the pixel height, determining the CT slice thickness, is 300 micrometers . Tomograms have been reconstructed by means of standard filtered backprojection algorithms. Images of normal and pathologic breast tissue samples show a good visibility of glandular structure. The delivered dose was in all cases comparable to the one delivered in clinical planar mammography. Due to the promising results we obtained, in vivo studies are under evaluation.

  20. A guide to synchrotron radiation science

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Shigeru; Munro, Ian; Lodha, G S

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR), as a light source is now in use around the world to provide brilliant radiation from the infrared into the soft and hard X-ray regions. It is an indispensible and essential tool to establish the physic-chemical characteristics of materials and surfaces from an atomic and molecular view point. It is being applied to topics which range from mineralogy to protein crystallography, embracing research in areas from the physical to the life sciences. This new guide is a concise yet comprehensive and easily readable introduction to an expanding area of science. It presents in a readily assimilable form the basic concepts of SR science from its generation principles, through source design and operation to the principles of instruments for SR exploitation followed by a survey of its actual applications in selected research fields, including spectroscopy, diffractometry, microanalysis and chemical processing.

  1. Silicon Pixel Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Graeme Douglas

    Recent advances in particle accelerators have increased the demands being placed on detectors. Novel detector designs are being implemented in many different areas including, for example, high luminosity experiments at the LHC or at next generation synchrotrons. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise some of these novel detectors. The first of the new detector types is called a 3D detector. This design was first proposed by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). In this design, doped electrodes are created that extend through the silicon substrate. When compared to a traditional photodiode with electrodes on the opposing surfaces, the 3D design can combine a reasonable detector thickness with a small electrode spacing resulting in fast charge collection and limited charge sharing. The small electrode spacing leads to the detectors having lower depletion voltages. This, combined with the fast collection time, makes 3D detectors a candidate for radiation hard applications. These applications include the upgra...

  2. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop trademark, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research

  3. 3D Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pennicard, D

    2009-01-01

    3D detectors are a novel variety of photodiode radiation detector, invented by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). Instead of having n- and p-type contacts on the front and back surfaces of a silicon substrate, like a standard photodiode, they have columns of doped material passing through the thickness of the silicon. This structure means that the detector can combine a reasonable substrate thickness with a very small electrode spacing, resulting in a low depletion voltage, fast charge collection and low charge sharing. These detectors have a couple of promising applications. Their fast charge collection and low depletion voltage should make them very radiation-tolerant. So, they could be used for future particle physics experiments at the Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC), where high levels of radiation damage are expected. Also, their low charge sharing means they could potentially improve X-ray diffraction measurements at synchrotrons such as Diamond Light Source. This would allow these experiments, for exa...

  4. Quantification estimate methods for synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bewer, Brian, E-mail: brian.bewer@lightsource.ca

    2015-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is a method which allows low elemental concentrations to be measured within a sample. To maintain biological or medical relevance increased importance is being placed on quantifying these in situ localized elemental concentrations. For third generation synchrotron light sources, which have the potential for high sample throughput, a rapid method of obtaining a quantification estimate is needed. Non-destructive transmission and surface analysis techniques for first transition metals, or elements of higher atomic number, using reference standards are examined for different sample property regimes to elucidate methods of quantitative synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

  5. Synchrotron Environmental Science-I Workshop Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-08

    Attendees of the Synchrotrons Environmental Science 1 (SES-1) workshop represented a broad spectrum of environmental science research areas and expertise in all of the current synchrotrons techniques (X-ray scattering and diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and two- and three-dimensional X-ray imaging). These individuals came together to discuss current measurement obstacles in environmental research and, more specifically, ways to overcome such obstacles by applying synchrotrons radiation techniques. Significant obstacles in measurement affect virtually all of the research issues described. Attendees identified synchrotrons approaches of potential value in their research. A number of the environmental research studies discussed are currently being addressed with some success by synchrotron-based approaches. Nevertheless, improvements in low-Z measurement capabilities are needed to facilitate the use of synchrotrons radiation methodologies in environmental research.

  6. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe2 and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials

  7. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spring of 2000, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) moved from Tanashi to Kashiwa Campus. Now, most important for SRL is to promote the future project of High-brilliance Light Source, Super SOR project, in cooperation with the nationwide user group as well as with the users of the University of Tokyo. The Super SOR will be one of the most brilliant light sources in vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regimes. In order to continue extensive efforts on research and developments (R and D) of the light source and beamlines, the SRL Experimental Building has been built at Kashiwa Campus, which acts as the Super SOR Project Office of the University of Tokyo. On the other hand, the SRL has a branch laboratory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) at Tsukuba. The branch laboratory maintains an undulator called Revolver, two beamlines and three experimental stations (BL-18A, 19A and 19B); they are installed in the Photon Factory (PF) and fully opened to outside users. The in-house staffs not only serve the outside users with technical support and advices, but also carry out their own research works on advanced solid state spectroscopy as well as instrumentation. In the fiscal year of 2000, the operation time of the beamlines wag more than 5000 hours and the number of the users was more than 200. The main scientific interests and activities in the SRL at KEK-PF are directed to the electronic structures of new materials with new transport and optical properties. The electronic structures of solid surfaces and interfaces are also intensively studied. The study of the behavior of electrons in a synchrotron radiation source is indispensable as a part of accelerator physics for developing electron accelerators. The SRL is carrying out research works of the accelerator physics and developing the accelerator-related technology, many parts of which will be directly applied to the Super SOR light source. This report contains the activities of the SRL

  8. Research on feedback system of synchrotron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a very complex problem to use feedback control system in synchrotron accelerator. Some scientists design feedback control system to make high energy beam stable in synchrotron accelerator, but it is very rare to see theoretically analysis feedback system in synchrotron accelerator by using new concept of control model. One new feedback control model is a fresh idea to discuss the feedback system more deeply. A topic about feedback control system discussed here will be useful for synchrotron accelerator design and operation. It is an good idea for some scientists and technician to continue study. (authors)

  9. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Adsorption of Anisotropic Noninteracting Molecules on the (111) Surface of a FCC Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, S. N.; Hervieu, Yu. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    We present results of computer Monte Carlo simulations of the formation of adsorption layers composed of noninteracting molecules of benzene, anthracene, and pentacene on the Ag(111) surface. The dependences of the chemical potential of the molecules on the density of the molecular layer (surface coverage) are obtained. By means of the thermodynamic integration method the configurational entropy of the molecular layer is evaluated as a function of surface coverage. It is shown that the substitution of benzene by pentacene results in a more than twofold decrease of the maximum entropy of the molecular layer. The presence of steps on the substrate surface also leads to a decrease of the molecular layer entropy. If the distance between the steps is comparable to the linear size of the molecule, the molecules in dense adsorption layers orient preferentially parallel to the step edges.

  10. Advanced Materials Research with 3RD Generation Synchrotron Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukiassian, P.; D'angelo, M.; Enriquez, H.; Aristov, V. Yu.

    H and D surface nanochemistry on an advanced wide band gap semiconductor, silicon carbide is investigated by synchrotron radiation-based core level and valence band photoemission, infrared absorption and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, showing the 1st example of H/D-induced semiconductor surface metallization, that also occurs on a pre-oxidized surface. These results are compared to recent state-of-the-art ab-initio total energy calculations. Most interestingly, an amazing isotopic behavior is observed with a smaller charge transfer from D atoms suggesting the role of dynamical effects. Such findings are especially exciting in semiconductor physics and in interface with biology.

  11. Time-resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poliakoff, E.D.

    1979-08-01

    Work performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is reported. The timing characteristics of the SPEAR beam (pulse width less than or equal to 0.4 nsec, pulse repetition period = 780 nsec) were exploited to determine dynamic behavior of atomic, molecular, excimeric, and photodissociative gas-phase species excited by vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. Fast fluorescence timing measurements were done to determine excited-state lifetimes of Kr and Xe. Pressure-dependent timing studies on Xe gas at higher concentrations demonstrated some of the problems associated with previous kinetic modeling of the Xe/sub 2/ system. It was found that even qualitative agreement of observed Xe/sub 2/ lifetimes as a function of pressure required the assumption that the radiative lifetime was a strong function of internuclear separation. The radiative decays of chemically unstable fragments, CN* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/) and XeF* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/ and C/sup 2/ Pi/sub 3/2//), were studied by pulsed photodissociation of stable parent compounds, ICN and XeF/sub 2/. When the polarization of the CN* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/) fragment fluorescence was measured, it was found to be non-zero and strongly dependent on excitation wavelength. This polarization is related to the symmetry of the photodissociative surface via a classical model, and the variations in the polarization with wavelength is attributed to symmetry and lifetime effects of a predissociating parent molecule. Despite the drawbacks of limited availability and low radiation flux, synchrotron radiation is definitely a useful spectroscopic tool for VUV studies of gas-phase systems.

  12. Time-resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is reported. The timing characteristics of the SPEAR beam (pulse width less than or equal to 0.4 nsec, pulse repetition period = 780 nsec) were exploited to determine dynamic behavior of atomic, molecular, excimeric, and photodissociative gas-phase species excited by vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. Fast fluorescence timing measurements were done to determine excited-state lifetimes of Kr and Xe. Pressure-dependent timing studies on Xe gas at higher concentrations demonstrated some of the problems associated with previous kinetic modeling of the Xe2 system. It was found that even qualitative agreement of observed Xe2 lifetimes as a function of pressure required the assumption that the radiative lifetime was a strong function of internuclear separation. The radiative decays of chemically unstable fragments, CN* (B2Σ+) and XeF* (B2Σ+ and C2 Pi/sub 3/2//), were studied by pulsed photodissociation of stable parent compounds, ICN and XeF2. When the polarization of the CN* (B2Σ+) fragment fluorescence was measured, it was found to be non-zero and strongly dependent on excitation wavelength. This polarization is related to the symmetry of the photodissociative surface via a classical model, and the variations in the polarization with wavelength is attributed to symmetry and lifetime effects of a predissociating parent molecule. Despite the drawbacks of limited availability and low radiation flux, synchrotron radiation is definitely a useful spectroscopic tool for VUV studies of gas-phase systems

  13. METROLOGICAL CHALLENGES OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OPTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern third generation storage rings, require state-of-the-art grazing incidence x-ray optics, in order to monochromate the Synchrotrons Radiation (SR) source photons, and focus them into the experimental stations. Slope error tolerances in the order of 0.5 microRad RMS, and surface roughness well below 5 angstrom RMS, are frequently specified for mirrors and gratings exceeding 300 mm in length. Non-contact scanning instruments were developed, in order to characterize SR optical surfaces, of spherical and aspherical shape. Among these, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a double pencil slope measuring interferometer, has proved to be particularly reliable, and was adopted by several SR optics metrology laboratories. The ELETTRA soft x-rays and optics metrology laboratory, has operated an LTP since 1992. We review the basic operating principles of this instrument, and some major instrumental and environmental improvements, that were developed in order to detect slope errors lower than 1 microRad RMS on optical surfaces up to one metre in length. A comparison among measurements made on the same reference flat, by different interferometers (most of them were LTPs) can give some helpful indications in order to optimize the quality of measurement

  14. METROLOGICAL CHALLENGES OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OPTICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOSTERO,G.

    1999-05-25

    Modern third generation storage rings, require state-of-the-art grazing incidence x-ray optics, in order to monochromate the Synchrotrons Radiation (SR) source photons, and focus them into the experimental stations. Slope error tolerances in the order of 0.5 {micro}Rad RMS, and surface roughness well below 5 {angstrom} RMS, are frequently specified for mirrors and gratings exceeding 300 mm in length. Non-contact scanning instruments were developed, in order to characterize SR optical surfaces, of spherical and aspherical shape. Among these, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a double pencil slope measuring interferometer, has proved to be particularly reliable, and was adopted by several SR optics metrology laboratories. The ELETTRA soft x-rays and optics metrology laboratory, has operated an LTP since 1992. We review the basic operating principles of this instrument, and some major instrumental and environmental improvements, that were developed in order to detect slope errors lower than 1 {micro}Rad RMS on optical surfaces up to one metre in length. A comparison among measurements made on the same reference flat, by different interferometers (most of them were LTPs) can give some helpful indications in order to optimize the quality of measurement.

  15. Understanding the Adsorption of CuPc and ZnPc on Noble Metal Surfaces by Combining Quantum-Mechanical Modelling and Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li Huang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phthalocyanines are an important class of organic semiconductors and, thus, their interfaces with metals are both of fundamental and practical relevance. In the present contribution we provide a combined theoretical and experimental study, in which we show that state-of-the-art quantum-mechanical simulations are nowadays capable of treating most properties of such interfaces in a quantitatively reliable manner. This is shown for Cu-phthalocyanine (CuPc and Zn-phthalocyanine (ZnPc on Au(111 and Ag(111 surfaces. Using a recently developed approach for efficiently treating van der Waals (vdW interactions at metal/organic interfaces, we calculate adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiments. With these geometries available, we are then able to accurately describe the interfacial electronic structure arising from molecular adsorption. We find that bonding is dominated by vdW forces for all studied interfaces. Concomitantly, charge rearrangements on Au(111 are exclusively due to Pauli pushback. On Ag(111, we additionally observe charge transfer from the metal to one of the spin-channels associated with the lowest unoccupied π-states of the molecules. Comparing the interfacial density of states with our ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS experiments, we find that the use of a hybrid functionals is necessary to obtain the correct order of the electronic states.

  16. Systematic studies of bonding distances of diindenoperylene on noble metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerker, Christoph; Gerlach, Alexander; Hosokai, Takuya; Schreiber, Frank [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Niederhausen, Jens; Koch, Norbert [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Detlefs, Blanka [ESRF, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of organic semiconducting molecules with different substrates is essential for the understanding of these systems and for possible applications in organic electronic devices. Diindenoperylene (DIP) is one promising semiconductor and has been studied widely in the recent years concerning its growth and ordering behavior on different substrates as well as electronic properties. Despite these efforts the bonding distance d{sub 0} and thus the coupling to the substrate is still an unknown key parameter of DIP adsorption. Here we present a systematic study of d{sub 0} of DIP on Cu(111), Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces, determined by the X-ray standing wave (XSW) technique. Different bonding distances for different substrates indicate a substrate dependent interaction strength. Our results are compared with the well-established bonding distances and interaction strength of PTCDA on the same noble metal surfaces. Interesting similarities as well as differences between the two molecules are discussed.

  17. High pressure and synchrotron radiation satellite workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, J.; Guignot, N.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, M.; Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Sturhahn, W.; Daniel, I.; Reynard, B.; Simionovici, A.; Sanchez Valle, C.; Martinez, I.; Kantor, I.; Dubrovinsky, I.; Mccammon, C.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Kurnosiv, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Goncharenko, I.; Loubeyre, P.; Desgreniers, S.; Weck, G.; Yoo, C.S.; Iota, V.; Park, J.; Cynn, H.; Gorelli, F.; Toulemonde, P.; Machon, D.; Merlen, A.; San Miguel, A.; Amboage, M.; Aquilanti, G.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Itie, J.P.; Mcmillan, P.F.; Trapananti, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Panfilis, S. de; Filipponi, A.; Kreisel, J.; Bouvier, P.; Dkhil, B.; Chaabane, B.; Rosner, H.; Koudela, D.; Schwarz, U.; Handestein, A.; Hanfland, M.; Opahle, I.; Koepernik, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Mueller, K.H.; Mydosh, J.; Richter, M.; Hejny, C.; Falconi, S.; Lundegaard, L.F.; Mcmahon, M.I; Loa, I.; Syassen, K.; Wang, X.; Roth, H.; Lorenz, T.; Farber Daniel, I.; Antonangeli Daniele, I.; Krisch, M.; Badro, J.; Fiquet, G.; Occelli, F.; Mao, W.L.; Mao, H.K.; Eng, P.; Kao, C.C.; Shu, J.F.; Hemley, R.J.; Tse, J.S.; Yao, Y.; Deen, P.P.; Paolasini, I.; Braithwaite, D.; Kernavanois, N.; Lapertot, G.; Rupprecht, K.; Leupold, O.; Ponkratz, U.; Wortmann, G.; Beraud, A.; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Aracne, C.; Zarestky, J.L.; Mcqueeney, R.; Mathon, O.; Baudelet, F.; Decremps, F.; Itie, J.P.; Nataf, I.; Pascarelli, S.; Polian, A

    2006-07-01

    The workshop is dedicated to recent advances on science at high pressure at third generation synchrotron sources. A variety of experiments using synchrotron radiation techniques including X-ray diffraction, EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), inelastic X-ray scattering, Compton scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy of crystalline, liquid or amorphous samples, are reported. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  18. High pressure and synchrotron radiation satellite workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop is dedicated to recent advances on science at high pressure at third generation synchrotron sources. A variety of experiments using synchrotron radiation techniques including X-ray diffraction, EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), inelastic X-ray scattering, Compton scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy of crystalline, liquid or amorphous samples, are reported. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations

  19. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Suetsugu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  20. Funding problems threaten Middle East's synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    McCabe, H

    1999-01-01

    Scientists will tour the Middle East to try to raise support for the Synchrotron radiation for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East project. The plan is to dismantle and move a decommissioned synchrotron from Berlin to the Middle East where scientists of any nationality would be able to use it (3 paragraphs).

  1. Synchrotron Physics and Industry: new opportunities for technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In 1979, with the opening in the UK of the world's first dedicated synchrotron light source, the SRS, experimental science in virtually every discipline underwent what amounted to a major revolution. The unique nature of synchrotron radiation, with its intensity, brightness, polarization, time structure and energy spectrum offer an unequalled probe of matter in all its states. The decades since have seen the development of a wide range of associated experimental techniques which harness the power of this radiation, including photoemission, EXAFS, spectroscopy, imaging and, of course, protein crystallography. These in turn have been applied to studies from surface science to molecular biology. The advances using synchrotron radiation throughout the 1980s and '90s naturally had a major impact on fundamental research, particularly in unraveling the structures of large proteins and in understanding the properties of semiconductors and surfaces. Much of this work could not have been accomplished without access to one of the world's increasing number of synchrotron facilities, of which there are now approaching 100. However, industrial awareness of the opportunities afforded by the use of synchrotron radiation was restricted to the handful of major multinational corporations, primarily in Europe, the USA and Japan, whose fundamental research staff had access. While there were major programmes in certain specific areas, such as X-ray lithography for semiconductor LSI fabrication, the general level of industrial involvement was low. But today, this is changing. In protein crystallography, for example, the use of synchrotron radiation in structure determination puts the 1PX' technique on the same level as NMR in terms of its routine utility. It has become an essential tool to drug designers in biopharmaceuticals, where access to the structural data is increasingly thought of almost as a service, rather than fundamental research. Pioneering work on medical imaging

  2. Workshop on detectors for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2000-11-22

    Forefront experiments in many scientific areas for which synchrotron sources provide sufficient flux are nonetheless hindered because detectors cannot collect data fast enough, do not cover sufficiently solid angle, or do no have adequate resolution. Overall, the synchrotron facilities, each of which represents collective investments from funding agencies and user institutions ranging from many hundreds of millions to more than a billion dollars, are effectively significantly underutilized. While this chronic and growing problem plagues facilities around the world, it is particularly acute in the United States, where detector research often has to ride on the coat tails of explicitly science-oriented projects. As a first step toward moving out of this predicament, scientists from the U.S. synchrotron facilities held a national workshop in Washington, DC, on October 30-31, 2000. The Workshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Research aimed to create a national ''roadmap'' for development of synchrotron-radiation detectors.

  3. Effects, causing intensification of synchrotron radiaiton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibility of intensification of synchrotron radiation beams in optical and ultraviolet spectrum range by shift of generation range of the output synchrotron radiation beams from circle sections of electron orbit to the magnetic field of gaps, separating sections of the accelerator electromagnets is discussed. The degree of manifestation of the considered effects in synchrotrons for 0.6 and 7.5 GeV energy is evaluated. The results of their experimental investigati.on in the optical beam of the 0.6 GeV synchrotron radiation are given. The results obtained show that beam intensity in the gap centre between the magnet sections increases 3.2 times. The structure of beam intensity distribution improves simultaneously and vertical direction of radiation increases approximately 2 times. A conclusion is made on applicability of the described method for beam intensification of synchrotron radiation

  4. Protein Data Bank Depositions from Synchrotron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey and analysis of Protein Data Bank (PDB) depositions from international synchrotron radiation facilities, based on the latest released PDB entries, are reported. The results () show that worldwide, every year since 1999, more than 50% of the deposited X-ray structures have used synchrotron facilities, reaching 75% by 2003. In this web-based database, all PDB entries among individual synchrotron beamlines are archived, synchronized with the weekly PDB release. Statistics regarding the quality of experimental data and the refined model for all structures are presented, and these are analysed to reflect the impact of synchrotron sources. The results confirm the common impression that synchrotron sources extend the size of structures that can be solved with equivalent or better quality than home sources

  5. Carbyne formation by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaito, C; Hanamoto, K; Sasaki, M; Kimura, S; Nakada, Tatsuya; Saitô, Y; Koike, C; Nakayama, Y

    2001-01-01

    Thin carbon films prepared by vacuum evaporation using the arc method were mounted on a standard electron microscope copper grid. They were irradiated by white synchrotron radiation (SR) beam by the use of cylindrical and toroidal mirrors. The irradiated film was examined using a high-resolution electron microscope. alpha and alpha+beta mixture carbyne crystals were grown in round and the elongated shapes. The round crystals were composed of 5-10 nm crystallites of a carbyne form. The elongated crystal grew into a single crystal 100 nm in size. The c-axes of both grown crystals were oblique to the film. The growth of the carbynes was discussed as being the result of nucleation due to graphite microcrystallites formed by SR beam irradiation.

  6. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  7. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well

  8. Experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ken; Arakida, Yoshio; Dixit, Tanuja; Iwashita, Taiki; Kono, Tadaaki; Nakamura, Eiji; Otsuka, Kazunori; Shimosaki, Yoshito; Torikai, Kota; Wake, Masayoshi

    2007-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron, the concept of which has been proposed as a future accelerator for the second generation of neutrino factory or hadron collider. The induction synchrotron supports a superbunch and a superbunch permits more charge to be accelerated while observing the constraints of the transverse space-charge limit. By using a newly developed induction acceleration system instead of radio-wave acceleration devices, a single proton bunch injected from the 500 MeV booster ring and captured by the barrier bucket created by the induction step voltages was accelerated to 6 GeV in the KEK proton synchrotron.

  9. Methods for lipid nanostructure investigation at neutron and synchrotron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    A lipid membrane is a main component of biological membranes. Contemporary bionanotechnologies use phospholipids and ceramides as basic components of drugs and cosmetic preparations. Phospholipids-based nanoparticles are used as drug carriers. Effective development of bionanotechnologies in Russia calls for creation of physical methods to diagnose the particle nanostructure which would be promising for application in pharmacology. Radiation with wavelengths of 1-10 Å is an adequate instrument for detecting the nanostructure of lipid bi- and monolayers. The review deals with methods that apply neutron scattering and synchrotron radiation for studying nanostructures of lipid membranes, phospholipid nanoparticles, and phospholipid monolayers on a water surface by techniques of diffraction, small-angle scattering, and reflectometry. The importance of the mutually complementary application of neutron and synchrotron radiation for solving urgent problems of membrane biophysics, microbiology, dermapharmacology, and bionanotechnologies is demonstrated by particular examples of studies of phospholipid membranes and ceramide-based membranes. The efficiency of development and application of new methods for solving urgent problems of biophysics is shown. The review is written on the basis of results obtained over the period of 1999-2010 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Laboratory of Neutron Physics in collaboration with the Pharmaceutical Departments of universities of France (Paris-Sud, Chatenay Malabry) and Germany (Martin Luther University, Halle). The experiments were performed at various European and Russian neutron and synchrotron sources.

  10. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SRμCT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SRμCT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SRμCT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SRμCT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SRμCT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  11. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After moved from Tanashi to Kashiwa Campus in the spring of 2000, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the High-brilliance Light Source project, Super SOR project, in cooperation with the nationwide user group as well as with the users of the University of Tokyo. In May of 2001, the project has met with a dramatic progress. The Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture organized the Advisory Board and started to discuss the future synchrotron radiation facilities in EUV and SX regime in Japan. Based on extensive discussion, they proposed the new facility consisting of a 1.8 GeV storage ring of 3rd generation type. The University of Tokyo approved to construct the proposed facility in the Kashiwa campus. The plan is supported not only by researchers in academic institutions but also bio- and chemical-industries. We strongly hope the plan will be realized in near future. On the other hand, SRL maintains a branch laboratory in the Photon Factory (PF) High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) at Tsukuba with a Revolver undulator, two beamlines and three experimental stations (BL-18A, 19A and 19B), which are and fully opened to the outside users. In the fiscal year of 2001, the operation time of the beamlines was more than 5000 hours and the number of the users was about 200. The main scientific interests and activities in the SRL at KEK-PF are directed to the electronic structures of new materials with new transport, magnetic and optical properties. The electronic structures of solid surfaces and interfaces are also intensively studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron microscopy. The accelerator group of SRL is carrying out research works of the accelerator physics and developing the accelerator-related technology, many parts of which will be directly applied to the new light source project. This report contains the activities of the staff members of SRL and users of the three beamlines in FY2001. The status of

  12. He atom-surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report describes work carried out in the study of surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators, the microscopic interactions controlling epitaxial growth and the formation of overlayers, and energy exchange in multiphonon surface scattering. The approach used is to employ high resolution helium atom scattering to study the geometry and structural features of the surfaces. Experiments have been carried out on the surface dynamics of RbCl and preliminary studies done on CoO and NiO. Epitaxial growth and overlayer dynamics experiments on the systems NaCl/NaCl(001), KBr/NaCl(001), NaCl/KBr(001) and KBr/RbCl(001) have been performed. They have collaborated with two theoretical groups to explore models of overlayer dynamics with which to compare and to interpret their experimental results. They have carried out extensive experiments on the multiphonon scattering of helium atoms from NaCl and, particularly, LiF. Work has begun on self-assembling organic films on gold and silver surfaces (alkyl thiols/Au(111) and Ag(111))

  13. An assessment of research opportunities and the need for synchrotron radiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The workshop focused on six topics, all of which are areas of active research: (1) speciation, reactivity and mobility of contaminants in aqueous systems, (2) the role of surfaces and interfaces in molecular environmental science, (3) the role of solid phases in molecular environmental science, (4) molecular biological processes affecting speciation, reactivity, and mobility of contaminants in the environment, (5) molecular constraints on macroscopic- and field-scale processes, and (6) synchrotron radiation facilities and molecular environmental sciences. These topics span a range of important issues in molecular environmental science. They focus on the basic knowledge required for understanding contaminant transport and fate and for the development of science-based remediation and waste management technologies. Each topic was assigned to a working group charged with discussing recent research accomplishments, significant research opportunities, methods required for obtaining molecular-scale information on environmental contaminants and processes, and the value of synchrotron x-ray methods relative to other methods in providing this information. A special working group on synchrotron radiation facilities was convened to provide technical information about experimental facilities at the four DOE-supported synchrotron radiation sources in the US (NSLS, SSRL, AS and UPS) and synchrotron- based methods available for molecular environmental science research. Similar information on the NSF-funded Cornell High Energy synchrotron Source (CHESS) was obtained after the workshop was held.

  14. An assessment of research opportunities and the need for synchrotron radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop focused on six topics, all of which are areas of active research: (1) speciation, reactivity and mobility of contaminants in aqueous systems, (2) the role of surfaces and interfaces in molecular environmental science, (3) the role of solid phases in molecular environmental science, (4) molecular biological processes affecting speciation, reactivity, and mobility of contaminants in the environment, (5) molecular constraints on macroscopic- and field-scale processes, and (6) synchrotron radiation facilities and molecular environmental sciences. These topics span a range of important issues in molecular environmental science. They focus on the basic knowledge required for understanding contaminant transport and fate and for the development of science-based remediation and waste management technologies. Each topic was assigned to a working group charged with discussing recent research accomplishments, significant research opportunities, methods required for obtaining molecular-scale information on environmental contaminants and processes, and the value of synchrotron x-ray methods relative to other methods in providing this information. A special working group on synchrotron radiation facilities was convened to provide technical information about experimental facilities at the four DOE-supported synchrotron radiation sources in the US (NSLS, SSRL, AS and UPS) and synchrotron- based methods available for molecular environmental science research. Similar information on the NSF-funded Cornell High Energy synchrotron Source (CHESS) was obtained after the workshop was held

  15. Workshop on surface and interface science at the ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Stierle, A.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.; Schmidt, S.; Hufner, S.; Moritz, W.; Fedley, Ch.S.; Rossi, G.; Durr Hermann, A.; Rohlsberger, R.; Dalmas, J.; Oughaddou, H.; Leandri, Ch.; Gay, J.M.; Treglia, G.; Le Lay, G.; Aufray, B.; Bunk, O.; Johnson, R.L.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Lucas, C.A.; Bauer, G.; Zhong, Z.; Springholz, G.; Lechner, R.; Stang, J.; Schulli, T.; Metzger, T.H.; Holy, V.; Woodruff, D.P.; Dellera, C.; Zegenhagen, J.; Robinson, I.; Malachias, A.; Schulli, T.U.; Magalhaes-Paniago, R.; Stoffel, M.; Schmidt, O.G.; Boragno, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Valbusa, U.; Felici, R.; Yacoby, Y.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Van der Veen, J.F

    2004-07-01

    The main aim of the workshop is to reflect the future of surface and interface research at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source ESRF taking into account experimental facilities which are becoming available at new synchrotron radiation facilities in Europe. 6 sessions have been organized: 1) surface and interface research and synchrotron radiation - today and tomorrow -, 2) aspects of surface and interface research, 3) real surfaces and interfaces, 4) synchrotron techniques in surface and interface research, 5) new directions in surface and interface research, and 6) surface and interface science at ESRF. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  16. In situ observation of surface reactions with synchrotron radiation induced semiconductor processes by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy using buried metal layer substrates; Umekomi kinzokuso kiban wo mochiita sekigai hansha kyushu supekutoruho ni yoru hoshako reiki handotai process hanno no sonoba kansatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshigoe, A.; Hirano, S. [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Yokohama (Japan); Mase, K.; Urisu, T. [Institute for Molecular Science, Aichi (Japan)

    1996-11-20

    It is known that infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) on semiconductor or insulator surfaces becomes practicable by using buried metal layer (BML) substrates, in which the metal thin film is buried order semiconductor or insulator films. In this work, IRAS has been measured for Langmuir-Blodgett films deposited on the BML substrate with SiO2/Al/Si(100) structure and the observed spectrum intensity has been quantitatively compared with the calculation assuming the ideal multilayer structure for the BML substrate. The BML-IRAS using CoSi2 has been adopted to the detection of SiHn on the Si (100) substrate during synchrotron radiation (SR) stimulated Si2H6 gas source molecular beam epitaxy. It has been found that SiH2 and SiH3 on the Si (100) surface are easily decomposed by SR, but SiH can`t be decomposed. From these experiments, it has been concluded that the BML-IRAS is an useful in situ observation technique for the photo-stimulated surface reactions. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Study of radioactive materials with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation brings 3 major improvements compared to other X-ray sources usually used in laboratories. Its high brilliance permits the study of size-reduced samples, the low divergency of the beam gives the possibility to increase the angular resolution of the diffractometer and the spectrum of the X-photons which is continuous, allows the experimenter to chose a particular wavelength. Synchrotron radiation is becoming an important tool to investigate radioactive materials particularly burnt nuclear fuels. Zircon is the corrosion product that appears on fuel clad during irradiation, the use of synchrotron radiation with the right wavelength and a discerning incidence angle has clearly shown a crystallographic change of the zircon induced by heavy ion irradiation. X-ray fluorescence induced by synchrotron radiation can give information on fission products which were till then undetected because of the lack of sensibility of previous methods. (A.C.)

  18. National synchrotron light source VUV storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumberg, L.; Bittner, J.; Galayda, J.; Heese, R.; Krinsky, S.; Schuchman, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    A 700 MeV electron storage ring designed for synchrotron radiation applications is described. Lattice and stability calculations are presented and the vacuum, correction and injection systems are discussed.

  19. Panel backs next-generation synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Service, R F

    1999-01-01

    A key federal panel recommended continued research into development of a fourth-generation synchrotron. It would be capable of creating x-ray pulses billions of times more intense than current designs (1 page).

  20. Applications of synchrotron radiation in Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short introduction to the generation of the synchrotron radiation is made. Following, the applications of such a radiation in biophysics with emphasis to the study of the hemoglobin molecule are presented. (L.C.)

  1. Time resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron infrared pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, G.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source; Lobo, R.P.S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source]|[Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Physics Dept.; Hirschmugl, C.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; LaVeigne, J.; Reitze, D.H.; Tanner, D.B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-09-01

    Electron synchrotron storage rings, such as the VUV ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), produce short pulses of infrared (IR) radiation suitable for investigating the time-dependent phenomena in a variety of interesting experimental systems. In contrast to other pulses sources of IR, the synchrotron produces a continuum spectral output over the entire IR (and beyond), though at power levels typically below those obtained from laser systems. The infrared synchrotron radiation (IRSR) source is therefore well-suited as a probe using standard FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Here the authors describe the pump-probe spectroscopy facility being established at the NSLS and demonstrate the technique by measuring the photocarrier decay in a semiconductor.

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SSRL at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 to take and use for synchrotron studies the intense x-ray beams from the SPEAR storage ring that...

  3. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  5. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems

  6. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truesdale, C.M.

    1983-04-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems.

  7. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

  8. Research Team for Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The research team has accomplished the largestin-history scientific facility and platform for multidisciplinary research in China, the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), which is one of the leading third generation intermediate-energy synchrotron radiation light sources in the world. On the basis of ten years' R&D of key technologies and timely optimization of the overall design, the team fulfilled the

  9. Early British synchrotrons, an informal history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An historical account of the design and construction of early synchrotrons in the United Kingdom, based partly on personal reminiscences, is presented. Material is also drawn from archives at Birmingham and CERN. The document covers the period from plans for the world's first synchrotron at Malvern after the Second World War to work done at Harwell Laboratory for CERN in the period 1951-1953. (UK)

  10. Wakefields in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, Tim E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, Ward A.; Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    When the electron bunches in a storage ring are sufficiently short the electrons act coherently producing radiation several orders of magnitude more intense than normal synchrotron radiation. This is referred to as Coherent Syncrotron Radiation (CSR). Due to the potential of CSR to provide a good source of Terahertz radiation for our users, the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been researching the production and application of CSR. CSR has been produced at the CLS for many years, and has been used for a number of applications. However, resonances that permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of 0.074 cm-1, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup, have hampered some experiments. Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes. These results are consistent with observations made by the interferometer in the THz range. Also discussed will be some practical examples of the application of CSR for the study of condensed phase samples using both transmission and Photoacoustic techniques.

  11. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fugui; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities, because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as sub-nanometer scale, and that variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach towards effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques.

  12. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ''gold standards'' to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications

  13. To tilt or not to tilt: Correction of the distortion caused by inclined sample surfaces in low-energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sojka, Falko, E-mail: falko.sojka@uni-jena.de [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Meissner, Matthias; Zwick, Christian; Forker, Roman [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Vyshnepolsky, Michael; Klein, Claudius; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Physics, Lotharstr. 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Fritz, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.fritz@uni-jena.de [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) is a widely employed technique for the structural characterization of crystalline surfaces and epitaxial adsorbates. For technical reasons the accessible reciprocal space is limited at a given primary electron energy E. This limitation may be overcome by sweeping E to observe higher diffraction orders decisively enhancing the quantitative examination. Yet, in many cases, such as molecular films with rather large unit cells, the adsorbate reflexes become less pronounced at energies high enough to observe substrate reflexes. One possibility to overcome this problem is an intentional inclination of the sample surface during the measurement at the expense of the quantitative interpretability of then severely distorted diffraction patterns. Here, we introduce a correction method for the axially symmetric distortion in LEED images of tilted samples. We provide experimental confirmation for micro-channel plate LEED and spot-profile analysis LEED instruments using the (7×7) reconstructed surface of a Si(111) single crystal as a reference sample. Finally, we demonstrate that the correction of this distortion considerably improves the quantitative analysis of diffraction patterns of adsorbates since substrate and adsorbate reflexes can be evaluated simultaneously. As an illustrative example we have chosen an epitaxial monolayer of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride on Ag(111) that is known to form a commensurate superstructure. - Highlights: • We introduce a method to correct distortions in LEED patterns of tilted surfaces. • Higher diffraction orders unobservable at higher beam energies can be evaluated. • Our procedure makes LEED patterns of tilted samples quantitatively analyzable. • Experimental confirmation with SPA-LEED and MCP-LEED is presented. • The method is applied to PTCDA on Ag(111) confirming earlier literature values.

  14. Fifth school on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Beaurepaire, Eric; Scheurer, Fabrice; Kappler, Jean-Paul; Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation : New Trends

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the synthesis of new materials with often complex, nano-scaled structures require increasingly sophisticated experimental techniques that can probe the electronic states, the atomic magnetic moments and the magnetic microstructures responsible for the properties of these materials. At the same time, progress in synchrotron radiation techniques has ensured that these light sources remain a key tool of investigation, e.g. synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation are able to support magnetic imaging on a sub-micrometer scale. With the Fifth Mittelwihr School on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation the tradition of teaching the state-of-the-art on modern research developments continues and is expressed through the present set of extensive lectures provided in this volume. While primarily aimed at postgraduate students and newcomers to the field, this volume will also benefit researchers and lecturers actively working in the field.

  15. Paraxial Green's functions in Synchrotron Radiation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, G; Schneidmiller, E; Yurkov, M; Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni; Schneidmiller, Evgeni; Yurkov, Mikhail

    2005-01-01

    This work contains a systematic treatment of single particle Synchrotron Radiation and some application to realistic beams with given cross section area, divergence and energy spread. Standard theory relies on several approximations whose applicability limits and accuracy are often forgotten. We begin remarking that on the one hand, a paraxial approximation can always be applied without loss of generality and with ultra relativistic accuracy. On the other hand, dominance of the acceleration field over the velocity part in the Lienard-Wiechert expressions is not always granted and constitutes a separate assumption, whose applicability is discussed. Treating Synchrotron Radiation in paraxial approximation we derive the equation for the slow varying envelope function of the Fourier components of the electric field vector. Calculations of Synchrotron Radiation properties performed by others showed that the phase of the Fourier components of the electric field vector differs from the phase of a virtual point sourc...

  16. Space-charge calculations in synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    One obvious bottleneck of achieving high luminosity in hadron colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), is the beam emittance growth, due to space-charge effects in low energy injector synchrotrons. Although space-charge effects have been recognized since the alternating-gradient synchrotron was invented, and the Laslett tune shift usually calculated to quantify these effects, our understanding of the effects is limited, especially when the Laslett tune shift becomes a large fraction of the integer. Using the Simpsons tracking code, which we developed to study emittance preservation issues in proton synchrotrons, we investigated space-charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster (LEB). We observed detailed dependence on parameters such as beam intensity, initial emittance, injection energy, lattice function, and longitudinal motion. A summary of those findings, as well as the tracking technique we developed for the study, are presented.

  17. New extreme synchrotron BL Lac objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the BeppoSAX observations of four 'extreme' BL Lacs, selected to have high synchrotron peak frequencies. All have been detected also in the PDS band. For 1ES 0120+340, PKS 0548-322 and H 2356-309 the spectrum is well fitted by a convex broken power-law, thus locating the synchrotron peak around 1-4 keV. 1ES 1426+428 presents a flat energy spectral index (αx=0.92) up to ∼100 keV, thus constraining the synchrotron peak to lie near or above that value. For their extreme properties, all sources could be strong TeV emitters

  18. Research on atmospheric corrosion of steel using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correlation between local structure around Cr in the protective rust layer on weathering steel and protective performance of the rust layer is presented as an example of corrosion research using synchrotron radiation which has recently been applied in various research fields as a useful tool. In addition, in situ observation of initial process of rust formation on steel is also mentioned. It was pointed out by considering the X-ray absorption fine structure spectra that the nanostructure of the protective rust layer on weathering steel primarily comprises of small Cr-goethite crystals containing surface adsorbed and/or intergranular CrOx3-2X complex anions. This CrOx3-2X explains the protective performance of the rust layer originated by dense aggregation of fine crystals with cation selectivity of the Cr-goethite. It is very advantageous to employ white X-rays for in situ observation of rusting process of a carbon steel covered with electrolyte thin films because rust structure might change very quickly. This in situ observation revealed the effect of ion species on the change in rust phase during wet/dry repeating. It can be said that application of synchrotron radiation on corrosion research is so useful to understand the nanostructure of surface oxides which closely relate to corrosion behavior of metals and alloys. (author)

  19. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  20. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  1. Characterizing laser fusion welded aluminum using synchrotron x-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary research into the application of high power Nd-YAG lasers for welding indicate a dependency of the occurrence of weld discontinuities on processing parameters such as pulse duty cycle, travel speed, etc. The size and distribution of weld features have been characterized using synchrotron microtomography, using facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The ability of this technique to image defects such as gross and minor porosity, and centerline cracking, enables a metrology of interior surfaces which cannot be provided by metallurgical sectioning techniques alone

  2. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field

  3. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-06-22

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field.

  4. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part I. Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography has been applied to the study of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing (AM). The AM method employed here was the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V), as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Samples were chosen to examine the effect of build direction and complexity of design on the surface morphology and final dimensions of the piece. PMID:27359150

  5. Synchrotron environmental laboratory (SUL) at Anka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research facility dedicated to environmental/geochemical research, the Synchrotron Environmental Laboratory (SUL), is planned to be installed and operated at ANKA. ANKA is the new synchrotron facility at the Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK), Karlsruhe, Germany. ANKA is now in commissioning and planning operations for the fall of 2000. As the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE) at FZK conducts a vigorous synchrotron-based research programme, INE was instrumental in the original impetus for installing such a facility at ANKA. These research activities at INE concentrate on actinide speciation in nuclear waste forms, geological media and geochemical model systems. In order for INE to direct their synchrotron research activities to ANKA, equipment and licensing required for performing experiments on actinide-containing samples is required. One great advantage of performing experiments on actinide-containing samples at ANKA is that the INE radiological laboratories lie in the near vicinity of the facility. This will minimise transport hazards and costs and allow experiments to be performed on samples whose characteristics may change with time. Experiments on radioactive samples with activities below the exemption level, according to German regulations, will be possible at ANKA at the start of operations. Licensing for work on higher levels of activity will be applied for in the future. The decades of experience in radiological work at FZK will facilitate development of procedure and equipment as prerequisites to licensing. A consortium of synchrotron radiation-user groups with environmental research interests has specified their requirements and needs for this facility. This scientific case serves as the foundation for the SUL design and is the basis for an application for federal funding. The SUL design reflects the heterogeneity and complexity of challenges facing researchers in the environmental/geochemical sciences. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS

  6. 12 Experimental Techniques at Synchrotron Lightsource Beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Peter L [US Department of Energy Office of Science Office Basic Energy Sciences; Rhyne, James J [US Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2015-01-01

    The unique properties of synchrotron radiation are its continuous spectrum, high flux and brightness, and high coherence, which make it an indispensable tool in the exploration of matter. The wavelengths of the emitted photons span a range of dimensions from the atomic level to biological cells, thereby providing incisive probes for advanced research in materials science, physical and chemical sciences, metrology, geosciences, environmental sciences, biosciences, medical sciences, and pharmaceutical sciences. The features of synchrotron radiation are especially well matched to the needs of nanoscience.

  7. Preliminar plan of a machine for the synchrotron radiation production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminar plan, with all the technical specifications, for the construction of a machine for the synchrotron radiation production to be done by the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory in Brazil is presented. (L.C.)

  8. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, T. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SR{sub {mu}}CT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SR{sub {mu}}CT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SR{sub {mu}}CT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on applications of synchrotron radiation to trace impurity analysis for advanced silicon processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laderman, S [Integrated Circuits Business Div., Hewlett Packard Co., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Pianetta, P [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Wafer surface trace impurity analysis is essential for development of competitive Si circuit technologies. Today's grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence techniques with rotating anodes fall short of requirements for the future. Hewlett Packard/Toshiba experiments indicate that with second generation synchrotron sources such as SSRL, the techniques can be extended sufficiently to meet important needs of the leading edge Si circuit industry through nearly all of the 1990's. This workshop was held to identify people interested in use of synchrotron radiation-based methods and to document needs and concerns for further development. Viewgraphs are included for the following presentations: microcontamination needs in silicon technology (M. Liehr), analytical methods for wafer surface contamination (A. Schimazaki), trace impurity analysis of liquid drops using synchrotron radiation (D. Wherry), TRXRF using synchrotron sources (S. Laderman), potential role of synchrotron radiation TRXRF in Si process R D (M. Scott), potenital development of synchrotron radiation facilities (S. Brennan), and identification of goals, needs and concerns (M. Garner).

  10. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applications of synchrotron radiation to research in high-energy atomic physics are summarized. These lie in the areas of photoelectron spectrometry, photon scattering, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved measurements, resonance spectroscopy and threshold excitation, and future, yet undefined studies

  11. The Synchrotron Radiation for Steel Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyada Suwanpinij

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synchrotron X-ray radiation is a great tool in materials characterization with several advantageous features. The high intensity allows clear interaction signals and high energy of X-ray yields higher sampling volume. The samples do not need extra preparation and the microstructure is therefore not affected. With the tunability of the X-ray energy, a large range of elements and features in the samples can be investigated by different techniques, which is a significant difference between a stand-alone X-ray tube and synchrotron X-ray. Moreover, any experimental equipment can be installed through which the synchrotron beam travels. This facilitates the so-called in situ characterization such as during heat treatment, hot deformation, chemical reaction or welding. Although steel which possesses rather high density requires very high energy X-ray for large interaction volume, lower energy is still effective for the investigation of local structure of nanoconstituents. This work picks up a couple examples employing synchrotron X-ray for the characterization of high strength steels. The first case is the quantification of precipitates in high strength low alloyed (HSLA steel by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The other case is the in situ X-ray diffraction for phase fraction and carbon partitioning in multiphase steels such as transformation induced plasticity (TRIP steel.

  12. Assessing noise sources at synchrotron infrared ports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Ph; Dumas, P; Schilcher, T; Nadji, A; Luedeke, A; Hubert, N; Cassinari, L; Boege, M; Denard, J-C; Stingelin, L; Nadolski, L; Garvey, T; Albert, S; Gough, Ch; Quack, M; Wambach, J; Dehler, M; Filhol, J-M

    2012-01-01

    Today, the vast majority of electron storage rings delivering synchrotron radiation for general user operation offer a dedicated infrared port. There is growing interest expressed by various scientific communities to exploit the mid-IR emission in microspectroscopy, as well as the far infrared (also called THz) range for spectroscopy. Compared with a thermal (laboratory-based source), IR synchrotron radiation sources offer enhanced brilliance of about two to three orders of magnitude in the mid-IR energy range, and enhanced flux and brilliance in the far-IR energy range. Synchrotron radiation also has a unique combination of a broad wavelength band together with a well defined time structure. Thermal sources (globar, mercury filament) have excellent stability. Because the sampling rate of a typical IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy experiment is in the kHz range (depending on the bandwidth of the detector), instabilities of various origins present in synchrotron radiation sources play a crucial role. Noise recordings at two different IR ports located at the Swiss Light Source and SOLEIL (France), under conditions relevant to real experiments, are discussed. The lowest electron beam fluctuations detectable in IR spectra have been quantified and are shown to be much smaller than what is routinely recorded by beam-position monitors.

  13. The profile of the electron beam in the PTB synchrotron, and its influence on radiometric measurements with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method is described to determine the beam profile in an electron synchrotron; the measured results are compared with calculated values. Moreover, the influence of synchrotron- and betatron-oscillations on synchrotron radiation measurements is discussed, and a method is given to correct this. (orig.)

  14. 50 years of synchrotrons. Early synchrotrons in Britain, and early work for CERN. - The CERN synchrotrons. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first report, 'Early synchrotrons in Britain, and early work for CERN', John Lawson gives an extended account of the material presented at the John Adams lecture, and at the same time a revised and shortened version of RAL report 97-011, which contains fuller archival references and notes. During the period covered by this report there was extensive work in Russia, where the principle of phase stability had been discovered in 1944 by Veksler. Unfortunately, all experimental work was kept secret until Veksler's talk at the first 'Atoms for Peace' conference at Geneva in August 1955. In the second lecture, 'The CERN Synchrotrons', Giorgio Brianti outlines the history of alternating-gradient synchrotrons from 1953/54 until today. In preparing this lecture he was confronted with a vast amount of material, while the time at his disposal was not even one minute per year, implying a time compression factor close to one million. Therefore, he had to exercise drastic choices, which led him to concentrate on CERN hadron synchrotrons and colliders and leave aside the Large Electron-Positron storage ring (LEP). Indeed, LEP was the subject of the John Adams Memorial Lecture in 1990, and it may be treated again in the future in connection with its energy upgrade. Even with these severe limitations, it was impossible to do justice to the number and variety of events and to the ingenuity of the people who have carved the history of CERN and of particle physics on the magnets, radiofrequency cavities, vacuum etc., and on the record performance of our machines. (orig./WL)

  15. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS [National Synchrotron Light Source]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MATRIX is a group of scientists who have common interests in utilizing x-ray synchrotron radiation for materials research. This group has developed a specialized beam line (X-18A) for x-ray scattering studies at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The beam line was designed to optimize experimental conditions for diffuse scattering and surface/interface studies. An extension of diffuse scattering to provide better quantitative data has been shown as well as a unique application to the solution of the phase problem. In the x-ray surface scattering area the first reported experiment to illustrate the capabilities for studying monolayers on water was performed. Current beam line upgrade projects are also described. In addition to a change to a UHV system and improvements dictated by operational experience, two new systems are described, a unique small angle scattering chamber (SAXS) for dynamic studies of nucleation and growth and a surface scattering chamber. 5 figs

  16. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghisellini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at GHz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1e33 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Alternatively, we can have maser emission. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability timescale.

  17. Indus synchrotron source: A national facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indus Synchrotron Radiation complex at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology at Indore, India houses two synchrotron radiation sources: Indus-1 and Indus-2 respectively. Indus-1 is a 450 MeV source emitting in VUV and soft x-ray region and operating at 100 mA since 1990 and Indus-2, designed for 2.5 GeV, 300 mA and is currently operating at 2 GeV and 100 mA. Indus-1 has five operational beamlines while Indus-2 has six beamlines installed and operational. Several materials research related problems have been investigated using the reflectivity and photo-electron spectroscopy beamlines at Indus-1 and also the beamlines at Indus-2. Here we will report the current status of both these sources and discuss a few of our studies carried out using these beamlines.

  18. Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation: New possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, E. N.; Mukhamedzhanov, E. Kh.

    2016-09-01

    Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) is a modern method of studying the structure and properties of condensed matter that can be implemented on third-generation synchrotrons. This method allows one to investigate local properties of media (including magnetic and electronic ones) and observe thermal vibrations, defects, and orbital and charge orderings. A brief review of the advance provided by SR resonant diffraction is presented, and the capabilities of this method for analyzing phase transitions are considered in more detail by the example of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and rubidium dihydrogen phosphate crystals. It is shown that the investigation of the temperature dependence of forbidden reflections not only makes it possible to observe the transition from para- to ferroelectric phase, but also gives information about the proton distribution at hydrogen bonds.

  19. Synchrotron Applications of High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This workshop aims at discussing the scientific potential of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy in magnetic fields above 30 T. Pulsed magnetic fields in the range of 30 to 40 T have recently become available at Spring-8 and the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facility). This document gathers the transparencies of the 6 following presentations: 1) pulsed magnetic fields at ESRF: first results; 2) X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction experiments by using mini-coils: applications to valence state transition and frustrated magnet; 3) R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}: an ideal system to be studied in X-ray under high magnetic field?; 4) high field studies at the Advanced Photon Source: present status and future plans; 5) synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies under extreme conditions; and 6) projects for pulsed and steady high magnetic fields at the ESRF.

  20. Structural analysis with high brilliance synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    The research subjects in diffraction and scattering of materials with high brilliance synchrotron radiation such as SPring-8 (Super Photon ring 8 GeV) are summarized. The SPring-8 project is going well and 10 public beamlines will be opened for all users in October, 1997. Three JAERI beamlines are also under construction for researches of heavy element science, physical and structural properties under extreme conditions such as high temperature and high pressure. (author)

  1. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation for Laminar Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Lovelace, B S S R V E

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of shear in the flow of charged particle equilibria that are unstable to the Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) instability. Shear may act to quench this instability because it acts to limit the size of the region with a fixed phase relation between emitters. The results are important for the understanding of astrophysical sources of coherent radiation where shear in the flow is likely.

  2. Synchrotron radiation of a relativistic magneton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordovitsyn, V.A.; Torres, R.

    1986-11-01

    The classical theory of synchrotron radiation of an electrically neutral relativistic particle with a large intrinsic magnetic moment is considered (g-factor much greater than unit). The spectral-angular composition and polarization of the radiation are studied. The magneton radiation self-polarization time is calculated. It is shown that identical results follow from the Ternov-Bagrov-Khapaev quantum theory constructed on the basis of the Dirac-Pauli equation for a neutron.

  3. The Synchrotron Radiation for Steel Research

    OpenAIRE

    Piyada Suwanpinij

    2016-01-01

    The synchrotron X-ray radiation is a great tool in materials characterization with several advantageous features. The high intensity allows clear interaction signals and high energy of X-ray yields higher sampling volume. The samples do not need extra preparation and the microstructure is therefore not affected. With the tunability of the X-ray energy, a large range of elements and features in the samples can be investigated by different techniques, which is a significant difference between a...

  4. Surface electron density models for accurate ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-06-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF) is a valuable methodology to study the interaction of atomic particles with metal surfaces. This method, in which the effect of low-energy electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations is treated within the local density friction approximation (LDFA) [Juaristi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 116102 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.116102], can provide an accurate description of both e-h pair and phonon excitations. In practice, its applicability becomes a complicated task in those situations of substantial surface atoms displacements because the LDFA requires the knowledge at each integration step of the bare surface electron density. In this work, we propose three different methods of calculating on-the-fly the electron density of the distorted surface and we discuss their suitability under typical surface distortions. The investigated methods are used in AIMDEF simulations for three illustrative adsorption cases, namely, dissociated H2 on Pd(100), N on Ag(111), and N2 on Fe(110). Our AIMDEF calculations performed with the three approaches highlight the importance of going beyond the frozen surface density to accurately describe the energy released into e-h pair excitations in case of large surface atom displacements.

  5. A novel approach to synchrotron radiation simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Trad, G; Goldblatt, A; Mazzoni, S; Roncarolo, F

    2014-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, synchrotron radiation (SR) is used to continuously monitor the transverse properties of the beams. Unfortunately the machine and beam parameters are such that the useful radiation emitted inside a separation dipole, chosen as source, is diffraction limited heavily affecting the accuracy of the measurement. In order to deconvolve the diffraction effects from the acquired beam images and in order to design an alternative monitor based on a double slit interferometer an extensive study of the synchrotron light source and of the optical propagation has been made. This study is based on simulations combining together several existing tools: SRW for the source, ZEMAX for the transport and MATLAB for the “glue” and analysis of the results. The resulting tool is very powerful and can be easily adapted to other synchrotron radiation problems. In this paper the simulation package and the way it is used will be described as well as the results obtained for the LHC and SPS.

  6. MICROANALYSIS OF MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.

    2000-12-01

    High intensity synchrotron radiation produces photons with wavelengths that extend from the infrared to hard x rays with energies of hundreds of keV with uniquely high photon intensities that can be used to determine the composition and properties of materials using a variety of techniques. Most of these techniques represent extensions of earlier work performed with ordinary tube-type x-ray sources. The properties of the synchrotron source such as the continuous range of energy, high degree of photon polarization, pulsed beams, and photon flux many orders of magnitude higher than from x-ray tubes have made possible major advances in the possible chemical applications. We describe here ways that materials analyses can be made using the high intensity beams for measurements with small beam sizes and/or high detection sensitivity. The relevant characteristics of synchrotron x-ray sources are briefly summarized to give an idea of the x-ray parameters to be exploited. The experimental techniques considered include x-ray fluorescence, absorption, and diffraction. Examples of typical experimental apparatus used in these experiments are considered together with descriptions of actual applications.

  7. Tabletop synchrotron and its unique features

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, H

    2002-01-01

    Two synchrotrons, AURORA and MIRRORCLE, were built in Ritsumeikan University. MIRRORCLE-20 is the smallest normal conduction synchrotron (15 cm orbit radius and 1.2 m outer diameter) in the world. It uses 2/3 resonance method for electron beam incidence but is not optimized for X-ray generation. MIRRORCLE-6 shall be optimized for X-ray generation. X-ray generated by MIRRORCLE shows very flat white light, rich in hard X-ray, pulse with width changeable from a few mu s to a few ms , wide radiation angle of 25 mrad at MIRRORCLE-20 and 80 mrad at MIRRORCLE-8 and high coherence. The feature such as pulsed light and high coherence is expected to new application which photon radiation cannot practice. Imaging experiments by MIRRORCLE were carried out by Cu plate, Al plate, Teflon and acryl plate. We took a photograph of insect, electric lamp, connector, and cyclotron. New X-ray generation mechanism, X-ray strength, development of tabletop synchrotron and features of X-ray beam are explained. (S.Y.)

  8. 50 Years of synchrotrons Adams' Memorial lecture

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, J D; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    Fifty years ago Frank Goward of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment Group at Malvern converted a small American betatron to make the worldÕs first synchrotron. At the same time Marcus Oliphant was planning to build at Birmingham a large proton machine with a ring magnet and variable magnetic field. Ideas for this had come to him during night-shifts tending the electromagnetic separators at Oak Ridge during the war. Some seven years later, in 1953, a group gathered together in Geneva to build the PS. A major contributor to the design work which had made this possible was John Adams. An account of some of the achievements in these eventful years will be presented. CERN has built nine synchrotrons/colliders and two temporary test rings. Eight machines are still running. The review will start with the PS, the first proton synchrotron based on the alternating gradient principle invented in 1952 at BNL. The design work of the PS team, under the enlightened leadership of J.B. Adams, and the construction of the...

  9. Synchrotron radiation studies of inorganic-organic semiconductor interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, D A; Vearey-Roberts, A R; Bushell, A; Cabailh, G; O'Brien, S; Wells, J W; McGovern, I T; Dhanak, V R; Kampen, T U; Zahn, D R T; Batchelor, D

    2003-01-01

    Organic semiconductors (polymers and small molecules) are widely used in electronic and optoelectronic technologies. Many devices are based on multilayer structures where interfaces play a central role in device performance and where inorganic semiconductor models are inadequate. Synchrotron radiation techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW) provide a powerful means of probing the structural, electronic and chemical properties of these interfaces. The surface-specificity of these techniques allows key properties to be monitored as the heterostructure is fabricated. This methodology has been directed at the growth of hybrid organic-inorganic semiconductor interfaces involving copper phthalocyanine as the model organic material and InSb and GaAs as the model inorganic semiconductor substrates. Core level PES has revealed that these interfaces are abrupt and chemically inert due to the weak bonding between t...

  10. Applications of synchrotron x-ray diffraction topography to fractography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractographs have been taken using a variety of probes each of which produces different types of information. Methods which have been used to examine fracture surfaces include: (a) optical microscopy, particularly interference contrast methods, (b) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), (c) SEM with electron channelling, (d) SEM with selected-area electron channelling, (e) Berg-Barrett (B-B) topography, and now (f) synchrotron x-radiation fractography (SXRF). This review concentrated on the role that x-ray methods can play in such studies. In particular, the ability to nondestructively assess the subsurface microstructure associated with the fracture to depths of the order of 5 to 10 μm becomes an important attribute for observations of a large class of semi-brittle metals, semiconductors and ceramics

  11. Emerging Approaches in Synchrotron Studies of Materials from Cultural and Natural History Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Loïc; Bernard, Sylvain; Marone, Federica; Thoury, Mathieu; Reiche, Ina; Gourrier, Aurélien; Sciau, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Synchrotrons have provided significant methods and instruments to study ancient materials from cultural and natural heritages. New ways to visualise (surfacic or volumic) morphologies are developed on the basis of elemental, density and refraction contrasts. They now apply to a wide range of materials, from historic artefacts to paleontological specimens. The tunability of synchrotron beams owing to the high flux and high spectral resolution of photon sources is at the origin of the main chemical speciation capabilities of synchrotron-based techniques. Although, until recently, photon-based speciation was mainly applicable to inorganic materials, novel developments based, for instance, on STXM and deep UV photoluminescence bring new opportunities to study speciation in organic and hybrid materials, such as soaps and organometallics, at a submicrometric spatial resolution over large fields of view. Structural methods are also continuously improved and increasingly applied to hierarchically structured materials for which organisation results either from biological or manufacturing processes. High-definition (spectral) imaging appears as the main driving force of the current trend for new synchrotron techniques for research on cultural and natural heritage materials.

  12. Emerging Approaches in Synchrotron Studies of Materials from Cultural and Natural History Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Loïc; Bernard, Sylvain; Marone, Federica; Thoury, Mathieu; Reiche, Ina; Gourrier, Aurélien; Sciau, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Synchrotrons have provided significant methods and instruments to study ancient materials from cultural and natural heritages. New ways to visualise (surfacic or volumic) morphologies are developed on the basis of elemental, density and refraction contrasts. They now apply to a wide range of materials, from historic artefacts to paleontological specimens. The tunability of synchrotron beams owing to the high flux and high spectral resolution of photon sources is at the origin of the main chemical speciation capabilities of synchrotron-based techniques. Although, until recently, photon-based speciation was mainly applicable to inorganic materials, novel developments based, for instance, on STXM and deep UV photoluminescence bring new opportunities to study speciation in organic and hybrid materials, such as soaps and organometallics, at a submicrometric spatial resolution over large fields of view. Structural methods are also continuously improved and increasingly applied to hierarchically structured materials for which organisation results either from biological or manufacturing processes. High-definition (spectral) imaging appears as the main driving force of the current trend for new synchrotron techniques for research on cultural and natural heritage materials. PMID:27572990

  13. New synchrotron radiation facility project. Panel on new synchrotron radiation facility project

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, S; Kimura, Y

    2003-01-01

    The project for constructing a new synchrotron radiation facility dedicated to the science in VUV (or EUV) and Soft X-ray (SX) region has been discussed for these two years at the Panel on New Synchrotron Radiation Facility Project. The Panel together with the Accelerator Design Working Group (WG), Beamline Design WG and Research Program WG suggested to the Ministry of Education, Science, Culture and Sports the construction of a 1.8 GeV electron storage ring suitable for 'Top-Up' operation and beamlines and monochromators designed for undulator radiation. The scientific programs proposed by nationwide scientists are summarized with their requirements of the characteristics of the beam. (author)

  14. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MULTI-TURN EXTRACTION FROM THE PROTON SYNCHROTRON TO THE SUPER PROTON SYNCHROTRON

    CERN Document Server

    Abernethy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Within CERN's accelerator complex, the extraction from the Proton Synchrotron to the Super Proton Synchrotron has been done using the so-called ``Continuous Transfer" (CT) method since the 1970's. A new technique, known as Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE), has now been implemented and is in full operation. This report examines a holistic performance analysis of the novel technique in multiple aspects of the accelerator complex, as well as a direct comparison with its predecessor, CT, from the implementation of MTE in 2010 until the end of 2015.

  15. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure

  16. Injection System design for a hadron therapy Synchrotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-Quan; SONG Ming-Tao; WEI Bao-Wen

    2008-01-01

    A synchrotron is designed for tumour therapy with C6+ ions or proton.Its injector is a cyclotron, which delivers C5+or H+2 ions to the synchrotron.After comparing the methods of the single-turn injection, the multi-turn injection and the stripping injection,this paper chooses the stripping injection method.In addition,the concept design of the injection system is presented,in which the synchrotron lattice is optimized.

  17. The 10 to 20 GeV Cornell Electron Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Richard R

    1967-01-01

    The National Science Foundation awarded a contract to Cornell University on April 4, 1965 for the construction of a 10 Gev electron synchrotron. The synchrotron itself has now been built and preliminary tests have been made at low energy. The present report is largely a revision and up-dating of CS DC-26 which was written two years ago when the construction of the synchrotron was authorized.

  18. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  19. A novel method of supporting gold nanoparticles on MWCNTs: Synchrotron X-ray reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuan-Nan Lin; Tsung-Yeh Yang; Hong-Ming Lin; Yeu-Kuang Hwu; She-Huang Wu; Chung-Kwei Lin

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles decorating the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by photochemical reduction. The gold clusters form different interesting geometrical faceted shapes in accordance to time duration of synchrotron X-ray irradiation. The shape of nanogold could be spherical, rod-like, or triangular. Carbon nanotubes serve as optimal templates for the heterogeneous nucleation of gold nanocrystals. These nanocrystal structures are characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and element analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  20. Impact of synchrotron radiation on macromolecular crystallography: a personal view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article, largely based on personal experiences of the authors, reviews the early history of the application of synchrotron radiation to structural biology, and particularly protein crystallography, to show the tremendous impact that this experimental innovation has had on these disciplines. The introduction of synchrotron radiation sources almost four decades ago has led to a revolutionary change in the way that diffraction data from macromolecular crystals are being collected. Here a brief history of the development of methodologies that took advantage of the availability of synchrotron sources are presented, and some personal experiences with the utilization of synchrotrons in the early days are recalled

  1. An ab-initio study of silicon adsorption on metallic surfaces (Au/Ag): Novel perspective to explore chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S.; Ghaisas, S. V.; Majumder, C.

    2012-07-01

    We report a first-principle investigation of the structure and electronic properties of small Sin (n = 1-6,9) clusters deposited on the Au(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. The calculations were performed using a plane wave based pseudopotential method under the framework of density functional theory. The results reveal the preference of Si atom to be adsorbed on the h.c.p. site of the metal (111) surfaces with strong binding energy. We study monolayer (ML) deposition as well as the cluster deposition on both the surfaces. The clusters introduce interlayer forces in the adsorbate. Based on PDOS (projected density of states) analysis it is found that Si atoms acquire charges from the Au/Ag surface. The binding energies are consistent with the known cohesive energy of Ag and Au silicides. The planar Sin cluster deposition on metal surfaces show that Au provides an adjustable surface with relatively strong Au-Si interaction while Ag-Si relatively weak interaction leading to dimerization of Si. The strong bonding with the surface atoms is a result of p-d hybridization. Some of the 3-D clusters show shape distortions after deposition on metal surfaces. This leads to internal stresses after deposition. A statistical parameter is defined over PDOS. It helps to measure the state delocalization in energy. Implications of the Si-Metal interaction on the initial stages of growth are discussed.

  2. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  3. Synchrotron radiation facilities in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, G.

    1996-07-01

    With the successful commissioning and achievement of significant milestones at both the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) and the 1.5- GeV Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, synchrotron radiation research capability in the United States holds the promise of many important discoveries in the decade to come. An overview of current accelerator commissioning performance at the American third-generation light sources, state-of-the-art developments at first- and second-generation sources, and a preview of fourth-generation source progress is presented.

  4. Handbook on synchrotron radiation, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    1987-01-01

    Volume 2 of this series concentrates on the use of synchrotron radiation which covers that region of the electromagnetic spectrum which extends from about 10eV to 3keV in photon energy and is essentially the region where the radiation is strongly absorbed by atmospheric gases. It therefore has to make extensive use of a high vacuum to transport the radiation to the workstation where the presence of hard X-rays can cause extensive damage to both the optics and the targets used in the experimental rigs. The topics chosen for this volume have been limited to the disciplines of physics and chemi

  5. Matching to gantries for medical synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of tumours by hadron-therapy is greatly improved if the patient can be irradiated from different directions. This task is performed by a gantry, i.e. a section of beam line that can be rotated around the patient. The gantry optics have to be designed in such a way that the beam at the patient is independent of the rotation angle. The various matching techniques are briefly reviewed in the light of the current development in medical synchrotrons towards active scanning, which requires a small, high-precision beam spot at the patient. In particular, beam delivery systems with rotators are discussed.

  6. Biological effects of synchrotron radiation on crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐掌雄; 董保中; 等

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of germinating seeds of barley,winter wheat and spring one to synchrotron ultraviolet radiation is barley>winter wheat and spring one.But when dry seeds of the three crops are irradiated by 3.5-22keV X-rays,the sequence of their sensitivity to radiation can be changed.for irradiation of 0.6-3keV ultra soft X-rays,0.40-0.90 of the seedlings of the first generation appear mutation of striped chlorophyll defect.This biological effect has never been found for irradiation of other rays.

  7. Synchrotron Lightcurves of blazars in a time-dependent synchrotron-self Compton cooling scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Zacharias, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Blazars emit non-thermal radiation in all frequency bands from radio to \\gamma-rays. Additionally, they often exhibit rapid flaring events at all frequencies with doubling time scale of the TeV and X-ray flux on the order of minutes, and such rapid flaring events are hard to explain theoretically. We explore the effect of the synchrotron-self Compton cooling, which is inherently time-dependent, leading to a rapid cooling of the electrons. Having discussed intensively the resulting effects of this cooling scenario on the spectral energy distribution of blazars in previous papers, the effects of the time-dependent approach on the synchrotron lightcurve are investigated here. Taking into account the retardation due to the finite size of the source and the source geometry, we show that the time-dependent synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) cooling still has profound effects on the lightcurve compared to the usual linear (synchrotron and external Compton) cooling terms. This is most obvious if the SSC cooling takes lon...

  8. Electronic properties of physisorbed helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with electronic excitations of helium physisorbed on metal substrates. It is studied to what extent the electronic properties change compared to the gas phase due to the increased helium density and the proximity of the metal. Furthermore, the influence of different substrate materials is investigated systematically. To this end, up to two helium layers were adsorbed onto Ru (001), Pt (111), Cu (111), and Ag (111) surfaces in a custom-made cryostat. These samples were studied spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation and a time-of-flight detector. The experimental results were then analyzed in comparison with extensive theoretical model calculations.

  9. Electronic properties of physisorbed helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossler, Sarah

    2011-09-22

    This thesis deals with electronic excitations of helium physisorbed on metal substrates. It is studied to what extent the electronic properties change compared to the gas phase due to the increased helium density and the proximity of the metal. Furthermore, the influence of different substrate materials is investigated systematically. To this end, up to two helium layers were adsorbed onto Ru (001), Pt (111), Cu (111), and Ag (111) surfaces in a custom-made cryostat. These samples were studied spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation and a time-of-flight detector. The experimental results were then analyzed in comparison with extensive theoretical model calculations.

  10. Looking Back at International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Gwyn

    2012-03-01

    With the 11th International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation coming up in July 2012 in Lyons, France, we thought it might be of interest to our readers to review all the past meetings in this series. We thank Denny Mills of the APS, Argonne for putting the list together. Prior to these larger meetings, and in the early days, facilities held their own meetings similar to the user meetings of today. However, the meeting held at ACO in Orsay, France in 1977 was the first such meeting with an international flavor and so it is on the list. However it is not counted as number 1 since it was agreed way back to start the numbering with the 1982 DESY meeting. The 2005 USA National Meeting scheduled at CAMD in Baton Rouge had to be canceled due to Hurricane Katrina. It was ultimately held in 2007, with the CLS hosted meeting the following year. And a personal note from the magazine - Synchrotron Radiation News was born at the 1987 meeting in Madison, Wisconsin with a proposal that was put to a special session of the meeting organized by Susan Lord. Initial proposals were to model it after the CERN Courier, but it soon adopted its own distinct flavor.

  11. Injection Efficiency Monitor for the Australian Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassool R. P.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Synchrotron AS is moving towards a continuous injection mode called top-up. During top-up the linac and booster synchrotron injection system will be in continuous operation rather than usedevery eight hours the way they are used at present. In order to monitor the performance of the injection system areal-time injection efficiency monitoring system has been developed. The system consists of several Fast CurrentTransformers [1] and matching digitisers [2] and is designed to count every beam pulse and measure the transmission efficiency through the whole accelerator complex. After calibrating the system using a properly matchedFaraday Cup at the electron gun, a transmission efficiency is then calculated at each stage of transferring the beamfrom 90 keV out of the gun to 3 GeV in the storage ring. The system is used to optimise the injection process inorder to maximise the injection efficiency and as an early warning system when equipment starts to fail and theinjection efficiency decreases.

  12. Mapping prehistoric ghosts in the synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, N.P.; Wogelius, R.A. [University of Manchester, School of Earth, Atmospheric, and Environmental Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bergmann, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Linac Coherent Light Source, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Larson, P. [Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, Inc., Hill City, SD (United States); Sellers, W.I. [University of Manchester, Faculty of Life Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manning, P.L. [University of Manchester, School of Earth, Atmospheric, and Environmental Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Pennsylvania, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The detailed chemical analysis of fossils has the potential to reveal great insight to the composition, preservation and biochemistry of ancient life. Such analyses would ideally identify, quantify, and spatially resolve the chemical composition of preserved bone and soft tissue structures, but also the embedding matrix. Mapping the chemistry of a fossil in situ can place constraints on mass transfer between the enclosing matrix and the preserved organism(s), and therefore aid in distinguishing taphonomic processes from original chemical zonation remnant within the fossils themselves. Conventional analytical methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) have serious limitations in this case, primarily, an inability to provide large (i.e., decimeter) scale chemical maps. Additionally, vacuum chamber size and the need for destructive sampling preclude analysis of large and precious fossil specimens. However, the recent development of Synchrotron Rapid Scanning X-ray Fluorescence (SRS-XRF) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) allows the non-destructive chemical analysis and imaging of major, minor, and trace element concentrations of large paleontological and archeological specimens in rapid scanning times. Here we present elemental maps of a fossil reptile produced using the new SRS-XRF method. Our results unequivocally show that preserved biological structures are not simply impressions or carbonized remains, but possess a remnant of the original organismal biochemistry. We show that SRS-XRF is a powerful new tool for the study of paleontological and archaeological samples. (orig.)

  13. Beam halo collimation in heavy ion synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strašík, I.; Prokhorov, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic study of the halo collimation of ion beams from proton up to uranium in synchrotrons. The projected Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research synchrotron SIS100 is used as a reference case. The concepts are separated into fully stripped (e.g., 238U92+ ) and partially stripped (e.g., 238U28+ ) ion collimation. An application of the two-stage betatron collimation system, well established for proton accelerators, is intended also for fully stripped ions. The two-stage system consists of a primary collimator (a scattering foil) and secondary collimators (bulky absorbers). Interaction of the particles with the primary collimator (scattering, momentum losses, and nuclear interactions) was simulated by using fluka. Particle-tracking simulations were performed by using mad-x. Finally, the dependence of the collimation efficiency on the primary ion species was determined. The influence of the collimation system adjustment, lattice imperfections, and beam parameters was estimated. The concept for the collimation of partially stripped ions employs a thin stripping foil in order to change their charge state. These ions are subsequently deflected towards a dump location using a beam optical element. The charge state distribution after the stripping foil was obtained from global. The ions were tracked by using mad-x.

  14. Physics design of SSRF synchrotron radiation security

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yi; DAI Zhi-Min; LIU Gui-Min

    2009-01-01

    High brightness of SSRF brings about synchrotron radiation security problems,which will be solved in physics design.The main radiations are generated from bending magnets and insertion devices.Since the fact that radiation power and radiating area are different in these two kinds of synchrotron radiation,the arrangements of photon absorbers,diaphragms and other vacuum components need to be treated distinctively.In addition.SSRF interlock protection threshold is defined and the beam orbit in the straight line is limited.Hence.beam orbit in the bending magnets and IDs are also restricted by the threshold.The orbit restriction is calculated and helps us to arrange the vacuum components.In this paper,beam orbit distortion restricted by interlock protection threshold,radiation power,radiation angle and illuminating area are calculated.From the calculation results,the physics designs in manufacture and installation vacuum components are put forward.By commissioning,it is shown that physics requirements are met rigidly in the engineering process.

  15. Synchrotrons for hadron therapy: Part I

    CERN Document Server

    Badano, L; Bryant, P; Crescenti, M; Holy, P; Knaus, P; Maier, A; Pullia, M; Rossi, S

    1999-01-01

    The treatment of cancer with accelerator beams has a long history with betatrons, linacs, cyclotrons and now synchrotrons being exploited for this purpose. Treatment techniques can be broadly divided into the use of spread-out beams and scanned 'pencil' beams. The Bragg-peak behaviour of hadrons makes them ideal candidates for the latter. The combination of precisely focused 'pencil' beams with controllable penetration (Bragg peak) and high, radio-biological efficiency (light ions) opens the way to treating the more awkward tumours that are radio-resistant, complex in shape and lodged against critical organs. To accelerate light ions (probably carbon) with pulse-to-pulse energy variation, a synchrotron is the natural choice. The beam scanning system is controlled via an on-line measurement of the particle flux entering the patient and, for this reason, the beam spill must be extended in time (seconds) by a slow-extraction scheme. The quality of the dose intensity profile ultimately depends on the uniformity o...

  16. Synchrotrons for hadron therapy, part 1

    CERN Document Server

    Badano, L; Bryant, P J; Crescenti, M; Holy, P; Knaus, P; Maier, A T; Pullia, M; Rossi, S

    1999-01-01

    The treatment of cancer with accelerator beams has a long history with linacs, cyclotrons and now synchrotrons being exploited for this purpose. Treatment techniques can be broadly divided into the use of spread-out beams and scanned 'pencil' beams. The Bragg-peak behaviour of hadrons makes them ideal candidates for the latter. The combination of precisely focused 'pencil' beams with controllable penetration (Bragg peak) and high, radio-biological efficiency (light ions) opens the way to treating the more awkward tumours that are radio-resistant, complex in shape and lodged against critical organs. To accelerate light ions (probably carbon) with pulse-to-pulse energy variation, a synchrotron is the natural choice. The beam scanning system is controlled via an on-line measurement of the particle flux entering the patient and, for this reason, the beam spill must be extended in time (seconds) by a slow-extraction scheme. The quality of the dose intensity profile ultimately depends on the uniformity of the beam ...

  17. Synchrotron Facilities and Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaclav, Vylet; /Duke U.; Liu, James; /SLAC

    2007-12-21

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle travels along a curved trajectory. Initially encountered as a nuisance around orbits of high energy synchrotron accelerators, it gradually became an indispensable research tool in many applications: crystallography, X-ray lithography, micromechanics, structural biology, microprobe X-ray experiments, etc. So-called first generation SR sources were exploiting SR in parasitic mode at electron accelerators built to study particle collisions. The second generation of SR sources was the first facilities solely devoted to SR production. They were optimized to achieve stable high currents in the accelerator ring to achieve substantially higher photon flux and to provide a large number of SR beam lines for users. Third generation sources were further optimized for increased brilliance, i.e. with photons densely packed into a beam of very small cross-sectional area and minimal angular divergence (see the Appendix for more detailed definitions of flux, brightness and brilliance) and makes extensive use of the insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators. Free Electron Lasers (FELs), the fourth generation SR sources, open new research possibilities by offering extremely short pulses of extremely bright and coherent radiation. The number of SR sources around the world now probably exceeds 100. These facilities vary greatly in size, energy of the electron (or positron) beams, range of photon energies and other characteristics of the photon beams produced. In what follows we will concentrate on describing some common aspects of SR facilities, their operation modes and specific radiation protection aspects.

  18. Many-body dispersion effects in the binding of adsorbates on metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Reinhard J; Ruiz, Victor G; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-09-14

    A correct description of electronic exchange and correlation effects for molecules in contact with extended (metal) surfaces is a challenging task for first-principles modeling. In this work, we demonstrate the importance of collective van der Waals dispersion effects beyond the pairwise approximation for organic-inorganic systems on the example of atoms, molecules, and nanostructures adsorbed on metals. We use the recently developed many-body dispersion (MBD) approach in the context of density-functional theory [Tkatchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 236402 (2012) and Ambrosetti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A508 (2014)] and assess its ability to correctly describe the binding of adsorbates on metal surfaces. We briefly review the MBD method and highlight its similarities to quantum-chemical approaches to electron correlation in a quasiparticle picture. In particular, we study the binding properties of xenon, 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid, and a graphene sheet adsorbed on the Ag(111) surface. Accounting for MBD effects, we are able to describe changes in the anisotropic polarizability tensor, improve the description of adsorbate vibrations, and correctly capture the adsorbate-surface interaction screening. Comparison to other methods and experiment reveals that inclusion of MBD effects improves adsorption energies and geometries, by reducing the overbinding typically found in pairwise additive dispersion-correction approaches. PMID:26374001

  19. Many-body dispersion effects in the binding of adsorbates on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Reinhard J. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Ruiz, Victor G.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-09-14

    A correct description of electronic exchange and correlation effects for molecules in contact with extended (metal) surfaces is a challenging task for first-principles modeling. In this work, we demonstrate the importance of collective van der Waals dispersion effects beyond the pairwise approximation for organic–inorganic systems on the example of atoms, molecules, and nanostructures adsorbed on metals. We use the recently developed many-body dispersion (MBD) approach in the context of density-functional theory [Tkatchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 236402 (2012) and Ambrosetti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A508 (2014)] and assess its ability to correctly describe the binding of adsorbates on metal surfaces. We briefly review the MBD method and highlight its similarities to quantum-chemical approaches to electron correlation in a quasiparticle picture. In particular, we study the binding properties of xenon, 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid, and a graphene sheet adsorbed on the Ag(111) surface. Accounting for MBD effects, we are able to describe changes in the anisotropic polarizability tensor, improve the description of adsorbate vibrations, and correctly capture the adsorbate–surface interaction screening. Comparison to other methods and experiment reveals that inclusion of MBD effects improves adsorption energies and geometries, by reducing the overbinding typically found in pairwise additive dispersion-correction approaches.

  20. Structural and electronic properties of ultrathin picene films on the Ag(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Simon J.; Sorescu, Dan C.; Wang, Jun; Archer, Kaye A.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-10-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy and electronic structure calculations, we investigated the assembly and electronic properties of picene molecules on the Ag(100), Ag(111), and Cu(111) surfaces, with particular emphasis on Ag(100). In each case, picene molecules are found to lie parallel to the surface at coverages up to half a monolayer and to adopt alternating parallel and tilted orientations at full monolayer coverage. In the latter case, the arrangement of the molecules is roughly similar to that in the bulk crystal. On the metal surfaces considered, the growth mode of picene is quite different from that of its structural isomer pentacene, which forms a bilayer overlayer on top of a dense monolayer of flat-lying molecules on metal surfaces. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements provide estimates of the energies of several low-lying unfilled molecular orbitals as well as of the highest occupied molecular orbital of the absorbed picene molecules. From analysis of these results, we establish that the on-site Coulomb repulsion for picene decreases by ~ 2 eV in going from the gas phase to the full monolayer on Ag(100), bringing it close to that of the undoped bulk crystal.

  1. A synchrotron radiation facility for x-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, C.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Christensen, Finn Erland;

    1997-01-01

    A proposal for an x-ray optics test facility based at a synchrotron radiation source is presented. The facility would incorporate a clean preparation area, and a large evacuable test area. The advantages of using a synchrotron as the source of the test radiation are discussed. These include the a...

  2. Synchrotron radiation in art and archaeology SRA 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, A.M.; Janssens, K.; Artioli, G.; Young, M.L.; Casadio, F.; Schnepp, S.; Marvin, J.; Dunand, D.C.; Almer, J.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.K.; Haeffner, D.R.; Reguer, S.; Dillmann, Ph.; Mirambet, F.; Susini, J.; Lagarde, P.; Pradell, T.; Molera, J.; Brunetti, B.; D' acapito, F.; Maurizio, C.; Mazzoldi, P.; Padovani, S.; Sgamellotti, A.; Garges, F.; Etcheverry, M.P.; Flank, A.M.; Lagarde, P.; Marcus, M.A.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Grolimund, D.; Pallot-Frossard, I.; Smith, A.D.; Jones, M.; Gliozzo, E.; Memmi-Turbanti, I.; Molera, J.; Vendrell, M.; Mcconachie, G.; Skinner, T.; Kirkman, I.W.; Pantos, E.; Wallert, A.; Kanngiesser, B.; Hahn, O.; Wilke, M.; NekaT, B.; Malzer, W.; Erko, A.; Chalmin, E.; Vignaud, C.; Farges, F.; Susini, J.; Menu, M.; Sandstrom, M.; Cotte, M.; Kennedy, C.J.; Wess, T.J.; Muller, M.; Murphy, B.; Roberts, M.A.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, C.; Gunneweg, J.; Pantos, E.; Dik, J.; Tafforeau, P.; Boistel, R.; Boller, E.; Bravin, A.; Brunet, M.; Chaimanee, Y.; Cloetens, P.; Feist, M.; Hoszowska, J.; Jaeger, J.J.; Kay, R.F.; Lazzari, V.; Marivaux, L.; Nel, A.; Nemoz, C.; Thibault, X.; Vignaud, P.; Zabler, S.; Sciau, P.; Goudeau, P.; Tamura, N.; Doormee, E.; Kockelmann, W.; Adriaens, A.; Ryck, I. de; Leyssens, K.; Hochleitner, B.; Schreiner, M.; Drakopoulos, M.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.; Sanchez Del Rio, M.; Martinetto, P.; Dooryhee, E.; Suarez, M.; Sodo, A.; Reyes-Valerio, C.; Haro Poniatowski, E.; Picquart, M.; Lima, E.; Reguera, E.; Gunneweg, J.; Reiche, I.; Berger, A.; Bevers, H.; Duval, A

    2005-07-01

    Materials - bones, artifacts, artwork,.... - lie at the heart of both archaeology and art conservation. Synchrotron radiation techniques provide powerful ways to interrogate these records of our physical and cultural past. In this workshop we will discuss and explore the current and potential applications of synchrotron radiation science to problems in archaeology and art conservation. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  3. Synchrotron radiation in art and archaeology SRA 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials - bones, artifacts, artwork,.... - lie at the heart of both archaeology and art conservation. Synchrotron radiation techniques provide powerful ways to interrogate these records of our physical and cultural past. In this workshop we will discuss and explore the current and potential applications of synchrotron radiation science to problems in archaeology and art conservation. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations

  4. Synchrotron topographic project. Progress report, February 20, 1981-January 20, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Synchrotron Topography Project (STP) has under design and construction various phases of a dedicated beam line for x-ray diffraction topography users in conjunction with the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the past year final design and procurement phase has been completed for the following: (1) Experimental Hutch, (2) White Beam Camera, (3) Detector Arm for White Beam Camera, (4) Film Cassette System, (5) Medium Resolution Real-time TV System, (6) Lift Table Assembly, (7) Asymmetric Camera Base Mount, (8) Motor Control System, and (9) Computer system. Experimental work has been initiated on using reflection topography to study fracture surfaces. Preliminary results, both with Berg-Barrett, as well as with Synchrotron Topography done in collaboration with the Daresbury, U.K. facility show that defects generated in the near surface layers can be detected. Research work on the effects of stress concentration and geometric effects due to grain boundaries on the fracture of tungsten has been completed

  5. Synchrotron-Based in Situ Characterization of the Scaffold Mass Loss from Erosion Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawolin, Nahshon K; Chen, Xiongbaio

    2016-01-01

    The mass loss behavior of degradable tissue scaffolds is critical to their lifespan and other degradation-related properties including mechanical strength and mass transport characteristics. This paper presents a novel method based on synchrotron imaging to characterize the scaffold mass loss from erosion degradation in situ, or without the need of extracting scaffolds once implanted. Specifically, the surface-eroding degradation of scaffolds in a degrading medium was monitored in situ by synchrotron-based imaging; and the time-dependent geometry of scaffolds captured by images was then employed to estimate their mass loss with time, based on the mathematical model that was adopted from the literature of surface erosion with the experimentally-identified model parameters. Acceptable agreement between experimental results and model predictions was observed for scaffolds in a cylindrical shape, made from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) and polycaprolactone (PCL). This study illustrates that geometry evaluation by synchrotron-based imaging is an effective means to in situ characterize the scaffold mass loss as well as possibly other degradation-related properties. PMID:27399789

  6. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  7. Synchrotron-Based in Situ Characterization of the Scaffold Mass Loss from Erosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahshon K. Bawolin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mass loss behavior of degradable tissue scaffolds is critical to their lifespan and other degradation-related properties including mechanical strength and mass transport characteristics. This paper presents a novel method based on synchrotron imaging to characterize the scaffold mass loss from erosion degradation in situ, or without the need of extracting scaffolds once implanted. Specifically, the surface-eroding degradation of scaffolds in a degrading medium was monitored in situ by synchrotron-based imaging; and the time-dependent geometry of scaffolds captured by images was then employed to estimate their mass loss with time, based on the mathematical model that was adopted from the literature of surface erosion with the experimentally-identified model parameters. Acceptable agreement between experimental results and model predictions was observed for scaffolds in a cylindrical shape, made from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and polycaprolactone (PCL. This study illustrates that geometry evaluation by synchrotron-based imaging is an effective means to in situ characterize the scaffold mass loss as well as possibly other degradation-related properties.

  8. Temporal step fluctuations on a conductor surface: electromigration force, surface resistivity and low-frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. D.; Bondarchuk, O.; Tao, C. G.; Yan, W.; Cullen, W. G.; Rous, P. J.; Bole, T.

    2007-10-01

    Scattering of charge carriers from surface structures will become an increasing factor in the resistivity as the structure decreases in size to the nanoscale. The effects of scattering at the most basic surface defect, a kink in a step edge, are here analyzed using the continuum step model. Using a Langevin analysis, it has been shown that the electromigration force on the atoms at the step edge causes changes in the temporal evolution of the step-edge. For an electromigration force acting perpendicular to the average step edge and mass-transport dominated by step-edge diffusion, significant deviations from the usual t1/4 scaling of the displacement correlation function occur dependent on a critical time τ and the direction of the force relative to the step edge (i.e. uphill or downhill). Experimental observations of step fluctuations on Ag(111) show the predicted changes among step fluctuations without current, and with current in the up- and down-hill directions for a current density of order 105 A cm-2. The results yield the magnitude of the electromigration force acting on kinked sites at the step-edge. This in turn yields the contribution of the fluctuating steps to the surface resistivity, which exceeds 1% of the bulk resistivity as wire diameters decrease below 10s of nanometres. The temporal fluctuations of kink density can thus also be related to resistivity noise. Relating the known fluctuation spectrum of the step displacements to fluctuations in their lengths, the corresponding resistivity noise is predicted to show spectral signatures of ~f-1/2 for step fluctuations governed by random attachment/detachment, and ~f-3/4 for step fluctuations governed by step-edge diffusion.

  9. Note: Dynamic strain field mapping with synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, L. [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Fan, D.; Luo, S. N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Bie, B. X. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Ran, X. X.; Qi, M. L., E-mail: qiml@whut.edu.cn [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Parab, N.; Sun, J. Z.; Liao, H. J.; Hudspeth, M. C.; Claus, B. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Fezzaa, K.; Sun, T. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Chen, W. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Material Science Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gong, X. L., E-mail: gongxl@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We present a dynamic strain field mapping method based on synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation (XDIC). Synchrotron X-ray sources are advantageous for imaging with exceptional spatial and temporal resolutions, and X-ray speckles can be produced either from surface roughness or internal inhomogeneities. Combining speckled X-ray imaging with DIC allows one to map strain fields with high resolutions. Based on experiments on void growth in Al and deformation of a granular material during Kolsky bar/gas gun loading at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID, we demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic XDIC. XDIC is particularly useful for dynamic, in-volume, measurements on opaque materials under high strain-rate, large, deformation.

  10. Dynamics of GaAs photocarriers probed with pulsed infrared synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, G L

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a source of high brightness, pulsed infrared light that is well suited to the study of materials by pump-probe spectroscopy. A synchronized laser produces pump pulses and synchrotron infrared pulses serve as the probe. This method has been used for a number of time-resolved investigations, including a study of the frequency-dependent conductivity of photocarrier relaxation in GaAs. For this material, a Drude model gives a good description of the photoconductivity, but requires that the average carrier scattering rate change from electron like to hole like during the decay process (a few nanoseconds). This behavior suggests the rapid trapping of electrons, as may occur near a surface with defect states.

  11. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  12. Synchrotron radiation techniques. Extension to magnetism research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently developed techniques using synchrotron radiation for the study of magnetism are reviewed. These techniques are based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and they exhibit significant advantages in element specificity. This is very important since the most attractive magnetic materials contain many magnetic elements, and those with small magnetic moments often play an essential role in the magnetic properties. Circularly polarized X-rays emitted from bending magnets or helical undulators allow us to perform magnetic circular dichroism measurements to reveal microscopic magnetic properties of various kinds of magnetic materials. X-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) is discussed in detail. This technique provides unique information on orbital magnetic moments as well as spin magnetic moments, which are useful for the study of magnetic anisotropy. X-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and X-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry (XRMR) techniques are also described. (author)

  13. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude

  14. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  15. Discussion on spin-flip synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bordovitsyn, V A; Myagkii, A N

    1998-01-01

    Quantum spin-flip transitions are of great importance in the synchrotron radiation theory. For better understanding of the nature of this phenomenon, it is necessary to except the effects connected with the electric charge radiation from observation. This fact explains the suggested choice of the spin-flip radiation model in the form of radiation of the electric neutral Dirac-Pauli particle moving in the homogeneous magnetic field. It is known that in this case, the total radiation in the quantum theory is conditioned by spin-flip transitions. The idea is that spin-flip radiation is represented as a nonstationary process connected with spin precession. We shall shown how to construct a solution of the classical equation of the spin precession in the BMT theory having the exact solution of the Dirac-Pauli equation.Thus, one will find the connection of the quantum spin-flip transitions with classical spin precession.

  16. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  17. Coherent synchrotron radiation experiments for the LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a coherent synchrotron radiation experiment planned at Los Alamos to support the design of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray FEL. Preliminary simulations of the LCLS compressors show that a clever tuning strategy can be used to minimize the electron's beam emittance growth due to noninertial space-charge forces by employing a delicate cancellation of these forces. The purpose of the Los Alamos experiment, using a sub-picosecond chicane compressor, is to benchmark these simulations tools. In this paper, the authors present detailed numerical simulations of the experiment, and point out unique signatures of this effect that are measurable. As predicted previously, the largest emittance growths and induced energy spreads result from the nonradiative components of this space-charge force

  18. European synchrotron radiation facility at Risoe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the feasibility study on a potential European Synchrotron Radiation Facility site at Risoe, Denmark, can be summarized as follows: The site is located in a geologically stable area. The ground is fairly flat, free from vibrations and earth movements, and the foundation properties are considered generally good. The study is based upon the machine concept and main geometry as presented in the ESF feasibility study of May 1979. However, the proposed site could accomodate a larger machine (e.g. 900 m of circumference) or a multi-facility centre. The site is located in the vicinity of Risoe National Laboratory, a R and D establishment with 850 employees and a well-developed technical and scientific infrastructure, which can provide support to the ESRF during the plant construction and operation. In particular the possible combination of synchrotron radiation with the existing neutron scattering facilities in DR 3 is emphasized. The site is located 35 km west of Copenhagen with easy access to the scientific, technological and industrial organizations in the metropolitan area. The regional infrastructure ensures easy and fast communication between the ESRF and locations in the host country as well as abroad. The site is located 35 minutes drive from Copenhagen International Airport and on a main communication route out of Copenhagen. The estimated time duration for the design, construction and commissioning of ESRF phase 1 - taking into account national regulatory procedures - is consistent with that of the ESF feasibility study, i.e. approx. 6 years. The estimated captal costs associated with site-specific structures are consistent with those of the ESF feasibility study, taking into account price increase between 1979 and 1981. It should be emphasized that the study is based upon technical and scientific assessments only, and does not reflect any official position or approval from appropriate authorities. (author)

  19. Growth of coronene on (100)- and (111)-surfaces of fcc-crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huempfner, Tobias; Sojka, Falko; Forker, Roman; Fritz, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    The growth of coronene thin films is studied via low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) comparing metal substrates with different lattice constants, different surface symmetry, and also with surface passivation, namely Cu(111), Ag(111), Ag(100), and (100)-terminated KCl/Ag(100). In particular, we investigate the evolution of the coronene lattice parameters upon coverage- and temperature-variation. On the pristine metal surfaces we observe disordered phases at low coverage. Further deposition leads to hexagonal arrangement of the molecules. With increasing coverage the lattice constant decreases continuously, whereas on Cu(111) the molecular unit cell additionally rotates w.r.t. the substrate lattice. We also discuss the interaction mechanisms that are responsible for this behavior. Due to the continuous change in the lattice dimensions we observe many incommensurate structures that were stable during our measurements, however the close-packed structures we found were always commensurate. The use of a passivation layer leads to the formation of a bulk-like structure consisting of molecules adsorbed in an upright standing manner which is stable at low temperatures only.

  20. Synchrotron X-Ray Study of Melting in Submonolayer Ar and other Rare-Gas Films on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McTague, J. P.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bohr, Jakob;

    1982-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of the (10) peak of Ar on the (001) surface of ZYX graphite show a sharp but continuous broadening of the Bragg peak with increasing temperature. Below a coverage of ∼ 1 Ar atom per six surface carbon atoms (ρ=1) the onset of this transition occurs at a cover...... at a coverage-independent temperature T=47.9 K. We interpret this point as a critical end point for melting. For coverages 0.94...

  1. Advances and synergy of high pressure sciences at synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introductory overview to the special issue papers on high-pressure sciences and synchrotron radiation. High-pressure research in geosciences, materials science and condensed matter physics at synchrotron sources is experiencing growth and development through synergistic efforts around the world. A series of high-pressure science workshops were organized in 2008 to highlight these developments. One of these workshops, on 'Advances in high-pressure science using synchrotron X-rays', was held at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, on 4 October 2008. This workshop was organized in honour of Drs Jingzhu Hu and Quanzhong Guo in celebration of their retirement after up to 18 years of dedicated service to the high-pressure community as beamline scientists at X17 of NSLS. Following this celebration of the often unheralded role of the beamline scientist, a special issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation on Advances and Synergy of High-Pressure Sciences at Synchrotron Sources was proposed, and we were pleased to invite contributions from colleagues who participated in the workshop as well as others who are making similar efforts at synchrotron sources worldwide.

  2. Depth profiling the solid electrolyte interphase on lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) using synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordh, Tim; Younesi, Reza; Brandell, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a surface layer on lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12, LTO) anodes, which has been a topic of debate in scientific literature, is here investigated with tunable high surface sensitive synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) to obtain a reliable depth profile of the interphase...

  3. Understanding Periodic Dislocations in 2D Supramolecular Crystals: The PFP/Ag(111) Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goiri, E.; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Corso, M.;

    2012-01-01

    ), and their interplay with molecule–substrate interactions is very subtle, making it difficult to single out the driving force for a nanoscale dislocation pattern. On the basis of a combined experimental and theoretical work, we here show that periodic dislocations in a molecular PFP film are mainly driven...

  4. STM-imaging of nanostructure dynamics on Ag(111)-experimental challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenstern, Karina; Rosenfeld, Georg; Poelsema, Bene; Comsa, George

    1996-01-01

    We describe experimental problems arising with the continuous observation of nanostructure dynamics by STM. We discuss the necessity to use a high-speed STM, possibilities to deal with the thermal drift, and tests to rule out the influence of the scanning process on the observation.

  5. Operation of INDUS-1, India's first synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INDUS-1 is a 450 MeV electron storage ring for the production of Synchrotron Radiation in Visible Ultra Violet (VUV) range with a critical wavelength of 61 A deg. The ring was commissioned in June 1999. Since then it is in regular operation. This Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) facility consists of a 20 MeV injector microtron, a 450 MeV booster synchrotron and a storage ring. In this paper operation aspects of INDUS-1 SRS facility will be presented. (author)

  6. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  7. Development of pulsed power modulator for induction synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Koseki, K

    2006-01-01

    A pulsed power modulator for the POP experiment of an induction synchrotron has been developed. Various difficulties in the development of the modulator, such as enormous power dissipation at a MOSFET, the resonant ringing in the output waveform, the isolation from the ground potential, and the incorrect action of a gate driving circuit, have been discussed and solved. The developed power modulator is installed into the existing accelerator, KEK 12GeV proton synchrotron. The POP experiment of the induction synchrotron has been successfully conducted. A single RF bunch injected from the 500 MeV booster ring was accelerated to the flat-top energy of 8 GeV.

  8. Limitations on plasma acceleration due to synchrotron losses

    CERN Document Server

    Barletta, W A; Bonifacio, R; De Salvo, L

    1999-01-01

    In this letter we consider the effect of synchrotron radiation losses due to the betatron motion of the electron beam in its self-induced magnetic field in a plasma accelerator taking into account the charge neutralization factor. The most favorable case is where the plasma density is smaller than the beam density. The contrary regime is strongly disfavored by the synchrotron radiation loss for beams with characteristics for TeV energies. In both cases we find that upon increasing the plasma density the synchrotron losses kill the acceleration process, so that there are limitations on the maximum allowable plasma density.

  9. Visualization of angiogenic vessels by synchrotron radiation microangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of synchrotron radiation microangiography for evaluating angiogenic vessels in regenerative therapy is illustrated. In a rabbit model of microvascular myocardial ischemia, angiogenic vessels in the heart were well visualized. In a rabbit model of hindlimb ischemia, vessel-regenerative therapy with fibroblast growth factor 4-gene incorporated to gelatin hydrogel well ameliorated muscle necrosis. Synchrotron radiation microangiography confirmed significant blood flow increase to adenosine administration in these treated rabbits (vascular responsiveness), but not in the control. Thus, synchrotron radiation microangiography is shown to be useful for the depiction, quantification and evaluation of angiogenic vessels in reproductive therapy. (author)

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on LAMPF II synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.K. (comp.)

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered at the workshop include: considerations for a staged approach to synchrotron construction; consideration of energy and cost for a kaon and/or antiproton factory; changing the transition energy in the main ring for the Fermilab antiproton beam; a lattice with 50% undispersed straight sections; bunch width considerations in a stretcher ring; a self-consistent longitudinal distribution; rapid-cycling tuned rf cavity for synchrotron use; considerations on a high-shunt impedance tunable RF cavity; rotating condensers; low extraction from the stretcher ring; an antiproton source for LAMPF II; synchrotron magnet circuit; power supply and ring magnet options; and notes for a kaon factory design. (GHT)

  11. Regulating spin and Fermi surface topology of a quantum metal film by the surface (interface) monatomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Iwao

    2012-02-01

    Spin and current controls in solids have been one of the central issues in researches of electron and spin transport. Nowadays, electronics/spintronics deals with nanometer- or atomic-scale structures and miniaturization of these systems implies emergence of various quantum phenomena, intimately linked to the formation of electronic states different from those of the corresponding bulk materials. For example, valence electrons of films with the thickness comparable to the electron wavelength form discrete quantum-well states (QWSs) under opportune conditions of confinement (quantum size effect). Furthermore, the size reduction also increases the surface/volume ratio and a film possibly changes its electronic (spin) properties by the surface effect. Concerning metal films, the quantum size effect requires the thickness in a range of nanometers and the length corresponds to several tens of atoms, indicating the very large ratio of a surface (interface) monatomic layer to film atomic layers. Thus, we have been interested in combining the quantum size effects and the surface effect on the metal films to induce new physical phenomena. In the present talk, two research cases are shown. 1) Instead of isotropic two-dimensional in-plane states expected for an isolated metal film, quasi-one-dimensional quantized states were measured by photoemission spectroscopy in an epitaxial Ag(111) ultra thin film, prepared on an array of atomic chains [1]. 2) High-resolution spin-resolved photoemission and magneto-transport experiments of ultrathin Ag(111) films, covered with a /3x/3-Bi/Ag surface ordered alloy, were performed. The surface state (SS) bands, spin-split by the Rashba interaction, selectively couple to the originally spin-degenerate QWS bands in the metal film, making the spin-dependent hybridization [2,3]. Magnetoconductance of the films, measured in situ by the micro-four-point probe method as a function of the applied magnetic field [4], has shown that the formation of

  12. Electronic Structure of Germanium Nanocrystal Films Probed with Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostedt, C

    2002-05-01

    The fundamental structure--property relationship of semiconductor quantum dots has been investigated. For deposited germanium nanocrystals strong quantum confinement effects have been determined with synchrotron radiation based x-ray absorption and photoemission techniques. The nanocrystals are condensed out of the gas phase with a narrow size distribution and subsequently deposited in situ onto various substrates. The particles are crystalline in the cubic phase with a structurally disordered surface shell and the resulting film morphology depends strongly on the substrate material and condition. The disordered surface region has an impact on the overall electronic structure of the particles. In a size-dependent study, the conduction and valence band edge of germanium nanocrystals have been measured for the first time and compared to the bulk crystal. The band edges move to higher energies as the particle size is decreased, consistent with quantum confinement theory. To obtain a more accurate analysis of confinement effects in the empty states, a novel analysis method utilizing an effective particle size for the x-ray absorption experiment, which allows a deconvolution of absorption edge broadening effects, has been introduced. Comparison of the present study to earlier studies on silicon reveals that germanium exhibits stronger quantum confinement effects than silicon. Below a critical particle size of 2.3 {+-} 0.7 nm, the band gap of germanium becomes larger than that of silicon--even if it is the opposite for bulk materials. This result agrees phenomenologically with effective mass and tight binding theories but contradicts the findings of recent pseudopotential calculations. The discrepancy between theory and experiments is attributed to the differences in the theoretical models and experimental systems. The experimentally observed structural disorder of the particle surface has to be included in the theoretical models.

  13. SYNCHROTRON HEATING BY A FAST RADIO BURST IN A SELF-ABSORBED SYNCHROTRON NEBULA AND ITS OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are mysterious transient sources. If extragalactic, as suggested by their relative large dispersion measures, their brightness temperatures must be extremely high. Some FRB models (e.g., young pulsar model, magnetar giant flare model, or supra-massive neutron star collapse model) suggest that they may be associated with a synchrotron nebula. Here we study a synchrotron-heating process by an FRB in a self-absorbed synchrotron nebula. If the FRB frequency is below the synchrotron self-absorption frequency of the nebula, electrons in the nebula would absorb FRB photons, leading to a harder electron spectrum and enhanced self-absorbed synchrotron emission. In the meantime, the FRB flux is absorbed by the nebula electrons. We calculate the spectra of FRB-heated synchrotron nebulae, and show that the nebula spectra would show a significant hump in several decades near the self-absorption frequency. Identifying such a spectral feature would reveal an embedded FRB in a synchrotron nebula.

  14. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  15. Oak Ridge Synchrotron Organization for Advanced Research (ORSOAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly describes the research highlights, publications, and work in progress for the Oak Ridge Synchrotron Organization for Advanced Research. Among the research highlights of this reporting period are the following: We have advanced the technique for depth-profiling strain distributions in materials. We continued our studies of depth-profiling of polished and severely grounded, fully stabilized zirconia using long wavelength x-rays and shallow glancing angles, strain gradients near the surface approached maximum compressive strains of 4% but dropped rapidly as a function of depth. Strain profiles in thin (∼900Ao) films of GaAs grown on Si(001) substrates have shown that about 90% of the strain from lattice mismatch is dissipated in a few GaAs planes (∼10Ao) at the silicon interface. The other 10% of the strain is distributed uniformly throughout the bulk of the GaAs film. An exciting discovery of a huge x-ray magnetic resonance scattering effect in UAs that was larger than expected opens the door for mapping the magnetic structure of materials by tuning the x-ray energy near an absorption edge

  16. Windowless transition between atmospheric pressure and high vacuum via differential pumping for synchrotron radiation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gog, T; Casa, D M; Kuzmenko, I; Krakora, R J; Bolin, T B

    2007-07-01

    A differential pump assembly is introduced which can provide a windowless transition between the full atmospheric pressure of an in-air sample environment and the high-vacuum region of a synchrotron radiation beamline, while providing a clear aperture of approximately 1 mm to pass through the X-ray beam from a modern third-generation synchrotron radiation source. This novel pump assembly is meant to be used as a substitute for an exit vacuum window on synchrotron beamlines, where the existence of such a window would negatively impact the coherent nature of the X-ray beam or would introduce parasitic scattering, distorting weak scattering signals from samples under study. It is found that the length of beam pipe necessary to reduce atmospheric pressure to below 10 mbar is only about 130 mm, making the expected photon transmission for hard X-rays through this pipe competitive with that of a regular Be beamline window. This result is due to turbulent flow dominating the first pumping stage, providing a mechanism of strong gas conductance limitation, which is further enhanced by introducing artificial surface roughness in the pipe. Successive reduction of pressure through the transitional flow regime into the high-vacuum region is accomplished over a length of several meters, using beam pipes of increasing diameter. While the pump assembly has not been tested with X-rays, possible applications are discussed in the context of coherent and small-angle scattering. PMID:17587659

  17. Characterization of a next-generation piezo bimorph X-ray mirror for synchrotron beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Simon G; Nistea, Ioana; Sutter, John P; Sawhney, Kawal; Fermé, Jean Jacques; Thellièr, Christophe; Peverini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Piezo bimorph mirrors are versatile active optics used on many synchrotron beamlines. However, many bimorphs suffer from the `junction effect': a periodic deformation of the optical surface which causes major aberrations to the reflected X-ray beam. This effect is linked to the construction of such mirrors, where piezo ceramics are glued directly below the thin optical substrate. In order to address this problem, a next-generation bimorph with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was developed at Thales-SESO and optimized at Diamond Light Source. Using metrology feedback from the Diamond-NOM, the optical slope error was reduced to ∼ 0.5 µrad r.m.s. for a range of ellipses. To maximize usability, a novel holder was built to accommodate the substrate in any orientation. When replacing a first-generation bimorph on a synchrotron beamline, the new mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected X-ray beam. Most importantly, there was no evidence of the junction effect even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. It is hoped that this new design will reinvigorate the use of active bimorph optics at synchrotron and free-electron laser facilities to manipulate and correct X-ray wavefronts.

  18. MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS LONG TRACE PROFILER (LTP-MF) FOR NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY OF CHINA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    QIAN, S.; WANG, Q.; HONG, Y.; TAKACS, P.

    2005-07-31

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is a useful optical metrology instrument for measuring the figure and slope error of cylindrical aspheres commonly used as synchrotron radiation (SR) optics. It is used extensively at a number of synchrotron radiation laboratories around the world. In order to improve SR beam line quality and resolution, the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) of China is developing a versatile LTP that can be used to measure both SR optics and more conventional ''normal'' optical surfaces. The optical metrology laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NSRL are collaborating in developing a multiple functions LTP (LTP-MF). Characteristics of the LTP-MF are: a very compact and lightweight optical head, a large angular test range ({+-} 16 mad) and high accuracy. The LTP-MF can be used in various configurations: as a laboratory-based LTP, an in-situ LTP or penta-prism LTP, as an angle monitor, a portable LTP, and a small radius of curvature test instrument. The schematic design of the compact optical head and a new compact slide are introduced. Analysis of different measurements modes and systematic error correction methods are introduced.

  19. Organic adsorbates on metal surfaces. PTCDA and NTCDA on AG(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Afshin

    2010-02-22

    , the inclusion of the major part of the attractive van-der-Waals interaction brings the adsorbate back to an arrangement close to parallel to the substrate, with very small differences in height between the different subunits. With respect to experimental data obtained on Ag(111), the calculated distance between adsorbate and substrate is somewhat smaller, indicating that the open Ag(110) surface interacts more strongly with the organic compounds. This is consistent with the fact that only Ag(110) induces a brickwall unit cell of the adsorbate, a clear sign for a particularly large adsorption energy. The resulting model geometries are analysed in terms of cohesive energy, Mulliken charges, core level shifts, and vibrational properties. (orig.)

  20. Residual stress evaluation by neutron and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    order) which result from microstructural defects and lead to peak broadening. We reports some results of microstrain investigation using neutron and synchrotron techniques. As an application of such analysis we investigated the influence of the shot-peening treatment on an austenitic steel. The microstrain distribution and the size of coherently diffracting blocks for a shot-peened sample of austenitic steel as a function of depth from the surface are determined by the above analysis and the results are presented. (author)

  1. Characterization of a next-generation piezo bimorph X-ray mirror for synchrotron beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A next-generation bimorph mirror with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was created. When replacing a first-generation bimorph mirror suffering from the junction effect, the new type of mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected synchrotron X-ray beam. No evidence of the junction effect was observed even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. Piezo bimorph mirrors are versatile active optics used on many synchrotron beamlines. However, many bimorphs suffer from the ‘junction effect’: a periodic deformation of the optical surface which causes major aberrations to the reflected X-ray beam. This effect is linked to the construction of such mirrors, where piezo ceramics are glued directly below the thin optical substrate. In order to address this problem, a next-generation bimorph with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was developed at Thales-SESO and optimized at Diamond Light Source. Using metrology feedback from the Diamond-NOM, the optical slope error was reduced to ∼0.5 µrad r.m.s. for a range of ellipses. To maximize usability, a novel holder was built to accommodate the substrate in any orientation. When replacing a first-generation bimorph on a synchrotron beamline, the new mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected X-ray beam. Most importantly, there was no evidence of the junction effect even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. It is hoped that this new design will reinvigorate the use of active bimorph optics at synchrotron and free-electron laser facilities to manipulate and correct X-ray wavefronts

  2. The Scale Invariant Synchrotron Jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L. M. Du; J. M. Bai; Z. H. Xie; T. F. Yi; Y. B. Xu; R. Xue; X. H. Wang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the scale invariance of the synchrotron jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars has been studied using a sample of combined sources from FKM04 and from SDSS DR3 catalogue. Since the research of scale invariance has been focused on sub-Eddington cases that can be fitted onto the fundamental plane, while near-Eddington sources such as FSRQs have not been explicitly studied. The extracted physical properties of synchrotron jet of FSRQs have been shown to be scale invariant using our sample. The results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations of Heinz & Sunyaev (2003). Therefore, the jet synchrotron is shown to be scale independent, regardless of the accretion modes. Results in this article thus lend support to the scale invariant model of the jet synchrotron throughout the mass scale of black hole systems.

  3. The use of slow-cycling synchrotrons in injection systems

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    The PS improvement programme is concerned with increasing the potential of the PS for high energy physics. It involves developing the performance of the proton synchrotron itself and providing major items of experimental equipment to be used on the machine.

  4. Stability of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the following topics: characteristics of synchrotron radiation sources; stability of the orbits; orbit control; nonlinear dynamic stability; and coherent stability and control. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Potential applications of synchrotron radiation to the treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although conventional radiotherapy remains to be one of the most useful treatments for cancer, it is not the best strategy to maximize the effects on the tumors and minimize the damage to the surrounding tissues due to its physical and biological characteristics. Synchrotron radiation (SR) with uniquely physical and biological advantages may represent an innovative approach for cancer treatment. In recent years, SR-based photon activation therapy, stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and micro-beam radiation treatment have been developed, and the results of in vitro and in vivo experiments are very promising. It is necessary to understand the physical and radiobiological principle of those novel strategies before the approach is applied to the clinic. In this paper, we summarize the advances of SR in terms of physical, radiobiological advantages and its potential clinical applications. With the successful operation of shanghai synchrotron radiation, good opportunities in China have been provided for investigations on the treatment of cancer with synchrotron radiation. (authors)

  6. Coherence Inherent in an Incoherent Synchrotron Radio Source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok K. Singal

    2011-12-01

    We show that a partial coherence due to antenna mechanism can be inherently present in any compact synchrotron source, which resolves many long-standing problems in the spectra and variability of compact extragalactic radio sources.

  7. Synchrotron radiation for direct analysis of metalloproteins on electrophoresis gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Metalloproteomics requires analytical techniques able to assess and quantify the inorganic species in metalloproteins. The most widely used methods are hyphenated techniques, based on the coupling of a high resolution chromatographic method with a high sensitivity method for metal analysis in solution. An alternative approach is the use of methods for solid sample analysis, combining metalloprotein separation by gel electrophoresis and direct analysis of the gels. Direct methods are based on beam analysis, such as lasers, ion beams or synchrotron radiation beams. The aim of this review article is to present the main features of synchrotron radiation based methods and their applications for metalloprotein analysis directly on electrophoresis gels. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence has been successfully employed for sensitive metal identification, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for metal local structure speciation in proteins. Synchrotron based methods will be compared to ion beam and mass spectrometry for direct analysis of metalloproteins in electrophoresis gels.

  8. CERN PSB Beam Tests of CNAO Synchrotron's Digital LLRF

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; De Martinis, C; Falbo, L; Findlay, A; Foglio, R; Hunt, S; Tourres, D; Vescovi, C

    2008-01-01

    The Italian National Centre for Oncological hAdrontherapy (CNAO), in its final construction phase, uses proton and carbon ion beams to treat patients affected by solid tumours. At the heart of CNAO is a 78- meter circumference synchrotron that accelerates particles to up to 400 MeV/u. The synchrotron relies on a digital LLRF system based upon Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). This system implements cavity servoing and beam control capabilities, such as phase and radial loops. Beam tests of the CNAO synchrotron LLRF system were carried out at CERN's Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) in autumn 2007, to verify the combined DSP/FPGA architecture and the beam control capabilities. For this, a prototype version of CNAO's LLRF system was adapted to the PSB requirements. This paper outlines the prototype system layout and describes the tests carried out and their results. In particular, system architecture and beam control capabilities were successfully proven by comparison wit...

  9. Plans for use of synchrotron radiation from the Tristan rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon after the first success of storing electrons at PF in 1982, some preliminary experiments using synchrotron radiation were started. Since then the rumber of experiments and associated experiences using synchrotron x-radiation has grown so much taht requirements for the beam characteristics of synchrotron x-radiation are now much clearer. Following are some of the requirements: high intensity in the current energy region, higher brightness, more photons in the higher energy region, and sometimes a larger beam size. In order to meet some of these requirements the Tristan rings, the Accumulation and the Main Ring seem to be very suitable in the higher energy region so that plans for use of those rings are under way as a joint project between the Photon Factory and the users' community. The following material has been collected for discussion on the above mentioned use of synchrotron radiation. Further details will be published as proceedings of the planned meetings. (author)

  10. Synchrotron speciation data for zero-valent iron nanoparticles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set encompasses a complete analysis of synchrotron speciation data for 5 iron nanoparticle samples (P1, P2, P3, S1, S2, and metallic iron) to include...

  11. Hearthfire reference concept No. 3. A rapid cycling synchrotron system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a reference design for an accelerator system for heavy ion fusion based on a rapid cycling synchrotron and storage rings. The system irradiates one fusion target per second with 1 MJ, 100 TW (peak) pulses of 20 GeV Xe+8. The major components are a 550 MV linac, eight 60 Hz synchrotrons, four matching rings, 16 storage rings, and 24 final beam lines and lenses

  12. Radio frequency system for the booster synchrotron and INDUS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synchrotron radiation facility at the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), consists of two storage rings of 450 MeV(INDUS-1) and 2.0 GeV(INDUS-2). In the first phase the storage ring INDUS-1 is being constructed along with a 20 MeV injector microtron and a 700 MeV booster synchrotron. Present paper describes the RF systems for the booster and the storage ring INDUS-1. (author). 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Synchrotron radiation from a curved plasma channel laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Hafizi, B; Chen, Y -H; Johnson, L A; Penano, J R; Helle, M H; Mamonau, A A

    2016-01-01

    A laser pulse guided in a curved plasma channel can excite wakefields that steer electrons along an arched trajectory. As the electrons are accelerated along the curved channel, they emit synchrotron radiation. We present simple analytical models and simulations examining laser pulse guiding, wakefield generation, electron steering, and synchrotron emission in curved plasma channels. For experimentally realizable parameters, a ~2 GeV electron emits 0.1 photons per cm with an average photon energy of multiple keV.

  14. An introduction to synchrotron radiation techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Willmott, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This book introduces the reader to the basic concepts of the generation and manipulation of synchrotron light, its interaction with matter, and the application of synchrotron light in the “classical” techniques, while including some of the most modern technological developments. As much as possible, complicated mathematical derivations and formulas are avoided. A more heuristic approach is adopted, whereby the general physical reasoning behind the equations is highlighted.

  15. Femtosecond x-ray pulses from a synchrotron

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenlein, R. W.; Chong, H. H. W.; Glover, T. E.; Heimann, P. A.; Shank, C. V.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    An important frontier in ultrafast science is the application of femtosecond x-ray pulses to the study of structural dynamics in condensed matter. We show that femtosecond laser pulses can be used to generate high-brightness, tunable, femtosecond x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. Performance of existing and proposed femtosecond x-ray beamlines at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron are discussed.

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source safety-analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document covers all of the safety issues relating to the design and operation of the storage rings and injection system of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The building systems for fire protection, access and egress are described together with air and other gaseous control or venting systems. Details of shielding against prompt bremstrahlung radiation and synchrotron radiation are described and the administrative requirements to be satisfied for operation of a beam line at the facility are given

  17. Recent Developments in Synchrotron Mössbauer Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, L.; Bottyán, L.; Major, M.; Nagy, D. L.; Spiering, H.; Szilágyi, E.; Tanczikó, F.

    2002-12-01

    Synchrotron Mössbauer Reflectometry (SMR), the grazing incidence nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation, can be applied to perform depth-selective phase analysis and to determine the isotopic and magnetic structure of thin films and multilayers. Principles and methodological aspects of SMR are briefly reviewed. Off-specular SMR provides information from the lateral structure of multilayers. In anti-ferromagneticly coupled systems the size of magnetic domains can be measured.

  18. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    OpenAIRE

    Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction me...

  19. Studying Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence with Synchrotron Polarization Dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-01-01

    We test a new technique of studying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence suggested by Lazarian \\& Pogosyan, using synthetic synchrotron polarization observations. This paper focuses on a one-point statistics, which is termed the polarization frequency analysis, that is characterized by the variance of polarized emission as a function of the square of wavelengths along a single line of sight. We adopt a ratio $\\eta$ of the standard deviation of the line-of-sight turbulent magnetic field to the line-of-sight mean magnetic field to depict the level of turbulence. When this ratio is either large ($\\eta\\gg1$), which characterizes a turbulent field dominated region, or small ($\\eta\\lesssim0.2$), which characterizes a mean field dominated region, we obtain the polarization variance $\\left\\propto\\lambda^{-2}$ and $\\left\\propto\\lambda^{-2-2m}$, respectively. At small $\\eta$, i.e., the mean field dominated region, we successfully recover the turbulent spectral index by the polarization variance. We find that our si...

  20. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    According to the literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so-called 'depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross-section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. We exemplify this formalism in simple limiting cases. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in the literature.

  1. Synchrotron radiation studies of supported metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic clusters supported on refractory oxides have been used extensively for several decades in the production of chemicals and petroleum derived transportation fuels. Catalysts containing more than one metal component are of particular interest since the addition of a second metal provides a method of controlling the selectivity of the catalyst. That is, the second metal can alter the rates of competing reactions in a complex reaction sequence and thus alter the final product distribution of the reaction. In this work the reactions of cyclohexane in hydrogen over silica supported ruthenium and osmium catalysts were studied. Bimetallic catalysts represent an important class of materials that are of interest both scientifically and technologically. Despite the importance and long-standing use of supported metal catalysts, detailed information on the structure of the metal clusters has been difficult to obtain. The development of x-ray absorption spectroscopy with the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation, however, has provided a powerful and versatile tool for studying the structure of these complex systems. Using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique, it is possible to obtain information on the local atomic structure of supported monometallic catalytic metals and their interaction with the support. In the discussion that follows the authors will focus on results that have been obtained on the structure of supported bimetallic cluster catalysts

  2. Golden Jubilee photos: The Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Energy record Standing before the CERN personnel in the Main Auditorium on 25 November 1959, John Adams held not a bottle of champagne but a bottle of vodka. It had been presented to him a few months earlier during a visit to Dubna in the Soviet Union, where the world's most powerful accelerator had just been commissioned. He had been given strict instructions not to open the bottle until Dubna's energy record of 10 GeV had been broken. On 24 November, the record was smashed by CERN's brand new machine, the Proton Synchrotron, which accelerated protons at 24 GeV, over twice the energy of the Dubna machine. Before sending the empty bottle back to the Soviet Union, John Adams, who had headed the accelerator's construction, placed the recording of the signal in it as proof of the record. More than 40 years later, the PS is still going strong, delivering beams with particle densities a thousand times greater than when it first started operation. Over the years, other accelerators have grown up around it and the...

  3. TOWARDS FAST-PULSED SUPERCONDUCTING SYNCHROTRON MAGNETS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MORITZ,G.; MUEHLE,C.; ANERELLA,M.; GHOSH,A.; SAMPSON,W.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.; AGAPOV,N.; KHODZHIBAGIYAN,H.; KOVALENKO,A.; HASSENZAHL,W.V.; WILSON,M.N.

    2001-06-18

    The concept for the new GSI accelerator facilities is based on a large synchrotron designed for operation at BR=200 Tm and with the short cycle-time of about one second to achieve high average beam intensities. Superconducting magnets may reduce considerably investment and operating costs in comparison with conventional magnets. A R and D program was initiated to develop these magnets for a maximum field of 2-4 Tesla and a ramp rate of 4 T/s. In collaboration with JINR (Dubna), the window-frame type Nuclotron dipole, which has been operated with 4 T/s at a maximum field of 2 Tesla, shall be developed to reduce heat losses and to improve the magnetic field quality. Another collaboration with BNL (Brookhaven) was established to develop the one-layer-coil cos{theta}-type RHIC arc dipole designed for operation at 3.5 Tesla with a rather slow ramp-rate of 0.07 T/s towards the design ramp-rate of 4 T/s. The design concepts for both R and D programs are reported.

  4. Studying Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence with Synchrotron Polarization Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Lazarian, Alex; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-07-01

    We test a new technique for studying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence suggested by Lazarian & Pogosyan, using synthetic observations of synchrotron polarization. This paper focuses on a one-point statistics, which is termed polarization frequency analysis, that is characterized by the variance of polarized emission as a function of the square of the wavelength along a single line of sight. We adopt the ratio η of the standard deviation of the line-of-sight turbulent magnetic field to the line-of-sight mean magnetic field to depict the level of turbulence. When this ratio is large (η \\gg 1), which characterizes a region dominated by turbulent field, or small (η ≲ 0.2), which characterizes a region dominated by the mean field, we obtain the polarization variance \\propto {λ }-2 or \\propto {λ }-2-2m, respectively. At small η, i.e., in the region dominated by the mean field, we successfully recover the turbulent spectral index from the polarization variance. We find that our simulations agree well with the theoretical prediction of Lazarian & Pogosyan. With existing and upcoming data cubes from the Low-Frequency Array for Radio Astronomy (LOFAR) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), this new technique can be applied to study the magnetic turbulence in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  5. Characterization of Medipix3 With Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gimenez, E N; Marchal, J; Turecek, D; Ballabriga, R; Tartoni, N; Campbell, M; Llopart, X; Sawhney, K J S

    2011-01-01

    Medipix3 is the latest generation of photon counting readout chips of the Medipix family. With the same dimensions as Medipix2 (256 x 256 pixels of 55 mu m x 55 mu m pitch each), Medipix3 is however implemented in an 8-layer metallization 0.13 mu m CMOS technology which leads to an increase in the functionality associated with each pixel over Medipix2. One of the new operational modes implemented in the front-end architecture is the Charge Summing Mode (CSM). This mode consists of a charge reconstruction and hit allocation algorithm which eliminates event-by-event the low energy counts produced by charge-shared events between adjacent pixels. The present work focuses on the study of the CSM mode and compares it to the Single Pixel Mode (SPM) which is the conventional readout method for these kind of detectors and it is also implemented in Medipix3. Tests of a Medipix3 chip bump-bonded to a 300 mu m thick silicon photodiode sensor were performed at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron to evaluate the performan...

  6. Synchrotron Radiation Studies of Environmental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Daniel; Terry, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    In the case of environmental contaminants, the mobility of elements changes depending on oxidation state. Remediation techniques often focus on changing the oxidation state in order to immobilize, by forming an insoluble species, or removing by binding a soluble species to an insoluble material. In order to accomplish this immobilization one has to understand all the possible reactions that can change the oxidation state. One of the techniques that can be used to determine the oxidation state and local atomic structure of environmental contaminants under aqueous conditions is x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Synchrotron radiation was used to excite the absorption edges of As, Tc, and Pu, in order to characterize their oxidation states and structures under environmentally relevant conditions. Granular activated carbon treated with iron has shown promise for the removal of arsenic from contaminated ground water, where XAS measurements have determined that the arsenic bound to iron oxide as AsO4^3-. Pertechnetate (TcO4^-) was found to be reduced to TcO2 in a reaction with amorphous iron sulfide (FeS). Bio-reduction of plutonium has also been studied using bacteria that may be found in nuclear waste repositories resulting in an end product of Pu(III).

  7. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Del Río, M.; Gutiérrez-León, A.; Castro, G. R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solís, C.; Sánchez-Hernández, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytán, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as añil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue.

  8. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Gutierrez-Leon, A.; Castro, G.R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J. [Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, SpLine, B.P. 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Solis, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Fisica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Sanchez-Hernandez, R. [INAH Subdireccion de Laboratorios y Apoyo Academico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Robles-Camacho, J. [INAH Centro Regional Michoacan, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Rojas-Gaytan, J. [INAH Direccion de Salvamento Arqueologico, Naucalpan de Juarez (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few {mu}g of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as anil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue. (orig.)

  9. Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Grischa R. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Aragão, David; Mudie, Nathan J.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); McGowan, Sheena; Bertling, Philip J.; Groenewegen, David; Quenette, Stevan M. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Bond, Charles S. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009, Western Australia (Australia); Buckle, Ashley M. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Androulakis, Steve, E-mail: steve.androulakis@monash.edu [Monash Bioinformatics Platform, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-10-01

    The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The service automatically receives and archives raw diffraction data, related metadata and preliminary results of automated data-processing workflows. Data are able to be shared with collaborators and opened to the public. In the nine months since its deployment in August 2013, the service has handled over 22.4 TB of raw data (∼1.7 million diffraction images). Several real examples from the Australian crystallographic community are described that illustrate the advantages of the approach, which include real-time online data access and fully redundant, secure storage. Discoveries in biological sciences increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches. With this in mind, Store.Synchrotron has been developed as a component within a greater service that can combine data from other instruments at the Australian Synchrotron, as well as instruments at the Australian neutron source ANSTO. It is therefore envisaged that this will serve as a model implementation of raw data archiving and dissemination within the structural biology research community.

  10. Physical properties and biocompatibility of UHMWPE-derived materials modified by synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, Iu; Weinhardt, V; Kashkarova, A; Lebedev, S; Baumbach, T; Pichugin, V; Zaitsev, K; Khlusov, I

    2014-08-01

    The applications of synchrotron radiation (SR) in medical imaging have become of great use, particularly in angiography, bronchography, mammography, computed tomography, and X-ray microscopy. Thanks to recently developed phase contrast imaging techniques non-destructive preclinical testing of low absorbing materials such as polymers has become possible. The focus of the present work is characterization and examination of UHMWPE-derived materials widely used in medicine, before and after their exposure to SR during such testing. Physical properties, such as wettability, surface energy, IR-spectroscopy, roughness, optical microscopy, microhardness measurements of UHMWPE samples were studied before and after SR. The relationship between a growth of UHMWPE surface hydrophilicity after SR and surface colonization by stromal cells was studied in vitro. Obtained results demonstrate that SR may be used as prospective direction to examine bulk (porous) structure of polymer materials and/or to modify polymer surface and volume for tissue engineering.

  11. Synchrotron and Smith-Purcell radiations from a charge rotating around a cylindrical grating

    CERN Document Server

    Saharian, A A; Mkrtchyan, A R; Khachatryan, B V

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the radiation from a charge rotating around conductors with cylindrical symmetry. First the problem is considered with a charge rotating around a conducting cylinder immersed in a homogeneous medium. The surface charge and current densities induced on the cylinder surface are evaluated. A formula is derived for the spectral-angular density of the radiation intensity. In the second part, we study the radiation for a charge rotating around a diffraction grating on a cylindrical surface with metallic strips parallel to the cylinder axis. The effect of the grating on the radiation intensity is approximated by the surface currents induced on the strips by the field of the rotating charge. The expressions are derived for the electric and magnetic fields and for the angular density of the radiation intensity on a given harmonic. We show that the interference between the synchrotron and Smith-Purcell radiations may lead to interesting features. In particular, the behavior of the radiation intensity on ...

  12. Surface characterization of catalytically active metal, alloy, and compound films. Progress report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vook, R. W.

    1981-06-01

    The work consists primarily of verification and confirmation of the Auger electron spectroscopy R-factor effect. The R-factor is a very sensitive measure of doublet Auger line shape changes or relative doublet line shifts. It can be used to identify epitaxial growth (in contrast to polycrystalline growth) and layer growth (in contrast to island or three dimensional growth). In these cases the R-factor oscillates periodically with added film thickness, for both thin and thick (approx. = 1500 A) films. The period equals the layer thickness. Since maxima in R are associated with a smooth surface and minima with a maximum in step density, R gives a measure of surface topography. An effect due to the substrate induced misfit strains on the Auger R-factor has been established. Studies were carried out on (111)Pd/(111)Cu, (111)Ag/(111)Cu, (111)Cu, and (111)Ag surfaces to establish the general validity of the results initially obtained with Pd. Experiments were begun to determine the effect of steps (as characterized by the R-factor) on the chemisorption of oxygen on Pd.

  13. Probing structural changes of spin-coated polystyrene film after swelling and precipitation by synchrotron GIUSAXS and AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Binbin SUN; Yuqing LAI; Yoong KIM; Yongfeng MEN

    2009-01-01

    Polystyrene film of about 50 nm in thickness on silicon wafer was obtained by spin-coating in tetrahydrofuran solution. The film exhibits a rough surface as shown by atomic force microscopy images and ellipsometry data.Furthermore, such surface roughness produced a characteristic lateral correlation peak in an "out-of-plane" scan in the synchrotron grazing incidence ultra-small angle X-ray scattering pattern. The film was treated with liquids of solvent and non-solvent sequen-tially, resulting in a process of swelling and precipita-tion of the polystyrene film. Such a solvent/non-solvent treatment completely changed the original surface structure of the film. Aggregates of polystyrene of different sizes were observed both in atomic force microscopy and synchrotron grazing ineidence ultra-small angle X-ray scattering measurements. The results demonstrate that synchrotron grazing incidence ultra-small angle X-ray scattering is a unique means to investigate large area micro-structural features of thin films supported on smooth surfaces.

  14. Density-functional theory with screened van der Waals interactions applied to atomic and molecular adsorbates on close-packed and non-close-packed surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Victor G.; Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the adsorption of atoms and molecules on surfaces requires efficient electronic-structure methods that are able to capture both covalent and noncovalent interactions in a reliable manner. In order to tackle this problem, we have developed a method within density-functional theory (DFT) to model screened van der Waals interactions (vdW) for atoms and molecules on surfaces (the so-called DFT+vdWsurf method). The relatively high accuracy of the DFT+vdWsurf method in the calculation of both adsorption distances and energies, as well as the high degree of its reliability across a wide range of adsorbates, indicates the importance of the collective electronic effects within the extended substrate for the calculation of the vdW energy tail. We examine in detail the theoretical background of the method and assess its performance for adsorption phenomena including the physisorption of Xe on selected close-packed transition metal surfaces and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on Au(111). We also address the performance of DFT+vdWsurf in the case of non-close-packed surfaces by studying the adsorption of Xe on Cu(110) and the interfaces formed by the adsorption of a PTCDA monolayer on the Ag(111), Ag(100), and Ag(110) surfaces. We conclude by discussing outstanding challenges in the modeling of vdW interactions for studying atomic and molecular adsorbates on inorganic substrates.

  15. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  16. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of 57Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2±0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1 1/2 natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei

  17. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials

  18. Multipositional internal target at the Yerevan synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main characteristics of the inner targets of three gamma-ray beams from the Erevan synchrotron are given. The accelerated electron beam is dumped on the targets by the orbit local disturbance method. Oscillograms of the beam stretching with time during extraction are given for different target operation. Some drawbacks of the design of the operating targets are pointed out, the main being the large period of time (about 3 hours) required to replace the target radiator. The comparative analysis of other known target designs is presented. The investigation was aimed at the development of a new target design that may ensure the possibility of an operative radiator replacement without breaking the accelerator vacuum with minimum effort and time. The problem has been solved by the modification of the present target design. An additional electromotor has been installed on the target chamber; the shaft pf the electromotor passes through the vacuum seal inside the chamber. The shaft has a gear at the end and it can be engaged with a gear at the main rod end of the target. 8 various radiators may be placed simulltaniously on the gear. The accuracy of installing each radiator in the radial direction is +-0.2 mm, and the accuracy of fixing if in rotation is +-0.3 degree. The replacement of the radiator takes not more than 3 min. The target may be used as an inner or an outer target in experiments in interactions of various materials with a particle beam. The relay control system for the multi-position target is described

  19. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction characterization of healthy and fluorotic human dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaço, M. V.; Barroso, R. C.; Porto, I. M.; Gerlach, R. F.; Costa, F. N.; Braz, D.; Droppa, R.; de Sousa, F. B.

    2012-10-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basic physical-chemistry reactions of demineralization and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction. All the scattering profile measurements were carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory—LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. X-ray diffraction experiments were performed both in powder samples and polished surfaces. The powder samples were analyzed to obtain the characterization of a typical healthy enamel pattern. The polished surfaces were analyzed in specific areas that have been identified as fluorotic ones. X-ray diffraction data were obtained for all samples and these data were compared with the control samples and also with the literature data.

  20. Characterization of semiconductor materials using synchrotron radiation-based near-field infrared microscopy and nano-FTIR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hermann, Peter; Hoehl, Arne; Ulrich, Georg; Fleischmann, Claudia; Hermelink, Antje; Kästner, Bernd; Patoka, Piotr; Hornemann, Andrea; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Rühl, Eckart; Ulm, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    We describe the application of scattering-type near-field optical microscopy to characterize various semiconducting materials using the electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) as a broadband synchrotron radiation source. For verifying high-resolution imaging and nano-FTIR spectroscopy we performed scans across nanoscale Si-based surface structures. The obtained results demonstrate that a spatial resolution below 40 nm can be achieved, despite the use of a radiation source with an e...

  1. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  2. Industrial Use of Synchrotron Radiation:. Love at Second Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, Josef; Warner, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) has become one of the most valuable tools for many areas of basic and applied research. In some cases, techniques have been developed that rely completely on the specific properties of synchrotron radiation; in many other cases, using synchrotron radiation has opened completely new and exciting opportunities for conventional techniques. In this chapter, the challenges, problems, and advantages of the industrial use of synchrotron radiation will be highlighted, in an admittedly subjective way, based on the experience of the authors at various synchrotron radiation facilities. "Typical" examples of industrial use of SR will be discussed for all areas of industrial activities, i.e., production, quality control and control of regulatory requirements, and research and development. Emphasis will be put on examples from R&D as this is the most intensively used area. Because this field is much too broad for a complete review here, examples will focus on applications from just three major sectors: biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, and automotive and mining. Environmental research is a fourth area that will be partly covered in the section on regulatory requirements.

  3. Modelisation of synchrotron radiation losses in realistic tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albajar, F.; Johner, J.; Granata, G

    2000-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation losses become significant in the power balance of high-temperature plasmas envisaged for next step tokamaks. Due to the complexity of the exact calculation, these losses are usually roughly estimated with expressions derived from a plasma description using simplifying assumptions on the geometry, radiation absorption, and density and temperature profiles. In the present article, the complete formulation of the transport of synchrotron radiation is performed for realistic conditions of toroidal plasma geometry with elongated cross-section, using an exact method for the calculation of the absorption coefficient, and for arbitrary shapes of density and temperature profiles. The effects of toroidicity and temperature profile on synchrotron radiation losses are analyzed in detail. In particular, when the electron temperature profile is almost flat in the plasma center, as for example in ITB confinement regimes, synchrotron losses are found to be much stronger than in the case where the profile is represented by its best generalized parabolic approximation, though both cases give approximately the same thermal energy contents. Such an effect is not included in present approximate expressions. Finally, we propose a seven-variable fit for the fast calculation of synchrotron radiation losses. This fit is derived from a large database, which has been generated using a code implementing the complete formulation and optimized for massively parallel computing. (author)

  4. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed 88SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles.

  5. Studies of Mn/ZnO (0001¯) Interfacial Formation and Electronic Properties with Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C. W.; Xu, P. S.; Wu, Y. Y.; Sun, B.; Xu, F. Q.; Pan, H. B.; Yuan, H. T.; Du, X. L.

    2007-01-01

    The initial growth, interfacial reaction and Fermi level movement of Mn on the O-terminated Zn (000 1¯) surface have been investigated by using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES) and X-ray photoemission (XPS). Mn is found to be grown on the surface in the layer-by-layer (Frank-van der Merwe) mode and be quite stable on the O-terminated surface at room temperature. With increasing the coverage of Mn, a downward Fermi level movement in band structure measurement of SRPES is observed and the resultant Schottky Barrier Height (SBH) is calculated to be about 1.1eV. Annealing behavior of the interface is investigated and we find that annealing at 600 °C induces a pronounced Mn-Zn atoms exchange reaction at the interface.

  6. Challenges for utilization of the new synchrotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emergence of third generation synchrotron radiation facilities provides new scientific opportunities and challenges. Optimized for small phase space electron beams, long periodic magnet structures, and dedicated scientific user access -- these new machines promise significant increases in spectral brightness, as well as enhanced spatial and temporal coherence properties, which translates to new opportunities for combining high spatial and spectral resolution. The challenges to the machine builders are well known: designing and maintaining the small phase space beams, constructing long magnet structures with minimal errors, stabilizing the beam to long and short term fluctuations, and multiple undulator tuning, to name a few. The challenges in beamline optics, spectroscopic and focusing systems are also quite clear. The issue of optical stability quickly comes to the forefront as we attempt to focus and image to ever finer spatial scales, with minimal loss of photon flux. Surface figure and polish are of greater importance, as is minimization of aberrations, as we strive to maintain these small phase space photon beams. The higher intensities and power loading mandate cooled, or cleverly controlled optics, to avoid thermal distortion. Spectroscopic efficiency, with minimal wavefront distortion to the near diffraction limited radiation, becomes more important, as do order and harmonic suppression resolution are called for -- with both diffractive and reflective optics. Two of our major issues will be efficient time sharing of these valuable resources, relegating time consuming setup procedures to branch lines while others take data, and controlling the cost of these ever more complex beamline engineering systems. 12 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  7. X-ray studies of multilayer semiconductors using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiwen

    X-ray scattering and absorption techniques utilizing synchrotron radiation have been used to study a variety of multilayer semiconductors. The angular-dependent x-ray scattering at grazing incidence angles (grazing incidence x-ray scattering, GIXS) provides structural information of interfaces in these materials, such as rms interfacial roughness, cross- and lateral-correlation lengths, etc. Long-range order structures in material are probed by large-angle scattering (x-ray diffraction), in which strain and lattice constant as well as crystallinity of the epilayers are measured. Local structural variations in materials including local bond length, coordination number, and local disorder are obtained quantitatively by examining the modulation in the x-ray absorption spectrum some 40 eV above the absorption edge (extended x-ray absorption fine structure, EXAFS). Materials studied in the present work are SiGe/Si heterostructures, MnAs/GaAs ferromagnetic-semiconductor films, solar cell films, ZnSe-based II-VI semiconductor thin films, InGaAs/GaAs and GaAs/AlAs superlattices. Results obtained have shown (i) evidence for strain-induced surface/interface morphology variations in SiGe/Si heterostructures, (ii) template-dependent microstructures in MnAs/GaAs, (iii) changes in interface structures for films of different formations in solar cell films, (iv) differences between samples prepared by different epitaxial growth methods in II-VI semiconductor films, (v) observation of lateral structural ordering in one of the InGaAs/GaAs superlattices, (vi) differences in interfacial microstructures between MBE-grown samples with different interrupts in GaAs/AlAs superlattices. Most of all, x- rays are found to be a very useful nondestructive tool for probing microscopic structures in various multilayer semiconductor materials.

  8. 3D synchrotron x-ray microtomography of paint samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ester S. B.; Boon, Jaap J.; van der Horst, Jerre; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-07-01

    Synchrotron based X-ray microtomography is a novel way to examine paint samples. The three dimensional distribution of pigment particles, binding media and their deterioration products as well as other features such as voids, are made visible in their original context through a computing environment without the need of physical sectioning. This avoids manipulation related artefacts. Experiments on paint chips (approximately 500 micron wide) were done on the TOMCAT beam line (TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs) at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, CH, using an x-ray energy of up to 40 keV. The x-ray absorption images are obtained at a resolution of 350 nm. The 3D dataset was analysed using the commercial 3D imaging software Avizo 5.1. Through this process, virtual sections of the paint sample can be obtained in any orientation. One of the topics currently under research are the ground layers of paintings by Cuno Amiet (1868- 1961), one of the most important Swiss painters of classical modernism, whose early work is currently the focus of research at the Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA). This technique gives access to information such as sample surface morphology, porosity, particle size distribution and even particle identification. In the case of calcium carbonate grounds for example, features like microfossils present in natural chalks, can be reconstructed and their species identified, thus potentially providing information towards the mineral origin. One further elegant feature of this technique is that a target section can be selected within the 3D data set, before exposing it to obtain chemical data. Virtual sections can then be compared with cross sections of the same samples made in the traditional way.

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for

  10. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomini, J C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with r...

  11. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  12. The challenges of third-generation synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Third-generation synchrotron light sources are specifically designed to operate with long insertion devices that produce very high brightness beams of synchrotron radiation. There are many such facilities now under construction, or in the design stage, all over the world. After a brief review of the main properties of the low emittance storage rings that form the heart of these facilities, we will discuss the particular challenges that accompany their design. These include: the effects of the strong sextupoles required for chromatic correction of the low emittance lattices; impact of machine imperfections on the dynamic aperture; the effects of the linear and nonlinear magnetic fields of the undulators; impedance consequences of long, narrow, undulator vacuum vessels; injection; and beam lifetime. As examples, we take the Advanced Light Source, currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, USA, and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility under construction in Grenoble, France. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  13. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Larkin, Kieran G

    2016-08-21

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required. PMID:27436750

  14. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  15. Transvenous coronary angiography in humans with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transvenous coronary angiography project at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is presently undergoing a significant upgrade to the hardware and software in the synchrotron medical facility. When completed, the project will have reached a level of maturity in the imaging technology which will allow the research team to begin to concentrate on medical research programs. This paper will review the status of the project and imaging technology and will discuss the current upgrades and future advanced technology initiatives. The advantages of using the radiation from a synchrotron, over that from a standard x-ray source, were the motivation for the project. A total of 23 human imaging sessions have been carried out with in the project. The primary goals have been to establish the imaging parameters and protocol necessary to obtain clinically useful images

  16. Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence to extraterrestrial materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) is a valuable technique for trace element analyses of extraterrestrial materials permitting minimum detection limits less than 1 ppM for 20 micrometer spots. SXRF measurements have been performed on iron meteorites and micrometeorites using white synchrotron radiation and an energy dispersive x-ray detector at the National Synchrotron Light Source (X-26C), Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY). Partitioning of Cu between troilite (FeS) and metal in the nine iron meteorites studied suggests sub-solidus re-equilibration in these objects. A technique has been developed for determining self-absorption corrections for filtered, continuum excitation of small specimens, such as stratospheric particles and refractory inclusions in meteorites.

  17. Rising dough and baking bread at the Australian synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, S. C.; McCann, T.; Day, L.; Favaro, J.; Tuhumury, H.; Thompson, D.; Maksimenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat protein quality and the amount of common salt added in dough formulation can have a significant effect on the microstructure and loaf volume of bread. High-speed synchrotron micro-CT provides an ideal tool for observing the three dimensional structure of bread dough in situ during proving (rising) and baking. In this work, the synchrotron micro-CT technique was used to observe the structure and time evolution of doughs made from high and low protein flour and three different salt additives. These experiments showed that, as expected, high protein flour produces a higher volume loaf compared to low protein flour regardless of salt additives. Furthermore the results show that KCl in particular has a very negative effect on dough properties resulting in much reduced porosity. The hundreds of datasets produced and analysed during this experiment also provided a valuable test case for handling large quantities of data using tools on the Australian Synchrotron's MASSIVE cluster.

  18. Evidence for Synchrotron Bubbles from GRS 1915+105

    CERN Document Server

    Ishwara-Chandra, C H; Rao, A P

    2002-01-01

    We present GMRT observations of the Galactic microquasar GRS 1915+105 at 1.28 GHz for 8 days from 2001 June 18 to July 1. We have seen several isolated radio flares of varying magnitudes (20 - 50 mJy) and durations (6 - 35 min) and we model them as due to adiabatically expanding synchrotron emitting clouds (synchrotron bubbles) ejected from the accretion disk. By applying this model, we provide a new method to estimate the electron power-law index p, hence the spectral index, from single frequency radio observations. This method does not require correction for the optical depth time delay effects which may be important in the case of optically thick radio emission. Using our estimated value of p and simultaneous multiwavelength data from literature, we have calculated the time of ejection of the synchrotron plasma and the time delays at different observed frequencies. Our estimates are in good agreement with the observed time delays.

  19. High Intensity Beam Issues in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Aumon, Sandra; Rivkin, Leonid

    This PhD work is about limitations of high intensity proton beams observed in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and, in particular, about issues at injection and transition energies. With its 53 years, the CERN PS would have to operate beyond the limit of its performance to match the future requirements. Beam instabilities driven by transverse impedance and aperture restrictions are important issues for the operation and for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade which foresees an intensity increase delivered by the injectors. The main subject of the thesis concerns the study of a fast transverse instability occurring at transition energy. The proton beams crossing this energy range are particularly sensitive to wake forces because of the slow synchrotron motion. This instability can cause a strong vertical emittance blow-up and severe losses in less than a synchrotron period. Experimental observations show that the particles at the peak density of the beam longitudinal distribution oscillate in the vertical plane du...

  20. HSC5: synchrotron radiation and neutrons for cultural heritage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron and neutron sources offer recent and additional insight into the records of our cultural past. Over the last years, there has been an increasing demand for access to synchrotron radiation- and neutron-based techniques, and their applications in the fields of archaeological science and cultural heritage. The purpose of this Hercules Specialized Course is to give the participants an introduction to the basic principles of synchrotron radiation and neutron techniques (imaging, microscopy, diffraction, absorption and fluorescence, IR spectroscopy). The school provides cross-disciplinary examples illustrating the abilities of these techniques in a representative range of scientific cases concerning painting, archaeological artefacts, inks, pigments, fossils and the Dead Sea scrolls. This document gathers only the resumes of the lectures

  1. HSC5: synchrotron radiation and neutrons for cultural heritage studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Anne [Institut Neel - CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France); Artioli, G. [Padova Univ. (Italy); Bleuet, P.; Cotte, M.; Tafforeau, P.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Dumas, P.; Somogyl, A. [SOLEIL Synchrotron, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Cotte, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, UMR171, 75 - Paris (France)]|[European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Kockelmann, W. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom); Kolar, J. [Ljubljana Univ., Morana RTD, Slovenia, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (Slovenia); Areon, I. [Nova Gorica Univ. (Slovenia); Meden, A.; Strlie, M. [Ljubljana Univ., Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (Slovenia); Pantos, M. [Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Vendrell, M. [Barcelona Univ., dept. of Crystallography and Mineralogy (Spain); Wess, T. [Cardiff Univ., School of Optometry and Institute of Vision (Ireland); Gunneweg, J. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron and neutron sources offer recent and additional insight into the records of our cultural past. Over the last years, there has been an increasing demand for access to synchrotron radiation- and neutron-based techniques, and their applications in the fields of archaeological science and cultural heritage. The purpose of this Hercules Specialized Course is to give the participants an introduction to the basic principles of synchrotron radiation and neutron techniques (imaging, microscopy, diffraction, absorption and fluorescence, IR spectroscopy). The school provides cross-disciplinary examples illustrating the abilities of these techniques in a representative range of scientific cases concerning painting, archaeological artefacts, inks, pigments, fossils and the Dead Sea scrolls. This document gathers only the resumes of the lectures.

  2. Transfiguration of extracting mirror in synchrotron radiation system at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The first extracting mirror is very important for synchrotron radiation monitor (SRM). The SRM system of SSRF (Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility) should extract the visible light with low optical distortion. The analysis of SR power spectrum and heat transfiguration based on Matlab is introduced in this paper, which will be used in calibration. One beryllium mirror with water-cooling is used to transmit X-ray and reflect visible light to satisfy the measurement request. The existing system suffers from a dynamic problem in some beam physics study. The system includes optics, image acquisition and interferometers. One of the instruments is a digital camera providing the image of the beam transverse profile. The hardware configuration will be summarized. The synchrotron radiation measurement system has been in operation in SSRF for more than one year.

  3. Synchrotron X-ray induced solution precipitation of nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J; Hwu, Y; Tsai, W L

    2003-01-01

    By irradiating a solution in electroless Ni deposition using synchrotron X-rays, Ni composite was found to nucleate homogeneously and eventually precipitate in the form of nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles precipitated is rather uniform (100-300 nm depending on the applied temperature). By the addition of an organic acid, well-dispersed nanoparticles could be effectively deposited on glass substrate. The hydrated electrons (e sub a sub q sup -), products of radiolysis of water molecules by synchrotron X-rays, may be responsible for the effective reduction of the metal ions, resulting in homogeneous nucleation and nanoparticle formation. Our results suggest that synchrotron X-ray can be used to induce solution precipitation of nanoparticles and therefore lead to a new method of producing nanostructured particles and coating.

  4. RF-knockout Extraction System for the CNAO Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Carmignani, Nicola; Serio, Mario; Balbinot, Giovanni; Bressi, Erminia; Caldara, Michele; Pullia, Marco; Bosser, Jacques; Venchi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) is a centre in Italy for the treatment of patients affected by tumours with proton and carbon ions beams accelerated in a synchrotron. The synchrotron extraction method is based on the use of a betatron core. This work aims to verify, through a theoretical study and a simulation, the possibility of using the RF-knockout extraction method exploiting the existing hardware. A simulation program has been written to simulate the extraction system of the synchrotron with the purpose to define the parameters of the radio frequency. Two types of radio frequencies have been compared in order to obtain a constant spill with the minimum ripple: a carrier wave with a frequency and amplitude modulation, and a gaussian narrow band noise modulated in amplitude. Results of the simulation and considerations on the kicker characteristics are presented

  5. Space charge tracking code for a synchrotron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottinger, M.B.; Tajima, T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Hiramoto, K. [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Research Lab.

    1997-06-01

    An algorithm has been developed to compute particle tracking, including self-consistent space charge effects for synchrotron accelerators. In low-energy synchrotrons space charge plays a central role in enhancing emittance of the beam. The space charge effects are modeled by mutually interacting (through the Coulombic force) N cylindrical particles (2-{1/2}-dimensional dynamics) whose axis is in the direction of the equilibrium particle flow. On the other hand, their interaction with synchrotron lattice magnets is treated with the thin-lens approximation and in a fully 3-dimensional way. Since the existing method to treat space charge fully self-consistently involved 3-D space charge effect computation, the present method allows far more realistic physical parameters and runs in far shorter time (about 1/20). Some examples on space charge induced instabilities are presented.

  6. 6th International School “Synchrotron Radiation and Magnetism”

    CERN Document Server

    Bulou, Hervé; Joly, Loic; Scheurer, Fabrice; Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation : Towards the Fourth Generation Light Sources

    2013-01-01

     Advances in the synthesis of new materials with often complex, nano-scaled structures require increasingly sophisticated experimental techniques that can probe the electronic states, the atomic magnetic moments and the magnetic microstructures responsible for the properties of these materials. At the same time, progress in synchrotron radiation techniques has ensured that these light sources remain a key tool of investigation, e.g. synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation are able to support magnetic imaging on a sub-micrometer scale. With the Sixth Mittelwihr School on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation the tradition of teaching the state-of-the-art on modern research developments continues and is expressed through the present set of extensive lectures provided in this volume. While primarily aimed at postgraduate students and newcomers to the field, this volume will also benefit researchers and lecturers actively working in the field.

  7. Comparisons of nozzle orifice processing methods using synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-jun WU; Zhi-long LI; Wei-di HUANG; Hui-feng GONG; Ya GAO; Jun DENG; Zong-jie HU

    2012-01-01

    Based on the high flux synchrotron X-ray of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF),high precision 3D digital models of diesel nozzle tips have been established by X-ray micro-tomography technology,which reveal the internal surfaces and structures of orifices.To analyze the machining precision and characteristics of orifice processing methods,an approach is presented based on the parameters of the internal structures of nozzle orifices,including the nozzle diameter,the orifice inner surface waviness,the eccentricity distance and the angle between orifices.Using this approach,two kinds of nozzle orifice processing methods,computerized numerical control drilling and electric discharge machining,have been studied and compared.The results show that this approach enables a simple,direct,and comprehensive contrastive analysis of nozzle orifice processing methods.When processing a single orifice,the electric discharge machining method has obvious advantages.However,when there are multiple orifices,the error levels of the two methods are similar in relation to the symmetry of distribution of the orifices.

  8. Single-cell-based sensors and synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy: a hybrid system towards bacterial detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-09-30

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell-based sensors were developed and demonstrated for potential real-time bacterium detection by synchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold electrodes of silicon oxide substrates by a surface engineering technique, in which the gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion and the silicon oxide background was passivated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Cell morphology and IR spectra of single, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared to reveal the detection capability of this cell-based sensing platform. The single-cell-based system was found to generate the most significant and consistent IR spectrum shifts upon exposure to LPS, thus providing the highest detection sensitivity. Changes in cell morphology and IR shifts upon cell exposure to LPS were found to be dependent on the LPS concentration and exposure time, which established a method for the identification of LPS concentration and infected cell population. Possibility of using this single-cell system with conventional IR spectroscopy as well as its limitation was investigated by comparing IR spectra of single-cell arrays with gold electrode surface areas of 25, 100, and 400 microm2 using both synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes. This cell-based platform may potentially provide real-time, label-free, and rapid bacterial detection, and allow for high-throughput statistical analyses, and portability. PMID:17560777

  9. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION XRF MICROPROBE STUDY OF HUMAN BONE TUMOR SLICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The experimental apparatus of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analysis at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) is described Using the bovine liver as the standard reference.the minimum detection limit(MDL) of trace element was measured to determine the capability of biological sample analysis by synchrotron radiation XRF microprobe.The relative change of the content of the major or trace element in the normal and tumor part of human bone tissue slice was investigated The experimental result relation to the clinical medicine was also discussed.

  10. Characteristics of synchrotron radiation and of its sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron light emission and the classical relativistic electromagnetic theory describing it are reviewed. The electron optics of storage rings are considered in some detail, beginning with the ideal electron orbit and the distribution which electrons take around it. This is folded with the process of synchrotron light emission itself to define the effective photon source. The predictions of classical relativistic theory are compared with experiment, and one finds agreement within the experimental uncertainties. Further refinements, such as wiggler magnets and free electron lasers are also considered

  11. Synchrotron radiation sources INDUS-1 and INDUS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synchrotron radiation sources, INDUS-1 and INDUS-2 are electron storage rings of 450 MeV and 2 GeV beam energies respectively. INDUS-1 is designed to produce VUV radiation whereas INDUS-2 will be mainly used to produce x-rays. INDUS-1 is presently undergoing commissioning whereas INDUS-2 is under construction. Both these rings have a common injector system comprising of a microtron and a synchrotron. Basic design features of these sources and their injector system are discussed in this paper. The radiation beamlines to be set up on these sources are also described. (author)

  12. Extended 1D Method for Coherent Synchrotron Radiation including Shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Sagan, David; Mayes, Christopher; Sae-Ueng, Udom

    2008-01-01

    Coherent Synchrotron Radiation can severely limit the performance of accelerators designed for high brightness and short bunch length. Examples include light sources based on ERLs or FELs, and bunch compressors for linear colliders. In order to better simulate Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, the established 1-dimensional formalism is extended to work at lower energies, at shorter bunch lengths, and for an arbitrary configuration of multiple bends. Wide vacuum chambers are simulated by means of vertical image charges. This formalism has been implemented in the general beam dynamics code "Bmad" and its results are here compared to analytical approximations, to numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations, and to the simulation code "elegant".

  13. Project X with Rapid Cycling and Dual Storage Superconducting Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarz, Henryk

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of neutrino oscillations and rare meson decays are main physics goals of Project X. The successful physics outcome relies on the feasibility of high-intensity neutrino and meson (K+ and \\mu) beams. In order to meet this goal we propose accelerator system dominated by the synchrotrons (Option A) as a technologically easier and significantly more cost-effective alternative to the accelerator system dominated by the linear accelerators (Option B). The synchrotron-based accelerator system and its main components are outlined and the expected proton beam power for the neutrino and meson beams production is presented and discussed.

  14. Energy dispersive spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation: intensity considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed considerations are given to the reliability of energy dependent integrated intensity data collected from the pressure cavity of a diamond-anvil pressure cell illuminated with heterochromatic radiation from a synchrotron storage ring. It is demonstrated that at least in one run, the electron beam current cannot be used to correct for energy-intensity variations of the incident beam. Rather there appears to be an additional linear relationship between the decay of the synchrotron beam and the magnitude of the background intensity. 13 refs., 7 figs

  15. X-ray intensity interferometer for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to measure the transverse coherence of an x-ray beam, for the first time, by Hanbury Brown intensity interferometry. Our approach is to use an intensity interferometer adapted to the soft x-ray region. The X1 or X13 soft x-ray undulator at the National Synchrotron Light Source will supply the partially coherent x-rays. We are developing this technique to characterize the coherence properties of x-ray beams from high brilliance insertion devices at third-generation synchrotron light facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source

  16. Combustion study with synchrotron radiation single photon ionization technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Rui; WANG Jing; HUANG Chaoqun; YANG Bin; WEI Lixia; SHAN Xiaobin; SHENG Liusi; ZHANG Yunwu; QI Fei

    2005-01-01

    Here we report a combustion endstation at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and some primary experimental results. Synchrotron radiation can provide the tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon with the high intensity and the good collimation. VUV photoionization is a single-photon ionization process. Combined with molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS), the VUV single-photon ionization can be applied to detect the combustion products, especially the intermediates and free radicals produced from combustion process. This method is proved to be a powerful tool for combustion study, which could be helpful for developing combustion kinetic models and understanding the mechanism of combustion reactions.

  17. Synchrotron radiation as a light source in confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Oord, C.J.R.; Gerritsen, H.C.; Levine, Y.K. (University of Utrecht, P.O. Box 80.000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)); Myring, W.J.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H. (Daresbury Laboratory (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    The optical properties of a confocal scanning microscope that was designed to utilize a synchrotron as light source are presented. The usable spectral range is from 200 nm up to 700 nm. Using 325-nm laser light, it is shown that the lateral resolution is about 125 nm, and the axial resolution better than 250 nm. After transport of the microscope from Utrecht to the Daresbury Synchrotron Source, 200-nm excitation can be applied, and the lateral resolution will drop to below 100 nm.

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of

  19. Nanoscale surface chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Madey, Theodore E.; Pelhos, Kalman; WU, QIFEI; Barnes, Robin; Ermanoski, Ivan; Chen, Wenhua; Kolodziej, Jacek J.; Rowe, John E.

    2002-01-01

    We report evidence in several experiments for nanometer-size effects in surface chemistry. The evidence concerns bimetallic systems, monolayer films of Pt or Pd on W(111) surfaces. Pyramidal facets with {211} faces are formed on annealing on physical monolayer of Pt, Pd on a W(111) substrate, and facet sizes increase with annealing temperature. We used synchrotron radiation-based soft x-ray photoemission to show that monolayer films of Pt, Pd, on W “float” on the outer surface, whereas multil...

  20. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system

  3. Synchrotron Microanalytical Methods in the Study of Trace and Minor Elements in Apatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakovan,J.; Luo, Y.; Borkiewicz, O.

    2008-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray facilities have the capability for numerous microanalytical methods with spatial resolutions in the micron to submicron range and sensitivities as low as ppm to ppb. These capabilities are the result of a high X-ray brilliance (many orders of magnitude greater than standard tube and rotating anode sources); a continuous, or white, spectrum through the hard X-ray region; high degrees of X-ray columniation and polarization; and new developments in X-ray focusing methods. The high photon flux and pulsed nature of the source also allow for rapid data collection and high temporal resolution in certain experiments. Of particular interest to geoscientists are X-ray fluorescence microprobes which allow for numerous analytical techniques including X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of trace element concentrations and distributions; X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for chemical speciation, structural and oxidation state information; X-ray diffraction (XRD) for phase identification; and fluorescence microtomography (CMT) for mapping the internal structure of porous or composite materials as well as elemental distributions. We have employed several synchrotron based microanalytical methods including XRF, microEXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure), microXANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) and CMT for the study of minor and trace elements in apatite (and other minerals). We have also been conducting time resolved X-ray diffraction to study nucleation of and phase transformations among precursor phases in the formation of apatite from solution at earth surface conditions. Summaries of these studies are given to exemplify the capabilities of synchrotron microanalytical techniques.

  4. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Unirradiated Magnox uranium was encapsulated in grout and exposed to hydrogen. • Synchrotron X-ray tomography imaged the uranium corrosion before and after exposure. • Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction identified the corrosion products; UH3 and UO2. • Uranium encapsulated in grout oxidised via the anoxic U + H2O regime. • Successful in-situ, non-invasive examination of pyrophoric and radioactive material - Abstract: How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H2 corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U + H2O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO2 and UH3, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems

  5. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stitt, C.A., E-mail: Camilla.stitt@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Hart, M., E-mail: oxford.mike@gmail.com [Diamond Light Source Limited, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Fermi Avenue, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Harker, N.J., E-mail: nicholas.harker@esrf.fr [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Hallam, K.R., E-mail: k.r.hallam@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); MacFarlane, J., E-mail: james.macfarlane@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Banos, A., E-mail: antonis.banos@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Paraskevoulakos, C., E-mail: cp13846@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Butcher, E., E-mail: ed.j.butcher@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1 PG (United Kingdom); Padovani, C., E-mail: cristiano.padovani@nda.gov.uk [Radioactive Waste Management Limited (formerly the Radioactive Waste Management Directorate of the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority), Curie Avenue, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RH (United Kingdom); Scott, T.B., E-mail: t.b.scott@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Unirradiated Magnox uranium was encapsulated in grout and exposed to hydrogen. • Synchrotron X-ray tomography imaged the uranium corrosion before and after exposure. • Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction identified the corrosion products; UH{sub 3} and UO{sub 2}. • Uranium encapsulated in grout oxidised via the anoxic U + H{sub 2}O regime. • Successful in-situ, non-invasive examination of pyrophoric and radioactive material - Abstract: How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H{sub 2} corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U + H{sub 2}O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems.

  6. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis (μ-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed

  7. Characterization of semiconductor materials using synchrotron radiation-based near-field infrared microscopy and nano-FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Peter; Hoehl, Arne; Ulrich, Georg; Fleischmann, Claudia; Hermelink, Antje; Kästner, Bernd; Patoka, Piotr; Hornemann, Andrea; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Rühl, Eckart; Ulm, Gerhard

    2014-07-28

    We describe the application of scattering-type near-field optical microscopy to characterize various semiconducting materials using the electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) as a broadband synchrotron radiation source. For verifying high-resolution imaging and nano-FTIR spectroscopy we performed scans across nanoscale Si-based surface structures. The obtained results demonstrate that a spatial resolution below 40 nm can be achieved, despite the use of a radiation source with an extremely broad emission spectrum. This approach allows not only for the collection of optical information but also enables the acquisition of near-field spectral data in the mid-infrared range. The high sensitivity for spectroscopic material discrimination using synchrotron radiation is presented by recording near-field spectra from thin films composed of different materials used in semiconductor technology, such as SiO2, SiC, SixNy, and TiO2. PMID:25089414

  8. Development of polishing methods for Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide (CVD SiC) make it ideal for use in mirrors for synchrotron radiation experiments. We developed methods to grind and polish flat samples of CVD SiC down to measured surface roughness values as low as 1.1 Angstroms rms. We describe the processing details, including observations we made during trial runs with alternative processing recipes. We conclude that pitch polishing using progressively finer diamond abrasive, augmented with specific water based lubricants and additives, produces superior results. Using methods based on these results, a cylindrical and a toroidal mirror, each about 100 x 300mm, were respectively finished by Continental Optical and Frank Cooke, Incorporated. WYCO Interferometry shows these mirrors have surface roughness less than 5.7 Angstroms rms. These mirrors have been installed on the LLNL/UC X-ray Calibration and Standards Facility at the Stanford Synthrotron Radiation Laboratory

  9. Synchrotron radiation. Appendix to the Daresbury annual report 1993/1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This appendix to the main report of the Daresbury Laboratory contains 387 contributions on research carried out using the Synchrotron Radiation Source. The research areas covered include: biological solution scattering; protein crystallography; biological radiation damage; biological spectroscopy; fibre diffraction of biological systems; membranes and liquid systems; machine physics; polymer studies; quantum wells; carbon fibre diffraction; organometallics; phase studies at high pressure; semiconductors; metal oxides; magnetic materials; non-linear optics; alloys; metallic glass; amorphous materials/aqueous solutions; porous silicon and mesoporous materials; silica sols and emulsions; thin films; geology and mineralogy; liquid crystals; catalysis; ceramics and glass; superconductors; detectors for structural biology; metal oxide gas sensors; X-ray scattering techniques; new developments in X-ray techniques; structural studies of powders; single crystal and small molecule crystallography; molecular spectroscopy; lime resolved spectroscopy; surface spectroscopy; topography and diffuse scattering; X-ray microscopy; X-ray studies of surfaces. (UK)

  10. Detection and spectral measurements of coherent synchrotron radiation at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2010-02-15

    The operation of high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) underlies tremendous demands on high quality electron beams with high peak currents. At the Free-Electron-Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), two magnetic bunch compressors are used to compress the electron bunches longitudinally. In the bunch compressor magnets, these short electron bunches generate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). This CSR contains information on the longitudinal bunch profile, which is relevant for driving an FEL. In order to investigate coherent synchrotron radiation at the second bunch compressor BC3 at FLASH, a new setup behind the last dipole was installed. For the detection of coherent synchrotron radiation, which is emitted in the infrared regime, pyroelectric detectors were used. These pyroelectric detectors have been calibrated at the free-electron laser FELIX in the wavelength range from 5 {mu}m to 110 {mu}m. For characterisation of the emitted radiation, a transverse scanning device was used to measure the transverse intensity distribution. Various transmission filters were used to obtain additional information about the spectral content. In order to get spectral information with high resolution over a wide wavelength range, a rotating mirror spectrometer using reflective blazed gratings was installed. Using this spectrometer, the first spectral measurements of coherent synchrotron radiation at FLASH in a wavelength range from 10 {mu}m to 160 {mu}m were done. (orig.)

  11. Research by industry at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The world`s foremost facility for research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation, is operated by the National Synchrotron Light Source dept. This pamphlet described the participating research teams that built most of the beam lines, various techniques for studying materials, treatment of materials, and various industrial research (catalysis, pharmaceuticals, etc.).

  12. India's first synchrotron radiation source Indus-1: a historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Indian synchrotron radiation source Indus-l was commissioned in May 1999. This article briefs the development of accelerator based research programme in India and discusses the historical perspectives starting from the year 1953 at and goes to the development of Indus-1 and Indus-2 at Centre for Advanced Technology at Indore

  13. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Frenkel, Anatoly [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adzic, Radoslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Hulbert, Steve L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karim, Ayman [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullins, David R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  14. Initial scientific uses of coherent synchrotron radiation inelectron storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basov, D.N.; Feikes, J.; Fried, D.; Holldack, K.; Hubers, H.W.; Kuske, P.; Martin, M.C.; Pavlov, S.G.; Schade, U.; Singley, E.J.; Wustefeld, G.

    2004-11-23

    The production of stable, high power, coherent synchrotron radiation at sub-terahertz frequency at the electron storage ring BESSY opens a new region in the electromagnetic spectrum to explore physical properties of materials. Just as conventional synchrotron radiation has been a boon to x-ray science, coherent synchrotron radiation may lead to many new innovations and discoveries in THz physics. With this new accelerator-based radiation source we have been able to extend traditional infrared measurements down into the experimentally poorly accessible sub-THz frequency range. The feasibility of using the coherent synchrotron radiation in scientific applications was demonstrated in a series of experiments: We investigated shallow single acceptor transitions in stressed and unstressed Ge:Ga by means of photoconductance measurements below 1 THz. We have directly measured the Josephson plasma resonance in optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} for the first time and finally we succeeded to confine the sub-THz radiation for spectral near-field imaging on biological samples such as leaves and human teeth.

  15. Synchrotron radiation, neutron, and mass spectrometry techniques at user facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, S. R.; Caffee, M. W.; Dove, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    User research facilities around the world offer tremendous opportunities for scientific experimentation by members of the Earth science community. Synchrotron radiation sources, neutron sources, mass spectrometers, and others represent a powerful force in tackling complex scientific problems. In these techniques, Earth materials are bombarded with beams of ions, subatomic particles and/or photons to learn the secr...

  16. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY. Scientific annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main event in 1993 was the commissioning start-up of DESY as synchrotron radiation source. The annual report covers activities in research (also DESY-Zeuthen), machinery, central data processing, development, and operation. There is much interest in international cooperation. (orig.)

  17. RF system of a synchrotron for protons and heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the potential and the constraints of producing many kilovolts of rf accelerating voltage for synchrotrons in a cumbersome board frequency range are reviewed from the electrical engineering standpoint. This paper elaborates on numbers and limits which determine cost and complexity of the rf system. (orig./HSI)

  18. Spatially Varying X-ray Synchrotron Emission in SN 1006

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, K K; Borkowski, K; Petre, R; Dyer, Kristy; Reynolds, Stephen P; Borkowski, Kazik; Petre, Rob

    2001-01-01

    A growing number of both galactic and extragalactic supernova remnants show non-thermal (non-plerionic) emission in the X-ray band. New synchrotron models, realized as SRESC and SRCUT in XSPEC 11, which use the radio spectral index and flux as inputs and include the full single-particle emissivity, have demonstrated that synchrotron emission is capable of producing the spectra of dominantly non-thermal supernova remnants with interesting consequences for residual thermal abundances and acceleration of particles. In addition, these models deliver a much better-constrained separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, whereas combining an unconstrained powerlaw with modern thermal models can produce a range of acceptable fits. While synchrotron emission can be approximated by a powerlaw over small ranges of energy, the synchrotron spectrum is in fact steepening over the X-ray band. Having demonstrated that the integrated spectrum of SN 1006, a remnant dominated by non-thermal emission, is well desc...

  19. Design of slow extraction system for therapy synchrotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-Quan; SONG Ming-Tao; WEI Bao-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Based on the optimized design of the lattice for therapy synchrotron and considering the requirement of radiation therapy,the third order resonant extraction is adopted.Using the momentum-amplitude selection method,the extraction system is designed and optimized.An extraction efficiency of more than 97%and a momentum spread less than 0.11%are obtained.

  20. Science minister puts French synchrotron back on the agenda

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The new French minister of Science has said that he would pursue plans to build a synchrotron in France, reversing the decision of his predecessor. He is still intending to participate in the British project Diamond though (1/2 page).