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Sample records for afterloading brachytherapy volume

  1. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science and Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  2. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error

  3. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Volume 2, Function and task analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A human factors project on the use of nuclear by-product material to treat cancer using remotely operated afterloaders was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the project was to identify factors that contribute to human error in the system for remote afterloading brachytherapy (RAB). This report documents the findings from the first phase of the project, which involved an extensive function and task analysis of RAB. This analysis identified the functions and tasks in RAB, made preliminary estimates of the likelihood of human error in each task, and determined the skills needed to perform each RAB task. The findings of the function and task analysis served as the foundation for the remainder of the project, which evaluated four major aspects of the RAB system linked to human error: human-system interfaces; procedures and practices; training and qualifications of RAB staff; and organizational practices and policies. At its completion, the project identified and prioritized areas for recommended NRC and industry attention based on all of the evaluations and analyses

  4. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Volume 2, Function and task analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, J.R.; Gwynne, J.W. III; Kelly, T.T.; Muckler, F.A. [Pacific Science and Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States); Saunders, W.M.; Lepage, R.P.; Chin, E. [University of California San Diego Medical Center, CA (United States). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Schoenfeld, I.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-05-01

    A human factors project on the use of nuclear by-product material to treat cancer using remotely operated afterloaders was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the project was to identify factors that contribute to human error in the system for remote afterloading brachytherapy (RAB). This report documents the findings from the first phase of the project, which involved an extensive function and task analysis of RAB. This analysis identified the functions and tasks in RAB, made preliminary estimates of the likelihood of human error in each task, and determined the skills needed to perform each RAB task. The findings of the function and task analysis served as the foundation for the remainder of the project, which evaluated four major aspects of the RAB system linked to human error: human-system interfaces; procedures and practices; training and qualifications of RAB staff; and organizational practices and policies. At its completion, the project identified and prioritized areas for recommended NRC and industry attention based on all of the evaluations and analyses.

  5. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  6. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  7. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy AMC EXPERIANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Gyong; Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyong; Yi, Byong Yong [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Remote afterloading high dose rate brachytherapy(HDRB) is a new technology and needs new biological principle for time and dose schedule. Here, authors attempt to evaluate the technique and clinical outcome in 116 patients, 590 procedures performed at Asan Medical Center for 3 years. From Sep. 1985 to Aug 1992, 471 procedures of intracavitary radiation in 55 patients of cervical cancer and 26 of nasopharyngeal cancer, 79 intraluminal radiation in 12 of esophageal cancer, 11 of endobronchial cancer and 1 Klatskin tumor and 40 interstitial brachytherapy in 4 of breast cancer, 1 sarcoma and 1 urethral cancer were performed. Median follow-up was 7 months with range 1-31 months. All procedures except interstitial were performed under the local anesthesia and they were all well tolerated and completed the planned therapy except 6 patients. 53/58 patients with cervical cancer and 22/26 patients with nasopharynx cancer achieved CR. Among 15 patients with palliative therapy, 80% achieves palliation. We will describe the details of the technique and results in the text. To evaluate biologic effects of HDRB and optimal time/dose/fractionation schedule, we need longer follow-up. But authors feel that HDRB with proper fractionation schedule may yield superior results compared to the low dose rate brachytherapy considering the advantages of HDRB in safety factor for operator, better control of radiation dose and volume and patients comfort over the low dose brachytherapy.

  8. Volume and dose rate dependent (MDR-LDR Ir-192 afterloading interstitial brachytherapy) treatment optimisation, for squamouscell carcinoma of the lip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: From 1/1/90 to 1/1/95, 53 patients with squamouscell carcinoma of the lip were treated by MDR or LDR Ir-192 afterloading interstitital brachytherapy. We compare the oncological and aesthetical results and sequelae depending on the volume and the dose rate. Material and methods: 53 patients, 41 men and 12 women, median age = 66y; 48 primary tumors (T1 = 26; T2 = 16; T3 = 6; N0 = 47; N1 = 1; M0 = 48) and 5 recurrencies; squamouscell carcinoma (grade 1 =45, g2 =6, g3 =2); clinical extension: buccal comissure=3, check =2, muscular =15, skin =7, lower and upper lip =1. Before radiotherapy, 28 biopsies and 25 excisional surgeries (19 with positive margins, 6 with negative margins) were performed. Brachytherapy was performed alone (dose 60-75 Gy BD85%) or as a boost (dose 10-30 Gy BD85%) associated with external beam (dose 46-50 Gy). MDR or LDR microselectron's afterloading was done after a computerised dosimetry (Paris System): treatment mean time = 30, 98 hours; mean volume = 10,2 cc (T1-T2 8, 61cc); Ir - 192 activity = range 0,7 - 4,792 mCi/cm; reference dose rate 45,6 - 290, 1 cGy/h. Results: 46 patients are alive without cancer, 1 died without responding, 6 died from non oncological diseases; 8 patients had recurrences (5 local, 3 nodal) but are alive. Mean follow-up 30,83 months (range 3-60m), mean DFS = 22,49 m (range 5-57m). Acute secondary effects: 30 radioepithelyties (grade 1 = 7, g2=23, g3=14), and 39 radiomucitis (g1=3; g2=23; g3=13); mean time for complete healing = 21, 66 days. Sequelae: moderate sclerosis of the skin =11, skin retraction = 1, hyperpigmentation2, depigmentation= 10, edema= 6, gingivitis= 7. Aesthetical results: good32; moderate= 18; bad= 2, very bad= 1 (uncontrolled tumor). Conclusions: The sequelae and aesthetical results are closely dependent on the treated volume and the dose rate, less dependent on the total dose, and independent on the Iridium activity. Complete healing time does not influence the late aesthetical results

  9. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Supporting analyses of human-system interfaces, procedures and practices, training and organizational practices and policies. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A human factors project on the use of nuclear by-product material to treat cancer using remotely operated afterloaders was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the project was to identify factors that contribute to human error in the system for remote afterloading brachytherapy (RAB). This report documents the findings from the second, third, fourth, and fifth phases of the project, which involved detailed analyses of four major aspects of the RAB system linked to human error: human-system interfaces; procedures and practices; training practices and policies; and organizational practices and policies, respectively. Findings based on these analyses provided factual and conceptual support for the final phase of this project, which identified factors leading to human error in RAB. The impact of those factors on RAB performance was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance, and alternative approaches for resolving safety significant problems were identified and evaluated

  10. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Supporting analyses of human-system interfaces, procedures and practices, training and organizational practices and policies. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science & Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    A human factors project on the use of nuclear by-product material to treat cancer using remotely operated afterloaders was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the project was to identify factors that contribute to human error in the system for remote afterloading brachytherapy (RAB). This report documents the findings from the second, third, fourth, and fifth phases of the project, which involved detailed analyses of four major aspects of the RAB system linked to human error: human-system interfaces; procedures and practices; training practices and policies; and organizational practices and policies, respectively. Findings based on these analyses provided factual and conceptual support for the final phase of this project, which identified factors leading to human error in RAB. The impact of those factors on RAB performance was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance, and alternative approaches for resolving safety significant problems were identified and evaluated.

  11. Real-time in vivo dosimetry and error detection during afterloading brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir

    Image guided afterloaded brachytherapy (BT) allows for conformal and patient specific radiotherapy (RT) treatments against cancer, where high dose concentrations are administered to the tumor volume and small doses to organs at risk (OARs). In afterloaded BT, ionizing radiation is delivered...... by means of a radionuclide attached to a source chain that is placed inside source catheters implanted in the target region. As for any RT treatment modality, BT treatments are subject to discrepancies between the delivered and planned treatments. Given the localized and high dose concentration near BT...... cervical cancer at the Aarhus University Hospital. The tools and methods developed for the implementation targeted requirements for accurate IVD and the demands for a time-efficient and straightforward clinical approach. The performance of all developments was explored based on IVD results for 20 PDR BT...

  12. A compilation of current regulations, standards and guidelines in remote afterloading brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P.; Simion, G.P.; Kozlowski, S.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Over a dozen government and professional organizations in the United States and Europe have issued regulations and guidance concerning quality management in the practice of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Information from the publications of these organizations was collected and collated for this report. This report provides the brachytherapy licensee access to a broad field of quality management information in a single, topically organized document.

  13. Reduction in radiation exposure to nursing personnel with the use of remote afterloading brachytherapy devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, P.W.; Perez, C.A.; Eichling, J.; Purdy, J.; Slessinger, E. (Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The radiation exposure to nursing personnel from patients with brachytherapy implants on a large brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposure to nurses, as determined by TLD monitors, indicates a 7-fold reduction in exposure after the implementation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for six quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the nurses of 152 and 154 mrem (1.5 mSv). After the implementation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per nurse of 23 and 19 mrem (0.2 mSv). This is an 87% reduction in exposure to nurses with the use of these devices (p less than 0.01).

  14. Reduction in radiation exposure to nursing personnel with the use of remote afterloading brachytherapy devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation exposure to nursing personnel from patients with brachytherapy implants on a large brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposure to nurses, as determined by TLD monitors, indicates a 7-fold reduction in exposure after the implementation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for six quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the nurses of 152 and 154 mrem (1.5 mSv). After the implementation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per nurse of 23 and 19 mrem (0.2 mSv). This is an 87% reduction in exposure to nurses with the use of these devices (p less than 0.01)

  15. A new afterloading-applicator for primary brachytherapy of endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented is a new afterloading applicator used for primary brachytherapy of endometrial cancer. The advantages: The afterloading applicator holds six afterloading tubes which bundled together in a cover. After the cover is pulled back, the individual tubes expand as a result of the sleeve shape and of the inherent stress of the plastic material used and make direct contact with the endometrium and with the tumor. The applicator is 8 mm in diameter which means that the cervix has to be dilated to Hegar 8 or 9. Radiation planning is done on the basis of orthogonal localisation X-rays or MR. The newly designed applicator can be used for both HDR and LDR afterloading procedures. We have clinical experiences in 42 applications. (orig.)

  16. A new afterloading-applicator for primary brachytherapy of endometrial cancer. First clinical experiences. Neuentwicklung eines Afterloading-Applikators zur primaeren Behandlung des Endometriumkarzinoms. Erster klinischer Erfahrungsbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, M.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Richard, F. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Gynaekologische Radiologie); Hooft, E. van t' (Nucletron, Leersum (Netherlands))

    1991-09-01

    Presented is a new afterloading applicator used for primary brachytherapy of endometrial cancer. The advantages: The afterloading applicator holds six afterloading tubes which bundled together in a cover. After the cover is pulled back, the individual tubes expand as a result of the sleeve shape and of the inherent stress of the plastic material used and make direct contact with the endometrium and with the tumor. The applicator is 8 mm in diameter which means that the cervix has to be dilated to Hegar 8 or 9. Radiation planning is done on the basis of orthogonal localisation X-rays or MR. The newly designed applicator can be used for both HDR and LDR afterloading procedures. We have clinical experiences in 42 applications. (orig.).

  17. Radiological safety problems in intracavitary brachytherapy using the manual afterloading in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In three venezuelan public hospitals it was detected radioactive contamination for Cs-137 during inspection with the wipe test technique in areas where is applied intracavitary brachytherapy using manual afterloading. This caused a condition of great stress in the personal engaged the treatments. In each Cs-137 source in these hospitals was tested leakage. The source plastic holder was analysed. The authors were able to demonstrate: a) The radioactive contamination found in the treatment area had its origin in the Cs-137 capsule corrosion and b) The corrosion in the source capsule was produced by the radiolytic degradation of the PVC tube used as source-holder in the intracavitary treatments. (authors). 3 refs., 1 tab

  18. Poster — Thur Eve — 40: Automated Quality Assurance for Remote-Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Anthony; Ravi, Ananth [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre/Odette Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy involves sending a small, high-activity radioactive source attached to a cable to different positions within a hollow applicator implanted in the patient. It is critical that the source position within the applicator and the dwell time of the source are accurate. Daily quality assurance (QA) tests of the positional and dwell time accuracy are essential to ensure that the accuracy of the remote afterloader is not compromised prior to patient treatment. Our centre has developed an automated, video-based QA system for HDR brachytherapy that is dramatically superior to existing diode or film QA solutions in terms of cost, objectivity, positional accuracy, with additional functionalities such as being able to determine source dwell time and transit time of the source. In our system, a video is taken of the brachytherapy source as it is sent out through a position check ruler, with the source visible through a clear window. Using a proprietary image analysis algorithm, the source position is determined with respect to time as it moves to different positions along the check ruler. The total material cost of the video-based system was under $20, consisting of a commercial webcam and adjustable stand. The accuracy of the position measurement is ±0.2 mm, and the time resolution is 30 msec. Additionally, our system is capable of robustly verifying the source transit time and velocity (a test required by the AAPM and CPQR recommendations), which is currently difficult to perform accurately.

  19. Poster — Thur Eve — 40: Automated Quality Assurance for Remote-Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy involves sending a small, high-activity radioactive source attached to a cable to different positions within a hollow applicator implanted in the patient. It is critical that the source position within the applicator and the dwell time of the source are accurate. Daily quality assurance (QA) tests of the positional and dwell time accuracy are essential to ensure that the accuracy of the remote afterloader is not compromised prior to patient treatment. Our centre has developed an automated, video-based QA system for HDR brachytherapy that is dramatically superior to existing diode or film QA solutions in terms of cost, objectivity, positional accuracy, with additional functionalities such as being able to determine source dwell time and transit time of the source. In our system, a video is taken of the brachytherapy source as it is sent out through a position check ruler, with the source visible through a clear window. Using a proprietary image analysis algorithm, the source position is determined with respect to time as it moves to different positions along the check ruler. The total material cost of the video-based system was under $20, consisting of a commercial webcam and adjustable stand. The accuracy of the position measurement is ±0.2 mm, and the time resolution is 30 msec. Additionally, our system is capable of robustly verifying the source transit time and velocity (a test required by the AAPM and CPQR recommendations), which is currently difficult to perform accurately

  20. Implementation of 'early alert system' area detector at patient from entrance in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of area monitors to detect the involuntary exit of the radiation sources used in low dose rate deferred brachytherapy treatment is being implemented in all facilities in Chile. The first implementation of this system, named 'Early Alert', was 5 years ago as a complement to the administrative procedures and verification measures by the medical physics carried out through visual verifications and by means of portable radiation detectors. This detector of the system should be located preferentially at the exit of the treatment room at a height not smaller than two meters. This has resulted in an increase of facilities safety in this practice. (author)

  1. Identifying afterloading PDR and HDR brachytherapy errors using real-time fiber-coupled Al2O3:C dosimetry and a novel statistical error decision criterion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Andersen, Claus Erik; Siebert, Frank-André;

    2011-01-01

    treatment errors, including interchanged pairs of afterloader guide tubes and 2–20mm source displacements, were monitored using a real-time fiber-coupled carbon doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C) crystal dosimeter that was positioned in the reconstructed tumor region. The error detection capacity was evaluated...... and position uncertainty 1–4mm). ResultsOut of 20 interchanged guide tube errors, time-resolved analysis identified 17 while fraction level analysis identified two. Channel and fraction level comparisons could leave 10mm dosimeter displacement errors unidentified. Dwell position dose rate comparisons correctly...... identified displacements ⩾5mm. ConclusionThis phantom study demonstrates that Al2O3:C real-time dosimetry can identify applicator displacements ⩾5mm and interchanged guide tube errors during PDR and HDR brachytherapy. The study demonstrates the shortcoming of a constant error criterion and the advantage...

  2. Effects of Endovascular Brachytherapy with 192Ir Afterloading System on Expression of Type Ⅰ Collagen after Angioplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向定成; 杨传红; 候友贤; 龚志华; 易绍东; 邱建

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To investi-gate the effect and mechanism of endovascularbrachytherapy with 192Ir on expression of type Ⅰ collagen, metalloproteinases - 1 (MMP - 1) and the tissueinhibitor (TIMP- 1 ) after angioplasty. MethodsRestenotic model of domestic microswine was em-ployed and the iliac arteries were randomized to radi-ation group ( n = 12), which were treated with 20 ~ 25Gy of 192Ir, and non - radiation group ( n = 36) afterangioplasty. The target vessels were harvested in theend of 3 months and 6 months after angioplasty. Im-munohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were usedto detect proteins of type Ⅰ collagen, MMP-1 andTIMP- 1, and mRNA expression of type Ⅰ collagen.Results The protein and mRNA of type Ⅰ collagen,the ratios of TIMP-1/MMP-1 were significantlylower iu radiation group than in non- radiation group( P < 0.05 or 0.01 ). The peak of transcription of typeⅠ collagen mRNA was at 6 months and 3 months in non-radiation group and radiation group respectively.Conclusions Endovascular brachytherapy with192Ir might modify the metabolism of extracellular ma-trix after angioplasty by inhibiting the synthesis of typeⅠ collagen and the activities of MMP - 1 and TIMP - 1.

  3. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  4. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Tozer-Loft, S M

    2000-01-01

    compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising, but significant association with outcome. A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy i...

  5. [Brachytherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  6. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozer-Loft, S.M

    2000-12-01

    A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy is explained in detail, and some improvements proposed. These 'natural' histograms are extended to show the effects of real point sources which do not exactly follow the inverse-square law, and to demonstrate the in-target dose-volume distribution, previously unpublished. The histograms are used as a way of mathematically analysing the properties of theoretical mono-energetic radionuclides, and for demonstrating the dosimetric properties of a potential new brachytherapy source (Ytterbium-169). A new modification of the Anderson formalism is then described for producing Anderson Inverse-Square Shifted (AISS) histograms for the Gamma Knife, which are shown to be useful for demonstrating the quality of stereotactic radiosurgery dose distributions. A study is performed analysing the results of Gamma Knife treatments on 44 patients suffering from a benign brain tumour (acoustic neuroma). Follow-up data is used to estimate the volume shrinkage or growth of each tumour, and this measure of outcome is compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising

  7. Time, dose and volume factors in interstitial brachytherapy combined with external irradiation for oral tongue carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorozu, Atsunori [National Tokyo Second Hospital (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 136 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of stages I and II of the oral tongue who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy alone or in combination with external irradiation between 1976 and 1991. Control of the primary lesion and the occurrence of late complications were analyzed with respect to dose, time and tumor size with the Cox hazard model. The 5-year survival rates for stages I and II were 84.5% and 75.6%. The 5-year primary control rate was 91.3% for stage I and 77.3% for stage II (p<0.05). Local control and survival rates were comparable with those of other modalities. The significant factor in local control was stage. For lesions more than 30 mm in diameter, local control was rather poor in the group given only brachytherapy compared with the group given combined therapy. After 30 Gy of external irradiation, local control was better at a brachytherapy dose >50 Gy compared with a brachytherapy dose <=50 Gy. Mucosal ulcer occurred frequently with increasing total dose and tumor volume. Bone necrosis increased significantly with increasing external irradiation dose. We suggest that external irradiation of 30 Gy followed by brachytherapy of 52 Gy is a better choice for T2 lesions >30 mm. Late complications should be reduced by using a spacer, improvements in dental and oral hygiene, and a sophisticated implant method. (author).

  8. Automated planning volume definition in soft-tissue sarcoma adjuvant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In current practice, the planning volume for adjuvant brachytherapy treatment for soft-tissue sarcoma is either not determined a priori (in this case, seed locations are selected based on isodose curves conforming to a visual estimate of the planning volume), or it is derived via a tedious manual process. In either case, the process is subjective and time consuming, and is highly dependent on the human planner. The focus of the work described herein involves the development of an automated contouring algorithm to outline the planning volume. Such an automatic procedure will save time and provide a consistent and objective method for determining planning volumes. In addition, a definitive representation of the planning volume will allow for sophisticated brachytherapy treatment planning approaches to be applied when designing treatment plans, so as to maximize local tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. An automated tumour volume contouring algorithm is developed utilizing computational geometry and numerical interpolation techniques in conjunction with an artificial intelligence method. The target volume is defined to be the slab of tissue r cm perpendicularly away from the curvilinear plane defined by the mesh of catheters. We assume that if adjacent catheters are over 2r cm apart, the tissue between the two catheters is part of the tumour bed. Input data consist of the digitized coordinates of the catheter positions in each of several cross-sectional slices of the tumour bed, and the estimated distance r from the catheters to the tumour surface. Mathematically, one can view the planning volume as the volume enclosed within a minimal smoothly-connected surface which contains a set of circles, each circle centred at a given catheter position in a given cross-sectional slice. The algorithm performs local interpolation on consecutive triplets of circles. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated based on its performance on a collection of

  9. Addendum to brachytherapy dose-volume histogram commissioning with multiple planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossman, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The process for validating dose-volume histogram data in brachytherapy software is presented as a supplement to a previously published article. Included is the DVH accuracy evaluation of the Best NOMOS treatment planning system called "Best TPS VolumePlan." As done previously in other software, a rectangular cuboid was contoured in the treatment planning system. A single radioactive 125I source was positioned coplanar and concentric with one end. Calculations were performed to estimate dose deposition in partial volumes of the cuboid structure, using the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism defined in AAPM Task Group 43. Hand-calculated, dose-volume results were compared to TPS-generated, point-source-approximated dose-volume histogram data to establish acceptance. The required QA for commissioning was satisfied for the DVH as conducted previously for other software, using the criterion that the DVH %VolTPS "actual variance" calculations should differ by no more than 5% at any specific radial distance with respect to %VolTG-43, and the "average variance" DVH %VolTPS calculations should differ by no more than 2% over all radial distances with respect to %VolTG-43. The average disagreement observed between hand calculations and treatment planning system DVH was less than 0.5% on average for this treatment planning system and less than 1.1% maximally for 1 ≤ r ≤ 5 cm. PMID:27167288

  10. Brachytherapy applications and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Written by the foremost experts in the field, this volume is a comprehensive text and practical reference on contemporary brachytherapy. The book provides detailed, site-specific information on applications and techniques of brachytherapy in the head and neck, central nervous system, breast, thorax, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract, as well as on gynecologic brachytherapy, low dose rate and high dose rate sarcoma brachytherapy, vascular brachytherapy, and pediatric applications. The book thoroughly describes and compares the four major techniques used in brachytherapy-intraca

  11. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  12. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Lucas Castro; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Guimarães, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues; Ramos, Clarissa Cerchi Angotti; de Paula, Lucas Assad; de Sales, Camila Pessoa; Chen, André Tsin Chih; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were acquired at diagnosis (D), first (B1), and third (B3) brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV) were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE) and MRI contouring (VC), which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20%) was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation. PMID:27648083

  13. High-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy inverse planning on dose-volume criteria by simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deist, T M; Gorissen, B L

    2016-02-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy is a tumor treatment method where a highly radioactive source is brought in close proximity to the tumor. In this paper we develop a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the dwell times at preselected dwell positions to maximize tumor coverage under dose-volume constraints on the organs at risk. Compared to existing algorithms, our algorithm has advantages in terms of speed and objective value and does not require an expensive general purpose solver. Its success mainly depends on exploiting the efficiency of matrix multiplication and a careful selection of the neighboring states. In this paper we outline its details and make an in-depth comparison with existing methods using real patient data. PMID:26760757

  14. Preimplant factors affecting postimplant CT-determined prostate volume and the CT/TRUS volume ratio after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with 125I free seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim was to identify preimplant factors affecting postimplant prostate volume and the increase in prostate volume after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with 125I free seeds. We reviewed the records of 180 patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy with 125I free seeds for clinical T1/T2 prostate cancer. Eighty-one (45%) of the 180 patients underwent neoadjuvant hormonal therapy. No patient received supplemental external beam radiotherapy. Postimplant computed tomography was undertaken, and postimplant dosimetric analysis was performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify preimplant factors affecting postimplant prostate volume by computed tomography and the increase in prostate volume after implantation. Preimplant prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, serum prostate-specific antigen, number of needles, and number of seeds implanted were significantly correlated with postimplant prostate volume by computed tomography. The increase in prostate volume after implantation was significantly higher in patients with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy than in those without. Preimplant prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, number of needles, and number of seeds implanted were significantly correlated with the increase in prostate volume after implantation. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that preimplant prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound and neoadjuvant hormonal therapy were significant independent factors affecting both postimplant prostate volume by computed tomography and the increase in prostate volume after implantation. The results of the present study show that preimplant prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound and neoadjuvant hormonal therapy are significant preimplant factors affecting both postimplant prostate volume by computed tomography and the increase in prostate volume after implantation

  15. Narrow safety range of intraoperative rectal irradiation exposure volume for avoiding bleeding after seed implant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectal toxicity is less common after 125I seed implant brachytherapy for prostate cancer, and intraoperative rectal dose-volume constraints (the constraint) is still undetermined in pioneering studies. As our constraint failed to prevent grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding (bled-pts) in 5.1% of patients, we retrospectively explored another constraint for the prevention of rectal bleeding. The study population consisted of 197 patients treated with the brachytherapy as monotherapy using real-time intraoperative transrectal ultrasound (US)-guided treatment at a prescribed dose of 145 Gy. Post-implant dosimetry was performed on Day 1 and Day 30 after implantation using computed tomography (CT) imaging. Rectal bleeding toxicity was classified by CTC-AE ver. 3.0 during a mean 29-month (range, 12-48 months) period after implantation. The differences in rV100s were compared among intraoperative, Day 1 and Day 30 dosimetry, and between that of patients with grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding (the bled-pts) and of the others (the spared-pts). All patients were divided into groups based on provisional rV100s that were increased stepwise in 0.1-cc increments from 0 to 1.0 cc. The difference in the ratios of the bled-pts to the spared-pts was tested by chi-square tests, and their odds ratios were calculated (bled-OR). All statistical analyses were performed by t-tests. The mean values of rV100us, rV100CT-1, and rV100CT-30 were 0.31 ± 0.43, 0.22 ± 0.36, and 0.59 ± 0.68 cc, respectively. These values temporarily decreased (p = 0.020) on Day 1 and increased (p = 0.000) on Day 30. There was no significant difference in rV100s between the bled-pts and spared-pts at any time of dosimetry. The maximum bled-OR was identified among patients with an rV100us value above 0.1 cc (p = 0.025; OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.4-145.8); an rV100CT-1 value above 0.3 cc (p = 0.014; OR = 16.2; 95% CI, 3.9-110.7), and an rV100CT-30 value above 0.5 cc (p = 0.019; OR = 6.3; 95% CI, 1.5-42.3). By retrospective analysis

  16. Assessment of dose-volume histograms in brachytherapy 3D high-rate; Evaluacion de los histogramas dosis volumen en braquiterapia de alta tasa 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Tripero Oter, J.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    The use of systems of treatment planning using 3D reconstruction algorithms are becoming more frequent in brachytherapy treatments. The implementation of these systems entails great qualitative and quantitative procedural changes in the way to evaluate the clinical dosimetry about the 2D classical systems. This paper describes the experience of our Centre in employment and prescription dose using histograms dose-volume in the treatment of brachytherapy of high rate. (Author)

  17. Evaluation of two intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices for irradiating additional and irregularly shaped volumes of breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Sharon M., E-mail: sharonlu@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies (CART), University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Barna, Patrick; Yashar, William; Yashar, Catheryn [Department of Radiation Oncology and Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies (CART), University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The SAVI and Contura breast brachytherapy applicators represent 2 recent advancements in brachytherapy technology that have expanded the number of women eligible for accelerated partial breast irradiation in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Early clinical experience with these 2 single-entry, multichannel high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices confirms their ease of use and dosimetric versatility. However, current clinical guidelines for SAVI and Contura brachytherapy may result in a smaller or less optimal volume of treated tissue compared with traditional interstitial brachytherapy. This study evaluates the feasibility of using the SAVI and Contura to irradiate larger and irregularly shaped target volumes, approaching what is treatable with the interstitial technique. To investigate whether additional tissue can be treated, 17 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected. For each patient, the planning target volume (PTV) was modified to extend 1.1 cm, 1.3 cm, and 1.5 cm beyond the tumor bed cavity. To evaluate dose conformance to an irregularly shaped target volume, 9 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected from the original 20 patients. The following asymmetric PTV margin combinations were assessed for each patient: 1.5/0.3, 1.3/0.3, and 1.1/0.3 cm. For all patients, treatment planning was performed, adopting the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project guidelines, and dosimetric comparisons were made. The 6-1 and 8-1 SAVI devices can theoretically treat a maximal tissue margin of 1.5 cm and an asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 cm. The 10-1 SAVI and Contura can treat a maximal margin of 1.3 cm and 1.1 cm, respectively, and asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3-1.3 cm. Compared with the Contura, the SAVI demonstrated greater dosimetric flexibility. Risk of developing excessive hot spots increased with the size of the SAVI device. Both the SAVI and Contura appear

  18. Asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: It is important to reduce fluence map complexity in rotating-shield brachytherapy (RSBT) inverse planning to improve delivery efficiency while maintaining plan quality. This study proposes an efficient and effective RSBT dose optimization method which enables to produce smooth fluence maps. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients each with a high-risk clinical-target-volume (HR-CTV) larger than 40 cm{sup 3} were considered as the test cases. The RSBT source was a partially shielded electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The anchor RSBT plans generated by the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control (ADOS) method were compared against those produced by the dose–surface optimization (DSO) method and inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA). Either L{sub 1}-norm or L{sub 2}-norm was used to measure the smoothness of a fluence map in the proposed ADOS method as one weighted term of the objective function. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that HR-CTV D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. The quality of the anchor plans was measured with HR-CTV D{sub 90} of the anchor plans. Single-shielded RSBT [(S-RSBT), RSBT with single, fix sized delivery window] and dynamic-sheilded RSBT [(D-RSBT), RSBT with dynamically varying sized delivery window] delivery plans generated based on the anchor plans were also measured, with delivery time constraints of 10, 20, and 30 min/fraction (fx). Results: The average HR-CTV D{sub 90} values of the anchor plans achieved by the ADOS, DSO, and IPSA methods were 111.5, 94.2, and 107.4 Gy, respectively, where the weighting parameter β used in ADOS with L{sub 2}-norm was set to be 100. By using S-RSBT sequencing and 20 min/fx delivery time, the corresponding D{sub 90} values were 88.8, 81.9, and 83.4 Gy; while using D-RSBT sequencing with 20 min/fx delivery time, the corresponding D{sub 90} values were

  19. SU-E-T-546: Use of Implant Volume for Quality Assurance of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, D; Kolar, M [Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the application of volume implant (V100) data as a method for a global check of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy plans. Methods: Treatment plans for 335 consecutive patients undergoing permanent seed implants for prostate cancer and for 113 patients treated with plaque therapy for ocular melanoma were analyzed. Plaques used were 54 COMS (10 to 20 mm, notched and regular) and 59 Eye Physics EP917s with variable loading. Plots of treatment time x implanted activity per unit dose versus v100 ^.667 were made. V100 values were obtained using dose volume histograms calculated by the treatment planning systems (Variseed 8.02 and Plaque Simulator 5.4). Four different physicists were involved in planning the prostate seed cases; two physicists for the eye plaques. Results: Since the time and dose for the prostate cases did not vary, a plot of implanted activity vs V100 ^.667 was made. A linear fit with no intercept had an r{sup 2} = 0.978; more than 94% of the actual activities fell within 5% of the activities calculated from the linear fit. The greatest deviations were in cases where the implant volumes were large (> 100 cc). Both COMS and EP917 plaque linear fits were good (r{sup 2} = .967 and .957); the largest deviations were seen for large volumes. Conclusions: The method outlined here is effective for checking planning consistency and quality assurance of two types of LDR brachytherapy treatment plans (temporary and permanent). A spreadsheet for the calculations enables a quick check of the plan in situations were time is short (e.g. OR-based prostate planning)

  20. SU-E-T-546: Use of Implant Volume for Quality Assurance of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the application of volume implant (V100) data as a method for a global check of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy plans. Methods: Treatment plans for 335 consecutive patients undergoing permanent seed implants for prostate cancer and for 113 patients treated with plaque therapy for ocular melanoma were analyzed. Plaques used were 54 COMS (10 to 20 mm, notched and regular) and 59 Eye Physics EP917s with variable loading. Plots of treatment time x implanted activity per unit dose versus v100 ^.667 were made. V100 values were obtained using dose volume histograms calculated by the treatment planning systems (Variseed 8.02 and Plaque Simulator 5.4). Four different physicists were involved in planning the prostate seed cases; two physicists for the eye plaques. Results: Since the time and dose for the prostate cases did not vary, a plot of implanted activity vs V100 ^.667 was made. A linear fit with no intercept had an r2 = 0.978; more than 94% of the actual activities fell within 5% of the activities calculated from the linear fit. The greatest deviations were in cases where the implant volumes were large (> 100 cc). Both COMS and EP917 plaque linear fits were good (r2 = .967 and .957); the largest deviations were seen for large volumes. Conclusions: The method outlined here is effective for checking planning consistency and quality assurance of two types of LDR brachytherapy treatment plans (temporary and permanent). A spreadsheet for the calculations enables a quick check of the plan in situations were time is short (e.g. OR-based prostate planning)

  1. Time, dose and volume factors in interstitial brachytherapy combined with external irradiation for oral tongue carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a retrospective analysis of 136 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of stages I and II of the oral tongue who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy alone or in combination with external irradiation between 1976 and 1991. Control of the primary lesion and the occurrence of late complications were analyzed with respect to dose, time and tumor size with the Cox hazard model. The 5-year survival rates for stages I and II were 84.5% and 75.6%. The 5-year primary control rate was 91.3% for stage I and 77.3% for stage II (p50 Gy compared with a brachytherapy dose 30 mm. Late complications should be reduced by using a spacer, improvements in dental and oral hygiene, and a sophisticated implant method. (author)

  2. Apparent diffusion coefficients in GEC ESTRO target volumes for image guided adaptive brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haack, Soeren (Dept. of Clinical Engineering, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)), E-mail: Soeren.haack@stab.rm.dk; Morre Pedersen, Erik (Dept. of Radiology, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Jespersen, Sune N. (Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Kallehauge, Jesper F. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari (Dept. of Oncology Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    Background and purpose. T2 weighted MRI is recommended for image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) in cervical cancer. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and the derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) may add additional biological information on tumour cell density. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of the ADC within target volumes as recommended by GEC-ESTRO: Gross Tumour Volume at BT (GTVBT), High-Risk Clinical Tumour Volume (HR-CTV) and Intermediate-Risk Clinical Target Volume (IR-CTV) and to evaluate the change of diffusion between fractions of IGABT. Material and methods. Fifteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were examined by MRI before their first (BT1) and second (BT2) fraction of IGABT, resulting in a total of 30 MR examinations including both T2 weighted and DWI sequences. The Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) was calculated by use of three levels of b-values (0, 600, 1000 s/mm2). ADC maps were constructed and fused with the GEC ESTRO target contours. The mean ADC value within each target volume was calculated. Furthermore, volumes of low diffusion (ADClow) were defined based on an ADC threshold of 1.2 x 10-3 mm2/s, and overlap with target volumes was evaluated. Change of ADC level in target volumes and change of ADClow volume from BT1 to BT2 was also evaluated. Results. The mean ADC was significantly lower in GTVBT than in HR-CTV (p<0.001) which again was significantly lower than in IR-CTV (p<0.001). There was no significant change of the ADClow volume or ADC level within each target structure between BT1 and BT2 (p=0.242). All three GEC-ESTRO volumes contained volumes with low diffusion. The GTVBT contained 37.2% volume of low diffusion, HR-CTV 20.3% and IR-CTV 10.8%. Conclusion. With DWI we were able to find a significant difference in ADC-values for the three different GEC ESTRO targets. This supports the assumption that the target volumes used for dose prescription in IGABT contain tissues with

  3. CT based three dimensional dose-volume evaluations for high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, high risk clinical target volumes (HR-CTVs) according to GEC-ESTRO guideline were contoured retrospectively based on CT images taken at the time of high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) and correlation between clinical outcome and dose of HR-CTV were analyzed. Methods Our study population consists of 51 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 50 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) using central shield combined with 2–5 times of 6 Gy HDR-ICBT with or without weekly cisplatin. Dose calculation was based on Manchester system and prescribed dose of 6 Gy were delivered for point A. CT images taken at the time of each HDR-ICBT were reviewed and HR-CTVs were contoured. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy). Results Three-year overall survival, Progression-free survival, and local control rate was 82.4%, 85.3% and 91.7%, respectively. Median cumulative dose of HR-CTV D90 was 65.0 Gy (52.7-101.7 Gy). Median length from tandem to the most lateral edge of HR-CTV at the first ICBT was 29.2 mm (range, 18.0-51.9 mm). On univariate analysis, both LCR and PFS was significantly favorable in those patients D90 for HR-CTV was 60 Gy or greater (p = 0.001 and 0.03, respectively). PFS was significantly favorable in those patients maximum length from tandem to edge of HR-CTV at first ICBT was shorter than 3.5 cm (p = 0.042). Conclusion Volume-dose showed a relationship to the clinical outcome in CT based brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. PMID:24938757

  4. [Risk factors of late complications after interstitial 192Ir brachytherapy in cancers of the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffert, D

    1997-01-01

    Brachytherapy has confirmed its prevailing role in conservative treatment of oral cavity carcinomas. To describe late toxicity in long-term surviving patients, comparisons with other series are necessary. Study of series of patients implanted for floor of the mouth or mobile tongue shows the need for more detailed data. Dental prophylaxy and lead protection of the mandibule, good indications and techniques of brachytherapy are necessary to avoid late complications. Some treatment factors have proved to be of good prognosis for late complications through multivariate analysis of large series treated with lr 192 wires, using the Paris system, eg, dose rate lower than 0.5 or 0.7 Gy/h, intersource spacing smaller than 1.2 or 1.5 cm, treated surface less than 12 cm2, lineic activity less than 1.5 mCi/cm, less than 1 cm diameter hyperdose, and use of mandibular lead protections. Tumor volume and location to the floor of mouth lead to higher risk of complications. Knowledge of treatment-related factors is important, with the development of new afterloading projectors allowing to control the dose rate and correct small inhomogeneities. High-dose rate exclusive brachytherapy is not recommended. More precise and reproducible classification should be used to report complications in series leading to publications in the future, thus allowing to compare results, reduce complication rates and improve the quality of life.

  5. SU-E-T-634: Analysis of Volume Based GYN HDR Brachytherapy Plans for Dose Calculation to Organs At Risk(OAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, M; Li, C; White, M; Davis, J [Joe Arrington Cancer Center, Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have analyzed the dose volume histogram of 140 CT based HDR brachytherapy plans and evaluated the dose received to OAR ; rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon based on recommendations from ICRU and Image guided brachytherapy working group for cervical cancer . Methods: Our treatment protocol consist of XRT to whole pelvis with 45 Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction followed by 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction by HDR brachytherapy in 2 weeks . The CT compatible tandem and ovoid applicators were used and stabilized with radio opaque packing material. The patient was stabilized using special re-locatable implant table and stirrups for reproducibility of the geometry during treatment. The CT scan images were taken at 3mm slice thickness and exported to the treatment planning computer. The OAR structures, bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon were outlined on the images along with the applicators. The prescription dose was targeted to A left and A right as defined in Manchester system and optimized on geometry . The dosimetry was compared on all plans using the parameter Ci.sec.cGy-1 . Using the Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) obtained from the plans the doses to rectum, sigmoid colon and bladder for ICRU defined points and 2cc volume were analyzed and reported. The following criteria were used for limiting the tolerance dose by volume (D2cc) were calculated. The rectum and sigmoid colon doses were limited to <75Gy. The bladder dose was limited to < 90Gy from both XRT and HDR brachytherapy. Results: The average total (XRT+HDRBT) BED values to prescription volume was 120 Gy. Dose 2cc to rectum was 70Gy +/− 17Gy, dose to 2cc bladder was 82+/−32 Gy. The average Ci.sec.cGy-1 calculated for the HDR plans was 6.99 +/− 0.5 Conclusion: The image based treatment planning enabled to evaluati volume based dose to critical structures for clinical interpretation.

  6. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  7. Image guided Brachytherapy: The paradigm of Gynecologic and Partial Breast HDR Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulos, S.; Kantemiris, I.; Konidari, A.; Zaverdinos, P.

    2015-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses high strength radioactive sources and temporary interstitial implants to conform the dose to target and minimize the treatment time. The advances of imaging technology enable accurate reconstruction of the implant and exact delineation of high-risk CTV and the surrounding critical structures. Furthermore, with sophisticated treatment planning systems, applicator devices and stepping source afterloaders, brachytherapy evolved to a more precise, safe and individualized treatment. At the Radiation Oncology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Athens, MRI guided HDR gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy are performed routinely. Contouring and treatment planning are based on the recommendations of the GEC - ESTRO Working group. The task of this presentation is to reveal the advantages of 3D image guided brachytherapy over 2D brachytherapy. Thus, two patients treated at our department (one GYN and one APBI) will be presented. The advantage of having adequate dose coverage of the high risk CTV and simultaneous low doses to the OARs when using 3D image- based brachytherapy will be presented. The treatment techniques, equipment issues, as well as implantation, imaging and treatment planning procedures will be described. Quality assurance checks will be treated separately.

  8. Radiological protection of patients in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The prefix 'brachy' means short-range, so brachytherapy is the administration of radiation therapy using small radioactive sources in the form of needles, tubes, wires or seeds, which are placed within the tumor -interstitial form- or very near of it, superficially or in an endo-cavity form. This technique, which was limited by the size of the primary tumor, has the advantage, that the radiation, can be adjusted to the size and shape of the tumor volume and the radioisotope used, - short range -, is selected with the criteria of getting the dose in the organs at risk, as low as possible, making what it is known as conformal radiotherapy. Radioactive sources may be permanent or temporary implants. The application of radioactive material, can be manually or automatically. In the first case, a major breakthrough from the radioprotection point of view, was the use of afterloading devices, methodology highly recommended to reduce the radiation exposure to staff. With the development of technology, remotely controlled afterloading devices were introduced, which in addition to complying with the above requirement, allow the source to move in different positions along catheters housed in one or more channels, making therapeutic brachytherapy treatments in tumor volumes possible, that due to its length, decades ago would have been an unthinkable deal. In all cases, sources, which may vary from the 3 mm in length, 125 Iodine or 198 Gold seeds, to extensive wires of 192 Iridium, are encapsulated for two main purposes: preventing leakage of radioactive material and absorption of unwanted radiation, alpha and beta, produced by the radioactive decay. Consequently, it should be highly unlikely that the radioactive material, could be lost or located in the patient, in a different place of the one that was planned. However, history shows us the opposite. Its is known the kind of deterministic effect that radiation is going to produce in the tumor, where the severity of

  9. Three-dimensional brachytherapy optimization techniques in the treatment of patients with cervix cancer; Apport des techniques de curietherapie optimisee grace a l'imagerie tridimensionnelle dans la prise en charge des patientes atteintes d'un cancer du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haie-Meder, C.; Mazeron, R.; Verezesan, O.; Monnier, L.; Vieillot, S. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Curietherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Dumas, I. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Physique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Lhomme, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service d' Ooncologie Gynecologique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Morice, P. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Chirurgie Oncologique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Barillot, I. [Centre Regional Universitaire de Cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, Hopital Bretonneau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, 37 - Tours (France)

    2009-10-15

    Traditionally, prescription and treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer have used either reference points (mainly points A and B) or reference isodoses (60 Gy according to ICRU recommendations) to report doses to the target volume. Doses to critical organs were reported at bladder and rectum ICRU points. This practice has been supported by a long-standing clinical experience that has yielded an acceptable therapeutic ratio. The recent development of imaging has contributed to the improvement in target and organs at risk knowledge. In 2005 and 2006, the European group of brachytherapy -European Society for therapeutic radiology and oncology (GEC-E.S.T.R.O.) recommendations publications on 3-D based image brachytherapy have defined the different volumes of interest. These recommendations have been validated with intercomparison delineation studies. With the concomitant development of remote after-loading projectors, provided with miniaturized sources, it is now possible to plan radiation doses by adjusting dwell positions and relative dwell time values. These procedures allow better coverage of the targets while sparing O.A.R.. The recent literature data evidence a significant improvement in local control with no increase in complications. Further studies are needed to better define the dose recommended in both tumour and organs at risk. This is one of the goals of the European study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (E.M.B.R.A.C.E.) protocol (meaning of acronym: an international study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer). (authors)

  10. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Erickson, Beth [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Beriwal, Sushil [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bhatia, Sudershan K. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lee Burnett, Omer [University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); D' Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh [London Health Sciences Centre and Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Haddock, Michael G. [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Ellen L. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Lee, Larissa J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Lilie L. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mayr, Nina A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petric, Primoz [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Loyola University Strich School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  11. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  12. Dose-volume parameters and clinical outcome of CT-guided freehand high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Wang; Wei-Jun Ye; Le-Hui Du; Ai-Ju Li; Yu-Feng Ren; Xin-Ping Cao

    2012-01-01

    Currently,image-based 3-dimentional (3D) planning brachytherapy allows for a better assessment of gross tumor volume (GTV) and the definition and delineation of target volume in cervix cancer.In this study,we investigated the feasibility of our novel computed tomography (CT)-guided free-hand high-doserate interstitial brachytherapy (HDRISBT) technique for cervical cancer by evaluating the dosimetry and preliminary clinical outcome of this approach.Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were analyzed according to the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group recommendations for image-based 3D treatment in cervical cancer.Twenty cervical cancer patients who underwent CT-guided free-hand HDRISBT between March 2009 and June 2010 were studied.With a median of 5 (range,4-7) implanted needles for each patient,the median dose of brachytherapy alone delivered to 90% of the target volume (D90) was 45 (range,33-54) Gyα/β10 for high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and 30 (range,20-36)Gyα/β10 for intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IR-CTV).The percentage of the CTV covered by the prescribed dose (V100) of HR-CTV with brachytherapy alone was 81.9%-99.2% (median,96.7%).With an additional dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT),the median D90 was 94 (range,83-104) Gyα/β10 for HR-CTV and 77 (range,70-87) Gyα/β10 for IR-CTV; the median dose delivered to 100% of the target volume (D100) was 75 (range,66-84) Gyα/β10 for HR-CTV and 65 (range,57-73) Gyα/β10 for IR-CTV.The minimum dose to the most irradiated 2 cc volume (D2cc) was 73-96 (median,83) Gyα/β3 for the bladder,64-98 (median,73) Gyα/β3 for the rectum,and 52-69 (median,61) Gyα/β3 for the sigmoid colon.After a median follow-up of 15 months (range,3-24 months),two patients experienced local failure,and 1 showed internal lilac nodal metastasis.Despite the relatively small number of needles used,CT-guided HDRISBT for cervical cancer showed favorable DVH parameters and clinical outcome.

  13. Implementation of microsource high dose rate (mHDR) brachytherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy using remote afterloading of a single high dose rate 192Ir microsource was developed in the 1970s. After its introduction to clinics, this system has spread rapidly among developed Member States and has become a highly desirable modality in cancer treatment. This technique is now gradually being introduced to the developing Member States. The 192Ir sources are produced with a high specific activity. This results in a high dose rate (HDR) to the tumour and shorter treatment times. The high specific activity simultaneously results in a much smaller source (so-called micro source, around I mm in diameter) which may be easily inserted into tissue through a thin delivery tube, the so-called interstitial treatment, as well as easily inserted into body cavities, the so-called intracavitary or endoluminal treatment. Another advantage is the ability to change dwell time (the time a source remains in one position) of the stepping source which allows dose distribution to match the target volume more closely. The purpose of this TECDOC is to advise radiation oncologists, medical physicists and hospital administrators in hospitals which are planning to introduce 192Ir microsource HDR (mHDR) remote afterloading systems. The document supplements IAEA-TECDOC-1040, Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, and will facilitate implementation of this new brachytherapy technology, especially in developing countries. The operation of the system, 'how to use the system', is not within the scope of this document. This TECDOC is based on the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting held in Vienna in April 1999

  14. Pelvic interstitial brachytherapy - improving the therapeutic ratio with magnetic resonance imaging and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction Interstitial brachytherapy in the pelvic region is often hampered by the radiation oncologist's inability to precisely differentiate tumor versus normal tissue during the planning and implantation procedures, often resulting in either excessive or incomplete coverage of tumor volume. The marked improvement in pelvic imaging seen with magnetic resonance, in conjunction with isodose optimization programs for remote-afterloading units, has created an opportunity to significantly improve the therapeutic ratio. Methods From 1992-1995, 23 interstitial perineal templates were performed in 22 patients with pelvic malignancies, using the pulsed low-dose-rate Selectron with dose optimization. MR imaging was performed immediately prior to the implant, with a MUPIT placed against the perineum and a vaginal obturator in place. These images were used for tumor volume measurements, determination of the number, depth and angle of needles required for the implant, and identification of position of normal tissues (rectum, small bowel, bladder) relative to the tumor. After implantation of stainless steel needles, orthogonal radiographs were obtained for isodose calculation, and planning carried out with isodose optimization. Patients were followed closely on a routine schedule, until time of last visit or until death. Every effort possible was made to assess local disease status at time of death. Results Sixteen patients with primary disease (14 cervix, 1 vulva, 1 vagina) and 6 with recurrent (2 with prior radiation) were implanted, all but 3 with curative intent. Nine patients with advanced cervix or vulvar cancer received concomitant chemotherapy (5FU + platinum or mitomycin-C) with the external beam therapy. At a median follow-up of 18.1 months for all cases, only three patients have failed locally for an actuarial local control of 85% at 1.5 years. Nine patients are alive and free of disease, 8 are alive with distant disease only (mean follow-up of 19.1 months), 2

  15. High dose brachytherapy in pediatric oncology; Braquiterapia com alta taxa de dose em oncologia pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Codjaian, Osanna Esther; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Trippe, Nivaldo [Fundacao Antonio Prudente, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital A.C. Camargo. Dept. de Radioterapia

    1995-05-01

    Brachytherapy is a kind of radiotherapy that has been used in the multidisciplinary approach of some pediatric tumors, such as soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities, head and neck and urogenital tract. Recent technological advances in this area lead to development of computerized high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy. This type of treatment has some advantages compared to low dose rate brachytherapy traditionally used. This article describes not only the characteristics and advantages of this kind of treatment, but also the preliminary results of the first seven children treated with high dose rate at the Hospital A.C.Camargo. (author) 10 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Dosimetry evaluation of SAVI-based HDR brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoharan Sivasubramanian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI with high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy offers an excellent compact course of radiation due to its limited number of fractions for early-stage carcinoma of breast. One of the recent devices is SAVI (strut-adjusted volume implant, which has 6, 8 or 10 peripheral source channels with one center channel. Each channel can be differentially loaded. This paper focuses on the treatment planning, dosimetry and quality assurance aspects of HDR brachytherapy implant with GammaMed Plus HDR afterloader unit. The accelerated PBI balloon devices normally inflate above 35 cc range, and hence these balloon type devices cannot be accommodated in small lumpectomy cavity sizes. CT images were obtained and 3-D dosimetric plans were done with Brachyvision planning system. The 3-D treatment planning and dosimetric data were evaluated with planning target volume (PTV_eval V90, V95, V150, V200 skin dose and minimum distance to skin. With the use of the SAVI 6-1 mini device, we were able to accomplish an excellent coverage - V90, V95, V150 and V200 to 98%, 95%, 37 cc (<50 cc volume and 16 cc (<20 cc volume, respectively. Maximum skin dose was between 73% and 90%, much below the prescribed dose of 34 Gy. The minimum skin distance achieved was 5 to 11 mm. The volume that received 50% of the prescribed radiation dose was found to be lower with SAVI. The multi-channel SAVI-based implants reduced the maximum skin dose to markedly lower levels as compared to other modalities, simultaneously achieving best dose coverage to target volume. Differential-source dwell-loading allows modulation of the radiation dose distribution in symmetric or asymmetric opening of the catheter shapes and is also advantageous in cavities close to chest wall.

  17. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  18. Characterization of a fiber-coupled Al2O3:C luminescence dosimetry system for online in vivo dose verification during Ir-192 brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Greilich, Steffen;

    2009-01-01

    A prototype of a new dose-verification system has been developed to facilitate prevention and identification of dose delivery errors in remotely afterloaded brachytherapy. The system allows for automatic online in vivo dosimetry directly in the tumor region using small passive detector probes...... outer diameter). The system was tested in the range from 0 to 4 Gy using a solid-water phantom, a Varian GammaMed Plus Ir-192 PDR afterloader, and dosimetry probes inserted into stainless-steel brachytherapy needles. The calibrated system was found to be linear in the tested dose range...

  19. Innovation in gynaecological brachytherapy: new technologies, pulse dose-rate brachytherapy, image, definition of new volumes of interest and their impact on dosimetry: application in a clinical research programme 'S.T.I.C.'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy plays a fundamental role in the therapeutic approach of patients with stage I-IV cervical carcinoma. Technical modalities have evolved during the last decades: stepping source technology, imaging modalities development, specially IMN, treatment planning system integrating 3D images. Images from CT-Scan and MRI have contributed to a better knowledge of tumoral extension and critical organs. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better definition of tumour volume compared to traditional approaches. The introduction of 3D image based approach for GTV and CTV requires new definitions and a common language. In 2000, a working group within GEC-ESTRO was created to support 3D image based 3D treatment planning approach in cervix cancer BT. The task was to determine a common terminology enabling various groups to use a common language. Recommendations were described and proposed based on clinical experience and dosimetric concepts of different institutions. Two CTVs were described en relation to the risk for recurrence: high-risk CTV and intermediate risk CTV. In order to better define the role of such definitions and their potential impact on the complication incidence in patients with cervical cancer, a special French programme was developed. The aim of this programme is to study the incidence of the severe 2-year complication rate in two comparable patient populations: one population is treated using PDR brachytherapy with CT-Scan or MRI with the applicators in place allowing a 3D dosimetry with optimization, the second population is treated using standard X-rays radiographs, without any delineation of the target nor optimisation. Each population arm includes 425 patients. A medico-economic assessment is performed, allowing a real cost of the most sophisticated approach compared to a historical dosimetric system. (author)

  20. [Innovation in gynaecological brachytherapy: new technologies, pulse dose-rate brachytherapy, image, definition of new volumes of interest and their impact on dosimetry: application in a clinical research programme "STIC"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, C; Peiffert, D

    2006-11-01

    Brachytherapy plays a fundamental role in the therapeutic approach of patients with stage I-IV cervical carcinoma. Technical modalities have evolved during the last decades: stepping source technology, imaging modalities development, specially IMN, treatment planning system integrating 3D images. Images from CT-Scan and MRI have contributed to a better knowledge of tumoral extension and critical organs. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better definition of tumour volume compared to traditional approaches. The introduction of 3D image based approach for GTV and CTV requires new definitions and a common language. In 2000, a working group within GEC-ESTRO was created to support 3D image based 3D treatment planning approach in cervix cancer BT. The task was to determine a common terminology enabling various groups to use a common language. Recommendations were described and proposed based on clinical experience and dosimetric concepts of different institutions. Two CTVs were described en relation to the risk for recurrence: high-risk CTV and intermediate risk CTV. In order to better define the role of such definitions and their potential impact on the complication incidence in patients with cervical cancer, a special French programme was developed. The aim of this programme is to study the incidence of the severe 2-year complication rate in two comparable patient populations: one population is treated using PDR brachytherapy with CT-Scan or MRI with the applicators in place allowing a 3D dosimetry with optimization, the second population is treated using standard X-rays radiographs without any delineation of the target nor optimisation. Each population arm includes 425 patients. A medicoeconomic assessment is performed, allowing a real cost of the most sophisticated approach compared to a historical dosimetric system.

  1. Dose volume histogram analysis of normal structures associated with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered by high dose rate brachytherapy and comparison with whole breast external beam radiotherapy fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutyala Subhakar

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess the radiation dose delivered to the heart and ipsilateral lung during accelerated partial breast brachytherapy using a MammoSite™ applicator and compare to those produced by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. Materials and methods Dosimetric analysis was conducted on patients receiving MammoSite breast brachytherapy following conservative surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma. Cardiac dose was evaluated for patients with left breast tumors with a CT scan encompassing the entire heart. Lung dose was evaluated for patients in whom the entire lung was scanned. The prescription dose of 3400 cGy was 1 cm from the balloon surface. MammoSite dosimetry was compared to simulated WBRT fields with and without radiobiological correction for the effects of dose and fractionation. Dose parameters such as the volume of the structure receiving 10 Gy or more (V10 and the dose received by 20 cc of the structure (D20, were calculated as well as the maximum and mean doses received. Results Fifteen patients were studied, five had complete lung data and six had left-sided tumors with complete cardiac data. Ipsilateral lung volumes ranged from 925–1380 cc. Cardiac volumes ranged from 337–551 cc. MammoSite resulted in a significantly lower percentage lung V30 and lung and cardiac V20 than the WBRT fields, with and without radiobiological correction. Conclusion This study gives low values for incidental radiation received by the heart and ipsilateral lung using the MammoSite applicator. The volume of heart and lung irradiated to clinically significant levels was significantly lower with the MammoSite applicator than using simulated WBRT fields of the same CT data sets. Trial registration Dana Farber Trial Registry number 03-179

  2. CT-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Roeddiger, S.; Filipowicz, I.; Kontova, M.; Heyd, R.; Zamboglou, N. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Interdisciplinary Oncology; Kolotas, C. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Interdisciplinary Oncology; Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiotherapy; Birn, G. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Fountzilas, G.; Selviaridis, P. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Thessaloniki (Greece); Baltas, D.; Anagnostopoulos, G. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics and Engineering

    2007-10-15

    Background and Purpose: Recurrences of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) within previously irradiated volumes pose a serious therapeutic challenge. This retrospective study evaluates the long-term tumor control of recurrent GBM treated with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2003, 84 patients were treated for recurrent cerebral GBM located within previously irradiated volumes. All patients had received adjuvant external radiotherapy following primary surgery, with a focal dose up to 60 Gy. The median recurrent tumor volume was 51 cm{sup 3} (3-207 cm{sup 3}), and the HDR-BRT consisted of an afterloading {sup 192}Ir implant which delivered a median dose of 40 Gy (30-50 Gy). Catheter implantation was implemented using interactive computed tomography (CT) guidance under local anesthesia and sedoanalgesia. Results: After a median follow-up of 61 months, 5/84 patients (6%) were alive. The median post-BRT survival was 37 weeks, and the median overall survival 78 weeks. Moderate to severe complications occurred in 5/84 cases (6%). Conclusion: For patients with recurrences of GBM within previously irradiated volumes, CT-guided interstitial HDR-BRT is a feasible treatment option that can play an important role in providing palliation. (orig.)

  3. Consecutive magnetic resonance imaging during brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma: predictive value of volume measurements with respect to persistent disease and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer is associated with a high yearly mortality. The presence of persistent disease after radiotherapy is a significant predictor of patient survival. The aim of our study was to assess if tumor volume regression measured with MR imaging at the time of brachytherapy can discriminate between patients who eventually will achieve a complete response to radiotherapy from those who will not. The second objective was to evaluate whether tumor volume regression predicts overall treatment failure. MRI was evaluated quantitatively in 35 patients; by means of tumor volumetry on T2-weighted MR images before treatment, at the first BCT application, and at the final BCT. The MR images were independently analyzed by two investigators. As a reference standard histopathologic confirmation of residual tumor and/or clinical exam during follow-up > 1 year were used. Area under the curve were compared, P-values <0.05 were considered significant. There was a good correlation between volume measurements made by the two observers. A residual tumor volume >9.4 cm3 at final BCT and tumor volume regression < 77 % of the pre-treatment volume were significantly associated with local residual tumor after completion of therapy (p < 0.02) (AUC, 0.98-1.00). A volume >2.8 cm3 at final BCT was associated with overall treatment failure (p < 0.03). Our study shows that volume analysis during BCT is a predictive tool for local tumor response and overall treatment outcome. The potential of local response assessment to identify patients at high risk of overall treatment failure is promising

  4. Control strategies for afterload reduction with an artificial vasculature device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Cheng, Rolando Chip; Glower, Jacob S; Ewert, Daniel L; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have been used successfully as a bridge to transplant in heart failure patients by unloading ventricular volume and restoring the circulation. An artificial vasculature device (AVD) is being developed that may better facilitate myocardial recovery than VAD by controlling the afterload experienced by the native heart and controlling the pulsatile energy entering into the arterial system from the device, potentially reconditioning the arterial system properties. The AVD is a valveless, 80 ml blood chamber with a servo-controlled pusher plate connected to the ascending aorta by a vascular graft. Control algorithms for the AVD were developed to maintain any user-defined systemic input impedance (IM) including resistance, elastance, and inertial components. Computer simulation and mock circulation models of the cardiovascular system were used to test the efficacy of two control strategies for the AVD: 1) average impedance position control (AIPC)-to maintain an average value of resistance during left ventricular (LV) systole and 2) instantaneous impedance force feedback (IIFF) and position control (IIPC)-to maintain a desired value or profile of resistance and compliance. Computer simulations and mock loop tests were performed to predict resulting cardiovascular pressures, volumes, flows, and the resistance and compliance experienced by the native LV during ejection for simulated normal, failing, and recovering LV. These results indicate that the LV volume and pressure decreased, and the LV stroke volume increased with decreasing IM, resulting in an increased ejection fraction. Although the AIPC algorithm is more stable and can tolerate higher levels of sensor errors and noise, the IIFF and IIPC control algorithms are better suited to maintain any instantaneous IM or an IM profile. The developed AVD impedance control algorithms may be implemented with current VADs to promote myocardial recovery and facilitate weaning.

  5. Control strategies for afterload reduction with an artificial vasculature device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Cheng, Rolando Chip; Glower, Jacob S; Ewert, Daniel L; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have been used successfully as a bridge to transplant in heart failure patients by unloading ventricular volume and restoring the circulation. An artificial vasculature device (AVD) is being developed that may better facilitate myocardial recovery than VAD by controlling the afterload experienced by the native heart and controlling the pulsatile energy entering into the arterial system from the device, potentially reconditioning the arterial system properties. The AVD is a valveless, 80 ml blood chamber with a servo-controlled pusher plate connected to the ascending aorta by a vascular graft. Control algorithms for the AVD were developed to maintain any user-defined systemic input impedance (IM) including resistance, elastance, and inertial components. Computer simulation and mock circulation models of the cardiovascular system were used to test the efficacy of two control strategies for the AVD: 1) average impedance position control (AIPC)-to maintain an average value of resistance during left ventricular (LV) systole and 2) instantaneous impedance force feedback (IIFF) and position control (IIPC)-to maintain a desired value or profile of resistance and compliance. Computer simulations and mock loop tests were performed to predict resulting cardiovascular pressures, volumes, flows, and the resistance and compliance experienced by the native LV during ejection for simulated normal, failing, and recovering LV. These results indicate that the LV volume and pressure decreased, and the LV stroke volume increased with decreasing IM, resulting in an increased ejection fraction. Although the AIPC algorithm is more stable and can tolerate higher levels of sensor errors and noise, the IIFF and IIPC control algorithms are better suited to maintain any instantaneous IM or an IM profile. The developed AVD impedance control algorithms may be implemented with current VADs to promote myocardial recovery and facilitate weaning. PMID:22635010

  6. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose–Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45–50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy for tumor; α/β = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV (± 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 (±30) cm3, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 (±14) cm3. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 (±13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 (±20) Gy, 76 (±16) Gy, 70 (±9) Gy, and 60 (±9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19–87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and organs at risk are in a comparable range

  7. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  8. Interstitial brachytherapy of intracranial germinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金林; 肖湘生; 施增儒; 陶晓峰; 肖珊; 丁学华; 卢亦成; 张耀范

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the process of tumor response to interstitial brachytherapy of intracranial germinomas during and immediately after the therapy. Methods: Fractionated brachytherapy using 192Ir was used in 13 patients with intracranial germinomas. The average age at diagnosis was 14.3 years (range 5 - 27 years). The frequency of fractionation had been increased stepwise from 3 fractionations within 5 d in the past to 26 - 30 fractionations in 15 - 20 d at present, Results: Of 9 pineal tumors, the average reduction of tumor volume was 73.2% at a cumulated radiation dose of 20 Gy and85.3 % at 30 Gy, respectively. In 4 cases of basal ganglia and thalamus areas tumors, the reduction of tumor volume was from an average 56.1% at a cumulated radiation dose of 30 Gy to 75.2% at the end of therapy. That intratumoral hemorrhage was absorbed quickly accompanying tumor regression was demonstrated in all but one patient; 6 patients died; 7 patients were still in follow-up without any evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion: Interstitial brachytherapy could be given as the first optional therapy for intraeranial germinomas. The histological diagnosis of germinomas can be verified by stereotactic biopsy simultaneously. Germinoma is one of the sensitive tumors to interstitial brachytberapy. The radiation injury to surrounding brain tissue could be reduced by using a conformal dynamic brachytherapy.

  9. In-phantom dosimetric measurements as quality control for brachytherapy. System check and constancy check; Messungen im Festkoerperphantom als Qualitaetskontrolle in der Brachytherapie. Systempruefung und Konstanzpruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollefrath, Michael; Bruggmoser, Gregor; Nanko, Norbert; Gainey, Mark [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde

    2015-09-01

    In brachytherapy dosimetric measurements are difficult due to the inherent dose-inhomogeneities. Typically in routine clinical practice only the nominal dose rate is determined for computer controlled afterloading systems. The region of interest lies close to the source when measuring the spatial dose distribution. In this region small errors in the positioning of the detector, and its finite size, lead to large measurement uncertainties that exacerbate the routine dosimetric control of the system in the clinic. The size of the measurement chamber, its energy dependence, and the directional dependence of the measurement apparatus are the factors which have a significant influence on dosimetry. Although ionisation chambers are relatively large, they are employed since similar chambers are commonly found on clinical brachytherapy units. The dose is determined using DIN 6800 [11] since DIN 6809-2 [12], which deals with dosimetry in brachytherapy, is antiquated and is currently in the process of revision. Further information regarding dosimetry for brachytherapy can be found in textbooks [1] and [2]. The measurements for this work were performed with a HDR (High-Dose-Rate) {sup 192}Ir source, type mHDR V2, and a Microselectron Afterloader V2 both from Nucletron/Elekta. In this work two dosimetric procedures are presented which, despite the aforemention difficulties, should assist in performing checks of the proper operation of the system. The first is a system check that measures the dose distribution along a line and is to be performed when first bringing the afterloader into operation, or after significant changes to the system. The other is a dosimetric constancy check, which with little effort can be performed monthly or weekly. It simultaneously verifies the positioning of the source at two positions, the functionality of the system clock and the automatic re-calculation of the source activity.

  10. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  11. [Mathematical Modelling of the Dependence of the Performance of the Left Ventricle of the Heart on Preload and Afterload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syomin, F A; Zberia, M V; Koubassova, N A; Tsaturyan, A K

    2015-01-01

    The results of the numerical simulation of the end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes of the left ventricle of the heart are presented. The simulation was based on a published simple kinetic model of cardiac muscle and approximation of the ventricle geometry with thick-wall cylinder where the fibre orientation varied linearly from sub-epicardium towards sub-endocardium. Blood flow was modelled with a liner compartment model. This simplified approach provides correct dependencies of the stroke volume on the pre- and afterload, namely end-diastolic pressure and peripheral resistance. The calculations show that the stroke volume is independent of arterial compliance and blood inertia. PMID:26841514

  12. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  13. Afterloading intracavitary irradiation and expanding stent for malignant biliary obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double lumen catheter was developed as an apllicator for the remote afterloading (RALS) of 60Co source for the intracavitary irradiation of an obstructed common bile duct caused by carcinoma of the gallbladder. This was followed by the placement of nylon-covered expandable metallic stents to maintain patency. This combination effectively provided palliation. (author)

  14. SU-E-T-525: Dose Volume Histograms (DVH) Analysis and Comparison with ICRU Point Doses in MRI Guided HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; McClinton, C; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy plays a crucial role in management of cervix cancer. MRI compatible applicators have made it possible to accurately delineate gross-target-volume(GTV) and organs-at-risk(OAR) volumes, as well as directly plan, optimize and adapt dose-distribution for each insertion. We sought to compare DVH of tumor-coverage and OARs to traditional Point-A, ICRU-38 bladder and rectum point-doses for four different planning-techniques. Methods: MRI based 3D-planning was performed on Nucletron-Oncentra-TPS for 3 selected patients with varying tumor-sizes and anatomy. GTV,high-risk-clinical-target-volume(HR-CTV), intermediate-risk-clinical-target-volume(IR-CTV) and OARs: rectum, bladder, sigmoid-colon, vaginal-mucosa were delineated. Three conventionally used techniques: mg-Radium-equivalent(RaEq),equal-dwell-weights(EDW), Medical-College-of-Wisconsin proposed points-optimization (MCWO) and a manual-graphical-optimization(MGO) volume-coverage based technique were applied for each patient. Prescription was 6Gy delivered to point-A in Conventional techniques (RaEq, EDW, MCWO). For MGO, goal was to achieve 90%-coverage (D90) to HR-CTV with prescription-dose. ICRU point doses for rectum and bladder, point-A doses, DVH-doses for HR-CTV-D90,0.1cc-volume(D0.1),1ccvolume( D1),2cc-volume(D2) were collected for all plans and analyzed . Results: Mean D90 for HR-CTV normalized to MGO were 0.89,0.84,0.9,1.0 for EDW, RaEq, MCWO, MGO respectively. Mean point-A doses were 21.7% higher for MGO. Conventional techniques with Point-A prescriptions under covered HR-CTV-D90 by average of 12% as compared to MGO. Rectum, bladder and sigmoid doses were highest in MGO-plans for ICRU points as well as D0.1,D1 and D2 doses. Among conventional-techniques, rectum and bladder ICRU and DVH doses(0.1,1,2cc) were not significantly different (within 7%).Rectum D0.1 provided good estimation of ICRU-rectum-point doses (within 3.9%),rectum D0.1 were higher from 0.8 to 3.9% while bladder D0

  15. Implication of uterine configuration on dosimetry to point A using the Amersham afterloading system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, R

    1993-03-15

    Ninety-four biopsy-proven cases of cervix carcinoma who underwent brachytherapy with the flexible Amersham afterloading system are examined in this study. The uterine configuration showed a wide range with respect to the length, angle of version (indicated by angle alpha) and the degree of right or left shift of the midline at the internal os (indicated by angle beta). The manufacturers of the afterloading system have given certain precalculated dose rates to A which they derived from computer calculations for the various configurations of the system, for a particular loading strength of the Caesium 137 source trains, and for a particular range of angle alpha and beta. The study involves mathematical calculations of point A dose rates using post application radiographs, and a mean value of point A dose rate is derived to compare with other variables. A distortion of the uterus in the form of flexion (as opposed to version), resulting in bending of the uterine tandem is noted in 3 cases. There are 22% of cases with gross degree of retroversion (angle alpha more than 180 degrees) for which the precalculated tables are lacking. The angle beta, however, is in the normal range for all the cases but one. Nineteen cases (20.2%) showed point A dose rates which are beyond the specified dose rates of the manufacturers. Analysis of these 19 cases showed 6 cases with angle alpha more than 180 degrees, eight cases with more than a 10 degrees shift of the uterus to right or left of midline (angle beta) and the rest five cases have fairly normal values of these angles. Analysis of these five cases showed that three of them showed more than 8 CGy/hr difference in dose rates to individual points A right and left. An undue curvature of the uterine tandem to one side in the distal half, with a straight proximal half (near the anterior flange) is noted in these three cases. The angle alpha and beta are normal here since the nearest 2 cm of uterine tandem to the anterior flange is

  16. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  17. High dose rate /sup 60/Co remote afterloading irradiation in cancer of the cervix in Haiti, 1977-1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streeter, O.E. Jr.; Goldson, A.L.; Chevallier, C.; Nibhanupudy, J.R.

    1988-06-01

    From 1977 through 1984, 293 previously untreated patients with biopsy proven carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated by whole pelvis irradiation and high intensity 60Co remote afterloading (RAL) intrauterine tandem techniques in Haiti. The treatment results were analyzed retrospectively to evaluate the therapeutic results and prognostic factors of a strict protocol involving 40 Gy to the whole pelvis (2 Gy/day, 5 days/week). In addition, on the 5th day of the 3rd week, the first outpatient 60Co remote afterloading intracavitary insertion, delivering 7.5 Gy to point A with each insertion, repeated 3 times by a week separation for a total of 4 times. The total TDF for external beam plus RAL was 158 and 175 for early and late effects respectively. One hundred-four patients were evaluable after 1 year or more follow-up, with a median of 26.5 months. No evidence of disease (NED) by Stage at 1 year was: Stage I of 100% (3/3), Stage II of 82% (9/11), Stage III of 80% (47/59), and Stage IV of 58% (18/31). The post-therapeutic complication rate was 7.7%, with no fistulas or requirement of surgical intervention. Those with documented follow-up of at least 2 years (74 patients) had comparable survival to other high dose rate and low dose rate studies. This study shows that outpatient brachytherapy can be carried out without sophisticated and expensive equipment with minimal staff trained in radiation therapy. A detailed description of this outpatient RAL technique and results are described so that this method can be adapted to other developing and industrialized nations where cost containment is becoming a key issue.

  18. Criteria for the evaluation of brachytherapy for malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty two patients with recurrent or unresectable malignant brain tumors were treated by interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 seeds. After-loading catheters were stereotactically implanted under local anesthesia using a Brown-Roberts-wells (BRW) CT guided stereotactic system. The response to the therapy was followed by serial CT and MRI scans and evaluated three months after implantation by the standard criteria for the evaluation of chemotherapy because there is no set of criteria available for radiation therapy. After interstitial brachytherapy, the most commonly observed CT and MRI finding was central low attenuation, that is, the central enhanced tumor replaced by the radiation necrosis. Three months after the treatment, these findings were observed in 23 patients out of 32 patients on the CT and MRI. We observed complete response (CR) in 6 of 32 patients, partial response (PR) in 9, no change (NC) in 7 and progressive disease (PD) in 9. In 6 CR patients, the tumor disappeared by three months after treatment. In 15 patients of 17 NC and PD patients, the central low attenuation was observed and their prognosis was better than those without central necrosis. The results suggested the standard criteria for the evaluation of chemotherapy, such as CR, PR etc, cannot be applicable to our series because the tumor mass replaced by necrotic tissue and remained as a mass lesion in most cases and new criteria in consideration of this low attenuation on CT and MRI will be needed for the evaluation of brachytherapy on neuroimagings. (author)

  19. Tolerance of the carotid-sheath contents to brachytherapy: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werber, J.L.; Sood, B.; Alfieri, A.; McCormick, S.A.; Vikram, B. (Department of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery, New York Medical College, Beth Israel (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Tumor invasion of the carotid artery is a potential indication for brachytherapy, which delivers a high dose of irradiation to residual tumor while limiting the dose to adjacent healthy tissues. The tolerance of carotid-sheath contents to varying doses of brachytherapy, however, has not been clearly established. In order to evaluate brachytherapy effects on carotid-sheath contents, after-loading catheters were implanted bilaterally in 3 groups of 6 rabbits each (18 rabbits). Iridium 192 brachytherapy doses of either 5000 cGy (rad), 9000 cGy, or 13,000 cGy were delivered unilaterally, with the contralateral neck serving as a nonirradiated control in each animal. There were no carotid ruptures and wound healing was normal. Two animals from each group were killed at 6, 20, and 48 weeks. Even at the highest dose (13,000 cGy), nerve conduction studies performed on the vagus nerve prior to sacrifice revealed no increased latency, histologic changes were minimal, and carotid arteries were patent. These observations suggest that the carotid-sheath contents in healthy rabbits could tolerate high doses (up to 13,000 cGy) of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy without complications.

  20. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Van Limbergen, Erik; Barillot, Isabelle; De Brabandere, Marisol; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm3; optional 5 and 10 cm3. Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm3. Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD2)-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Pötter R, Van Limbergen E et al. Recommendations from

  1. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  2. Acceptance testing and commissioning of a new model HDR afterloader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently performed acceptance testing procedures and have commissioned a new model HDR afterloader, the Varian VariSource with ''Intelligent Drive.'' Our site was one of the first installations worldwide. It is our intent to describe our tests and the results of the tests particularly as they may differ from other afterloaders. The Ir-192 source is unique among afterloaders marketed in the US in that it is very slender (OD of source wire is 0.59 mm) and relatively long (two 0.5 cm sources for a total active length of 1.0 cm). A check of source homogeneity by autoradiograph as urged by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission demonstrates no detectable source inhomogeneity. Reentrant well ionization chambers are calibrated in the US with a 3.5 mm long source at Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories. Therefore calibration needs to be considered with some care. Calibration of the first delivered source with a well ionization chamber indicated agreement with the manufacturer's stated activity to within 0.5%. Source positioning is checked with a device called a 'cam scale'. Tests have been carried out on this system and it has been found to accurately indicate source position to within ±0.5 mm. Timer accuracy has been found to be better than 0.1% for dwell times of several hundred seconds. The intelligent drive system and the small source diameter allow the source wire to negotiate paths with small radius of curvature. A series of tests have been made in which the source is forced to negotiate 'U' turns of decreasing radius of curvature. A 4.7 F, 100 cm long catheter was used for these tests and the 'U' turn was positioned at approximately 90 cm. Under these conditions, the VariSource was consistently able to traverse a 1.25 cm radius of curvature, which is better than the manufacturer's stated limit of 1.5 cm

  3. Physical characteristics of the Selectron high dose rate intracavitary afterloader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenery, S.G.A.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B. (Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1985-08-01

    The physics measurements on a Selectron high dose-rate afterloading cobalt-60 unit are reported. The installation was found to be acceptable from the standpoint of radiation safety and cost effectiveness; hospital bed space was saved as treatment could be on an outpatient basis. A source calibration 4% higher than the value stated by the manufacturer was obtained. Measurement of the ratio of exposure rate in water to that in air confirmed the calibration and the applicability of correction factors for routine clinical dosimetry recommended in the literature.

  4. 10 CFR 35.647 - Additional technical requirements for mobile remote afterloader units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... on the remote afterloader unit, on the control console, and in the facility; (3) Viewing and intercom... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional technical requirements for mobile remote... MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic...

  5. Variation of treatment planning parameters (D90 HR-CTV, D2cc for OAR) for cervical cancer tandem ring brachytherapy in a multicentre setting: Comparison of standard planning and 3D image guided optimisation based on a joint protocol for dose-volume constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a qualitative and quantitative comparison of different treatment planning methods used in different centres for MRI-based brachytherapy (BT) of cervical cancer. Materials and methods: Two representative patients with advanced cervical cancer (1 'limited volume case'; 1 'extensive volume case') were planned for brachytherapy (BT) with a tandem-ring applicator by six different centres. During a workshop all centres produced an institutional standard plan and an MRI-based adaptive treatment plan for each case. Optimisation was based on the fractionation schedule (HDR, PDR) and method according to the institutional protocol. Results: The loading pattern, dwell times, shape of the point A isodose varied considerably between institutional standard plans, as did dose-volume parameters for high risk CTV (HR-CTV) and also for the D2cc for OAR, violating the dose-volume constraints in many situations. During optimisation, the centres stayed as close as possible to the standard loading pattern and dwell times. The dose distributions and dose-volume parameters between the plans from the different centres became much more comparable after optimisation. The prescribed dose to the HR-CTV could be achieved in the limited volume case by all centres, in the extensive case only if additional needles were applied. Conclusion: Treatment planning for gynaecologic brachytherapy based on different traditions shows less variation in regard to target coverage and OAR dose, when 3D image-based optimisation is performed with a uniform prescription protocol.

  6. Adaptive right ventricular performance in response to acutely increased afterload in a lamb model of congenital heart disease: evidence for enhanced Anrep effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca C; Datar, Sanjeev A; Oishi, Peter E; Bennett, Stephen; Maki, Jun; Sun, Christine; Johengen, Michael; He, Youping; Raff, Gary W; Redington, Andrew N; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-15

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease survive longer with preserved right ventricular (RV) function compared with those with primary pulmonary hypertension. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that superior RV performance can be demonstrated, at baseline and when challenged with increased RV afterload, in lambs with chronic left-to-right cardiac shunts compared with control lambs. A shunt was placed between the pulmonary artery and the aorta in fetal lambs (shunt). RV pressure-volume loops were obtained 4 wk after delivery in shunt and control lambs, before and after increased afterload was applied using pulmonary artery banding (PAB). Baseline stroke volume (8.7 ± 1.8 vs. 15.8 ± 2.7 ml, P = 0.04) and cardiac index (73.0 ± 4.0 vs. 159.2 ± 25.1 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1), P = 0.02) were greater in shunts. After PAB, there was no difference in the change in cardiac index (relative to baseline) between groups; however, heart rate (HR) was greater in controls (168 ± 7.3 vs. 138 ± 6.6 beats/min, P = 0.01), and end-systolic elastance (Ees) was greater in shunts (2.63 vs. 1.31 × baseline, P = 0.02). Control lambs showed decreased mechanical efficiency (71% baseline) compared with shunts. With acute afterload challenge, both controls and shunts maintained cardiac output; however, this was via maladaptive responses in controls, while shunts maintained mechanical efficiency and increased contractility via a proposed enhanced Anrep effect-the second, slow inotropic response in the biphasic ventricular response to increased afterload, a novel finding in the RV. The mechanisms related to these physiological differences may have important therapeutic implications.

  7. Brachytherapy in thetreatment of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zhumankulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the methods of radiotherapy of malignant tumors of oral cavity and oropharyngeal region today is interstitial radiation therapy – brachytherapy, allowing you to create the optimum dose of irradiation to the tumor, necessary for its destruction, without severe radiation reactions in the surrounding tissues unchanged. Brachytherapy has the following advantages: high precision – the ability of the local summarization of high single doses in a limited volume of tissue; good tolerability; a short time of treatment. At this time, brachytherapy is the method of choice used as palliative therapy and as a component of radical treatment.Objective: The purpose of this article is a literature review about the latest achievements of interstitial brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

  8. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M., E-mail: mharkenrider@lumc.edu; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  9. High-risk clinical target volume delineation in CT-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy - Impact of information from FIGO stage with or without systematic inclusion of 3D documentation of clinical gynecological examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegazy, Neamat [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Medical Univ. of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Poetter Rickard; Kirisits, Christian [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel; Federico, Mario; Sturdza, Alina; Nesvacil, Nicole [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], e-mail: nicole.nesvacil@meduniwien.ac.at

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to improve computed tomography (CT)-based high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) delineation protocols for cervix cancer patients, in settings without any access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of brachytherapy. Therefore the value of a systematic integration of comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) documentation of repetitive gynecological examination for CT-based HR CTV delineation protocols, in addition to information from FIGO staging, was investigated. In addition to a comparison between reference MRI contours and two different CT-based contouring methods (using complementary information from FIGO staging with or without additional 3D clinical drawings), the use of standardized uterine heights was also investigated. Material and methods: Thirty-five cervix cancer patients with CT- and MR-images and 3D clinical drawings at time of diagnosis and brachytherapy were included. HR CTV{sub stage} was based on CT information and FIGO stage. HR CTV{sub stage} {sub +3Dclin} was contoured on CT using FIGO stage and 3D clinical drawing. Standardized HR CTV heights were: 1/1, 2/3 and 1/2 of uterine height. MRI-based HR CTV was delineated independently. Resulting widths, thicknesses, heights, and volumes of HR CTV{sub stage}, HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} and MRI-based HR CTV contours were compared. Results: The overall normalized volume ratios (mean{+-}SD of CT/MRI{sub ref} volume) of HR CTV{sub stage} and HR{sub stage+3Dclin} were 2.6 ({+-}0.6) and 2.1 ({+-}0.4) for 1/1 and 2.3 ({+-}0.5) and 1.8 ({+-}0.4), for 2/3, and 1.9 ({+-}0.5) and 1.5 ({+-}0.3), for 1/2 of uterine height. The mean normalized widths were 1.5{+-}0.2 and 1.2{+-}0.2 for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin}, respectively (p < 0.05). The mean normalized heights for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} were both 1.7{+-}0.4 for 1/1 (p < 0.05.), 1.3{+-}0.3 for 2/3 (p < 0.05) and 1.1{+-}0.3 for 1/2 of uterine height. Conclusion: CT-based HR

  10. Remote afterloading interstitial radiotherapy of patients with vulva cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience in application of interstitial gamma-therapy according remote afterloading technique for the period of 1991 - 1996 is described. Computer-aided programmed complex NPS (Nucletron) was used for dosimetric planning. Micro Selectron-LDR (Nucletron, Netherlands) with 137Cs source and Micro Selectron-HDR (Nucletron) with 192Ir sources were used for irradiation. Interstitial gamma-therapy was used as a component of associated radio- and combined therapy of 21 patients with primary vulva cancer and 10 patients with recurrent vulva cancer. It is shown that the complete tumor regression was attained in 48.4 %, partial regression in 35.5 %, stabilization of the process in 16.1 % of cases. Three-year survival of patients with primary vulva cancer was 33.7 %

  11. Innovation in gynaecological brachytherapy: new technologies, pulse dose-rate brachytherapy, image, definition of new volumes of interest and their impact on dosimetry: application in a clinical research programme 'S.T.I.C.'; Nouveautes en curietherapie gynecologique: nouvelles technologies, curietherapie pulsee, imagerie, definitions de nouveaux volumes d'interet et leur impact sur la dosimetrie: applications dans le cadre d'un STIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haie-Meder, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Curietherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Service de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France)

    2006-11-15

    Brachytherapy plays a fundamental role in the therapeutic approach of patients with stage I-IV cervical carcinoma. Technical modalities have evolved during the last decades: stepping source technology, imaging modalities development, specially IMN, treatment planning system integrating 3D images. Images from CT-Scan and MRI have contributed to a better knowledge of tumoral extension and critical organs. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better definition of tumour volume compared to traditional approaches. The introduction of 3D image based approach for GTV and CTV requires new definitions and a common language. In 2000, a working group within GEC-ESTRO was created to support 3D image based 3D treatment planning approach in cervix cancer BT. The task was to determine a common terminology enabling various groups to use a common language. Recommendations were described and proposed based on clinical experience and dosimetric concepts of different institutions. Two CTVs were described en relation to the risk for recurrence: high-risk CTV and intermediate risk CTV. In order to better define the role of such definitions and their potential impact on the complication incidence in patients with cervical cancer, a special French programme was developed. The aim of this programme is to study the incidence of the severe 2-year complication rate in two comparable patient populations: one population is treated using PDR brachytherapy with CT-Scan or MRI with the applicators in place allowing a 3D dosimetry with optimization, the second population is treated using standard X-rays radiographs, without any delineation of the target nor optimisation. Each population arm includes 425 patients. A medico-economic assessment is performed, allowing a real cost of the most sophisticated approach compared to a historical dosimetric system. (author)

  12. Stem signal suppression in fiber-coupled Al2O3:C dosimetry for 192Ir brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Andersen, Claus Erik; Edmund, J.M.;

    2011-01-01

    The stem signal, composed of fluorescence and Čerenkov light, becomes a significant source of uncertainty in fiber-coupled afterloaded brachytherapy dosimetry when the source dwells near the fiber cable but far from the detector. A stem suppression technique originally developed for scintillators...... was adapted for on-line in-vivo dosimetry using fiber-coupled carbon doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C). The technique involved a two-channel optical filtration of the radioluminescence (RL) emitted from a pre-irradiated Al2O3:C crystal with enhanced sensitivity. The system responded linearly in the absorbed dose...

  13. 10 CFR 35.633 - Full calibration measurements on remote afterloader units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.633...) Length of the applicators; and (7) Function of the source transfer tubes, applicators, and transfer...

  14. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR, namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  15. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, V; Kurup, P G G; Mahadev, P; Mahalakshmi, S

    2010-04-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  16. Sealed source and device design safety testing: Technical report on the findings of task 4 -- Investigation of failed Nitinol brachytherapy wire. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benac, D.J.; Burghard, H.C. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This report covers an investigation of the nature and cause of failure in Nitinol brachytherapy sourcewires. The investigation was initiated after two clinical incidents in which sourcewires failed during or immediately after a treatment. The investigation determined that the two clinical Nitinol sourcewires failed in a brittle manner, which is atypical for Nitinol. There were no material anomalies or subcritical flaws to explain the brittle failures. The bend tests also demonstrated that neither moist environment, radiation, nor low-temperature structural transformation was a likely root cause of the failures. However, degradation of the PTFE was consistently evident, and those sourcewires shipped or stored with PTFE sleeves consistently failed in laboratory bend tests. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that the root cause of the in-service failures of the sourcewires was environmentally induced embrittlement due to the breakdown of the PTFE protective sleeves in the presence of the high-radiation field and subsequent reaction or interaction of the breakdown products with the Nitinol alloy.

  17. Restenosis: Intracoronary Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachman, Douglas E.; Simon, Daniel I.

    2002-04-01

    Though interventional strategies have revolutionized the management of patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, in-stent restenosis has emerged as the single most important limitation of long-term success following percutaneous coronary intervention. Once present, in-stent restenosis is extraordinarily difficult to treat, with conventional revascularization techniques failing in 50% to 80% of patients. Intracoronary radiation, or brachytherapy, targets cellular proliferation within the culprit neointima. Clinical trials have demonstrated that brachytherapy is a highly effective treatment for in-stent restenosis, reducing angiographic restenosis by 50% to 60% and the need for target vessel revascularization by 40% to 50%. The benefits of intracoronary brachytherapy may be particularly pronounced in certain patient subgroups (eg, those with diabetes, long lesions, or lesions in saphenous vein bypass grafts), but comes at the cost of an increased rate of late stent thrombosis and the need for extended antiplatelet therapy. The role of brachytherapy in the arsenal of the interventional cardiologist will continue to evolve, particularly in light of the unprecedented recent advances with the use of drug-eluting stents for restenosis prevention. PMID:11858773

  18. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at

  19. Prospective multi-center trial utilizing electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified form of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been developed called Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT). EBT uses a kilovolt X-ray source and does not require treatment in a shielded vault or a HDR afterloader unit. A multi-center clinical study was carried out to evaluate the success of treatment delivery, safety and toxicity of EBT in patients with endometrial cancer. A total of 15 patients with stage I or II endometrial cancer were enrolled at 5 sites. Patients were treated with vaginal EBT alone or in combination with external beam radiation. The prescribed doses of EBT were successfully delivered in all 15 patients. From the first fraction through 3 months follow-up, there were 4 CTC Grade 1 adverse events and 2 CTC Grade II adverse events reported that were EBT related. The mild events reported were dysuria, vaginal dryness, mucosal atrophy, and rectal bleeding. The moderate treatment related adverse events included dysuria, and vaginal pain. No Grade III or IV adverse events were reported. The EBT system performed well and was associated with limited acute toxicities. EBT shows acute results similar to HDR brachytherapy. Additional research is needed to further assess the clinical efficacy and safety of EBT in the treatment of endometrial cancer

  20. Current Brachytherapy Quality Assurance Guidance: Does It Meet the Challenges of Emerging Image-Guided Technologies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade, brachytherapy has shifted from the traditional surgical paradigm to more modern three-dimensional image-based planning and delivery approaches. The role of intraoperative and multimodality image-based planning is growing. Published American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American College of Radiology, European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and International Atomic Energy Agency quality assurance (QA) guidelines largely emphasize the QA of planning and delivery devices rather than processes. These protocols have been designed to verify compliance with major performance specifications and are not risk based. With some exceptions, complete and clinically practical guidance exists for sources, QA instrumentation, non-image-based planning systems, applicators, remote afterloading systems, dosimetry, and calibration. Updated guidance is needed for intraoperative imaging systems and image-based planning systems. For non-image-based brachytherapy, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group reports 56 and 59 provide reasonable guidance on procedure-specific process flow and QA. However, improved guidance is needed even for established procedures such as ultrasound-guided prostate implants. Adaptive replanning in brachytherapy faces unsolved problems similar to that of image-guided adaptive external beam radiotherapy

  1. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  2. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  3. Prospective multi-center trial utilizing electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thropay John P

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified form of high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy has been developed called Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT. EBT uses a kilovolt X-ray source and does not require treatment in a shielded vault or a HDR afterloader unit. A multi-center clinical study was carried out to evaluate the success of treatment delivery, safety and toxicity of EBT in patients with endometrial cancer. Methods A total of 15 patients with stage I or II endometrial cancer were enrolled at 5 sites. Patients were treated with vaginal EBT alone or in combination with external beam radiation. Results The prescribed doses of EBT were successfully delivered in all 15 patients. From the first fraction through 3 months follow-up, there were 4 CTC Grade 1 adverse events and 2 CTC Grade II adverse events reported that were EBT related. The mild events reported were dysuria, vaginal dryness, mucosal atrophy, and rectal bleeding. The moderate treatment related adverse events included dysuria, and vaginal pain. No Grade III or IV adverse events were reported. The EBT system performed well and was associated with limited acute toxicities. Conclusions EBT shows acute results similar to HDR brachytherapy. Additional research is needed to further assess the clinical efficacy and safety of EBT in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  4. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.;

    1999-01-01

    . Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes......We have been studying brachytherapy planning with the objective of manimizing the maximum deviation of the delivered dose from prescribed dose bounds for treatment volumes. A general framework for optimal treatment planning is presented and the minmax optimization is formulated as a linear program...

  5. Fractionated afterloading irradiation as a new therapy method for inoperable cerebral tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, H.; Scheffler, A.; Oppel, F.; Brock, M.; Brust, V.; Bauer, R.; Pannek, H.W.

    1986-07-01

    A method is shown for fractionated afterloading therapy of inoperable cerebral tumors. A 3 mm thick, tube-form applicator of noble metal which is closed at the front side is implanted into the tumor by a stereotaxic technique and firmly screwed together with the osseous calotte. It remains there up to two weeks, giving full mobility to the patient. The afterloading therapy with a moving iridium source is performed one or two times per day with individual doses of 2 Gray. Thus, the chronological and - to a certain extent - also the spatial dose distribution is variable when applying this method.

  6. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  7. Physics and quality assurance of low dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this course is to review the physical principles underlying design, clinical application and execution of interstitial and intracavitary implants in the classical low dose-rate (LDR) range. This year, the course will focus on quality assurance of sources, applicators and treatment planning software. In addition, development of procedures and QA checks designed optimize treatment delivery accuracy and patient safety during each individual procedure will be reviewed. The level of presentation will be designed to accommodate both physicists and physicians. Implementation of recently published AAPM Task Group reports (no. 40, 'Comprehensive Quality Assurance' and No. 43, 'Dosimetry of Interstitial Brachytherapy Sources') will be reviewed. Outline: (A) General Principles (1) QA endpoints: temporal accuracy, positional accuracy, dose delivery accuracy, and safety of the patient, personnel, and the institution (2) QA procedure development: forms, checklists, test development and design of treatment delivery procedures (B) QA of treatment delivery devices (1) Source acceptance testing and QA a) calibration and source strength specification standards b) leakage tests and source geometry verification (2) Applicator acceptance testing and QA (3) Remote afterloading devices (4) Treatment planning systems a) graphic input/output devices, implant geometry reconstruction, and graphical display b) dose calculation accuracy i) review of brachytherapy dose calculation algorithms ii) dosimetric benchmarks available: Task Group 43 report (C) Procedure-specific QA 1) Organization of treatment delivery team 2) Preplanning and preparation 3) Applicator insertion 4) Radiographic examination of the implant, prescription, and treatment calculation 5) Source insertion 6) Treatment planning and physicist review of treatment plans 7) QA during patient treatment and removal of sources and applicators

  8. Development of high-activity 252Cf sources for neutron brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center of Wayne State University (WSU), Detroit, Michigan, is using 252Cf medical sources for neutron brachytherapy. These sources are based on a 20-year-old design containing ≤ 30 microg 252Cf in the form of a cermet wire of Cf2O3 in a palladium matrix. The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been asked to develop tiny high-activity 252Cf neutron sources for use with remote afterloading equipment to reduce treatment times and dose to clinical personnel and to expedite treatment of brain and other tumors. To date, the REDC has demonstrated that 252Cf loadings can be greatly increased in cermet wires much smaller than before. Equipment designed for hot cell fabrication of these wires is being tested. A parallel program is under way to relicense the existing source design for fabrication at the REDC

  9. Effect of Uniform and Non-uniform High-z Nanoparticles Distribution in Tumor Volume on Dose Enhancement Factor During 192Ir Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zabihzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: increase of atomic number and concentrations of NPs enhance the absorbed dose due to increased possibility of photoelectric phenomena. Non-uniform distribution of NPs underestimated dose compared to uniform distribution; therefore, considering accurate NPs distribution inside the tumor volume is crucial to calculation of dose enhancement. Targeted labeling of NPs for the maximum absorption by tumor and for the minimal penetration into peripheral tissues has potential to increase radiation therapeutic ratio.

  10. Intraluminal High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Tumors of Gastrointestinal Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : Intraluminal High dose rate brachytherapy is an accepted treatment for the tumors of GI tract. However, there is only some limited clinical data for intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy for the tumors of GI tract. Materials and Methods : Between February 1991 and July 1993, 18 patients who have the tumors of GI tract (esophageal cancer-8 cases, rectal cancer-10 cases) were treated with high dose rae iridium-192 afterloading system )Microselectron-HDR, Nucletron CO, Netherland) at the department of therapeutic radiology, St. Mary's hospital, Catholic university medical college. Age rage was 47-87 years with a mean age 71 years. All patients were treated with intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy within two weeks after conventional external radiation therapy and received 3-5 Gy/fraction 3-4 times per week to a total dose 12-20 Gy (mean 17 Gy). Standard fractionation and conventional dose were delivered for external radiation therapy. Total dose of external radiation therapy ranged 41.4-59.4 Gy (mean 49.6 Gy). Median follow up was 19 months. Results : The analysis was based on 18 patients. The complete response and partial response in esophageal cancer was similar (38%). Two year rates for survival and median survival were 13% and 10 months, respectively. Among 10 patients of rectal cancers, partial response was obtained in 6 patients (60%). There was no complete response in the patients with rectal cancer, but good palliative results were achieved in all patients. Conclusion : Although the number of patients was not large and the follow up period was relatively short, these findings suggested that intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy could be useful in the treatment of the patients with advanced tumors of GI tract

  11. Studies on 192Ir afterloading irradiation of the canine prostate with special consideration of thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for high dose rate afterloading irradiation of the prostate with iridium 192 was developed. The isodoses of the urethra and rectum, which were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimetry, showed deviations from the doses pre-calculated by computer (BRACHY), because this calculation is based on an anatomically ideal condition. (MBC)

  12. Implementation of a High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Program for Carcinoma of the Cervix in Senegal: A Pragmatic Model for the Developing World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West Africa has one of the highest incidence rates of carcinoma of the cervix in the world. The vast majority of women do not have access to screening or disease treatment, leading to presentation at advanced stages and to high mortality rates. Compounding this problem is the lack of radiation treatment facilities in Senegal and many other parts of the African continent. Senegal, a country of 13 million people, had a single 60Co teletherapy unit before our involvement and no brachytherapy capabilities. Radiating Hope, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide radiation therapy equipment to countries in the developing world, provided a high-dose-rate afterloading unit to the cancer center for curative cervical cancer treatment. Here we describe the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in Senegal requiring a nonstandard fractionation schedule and a novel treatment planning approach as a possible blueprint to providing this technology to other developing countries

  13. Implementation of a High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Program for Carcinoma of the Cervix in Senegal: A Pragmatic Model for the Developing World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einck, John P., E-mail: jeinck@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Hudson, Alana [Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Shulman, Adam C. [Overlook Medical Center, Summit, New Jersey (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Dieng, Mamadou M.; Diagne, Magatte; Gueye, Latifatou; Gningue, Fama; Gaye, Pape M. [Départemént de Radiothérapie, Institut Joliot-Curie, Hôpital Aristide Le Dantec, Dakar (Senegal); Fisher, Brandon J. [GammaWest Cancer Services, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Mundt, Arno J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Brown, Derek W. [Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    West Africa has one of the highest incidence rates of carcinoma of the cervix in the world. The vast majority of women do not have access to screening or disease treatment, leading to presentation at advanced stages and to high mortality rates. Compounding this problem is the lack of radiation treatment facilities in Senegal and many other parts of the African continent. Senegal, a country of 13 million people, had a single {sup 60}Co teletherapy unit before our involvement and no brachytherapy capabilities. Radiating Hope, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide radiation therapy equipment to countries in the developing world, provided a high-dose-rate afterloading unit to the cancer center for curative cervical cancer treatment. Here we describe the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in Senegal requiring a nonstandard fractionation schedule and a novel treatment planning approach as a possible blueprint to providing this technology to other developing countries.

  14. Implementation of a high-dose-rate brachytherapy program for carcinoma of the cervix in Senegal: a pragmatic model for the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einck, John P; Hudson, Alana; Shulman, Adam C; Yashar, Catheryn M; Dieng, Mamadou M; Diagne, Magatte; Gueye, Latifatou; Gningue, Fama; Gaye, Pape M; Fisher, Brandon J; Mundt, Arno J; Brown, Derek W

    2014-07-01

    West Africa has one of the highest incidence rates of carcinoma of the cervix in the world. The vast majority of women do not have access to screening or disease treatment, leading to presentation at advanced stages and to high mortality rates. Compounding this problem is the lack of radiation treatment facilities in Senegal and many other parts of the African continent. Senegal, a country of 13 million people, had a single (60)Co teletherapy unit before our involvement and no brachytherapy capabilities. Radiating Hope, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide radiation therapy equipment to countries in the developing world, provided a high-dose-rate afterloading unit to the cancer center for curative cervical cancer treatment. Here we describe the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in Senegal requiring a nonstandard fractionation schedule and a novel treatment planning approach as a possible blueprint to providing this technology to other developing countries.

  15. Intra coronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the initial promise of vasculopathy intervention restenosis- a consequence of the (normal) would healing process-has emerged as a major problem. Angiographic restenosis has been reported in 40-60% of patients after successful P TCA. The basic mechanism of restenosis, (acute recoil, negative remodeling and neo intimal hyperplasia), are only partially counteracted by endovascular prosthetic devices (s tents). The rate of in-s tent restenosis, which is primarily caused by neo intimal hyperplasia due to the (micro) trauma of the arterial wall by the s tent struts, has been reduced to 18-32%. Ionizing (beta or gamma) radiations has been established as a potent treatment for malignant disorders. In recent years, there has also been increasing interest among clinicians in the management of benign lesions with radiation. Over the past several years, there has been a growing body of evidence that endovascular brachytherapy has a major impact on the biology of the restenosis. It must be underlined that understanding the biology and pathophysiology of restenosis and assessing various treatment options should preferably be a team effort, with the three gracesbeing interventional cardiologist, nuclear oncologist, and industrial partners. The vast amount of data in over 20000 patients from a wide range of randomized controlled trials, has shown that brachytherapy is the only effective treatment for in-s tent restenosis. We are learning more and more about how to improve brachytherapy. While the new coated s tents that we heard about today is fascinating and extremely promising, brachytherapy still has a very important place in difficult patients, such as those with total occlusions, osti al lesions, left main lesions, multivessel disease and diabetes. Regarding to above mentioned tips, we (a research team work, in the Nuclear Research Center Of the Atomic Energy Organization Of Iran), focused on synthesis and preparation of radioactive materials for use in I c-B T. We

  16. Comparison of different application systems and CT-assisted treatment planning procedures in the treatment of primary endometrium carcinoma. Is it technically possible to include the whole uterus volume in the volume treated by brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a consecutive series of 10 patients with primary irradiated endometrial carcinoma we analyzed the correlation between target volume and treated volume using either standard 1-channel applicators or individual Heyman-applicators. Application of the ovoids was followed by a planning CT scan for all patients. Based on this, target volume (uterus volume) was estimated on a 3D-planning system. According to the measurable length of the uterus cavity we determined the corresponding standard 1-channel applicator and calculated the respectively treated volume. Estimating the advantages of an optimized treatment planning strategy for individual Heyman-applications we compared the treated volumes, which result from a standardized and optimized treatment planning procedure. The mean uterus volume was 180 cm3 (range 57 to 316 cm3). Asymmetric uterus configurations with longitudinal or sagittal side differences exceeding 1 cm were found in 40% of the cases. Using standard 1-channel applicators on average 47% (range 25 to 89%) of the uterus volume were enclosed by the treated volume compared to 70% for Heyman-applications. Differentiating these individual applications according to the variable treatment modality values of mean 66% (range 36 to 110%) for the standardized and 73% (range 48 to 95%) for the optimized treatment planning strategy were found. Moreover optimized planning modalities led to an improved coverage of the target volume in 5 out of 10 cases with an increase in volume of 20% on average (range 11 to 32%). In 3 cases changes of less than 5% were noticed (no improvement). In order to protect organs at risk treated volume had to be decreased in 2 cases for 19% and 40% respectively. (orig./MG)

  17. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold198, Cesium137 and Iridium192. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  18. Quality assurance programme in high dose rate brachytherapy with Iridium-192 source. Recommendations of the French Medical Physicists Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report on Quality Assurance in High Dose Rate brachytherapy with Iridium-192 source has been prepared by the task group of the Brachytherapy committee of the French Medical Physicists Society. This report provides recommendations on what should be tested, the methods to be used, the test frequencies and the tolerances. The Quality Assurance Programme concerns mainly the Q.A. on the treatment unit, the treatment planning system and the patient procedure. Tolerances and action levels are linked to international recommendations. Safety standards are linked to national legislation and to international recommendations. It is the responsibility of the Institution to verify that the source calibration provided by the manufacturer is correct. The calibration of the Iridium-192 source should be an in-air measurement of air-kerma using an ionization chamber. The recommended tolerance between manufacturer and Institution calibration is 3 %. Quality Control on remote afterloading systems should include consideration of the accuracy and reproducibility of positioning of sources in the applicators. Safety features must also be evaluated regularly and emergency procedures should be tested regularly and posted in a prominent place. After the detailed acceptance tests of dose calculation algorithm, routine checks should be done after software update. An independent dose calculation is recommended before treatment. The recommended agreement with the computer calculation should be within 10%. A written dosimetry report for each brachytherapy procedure is recommended to be inserted in patient charts. The results of all tests should be recorded in a logbook. Fault conditions should be carefully documented

  19. An approach to using conventional brachytherapy software for clinical treatment planning of complex, Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Physics Section, ' ' La Fe' ' University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC (University of Valencia-CSIC), C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Certain brachytherapy dose distributions, such as those for LDR prostate implants, are readily modeled by treatment planning systems (TPS) that use the superposition principle of individual seed dose distributions to calculate the total dose distribution. However, dose distributions for brachytherapy treatments using high-Z shields or having significant material heterogeneities are not currently well modeled using conventional TPS. The purpose of this study is to establish a new treatment planning technique (Tufts technique) that could be applied in some clinical situations where the conventional approach is not acceptable and dose distributions present cylindrical symmetry. Dose distributions from complex brachytherapy source configurations determined with Monte Carlo methods were used as input data. These source distributions included the 2 and 3 cm diameter Valencia skin applicators from Nucletron, 4-8 cm diameter AccuBoost peripheral breast brachytherapy applicators from Advanced Radiation Therapy, and a 16 mm COMS-based eye plaque using {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs seeds. Radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions were obtained by positioning the coordinate system origin along the dose distribution cylindrical axis of symmetry. Origin:tissue distance and active length were chosen to minimize TPS interpolation errors. Dosimetry parameters were entered into the PINNACLE TPS, and dose distributions were subsequently calculated and compared to the original Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. The new planning technique was able to reproduce brachytherapy dose distributions for all three applicator types, producing dosimetric agreement typically within 2% when compared with Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Agreement between Monte Carlo-derived and planned dose distributions improved as the spatial resolution of the fitted dosimetry parameters improved. For agreement within 5% throughout the clinical volume, spatial resolution of

  20. Initial application of digital tomosynthesis to improve brachytherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Mirzaei McKee, Mahta; King, June; Godfrey, Devon J.

    2007-03-01

    We present preliminary investigations that examine the feasibility of incorporating volumetric images generated using digital tomosynthesis into brachytherapy treatment planning. The Integrated Brachytherapy Unit (IBU) at our facility consists of an L-arm, C-arm isocentric motion system with an x-ray tube and fluoroscopic imager attached. Clinically, this unit is used to generate oblique, anterior-posterior, and lateral images for simple treatment planning and dose prescriptions. Oncologists would strongly prefer to have volumetric data to better determine three dimensional dose distributions (dose-volume histograms) to the target area and organs at risk. Moving the patient back and forth to CT causes undo stress on the patient, allows extensive motion of organs and treatment applicators, and adds additional time to patient treatment. We propose to use the IBU imaging system with digital tomosynthesis to generate volumetric patient data, which can be used for improving treatment planning and overall reducing treatment time. Initial image data sets will be acquired over a limited arc of a human-like phantom composed of real bones and tissue equivalent material. A brachytherapy applicator will be incorporated into one of the phantoms for visualization purposes. Digital tomosynthesis will be used to generate a volumetric image of this phantom setup. This volumetric image set will be visually inspected to determine the feasibility of future incorporation of these types of images into brachytherapy treatment planning. We conclude that initial images using the tomosynthesis reconstruction technique show much promise and bode well for future work.

  1. Intraluminal brachytherapy with metallic stenting in the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of the bile duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to describe the outcome of intraluminal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with metallic stenting in patients with obstructing extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Eight patients with inoperable and/or unresectable extrahepatic bile duct carcinomas were treated with intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) followed by self-expandable metallic stent placement. Following percutaneous transhepatic drainage, ILBT was delivered by an HDR-Ir-192 source using the Micro-Selectron afterloading device. Two treatments were planned one week apart, with each treatment consisting of a single 10 Gy fraction. Biliary patency and palliative effect were assessed by serial labs (including bilirubin/alkaline phosphatase), symptomatic improvement, and/or cholangiography. All eight patients tolerated the first application of ILBT well, and five of them completed two-intraluminal treatments. Six of eight had satisfactory control of jaundice until death. Pain relief was observed in four of five (80%) and pruritis in six of seven (86%) patients experiencing such symptoms. The mean and median times of stent patency were 6.9 and 5 months (range, 4-14), respectively. Gastrointestinal bleeding and/or cholangitis occurred in three patients. HDR ILBT with metallic stenting for patients with obstructive jaundice from extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma appears to be feasible and associated with acceptable toxicity. These treatments may lead to an improved quality of life in these patients. (author)

  2. Clinical results in carcinoma of the cervix: radium compared to caesium using remote afterloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, S M; Fairey, R N; Kornelsen, R O; Young, M E; Wong, F L

    1989-05-01

    In 1979 the Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia changed from radium to remote controlled afterloaded caesium in the treatment of carcinoma of the cervix. In the 3 years prior to the change, 139 patients received radium as part of their treatment and in the 3 years after the change, 158 patients received caesium. Overall referral patterns, patient and cancer demographics, and treatment policies were stable throughout the 6-year period. Radiotherapy technique, dose, dose distribution and dose rate were comparable for both radium and caesium treated patients. The results of treatment in the two time periods showed no difference in survival, local tumour control or complications. The use of afterloading has not compromised treatment results and has allowed better nursing care for patients and protection from radiation for all staff. PMID:2752690

  3. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  4. [Improvement of gynecologic radium therapy through the afterloading method using cesium 137].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, D V; Senf, W; Kuttig, H; Kubli, F

    1976-03-01

    For all centers performing gynecological contact irradiation the use of afterloading techniques is urgently required, since they eliminate any radiation exposure to the personnel. The radio-therapist may position and control the empty applicators still free from radiation withoug haste. This procedure diminishes the occurrence of overdosages and underdosages. The care for the patients is possible without radiation exposure, and the morbidity of contact therapy can be reduced by occasional mobilization of the patient, the applicator without sources remaining at its place. The fully automatic apparatus "Curietron" using cesium-137 sources (0.662 MeV gamma emission, half-life period 26.6 years) with an equivalent source activity (factor 2.6) yields the dose distribution demanded in the gynecologic field which in practice is identical to that of Ra-226 (medium gamma emission 1 MeV, half-life period 1620 years). With similar dose distribution, a biological and therapeutical effect alike to Ra-226 may be expected from Cs-137. In comparison with Ra-226, the following advantages of Cs-137 may be mentioned: Lower half-value thickness of 5.5 mm lead (low expenses for radioprotection), less danger with handling (no emanation of radioactive gases), and lower contamination risks in case of breaking. The measured dose distributions at equivalent source activity and similar geometry of the applicators revealed the possibility with regard of all techniques of gynecologic irradiation utilized in our field of arriving at similar relative and absolute dose distributions by means of the Cs-137 afterloading technique. Whilst short-term afterloading irradiation with highly active sources, their radiobiological effectiveness being not yet ascertained, has to be tested at appropriate scientific centers, it is necessary to demand afterloading techniques with dosages and duration of irradiations approved over decades for all centers of gynecological contact therapy because of radiation

  5. Pulmonary vascular wall stiffness: An important contributor to the increased right ventricular afterload with pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Arterial stiffening, which can occur in both the proximal and distal pulmonary arteries, is an important index of disease p...

  6. Frequency of afterload homocysteinemia in normal population of Southern Iran: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, A; Dehbozorgian, J; Afrasibi, A R; Gafari, H; Gerdabi, J; Karimi, M

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of the present pilot study were to investigate the effect of an oral methionine load on plasma homocysteine in healthy subjects southern Iran. We studied 50 peoples (10 men, 40 women, median age 27.5, range 20-37) referred to screening center for marriage since different part of southern Iran. Methionine (0.1 g kg(-1) b.wt.) was immediately administrated orally in 200 mL of orange juice and a second blood was obtained 4 h later. Plasma level of homocysteine was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography and flumetric detection. A homocysteine level above 15 mmol L(-1) was considered high. The mean fasting and afterload homocysteine were 15.28 and 31.29 micromol L(-1), respectively. Fasting hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 micromol L(-1)) was detected in 12% of male and 8% in female which significantly higher in men than women (p homocysteine levels (> 31 micromol L(-1)) was detected in 16% of male and 14%in female which higher in men than women. Notably 80% of participants had normal total homocystein concentration (homocystein levels (p = 0.000), in 8% of those normal homocystein level, methionine afterload homocystein levels became abnormal. In conclusion, based on results, we recommend the methionine afterload homocystein levels in high risk cases with normal fasting level in order to unmissed some cases with normal basal homocystein level. PMID:20836293

  7. Afterload reduction: a comparison of captopril and nifedipine in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, P G; De Cesare, N; Doria, E; Polese, A; Tamborini, G; Guazzi, M D

    1986-01-01

    Nifedipine and captopril are potent vasodilators and may be expected to help left ventricular failure by reducing afterload. Nifedipine (20 mg three times a day) and captopril (50 mg three times a day) were added to an optimal regimen of digitalis and diuretics in a double blind crossover trial in 18 cases of dilated cardiomyopathy. New York Heart Association functional class rating symptoms and exercise tolerance times improved on captopril but not on nifedipine. The reduction in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and the increase of cardiac output on captopril indicated that the augmented functional capacity may have resulted in part from an improved performance of the left ventricle. Although there were comparable decreases in systemic vascular resistance and presumably in impedence to ejection by the left ventricle on both drugs, the dimensions of the ventricular cavity were found to be reduced by captopril and augmented by nifedipine, and only captopril reduced the afterload (wall stress). In addition, the force-length relation (between left ventricular end systolic stress and end systolic diameter) was shifted to the left of baseline by captopril and to the right by nifedipine, suggesting that muscle contractility was reduced by nifedipine and not by captopril. These results suggest that nifedipine and captopril have different effects on afterload and contractility and these may account for the different effects of these drugs on the performance of the heart and clinical responses. PMID:3516187

  8. High dose rate brachytherapy using custom made superficial mould applicators and Leipzig applicators for non melanoma localized skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, A. Cassio A.; Miziara, Daniela; Lima, Flavia Pedroso de; Miziara, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: advances in technology and the commercial production of Leipzig applicators allowed High Dose Rate after-load brachytherapy (HDR-BT) to address a number of the challenges associated with the delivery of superficial radiation to treat localized non melanoma skin cancer (NMSK). We reviewed our uni-institutional experience on the treatment of NMSK with HDR-BT. Methods: data were collected retrospectively from patients attending the Radiation Oncology Department at AV Carvalho Insitute, Sao Paulo, Brazil. HDR-BT was done using the stepping source HDR 192Ir Microselectron (Nucletron BV). The planning target volume consisted of the macroscopic lesion plus a 5mm to 10mm margin.The depth of treatment was 0.5 cm in smaller (< 2.0 cm) tumors and 10 to 15 mm for lesions bigger than that. Results: Thirteen patients were treated with HDR-BT from June, 2007 to June 2013. The median age and follow up time were 72 (38-90) years old and 36 (range, 7-73) months, respectively. There a predominance of males (61.5%) and of patients referred for adjuvant treatment due positive surgical margins or because they have had only a excision biopsy without safety margins (61.5%). Six (46.2%) patients presented with squamous cell carcinoma and 7 (53.8%) patients presented with basal cell carcinoma. The median tumor size was 20 (range, 5-42) mm. Patients were treated with a median total dose of 40 Gy (range, 20 -60), given in 10 (range, 2-15) fractions, given daily or twice a week. All patients responded very well to treatment and only one patient has failed locally so far, after 38 months of the end of the irradiation. The crude and actuarial 3-year local control rates were 100% and 80%, respectively. Moist desquamation, grade 2 RTOG, was observed in 4 (30.8%) patients. Severe late complication, radiation-induced dyspigmentation, occurred in 2 patients and 1 of the patients also showed telangiectasia in the irradiated area. The cosmetic result was considered good in 84% (11/13) patients

  9. Feasibility of combined operation and perioperative intensity-modulated brachytherapy of advanced/recurrent malignancies involving the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strege, R.J.; Eichmann, T.; Mehdorn, H.M. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kovacs, G.; Niehoff, P. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Interdisciplinary Brachytherapy Center; Maune, S. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Otolaryngology; Holland, D. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Ophthalmology

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical feasibility and toxicity of combined operation and perioperative intensity-modulated fractionated interstitial brachytherapy (IMBT) in advanced-stage malignancies involving the skull base with the goal of preserving the patients' senses of sight. Patients and Methods: This series consisted of 18 consecutive cases: ten patients with paranasal sinus carcinomas, five with sarcomas, two with primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs), and one with parotid gland carcinoma. After, in most cases, subtotal surgical resection (R1-R2: carried out so that the patients' senses of sight were preserved), two to twelve (mean five) afterloading plastic tubes were placed into the tumor bed. IMBT was performed with an iridium-192 stepping source in pulsed-dose-rate/high-dose-rate (PDR/HDR) afterloading technique. The total IMBT dose, ranging from 10 to 30 Gy, was administered in a fractionated manner (3-5 Gy/day, 5 days/week). Results: Perioperative fractionated IMBT was performed in 15 out of 18 patients and was well tolerated. Complications that partially prevented or delayed IMBT in some cases included cerebrospinal fluid leakage (twice), meningitis (twice), frontal brain syndrome (twice), afterloading tube displacement (twice), seizure (once), and general morbidity (once). No surgery- or radiation-induced injuries to the cranial nerves or eyes occurred. Median survival times were 33 months after diagnosis and 16 months after combined operation and IMBT. Conclusion: Perioperative fractionated IMBT after extensive but vision-preserving tumor resection seems to be a safe and well-tolerated treatment of advanced/recurrent malignancies involving the skull base. These preliminary state suggest that combined operation and perioperative fractionated IMBT is a palliative therapeutic option in the management of fatal malignancies involving the base of the skull, a strategy which leaves the patients' visual acuity intact. (orig.)

  10. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was

  11. Brachytherapy in Gynecologic Cancers: Why Is It Underused?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kathy; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2016-04-01

    Despite its established efficacy, brachytherapy is underused in the management of cervical and vaginal cancers in some parts of the world. Possible reasons for the underutilization of brachytherapy include the adoption of less invasive techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy; reimbursement policies favoring these techniques over brachytherapy; poor physician or patient access to brachytherapy; inadequate maintenance of brachytherapy skills among practicing radiation oncologists; transitioning to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with increased time requirements; and insufficient training of radiation oncology residents.

  12. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  13. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy

  14. Tomosynthesis-based localization of radioactive seeds in prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurately assessing the quality of prostate brachytherapy intraoperatively would be valuable for improved clinical outcome by ensuring the delivery of a prescribed tumoricidal radiation dose to the entire prostate gland. One necessary step towards this goal is the robust and rapid localization of implanted seeds. Several methods have been developed to locate seeds from x-ray projection images, but they fail to detect completely-overlapping seeds, thus necessitating manual intervention. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a new method where (1) a three-dimensional volume is reconstructed from x-ray projection images using a brachytherapy-specific tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithm with built-in blur compensation and (2) the seeds are located in this reconstructed volume. In contrast to other projection-based methods, our method can detect completely overlapping seeds. Our simulation results indicate that we can locate all implanted seeds in the prostate using a tomosynthesis angle of 30 deg. and seven projection images. The mean localization error is 1.27 mm for a case with 100 seeds. We have also tested our method using a prostate phantom with 61 implanted seeds and succeeded in locating all seeds automatically. We believe this new method can be useful for the intraoperative quality assessment of prostate brachytherapy in the future

  15. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As suggested by

  16. Water equivalent phantom materials for (192)Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-21

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with (192)Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading (192)Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm.The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm.As suggested

  17. Aktuelle Entwicklungen in der Strahlentherapie des Prostatakarzinoms: HDR-Brachytherapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knocke-Abulesz TH

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In der primären Therapie des Prostatakarzinoms ist die Seed-Implantation neben der radikalen Prostatektomie und der konformalen 3D-geplanten Teletherapie in den letzten Jahren insbesondere bei den lokal begrenzten Tumoren die dritte etablierte Behandlungstechnik geworden. In den USA werden bereits fast ein Drittel der Patienten mit dieser Technik behandelt. Im Gegensatz hierzu wurde in der Strahlentherapie in den letzten beiden Jahrzehnten die Langzeit-Implantation von Nukliden bei den meisten Tumoren zugunsten der fraktionierten Afterloading-Bestrahlung in "high dose rate" (HDR- Technik ersetzt – wobei partiell für HNO- und gynäkologische Tumoren die HDR-Technik als "pulse-dose-rate" (PDR- Verfahren modifiziert wird, um die biologischen Vorteile der LDR- und die technologischen Vorteile der HDR-Anwendung zu vereinen. Vorteile der Methode im Vergleich zur Seed-Implantation sind: – Niedrigere Kosten, allgemeine Verfügbarkeit, – Idealer Strahlenschutz, – Zuverlässige Dosisverteilung, – Keine Migration von Seeds, – Durchführbar auch nach TURP, – Durchführbar bei manifesten Lokalrezidiven. Allerdings liegen bisher nur vereinzelte klinische Ergebnisse beim Prostatakarzinom vor, die zeigen, daß eine lokale Dosiserhöhung in Kombination mit der Teletherapie eine Verbesserung der lokalen Kontrolle bei kapselüberschreitenden Tumoren ermöglicht. Inwieweit der Einsatz der Technik bei Lokalrezidiven zu langandauernden Remissionen führen kann, ist Gegenstand von laufenden Untersuchungen. Der Ersatz der Seed-Implantation durch eine 2-tägige fraktionierte Brachytherapie mit vier Bestrahlungen ist derzeit Gegenstand einer prospektiven Studie, deren erste Langzeitergebnisse in diesem Jahr erwartet werden.

  18. Brachytherapy in coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National University Medicine School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality across the world. Percutaneous coronary intervention has become the major technique of revascularization. However, restenosis remains a major limitation of this procedure. Recently the need for repeat intervention due to restenosis, the most vexing long-term failure of percutaneous coronary intervention, has been significantly reduced owing to the introduction to two major advances, intracoronary brachytherapy and the drug-eluting stents, intracoronary brachytherapy has been employed in recent years to prevent restenosis lesions with effective results, principally in in-stent restenosis. Restenosis is generally considered as an excessive form of normal wound healing divided up in processes: elastic recoil, neointimal hyperplasia, and negative vascular remodeling. Restenosis has previously been regarded as a proliferative process in which neointimal thickening, mediated by a cascade of inflammatory mediators and other factors, is the key factor. Ionizing radiation has been shown to decrease the proliferative response to injury in animal models of restenosis. Subsequently, several randomized, double-blind trials have demonstrated that intracoronary brachytherapy can reduce the rates to both angiographic restenosis and clinical event rates in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for in-stent restenosis. Some problems, such as late thrombosis and edge restenosis, have been identified as limiting factors of this technique. Brachytherapy is a promising method of preventing and treating coronary artery restenosis.

  19. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  20. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  1. Panoptes: Calibration of a dosimetry system for eye brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraocular cancer is a serious threat to the lives of those that suffer from it. Dosimetry for eye brachytherapy presents a significant challenge due to the inherently steep dose gradients that are needed to treat such small tumours in close proximity to sensitive normal structures. This issue is addressed by providing much needed quality assurance to eye brachytherapy, a novel volumetric dosimetry system, called PANOPTES was developed. This study focuses on the preliminary characterisation and calibration of the system. Using ion beam facilities, the custom, pixelated silicon detector of PANOPTES was shown to have good charge collection uniformity and a well defined sensitive volume. Flat-field calibration was conducted on the device using a 250 kVp orthovoltage beam. Finally, the detector and phantom were simulated with Monte Carlo in Geant4, to create water equivalent dose correction factors for each pixel across a range of angles. - Highlights: • Volumetric detector system produced for plaque brachytherapy. • Orthovoltage, flat-field calibration performed for detector pixels. • Monte Carlo simulation showed mostly little angular deviation across all angles. • Ion beam induced charge collection showed pixels uniform and fully depleted

  2. High-dose rate iridium-192 brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Kotaro; Inoue, Keiji; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichiro; Kariya, Shinji; Inomata, Taisuke; Yoshida, Shoji; Shuin, Taro [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    We report our technique and also preliminary results in the cases with localized prostate cancer treated by the combination of high-dose rate Iridium-192 (HDR-Ir 192) brachytherapy and external irradiation. From June 1999 to August 2000, 17 patients were treated by the combination of HDR-Ir 192 and external beam. The mean age of patients was 72 years (range, 48-81 years). The clinical stage was B1 in 5, B2 in 7 and C (no cancer with seminal vesicle) in 5 cases. Of 10 patients without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, the median initial pretreatment PSA was 15.3 ng/ml (6.93-222.32 ng/ml). The treatment was given by HDR-Ir 192 brachytherapy (6 Gy x 3 times/2 days) and external beam irradiation (40 or 45 Gy). The brachytherapy was given using TRUS guided percutaneously inserted temporary needles with a high dose rate remote afterloading control. Local control was evaluated by digital rectal examination, TRUS-guided biopsies and serum PSA evaluations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 14 months, with a median of 8 months. In 4 (40.0%) of 10 patients without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy the level of serum PSA was decreased to less than 4.0 ng/ml within 3 months after the therapy. The effective grade in the biopsy specimens of 8 patients without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was Grade 0b in 4, Grade 1 in 1, Grade 3 in 3 cases at 3 months after the therapy. No severe intra-or peri-operative complications occurred. The combined radiotherapy treatment is safe and effective for use in the patients with localized prostate cancer. However, more comprehensive studies involving long-term follow-up and great numbers of the cases with localized prostate cancer treated by the combination of HDR-Ir 192 brachytherapy and external irradiation will be necessary to determine whether this therapy contributes to better prognosis. (author)

  3. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-05-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  4. GGEMS-Brachy: GPU GEant4-based Monte Carlo simulation for brachytherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In brachytherapy, plans are routinely calculated using the AAPM TG43 formalism which considers the patient as a simple water object. An accurate modeling of the physical processes considering patient heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) methods is currently too time-consuming and computationally demanding to be routinely used. In this work we implemented and evaluated an accurate and fast MCS on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for brachytherapy low dose rate (LDR) applications. A previously proposed Geant4 based MCS framework implemented on GPU (GGEMS) was extended to include a hybrid GPU navigator, allowing navigation within voxelized patient specific images and analytically modeled 125I seeds used in LDR brachytherapy. In addition, dose scoring based on track length estimator including uncertainty calculations was incorporated. The implemented GGEMS-brachy platform was validated using a comparison with Geant4 simulations and reference datasets. Finally, a comparative dosimetry study based on the current clinical standard (TG43) and the proposed platform was performed on twelve prostate cancer patients undergoing LDR brachytherapy. Considering patient 3D CT volumes of 400  × 250  × 65 voxels and an average of 58 implanted seeds, the mean patient dosimetry study run time for a 2% dose uncertainty was 9.35 s (≈500 ms 10−6 simulated particles) and 2.5 s when using one and four GPUs, respectively. The performance of the proposed GGEMS-brachy platform allows envisaging the use of Monte Carlo simulation based dosimetry studies in brachytherapy compatible with clinical practice. Although the proposed platform was evaluated for prostate cancer, it is equally applicable to other LDR brachytherapy clinical applications. Future extensions will allow its application in high dose rate brachytherapy applications. (paper)

  5. A gEUD-based inverse planning technique for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of a new inverse planning technique based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose for image-guided high dose rate (HDR) prostate cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional dose-volume based optimization. Methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO (Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization) is compared with alternative plans, which were produced through inverse planning using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). All the common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk were considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by comparing dose volume histogram and gEUD evaluators. Results: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of gEUD-based inverse planning in HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate. A statistically significant decrease in D10 or/and final gEUD values for the organs at risk (urethra, bladder, and rectum) was found while improving dose homogeneity or dose conformity of the target volume. Conclusions: Following the promising results of gEUD-based optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment optimization, as reported in the literature, the implementation of a similar model in HDR brachytherapy treatment plan optimization is suggested by this study. The potential of improved sparing of organs at risk was shown for various gEUD-based optimization parameter protocols, which indicates the ability of this method to adapt to the user's preferences.

  6. The role of dosimetry audits in radiotherapy quality assurance: The 8 year experience in Greek radiotherapy and brachytherapy centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty six (26) radiotherapy (RT) centers (public and private) operate in Greece up to date (Apr. 2010), where 36 linacs and 8 Co-60 teletherapy units are being used, producing 64 photon beams (Co60, 6-23 MV) and 126 electron beams (4-21 MeV) in total. Furthermore, 7 HDR Ir192 and 2 MDR/LDR Cs137 remote afterloading brachytherapy systems operate. The Ionizing Radiation Calibration Laboratory (IRCL) of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) runs dosimetry audits in all Greek radiotherapy centers by means of on-site visits, in order to assess the dose accuracy, to identify and resolve problems on dosimetry, to provide intercomparisons to hospitals and disseminate the IAEA TRS 398 protocol. Additionally, the GAEC's IRCL calibrates the reference dosimetry equipment of all RT centers, in terms of absorbed dose in water at Co60 beam quality and air kerma strength at Ir192 qualities. The GAEC's dosimetry audit is a continuous process: The 1st round has been completed for the photons beams (2002 - 2006), electrons (2002 - 2008) and brachytherapy (2006-2009). The 2nd round is at the final stage for photons (2006-2010) and in progress for the rest, while a 3rd round for photons has already been initiated. The audit results for the photons 1st round have been published. This work presents the results of these audits and focuses on the improvements of RT centers' dosimetry during the successive audit rounds

  7. Physical aspects of radioisotope brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report represents an attempt to provide, within a necessarily limited compass, an authoritative guide to all important physical aspects of the use of sealed gamma sources in radiotherapy. Within the report, reference is made wherever necessary to the more extensive but scattered literature on this subject. While this report attempts to cover all the physical aspects of radioisotope 'brachytherapy' it does not, of course, deal exhaustively with any one part of the subject. 384 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  8. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, Gyoergy [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Interdiscipliary Brachytherapy Unit; Hoskin, Peter (ed.) [London Univ. College (United Kingdom). Mount Vernon Cancer Centre

    2013-07-01

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging for planning intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate Miranda, M; Pinho, D F; Wardak, Z; Albuquerque, K; Pedrosa, I

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common gynecological cancer. Its treatment depends on tumor staging at the time of diagnosis, and a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in locally advanced cervical cancers. The combined use of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy increases survival in these patients. Brachytherapy enables a larger dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumor with less toxicity for neighboring tissues with less toxicity for neighboring tissues compared to the use of external beam radiotherapy alone. For years, brachytherapy was planned exclusively using computed tomography (CT). The recent incorporation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides essential information about the tumor and neighboring structures making possible to better define the target volumes. Nevertheless, MRI has limitations, some of which can be compensated for by fusing CT and MRI. Fusing the images from the two techniques ensures optimal planning by combining the advantages of each technique.

  10. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  11. HDR brachytherapy. An option for preventing nonmalignant obstruction in patients after lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Interventional bronchoscopy is the main treatment modality in managing benign airway obstructions following lung transplantation. We analyzed the effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on preventing recurrence of hyperplastic tissue. Patients and methods: From September 2002 to September 2004, a total of 24 intraluminal brachytherapy applications were carried out on 12 lung transplant patients in 15 different locations. A single dose of 3 Gy was calculated at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface; the target volume included a stenosis plus safety interval of 0.5-1.0 cm. Results: All patients had a mean 10.6 local interventions (Argon plasma coagulation, balloon dilatations, stenting) over 4.4 months before the first application of endobronchial brachytherapy, with a mean amount of 2.4 applications per month. The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 2,219 ml in the 3 months before application of brachytherapy. After endobronchial brachytherapy, all patients experienced improvement in clinical status and respiratory function. The mean level of FEV1 in the 3 months after application was 2,435 ml (p = 0.02), and the number of invasive interventions dropped to a mean rate of 5.2 interventions in the 5.1 months after the first intervention, with an amount of 1 application per month. No treatment-related complications were seen. Four patients were treated twice, 1 patient three times, and 1 patient four times at the same localization. Conclusions: Recurrent symptomatic benign airway obstruction from hyperplastic tissue in the bronchus after lung transplantation can be successfully treated with intraluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy with a dose of 3 Gy at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface and a longitudinal safety margin of 1 cm. (orig.)

  12. HDR brachytherapy. An option for preventing nonmalignant obstruction in patients after lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.; Karstens, J.H.; Christiansen, H. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Warszawski-Baumann, A.; Baumann, R. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Medical Practice for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Gottlieb, J.; Welte, T. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Interventional bronchoscopy is the main treatment modality in managing benign airway obstructions following lung transplantation. We analyzed the effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on preventing recurrence of hyperplastic tissue. Patients and methods: From September 2002 to September 2004, a total of 24 intraluminal brachytherapy applications were carried out on 12 lung transplant patients in 15 different locations. A single dose of 3 Gy was calculated at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface; the target volume included a stenosis plus safety interval of 0.5-1.0 cm. Results: All patients had a mean 10.6 local interventions (Argon plasma coagulation, balloon dilatations, stenting) over 4.4 months before the first application of endobronchial brachytherapy, with a mean amount of 2.4 applications per month. The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 2,219 ml in the 3 months before application of brachytherapy. After endobronchial brachytherapy, all patients experienced improvement in clinical status and respiratory function. The mean level of FEV1 in the 3 months after application was 2,435 ml (p = 0.02), and the number of invasive interventions dropped to a mean rate of 5.2 interventions in the 5.1 months after the first intervention, with an amount of 1 application per month. No treatment-related complications were seen. Four patients were treated twice, 1 patient three times, and 1 patient four times at the same localization. Conclusions: Recurrent symptomatic benign airway obstruction from hyperplastic tissue in the bronchus after lung transplantation can be successfully treated with intraluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy with a dose of 3 Gy at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface and a longitudinal safety margin of 1 cm. (orig.)

  13. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  14. High-dose-rate afterloading intracavitary irradiation and expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis for malignant biliary obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double lumen catheter was developed as an applicator for the remote afterloading system (RALS) of 60Co for the intracavitary irradiation of an obstructed common bile duct due to gallbladder cancer in 1 case and by cholangiocarcinoma in 7 cases. This was followed by the biliary endoprosthesis with expandable metallic stents to maintain patency. The mean survival period after treatment was not long (14 weeks). However, removal of the external drainage tube was possible in 7 of the 8 cases, and none of the 8 cases showed dislodgement or deformity of the stent, or obstruction of the bile duct in the stent-inserted area. This combination effectively provided palliation, and has considerable potential for malignant biliary obstruction. (author)

  15. Five years hospital experience with the Amersham caesium 137 manual afterloading system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, T.J.; Davy, T.J.; Skeggs, D.B.L. (Royal Free Hospital, London (UK))

    1983-06-01

    The Amersham caesium 137 manual afterloading system for treatment of cancer of the uterine cervix and endometrium has been in use at the Royal Free Hospital for more than five years. The system uses permanently loaded flexible source pencils in combination with standard packs of disposable plastic applicators. Both sources and applicators have proved trouble-free in use. The sources are transported in special containers designed and built at the Royal Free Hospital and are inserted and removed on the ward by nursing staff. A set of sources is used in theatre for rectal and bladder dose measurements when the applicators are inserted. Staff radiation doses are low. The system is mainly used to produce pear-shaped dose distributions similar to those of the Manchester system, but simple cylindrical distributions are possible using symmetrically loaded source pencils.

  16. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm3 was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable reduction

  17. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  18. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, FMIPA Institut Teknologi Bandung, Physics Buildings, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  19. Treatment results of stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for primary and metastatic brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, G.L.; Luxton, G.; Cohen, D.; Petrovich, Z.; Langholz, B.; Apuzzo, M.L.; Sapozink, M.D. (USC School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1991-08-01

    A total of 41 stereotactic interstitial brain implants in 39 patients were performed for recurrence after teletherapy (recurrence implant), or as part of initial treatment in conjunction with teletherapy (primary implant). Implanted tumors consisted of malignant gliomas (33), other primary brain tumors (3), and single metastatic lesions (3). All patients were temporarily implanted with Ir-192 using a coaxial catheter afterloading system; two patients were implanted twice. Survival post-implant for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 13 patients, was 10 months whether implanted primarily or for recurrence. Mean time to recurrence, measured from initiation of teletherapy to implantation, was 10 months. Twenty patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) had a median survival post-implant of 23 months for primary implants (7 patients) and 11 months for recurrence implants (13 patients). Mean time to recurrence, measured from initiation of teletherapy to implantation, was 19 months. Three patients (9%) of the evaluable group required reoperation for symptomatic mass effect, all with initial diagnosis of AA. Survival for this subgroup was 14, 22, and 32 months post-implantation. Using stereotactic techniques, interstitial brachytherapy of brain tumors was technically feasible with negligible acute morbidity and mortality, and appeared to offer limited prolongation of control for a subset of patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. The role of this modality in primary treatment for malignant gliomas needs to be further defined by prospectively randomized trials.

  20. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Comparison of two brachytherapy schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the survival rates and late effects for two groups of cervical cancer patients treated with almost the same external radiotherapy but different remote afterloading systems (RALS) for high-dose-rate intracavitary radiation therapy regimens. A total of 218 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated. For 98 patients, intracavitary brachytherapy was delivered with 6-7.5 Gy/fraction to Point A (Group A), and for 120, 5 Gy/fraction with a modified source step size (Group B). The 3-year cause-specific survival rates by stage and treatment schedule were Group A: 91% and Group B: 96% in Stage I, 89% and 92% in Stage II, 64% and 75% in Stage III, 44% and 69% in Stage IV. The survival curves did not reveal any statistically significant differences at any stage. The 3-year cumulative local failure rates were 14% in Group A and 7% in Group B (P = 0.1202), while the actuarial rates of developing rectal complication (Grade 2 or more) at 3 years were 25% in Group A and 4% in Group B (P < 0.0001). This retrospective analysis suggests that a low dose per fraction with modified source step size is advantageous because of yielding almost the same local control but with fewer rectal complications. (author)

  1. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  2. Higher caseload improves cervical cancer survival in patients treated with brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased caseload has been associated with better patient outcomes in many areas of health care, including high-risk surgery and cancer treatment. However, such a positive volume vs. outcome relationship has not yet been validated for cervical cancer brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physician caseload and survival rates in cervical cancer treated with brachytherapy using population-based data. Between 2005 and 2010, a total of 818 patients were identified using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model and propensity scores was used to assess the relationship between 5-year survival rates and physician caseloads. As the caseload of individual physicians increased, unadjusted 5-year survival rates increased (P = 0.005). Using a Cox proportional hazard model, patients treated by high-volume physicians had better survival rates (P = 0.03), after adjusting for comorbidities, hospital type, and treatment modality. When analyzed by propensity score, the adjusted 5-year survival rate differed significantly between patients treated by high/medium-volume physicians vs. patients treated by low/medium-volume physicians (60% vs. 54%, respectively; P = 0.04). Provider caseload affected survival rates in cervical cancer patients treated with brachytherapy. Both Cox proportional hazard model analysis and propensity scores showed association between high/medium volume physicians and improved survival

  3. Intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the practicability and preliminary effect of intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. Methods: Intraluminal brachytherapy was performed in 4 patients who had been treated with biliary stent implantation. Results: No complications related to intraluminal brachytherapy had happened. One patient was followed up by means of CT, showing reduction in tumor size. Conclusion: Intraluminal brachytherapy is a safe and effective method in treating malignant tumor causing obstructive jaundice

  4. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina; Kacsó, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  5. Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, Jasmine H., E-mail: francij1@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Segal, Kira; Cohen, Gil [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Gobin, Y. Pierre; Marr, Brian P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Brodie, Scott E. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Dunkel, Ira J.; Abramson, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG.

  6. Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG

  7. Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy as salvage treatment of locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P T; Roed, H; Engelholm, S A;

    1998-01-01

    presents the first clinical results from The Finsen Center with PDR-brachytherapy in patients with locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between June 1993 and August 1996, 34 patients with gynecologic malignancies (22 pelvic recurrences, 12 primary locally advanced) have....... There was no difference in survival probability when stratifying the patients by primary diagnosis (recurrent vs. primary advanced), relapse locations (central vs. central + pelvic wall mass) or treatment volume. Seventeen chronic grade III complications were observed in 10 patients. Large treatment volumes significantly...... correlated to severe gastrointestinal complications. Fifteen of 17 chronic grade III complications were observed in patients treated for recurrent disease. CONCLUSION: PDR-brachytherapy in combination with external irradiation is an effective treatment option for patients with locally advanced or recurrent...

  8. Low dose rate caesium-137 implant time of intracavitary brachytherapy source of a selected oncology center in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Owusu Banahene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment time taken for a radioactive source is found to be very important in intracavitary brachytherapy treatment. The duration of the treatment time depends on the prescribed dose requested to a reference point and the calculated dose rate to the same point. The duration of the treatment time of source is found to depend on the tumour stage. In this work, the treatment time of implant has been calculated for a Caesium-137 low dose rate brachytherapy source at an oncology facility in Ghana. Objective: The objective was to determine how the treatment time of tumours depends on the dose rate to the reference point prescribed by the Oncologists and the dose rate determined by the dosimetrists at the facility. Materials and Method: Depending upon the stage of the cancer, the Oncologist determines the type of treatment modality, source configuration for the cancer patient and positions of both tandem and ovoids in the cervix. Depending also on the tumour stage, two orthogonal radiographic X-ray films are taken using a simulator machine. The treatment machine used in the study is AMRA-Curietron. The maximum activity of the source was 259GBq. It has five channels which is a manual remote afterloader. In clinical practice, the treatment time t is very short(only some few days for such low dose rate brachytherapy source like Cs-137 which lasts only for some few days in comparison with the half life of the Cs-137 source. The mathematical equation for the calculation of treatment time is written as t=D/D. Hence t is the treatment time of the radioactive source of patients undergoing intracavitary brachytherapy treatment, D is prescribed dose to a reference point and D is the dose rate to the same reference point. Results: The calculated treatment time of the Cs-137 brachytherapy source for different source arrangements or channels used in clinical practice at the brachytherapy Centre have been determined. Also provided, are the

  9. Simulation of 3D Needle-Tissue Interaction with Application to Image Guided Prostate Brachytherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜杉; HATA; Nobuhiko; 肖渤瀚; 安蔚瑾

    2010-01-01

    To improve global control of disease and reduce global toxicity, a complex seed distribution pattern should be achieved with great accuracy during brachytherapy.However, the interaction between the needle and prostate will cause large deformation of soft tissue.As a result, seeds will be misplaced, sharp demarcation between irradiated volume and healthy structures is unavailable and this will cause side effects such as impotence and urinary incontinence.In this paper, a 3D nonlinear dynamic finite element s...

  10. Volume study pre and post-implant brachytherapy prostate for establishment of PTV margins; Estudio de volumenes pre y post-implante en braquiterapia de prostata para establecimiento de margenes del PTV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Dominguez, M.; Carrasco Herrera, M.; Baeza Trujillo, M.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2011-07-01

    Treatment of prostate cancer by permanent implantation of radioactive seeds is now a good alternative to radical surgery or radiotherapy, as it provides a good tumor control while the risk is reduced by a lower complication irradiation of adjacent healthy organs. The large volume change during seed implantation occurs in the prostate of the patient, makes it important to consider margins around the organs of interest both to ensure optimal coverage and minimal tumor irradiation of healthy tissue. Analyze how the volume varies during and after implantation and establish a margin around the prostate to the practice of our hospital are the two objectives of this work.

  11. ACPSEM brachytherapy working group recommendations for quality assurance in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) Radiation Oncology Specialty Group (ROSG) formed a series of working groups in 2011 to develop recommendation papers for guidance of radiation oncology medical physics practice within the Australasian setting. These recommendations are intended to provide guidance for safe work practices and a suitable level of quality control without detailed work instructions. It is the responsibility of the medical physicist to ensure that locally available equipment and procedures are sufficiently sensitive to establish compliance to these recommendations. The recommendations are endorsed by the ROSG, have been subject to independent expert reviews and have also been approved by the ACPSEM Council. For the Australian audience, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with the Tripartite Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. This publication presents the recommendations of the ACPSEM Brachytherapy Working Group (BTWG) and has been developed in alignment with other international associations. However, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with relevant national, state or territory legislation and local requirements, which take precedence over the ACPSEM recommendation papers. It is hoped that the users of this and other ACPSEM recommendation papers will contribute to the development of future versions through the Radiation Oncology Specialty Group of the ACPSEM.

  12. Treatment of localized prostate cancer with brachytherapy: six years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usage of ultrasound scan to perform prostate biopsy punctures, the new radiation therapies and the more accurate selection of patients has allowed brachytherapy to play an important role in the treatment of the localized pathology. The objective of this paper is to review the results obtained when treating the localized prostate cancer by using brachytherapy with mud 125. Materials and methods: Between December 1999 and July 2006, 100 prostate cancer patients were treated at the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, using brachytherapy with mud 125. One of the patients was treated with a combined therapy (brachytherapy + external radiotherapy). For that reason, the patient was not taken into consideration for this paper. The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The tumoral stages were T1c in 81% of the patients and T2a in 19% of them. The PSA was always below 15 ng/ml, with an average of 8.92 ng/ml; inferior to 10 ng/ml in 72 patients and between 10 and 15 ng/m ml in 28 of them. The average prostate volume was 34.68 c.c. (18.70 c.c.-58.00 c.c.). The combined Gleason score was below 6 (except for three patients with Gleason 7 who had a PSA below 10, stage T1c). The dose used was 16,000 cGy as recommended by the TG43. The energy charge of each seed was between 0.28 and 0.40 mci. Thirty days later, a prostate axial computer tomography was carried out every 3 mm. with a scanning set every 5 mm. to perform a dosimetric control of the implant. Results: The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The control computer tomography showed an adequate dosimetric coverage for the entire prostate volume, with a maximum urethral dose not above 400 Gy and a maximum rectal dose below 100 Gy. The PSA of all patients decreased to a normal level 6 months after the treatment started. The average follow-up of the 71 patients able to be tested from an oncological perspective lasted 31.15 months, with a minimum of 18 and a maximum of 72 months. Currently, seven patients of those tested (9.86%) manifest

  13. Clinical experience with the MammoSite[reg] radiation therapy system for brachytherapy of breast cancer: Results from an international phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In a prospective multi-center phase II trial, we investigated the MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System, a new device for delivering intracavitary brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery. The MammoSite[reg] is a dual lumen, closed ended catheter with a small, spherical inflatable balloon and a port for connecting a remote afterloader to the central lumen. We analyzed the surgical procedure and placement of the MammoSite[reg], treatment planning and radiation delivery complications and cosmesis, as well the comfort for the patients. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2004 a total of 32 patients (pts) were implanted using the MammoSite[reg]. The reference isodose was defined 1 cm from the balloon surface. We analyzed the post-implant anatomic position of the applicator and the geometric form of the balloon via ultrasound, CT and X-ray, related side effects, cosmetic outcome and patient quality of life. Results: Twenty-three out of 32 patients (72%) were eligible for MammoSite[reg] intracavitary brachytherapy. Twenty-eight percentage had to be excluded because of different reasons. Eleven patients were treated with primary brachytherapy with a total dose of 34 Gy (2x3.4 Gy) and 12 had a boost with a mean dose of 13.3 Gy (range: 7.5-15 Gy; 2x2.5 Gy) combined with EBRT and doses ranged between 46 and 50 Gy. In three cases a balloon rupture occurred. We observed two abscesses within 3 months of implantation and serious seroma development in 10 patients (39%). Skin related side effects were erythema in 21 patients (91%), hyperpigmentation in 13 patients (56%) and teleangiectasia in six patients (26%) after mean follow-up 20 months. Conclusions: The MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System is a feasible treatment modality for intracavitary brachytherapy of breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. The advantage of the system is only one applicator is necessary for the delivery of a fractionated radiotherapy. In addition, patient

  14. Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-30

    The ICRU has previously published reports dealing with Dose Specification for Reporting External Beam Therapy with Photons and Electrons (ICRU Report 29, ICRU, 1978), Dose Specification for Reporting External Beam Therapy (ICRU Report 50, ICRU, 1993) and Dose and Volume Specification for Reporting Intracavitary Therapy in Gynecology (ICRU Report 38, ICRU, 1985). The present report addresses the problem of absorbed dose specification for report interstitial therapy. Although specific to interstitial therapy, many of the concepts developed in this report are also applicable to certain other kinds of brachytherapy applications. In particular, special cases of intraluminal brachytherapy and plesio-brachytherapy via surface molds employing x or gamma emitters are addressed in this report.

  15. Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRU has previously published reports dealing with Dose Specification for Reporting External Beam Therapy with Photons and Electrons (ICRU Report 29, ICRU, 1978), Dose Specification for Reporting External Beam Therapy (ICRU Report 50, ICRU, 1993) and Dose and Volume Specification for Reporting Intracavitary Therapy in Gynecology (ICRU Report 38, ICRU, 1985). The present report addresses the problem of absorbed dose specification for report interstitial therapy. Although specific to interstitial therapy, many of the concepts developed in this report are also applicable to certain other kinds of brachytherapy applications. In particular, special cases of intraluminal brachytherapy and plesio-brachytherapy via surface molds employing x or gamma emitters are addressed in this report

  16. Computed tomography-guided permanent brachytherapy for locoregional recurrent gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locoregional recurrence is the typical pattern of recurrence in gastric cancer, and cannot be removed by surgery in most of the patients. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided brachytherapy for patients with locoregional recurrent gastric cancer. We reviewed the case histories of 28 patients with locoregional recurrent gastric cancer that were selected for CT- guided brachytherapy by a multidisciplinary team. The clinical data of the patients including patient characteristics, treatment parameters, short-term effects, and survival data were collected and analyzed. 15-75 125I seeds were implanted into each patient to produce a minimal peripheral dose (MPD) 100-160 Gy. Median day 0 dosimetry was significant for the following: V100 (the volume treated with the prescription dose) 95.8% (90.2-120.5%) and D90 (prescription dose received by at least 90% of the volume) 105.2% (98.0-124.6%) of prescription dose. No serious complications occurred during the study. Two months after brachytherapy, complete response, partial response and progressive disease were observed in 50.0%, 28.6% and 21.4% of patients, respectively. The median survival time was 22.0 ± 5.2 months, and the 1, 2,and 3-year survival rate was 89 ± 6%, 52 ± 10% and 11 ± 7%, respectively. A univariate analysis showed that the tumor size was a significant predictor of overall survival (P = 0.034). Patients with tumors <3 cm had relatively higher complete response rate (66.7%), compared to those with tumors >3 cm (30.8%). The PTV (planning target volume) smaller than 45 cm3 was significantly correlated with achieving complete tumor eradication in the treated region (P = 0.020). For selected patients with limited locoregional recurrent gastric cancer, CT-guided brachytherapy using 125I seeds implantation can provide a high local control rate, with minimal trauma

  17. Dosimetric calculus in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment). Known as Intravascular Brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, 0.30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several radionuclides. Two stent sources employing 32P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the radionuclides and source geometries are discussed and the dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients. (author)

  18. Two years experience with a computer-assisted monitoring and recording system used in gynecological afterloading therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program running on a simple desk-calculator has been developed for monitoring and recording gynecological high-dose afterloading therapy. For treatment monitoring the multiple-probe AM6-system (PTW-Freiburg) is used which allows for dose measurements in the urinary bladder and the rectum. The probe signals are processed on line in order to indicate the actual dose at the measuring points. After completing the irradiation the treatment is documented. Performing fractionated treatment the measuring data are stored in the computer memory for calculating total accumulated dose. The above-described monitoring- and protocolling system has proven its usefulness during two years of clinical work. (orig.)

  19. Optimization in brachytherapy with the implementation of Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the brachytherapy planning treatments with High dose rates (HDR), the optimization algorithms used are based in dosimetric considerations and/or geometric ones, ignoring the radiobiological response of the tissue treated. In this work we wish to show the implementation of radiobiological concepts in the optimization. Assuming that the subtiles differences that result in the dose distribution among the different optimization models which are not visible in an isodose plane, it is studied how is classically make it , the quality implant through natural histograms about dose volumes and the resulting parameters. Also is studied the necrosis probability which may be caused by the choice of some optimization model, allowing with this the choice of the best implant. (Author)

  20. HDR intralumenal brachytherapy in bronchial cancer: review of our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main indications for brachytherapy in the treatment of endobronchial cancer are dyspnea. postobstructive pneumonia and atelectasis, cough and hemoptysis resulting from broncus obstruction by exophytic intralumenal tumor growth. High Dose Rate intralumenal brachytherapy (HDRBT) may be combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in particular as almost all tumors are too large for HDRBT alone. From January 1992 to September 1995 we treated 268 patients affected by bronchial cancer, with EBRT combined with HDRBT. All patients were staged as IIIa-IIIb-IV but KPS was >60 and expectancy of life > than 3 months. After bronchoscopy and Tc simulation we found that almost 10% of patients were downstaged. Treatment was always realized delivering 60 Gy to the tumour volume and 50 Gy to the mediastinal structures with EBRT. Brachytherapy was performed during the radiotherapy course. In 38 patients HDRBT was realized just one time, at the beginning of EBRT, with a dose of 10 Gy calculated at 1cm from the central axis of the catheter. In 47 HDRBT was performed twice (at the beginning and at the end of EBRT) with a dose of 7 Gy calculated at 1 cm from the central axis. From 1994 we started a 3 fractions protocol (Timing: days 1.15.30) with a dose of 5 Gy calculated at 0.5 cm from the axis. Of the 183 patients introduced in the protocol 170 received the three fractions of HDRBT and 13 were excluded from the study for personal or clinical reasons. In 97% of cases the application did not need general anesthesia; local anesthesia has been sufficient supplemented by some drug for sedation and coughing. Anyway both bronchoscopy and HDRBT (with anterior-posterior and lateral chest X-ray) are performed in the same shielded room without the necessity of displacing the patient. In almost 60% of treatments we used just one endobronchial applicator. In case of tumor involvement of the carina, two applicators were introduced. By this a larger tumor volume can be treated with adequate

  1. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  2. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...

  3. Chemoradiation in cervical cancer with cisplatin and high-dose rate brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results of a phase-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.G.; Laban, C.; Puschmann, D.; Koelbl, H. [Dept. of Gynecology, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Dunst, J.; Haensgen, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    chemoradiation with cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly x 6 using HDR brachytherapy represents a promising treatment of cervical cancer with an acceptable toxicity. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: 1999 zeigten fuenf randomisierte Studien, dass die simultane Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin und einer Low-Dose-Rate-Brachytherapie fuer Patientinnen mit einem lokal fortgeschrittenen Zervixkarzinom und in der adjuventen Hochrisikosituation einen Ueberlebensvorteil bringt. Wir untersuchten die Sicherheit und Effektivitaet der simultanen Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin und High-Dose-Rate-Brachytherapie bei diesen Patientinnen. Patientinnen und Methode: 27 Patientinnen wurden in unserer Phase-II-Studie eingeschlossen: 13 mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Zervixkarzinomen (Gruppe A) und 14 adjuvante Hochrisikopatientinnen (Gruppe B). Die primaer radiochemotherapierten Faelle erhielten 25 Fraktionen einer perktuanen Hochvolttherapie des Beckens (1,8 Gy pro Fraktion/Einbringen eines Mittelblocks nach elf Fraktionen). Die Brachytherapie wurde bei den FIGO-Stadien IIB-IIIB nach dem High-Dose-Rate-Afterloading-Prinzip mit 7 Gy pro Fraktion in Punkt A (Gesamtdosis 35 Gy) appliziert. Die Gesamtdosis der kombinierten Therapie war 70 Gy in Punkt A und 52-54 Gy in Punkt B. Bei den FIGO-Stadien IVA erfolgte keine Brachyhtherapie. Bei der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie wurde die perkutane Hochvolttherapie des Beckens mit Fraktionen von 1,8 Gy bis zu einer Gesamtdosis von 50,4 Gy appliziert. Die High-Dose-Rate-Afterloading-Brachytherapie mit zwei Fraktionen von 5 Gy erfolgte nur bei Patientinnen, bei denen sich im Operationspraeparat tumorbefallene Resektionsraender oder ein Befall der Scheide fanden. Das Chemotherapieregime mit 6 woechentlichen Gaben von 40 mg/m{sup 2} Cisplatin entsprach dem der Studien 120 und 123 der GOG. Ergebnisse: 18 von 27 Patientinnen (66,7%) erhielten alle sechs Cisplatingaben. Eine Unterbrechung der Strahlentherapie aufgrund von Nebenwirkungen war in keinem Fall erforderlich. Die G3

  4. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  5. Thyroid hormone reverses aging-induced myocardial fatty acid oxidation defects and improves the response to acutely increased afterload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolena Ledee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to the development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone supplementation reverses these defects. METHODS: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months and aged (Old, 22-24 months C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg and high afterload (80 mmHg. Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only. Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc to the citric acid cycle (CAC using perfusate with (13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. RESULTS: Old mice maintained cardiac function under standard workload conditions, despite a marked decrease in unlabeled (presumably palmitate Fc and relatively similar individual carbohydrate contributions. However, old mice exhibited reduced palmitate oxidation with diastolic dysfunction exemplified by lower -dP/dT. Thyroid hormone abrogated the functional and substrate flux abnormalities in aged mice. CONCLUSION: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  6. CT-guided brachytherapy. A novel percutaneous technique for interstitial ablation of liver malignancies; CT-gesteuerte Brachytherapie. Eine neue perkutane Technik zur interstitiellen Ablation von Lebermetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricke, J.; Wust, P.; Stohlmann, A.; Beck, A.; Cho, C.H.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Spors, B.; Werk, M.; Rosner, C.; Haenninen, E.L.; Felix, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to assess safety and efficacy of CT-guided brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Patients and methods: 21 patients with 21 liver malignancies (19 metastases, two primary liver tumors) were treated with interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy applying a {sup 192}Ir source. In all patients, the use of image-guided thermal tumor ablation such as by radiofrequency or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was impeded either by tumor size {>=} 5 cm in seven, adjacent portal or hepatic vein in ten, or adjacent bile duct bifurcation in four patients. Dosimetry was performed using three-dimensional CT data sets acquired after CT-guided positioning of the brachytherapy catheters. Results: the mean tumor diameter was 4.6 cm (2.5-11 cm). The mean minimal tumor dose inside the tumor margin amounted to 17 Gy (12-20 Gy). The proportion of the liver parenchyma exposed to > 5 gy was 18% (5-39%) of total liver parenchyma minus tumor volume. Nausea and vomiting were observed in six patients after brachytherapy (28%). One patient demonstrated obstructive jaundice due to tumor edema after irradiation of a metastasis adjacent to the bile duct bifurcation. We commonly encountered asymptomatic increases of liver enzymes. Local control rates after 6 and 12 months were 87% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: CT-guided brachytherapy is safe and effective. This technique displays broader indications compared to image-guided thermal ablation by radiofrequency or LITT with respect to tumor size or localization. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Analyse der Sicherheit und Effektivitaet CT-gesteuerter Brachytherapie zur Ablation von Lebermalignomen. Patienten und Methodik: 21 Patienten mit 21 Lebermalignomen (19 Metastasen, zwei primaere Lebermalignome) wurden mit perkutaner, CT-gesteuerter interstitieller Brachytherapie mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. Alle Patienten wiesen Umstaende auf, die eine bildgefuehrte thermische Ablation mit Radiofrequenz oder laserinduzierter Thermotherapie (LITT) einschraenkten

  7. Langzeitergebnisse bei Aderhautmelanom nach 106Ruthenium-Brachytherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Nona

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: 106Ruthenium-brachytherapy (106Ru-brachytherapy) is an established therapy for small and medium-sized uveal melanomas. The aim of this study was to examine the long-time results in regard to recurrence rate, complication rate, ocular preservation, metastasis rate and survival with malignant uveal and ciliary body melanoma, as well as relevant prognosis factors, subsequent to 106Ru-brachytherapy. Methodology: In this retrospective study of all cases with uveal or with ciliary ...

  8. Combined re-excision and perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for salvage of breast conservation therapy recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate local control, survival and cosmetic outcome of combined second lumpectomy and interstitial brachytherapy as salvage treatment for isolated local recurrence of breast cancer after breast conserving therapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1983 and 1996, 32 patients with isolated breast recurrence previously treated by breast conserving therapy, underwent salvage lumpectomy and perioperative brachytherapy. Initial staging and treatment were performed between 1975 and 1994. Median age at diagnosis was 45 years (range 31-67 years), 79% were pre or peri menopausal. Tumors were staged according to the AJCC-system with pathologic findings. Distribution of stage was T1 (n=24), T2 (n=8), in 79% of the patients axillary lymph nodes were negative and all were free of systemic disease. Breast conserving treatment consisted of lumpectomy plus axillary lymph nodes dissection, the mean excised breast tissue volume was 290 cc. All patient received external beam radiation therapy to a dose of 50 Gy/25 fr delivered on breast and nodal areas. Tumor bed was boosted to a total dose of 56 Gy (range 52-66 Gy) by external beam irradiation. Cosmetic outcome after initial therapy was excellent to good in all patients. The mean interval from the initial treatment and first local recurrence was 51 months. The tumor size at recurrence range between 0.2-2.5cm (median 1cm). Recurrence occurs on the boost area of the primary tumor in 13 patients, in other part of the breast in 14 and in the field edge in 5 patients. Treatment of the recurrence consisted of salvage lumpectomy, with a mean excised tissue volume of 51 cc. In all cases perioperative brachytherapy was also performed by introperative plastic tubes positioning. The implant target volume was determined according to surgery findings. Iridium wires were placed into the tubes with a delay of 3 to 4 days. Brachytherapy set up included one (n=20) or two (n=12) planes implants. The mean implant volume determined according

  9. Reduction of rectal doses by removal of gas in the rectum during vaginal cuff brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabater, S.; Sevillano, M.M.; Andres, I.; Berenguer, R. [Complejo Hospitalario Univ. de Albacete (CHUA) (Spain). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Machin-Hamalainen, S. [C.S. General Ricardos, Madrid (Spain); Mueller, K.; Arenas, M. [Hospital Univ. Sant Joan, Reus (Spain). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-11-15

    Objective: The goal of this work was to evaluate whether the volume reduction related to removal of gas in the rectum could be translated in lower doses to organs at risk (OAR) during vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VBT). Material and methods: Fourteen pairs of brachytherapy planning CT scans derived from 11 patients were re-segmented and re-planned using the same parameters. The only difference between pairs of CTs was the presence or lack of gas in the rectum. The first CT showed the basal status and the second was carried out after gas removal with a tube. A set of values derived from bladder and rectum dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose-surface histograms (DSH) were extracted. Moreover the cylinder position related to the patient craniocaudal axis was recorded. Results: Rectum volume decreased significantly from 77.8 {+-} 45 to 55.43 {+-} 17.6 ml (p = 0.0052) after gas removal. Such volume diminution represented a significant reduction on all rectal DVH parameters analyzed except D{sub 25%} and D{sub 50%}. DSH parameter results were similar to previous ones. A nonsignificant increase of the bladder volume was observed and was associated with an increase of the DVH metrics analyzed. Conclusion: Removal of gas pockets is a simple and inexpensive maneuver that decreases rectal dose parameters on VBT, which can be translated as a better therapeutic ratio. It also suggests that other actions directed to empty the rectum could have a similar effect. (orig.)

  10. Iodine-125 interstitial brachytherapy for experimental liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Fei-guo; YAN Jian-jun; HUANG Liang; LIU Cai-feng; ZHANG Xiang-hua; ZHOU Wei-ping; YAN Yi-qun

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of iodine-125 interstitial brachytherapy on liver cancer.Methods:Animal model of human liver cancer was established by injecting SMMC-7721 cells cultivated in vitro subcutaneously into the flank of BALB/c nude mice.Nude mice with tumor of 5 mm in diameter were randomly divided into 2 groups(n=10).One iodine-125 seed of apparent activity 0.8 mCi was implanted into the center of tumor in treatment group,whereas an inactive seed was implanted in control group.The other 20 nude mice with tumor reaching 10 mm in diameter were also treated as above.The size of tumor was determined weekly after implantation,and pathological examination and blood routine were taken on the 28th day.Results:Tumor growth was obviously inhibited in treatment group of tumor of 5 mm in diameter,and there was statistically significant difference in tumor volume between treatment and control groups(P<0.01).Around iodine-125 seed,apparent necrosis of tumor was shown in treatment group,accompanied by karyopyknosis and reduced plasma in residual tumor cells microscopically.Tumor growth was not inhibited in either treatment or control group of tumor of 10 mm in diameter.There was no obvious adverse effect except for decreased white blood cells in treatment groups.Conclusion:There is certain effect of iodine-125 interstitial brachytherapy on liver cancer,which is associated with the size of tumor.

  11. Development of prostate voxel models for brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adriano M.; Reis, Lucas P.; Grynberg, Suely E., E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b [Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The tools developed recently in the areas of computer graphics and animation movies to computer games allow the creation of new voxel anthropomorphic phantoms with better resolution and thus, more anatomical details. These phantoms can be used in nuclear applications, especially in radiation protection for estimating doses in cases of occupational or accidental radioactive incidents, and in medical and biological applications. For dose estimates, the phantoms are coupled to a Monte Carlo code, which will be responsible for the transport of radiation in this environment. This study aimed to develop a computational tool to estimate the isodose curves in the prostate after brachytherapy seed implants. For this, we have created a model called FANTPROST in the shape of a 48 mm side cube, with a standard prostate inserted in the center of this cube with different distributions of brachytherapy seeds in this volume. The prostate, according to this model, was obtained from the phantom voxels MASH2 developed by Numerical Dosimetry Group, Department of Nuclear Energy - Federal University of Pernambuco. The modeling of the seeds, added to FANTPROST, was done through the use of geometric information of Iodine-125 Amersham 6711 commercial seed. The simulations were performed by the code MCNP5 for spatial distributions containing different amounts of seeds within the FANTPROST. The obtained curves allowed an estimation of the behavior of the maximum dose that decreases with distance, showing that this tool can be used for a more accurate analysis of the effects produced by the presence of such seeds in the prostate and its vicinity. (author)

  12. Rapid emission angle selection for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang Wenjun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The authors present a rapid emission angle selection (REAS) method that enables the efficient selection of the azimuthal shield angle for rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). The REAS method produces a Pareto curve from which a potential RSBT user can select a treatment plan that balances the tradeoff between delivery time and tumor dose conformity. Methods: Two cervical cancer patients were considered as test cases for the REAS method. The RSBT source considered was a Xoft Axxent{sup TM} electronic brachytherapy source, partially shielded with 0.5 mm of tungsten, which traveled inside a tandem intrauterine applicator. Three anchor RSBT plans were generated for each case using dose-volume optimization, with azimuthal shield emission angles of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 270 Degree-Sign . The REAS method converts the anchor plans to treatment plans for all possible emission angles by combining neighboring beamlets to form beamlets for larger emission angles. Treatment plans based on exhaustive dose-volume optimization (ERVO) and exhaustive surface optimization (ERSO) were also generated for both cases. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that that high-risk clinical target volume D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. Results: By choosing three azimuthal emission angles out of 32 potential angles, the REAS method performs about 10 times faster than the ERVO method. By setting D{sub 90} to 85-100 Gy{sub 10}, the delivery times used by REAS generated plans are 21.0% and 19.5% less than exhaustive surface optimized plans used by the two clinical cases. By setting the delivery time budget to 5-25 and 10-30 min/fx, respectively, for two the cases, the D{sub 90} contributions for REAS are improved by 5.8% and 5.1% compared to the ERSO plans. The ranges used in this comparison were selected in order to keep both D{sub 90} and the delivery time within acceptable

  13. Development of a Brachytherapy Software Nomogram Equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this project is developing a software nomogram equivalent. A nomogram is a graph typically comprised of three parallel lines. Each of the lines is graduated for a different variable, often in a non-linear scale. The lines are oriented in such a manner that if a straight line is drawn connecting two of the three variables, the value of the third variable is uniquely determined by the intersection of the connecting line and the graduated line of the third variable. The value of the third variable is determined by reading the graduated scale at the point of intersection. A nomogram as applied in brachytherapy is used for determining the required amount of radioactive material to be implanted in a diseased site. A typical brachytherapy nomogram relates the average dimension of a site, the air kerma strength per source and the number of sources required for yielding a therapeutic radiation dose to the site. More sophisticated nomograms also provide scales for recommending source and needle spacings. For decades the nomogram has been clinically employed as a brachytherapy treatment planning tool. Imaging modalities such as CT and ultrasound ushered in modern image-based brachytherapy treatment planning. These modern imaging techniques dramatically advanced the state of the art of brachytherapy, often obviating the use of nomograms. Although the routine use of nomograms has decreased, there are clinical situations where nomograms still prove useful for brachytherapy treatment planning. Often times the dimensions of a tumor or tumor bed are not known prior to surgery and delineated images of the site are not available. In such situations the tumor dimensions can be measured in the OR and a nomogram applied for rapid treatment planning. By definition a nomogram is a graphical tool, which is fixed and cannot be modified. Differences of opinion and treatment philosophies exist among physicians and institutions. These varying approaches can lead to

  14. Dosimetric analysis of 3D image-guided HDR brachytherapy planning for the treatment of cervical cancer: is point A-based dose prescription still valid in image-guided brachytherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Houser, Chris; Huq, M Saiful

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric outcome of 3D image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer treatment and compare dose coverage of high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) to traditional Point A dose. Thirty-two patients with stage IA2-IIIB cervical cancer were treated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-based image-guided HDR brachytherapy (IGBT). Brachytherapy dose prescription was 5.0-6.0 Gy per fraction for a total 5 fractions. The HRCTV and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated following the GYN GEC/ESTRO guidelines. Total doses for HRCTV, OARs, Point A, and Point T from external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy were summated and normalized to a biologically equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The total planned D90 for HRCTV was 80-85 Gy, whereas the dose to 2 mL of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was limited to 85 Gy, 75 Gy, and 75 Gy, respectively. The mean D90 and its standard deviation for HRCTV was 83.2 ± 4.3 Gy. This is significantly higher (p IGBT in HDR cervical cancer treatment needs advanced concept of evaluation in dosimetry with clinical outcome data about whether this approach improves local control and/or decreases toxicities. PMID:20488690

  15. Deformable anatomical templates for brachytherapy treatment planning in radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Chao, K. S. C.; Miller, Michael I.; So, F. B.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a new method to register serial, volumetric x-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets for tracking soft-tissue deformation caused by insertion of intracavity brachytherapy applicators to treat cervical cancer. 3D CT scans collected from the same patient with and without a brachytherapy applicator are registered to aid in computation of the radiation dose to tumor and normal tissue. The 3D CT image volume of pelvic anatomy with the applicator. Initial registration is accomplished by rigid alignment of the pelvic bones and non-rigid alignment of gray scale CT data and hand segmentations of the vagina, cervix, bladder, and rectum. A viscous fluid transformation model is used for non-rigid registration to allow for local, non-linear registration of the vagina, cervix, bladder, and rectum without disturbing the rigid registration of the bony pelvis and adjacent structures. Results are presented in which two 3D CT data sets of the same patient - imaged with and without a brachytherapy applicator - are registered.

  16. Observation of hyperfractional integrated intracavitary brachytherapy on efficacy and complications in patients with middle and advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe and compare the efficacy and complications of hyperfractional integrated intracavitary brachtherapy in middle-advanced squamous-cell carcinoma with the traditional brachytherapy. Methods: In the observed group, 328 patients with cervical cancer received hyperfractional integrated intracavitary after loading therapy between Jan 2004 and Jan 2005 were selected. The dose of point A was 2.5 Gy-3.0 Gy/fraction, 2 fractions per week, and the total dose of reference point A was 49.8 Gy in stage IIb, 52.6 Gy in stage IIIb. In the control group, 331 cases treated with traditional afterloading brachytherapy between Jan 2002 and Dec 2003 were selected. The dose of point A was 5.0∼7.0 Gy/fraction, 1 fraction per week, and the total dose of point A was 50.1 Gy in stage IIb, 53.5 Gy in stage IIIb, In vitro irradiation began at the same time with the intracavitary brachytherapy. The whole pelvic was irradiated with 15 MV X-rays. Results: In the observed group, the recent control rate of stage IIb was 97.2% (104/107), 94.1% (208/221) for stage IIIb. The 3- year survival rate was 80.5% (264/328), and the 5-year survival rate was 68.6% (225/328). The complication rate was 5.2% (17/328) for cystitis, 14.6% (48/328) for proctitis. Out of 331 cases in control group, the recent control rate of stage IIb was 95.4% (103/108), 92.8% (207/223) for stage IIIb. The 3-year survival rate was 75.2% (249/332), the 5-year survival rate was 62.5% (207/331). The complication rate was 13.3% (44/331) for cystitis, and 32.3% (107/331) for proctitis. Conclusions: Compared with combination of traditional brachytherapy and external radiotherapy, combination of hyperfractional integrated brachtherapy therapy and external radiotherapy has no significant improvement for recent control rate and long-term survival rate, but could reduce the complication rates of cystitis and proctitis. (authors)

  17. Dosimetric and clinical comparison between MammoSite and interstitial HDR brachytherapy in treatment of early stage breast cancer after conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To comparatively study dosimetric evaluation, side effects in early and late stage, and cosmetic outcome between MammoSite and interstitial using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in early stage breast cancer patient after conserving surgery. Methods: From January 2004 to December 2004, 10 breast cancer cases were treated with HDR 192Ir APBI after Lumpectomy surgery, 6 cases with interstitial brachytherapy, 4 cases with MammoSite. Sources were placed during the operation in all patients, distance from cavity to skin > 5-7 mm in interstitial brachytherapy group, one case is 6.5 mm, 3 cases > 10 mm in MammoSite group. Treatment Target area is 20 mm away from cavity in interstitial brachytherapy group with DHI 0.77, 10 mm away from Balloon margin in MammoSite with DHI 0.73. Results: Follow up 12-24 months while median follow-up was 18 months for the whole group (100%). During the treatment, grade III acute reactions were not seen in both group, grade I or II were seen including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection. More late toxicity reaction including skin fibrosis, breast tenderness and fat necrosis were observed in interstitial brachytherapy group than that of MammoSite group. Cosmetic outcome evaluation were excellent in 12 months 100% (patient) and 83% (doctor) in interstitial brachytherapy, 100% in MammoSite group, respectively, none recurrence. Conclusions: Interstitial brachytherapy shows more uniformity in dose distribution as well as larger treatment volume, while MammoSite tends to be stable in repeatability and easy in use. Both groups show excellent cosmetic results, with same acute and late reactions. (authors)

  18. The Effects of Metallic Implants on Electroporation Therapies: Feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation for Brachytherapy Salvage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Electroporation-based therapies deliver brief electric pulses into a targeted volume to destabilize cellular membranes. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) provides focal ablation with effects dependent on the electric field distribution, which changes in heterogeneous environments. It should be determined if highly conductive metallic implants in targeted regions, such as radiotherapy brachytherapy seeds in prostate tissue, will alter treatment outcomes. Theoretical and experimental models determine the impact of prostate brachytherapy seeds on IRE treatments. Materials and Methods: This study delivered IRE pulses in nonanimal, as well as in ex vivo and in vivo tissue, with and in the absence of expired radiotherapy seeds. Electrical current was measured and lesion dimensions were examined macroscopically and with magnetic resonance imaging. Finite-element treatment simulations predicted the effects of brachytherapy seeds in the targeted region on electrical current, electric field, and temperature distributions. Results: There was no significant difference in electrical behavior in tissue containing a grid of expired radiotherapy seeds relative to those without seeds for nonanimal, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments (all p > 0.1). Numerical simulations predict no significant alteration of electric field or thermal effects (all p > 0.1). Histology showed cellular necrosis in the region near the electrodes and seeds within the ablation region; however, there were no seeds beyond the ablation margins. Conclusion: This study suggests that electroporation therapies can be implemented in regions containing small metallic implants without significant changes to electrical and thermal effects relative to use in tissue without the implants. This supports the ability to use IRE as a salvage therapy option for brachytherapy

  19. The Effects of Metallic Implants on Electroporation Therapies: Feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation for Brachytherapy Salvage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Robert E., E-mail: robert.neal@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia); Smith, Ryan L., E-mail: ryan.smith@wbrc.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre (Australia); Kavnoudias, Helen, E-mail: H.Kavnoudias@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia); Rosenfeldt, Franklin, E-mail: F.Rosenfeldt@alfred.org.au; Ou, Ruchong, E-mail: Ruchong.Ou@bakeridi.edu.au [Monash University, Department of Surgery (Australia); Mclean, Catriona A., E-mail: C.Mclean@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Department of Anatomical Pathology (Australia); Davalos, Rafael V., E-mail: davalos@vt.edu [Virginia Tech, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences (United States); Thomson, Kenneth R., E-mail: K.Thomson@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Electroporation-based therapies deliver brief electric pulses into a targeted volume to destabilize cellular membranes. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) provides focal ablation with effects dependent on the electric field distribution, which changes in heterogeneous environments. It should be determined if highly conductive metallic implants in targeted regions, such as radiotherapy brachytherapy seeds in prostate tissue, will alter treatment outcomes. Theoretical and experimental models determine the impact of prostate brachytherapy seeds on IRE treatments. Materials and Methods: This study delivered IRE pulses in nonanimal, as well as in ex vivo and in vivo tissue, with and in the absence of expired radiotherapy seeds. Electrical current was measured and lesion dimensions were examined macroscopically and with magnetic resonance imaging. Finite-element treatment simulations predicted the effects of brachytherapy seeds in the targeted region on electrical current, electric field, and temperature distributions. Results: There was no significant difference in electrical behavior in tissue containing a grid of expired radiotherapy seeds relative to those without seeds for nonanimal, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments (all p > 0.1). Numerical simulations predict no significant alteration of electric field or thermal effects (all p > 0.1). Histology showed cellular necrosis in the region near the electrodes and seeds within the ablation region; however, there were no seeds beyond the ablation margins. Conclusion: This study suggests that electroporation therapies can be implemented in regions containing small metallic implants without significant changes to electrical and thermal effects relative to use in tissue without the implants. This supports the ability to use IRE as a salvage therapy option for brachytherapy.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jimmy L.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Hazle, John D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy seed therapy is an increasingly common way to treat prostate cancer through localized radiation. The current standard of care relies on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for imaging guidance during the seed placement procedure. As visualization of individual metallic seeds tends to be difficult or inaccurate under TRUS guidance, guide needles are generally tracked to infer seed placement. In an effort to improve seed visualization and placement accuracy, the use of photoacoustic (PA...

  1. Brachytherapy in treatment of vaginal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Kaprin; V. N. Galkin; S. A. Ivanov; V. A. Solodkiy; V. A. Titova

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of diagnosis and treatment of different types of primary vaginal cancer are highlighted, the role and place of brachytherapy as independent method or combined treatment modality for this pathology is shown in the review. Epidemiological data on incidence of vaginal cancer in Russia are represented, presumptive mechanisms for development of the disease, risk factors, histological types, features of the course, clinical presentation, diagnostic algorithm are described. Treatment...

  2. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  3. A robotic device for MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerburg, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the treatment options for prostate cancer is brachytherapy with iodine-125 sources. In prostate brachytherapy a high radiation dose is delivered to the prostate with a steep dose fall off to critical surrounding organs. The implantation of the iodine sources is currently performed under ultra

  4. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tourinho Campos

    Full Text Available The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®; it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86, which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21, which is also from BEBIG.The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the photoelectric effect, pair

  5. ENT COBRA (Consortium for Brachytherapy Data Analysis): interdisciplinary standardized data collection system for head and neck patients treated with interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferri, Luca; Kovács, György; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Guinot, Jose Luis; Hildebrand, Guido; Johansson, Bengt; Monge, Rafael Martìnez; Meyer, Jens E.; Niehoff, Peter; Rovirosa, Angeles; Takàcsi-Nagy, Zoltàn; Dinapoli, Nicola; Lanzotti, Vito; Damiani, Andrea; Soror, Tamer; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Aim of the COBRA (Consortium for Brachytherapy Data Analysis) project is to create a multicenter group (consortium) and a web-based system for standardized data collection. Material and methods GEC-ESTRO (Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie – European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology) Head and Neck (H&N) Working Group participated in the project and in the implementation of the consortium agreement, the ontology (data-set) and the necessary COBRA software services as well as the peer reviewing of the general anatomic site-specific COBRA protocol. The ontology was defined by a multicenter task-group. Results Eleven centers from 6 countries signed an agreement and the consortium approved the ontology. We identified 3 tiers for the data set: Registry (epidemiology analysis), Procedures (prediction models and DSS), and Research (radiomics). The COBRA-Storage System (C-SS) is not time-consuming as, thanks to the use of “brokers”, data can be extracted directly from the single center's storage systems through a connection with “structured query language database” (SQL-DB), Microsoft Access®, FileMaker Pro®, or Microsoft Excel®. The system is also structured to perform automatic archiving directly from the treatment planning system or afterloading machine. The architecture is based on the concept of “on-purpose data projection”. The C-SS architecture is privacy protecting because it will never make visible data that could identify an individual patient. This C-SS can also benefit from the so called “distributed learning” approaches, in which data never leave the collecting institution, while learning algorithms and proposed predictive models are commonly shared. Conclusions Setting up a consortium is a feasible and practicable tool in the creation of an international and multi-system data sharing system. COBRA C-SS seems to be well accepted by all involved parties, primarily because it does not influence the center's own data storing

  6. Iodine-125 thin seeds decrease prostate swelling during transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate swelling following seed implantation is a well-recognised phenomenon. The purpose of this intervention was to assess whether using thinner seeds reduces post-implant swelling with permanent prostate brachytherapy. Eighteen consecutive patients eligible for prostate seed brachytherapy underwent seed implantation using iodine-125 (I-125) thin seeds. Operative time, dosimetry, prostate swelling and toxicity were assessed and compared with standard I-125 stranded seed controls, sourced from the department's brachytherapy database. A learning curve was noted with the thin seeds in terms of greater bending and deviation of needles from their intended path. This translated into significantly longer total operative time (88 vs 103 minutes; P=0.009, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.1-24.3) and time per needle insertion (2.6 vs 3.7 minutes; P<0.001, 95% CI 0.5-1.3) for the thin seeds. Day 30 prostate volumes were significantly smaller in the thin seed group compared with standard seeds (40.9cc vs 46.8cc; P=0.001, 95% CI 1.5-5.6). The ratio of preoperative transrectal ultrasound to day 30 post-implant CT volume was also smaller in the thin seed group (1.2±0.1 for standard seeds vs 1.1±0.1 for thin seeds). Post-implant dosimetric parameters were comparable for both groups. No significant differences were seen in acute urinary morbidity or quality of life between the two groups. I-125 thin seeds are associated with an initial learning curve, with longer operative time, even for experienced brachytherapists. The significant reduction in day 30 prostate volumes with the thin seeds has useful implications in terms of optimising dose coverage to the prostate in the early period post-implantation, as well as improving the accuracy of post-implant dosimetric assessments.

  7. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 08: The Role and Benefits of Electromagnetic Needle-Tracking Technologies in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In modern brachytherapy, application of large doses of ionizing radiation in a limited number of fractions is frequent. Furthermore, as with any surgical procedures, brachytherapy is subject to learning curve effects. In this context, there could be advantages of integrating real-time tracking of needles/catheters to existing protocols given the recent prominent advances in tracking technologies. In this work, we review the use of an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) based on the second generation Aurora® Planar Field Generator (Northern Digital Inc) and custom design needles (Philips Healthcare) for brachytherapy applications. The position and orientation information is obtained from 5 degrees of freedom sensors. Basic system performance characterization is performed in well-controlled conditions to establish accuracy and reproducibility as well as potential interference from standard brachytherapy equipment. The results show that sensor locations can be tracked to within 0.04mm (la) when located within 26cm of the generator. Orientation accuracy of the needle remained within ±1° in the same region, but rose quickly at larger distances. The errors on position and orientation strongly dependent the sensor position in the characterization volume (500×500×500mm3). The presence of an ultrasound probe was shown to have negligible effects on tracking accuracy. The use of EMTS for automatic catheter/applicator reconstruction was also explored. Reconstruction time was less than 10 sec/channel and tips identification was within 0.69±0.29mm of the reference values. Finally, we demonstrate that hollow needle designs with special EM adaptation also allow for real-time seed drop position estimation. In phantom experiments showed that drop positions were on average within 1.6±0.9mm of the reference position measured from μCT. Altogether, EMTS offer promising benefits in a wide range of brachytherapy applications

  8. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 08: The Role and Benefits of Electromagnetic Needle-Tracking Technologies in Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, L.; Racine, E.; Boutaleb, S.; Filion, O. [Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, Québec (Québec), and Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d' Optique et Centre de recherche en sur le Cancer, Université Laval, Québec (Québec) (Canada); Poulin, E.; Hautvast, G. [Biomedical Systems, Philips Group Innovation, High Tech Campus 34 (HTC 34), Eindhoven (Netherlands); Binnekamp, D. [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    In modern brachytherapy, application of large doses of ionizing radiation in a limited number of fractions is frequent. Furthermore, as with any surgical procedures, brachytherapy is subject to learning curve effects. In this context, there could be advantages of integrating real-time tracking of needles/catheters to existing protocols given the recent prominent advances in tracking technologies. In this work, we review the use of an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) based on the second generation Aurora® Planar Field Generator (Northern Digital Inc) and custom design needles (Philips Healthcare) for brachytherapy applications. The position and orientation information is obtained from 5 degrees of freedom sensors. Basic system performance characterization is performed in well-controlled conditions to establish accuracy and reproducibility as well as potential interference from standard brachytherapy equipment. The results show that sensor locations can be tracked to within 0.04mm (la) when located within 26cm of the generator. Orientation accuracy of the needle remained within ±1° in the same region, but rose quickly at larger distances. The errors on position and orientation strongly dependent the sensor position in the characterization volume (500×500×500mm{sup 3}). The presence of an ultrasound probe was shown to have negligible effects on tracking accuracy. The use of EMTS for automatic catheter/applicator reconstruction was also explored. Reconstruction time was less than 10 sec/channel and tips identification was within 0.69±0.29mm of the reference values. Finally, we demonstrate that hollow needle designs with special EM adaptation also allow for real-time seed drop position estimation. In phantom experiments showed that drop positions were on average within 1.6±0.9mm of the reference position measured from μCT. Altogether, EMTS offer promising benefits in a wide range of brachytherapy applications.

  9. Calculating of Dose Distribution in Tongue Brachytherapy by Different Radioisotopes using Monte Carlo Simulation and Comparing by Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banafsheh Zeinali Rafsanjani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among different kinds of oral cavity cancers, the frequency of tongue cancer occurrence is more significant. Brachytherapy is the most common method to cure tongue cancers. Long sources are used in different techniques of tongue brachytherapy. The objective of this study is to asses the dose distribution around long sources, comparing different radioisotopes as brachytherapy sources, measuring the homogeneity of delivered dose to treatment volume and also comparing mandible dose and dose of tongue in the regions near the mandible with and without using shield. Material and Method: The Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used for simulation. The accuracy of simulation was verified by comparing the results with experimental data. The sources like Ir-192, Cs-137, Ra-226, Au-198, In-111 and Ba-131 were simulated and the position of sources was determined by Paris system. Results: The percentage of mandible dose reduction with use of 2 mm Pb shield for the sources mentioned above were: 35.4%, 20.1%, 86.6%, 32.24%, 75.6%, and 36.8%. The tongue dose near the mandible with use of shied did not change significantly. The dose homogeneity from the most to least was obtained from these sources: Cs-137, Au-198, Ir-192, Ba-131, In-111 and Ra-226. Discussion and Conclusion: Ir-192 and Cs-137 were the best sources for tongue brachytherapy treatment but In-111 and Ra-226 were not suitable choices for tongue brachytherapy. The sources like Au-198 and Ba-131 had rather the same performance as Ir-192

  10. Uncertainties associated with bronchial brachytherapy; Incertidumbres asociadas a la brquiterapia de bronquio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richarte, J. M.; Lupiani Castellanos, J.; Quinones Rodriguez, L. A.; Ramos Caballero, L. J.; Angulo Pain, E.; Iborra Oquendo, M.; Ramirez, I.; Urena Llinares, A.

    2011-07-01

    Bronchial brachytherapy treatments are affected by movement (breathing, coughing, patient discomfort, etc ...) of the probe lodged in the trachea. From the CT images, this movement results in an uncertain trajectory of the probe according to the reconstruction of the catheter is performed. To establish whether this influence has important implications for the location and distance of the section of bronchus treated, is the goal of this work. Other circumstances, such as inaccuracy in the determination of the probe or the delimitation of volumes, increase the uncertainty in the record that the treatment should be pursued.

  11. High-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy during preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mutahir; Ali; Tunio; Mansoor; Rafi; Altaf; Hashmi; Rehan; Mohsin; Abdul; Qayyum; Mujahid; Hasan; Amjad; Sattar; Muhammad; Mubarak

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the feasibility and safety of high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy(HDR-ILBT) boost during preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer.METHODS:Between 2008 and 2009,thirty-six patients with locally advanced rectal cancer(≥ T3 or N+),were treated initially with concurrent capecitabine(825 mg/m2 oral twice daily) and pelvic external beam radiotherapy(EBRT)(45 Gy in 25 fractions),then were randomized to group A;HDR-ILBT group(n = 17) to receive 5.5-7 Gy×2 to gross tumor volume(GTV) and g...

  12. Brachytherapy: The need for a national metrology lab in Spain; Branquiterapia: la necesidad de un laboratorio nacional de metrologia en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviles Lucas, P.

    2011-07-01

    Radiotherapy, along with chemotherapy and surgery, is an essential therapeutic technique for treating malignant tumours. Part of the challenge of a suitable radiotherapy treatment lies on the optimisation of the irradiated volume, which must be adapted to the tumour volume as far as possible. Depending on position of the radiation source relative to the patient, the procedure in question could be external radiotherapy, or brachytherapy. In a brachytherapy procedure, relatively small encapsulated radioactive sources are placed close to or in the tumour volume to be treated. This therapeutic treatment has two obvious advantages; on one hand the prescribed dose can be adjusted to the tumour volume, preventing unnecessary exposure of the adjacent healthy tissues, and on the other, it decreases the treatment duration compared to a radiotherapy treatment. (Author) 19 refs.

  13. Interfractional change of high-risk CTV D90 during image-guided brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Yu; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Nakagawa, Akiko; Kawahara, Masahiro; Abe, Takanori; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate interfractional changes of the minimum dose delivered to 90% of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV D90) and D2cc of the bladder and rectum during brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer patients. A total of 52 patients received external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). For each of four ICBT applications, a pelvic CT scan was performed and the HR-CTV was delineated. Retrospectively, these patients were divided into two groups: (i) the standard dose group with 6 Gy to point A in each ICBT, and (ii) the adaptive dose group with a modified dose to point A to cover the HR-CTV with the 6-Gy isodose line as much as possible. The HR-CTV D90 was assessed in every session, and analyzed as interfractional changes. In the standard dose group, the interfractional changes of the HR-CTV D90 showed a linear increase from the first to the third of the four ICBT (average 6.1, 6.6, 7.0 and 7.1 Gy, respectively). In contrast, those of the adaptive dose group remained almost constant (average 7.2, 7.2, 7.3 and 7.4 Gy, respectively). Especially, in the case of a large HR-CTV volume (≥35 cm(3)) at first ICBT, the total HR-CTV D90 of the adaptive dose group with brachytherapy was significantly higher than that of the standard dose group. There were no significant differences in total D2cc in bladder and rectum between the two groups. Image-guided adaptive brachytherapy based on interfractional tumor volume change improves the dose to the HR-CTV while keeping rectal and bladder doses within acceptable levels. PMID:23732770

  14. SU-E-T-564: Multi-Helix Rotating Shield Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Flynn, R; Kim, Y [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel and practical brachytherapy technique, called multi-helix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT enables RSBT delivery using only translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. H-RSBT overcomes the challenges associated with previously proposed RSBT approaches based on a serial (S-RSBT) step-and-shoot delivery technique, which required independent translational and rotational motion. Methods: A Fletcher-type applicator, compatible with the combination of a Xoft Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy source and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten shield, is proposed. The wall of the applicator contains six evenly-spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the shield as a function of depth. The shield contains three protruding keys and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients representative of a wide range of high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. The number of beamlets used in the treatment planning process was nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. For all the treatment plans the EQD2 of the HR-CTV was escalated until the EQD{sub 2cc} tolerance of either the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon was reached. Results: Treatment times for H-RSBT tended to be shorter than for S-RSBT, with changes of −38.47% to 1.12% with an average of −8.34%. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} changed by −8.81% to 2.08% with an average of −2.46%. Conclusion: H-RSBT is a mechanically feasible technique in the curved applicators needed for cervical cancer brachytherapy. S-RSBT and H-RSBT dose distributions were clinically equivalent for all patients

  15. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Samia de Freitas Brandao; Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2013-01-01

    Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted int...

  16. Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (L.D.R.) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medico surgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6 h). The median dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-40 Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6 cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5 cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6 cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6 cm (p = 0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Conclusion: Early perioperative L.D.R. brachytherapy delivering 20 Gy at 5 mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. (authors)

  17. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  18. Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) ≤6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) ≤10, and ≤ T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = 20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of implant (learning curve). Over the course of the program, we have deliberately reduced the number of needles and OR time per patient, which have potentially

  19. The case for focal brachytherapy for the management of low grade prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radical therapy of low to intermediate prostate cancer patients can cause substantial adverse events relating to genitourinary and rectal toxicity. Yet there is little evidence that such treatment results in increased life expectancy. On the other hand, watchful waiting is associated with active surveillance and the patient must accept that the cancer remains untreated and has a risk of progression. Focal therapy of low grade prostate cancer provides an intermediate approach to the management of this cancer. The approach is to treat only those positive segments on biopsy and so reduce the likelihood of adverse events. However, continued surveillance is required because of the increased risk of disease progression. Focal therapy needs to be evaluated using available ablative therapies. Recent studies of focal HIFU for 20 patients showed PSA reduced from 7.3 to 1.5 ng/mL at 12 months. 1/20 patients had inadequate erections and 2120 required pads. 17/19 had no histological evidence of cancer and none had evidence of high volume or Gleason = 7 cancer in the treated lobe. Seed brachytherapy is commonly used for radical prostate treatment of low volume disease. As the same template can be used for seed therapy as is used for biopsy, the technique is ideally suited for focal brachytherapy. As any treatment involving less than the entire gland involves the risk of leaving viable cancer cells outside the treatment zone, a phase 3 randomised clinical trial between radical and focal brachytherapy is advocated to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the latter relative to radical therapy.

  20. Pretreatment Nomogram to Predict the Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 (I-125) prostate brachytherapy negatively influences long-term quality of life and therefore should be prevented. We aimed to develop a nomogram to preoperatively predict the risk of AUR. Methods: Using the preoperative data of 714 consecutive patients who underwent I-125 prostate brachytherapy between 2005 and 2008 at our department, we modeled the probability of AUR. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the predictive ability of a set of pretreatment predictors and the additional value of a new risk factor (the extent of prostate protrusion into the bladder). The performance of the final model was assessed with calibration and discrimination measures. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 patients (8.0%) developed AUR after implantation. Multivariate analysis showed that the combination of prostate volume, IPSS score, neoadjuvant hormonal treatment and the extent of prostate protrusion contribute to the prediction of AUR. The discriminative value (receiver operator characteristic area, ROC) of the basic model (including prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, and neoadjuvant hormonal treatment) to predict the development of AUR was 0.70. The addition of prostate protrusion significantly increased the discriminative power of the model (ROC 0.82). Calibration of this final model was good. The nomogram showed that among patients with a low sum score (35 points), the risk of AUR was more than 20%. Conclusion: This nomogram is a useful tool for physicians to predict the risk of AUR after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. The nomogram can aid in individualized treatment decision-making and patient counseling.

  1. Single fraction multimodal image guided focal salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischke, Hans-Christian; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Knobe, Sven; Volgeova-Neher, Natalja; Kollefrath, Michael; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Grosu, Anca Ligia; Baltas, Dimos; Kroenig, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a novel method for treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) following radiation therapy: focal, multimodal image guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Material and methods We treated two patients with recurrent PCa after primary (#1) or adjuvant (#2) external beam radiation therapy. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), choline, positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT), or prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-PET combined with CT identified a single intraprostatic lesion. Positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging – transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion guided transperineal biopsy confirmed PCa within each target lesion. We defined a PET and mpMRI based gross tumor volume (GTV). A 5 mm isotropic margin was applied additionally to each lesion to generate a planning target volume (PTV), which accounts for technical fusion inaccuracies. A D90 of 18 Gy was intended in one fraction to each PTV using ultrasound guided HDR brachytherapy. Results Six month follow-up showed adequate prostate specific antygen (PSA) decline in both patients (ΔPSA 83% in patient 1 and ΔPSA 59.3% in patient 2). Follow-up 3-tesla MRI revealed regressive disease in both patients and PSMA-PET/CT showed no evidence of active disease in patient #1. No acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions Single fraction, focal, multimodal image guided salvage HDR brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer is a feasible therapy for selected patients with single lesions. This approach has to be evaluated in larger clinical trials. PMID:27504134

  2. The long term effects of high dose rate brachytherapy on neointimal hyperplasia formation in the rat carotid artery - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: A large number of investigators have begun utilizing radiation modalities in order to prevent or delay neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) formation. Following our initial successful studies looking at single fraction low doses of HDR brachytherapy given immediately after injury, we extended this model to look at the long term effects on the inhibition of NIH in the rat common carotid artery. Materials and Methods: The right common carotid arteries (CCA) of 4-5 month old male Sprague Dawley rats were injured using a 2F balloon catheter. Immediately post-injury, a delivery catheter was sutured alongside the injured artery and the vessel received either 0, 5, or 10 Gy irradiation using an Iridium 192 afterloader. Six months post-treatment, the animals were sacrificed and both the right and left CCA were harvested following perfusion fixation, and processed for light and electron micrography. Specimens were stained with PAS and the intima and media areas were calculated using a computer-assisted digitizing program. Additional immunocytochemical staining was carried out, looking particularly at PDGF. Results: In contrast to our previous findings which were assessed at 3 weeks post-treatment, at the later time point of 6 months post-treatment, there was no significant reduction in intimal area of the radiation-treated balloon-injured animals compared to the balloon-injured alone and the intima: media ratios was the same in both groups (Fig. 1). The lumenal area in both treatment groups was significantly reduced from normal controls (Fig. 2). Immunocytochemical staining for PDGF at 3 weeks demonstrated that there was an immediate (24 hours) release of growth factor from the medial smooth muscle in the balloon-injured animals; there was no similar release in the radiation-treated animals at the 1 day, 1 or 3 week time points. This will now be assessed at the later time points. Higher doses of 15-25 Gy are now being studied since other investigators have shown

  3. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  4. Bladder Function Preservation With Brachytherapy, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Limited Surger in Bladder Cancer Patients: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report long-term results of a bladder preservation strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) using external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy/interstitial radiation therapy (IRT). Methods and Materials: Between May 1989 and October 2011, 192 selected patients with MIBC were treated with a combined regimen of preoperative external beam radiation therapy and subsequent surgical exploration with or without partial cystectomy and insertion of source carrier tubes for afterloading IRT using low dose rate and pulsed dose rate. Data for oncologic and functional outcomes were prospectively collected. The primary endpoints were local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), bladder function preservation survival, and salvage cystectomy-free survival. The endpoints were constructed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean follow-up period was 105.5 months. The LRFS rate was 80% and 73% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Salvage cystectomy-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 93% and 85%. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 65% and 46%, whereas cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10 years was 75% and 67%. The distant metastases-free survival rate was 76% and 69% at 5 and 10 years. Multivariate analysis revealed no independent predictors of LRFS. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥3 late bladder and rectum toxicity were recorded in 11 patients (5.7%) and 2 patients (1%), respectively. Conclusions: A multimodality bladder-sparing regimen using IRT offers excellent long-term oncologic outcome in selected patients with MIBC. The late toxicity rate is low, and the majority of patients preserve their functional bladder

  5. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N. [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Maurer, U. [St.-Antonius-Hospital, Strahlentherapie, Eschweiler (Germany); Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, H. [University of Essen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  7. The Activity Check of Brachytherapy Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isotope Ir-192, which is used in brachytherapy depends on import in whole quantities. There are a few ways for its activity. measurement using Welltype chamber or the way to rely on authentic decay table of manufacturer. In-air dosimetry using Farmer Chamber, etc. In this paper, let me introduce the way using Farmer chamber which is easier and simple. With the Farmer chamber and source calibration jig, take a measurement the activity of an isotope Ir-192 and compare the value with the value from decay table of manufacturer and check the activity of source. The result of measurement, compared the value from decay table, by ±2.1. (which belongs to recommendable value for AAPM ±5% as difference of error range). It is possible to use on clinical medicine. With the increase in use of brachytherapy, the increase of import is essential. And an accurate activity check of source is compulsory. For the activity check of source, it was possible to use Farmer chamber and source calibration jig without additional purchase of Well type chamber.

  8. A study of brachytherapy for intraocular tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose of this study is to perform brachytherapy for intraocular tumor. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere. Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within ±10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm. Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. 7 figs, 2 tabs, 28 refs. (Author)

  9. Radioactive seed migration after prostate brachytherapy with Iodine-125 using loose seeds versus stranded seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To assess the incidence and clinical parameters that could influence migration of seeds in localized prostate cancer patients treated by stranded versus loose sources by Iodine-125 brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: 100 patients were treated from January/1998 until December/2006. Age, PSA, clinical stage, Gleason, prostate volume, number of seeds, activity of radioactive seeds, and dosimetric parameters, such as V100, V150 and D90 were evaluated. Results: Mean follow-up was 79 months (18 - 120. CI 95%: 72 - 85). Overall, 6 of 100 patients experienced seed migration. Seed migration was found in 4/50 (8%) patients using loose seeds and in 2/50 (4%) treated by stranded seeds. Mean value dosimetric parameters for stranded seeds were greater than those for loose seeds (V100(%): 88.7/82, D90(Gy): 149.2/140.3, D90(%): 104.2/93.8, V150 (%): 53.8/47, respectively). No significant difference in migration of seeds was detected between loose and stranded seeds considering age (p = 0.33), PSA (p = 0.391), prostate volume (p 0.397), activity of radioactive seeds (p = 0.109), number of seeds (p 0.338), V100 (p = 0.332), although significant differences were measured in the values of D90 (% and Gy) (p = 0.022 and 0.011) and V150 (p = 0.023). Conclusions: Seed migration after brachytherapy might occur and it does affect post-implant dosimetry. (author)

  10. Nursing intervention in gynecologic brachytherapy under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsidered our nursing intervention in gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy as general anesthesia was introduced. We recognized that safety, comfort, privacy protection and relief of anxiety of the patients were important points for nursing with corporation of other medical staffs. (author)

  11. Localization of brachytherapy seeds in ultrasound by registration to fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, P.; KarimAghaloo, Z.; Burdette, E. C.; Song, D. Y.; Abolmaesumi, P.; Fichtinger, G.

    2010-02-01

    Motivation: In prostate brachytherapy, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is used to visualize the anatomy, while implanted seeds can be seen in C-arm fluoroscopy or CT. Intra-operative dosimetry optimization requires localization of the implants in TRUS relative to the anatomy. This could be achieved by registration of TRUS images and the implants reconstructed from fluoroscopy or CT. Methods: TRUS images are filtered, compounded, and registered on the reconstructed implants by using an intensity-based metric based on a 3D point-to-volume registration scheme. A phantom was implanted with 48 seeds, imaged with TRUS and CT/X-ray. Ground-truth registration was established between the two. Seeds were reconstructed from CT/X-ray. Seven TRUS filtering techniques and two image similarity metrics were analyzed as well. Results: For point-to-volume registration, noise reduction combined with beam profile filter and mean squares metrics yielded the best result: an average of 0.38 +/- 0.19 mm seed localization error relative to the ground-truth. In human patient data C-arm fluoroscopy images showed 81 radioactive seeds implanted inside the prostate. A qualitative analysis showed clinically correct agreement between the seeds visible in TRUS and reconstructed from intra-operative fluoroscopy imaging. The measured registration error compared to the manually selected seed locations by the clinician was 2.86 +/- 1.26 mm. Conclusion: Fully automated seed localization in TRUS performed excellently on ground-truth phantom, adequate in clinical data and was time efficient having an average runtime of 90 seconds.

  12. Automated treatment planning engine for prostate seed implant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a computer-intelligent planning engine for automated treatment planning and optimization of ultrasound- and template-guided prostate seed implants. Methods and Materials: The genetic algorithm was modified to reflect the 2D nature of the implantation template. A multi-objective decision scheme was used to rank competing solutions, taking into account dose uniformity and conformity to the planning target volume (PTV), dose-sparing of the urethra and the rectum, and the sensitivity of the resulting dosimetry to seed misplacement. Optimized treatment plans were evaluated using selected dosimetric quantifiers, dose-volume histogram (DVH), and sensitivity analysis based on simulated seed placement errors. These dosimetric planning components were integrated into the Prostate Implant Planning Engine for Radiotherapy (PIPER). Results: PIPER has been used to produce a variety of plans for prostate seed implants. In general, maximization of the minimum peripheral dose (mPD) for given implanted total source strength tended to produce peripherally weighted seed patterns. Minimization of the urethral dose further reduced the loading in the central region of the PTV. Isodose conformity to the PTV was achieved when the set of objectives did not reflect seed positioning uncertainties; the corresponding optimal plan generally required fewer seeds and higher source strength per seed compared to the manual planning experience. When seed placement uncertainties were introduced into the set of treatment planning objectives, the optimal plan tended to reach a compromise between the preplanned outcome and the likelihood of retaining the preferred outcome after implantation. The reduction in the volatility of such seed configurations optimized under uncertainty was verified by sensitivity studies. Conclusion: An automated treatment planning engine incorporating real-time sensitivity analysis was found to be a useful tool in dosimetric planning for prostate

  13. A Comparison of the Dosimetric Parameters of Cs-137 Brachytherapy Source in Different Tissues with Water Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction After the publication of Task Group number 43 dose calculation formalism by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM, this method has been known as the most common dose calculation method in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this formalism, the water phantom is introduced as the reference dosimetry phantom, while the attenuation coefficient of the sources in the water phantom is different from that of different tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the phantom materials on the TG-43 dosimetery parameters of the Cs-137 brachytherapy source using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. Materials and Methods In this research, the Cs-137 (Model Selectron brachytherapy source was simulated in different phantoms (bone, soft tissue, muscle, fat, and the inhomogeneous phantoms of water/bone of volume 27000 cm3 using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. *F8 tally was used to obtain the dose in a fine cubical lattice. Then the TG-43 dosimetry parameters of the brachytherapy source were obtained in water phantom and compared with those of different phantoms. Results The percentage difference between the radial dose function g(r of bone and the g(r of water phantom, at a distance of 10 cm from the source center is 20%, while such differences are 1.7%, 1.6% and 1.1% for soft tissue, muscle, and fat, respectively. The largest difference of the dose rate constant of phantoms with those of water is 4.52% for the bone phantom, while the differences for soft tissue, muscle, and fat are 1.18%, 1.27%, and 0.18%, respectively. The 2D anisotropy function of the Cs-137 source for different tissues is identical to that of water. Conclusion The results of the simulations have shown that dose calculation in water phantom would introduce errors in the dose calculation around brachytherapy sources. Therefore, it is suggested that the correction factors of different tissues be applied after dose calculation in water phantoms, in order to

  14. High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Consistently Results in High Quality Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Evan C.; Kamrava, Mitchell R.; Demarco, John; Park, Sang-June; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kayode, Oluwatosin; Steinberg, Michael L. [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: jdemanes@mednet.ucla.edu [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We performed a dosimetry analysis to determine how well the goals for clinical target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue dose constraints were achieved with high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Cumulative dose-volume histograms for 208 consecutively treated HDR prostate brachytherapy implants were analyzed. Planning was based on ultrasound-guided catheter insertion and postoperative CT imaging; the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) was the prostate, a small margin, and the proximal seminal vesicles. Dosimetric parameters analyzed for the CTV were D90, V90, V100, V150, and V200. Dose to the urethra, bladder, bladder balloon, and rectum were evaluated by the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} of each organ, expressed as a percentage of the prescribed dose. Analysis was stratified according to prostate size. Results: The mean prostate ultrasound volume was 38.7 {+-} 13.4 cm{sup 3} (range: 11.7-108.6 cm{sup 3}). The mean CTV was 75.1 {+-} 20.6 cm{sup 3} (range: 33.4-156.5 cm{sup 3}). The mean D90 was 109.2% {+-} 2.6% (range: 102.3%-118.4%). Ninety-three percent of observed D90 values were between 105 and 115%. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 99.9% {+-} 0.05%, 99.5% {+-} 0.8%, 25.4% {+-} 4.2%, and 7.8% {+-} 1.4%. The mean dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for organs at risk were: Urethra: 107.3% {+-} 3.0%, 101.1% {+-} 14.6%, and 47.9% {+-} 34.8%; bladder wall: 79.5% {+-} 5.1%, 69.8% {+-} 4.9%, and 64.3% {+-} 5.0%; bladder balloon: 70.3% {+-} 6.8%, 59.1% {+-} 6.6%, and 52.3% {+-} 6.2%; rectum: 76.3% {+-} 2.5%, 70.2% {+-} 3.3%, and 66.3% {+-} 3.8%. There was no significant difference between D90 and V100 when stratified by prostate size. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy allows the physician to consistently achieve complete prostate target coverage and maintain normal tissue dose constraints for organs at risk over a wide range of target volumes.

  15. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  16. Stereotactic intracavitary brachytherapy with P-32 for cystic craniopharyngiomas in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although microsurgery remains the first-line treatment, gross total resection of cystic craniopharyngeomas (CP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and the addition of external irradiation to subtotal resection proves to achieve similar tumor control. However, concern regarding long-term morbidity associated with external irradiation in children still remains. With this retrospective analysis, the authors emphasize intracavitary brachytherapy using phosphorus-32 (P-32) as a treatment option for children with cystic CP. Between 1992 and 2009, 17 children (median age 15.4 years; range 7-18 years) with cystic CP underwent intracavitary brachytherapy using P-32. Eleven patients were treated for recurrent tumor cysts; 6 patients were treated primarily. MR imaging revealed solitary cysts in 7 patients; 10 patients had mixed solid-cystic lesions (median tumor volume 11.1 ml; range 0.5-78.9 ml). The median follow-up time was 61.9 months (range 16.9-196.6 months). Local cyst control could be achieved in 14 patients (82 %). Three patients showed progression of the treated cystic formation (in-field progression) after a median time of 8.3 months (range 5.3-10.3 months), which led to subsequent interventions. The development of new, defined cysts and progression of solid tumor parts (out-of-field progression) occurred in 5 patients and led to additional interventions in 4 cases. There was neither surgery-related permanent morbidity nor mortality in this study. The overall progression-free survival was 75, 63, and 52 % after 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Intracavitary brachytherapy using P-32 represents a safe and effective treatment option for children harboring cystic CP, even as primary treatment. However, P-32 does not clearly affect growth of solid tumor parts or the development of new cystic formations. (orig.)

  17. Gamma knife radiosurgery for uveal melanoma ineligible for brachytherapy by the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola G Ghazi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicola G Ghazi1, Christopher S Ketcherside1, Jason Sheehan2, Brian P Conway11Department of Ophthalmology and 2Neurosurgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USAPurpose: To report outcomes of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS in treating uveal melanoma lesions ineligible for standard brachytherapy.Methods: A retrospective interventional case series of uveal melanoma patients treated with GKRS between 1996 and 2004 was performed. The main outcome measures were local tumor control, metastasis, and death.Results: Four patients with uveal melanoma treated with GKS were identified. Three tumors involved the ciliary body and one was macular with its border within 2 mm of the optic disc. Adequate globe stabilization was achieved by retrobulbar anesthesia in all cases. Pretreatment mean visual acuity was 20/30. Tumor volume as determined by magnetic resonance imaging ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 cc. Ultrasonographic greatest tumor diameter and height ranged from 11 to 18 mm (mean 14.5 mm and 2.9 to 4.5 mm (mean 3.6 mm, respectively. The peripheral dose varied from 16.5 to 30 Gray. Local tumor control was achieved in all cases over a follow up period of 6 to 96 months. Mean final visual acuity was 20/50. One eye was enucleated for neovascular glaucoma and one patient died from liver and lung metastasis.Conclusions: GKRS for uveal melanoma appears to be safe and effective. The metastasis and mortality rates appear to be comparable to those following brachytherapy and enucleation. Moreover, local tumor control and enucleation rates are similar to those following brachytherapy. The findings in this small series suggest a role for GKRS in the treatment of selected cases of uveal melanomas.Keywords: gamma knife radiosurgery, radiation therapy, uveal melanoma

  18. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkla, Anna M., E-mail: a.m.dinkla@amc.uva.nl; Laarse, Rob van der; Koedooder, Kees; Petra Kok, H.; Wieringen, Niek van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels.

  19. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2–15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  20. Proposal of a new grading system for evaluation of tongue hemiatrophy as a late effect of brachytherapy for oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate tongue hemiatrophy as a late effect of brachytherapy, a new grading system was designed and applied to patients who had received low dose rate (LDR) or high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for early tongue cancer. Methods and materials: Between December 1998 and April 1999, 49 patients who had received brachytherapy for early tongue cancer (T1/T2=22:27) at Osaka University Hospital were investigated. All patients had undergone either LDR or HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 (LDR/HDR=30:19) between 1980 and 1998. Atrophic changes in their tongue were classified into four categories (G0-G3): G3, not able to protrude the tongue beyond incisors; G2, hemiatrophy is seen on the irradiated side in the resting position of the tongue; G1, deviation of the tip of the tongue to the irradiated side is seen when protruded; and G0, none of these signs. The relationship between tongue hemiatrophy and tumor factors, treatment factors, and patients' functional impairment was then investigated. The median time from treatment to assessment was 75 months (range 8-219 months). Volume index was defined as the number of needles that were implanted vertically into the tongue. Results: Fourteen patients were classified as G0, 29 as G1, five as G2, and one as G3. None of the G0 patients showed any speech or swallowing dysfunction, pain or contracted feeling, or general dissatisfaction with post-treatment tongue status. There was a tendency for such problems to increase with the tongue hemiatrophy grade. The frequency of T2 and non-superficial type tumors also tended to increase with the tongue hemiatrophy grade. The volume index of the G2-3 hemiatrophy group was significantly larger than that of the G0-1 group (P=0.041). Conclusion: This new grading system makes evaluation of atrophic changes in the tongue after brachytherapy easy and effective

  1. Effectiveness of interstitial brachytherapy HDR combined with surgery in the treatment of locally advanced carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To asses the potential improvement of local control and survival of patients operated for stage III carcinoma of the vulva with adjuvant interstitial brachytherapy HDR. The potential for sparing the urethral and anal sphincter was also examined. Thirty one patients with stage III carcinoma of vulva were treated primarily with radical vulctomy. Due to proximity of tumor to the urethra or anus flexible or rigid catheters were placed in the involved area for perioperative interstitial brachytherapy HDR. Total dose delivered to the treatment volume was 30 Gy (6Gy per fraction) or 25 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) if external beam irradiation was given. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 48 months (median 29 months). The 3-year overall survival was 74 %. Eight patients (26 %) died of the disease. Eleven patients (34.5 %) recurred: 8 locally, 3 had distant metastases. A multivariate analysis indicated that tumor size and nodal status were independent prognostic factors for survival and local control. Eleven patients (34.5%) developed grade 3 or 4 (EORTC scoring system) complications. Preservation of sphincter function was obtained in all but one patient. The addition of interstitial brachytherapy HDR to primary surgery for locally advanced carcinoma of the vulva has a potential for improving local control and survival. By limiting the need for exonerative surgery, it also contributes to a significantly better quality of due to preservation of the urethra and anus. Further improvement in the stability of the catheters is needed to improve the incidence of severe complications. (author)

  2. Quality assurance for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning optimization: using a simple optimization to verify a complex optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As dose optimization for high dose rate brachytherapy becomes more complex, it becomes increasingly important to have a means of verifying that optimization results are reasonable. A method is presented for using a simple optimization as quality assurance for the more complex optimization algorithms typically found in commercial brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Quality assurance tests may be performed during commissioning, at regular intervals, and/or on a patient specific basis. A simple optimization method is provided that optimizes conformal target coverage using an exact, variance-based, algebraic approach. Metrics such as dose volume histogram, conformality index, and total reference air kerma agree closely between simple and complex optimizations for breast, cervix, prostate, and planar applicators. The simple optimization is shown to be a sensitive measure for identifying failures in a commercial treatment planning system that are possibly due to operator error or weaknesses in planning system optimization algorithms. Results from the simple optimization are surprisingly similar to the results from a more complex, commercial optimization for several clinical applications. This suggests that there are only modest gains to be made from making brachytherapy optimization more complex. The improvements expected from sophisticated linear optimizations, such as PARETO methods, will largely be in making systems more user friendly and efficient, rather than in finding dramatically better source strength distributions. (paper)

  3. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  4. A dynamic dosimetry system for prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-03-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry.

  5. Verification of ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ophthalmic brachytherapy dose calculations were performed as an independent verification of commercial dosimetry software (BEBIG Plaque Simulator). Excel spreadsheets were constructed to follow the formalism of the AAPM Task Group No. 43. As a software commissioning tool, TG43 seed-based coordinates were reformatted to be compatible with plaque-based BEBIG dose tables for centrally positioned seeds. Plaque central axis doses were also calculated for rings of seeds. Close agreement with BEBIG doses was obtained in both cases. Tailored spreadsheet versions were subsequently created to verify patient treatment plans. Treatment time and dose to a specified central-axis point are calculated for ROPES plaques fully loaded with I-125 model 6702 seeds. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  6. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  7. Comparison of Oncentra® Brachy IPSA and graphical optimisation techniques: a case study of HDR brachytherapy head and neck and prostate plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, Michael G, E-mail: michael.jameson@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Ohanessian, Lucy [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Batumalai, Vikneswary [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, School of Medicine, University of New South Wales (Australia); Patel, Virendra [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Holloway, Lois C [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, School of Medicine, University of New South Wales (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    There are a number of different dwell positions and time optimisation options available in the Oncentra® Brachy (Elekta Brachytherapy Solutions, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) brachytherapy treatment planning system. The purpose of this case study was to compare graphical (GRO) and inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation techniques for interstitial head and neck (HN) and prostate plans considering dosimetry, modelled radiobiology outcome and planning time. Four retrospective brachytherapy patients were chosen for this study, two recurrent HN and two prostatic boosts. Manual GRO and IPSA plans were generated for each patient. Plans were compared using dose–volume histograms (DVH) and dose coverage metrics including; conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity number (CN). Logit and relative seriality models were used to calculate tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Approximate planning time was also recorded. There was no significant difference between GRO and IPSA in terms of dose metrics with mean CI of 1.30 and 1.57 (P > 0.05) respectively. IPSA achieved an average HN TCP of 0.32 versus 0.12 for GRO while for prostate there was no significant difference. Mean GRO planning times were greater than 75 min while average IPSA planning times were less than 10 min. Planning times for IPSA were greatly reduced compared to GRO and plans were dosimetrically similar. For this reason, IPSA makes for a useful planning tool in HN and prostate brachytherapy.

  8. Comparison of Oncentra® Brachy IPSA and graphical optimisation techniques: a case study of HDR brachytherapy head and neck and prostate plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a number of different dwell positions and time optimisation options available in the Oncentra® Brachy (Elekta Brachytherapy Solutions, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) brachytherapy treatment planning system. The purpose of this case study was to compare graphical (GRO) and inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation techniques for interstitial head and neck (HN) and prostate plans considering dosimetry, modelled radiobiology outcome and planning time. Four retrospective brachytherapy patients were chosen for this study, two recurrent HN and two prostatic boosts. Manual GRO and IPSA plans were generated for each patient. Plans were compared using dose–volume histograms (DVH) and dose coverage metrics including; conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity number (CN). Logit and relative seriality models were used to calculate tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Approximate planning time was also recorded. There was no significant difference between GRO and IPSA in terms of dose metrics with mean CI of 1.30 and 1.57 (P > 0.05) respectively. IPSA achieved an average HN TCP of 0.32 versus 0.12 for GRO while for prostate there was no significant difference. Mean GRO planning times were greater than 75 min while average IPSA planning times were less than 10 min. Planning times for IPSA were greatly reduced compared to GRO and plans were dosimetrically similar. For this reason, IPSA makes for a useful planning tool in HN and prostate brachytherapy

  9. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  10. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l' Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  11. Stereotactic intracavitary brachytherapy with P-32 for cystic craniopharyngiomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maarouf, Mohammad; El Majdoub, Faycal [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Center of Neurosurgery, Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Fuetsch, Manuel [University Hospital of Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Hoevels, Mauritius [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Lehrke, Ralph [St. Barbara-Klinik Hamm-Heessen, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Hamm (Germany); Berthold, Frank [University Hospital of Cologne, Department Pediatric Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Voges, Juergen [University Hospital of Magdeburg, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Magdeburg (Germany); Sturm, Volker [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University Hospital of Wurzburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Although microsurgery remains the first-line treatment, gross total resection of cystic craniopharyngeomas (CP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and the addition of external irradiation to subtotal resection proves to achieve similar tumor control. However, concern regarding long-term morbidity associated with external irradiation in children still remains. With this retrospective analysis, the authors emphasize intracavitary brachytherapy using phosphorus-32 (P-32) as a treatment option for children with cystic CP. Between 1992 and 2009, 17 children (median age 15.4 years; range 7-18 years) with cystic CP underwent intracavitary brachytherapy using P-32. Eleven patients were treated for recurrent tumor cysts; 6 patients were treated primarily. MR imaging revealed solitary cysts in 7 patients; 10 patients had mixed solid-cystic lesions (median tumor volume 11.1 ml; range 0.5-78.9 ml). The median follow-up time was 61.9 months (range 16.9-196.6 months). Local cyst control could be achieved in 14 patients (82 %). Three patients showed progression of the treated cystic formation (in-field progression) after a median time of 8.3 months (range 5.3-10.3 months), which led to subsequent interventions. The development of new, defined cysts and progression of solid tumor parts (out-of-field progression) occurred in 5 patients and led to additional interventions in 4 cases. There was neither surgery-related permanent morbidity nor mortality in this study. The overall progression-free survival was 75, 63, and 52 % after 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Intracavitary brachytherapy using P-32 represents a safe and effective treatment option for children harboring cystic CP, even as primary treatment. However, P-32 does not clearly affect growth of solid tumor parts or the development of new cystic formations. (orig.) [German] Obwohl die Mikrochirurgie die Methode der Wahl darstellt, ist die komplette Resektion zystischer Kraniopharyngeome haeufig mit einer

  12. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, 131Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium Dw,m as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium Dm,m. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using 125I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D90 values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using 103Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D90 values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations in the mean compositions of tissues affect low energy

  13. Dosimetry on ocular brachytherapy with ROPES plaque with Iodine-125 and Palladium-103 seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an alternative to ocular enucleation. However, the irradiation of ocular region can bring deleterious effects due to the high doses, mainly in the lens, retina and in the bone structures in growth phase. Brachytherapy instead of teletherapy looks for departuring absorbed doses in tumor minimizing doses in the lens and the adjacent tissues of the eyeball (orbital region), avoiding deleterious effects. Thus, a three-dimensional computational model of ocular area was developed to simulate orbital irradiation with ROPES ophthalmologic plaque placed on the sclera surface filled to ten iodine-125 seeds, and palladium-103 seeds. Simulations are performed on the MCNP5 code. The computational simulation allows evaluating how the dose rates are spatially distributed in the orbital volume. The results are normalized to 100% at the maximum dose on the tumor base, and by the applied source activity. The maximum dose is found onto the eyeball, in the vitreous. The present model represents an advance in simulating and predicting absorbed dose on ocular brachytherapy. (author)

  14. Dosimetry on ocular brachytherapy with ROPE plaque with iodine125 and palladium-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an alternative to ocular enucleation. However, the irradiation of ocular region can bring deleterious effects due to the high doses, mainly in the lens, retina and in the bone structures in growth phase. Brachytherapy instead of teletherapy looks for departing absorbed doses in tumor minimizing doses in the lens and the adjacent tissues of the eyeball (orbital region), avoiding deleterious effects. Thus, a three-dimensional computational model of ocular area was developed to simulate orbital irradiation with ROPES ophthalmologic plaque placed on the sclera surface filled to ten iodine-125 seeds, and palladium-103 seeds. Simulations are performed on the MCNP5 code. The computational simulation allows evaluating how the dose rates are spatially distributed in the orbital volume. The results are normalized to 100% at the maximum dose on the tumor base, and by the applied source activity. The maximum dose is found onto the eyeball, in the vitreous. The present model represents an advance in simulating and predicting absorbed dose on ocular brachytherapy. (author)

  15. Automatic segmentation of seeds and fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in prostate brachytherapy x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Lee, Junghoon; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny; Burdette, E. Clif; Prince, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    C-arm X-ray fluoroscopy-based radioactive seed localization for intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy is an active area of research. The fluoroscopy tracking (FTRAC) fiducial is an image-based tracking device composed of radio-opaque BBs, lines, and ellipses that provides an effective means for pose estimation so that three-dimensional reconstruction of the implanted seeds from multiple X-ray images can be related to the ultrasound-computed prostate volume. Both the FTRAC features and the brachytherapy seeds must be segmented quickly and accurately during the surgery, but current segmentation algorithms are inhibitory in the operating room (OR). The first reason is that current algorithms require operators to manually select a region of interest (ROI), preventing automatic pipelining from image acquisition to seed reconstruction. Secondly, these algorithms fail often, requiring operators to manually correct the errors. We propose a fast and effective ROI-free automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm to minimize such human intervention. The proposed algorithm exploits recent image processing tools to make seed reconstruction as easy and convenient as possible. Preliminary results on 162 patient images show this algorithm to be fast, effective, and accurate for all features to be segmented. With near perfect success rates and subpixel differences to manual segmentation, our automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm shows promising results to save crucial time in the OR while reducing errors.

  16. Hybrid dosimetry: Feasibility of mixing angulated and parallel needles in planning prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pubic arch interference (PAI) often caused inadequate prostate coverage during transperineal brachytherapy using all parallel needles. In this paper, a hybrid implantation approach is presented in which additional angulated needles can be used to avoid PAI. This approach can be applied in prostate brachytherapy using a robotic assisted device. To examine the feasibility of this approach, volume data from three prostate seed implant patients were selected, which represent small, medium, and large prostates. As the blocking area was artificially increased simulating pubic arch overlap, the dosimetry outcomes and ratio of number of angulated needles to the total number of needles were analyzed. The hybrid dosimetry broke down when blocking is over 42%. As the percent of blocking increased, the ratio of the number of angulated needles to the total number of needles increased, while the dosimetry outcomes only had a slight trend of worsening. When close to the breakdown point, the dosimetry outcomes worsen drastically. Therefore, for moderate PAI the hybrid dosimetry is feasible

  17. Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC-ESTRO Working Group (IV): Basic principles and parameters for MR imaging within the frame of image based adaptive cervix cancer brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Petrow, Peter; Tanderup, Kari; Petric, Primoz; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pedersen, Erik M; van Limbergen, Erik; Haie-Meder, Christine; Pötter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The GYN GEC-ESTRO working group issued three parts of recommendations and highlighted the pivotal role of MRI for the successful implementation of 3D image-based cervical cancer brachytherapy (BT). The main advantage of MRI as an imaging modality is its superior soft tissue depiction quality. To exploit the full potential of MRI for the better ability of the radiation oncologist to make the appropriate choice for the BT application technique and to accurately define the target volumes and the...

  18. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  19. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  20. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  1. The role of brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre of Khartoum (RICK)

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A M

    2000-01-01

    As there are many efforts devoted in order to manage the cancer, here the researcher handle one of these efforts that play a major part in treating the cancer internationally, it is a brachytherapy system. Brachytherapy was carried out mostly with radium sources, but recently some artificial sources are incorporated in this mode of treatment such as Cs-137, Ir-192, Au-198, P-32, Sr-90 and I-125. The research cover history of brachytherapy and radioactive sources used in, techniques of implementation, radiation protection and methods of brachytherapy dose calculation, as well as brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre in Khartoum.

  2. Percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed and evaluated the feasibility of a brachytherapy technique as a safe and effective treatment for adrenal metastasis. Adapting a paravertebral insertion technique in radiofrequency ablation of adrenal tumors, we developed an interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis achievable on an outpatient basis. Under local anesthesia and under X-ray CT guidance, brachytherapy applicator needles were percutaneously inserted into the target. A treatment plan was created to eradicate the tumor while preserving normal organs including the spinal cord and kidney. We applied this interstitial brachytherapy technique to two patients: one who developed adrenal metastasis as the third recurrence of uterine cervical cancer after reirradiation, and one who developed metachronous multiple metastases from malignant melanoma. The whole procedure was completed in 2.5 hours. There were no procedure-related or radiation-related early/late complications. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-CT images at two and three months after treatment showed absence of FDG uptake, and no recurrence of the adrenal tumor was observed for over seven months until expiration, and for six months until the present, respectively. This interventional interstitial brachytherapy procedure may be useful as a safe and eradicative treatment for adrenal metastasis. (author)

  3. A theoretical derivation of the nomograms for permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study calculates the required minimum radioactivity to deliver a prescribed dose of radiation to a target using radioisotopes in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Assuming the radioactivity to be in a continuous form, an integral equation -- Fredholm equation of the first kind, can be formulated with the radioactivity density used as the variable. The density distribution to produce a uniform volume dose rate is determined using a quadrature method and the radial profile behaves smoothly from the zero radius, and peaks sharply approaching the volume boundary. The density for Pd-103 is about 1.5 times that of I-125 due to its higher spatial attenuation. A nomogram is the relationship between the total activity per unit dose (A) and the dimension of the volume (d). Expressing the nomogram as A=cxdn U/Gy, then (c,n)= [(0.0098, 2.09) I-125] and [(0.031, 2.25) Pd-103]. Compared with the Memorial nomogram, (c,n)=[(0.011,2.2) I-125] and [(0.036,2.56) Pd-103], or that quoted by AAPM TG64, (c,n)=[(0.014,2.05) I-125] and [(0.056,2.22) Pd-103], our calculation determined an average 33% and 35% decrease for I-125, and 89% and 77% decrease for Pd-103, respectively. Two reasons for the extra total activity found in the Memorial and AAPM nomograms are: (a) An imperfect clinical situation limited by the restraints of implant techniques (e.g., use of templates) associated with the presence of adjacent normal organs, and (b) source discretization into seeds. When radioactivity is clumped as discrete seeds, higher activity is needed because of 'wastage' in two aspects: (a) Dose cold-spots at intersource spaces, (b) hot-spots around the sources. Thus in theory, use of lower activity seeds will require less total activity to deliver a prescribed dose. Based on our study, Pd-103 delivers a higher therapeutic ratio and a lower integral dose to the patient compared to I-125

  4. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emisson Tomography/Computed Tomography Guided Conformal Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Heerim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sj5201.huh@samsung.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Sang Gyu; Park, Won; Lee, Jeong Eun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT)-guided conformal brachytherapy treatment planning in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment FDG-PET/CT was performed for 12 patients with cervical cancer. Brachytherapy simulation was performed after an external-beam radiation therapy median dose of 4140 cGy. Patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans with placement of tandem and ovoid applicators. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was determined by adjusting the window and level to a reasonable value and outlining the edge of the enhancing area, which was done in consultation with a nuclear medicine physician. A standardized uptake value profile of the tumor margin was taken for each patient relative to the maximum uptake value of each tumor and analyzed. The plan was designed to deliver 400 cGy to point A (point A plan) or to cover the clinical target volume (CTV) (PET/CT plan). Results: The median dose that encompassed 95% of the target volume (D95) of the CTV was 323.0 cGy for the point A plan vs 399.0 cGy for the PET/CT plan (P=.001). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumors were reduced by a median of 57% (range, 13%-80%). All but 1 patient presented with discernable residual uptake within the tumors. The median value of the thresholds of the tumors contoured by simple visual analysis was 41% (range, 23%-71%). Conclusions: In this study, the PET/CT plan was better than the conventional point A plan in terms of target coverage without increasing the dose to the normal tissue, making optimized 3-dimensional brachytherapy treatment planning possible. In comparison with the previously reported study with PET or CT alone, we found that visual target localization was facilitated by PET fusion on indeterminate CT masses. Further studies are needed to characterize the metabolic activity detected during radiation therapy for more reliable targeting.

  5. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, May

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. Material and methods This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. Results The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. Conclusions The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected. PMID:27504129

  6. A dosimetric comparison of 169Yb and 192Ir for HDR brachytherapy of the breast, accounting for the effect of finite patient dimensions and tissue inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulou, G; Papagiannis, P; Angelopoulos, A; Karaiskos, P; Georgiou, E; Baltas, D

    2006-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry is used to compare 169Yb to 192Ir for breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy applications using multiple catheter implants. Results for bare point sources show that while 169Yb delivers a greater dose rate per unit air kerma strength at the radial distance range of interest to brachytherapy in homogeneous water phantoms, it suffers a greater dose rate deficit in missing scatter conditions relative to 192Ir. As a result of these two opposing factors, in the scatter conditions defined by the presence of the lung and the finite patient dimensions in breast brachytherapy the dose distributions calculated in a patient equivalent mathematical phantom by Monte Carlo simulations for the same implant of either 169Yb or 1921r commercially available sources are found comparable. Dose volume histogram results support that 169Yb could be at least as effective as 192Ir delivering the same dose to the lung and slightly reduced dose to the breast skin. The current treatment planning systems' approach of employing dosimetry data precalculated in a homogeneous water phantom of given shape and dimensions, however, is shown to notably overestimate the delivered dose distribution for 169Yb. Especially at the skin and the lung, the treatment planning system dose overestimation is on the order of 15%-30%. These findings do not undermine the potential of 169Yb HDR sources for breast brachytherapy relative to the most commonly used 192Ir HDR sources. They imply, however, that there could be a need for the amendment of dose calculation algorithms employed in clinical treatment planning of particular brachytherapy applications, especially for intermediate photon energy sources such as 169Yb.

  7. Simple DVH parameter addition as compared to deformable registration for bladder dose accumulation in cervix cancer brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Else Stougård; Noe, Karsten Østergaaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild;

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Variations in organ position, shape, and volume cause uncertainties in dose assessment for brachytherapy (BT) in cervix cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate uncertainties associated with bladder dose accumulation based on DVH parameter addition (previously...... called "the worst case assumption") in fractionated BT. Materials and methods: Forty-seven patients treated for locally advanced cervical cancer were included. All patients received EBRT combined with two individually planned 3D image-guided adaptive BT fractions. D2 and D0.1 were estimated by DVH...

  8. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with prior evidence of prostatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To refute a misconception that a prior history of prostatitis is a contraindication to prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Five patients with clinical or pathologic evidence of prior prostatitis were treated with transperineal brachytherapy. Four of the patients received a single i.v. dose of ciprofloxacin (500 mg) intraoperatively. Postimplant antibiotics were not given. The pretreatment biopsy slides were reviewed. Results: Two of the five patients developed postimplant urinary retention requiring short-term catheterization, and both resolved spontaneously. One patient developed what appeared to be an exacerbation of his chronic prostatitis. Conclusion: We continue to recommend prostate brachytherapy for the treatment of clinically organ-confined cancer, with no concern about prior clinical or pathologic evidence of prostatitis

  9. HDR neutron brachytherapy for prostatic cancer in lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to analyse the physical and radiobiological background of the HDR Cf-252 Neutron brachytherapy boost in the combined radiation therapy for locally advanced prostatic cancer. The treatment schedule:two fractions of the Cf-252 brachytherapy(5Gy-eq at the dose point 2 cm from source movement trajectory) with interval 24 hours; 5-8 fractions of the photon beam external radiation therapy(5 fractions per week, 2 Gy per fraction) to the prostate, two fractions of the Cf-252 brachytherapy and after that external beam radiation therapy is continued till total dose 40-45 Gy. Six patients completed the proposed combined radiation therapy. The results of this trial will be discussed

  10. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains a summary of that workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report. An appendix contains the 8 papers presented at the conference: NRC proposed policy statement on the use of probabilistic risk assessment methods in nuclear regulatory activities; NRC proposed agency-wide implementation plan for probabilistic risk assessment; Risk evaluation of high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy at a large research/teaching institution; The pros and cons of using human reliability analysis techniques to analyze misadministration events; Review of medical misadministration event summaries and comparison of human error modeling; Preliminary examples of the development of error influences and effects diagrams to analyze medical misadministration events; Brachytherapy risk assessment program plan; and Principles of brachytherapy quality assurance.

  11. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains a summary of that workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC's intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report. An appendix contains the 8 papers presented at the conference: NRC proposed policy statement on the use of probabilistic risk assessment methods in nuclear regulatory activities; NRC proposed agency-wide implementation plan for probabilistic risk assessment; Risk evaluation of high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy at a large research/teaching institution; The pros and cons of using human reliability analysis techniques to analyze misadministration events; Review of medical misadministration event summaries and comparison of human error modeling; Preliminary examples of the development of error influences and effects diagrams to analyze medical misadministration events; Brachytherapy risk assessment program plan; and Principles of brachytherapy quality assurance

  12. Saline volume expansion and cardiovascular physiology: novel observations, old explanations, and new questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, James L

    2004-10-01

    In a clinical investigation, Kumar and coworkers reported the hemodynamic events that accompany plasma volume expansion over 3 hours in healthy adult volunteers, and found that increases in stroke volume (SV) may be related to increases in left ventricular (LV)/right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume, as they expected, but also to decreases in LV/RV end-systolic volume. The latter finding suggests increased contractility and/or decreased afterload, which do not fit with their perception that clinicians ascribe increases in SV to increases in end-diastolic volume based on Starling's work. Increased ejection fraction and decreased vascular resistances were also observed. The same authors recently reported novel data suggesting that reduced blood viscosity may account for the observed reduction in vascular resistances with saline volume expansion. However, the variances in preload and afterload, along with uncertainty in estimates of contractility, substantially limit their ability to define a primary mechanism to explain decreases in LV end-systolic volume. A focus on using ejection fraction to evaluate the integrated performance of the cardiovascular system is provided to broaden this analytic perspective. Sagawa and colleagues described an approach to estimate the relationship, under clinical conditions, between ventricular and arterial bed elastances (i.e. maximal ventricular systolic elastance [Emax] and maximal arterial systolic elastance [Ea]), reflecting ventricular-arterial coupling. I used the mean data provided in one of the reports from Kumar and coworkers to calculate that LV Emax decreased from 1.09 to 0.96 mmHg/ml with saline volume expansion, while Ea decreased from 1.1 to 0.97 mmHg/ml and the SV increased (i.e. the increase in mean SV was associated with a decrease in mean afterload while the mean contractility decreased). The results reported by Kumar and coworkers invite further studies in normal and critically ill patients during acute saline

  13. Is a Loose-Seed Nomogram Still Valid for Prostate Brachytherapy in a Stranded-Seed Era?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To characterize the amount of activity required to treat the prostate with stranded 125I radioactive seeds and compare our stranded data with the amount of activity recommended when individual seeds are implanted using a Mick applicator. Methods and Materials: Data from two groups of patients at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center who were treated with prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy were analyzed. The first group included 100 patients implanted with individual seeds in 2000 and 2001. The second group comprised 81 patients for whom stranded seeds were implanted in 2006 and 2007. Seeds in both groups were 125I seeds with an air kerma strength of 0.497 U per seed (0.391 mCi per seed). The prescribed dose to planning target volume was 145 Gy. Results: The total implanted activity and the number of seeds used were significantly lower in the second group (p 3 prostate and approximately 15% for a 60-cm3 prostate. With equivalent activity between the two groups, the stranded-seed treatment covered a larger treatment volume with the prescribed dose. Conclusions: The amount of activity required to effectively treat a prostate of a given volume was lower with stranded seeds than with loose seeds. Our experience suggests that prostate brachytherapy that uses stranded seeds leads to a more efficient implant with fewer seeds and lower overall activity, resulting in improved homogeneity

  14. Uncertainty analysis in MCNP5 calculations for brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardy, I., E-mail: gerardy@isib.be [Institut Superieur Industriel de Bruxelles, 150, Rue Royale, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Rodenas, J.; Gallardo, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method can be applied to simulate brachytherapy treatment planning. The MCNP5 code gives, together with results, a statistical uncertainty associated with them. However, the latter is not the only existing uncertainty related to the simulation and other uncertainties must be taken into account. A complete analysis of all sources of uncertainty having some influence on results of the simulation of brachytherapy treatment is presented in this paper. This analysis has been based on the recommendations of the American Association for Physicist in Medicine (AAPM) and of the International Standard Organisation (ISO).

  15. Brachytherapy in vulvar cancer: analysis of 18 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION: Vulvar cancer is a rather common neoplasm in elderly patients. Surgery, followed eventually by postoperative radiotherapy, is the treatment of choice. The results of exclusive radiotherapy (external beam irradiation and/or brachytherapy) are not well defined and in the recent literature only small series are reported. Radiotherapy however is the only therapeutic option in patients who are not fit for radical surgery. It is thus necessary to review its indications and its modalities. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1990 to 1994 18 pts with a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva have been submitted to brachytherapy. Age ranged from 60 to 92 years (mean age 76, 1 ys). 14 pts were treated at diagnosis (11 pts) or for recurrent disease after surgery (3 pts). In 8 of them brachytherapy (total dose 35-45 Gy, dose rate: 0,4-0,78 Gy/h) was preceded by external beam irradiation (Co60 or electron beam, 40-50 Gy to primary and inguinal nodes); 6 pts were treated with brachytherapy alone (58-60 Gy; dose rate 0,44-0,63 Gy/h). 4 pts underwent to brachytherapy alone for local recurrence after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (total dose 45-60 Gy; dose rate 0,37-0,49 Gy/h). Brachytherapy was always performed with 192 Ir. Plastic tubes (2 to 5 lines) were used for single plane implantation of small exophytic lesions limited to the labia (8 cases); a perineal template (10 cases) was employed in lesions extended to the vaginal mucosa or involving the clitoris or the area of the perineum. (10(14)) pts treated at diagnosis are alive and free from local recurrence after 11-48 mos. 3 of them, treated with brachytherapy alone, have presented a nodal recurrence in the groin after 14, 15 and 27 mos. respectively. All of them are alive and free from disease after surgery and external radiotherapy. None of the pts treated for recurrent disease after surgery + external beam radiotherapy has achieved a local control. CONCLUSION: Brachytherapy alone or

  16. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  17. Quality of life of patients after permanent prostate brachytherapy in relation to dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate changes in quality of life (QoL) after permanent prostate brachytherapy and to correlate these changes with postimplant dosimetry based on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Methods and Materials: For this study, 127 patients with low-stage prostate cancer and treated with brachytherapy received a QoL questionnaire at five time points: before treatment and at 4 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after treatment. The questionnaire included the RAND-36 generic health survey, the cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core questionnaire, the tumor-specific EORTC prostate cancer module, and the American Urological Association symptom index. Postimplant dosimetry was based on registered T1 spin echo transversal, T2 turbo spin echo transversal, and T2 turbo spin echo sagittal MR images and CT images taken 4 weeks after implantation of the iodine-125 seeds. Calculated parameters were prostate volume, prostate volume receiving 100% (V100) and 150% (V150) dose, dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90), maximum dose in 1-, 2-, and 5-cm3 rectum volume, distance between prostate and anterior rectum wall, and the maximum dose in 1%, 2%, and 5% urethra volume. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used for comparison of the means of all variables in the different questionnaires. Linear regression analysis (stepwise) was used to investigate the correlations between QoL parameters and dosimetry parameters. Results: On average, only the QoL at 4 weeks after implant was significantly different from (worse than) the QoL at the other time points. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between changes in bowel problems and the maximum dose in 2-cm3 rectum volume, between changes in urinary symptoms and prostate volume, and between changes in urinary problems and the D90 value of the prostate. Conclusions: The QoL for patients with permanent prostate implants was worse in the first months after

  18. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI

  19. Halo's production in vitro on brachytherapy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since earlier of 1960, one of the most significant contributions of radiation biology has been the theory of cell killing as a function of increasing doses of a cytotoxic agent, as well as the demonstration of repair of sublethal or potentially lethal damage after irradiation. The impact of cellular and molecular radiobiology, by exploitation of cellular mechanisms related to apoptosis, may be the cell killing with irradiation by including changes other than unrepaired DNA damage. Based on the understanding of the tumor microenvironment and how growth factors and proteins produced by irradiated cells may alter cellular processes, improved combined-modality strategies may emerge. This effect was show since 1960's, but here we propose to demonstrate this phenomenon in Brachytherapy. The present goal is to verify the macroscopic response through the production and analysis of clonogenic control based on halos generation by radioactive seeds of Ho-165 and Sm-153, aiming to study the effect of this type of irradiation. Confluent cell culture flasks with HeLa cell line were subjected to radiation in a period up to five half-lives of radionuclide, respectively. Devices were introduced which set the polymer-ceramic Ho-165 and Sm-153 seeds in the vials. After a period of exposure, the flasks were stained with violet Gensiana. The results showed the formation of halos control of confluent cancer cells. This paper will describe these experiments in the current stage of the research and report the implications of this new way of therapy for cancer treatment. (author)

  20. Radiation Protection Training in Intracoronary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the educational objectives and contents on Radiation Protection (RP) for the practice of Intracoronary Brachytherapy (ICB) procedures. The wide international experience on training programs for ICB as well as our own experience organizing several courses aimed at Cardiologists, Radio therapists and Medical Physicists has been used to elaborate specific RP objectives and contents. The objectives, differentiated for Cardiologists, Radio therapists, Medical Physicists, Nurses and Technicians, pretend to guarantee the safety and RP of both patient and staff in the procedures of ICB. The objectives are necessarily different because their RP formation and their role in the procedure are different. The general topics included in RP training programmes for ICB could be: general topics on RP (Interaction of radiation and matter, RP principles, radiobiology, etc), principles of operation of ICB and interventional X-ray equipment, quantification of radiation dose and risks, optimisation of protection of staff and patients, accidents and emergencies, regulations, responsibilities, quality assurance program, handling of ICB sources, installation and commissioning. Training programs based on the objectives presented in this paper would encourage positive safety culture in ICB and can also be used as a starting point by the Regulatory Authority for the authorization of new Installations and credentialing of professionals involved in this technique as well as for the continuous education of the staff involved. (Author) 10 refs

  1. A quality management program in intravascular brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakri, Abderrahim; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-12-01

    While simple, intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) presents a considerable potential for harm to the patient. The medical physicist maintains the responsibility to minimize the likelihood of operational problems or dosimetric errors. The principals for safe operation remain the same as with any radiotherapy treatment: to deliver the correct dose, to the correct location, safety. To develop an effective and comprehensive quality management (QM) program for IVB, a physicist should utilize proven risk assessment techniques rather than simply thinking of things to check, and follow guidances such as ISO9001:2000. The proposed QM program includes the following: Procedures designed to assure the safety of the patient. Identification of the patient; tests of the integrity and patency for the delivery catheter, operation of the source train, and patency of the catheter in the treatment position; a check for recovery preparations; and verification of source recovery. Procedures to assure positional accuracy of the treatment: Verification of the positioning the catheter in the artery and of the sources in the catheter. Procedures to assure dosimetry accuracy: Acceptance testing of the device, including verification of the source strength and uniformity, and of the treatment duration tables; verification of the treatment prescription and duration for each patient; and control measures that minimize the likelihood of errors removing the source at the correct time. PMID:12512720

  2. CT guided 125I seed brachytherapy for recurrent rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the technological feasibility, efficacy and morbidity of CT guided 125I seed implantation for recurrent rectum cancer. Methods: Twenty-three patients with recurrent rectum cancer were treated with CT guided interstitial 125I seed brachytherapy. In 20 patients the procedure was performed under epidural anesthesia and 3 patients under local anesthesia. Treatment planning system was used to calculate the number of seeds, the space distribution and the introduction of the seeding needles. Matched peripheral dose (MPD) of 121I seed implantation ranged from 90-120 Gy for patients who had had external radiotherapy, and 140- 160 Gy for those who had not. The planning target volume(PTV) was clinical target volume(CTV) plus 1 cm margin. The range of radioactivity of the 125I seeds was 18.5-25.9 MBq. All these 23 patients had CT scan at 5 mm intervals after implantation for quality evaluation, together with routine chest, pelvic X-ray films within 24-48 hours after seed implantation. Three patients received three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy(3DCRT) to a total dose of 45-50 Gy, with 2-3 Gy/f. Follow-up time was from 3 to 28 months. Results: All patients was able to tolerate seed implantation well. Complete pain relief was observed in 12/15, and partial relief in 2/15 and no response in 1/15, with a response rate of 93%. The local control rate was 87%. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 93% and 50% respectively. Two of four patients have died of dissemination to the lung after 8 and 12 months. One seed has migrated into the pelvis without causing any untoward morbidity. Conclusion: CT guided 125I seed implantation for recurrent rectum cancer is safe, minimally invasive, causing only mild morbidity. It possesses a high efficacy, yet it should be given in combination with extemal beam radiation and chemotherapy, should distant metastasis be observed. (authors)

  3. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR-brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorissen, Bram L; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2014-01-01

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 seconds, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iter...

  4. Development of a Novel Robot for Transperineal Needle Based Interventions: Focal Therapy, Brachytherapy and Prostate Biopsies

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Jean-Alexandre; Baumann, Michael; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Bolla, Michel; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Rambeaud, Jean-Jacques; Troccaz, Jocelyne; 10.1016/j.juro.2012.06.003

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We report what is to our knowledge the initial experience with a new 3-dimensional ultrasound robotic system for prostate brachytherapy assistance, focal therapy and prostate biopsies. Its ability to track prostate motion intraoperatively allows it to manage motions and guide needles to predefined targets. Materials and Methods: A robotic system was created for transrectal ultrasound guided needle implantation combined with intraoperative prostate tracking. Experiments were done on 90 targets embedded in a total of 9 mobile, deformable, synthetic prostate phantoms. Experiments involved trying to insert glass beads as close as possible to targets in multimodal anthropomorphic imaging phantoms. Results were measured by segmenting the inserted beads in computerized tomography volumes of the phantoms. Results: The robot reached the chosen targets in phantoms with a median accuracy of 2.73 mm and a median prostate motion of 5.46 mm. Accuracy was better at the apex than at the base (2.28 vs 3.83 mm, p <...

  5. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: The feasibility and cosmetic outcome of a fractionated outpatient delivery scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, potential toxicity, and cosmetic outcome of fractionated interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for the management of patients with breast cancer at increased risk for local recurrence. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 1996, 18 women with early stage breast cancer underwent conventionally fractionated whole breast radiotherapy (50-50.4 Gy) followed by interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost. All were considered to be at high risk for local failure. Seventeen had pathologically confirmed final surgical margins of less than 2 mm or focally positive. Brachytherapy catheter placement and treatment delivery were conducted on an outpatient basis. Preplanning was used to determine optimal catheter positions to enhance dose homogeneity of dose delivery. The total HDR boost dose was 15 Gy delivered in 6 fractions of 2.5 Gy over 3 days. Local control, survival, late toxicities (LENT-SOMA), and cosmetic outcome were recorded in follow-up. In addition, factors potentially influencing cosmesis were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results: The minimum follow-up is 40 months with a median 50 months. Sixteen patients were alive without disease at last follow-up. There have been no in-breast failures observed. One patient died with brain metastases, and another died of unrelated causes without evidence of disease. Grade 1-2 late toxicities included 39% with hyperpigmentation, 56% with detectable fibrosis, 28% with occasional discomfort, and 11% with visible telangiectasias. Grade 3 toxicity was reported in one patient as persistent discomfort. Sixty-seven percent of patients were considered to have experienced good/excellent cosmetic outcomes. Factors with a direct relationship to adverse cosmetic outcome were extent of surgical defect (p = 0.00001), primary excision volume (p = 0.017), and total excision volume (p = 0.015). Conclusions: For high risk patients who may benefit from increased doses, interstitial HDR

  6. Nodal recurrences after exclusive brachytherapy for T1-T2 N0 cancer of the oral tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION: Exclusive brachytherapy represents the treatment of choice in small volume cancer of the oral tongue. In this neoplasm however the incidence of subclinical metastasis in neck nodes is not negligible, and prophylactic neck dissection is advocated by some Authors after interstitial irradiation. We have thus reviewed the incidence of nodal recurrences in a group of pts treated with brachytherapy alone for tongue cancer. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1982 to 1994 44 pts (27 males, 17 females, age 35-84 years, median 63,3 years) were treated with 192 Ir interstitial irradiation alone for clinically N0 epidermoid cancer of the oral tongue (T1: 19 pts, T2: 25 pts). Brachytherapy was performed with hairpins or plastic tubes, according to the rules of the Paris system. Dose ranged from 60-70 Gy with a dose rate of 0.38-0.62 Gy/h (median: 63.8 and 0.52 respectively). Local recurrences were observed in 8 pts (18.1 %), 3 of whom are free from disease after salvage surgery. Neck nodes metastasis appeared after 3-11 months (mos) from primary treatment (median 6,3 mos) and represented the first site of failure in 16 pts (36,3 %; T1 (6(19)): 31,5 %. T2(10(25)) : 40 %; volume 3cc.: 55.5 %). After neck dissection and external radiotherapy 10 of them were rendered free from disease and are still alive at 12-123 mos. Definitive control above the clavicles was thus 75 % ((33(44)) pts). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Exclusive brachytherapy can obtain excellent local control rates in T1 T2 oral tongue cancer (81.9 % in our experience). Nodal recurrences are however frequent after interstitial irradiation in large volume cancers and salvage of pts relapsed in the neck is not easily achievable. Prophylactic neck dissection could be advisable to enhance regional control rate in these pts. The role of newer methods to evaluate neck nodes during follow up (ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration of suspicious nodes) is now being investigated in our centre

  7. A Monte Carlo study on tissue dose enhancement in brachytherapy: a comparison between gadolinium and gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to quantify the dose enhancement by gadolinium and gold nanoparticles in brachytherapy. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used to simulate four brachytherapy sources: 60Co, 198Au, 192Ir, 169Yb. To verify the accuracy of our simulations, the obtained values of dose rate constants and radial dose functions were compared with corresponding published values for these sources. To study dose enhancements, a spherical soft tissue phantom with 15 cm in radius was simulated. Gadolinium and gold nanoparticles at 10, 20 and 30 mg/ml concentrations were separately assumed in a 1 × 1 × 1 cm3 volume simulating tumour. The simulated dose to the tumour with the impurity was compared to the dose without impurity, as a function of radial distance and concentration of the impurity, to determine the enhancement of dose due to the presence of the impurity. Dose enhancements in the tumour obtained in the presence of gadolinium and gold nanoparticles with concentration of 30 mg/ml, were found to be in the range of −0.5–106.1 and 0.4–153.1 % respectively. In addition, at higher radial distances from the source center, higher dose enhancements were observed. GdNPs can be used as a high atomic number material to enhance dose in tumour volume with dose enhancements up to 106.1 % when used in brachytherapy. Regardless considering the clinical limitations of the here-in presented model, for a similar source and concentration of nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles show higher dose enhancement than gadolinium nanoparticles and can have more clinical usefulness as dose enhancer material.

  8. Modelling radiation doses to critical organs of patients undergoing intracavitary brachytherapy treatment at Kumfo Anokye Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of radiotherapy is to destroy cancerous tissues with ionizing radiation while the other normal parts of the body are saved or spared. Intracavitary brachytherapy is a procedure in which radioactive sources are placed in the body cavities close to or inside the target volume to deliver radiation at short distances. In this mode of treatment, high radiation dose can be delivered to the tumour volume with rapid dose fall-off into the surrounding normal tissues. In brachytherapy, the dosimetry in biological tissues is a complex process. Dosimetric parameters such as the dose to critical organs and the total dose to the reference points as in the case of Manchester system are critical for patients undergoing intracavitary brachytherapy treatment. In this study, the Finite Element Method (FEM) has been utilized to solve Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) to determine the distribution of angular photon fluxes at various positions in the cervix of cancer patients and the dose distribution calculated for the organs of interest. The time-dependent linear BTE was used to describe the passage of ionizing radiation taking into account tissue heterogeneities and other scattering phenomena before depositing the absorbed dose in a patient. The simulation was carried out to determine doses to the critical organs, namely the rectum and bladder. Results from the study indicate doses to the rectum and the bladder to be in the range of 10.13-85.67cGy and 21.32-78.81cGy respectively for stage I to stage IV cancer patients. Comparison of the results from the model with data from published articles and dose prescriptions from the treatment planning system of the Radiotherapy Center of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana for different cancer stages indicate good agreement with standard error of ±20% to ±34%. (au)

  9. Establishing High-Quality Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Phantom Simulator Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaker, Nikhil G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Albert, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Banner Health, Loveland/Greeley, Colorado (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Pugh, Thomas J.; Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bruno, Teresa L. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Prestidge, Bradley R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bon Secours Health System, Norfolk, Virginia (United States); Crook, Juanita M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Cox, Brett W.; Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore-LIJ Health System, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, Illinois (United States); Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Center, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To design and implement a unique training program that uses a phantom-based simulator to teach the process of prostate brachytherapy (PB) quality assurance and improve the quality of education. Methods and Materials: Trainees in our simulator program were practicing radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents, and fellows of the American Brachytherapy Society. The program emphasized 6 core areas of quality assurance: patient selection, simulation, treatment planning, implant technique, treatment evaluation, and outcome assessment. Using the Iodine 125 ({sup 125}I) preoperative treatment planning technique, trainees implanted their ultrasound phantoms with dummy seeds (ie, seeds with no activity). Pre- and postimplant dosimetric parameters were compared and correlated using regression analysis. Results: Thirty-one trainees successfully completed the simulator program during the period under study. The mean phantom prostate size, number of seeds used, and total activity were generally consistent between trainees. All trainees met the V100 >95% objective both before and after implantation. Regardless of the initial volume of the prostate phantom, trainees' ability to cover the target volume with at least 100% of the dose (V100) was not compromised (R=0.99 pre- and postimplant). However, the V150 had lower concordance (R=0.37) and may better reflect heterogeneity control of the implant process. Conclusions: Analysis of implants from this phantom-based simulator shows a high degree of consistency between trainees and uniformly high-quality implants with respect to parameters used in clinical practice. This training program provides a valuable educational opportunity that improves the quality of PB training and likely accelerates the learning curve inherent in PB. Prostate phantom implantation can be a valuable first step in the acquisition of the required skills to safely perform PB.

  10. Measurement uncertainty analysis of low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy: post-implant dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kent J; Pattison, John E; Bibbo, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The minimal dose covering 90 % of the prostate volume--D 90--is arguably the most important dosimetric parameter in low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy. In this study an analysis of the measurement uncertainties in D 90 from low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy was conducted for two common treatment procedures with two different post-implant dosimetry methods. The analysis was undertaken in order to determine the magnitude of D 90 uncertainty, how the magnitude of the uncertainty varied when D 90 was calculated using different dosimetry methods, and which factors were the major contributors to the uncertainty. The analysis considered the prostate as being homogeneous and tissue equivalent and made use of published data, as well as original data collected specifically for this analysis, and was performed according to the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). It was found that when prostate imaging and seed implantation were conducted in two separate sessions using only CT images for post-implant analysis, the expanded uncertainty in D 90 values were about 25 % at the 95 % confidence interval. When prostate imaging and seed implantation were conducted during a single session using CT and ultrasound images for post-implant analysis, the expanded uncertainty in D 90 values were about 33 %. Methods for reducing these uncertainty levels are discussed. It was found that variations in contouring the target tissue made the largest contribution to D 90 uncertainty, while the uncertainty in seed source strength made only a small contribution. It is important that clinicians appreciate the overall magnitude of D 90 uncertainty and understand the factors that affect it so that clinical decisions are soundly based, and resources are appropriately allocated.

  11. First experiences with computer-assisted frameless stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy (CASIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reach an optimal treatment result and to avoid damage to critical structures a homogenous dose distribution in the tumor volume with a rapid decreasing dose to the surrounding structures is necessary. Fractionated interstitial brachytherapy of tumors in the ENT region employing needles depends on exact localization of the target volume during all fractions. Therefore reproducibility of positioning of the needle(s) plays an important role. Material and Methods: We used the ISG Viewing Wand system in combination with the Vogele-Bale-Hohner (VBH) head holder and a new targeting device. Point of entrance, pathway, and target point of the needle were planned and insertion of the needle simulated in advance. To date we have treated 7 patients with inoperable tumors in the ENT region. The actual position of the needle in the control CT was compared to the planned position. Results: The accuracy of positioning of the needle depended on the location of the tumor. In a patient with a recurrent retroorbital adenocarcinoma the mean accuracy was 1 mm. Due to soft tissue displacement in the neck region and the resulting necessity to readjust the targeting device the needle was placed with a mean deviation of 15 mm between the planned and the actual position. Conclusions: Computer-assisted frameless stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy allows for precise, reproducible and preplanned insertion of hollow needles into target structures closely adherent to the surrounding tissue, thus avoiding damage of neighbouring structures. This technique is of great advantage in treating deeply seated tumors which are fixed to bony structures, especially at the skull base. Inaccuracy in the neck region caused by soft tissue shift requires improvement of the immobilization in this region. (orig.)

  12. Establishing High-Quality Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Phantom Simulator Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To design and implement a unique training program that uses a phantom-based simulator to teach the process of prostate brachytherapy (PB) quality assurance and improve the quality of education. Methods and Materials: Trainees in our simulator program were practicing radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents, and fellows of the American Brachytherapy Society. The program emphasized 6 core areas of quality assurance: patient selection, simulation, treatment planning, implant technique, treatment evaluation, and outcome assessment. Using the Iodine 125 (125I) preoperative treatment planning technique, trainees implanted their ultrasound phantoms with dummy seeds (ie, seeds with no activity). Pre- and postimplant dosimetric parameters were compared and correlated using regression analysis. Results: Thirty-one trainees successfully completed the simulator program during the period under study. The mean phantom prostate size, number of seeds used, and total activity were generally consistent between trainees. All trainees met the V100 >95% objective both before and after implantation. Regardless of the initial volume of the prostate phantom, trainees' ability to cover the target volume with at least 100% of the dose (V100) was not compromised (R=0.99 pre- and postimplant). However, the V150 had lower concordance (R=0.37) and may better reflect heterogeneity control of the implant process. Conclusions: Analysis of implants from this phantom-based simulator shows a high degree of consistency between trainees and uniformly high-quality implants with respect to parameters used in clinical practice. This training program provides a valuable educational opportunity that improves the quality of PB training and likely accelerates the learning curve inherent in PB. Prostate phantom implantation can be a valuable first step in the acquisition of the required skills to safely perform PB

  13. Reporting small bowel dose in cervix cancer high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yixiang; Dandekar, Virag; Chu, James C H; Turian, Julius; Bernard, Damian; Kiel, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel (SB) is an organ at risk (OAR) that may potentially develop toxicity after radiotherapy for cervix cancer. However, its dose from brachytherapy (BT) is not systematically reported as in other OARs, even with image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT). This study aims to introduce consideration of quantified objectives for SB in BT plan optimization and to evaluate the feasibility of sparing SB while maintaining adequate target coverage. In all, 13 patients were included in this retrospective study. All patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) 45Gy in 25 fractions followed by high dose rate (HDR)-BT boost of 28Gy in 4 fractions using tandem/ring applicator. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomographic (CT) images were obtained to define the gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and OARs (rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, and SB). Treatment plans were generated for each patient using GEC-ESTRO recommendations based on the first CT/MRI. Treatment plans were revised to reduce SB dose when the [Formula: see text] dose to SB was > 5Gy, while maintaining other OAR constraints. For the 7 patients with 2 sets of CT and MRI studies, the interfraction variation of the most exposed SB was analyzed. Plan revisions were done in 6 of 13 cases owing to high [Formula: see text] of SB. An average reduction of 19% in [Formula: see text] was achieved. Meeting SB and other OAR constraints resulted in less than optimal target coverage in 2 patients (D90 of HR-CTV < 77Gyαβ10). The highest interfraction variation was observed for SB at 16 ± 59%, as opposed to 28 ± 27% for rectum and 21 ± 16% for bladder. Prospective reporting of SB dose could provide data required to establish a potential correlation with radiation-induced late complication for SB. PMID:26235549

  14. The investigation of prostatic calcifications using μ-PIXE analysis and their dosimetric effect in low dose rate brachytherapy treatments using Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, D. J.; Cutajar, D. L.; George, S. P.; Guatelli, S.; Bucci, J. A.; Enari, K. E.; Miller, S.; Siegele, R.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-06-01

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is a widely used modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Most clinical treatment planning systems currently in use approximate all tissue to water, neglecting the existence of inhomogeneities, such as calcifications. The presence of prostatic calcifications may perturb the dose due to the higher photoelectric effect cross section in comparison to water. This study quantitatively evaluates the effect of prostatic calcifications on the dosimetric outcome of brachytherapy treatments by means of Monte Carlo simulations and its potential clinical consequences. Four pathological calcification samples were characterised with micro-particle induced x-ray emission (μ-PIXE) to determine their heavy elemental composition. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc were found to be the predominant heavy elements in the calcification composition. Four clinical patient brachytherapy treatments were modelled using Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations, in terms of the distribution of brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate. Dose reductions were observed to be up to 30% locally to the calcification boundary, calcification size dependent. Single large calcifications and closely placed calculi caused local dose reductions of between 30-60%. Individual calculi smaller than 0.5 mm in diameter showed minimal dosimetric impact, however, the effects of small or diffuse calcifications within the prostatic tissue could not be determined using the methods employed in the study. The simulation study showed a varying reduction on common dosimetric parameters. D90 showed a reduction of 2-5%, regardless of calcification surface area and volume. The parameters V100, V150 and V200 were also reduced by as much as 3% and on average by 1%. These reductions were also found to relate to the surface area and volume of calcifications, which may have a significant dosimetric impact on brachytherapy treatment, however, such impacts depend strongly on specific factors

  15. The investigation of prostatic calcifications using μ-PIXE analysis and their dosimetric effect in low dose rate brachytherapy treatments using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is a widely used modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Most clinical treatment planning systems currently in use approximate all tissue to water, neglecting the existence of inhomogeneities, such as calcifications. The presence of prostatic calcifications may perturb the dose due to the higher photoelectric effect cross section in comparison to water. This study quantitatively evaluates the effect of prostatic calcifications on the dosimetric outcome of brachytherapy treatments by means of Monte Carlo simulations and its potential clinical consequences.Four pathological calcification samples were characterised with micro-particle induced x-ray emission (μ-PIXE) to determine their heavy elemental composition. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc were found to be the predominant heavy elements in the calcification composition. Four clinical patient brachytherapy treatments were modelled using Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations, in terms of the distribution of brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate. Dose reductions were observed to be up to 30% locally to the calcification boundary, calcification size dependent. Single large calcifications and closely placed calculi caused local dose reductions of between 30–60%. Individual calculi smaller than 0.5 mm in diameter showed minimal dosimetric impact, however, the effects of small or diffuse calcifications within the prostatic tissue could not be determined using the methods employed in the study. The simulation study showed a varying reduction on common dosimetric parameters. D90 showed a reduction of 2–5%, regardless of calcification surface area and volume. The parameters V100, V150 and V200 were also reduced by as much as 3% and on average by 1%. These reductions were also found to relate to the surface area and volume of calcifications, which may have a significant dosimetric impact on brachytherapy treatment, however, such impacts depend strongly on specific

  16. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  17. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  18. Comparison of Real-Time Intraoperative Ultrasound-Based Dosimetry With Postoperative Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate whether real-time intraoperative ultrasound (US)-based dosimetry can replace conventional postoperative computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 2001 and November 2002, 82 patients underwent 103Pd prostate brachytherapy. An interplant treatment planning system was used for real-time intraoperative transrectal US-guided treatment planning. The dose distribution was updated according to the estimated seed position to obtain the dose-volume histograms. Postoperative CT-based dosimetry was performed a few hours later using the Theraplan-Plus treatment planning system. The dosimetric parameters obtained from the two imaging modalities were compared. Results: The results of this study revealed correlations between the US- and CT-based dosimetry. However, large variations were found in the implant-quality parameters of the two modalities, including the doses covering 100%, 90%, and 80% of the prostate volume and prostate volumes covered by 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription dose. The mean relative difference was 38% and 16% for doses covering 100% and 90% of the prostate volume and 10% and 21% for prostate volumes covered by 100% and 150% of the prescription dose, respectively. The CT-based volume covered by 200% of the prescription dose was about 30% greater than the US-based one. Compared with CT-based dosimetry, US-based dosimetry significantly underestimated the dose to normal organs, especially for the rectum. The average US-based maximal dose and volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose for the rectum was 72 Gy and 0.01 cm3, respectively, much lower than the 159 Gy and 0.65 cm3 obtained using CT-based dosimetry. Conclusion: Although dosimetry using intraoperative US-based planning provides preliminary real-time information, it does not accurately reflect the postoperative CT-based dosimetry. Until studies have determined whether US-based dosimetry or postoperative CT

  19. Adaptation of the CVT algorithm for catheter optimization in high dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Fekete, Charles-Antoine Collins; Beaulieu, Luc [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’Optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Létourneau, Mélanie [Département de Radio-Oncologie, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (United Kingdom); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An innovative, simple, and fast method to optimize the number and position of catheters is presented for prostate and breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, both for arbitrary templates or template-free implants (such as robotic templates).Methods: Eight clinical cases were chosen randomly from a bank of patients, previously treated in our clinic to test our method. The 2D Centroidal Voronoi Tessellations (CVT) algorithm was adapted to distribute catheters uniformly in space, within the maximum external contour of the planning target volume. The catheters optimization procedure includes the inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA). Complete treatment plans can then be generated from the algorithm for different number of catheters. The best plan is chosen from different dosimetry criteria and will automatically provide the number of catheters and their positions. After the CVT algorithm parameters were optimized for speed and dosimetric results, it was validated against prostate clinical cases, using clinically relevant dose parameters. The robustness to implantation error was also evaluated. Finally, the efficiency of the method was tested in breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy cases.Results: The effect of the number and locations of the catheters on prostate cancer patients was studied. Treatment plans with a better or equivalent dose distributions could be obtained with fewer catheters. A better or equal prostate V100 was obtained down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of prostate V100 and D90. Implantation errors up to 3 mm were acceptable since no statistical difference was found when compared to 0 mm error (p > 0.05). No significant difference in dosimetric indices was observed for the different combination of parameters within the CVT algorithm. A linear relation was found between the number of random points and the optimization time of the CVT algorithm. Because the

  20. Factors influencing outcome of I-125 prostate cancer brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinnen, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is becoming an increasingly popular prostate cancer treatment, probably due to the specific advantages of the procedure, such as the minimal invasiveness and the lower chance of impotence and incontinence. Nonetheless, because of the long follow-up that is required to obtain prostate c

  1. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.;

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD)...

  2. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author)

  3. Brachytherapy in Europe: philosophies, current practice and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Five months sabbatical leave provided an opportunity to visit six radiotherapy centres in France, Holland and England. While brachytherapy philosophies and practices within each country were similar, there were considerable differences in attitudes between countries. The Institute Gustave Roussy, home of the Paris System and host for the French sector confirmed that the Paris System is still very much the preferred dosimetry method in this part of the world. Though their preference for low dose rate brachytherapy is still evident, high dose rate brachytherapy has found some applications but the rules of the Paris System are never far away and the words 'what about the hyperdose sleeve' are firmly implanted into this visitor's brain. The use of real time dosimetry for I-125 prostate brachytherapy at the Institute Curie (Paris) provided an interesting contrast to the standard pre and post implant dosimetry techniques commonly employed elsewhere. The two Dutch centres on the itinerary, in stark contrast to the traditional techniques seen in France, have applied the power of computers to investigate optimisation of the classic dosimetry systems and called on the analysis techniques (DVH, NTCP, TCP etc) now familiar to us all in external beam therapy. The Cookridge Hospital in England fitted somewhere between the French and Dutch centres. This centre showed how both modern and traditional techniques could be applied in an efficient way for a large variety of treatment sites. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  5. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  6. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /1 and /2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /1 and /2 infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  7. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  8. Exclusive brachytherapy for T1-T2 N0 cancer of the oral tongue: prognostic factors for local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION: The files of a group of patients (pts) treated with brachytherapy alone for cancer of the oral tongue were reviewed to assess the prognostic role of T stage, volume of disease, total dose and dose-rate. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1982 to 1994 46 pts (29 males, 17 females, age 38-84 years, median 63.1 years) were treated with 192 Ir brachytherapy, in 2 cases followed by prophylactic neck dissection for cancer of the oral tongue (T1N0: 19 pts; T2N0: 27 pts). Brachytherapy was performed with hairpins in the early years of the study (17 pts) and more recently with plastic tubes (29 pts), according to the Parts System. Dose ranged from 60-70 Gy with a dose-rate of 0.38-0.62 Gy/h (median 63.8 and 0.52 respectively). Volume of the disease was retrospectively assessed as the product of the three diameters of the lesion calculated for provisional dosimetry (range 0.25- 16 cc.). Median follow up is 72 mos (range: 14-153 mos). RESULTS: Overall local control was 82.6% ((38(46)) pts; T1: (18(19)), 94.7 %; T2: (22(27)), 81.5 %). Five of 8 pts who recurred were submitted to salvage surgery, and 3 of them are alive and free from disease at 34, 52 and 87 mos respectively. Recurrences appeared after 3-13 mos (median 5.5 mos) and were related to total dose ( 63 Gy (1(18)); 5.5 %) and to dose-rate ( 45 cGy/h (4(36)): 11.1 %). The volume of disease was not of prognostic significance since local control was 79.6 % ((6(28)) pts) in pts with a disease smaller than 3 cc. and 88.9 % in pts with large volume ((2(18)) pts). Seven (15.2 %) grade 3 complications (necrosis of the mandibular bone and- or of the soft tissues) were observed. Complication rate was higher in the high dose group (>63 Gy (4(18)) pts: 22.2 %) and was less affected by dose-rate (> 45 cGy/h (6(36)) pts: 16.6 %). No relationship between complications and volume was observed ( 3cc.: 16.6 %). All complications healed spontaneously. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: For T1-T2 cancer of the oral tongue exclusive

  9. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perma, L; Bianchi, C; Nicolini, G; Novario, R; Tanzi, F; Conte, L

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 112Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rqndo phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from cronary treatment were 2.4 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for lung, 0.9 x 10(-2) mSv.GBSq(-1).min(-1) for oesophagus and 0.48 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for colon, 7.8 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for stomach and 1.7 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for liver. Coronary treatment iJnvlled an efl'fective dose of (0.046 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1), whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1); there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low.

  10. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  11. Medical physics aspects of ophthalmic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraocular melanoma is the most common primary malignancy of the eye. Radiation therapy using ophthalmic plaque has proved successful in the management of various ocular lesions. Although a few centres were using 90Sr/90Y plaques for shallow turtlours some years ago, eye plaque therapy was not a common practice in India. A revived interest in the use of eye plaque therapy and very high cost of imported sources has led to the development and production of 125I seed sources by the Radiopharmaceuticals Division, BARC. This report presents a brief description on the clinical, dosimetry and radiation safety aspects of 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta ray and 125I gamma ray eye plaque applicators. This report has been divided in five Sections. Section I presents general introduction of ophthalmic brachytherapy including the structure of a human eye, types of ophthalmic plaques and characteristics of radioisotopes commonly used in such applications. A brief review of sources, applicators and dosimetry of 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta and 125I gamma ophthalmic plaques are given in Section II and Section III, respectively. Section IV contains the single seed dosimetry data of BARC OcuProsta 125I seed as well as dosimetry data of typical eye plaques loaded with BARC OcuProsta 125I seed. Quality assurance and radiation safety aspects of these eye applicators are described in Section V. A proforma of the application required to be filled in by the user institution for obtaining regulatory consent to start eye plaque therapy has also been appended to this report. (author)

  12. Epimacular brachytherapy for wet AMD: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casaroli-Marano RP

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo P Casaroli-Marano,1,2 Socorro Alforja,1 Joan Giralt,1 Michel E Farah2 1Instituto Clínic de Oftalmología (Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is considered the most common cause of blindness in the over-60 age group in developed countries. There are basically two forms of presentation: geographic (dry or atrophic and wet (neovascular or exudative. Geographic atrophy accounts for approximately 85%–90% of ophthalmic frames and leads to a progressive degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors. Wet AMD causes the highest percentage of central vision loss secondary to disease. This neovascular form involves an angiogenic process in which newly formed choroidal vessels invade the macular area. Today, intravitreal anti-angiogenic drugs attempt to block the angiogenic events and represent a major advance in the treatment of wet AMD. Currently, combination therapy for wet AMD includes different forms of radiation delivery. Epimacular brachytherapy (EMBT seems to be a useful approach to be associated with current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, presenting an acceptable efficacy and safety profile. However, at the present stage of research, the results of the clinical trials carried out to date are insufficient to justify extending routine use of EMBT for the treatment of wet AMD. Keywords: macular degeneration, radiation, vascular endothelial growth factor, combined therapy, intravitreal therapy, vitrectomy

  13. A phantom study on bladder and rectum dose measurements in brachytherapy of cervix cancer using FBX aqueous chemical dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Anil K; Semwal, Manoj K; Arora, Deepak; Sharma, D N; Julka, P K; Rath, G K

    2013-06-01

    The ferrous sulphate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange (FBX) chemical dosimeter, due to its aqueous form can measure average volume doses and hence may overcome the limitations of point dosimetry. The present study was undertaken to validate the use of FBX dosimeter for rectum and bladder dose measurement during intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) and transperineal interstitial brachytherapy (TIB). We filled cylindrical polypropylene tubes (PT) and Foley balloons (FB) with FBX solution and used them as substitutes for rectum and bladder dose measurements respectively. A water phantom was fabricated with provision to place the Fletcher-type ICBT and MUPIT template applicators, and FBX filled PT and FB within the phantom. The phantom was then CT scanned for treatment planning and subsequent irradiation. Our results show that the average difference between DVH derived dose value and FBX measured dose is 3.5% (PT) and 13.7% (FB) for ICBT, and 9% (PT) and 9.9% (FB) for TIB. We believe that the FBX system should be able to provide accuracy and precision sufficient for routine quality assurance purposes. The advantage of the FBX system is its water equivalent composition, average volume dose measuring capability, and energy and temperature independent response as compared to TLD or semiconductor dosimeters. However, detailed studies will be needed with regards to its safety before actual in-vivo dose measurements are possible with the FBX dosimeter. PMID:22687710

  14. Dosimetric impact of applicator displacement during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A planning study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J. S.; Ung, N. M.; Jamalludin, Z.; Malik, R. A.; Wong, J. H. D.; Liew, Y. M.; Ng, K. H.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the dosimetric impact of applicator displacement on dose specification during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 (Co-60) brachytherapy for cervical cancer through a planning study. Eighteen randomly selected HDR full insertion plans were restrospectively studied. The tandem and ovoids were virtually shifted translationally and rotationally in the x-, y- and z-axis directions on the treatment planning system. Doses to reference points and volumes of interest in the plans with shifted applicators were compared with the original plans. The impact of dose displacement on 2D (point-based) and 3D (volume-based) treatment planning techniques was also assessed. A ±2 mm translational y-axis applicator shift and ±4° rotational x-axis applicator shift resulted in dosimetric changes of more than 5% to organs at risk (OAR) reference points. Changes to the maximum doses to 2 cc of the organ (D2cc) in 3D planning were statistically significant and higher than the reference points in 2D planning for both the rectum and bladder (p<0.05). Rectal D2cc was observed to be the most sensitive to applicator displacement among all dose metrics. Applicator displacement that is greater than ±2 mm translational y-axis and ±4° rotational x-axis resulted in significant dose changes to the OAR. Thus, steps must be taken to minimize the possibility of applicator displacement during brachytherapy.

  15. Integer Programs for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Needle and Dose Planning that Directly Optimize Clinical Objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Siauw, Ko-Ay Timmy

    2012-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a radiation therapy for cancer in the prostate, cervix, breast, head, and neck, including other sites. In HDR brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted or placed near the cancer site. Radiation is delivered to the patient by a radioactive source which is sequentially threaded through the needles. The dose distribution is controlled by altering the dwell times, the time spent at pre-defined positions on the needles.HDR brachytherapy has a 90\\% cancer-free...

  16. Tolerance and efficacy of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy in IB and IIA cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, Brygida; Fijalkowski, Marek; Raczek-Zwierzycka, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to analyze the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer. Material and methods 139 patients with cervical cancer IB-IIA with preoperative HDR-BT, out of which 60 patients with cervical cancer IB (43.2%) and 79 with IIA (56.8%) were treated since 1996 to 2002. In preoperative BT total dose to point A ranged from 30-45 Gy in 6-9 fractions twice a week. The fraction dose was 4-5 Gy at point A. Six weeks after BT all patients underwent radical Wertheim-Meigs hysterectomy. Patients with disadvantageous risk factors or with positive specimen histology had a complementary therapy: external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) given to the whole pelvic volume in daily fractions of 2 Gy up to total dose of 36-52 Gy (20 patients) or EBRT with cisplatin-based chemotherapy with the dose of 30-40 mg/m2 in 5-7 fractions given weekly (7 patients) or chemotherapy (6 patients). Acute and late radiation toxicity was evaluated according to EORTC/RTOG. Results In postoperative specimen histopathology the number of 114 women (82%) had tumor-free specimen within brachytherapy target (in cervix and cavity), 96 women (60.1%) had tumor-free specimen both in and outside brachytherapy target (lymph nodes, parametra, adnexis). The 5-year and 10-year DFS were 93.8% and 88% for IB and 89.7% and 64.7% for IIA respectively. 7.9% of patients developed acute toxicity both in rectum and bladder (only in I and II grade of EORTC/RTOG). Late severe complication occurred in rectum in 2.2% of patients and in bladder 1.4%. Conclusions 1. Preoperative HDR-BT in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer is an effective and well tolerated therapy with acceptable rate of side effects. 2. Preoperative HDR-BT followed by surgery in a group without risk factors is a sufficient treatment option with no additional adjuvant therapy requirement.

  17. A CT-based analytical dose calculation method for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This article presents an analytical dose calculation method for high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, taking into account the effects of inhomogeneities and reduced photon backscatter near the skin. The adequacy of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) two-dimensional formalism for treatment planning is also assessed. Methods: The proposed method uses material composition and density data derived from computed tomography images. The primary and scatter dose distributions for each dwell position are calculated first as if the patient is an infinite water phantom. This is done using either TG-43 or a database of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions. The latter can be used to account for the effects of shielding in water. Subsequently, corrections for photon attenuation, scatter, and spectral variations along medium- or low-Z inhomogeneities are made according to the radiological paths determined by ray tracing. The scatter dose is then scaled by a correction factor that depends on the distances between the point of interest, the body contour, and the source position. Dose calculations are done for phantoms with tissue and lead inserts, as well as patient plans for head-and-neck, esophagus, and MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy treatments. Gamma indices are evaluated using a dose-difference criterion of 3% and a distance-to-agreement criterion of 2 mm. PTRANCT MC calculations are used as the reference dose distributions. Results: For the phantom with tissue and lead inserts, the percentages of the voxels of interest passing the gamma criteria (Pγ≥1) are 100% for the analytical calculation and 91% for TG-43. For the breast patient plan, TG-43 overestimates the target volume receiving the prescribed dose by 4% and the dose to the hottest 0.1 cm3 of the skin by 9%, whereas the analytical and MC results agree within 0.4%. Pγ≥1 are 100% and 48% for the analytical and TG-43 calculations, respectively. For the head-and-neck and esophagus patient plans, Pγ≥1 are ≥99

  18. Image-Based 3D Treatment Planning for Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy: Dosimetric Effects of Bladder Filling on Organs at Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Jennifer; Shen Sui; De Los Santos, Jennifer F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States); Kim, Robert Y., E-mail: rkim@uabmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of bladder filling on organs at risk (OARs) using three-dimensional image-based treatment planning for vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent postoperative high-dose rate vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. For three-dimensional planning, patients were simulated by computed tomography with an indwelling catheter in place (empty bladder) and with 180 mL of sterile water instilled into the bladder (full bladder). The bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and small bowel (OARs) were contoured, and a prescription dose was generated for 10 to 35 Gy in 2 to 5 fractions at the surface or at 5 mm depth. For each OAR, the volume dose was defined by use of two different criteria: the minimum dose value in a 2.0-cc volume receiving the highest dose (D{sub 2cc}) and the dose received by 50% of the OAR volume (D{sub 50%}). International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) bladder and rectum point doses were calculated for comparison. The cylinder-to-bowel distance was measured using the shortest distance from the cylinder apex to the contoured sigmoid or small bowel. Statistical analyses were performed with paired t tests. Results: Mean bladder and rectum D{sub 2cc} values were lower than their respective ICRU doses. However, differences between D{sub 2cc} and ICRU doses were small. Empty vs. full bladder did not significantly affect the mean cylinder-to-bowel distance (0.72 vs. 0.92 cm, p = 0.08). In contrast, bladder distention had appreciable effects on bladder and small bowel volume dosimetry. With a full bladder, the mean small bowel D{sub 2cc} significantly decreased from 677 to 408 cGy (p = 0.004); the mean bladder D{sub 2cc} did not increase significantly (1,179 cGy vs. 1,246 cGy, p = 0.11). Bladder distention decreased the mean D{sub 50%} for both the bladder (441 vs. 279 cGy, p = 0.001) and the small bowel (168 vs. 132 cGy, p = 0.001). Rectum

  19. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement.

  20. Physical basics and clinical realization of interstitial brachytherapy of the prostate with iodine 125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Interstitial brachytherapy with I-125 seeds can be used for successful treatment of early stage prostate cancer. There is presented the technique of permanent transperineal implantation of I-125 seeds with intraoperative treatment planning which is suited for the treatment of prostate cancer up to the clinical stage of T2a. Material and methods: Some weeks before the implantation of the seeds the prostate volume is determined using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) so as to estimate the required number of I-125 seeds. At the outset of the treatment the prostate is stabilized by two perineally inserted needles. Subsequently there is carried out an ultrasound guide treatment planning that allows to optimize the distribution of the seeds within the prostate. In interstitial brachytherapy we use RAPID STRANDs trademark, i.e. the I-125 seeds are embedded in vicryl suture at distances of 1 cm. During implantation of the I-125 seeds the transversal placement of the applicator needles is controlled by TRUS and the cranio-caudal placement of the applicator needles is controlled using the fluoroscopic unit as well as TRUS. About 4 weeks after the implantation of the seeds there is carried out a postoperative computation of the dose distribution of the implant using CT imaging. Results: The procedure possesses the advantage that ultrasound imaging, treatment planning and seed implantation are carried out with the prostate remaining in an unaltered position. During implantation the combined imaging of TRUS and fluoroscopy allows a safe placement of the seeds within the prostate. Conclusion: The methods for the calculation of the actually attained dose distribution must still be optimized, because the postoperative examination of the individual results has so far been possible only with difficulties resulting from methodological inconveniences. (orig.)

  1. Dosimetric analysis at ICRU reference points in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, H T; Haverkamp, U; Micke, O; Prott, F J; Müller, R P

    2000-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry in bladder and rectum as well as determining doses on suggested reference points following the ICRU report 38 contribute to quality assurance in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma, especially to minimize side effects. In order to gain information regarding the radiation exposure at ICRU reference points in rectum, bladder, ureter and regional lymph nodes those were calculated (digitalisation) by means of orthogonal radiographs of 11 applications in patients with cervical carcinoma, who received primary radiotherapy. In addition, the doses at the ICRU rectum reference point was compared to the results of in vivo measurements in the rectum. The in vivo measurements were by factor 1.5 below the doses determined for the ICRU rectum reference point (4.05 +/- 0.68 Gy versus 6.11 +/- 1.63 Gy). Reasons for this were: calibration errors, non-orthogonal radiographs, movement of applicator and probe in the time span between X-ray and application, missing connection of probe and anterior rectal wall. The standard deviation of calculations at ICRU reference points was on average +/- 30%. Possible reasons for the relatively large standard deviation were difficulties in defining the points, identifying them on radiographs and the different locations of the applicators. Although 3 D CT, US or MR based treatment planning using dose volume histogram analysis is more and more established, this simple procedure of marking and digitising the ICRU reference points lengthened treatment planning only by 5 to 10 minutes. The advantages of in vivo dosimetry are easy practicability and the possibility to determine rectum doses during radiation. The advantages of computer-aided planning at ICRU reference points are that calculations are available before radiation and that they can still be taken into account for treatment planning. Both methods should be applied in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. PMID:10994367

  2. Bladder–Rectum Spacer Balloon in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Cervix Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Patel, Firuza D., E-mail: firuzapatel@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Chakraborty, Santam; Sharma, Suresh C.; Kapoor, Rakesh [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Aprem, Abi Santhosh [Corporate R and D Division, HLL Lifecare Limited, Karamana, Trivandrum (India)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To compare bladder and rectum doses with the use of a bladder–rectum spacer balloon (BRSB) versus standard gauze packing in the same patient receiving 2 high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy fractions. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized study to compare the reduction in bladder and rectum doses with the use of a BRSB compared with standard gauze packing in patients with carcinoma of the cervix being treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. The patients were randomized between 2 arms. In arm A, vaginal packing was done with standard gauze packing in the first application, and BRSB was used in the second application. Arm B was the reverse of arm A. The International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) point doses and doses to 0.1-cm{sup 3}, 1-cm{sup 3}, 2-cm{sup 3}, 5-cm{sup 3}, and 10-cm{sup 3} volumes of bladder and rectum were compared. The patients were also subjectively assessed for the ease of application and the time taken for application. Statistical analysis was done using the paired t test. Results: A total of 43 patients were enrolled; however, 3 patients had to be excluded because the BRSB could not be inserted owing to unfavorable local anatomy. Thus 40 patients (80 plans) were evaluated. The application was difficult in 3 patients with BRSB, and in 2 patients with BRSB the application time was prolonged. There was no significant difference in bladder doses to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, 2 cm{sup 3}, 5 cm{sup 3}, and 10 cm{sup 3} and ICRU bladder point. Statistically significant dose reductions to 0.1-cm{sup 3}, 1-cm{sup 3}, and 2-cm{sup 3} volumes for rectum were observed with the BRSB. No significant differences in 5-cm{sup 3} and 10-cm{sup 3} volumes and ICRU rectum point were observed. Conclusion: A statistically significant dose reduction was observed for small high-dose volumes in rectum with the BRSB. The doses to bladder were comparable for BRSB and gauze packing. Transparent balloons of

  3. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttino, Laurie W., E-mail: lcuttino@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Vicini, Frank [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Onoclogy, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Todor, Dorin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Julian, Thomas [Allegheny Hospital, Temple School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Nitai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  4. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit. (paper)

  5. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Jeffery H; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J, E-mail: CDiederich@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue {>=}41 deg. C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints T{sub max} {<=} 47 deg. C, T{sub rectum} {<=} 41.5 deg. C, and T{sub bladder} {<=} 42.5 deg. C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360{sup 0} or 2 x 180{sup 0} output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180{sup 0}, 270{sup 0}, or 360{sup 0} output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1}) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm{sup 3}) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 deg. C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T{sub 90} in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 deg. C (1.9-39.6 EM{sub 43deg.C}) at 1 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1} with 10/14 patients {>=}41 deg. C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T{sub 90} {>=} 41 deg. C in clinically practical implant

  6. Intraoperative brachytherapy in the management of keloids: about 114 cases; Place de la curietherapie dans le traitement des cheloides a propos de 114 cas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalej, M.; Frikha, H.; Bouaouina, N.; Daoud, J.; Besbes, M.; Benna, F.; Sellami, D.; Bennour, N. [Institut Salah-Azaiz, Service de Radiotherapie, Tunis (Tunisia); Jellouli, M.; Gritli, S. [Institut Salah-Azaiz, Service d' ORL, Tunis (Tunisia); Guigua, M. [Institut Salah-Azaiz, Service de Chirurgie reparatrice et esthetique, Tunis (Tunisia); Ben Abdallah, M. [Institut Salah-Azaiz, Service de Statistique Medicale, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2000-08-01

    Keloid scars are unsightly, especially when located on the face or bare zones. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic results of intraoperative brachytherapy in the management of keloids. This retrospective study was based on the study of 82 patients with keloids treated in Salah Azaiz Institute (Tunisia) between 1982 and 1994 (65 women and 17 men). The mean age of patients was 23.4 years ({+-}8.4). A total of 114 lesions have been treated with surgical resection and intraoperative brachytherapy using an iridium source placed under the surgical scar. The length of iridium was chosen with the result that the radioactive thread exceeded 5 mm on each side of the surgical scar. The iridium source was loaded less than six hours after resection. Average iridium activity was 1.5{+-}0.3 mCi/cm. Average iridium length was 56.8{+-}34 mm. The referred isodose chosen for the target volume included the surgical scar and a margin of 5 mn around the iridium source, which was placed under the surgical scar. The average administered dose was 20.4 Gy ({+-}3.2 Gy). The 2-year local control rate was 87% for the whole group of lesions treated (n=114). Local control rate of keloids processed by resection and intraoperative brachytherapy as the first treatment (59 cases) was 96% at two years. This rate was better than the local control of lesions that had been previously treated with anterior surgical resection (84% in 55 cases). For the latter group, lesions treated with a dose of more than 20 Gy had better local control, but the difference was not statistically significant (87 vs. 65% at two years, P = 0.41). Intraoperative brachytherapy is effective for improving local control of keloids and preventing a recurrence. A rigorous technique and an adequate dose according to previous surgical treatment allows very good results. (author)

  7. 3T MR-Guided Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Malignancies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapur, Tina; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N; 10.1016/j.mri.2012.06.003

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes a combination of external beam radiation, followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is benefitial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose, and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR-guidance in gynecologic brachtherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This has been used in 18 cases to date in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. It is comprised of state of the art methods for MR imaging, image analysis, and treatment plann...

  8. Brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Comparative characteristics of procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kanaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of interstitial radiation sources is the «youngest» of the radical method of treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PC. The high level of efficiency comparable to prostatectomy at a significantly lower rate of complications causes rapid growth of clinical use of brachytherapy (BT. Depending on the radiation source and the mode of administration into the prostate gland are two types BT – high-dose rate (temporary (HDR-BT and low-dose rate (permanent (LDR-BT brachytherapy. At the heart of these two methods are based on a single principle of direct effect of the quantum gamma radiation on the area of interest. However, the differences between the characteristics of isotopes used and technical aspects of the techniques cause the difference in performance and complication rates for expression HDR-BT and LDR-BT.

  9. Iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumours - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-125 brachytherapy has been applied to brain tumours since 1979. Even though the physical and biological characteristics make these implants particularly attractive for minimal invasive treatment, the place for stereotactic brachytherapy is still poorly defined. An extensive review of the literature has been performed, especially concerning indications, results and complications. Iodine-125 seeds have been implanted in astrocytomas I-III, glioblastomas, metastases and several other tumour entities. Outcome data given in the literature are summarized. Complications are rare in carefully selected patients. All in all, for highly selected patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent primary or metastatic tumours, this method provides encouraging survival rates with relatively low complication rates and a good quality of life

  10. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  11. Distortions induced by radioactive seeds into interstitial brachytherapy dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi; Modrick, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    In a previous article, we presented development and verification of an integral transport equation-based deterministic algorithm for computing three-dimensional brachytherapy dose distributions. Recently, we have included fluorescence radiation physics and parallel computation to the standing algorithms so that we can compute dose distributions for a large set of seeds without resorting to the superposition methods. The introduction of parallel computing capability provided a means to compute the dose distribution for multiple seeds in a simultaneous manner. This provided a way to study strong heterogeneity and shadow effects induced by the presence of multiple seeds in an interstitial brachytherapy implant. This article presents the algorithm for computing fluorescence radiation, algorithm for parallel computing, and display results for an 81-seed implant that has a perfect and imperfect lattice. The dosimetry data for a single model 6711 seeds is presented for verification and heterogeneity factor computations using simultaneous and superposition techniques are presented.

  12. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G. (Texas Retina Associates, Dallas (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid.

  13. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  14. The use of nomograms in LDR-HDR prostate brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pujades, Ma Carmen; Camacho, Cristina; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Richart, José; Gimeno, Jose; Lliso, Françoise; Carmona, Vicente; Ballester, Facundo; Crispín, Vicente; Rodríguez, Silvia; Tormo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The common use of nomograms in Low Dose Rate (LDR) permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT) allows to estimate the number of seeds required for an implant. Independent dosimetry verification is recommended for each clinical dosimetry in BT. Also, nomograms can be useful for dose calculation quality assurance and they could be adapted to High Dose Rate (HDR). This work sets nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate-BT implants, which are applied to three different institutions that use different...

  15. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Mireille, E-mail: mireilleguib@voila.fr [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); David, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Vergez, Sebastien [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); Rives, Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Department of Epidemiology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  16. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Govorov; A. O. Vasilyev; E. A. Prilepskaya; K. B. Kоlоntaryov; D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-01-01

    In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic), hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large numb...

  17. Which modality for prostate brachytherapy; Quelle modalite de curietherapie prostatique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2010-10-15

    Brachytherapy techniques by permanent implant of radioactive sources or by temporary high-dose-rate (HDR) fractions are nowadays extensively used for the treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Long-term results (at 20 years) concerning large amount of patients have been published by major centers confirming both in terms of efficacy and toxicities that permanent implant of radioactive iodine-125 seeds yields at least the same good results of surgery and of external beam irradiation when proposed to patients affected by low-risk disease. For intermediate to high-risk tumors, HDR temporary implants are proposed as a boost for dose escalation. For both techniques, several topics still need to be clarified dealing with a recent enlargement of indications (HDR alone for low-risk, iodine-125 seeds boost for intermediate-high-risk cancers), or with technical aspects (loose seeds versus linked ones, number of fractions and dose for HDR protocols), while dosimetric issues have only recently been addressed by cooperatives groups. Last but not least, there is a real need to address and clearly characterize the correct definition of biochemical disease control both for iodine permanent implant and for HDR implant. New challenges are facing the prostate-brachytherapy community in the near future: local relapse after external beam radiotherapy are currently managed by several salvage treatments (prostatectomy, cryo, high intensity focused ultrasounds [HIFU]) but the role of reirradiation by brachytherapy is also actively investigated. Focal therapy has gained considerable interest in the last 5 years aiming at treating only the area of cancer foci inside the prostate and preserving nearby healthy tissues. Encouraging results have been obtained with the so-called 'minimally invasive' approaches and both permanent seed implantation and HDR brachytherapy techniques may be worthwhile testing in this setting because of their capability of exactly sculpting the dose inside the

  18. Present status and future of high-precision image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervix carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Dimopoulos, Johannes C. A.; Berger, Daniel; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. (Dept. of Radiotherapy Medical Univ. of Vienna, General Hospital Vienna, Wien (Austria))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for cervical cancer, using mainly MRI, is an evolving method, increasingly replacing the 2D approach based on conventional radiography. During the complex 4D chain of this procedure image-assistance is provided for disease assessment, provisional treatment planning ('pre-planning'), applicator placement and reconstruction, as well as for contouring, definitive treatment planning and quality control of dose delivery. With IGABT changes of topography adjacent to the applicator, caused by tumour regression, oedema, organ changes and dilation are identified. Thus, the CTV for IGABT is primarily based on the tumour volume at the time of BT and takes into account both time and spatial domains. IGABT requires systematic concepts for target, OAR, biological modelling, DVH analysis, and dose-volume-adaptation. Methods and Results. This report focuses on the advantages and uncertainties, dose-effect relations and clinical results of the IGABT procedure addressing the current status and future perspectives. Uncertainties during the 4D chain of IGABT are mainly related to target contouring, applicator reconstruction, as well as to inter-fraction, intra-fraction and inter-application variability, as caused by tumour response and organ changes. Different from EBRT where set-up uncertainties are compensated by adding a margin to the CTV, no margins to the lateral and anterior-posterior directions can be used for IGABT. Discussion. By 3D treatment planning for IGABT significant improvement of the DVH parameters is achieved compared to 2D library plans. In small tumours the benefit is primarily obtained by a decrease of dose to nearby OAR while in large tumours the use of supplementary interstitial techniques and optimization may double the target volume that can be treated at a therapeutic dose level. The clinical impact of IGABT could recently be demonstrated by the establishment of some correlations between

  19. Application of Modified MUPIT for the Recurrent Vulva Cancer in Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Sik; Jung, Chun Young; Oh, Dong Gyoon; Song, Ki Won; Park, Young Hwan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate whether modified MUPIT applicator can effectively eradicate recurrent tumor in uterine cervix cancer and reduce rectal complication after complete radiation treatment. Modified MUPIT applicator basically consists of an acrylic cylinder with flexible brain applicator, an acrylic template with a predrilled array of holes that serve as guides for interstitial needles and interstitial needles. CT scan was performed to determine tumor volume and the position of interstitial needles. Modified MUPIT applicator was applied to patient in operation room and the accuracy for position of interstitial needles in tumor volume was confirmed by CT scan. Brachytherapy was delivered using modified MUPIT applicator and RALS(192-lr HDR) after calculated computer planning by orthogonal film. The daily dose was 600 cGy and the total dose was delivered 3,000 cGy in tumor volume by BID. Rectal dose was measured by TLD at 5 points so that evaluated the risk of rectal complication. The application of modified MUPIT applicator improved dramatically dose distributions in tumor volume and follow-up of 3 month for this patient was clinically partial response without normal tissue complication, Rectal dose was measured 34.1 cGy, 57.1 cGy, 103.8 cGy, 162.7 cGy, 165.7 cGy at each points, especially the rectal dose including previous EBRT and ICR was 34.1 cGy, 57.1 cGy. Patients with locally recurrent tumor in uterine cervix cancel treated with modified MUPIT applicator can expect reasonable rates of local control. The advantages of the system are the fixed geometry provided by the template and cylinders. and improved dose distributions in irregular tumor volume without rectal complication.

  20. Application of Modified MUPIT for the Recurrent Vulva Cancer in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate whether modified MUPIT applicator can effectively eradicate recurrent tumor in uterine cervix cancer and reduce rectal complication after complete radiation treatment. Modified MUPIT applicator basically consists of an acrylic cylinder with flexible brain applicator, an acrylic template with a predrilled array of holes that serve as guides for interstitial needles and interstitial needles. CT scan was performed to determine tumor volume and the position of interstitial needles. Modified MUPIT applicator was applied to patient in operation room and the accuracy for position of interstitial needles in tumor volume was confirmed by CT scan. Brachytherapy was delivered using modified MUPIT applicator and RALS(192-lr HDR) after calculated computer planning by orthogonal film. The daily dose was 600 cGy and the total dose was delivered 3,000 cGy in tumor volume by BID. Rectal dose was measured by TLD at 5 points so that evaluated the risk of rectal complication. The application of modified MUPIT applicator improved dramatically dose distributions in tumor volume and follow-up of 3 month for this patient was clinically partial response without normal tissue complication, Rectal dose was measured 34.1 cGy, 57.1 cGy, 103.8 cGy, 162.7 cGy, 165.7 cGy at each points, especially the rectal dose including previous EBRT and ICR was 34.1 cGy, 57.1 cGy. Patients with locally recurrent tumor in uterine cervix cancel treated with modified MUPIT applicator can expect reasonable rates of local control. The advantages of the system are the fixed geometry provided by the template and cylinders. and improved dose distributions in irregular tumor volume without rectal complication.

  1. HDR neutron brachytherapy for cervix carcinoma in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1988 and December 1995, a total of 285 patients with stage I-17, with stage II-157, with stage III-104 and stage IV-7 carcinoma of the cervix were treated with a combination of external beam radiation or surgery and HDR brachytherapy. The dose prescription for HDR brachytherapy was point A. The goals of combined radiation therapy were to deliver a total dose of 60.5-68.5 Gy to point A and 53-58 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes (point B) or 14 Gy-eq to point A in case of preoperative brachytherapy. Dosimetric planning was performed in Gray- equivalents by the use of PC-based computer programme. Relative biological effectiveness of the Cf-252 neutrons was physical gamma and neutron dose rate dependent. Most of the insertions were performed weekly when dose per fraction was 8-10 Gy or 2 insertions were done in one week at lower fractions. The median follow-up for the various stages of disease ranged from 0.5 to 6.5 year. Treatment results, acute and late toxicity will be discussed

  2. Stereolithographic modelling as an aid to orbital brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper describes the technique of stereolithographic biomodelling and its application to a patient who was treated using orbital brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The process uses a moving laser beam, directed by a computer, to draw cross-sections of the model onto the surface of photo-curable liquid plastic. Using a stereolithographic apparatus (SLA), solid or surface data is sliced by software into very thin cross-sections. A helium cadmium (HeCd) laser then generates a small intense spot of ultraviolet (UV) light that is moved across the top of a vat of liquid photo monomer by a computerised optical scanning system. The laser polymerises the liquid into a solid where it touches, precisely printing each cross-section. A vertical elevator lowers the newly formed layer, and a recoating and levelling system establishes the next layer's thickness. Successive cross-sections (0.25 mm thick), each one adhering to the one below, are built one on top of the other, to form the part from the bottom up. The biomodel allowed the implant to be planned in detail prior to the surgery. The accurate placement of brachytherapy catheters was assured, and the dosimetry could be determined and optimised prior to the definitive procedure. Conclusions: Stereolithography is a useful technique in the area of orbital brachytherapy. It allows the implant to to be carried out with greater accuracy and confidence. For the patient, it minimises the risk to the eye and provides them with a greater understanding of the procedure

  3. Invited review, recent developments in brachytherapy source dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of radioactive isotopes is the treatment of choice around the globe for many cancer sites. In this technique, the accuracy of the radiation delivery is highly dependent on the accuracy of radiation dosimetry around individual brachytherapy sources. Moreover, in order to have compatible clinical results, an identical method of source dosimetry must be employed across the world. This problem has been recently addressed by task group 43 from the American Association of Medical Physics with a protocol for dosimetric characterization of brachytherapy sources. This new protocol has been further updated using published data from international sources, by a new Task Group from the American Association of Medical Physics. This has resulted in an updated protocol known as TG43U1 that has been published in March 2004 issue of Medical Physics. The goal of this presentation is to review the original Task Group 43 protocol and associated algorithms for brachytherapy source dosimetry. In addition, the shortcomings of the original protocol that has been resolved in the updated recommendation will be highlighted. I am sure that this is not the end of the line and more work is needed to complete this task. I invite the scientists to join this task and complete the project, with the hope of much better clinical results for cancer patients

  4. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium (192Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.)

  5. Protocol-based image-guided salvage brachytherapy. Early results in patients with local failure of prostate cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmer, G.; Lotter, M.; Kreppner, S.; Fietkau, R.; Strnad, V. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the overall clinical outcome of protocol-based image-guided salvage pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure particularly regarding feasibility and side effects. Patients and methods: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer (median age, 69 years) were treated during 2005-2011 with interstitial PDR brachytherapy (PDR-BT) as salvage brachytherapy after radiotherapy failure. The treatment schedule was PDR-BT two times with 30 Gy (pulse dose 0.6 Gy/h, 24 h per day) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of optimal coverage of the whole prostate (V{sub 100} > 95 %) simultaneously respecting the protocol-based dose volume constraints for the urethra (D{sub 0.1} {sub cc} < 130 %) and the rectum (D{sub 2} {sub cc} < 50-60 %) taking into account the previous radiation therapy. Local relapse after radiotherapy (external beam irradiation, brachytherapy with J-125 seeds or combination) was confirmed mostly via choline-PET and increased PSA levels. The primary endpoint was treatment-related late toxicities - particularly proctitis, anal incontinence, cystitis, urinary incontinence, urinary frequency/urgency, and urinary retention according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. The secondary endpoint was PSA-recurrence-free survival. Results: We registered urinary toxicities only. Grade 2 and grade 3 toxicities were observed in up to 11.1 % (2/18) and 16.7 % (3/18) of patients, respectively. The most frequent late-event grade 3 toxicity was urinary retention in 17 % (3/18) of patients. No late gastrointestinal side effects occurred. The biochemical PSA-recurrence-free survival probability at 3 years was 57.1 %. The overall survival at 3 years was 88.9 %; 22 % (4/18) of patients developed metastases. The median follow-up time for all patients after salvage BT was 21 months (range, 8-77 months). Conclusion: Salvage PDR-brachytherapy

  6. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for possession of sealed sources and... MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.67 Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall...

  7. Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Ronald E.; Kal, Henk B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to show the efficiency of keloidectomy and postoperative interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 35 patients with 54 keloids were treated postoperatively with HDR brachytherapy. T

  8. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpour, H; Landry, G; D'Amours, M; Enger, S; Reniers, B; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Verhaegen, F; Beaulieu, L

    2012-06-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  9. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Yamada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiotherapy (EBRT is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method.

  10. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Masui, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Yamada, Kei; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method. PMID:26112477

  11. Combined interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy: Institute Gustave-Roussy technique and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosset, J.M. (Inst. Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, France); Dutreix, J.; Dufour, J.; Janoray, P.; Damia, E.; Haie, C.; Clarke, D.

    1984-02-01

    In 1981, a protocol was developed at the Institute Gustave-Roussy, utilizing combined interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy, to treat recurrent tumors in previously irradiated areas. This protocol consisted of interstitial hyperthermia, 44/sup 0/C for 45 minutes, followed immediately by iridium 192 curietherapy, delivering 30 Gy in 2 or 3 days to the tumor volume. Fourteen implantations have been performed in 11 patients. Complete eradication of tumor has been achieved thus far in 10 cases. Two patients were not evaluable because of rapid death resulting from diffuse metastases, and two patients demonstrated a partial response (greater than 50% tumor reduction). Treatment has been generally well tolerated despite prior high dose irradiation. There has been only one serious complication-a large area of painful necrosis following retreatment of a recurrent floor of mouth carcinoma. Special ''metallic plastic'' tubes were developed to improve tissue tolerance. The authors were not able to document that a high and homogeneous temperature could be delivered throughout the tumor volume. The technical innovations, and the techniques of implantation and temperature documentation are described below.

  12. Comparative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy with I-125 and Pd-103 seeds via SISCODES/MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Bruno Machado; Falcao, Patricia Lima, E-mail: bmtrindade@yahoo.com [Nucleo de Radiacoes Ionizantes - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (NRI/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Christovao, Marilia Tavares [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Trindade, Daniela de Fatima Maia [Centro Universitario Una, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: The present paper is aimed at presenting a comparative dosimetric study of prostate brachytherapy with I-125 and Pd-103 seeds. Materials and Methods: A protocol for both implants with 148 seeds was simulated on a heterogeneous three-dimensional pelvic phantom by means of the SISCODES/MCNP5 codes. Dose-volume histograms on prostate, rectum and bladder, dose indexes D10, D30, D90, D0.5cc, D2cc and D7cc, and representations of the spatial dose distribution were evaluated. Results: For a D90 index equivalent to the prescription dose, the initial activity of each I-125 seed was calculated as 0.42 mCi and of Pd-103 as 0.94 mCi. The maximum dose on the urethra was 90% and 108% of the prescription dose for I-125 and Pd-103, respectively. The D2cc for I-125 was 30 Gy on the rectum and 127 Gy on the bladder; for Pd-103 was 29 Gy on the rectum and 189 Gy on the bladder. The D10 on the pubic bone was 144 Gy for I-125 and 66 Gy for Pd-103. Conclusion: The results indicate that Pd-103 and I-125 implants could deposit the prescribed dose on the target volume. Among the findings of the present study, there is an excessive radiation exposure of the pelvic bones, particularly with the I-125 protocol. (author)

  13. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of cancers of the anal canal. Long-term follow-up and multivariate analysis of a large monocentric retrospective series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestrade, Laetitia; Pommier, Pascal; Montbarbon, Xavier; Carrie, Christian [Leon Berard Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France); De Bari, Berardino [Centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois (CHUV), Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Lavergne, Emilie [Leon Berard Cancer Center, Unite de Biostatistique et d' Evaluation des Therapeutiques, Lyon (France); Ardiet, Jean-Michel [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France)

    2014-06-15

    There are few data on long-term clinical results and tolerance of brachytherapy in anal canal cancer. We present one of the largest retrospective analyses of anal canal cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy with/without (±) chemotherapy followed by a brachytherapy boost. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical results in terms of efficacy and toxicity. The impact of different clinical and therapeutic variables on these outcomes was studied. From May 1992 to December 2009, 209 patients received brachytherapy after external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Of these patients, 163 were stage II or stage IIIA (UICC 2002) and 58 were N1-3. According to age, ECOG performance status (PS), and comorbidities, patients received either radiotherapy alone (58/209) or radiochemotherapy (151/209). The median follow-up was 72.8 months. The 5- and 10-year local control rates were 78.6 and 73.9 %, respectively. Globally, severe acute and late G3-4 reactions (NCI-CTC scale v. 4.0) occurred in 11.2 and 6.3 % of patients, respectively. Univariate analysis showed the statistical impact of the pelvic treatment volume (p = 0.046) and of the total dose (p = 0.02) on the risk of severe acute and late toxicities, respectively. Only six patients required permanent colostomy because of severe late anorectal toxicities. After a long follow-up time, brachytherapy showed an acceptable toxicity profile and high local control rates in patients with anal canal cancer. (orig.) [German] Es gibt gegenwaertig nur wenige klinische Daten zu den Ergebnissen und Nebenwirkungen von Brachytherapie bei Analkanaltumoren. Wir praesentieren die Daten einer der groessten retrospektiven Auswertungen fuer die Behandlung von Analkanaltumoren mit perkutaner Radiotherapie ± simultaner Chemotherapie, gefolgt von einem Brachytherapie-Boost. Wir analysierten retrospektiv die Patientendaten hinsichtlich Toxizitaet und Tumorkontrolle. Der Einfluss verschiedener klinischer und therapeutischer

  14. Radiobiology for eye plaque brachytherapy and evaluation of implant duration and radionuclide choice using an objective function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Clinical optimization of Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaque brachytherapy is currently limited to tumor coverage, consensus prescription dosage, and dose calculations to ocular structures. The biologically effective dose (BED) of temporary brachytherapy treatments is a function of both chosen radionuclide R and implant duration T. This study endeavored to evaluate BED delivered to the tumor volume and surrounding ocular structures as a function of plaque position P, prescription dose, R, and T. Methods: Plaque-heterogeneity-corrected dose distributions were generated with MCNP5 for the range of currently available COMS plaques loaded with sources using three available low-energy radionuclides. These physical dose distributions were imported into the PINNACLE{sup 3} treatment planning system using the TG-43 hybrid technique and used to generate dose volume histograms for a T = 7 day implant within a reference eye geometry including the ciliary body, cornea, eyelid, foveola, lacrimal gland, lens, optic disc, optic nerve, retina, and tumor at eight standard treatment positions. The equation of Dale and Jones was employed to create biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs), allowing for BED volumetric analysis of all ROIs. Isobiologically effective prescription doses were calculated for T = 5 days down to 0.01 days, with BEDVHs subsequently generated for all ROIs using correspondingly reduced prescription doses. Objective functions were created to evaluate the BEDVHs as a function of R and T. These objective functions are mathematically accessible and sufficiently general to be applied to temporary or permanent brachytherapy implants for a variety of disease sites. Results: Reducing T from 7 to 0.01 days for a 10 mm plaque produced an average BED benefit of 26%, 20%, and 17% for {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs, respectively, for all P; 16 and 22 mm plaque results were more position-dependent. {sup 103}Pd produced a 16

  15. Highly conformal CT based surface mould brachytherapy for non-melanoma skin cancers of earlobe and nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowski, Sławomir; Pietraszek, Andrzej; Pietrzykowska-Kuncman, Malwina; Danielska, Justyna; Sobotkowski, Janusz; Łuniewska-Bury, Jolanta; Fijuth, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Brachytherapy (BT), due to rapid dose fall off and minor set-up errors, should be superior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for treatment of lesions in difficult locations like nose and earlobe. Evidences in this field are scarce. We describe computed tomography (CT) based surface mould BT for non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC), and compare its conformity, dose coverage, and tissue sparing ability to EBRT. Material and methods We describe procedure of preparation of surface mould applicator and dosimetry parameters of BT plans, which were implemented in 10 individuals with NMSC of nose and earlobe. We evaluated dose coverage by minimal dose to 90% of planning target volume (PTV) (D90), volumes of PTV receiving 90-150% of prescribed dose (PD) (VPTV90-150), conformal index for 90 and 100% of PD (COIN90, COIN100), dose homogeneity index (DHI), dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR), exposure of organs. Prospectively, we created CT-based photons and electrons plans. We compared conformity (COIN90, COIN100), dose coverage of PTV (D90, VPTV90, VPTV100), volumes of body receiving 10-90% of PD (V10-V90) of EBRT and BT plans. Results We obtained mean BT-DHI = 0.76, BT-DNR = 0.23, EBRT-DHI = 1.26. We observed no significant differences in VPTV90 and D90 between BT and EBRT. Mean BT-VPTV100 (89.4%) was higher than EBRT-VPTV100 (71.2%). Both COIN90 (BT-COIN90 = 0.46 vs. EBRT-COIN90 = 0.21) and COIN100 (BT-COIN100 = 0.52 vs. EBRT-COIN100 = 0.26) were superior for BT plans. We observed more exposure of normal tissues for small doses in BT plans (V10, V20), for high doses in EBRT plans (V70, V90). Conclusions Computed tmography-based surface mould brachytherapy for superficial lesions on irregular surfaces is a highly conformal method with good homogeneity. Brachytherapy is superior to EBRT in those locations in terms of conformity and normal tissue sparing ability in high doses. PMID:27504128

  16. Changes in dose with segmentation of breast tissues in Monte Carlo calculations for low-energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Thomson, R. M.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of various breast tissue segmentation models in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low-energy brachytherapy. Methods: The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of a breast brachytherapy treatment using TheraSeed Pd-103 seeds with various breast tissue segmentation models. Models used include a phantom where voxels are randomly assigned to be gland or adipose (randomly segmented), a phantom where a single tissue of averaged gland and adipose is present (averaged tissue), and a realistically segmented phantom created from previously published numerical phantoms. Radiation transport in averaged tissue while scoring in gland along with other combinations is investigated. The inclusion of calcifications in the breast is also studied in averaged tissue and randomly segmented phantoms. Results: In randomly segmented and averaged tissue phantoms, the photon energy fluence is approximately the same; however, differences occur in the dose volume histograms (DVHs) as a result of scoring in the different tissues (gland and adipose versus averaged tissue), whose mass energy absorption coefficients differ by 30%. A realistically segmented phantom is shown to significantly change the photon energy fluence compared to that in averaged tissue or randomly segmented phantoms. Despite this, resulting DVHs for the entire treatment volume agree reasonably because fluence differences are compensated by dose scoring differences. DVHs for the dose to only the gland voxels in a realistically segmented phantom do not agree with those for dose to gland in an averaged tissue phantom. Calcifications affect photon energy fluence to such a degree that the differences in fluence are not compensated for (as they are in the no calcification case) by dose scoring in averaged tissue phantoms. Conclusions: For low-energy brachytherapy, if photon transport and dose scoring both occur in an averaged tissue, the resulting DVH for the entire

  17. Ocular Response of Choroidal Melanoma With Monosomy 3 Versus Disomy 3 After Iodine-125 Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marathe, Omkar S. [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wu, Jeffrey; Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yu Fei; Burgess, Barry L. [Department of Ophthalmology, The Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Leu Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Straatsma, Bradley R. [Department of Ophthalmology, The Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McCannel, Tara A., E-mail: TMcCannel@jsei.ucla.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the ocular response of choroidal melanoma with monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with ciliochoroidal melanoma managed with fine needle aspiration biopsy immediately before plaque application for {sup 125}I brachytherapy between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008. Patients with (1) cytopathologic diagnosis of melanoma, (2) melanoma chromosome 3 status identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and (3) 6 or more months of follow-up after brachytherapy were sorted by monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 and compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Among 40 ciliochoroidal melanomas (40 patients), 15 had monosomy 3 and 25 had disomy 3. Monosomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 12.00 mm and a median tumor thickness of 6.69 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy, median thickness was 3.10 mm. Median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 48.3%. Disomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 10.00 mm and median tumor thickness of 3.19 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 2.00 years after brachytherapy, median tumor thickness was 2.37 mm. The median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 22.7%. Monosomy 3 melanomas were statistically greater in size than disomy 3 melanomas (p < 0.001) and showed a greater decrease in tumor thickness after brachytherapy (p = 0.006). Conclusion: In this study, ciliochoroidal melanomas with monosomy 3 were significantly greater in size than disomy 3 melanoma and showed a significantly greater decrease in thickness at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy. The greater decrease in monosomy 3 melanoma thickness after brachytherapy is consistent with other malignancies in which more aggressive pathology has been shown to be associated with a greater initial response to radiotherapy.

  18. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure

  19. Natural History of Clinically Staged Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Monotherapeutic Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent interstitial seed implants as monotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and May 2005, 463 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy as the sole definitive treatment. Men who received supplemental external beam radiotherapy or androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Dosimetric implant quality was determined based on the minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume and the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of treatment outcomes. Results: The 12-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 97.1%, 99.7%, and 75.4%, respectively. Only pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, percent positive biopsy cores, and minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence. The bPFS, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 97.4%, 99.6%, and 76.2%, respectively, for low-risk patients and 96.4%, 100%, and 74.0%, respectively, for intermediate-risk patients. The bPFS rate was 98.8% for low-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 92.1% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01), and it was 98.3% for intermediate-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 86.4% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01). Conclusions: High-quality brachytherapy implants as monotherapy can provide excellent outcomes for men with clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For these men, a high-quality implant can achieve results comparable to high-quality surgery in the most favorable pathologically staged patient subgroups.

  20. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Colonias, Athanasios; Parda, David; Trombetta, Mark; Gayou, Olivier; Reitz, Bodo; Miften, Moyed

    2007-03-01

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  1. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Colonias, Athanasios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Parda, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Trombetta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Gayou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Reitz, Bodo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

    2007-03-07

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  2. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Computed Tomography–Based Volumetric Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Daniel R., E-mail: drsimpson@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Carmona, Ruben; McMurtrie, Riley M.; Einck, John; Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Harrison, Terry [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Mundt, Arno J.; Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A report of clinical outcomes of a computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) technique for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six women with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB to IVA cervical carcinoma diagnosed between 2007 and 2014 were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy followed by high-dose-rate (HDR) IGBT. All patients underwent planning CT simulation at each implantation. A high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) encompassing any visible tumor and the entire cervix was contoured on the simulation CT. When available, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at implantation to assist with tumor delineation. The prescription dose was prescribed to the HRCTV. Results: The median follow-up time was 17 months. Thirteen patients (17%) had an MRI done before brachytherapy, and 16 patients (21%) were treated without MRI guidance. The mean EBRT/IGBT sum 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) delivered to the 90% volume of the HRCTV was 86.3 Gy. The mean maximum EQD2s delivered to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 67.5 Gy, 66.2 Gy, and 75.3 Gy, respectively. The 2-year cumulative incidences of local, locoregional, and distant failure were 5.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4%-14.8%), 15.1% (95% CI: 5.4%-29.4%), and 24.3% (95% CI: 12.1%-38.9%), respectively. The 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 75% (95% CI, 61%-91%) and 73% (95% CI, 60%-90%), respectively. Twenty-nine patients (38%) experienced grade ≥2 acute toxicity, with 5 cases of acute grade 3 toxicity and no grade ≥4 toxicities. One patient experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. No other late grade ≥3 events were observed. Conclusions: This is the largest report to date of CT/MRI-based IGBT for the treatment of cervical cancer. The results are promising, with excellent local control and acceptable

  4. Boron dose enhancement for Cf-252 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Monte Carlo modelling of a Cf-252 source in water and in tissue has shown that there is a significant therapeutic advantage obtained if B-10 is present in the tumour cells. This study analyses the advantage in terms of therapeutic margin, defined as the distance from the border of the treatment volume where boron-loaded tumour cells will receive a therapeutic dose. Calculations were made with MCNP version 4a on a Pentium 60 MHz computer. Large voxel sizes allowed 70 minute runs to achieve statistical uncertainties of 5% or less for 100,000 source neutrons. Later runs with smaller voxels confirmed the accuracy of the initial calculations. Calculations were made for treatment volume radii up to 11 cm and 30 ppm boron-10. The therapeutic margin for radii in the range 3-9 cm is approximately 10% of the tumour radius. This results in a 30% increase in the volume inside which peripheral tumour cells may receive a therapeutic dose. The median therapeutic ratio within the therapeutic margin varied from 1.05 at 3 cm up to 1.25 at 10 cm. Thus there is little benefit for less advanced tumours with thickness less than 3 cm. However, cervical cancer frequently presents in an advanced state in Southeast Asia and in Aboriginal communities in Australia, partially attributable to low Pap smear screening rates. These conclusions support the development and testing of boron compounds in in vitro and in vivo models for cervical cancer

  5. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper ME

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Kasper,1,2 Ahmed A Chaudhary3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, 2Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, FL, 3North Main Radiation Oncology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, superficial radiotherapy, skin surface brachytherapy, electron beam therapy, nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  6. The non-uniformity correction factor for the cylindrical ionization chambers in dosimetry of an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majumdar Bishnu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to derive the non-uniformity correction factor for the two therapy ionization chambers for the dose measurement near the brachytherapy source. The two ionization chambers of 0.6 cc and 0.1 cc volume were used. The measurement in air was performed for distances between 0.8 cm and 20 cm from the source in specially designed measurement jig. The non-uniformity correction factors were derived from the measured values. The experimentally derived factors were compared with the theoretically calculated non-uniformity correction factors and a close agreement was found between these two studies. The experimentally derived non-uniformity correction factor supports the anisotropic theory.

  7. Optimization in brachytherapy with the implementation of Radiobiology; Optimizacion en Braquiterapia con la implementacion de la Radiobiologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, M.P.; Bourel, V.J.; Rodriguez, I.; Torre, M. de la; Caneva, S. [Braqui S.R.L. Viamonte 1861, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    In the brachytherapy planning treatments with High dose rates (HDR), the optimization algorithms used are based in dosimetric considerations and/or geometric ones, ignoring the radiobiological response of the tissue treated. In this work we wish to show the implementation of radiobiological concepts in the optimization. Assuming that the subtiles differences that result in the dose distribution among the different optimization models which are not visible in an isodose plane, it is studied how is classically make it , the quality implant through natural histograms about dose volumes and the resulting parameters. Also is studied the necrosis probability which may be caused by the choice of some optimization model, allowing with this the choice of the best implant. (Author)

  8. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krengli, M.; Deantonio, L. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); University of ' ' Piemonte Orientale' ' , Department of Translational Medicine, Novara (Italy); Masini, L.; Filomeno, A.; Gambaro, G. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); Comoli, A.M. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Ophthalmology, Novara (Italy); Negri, E. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics, Novara (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium ({sup 192}Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.) [German] Das Karzinom des Augenlids stellt aufgrund der funktionellen und kosmetischen Beeintraechtigungen dieser anatomischen Region eine therapeutische Herausforderung dar. Ziele der Therapie sind sowohl die Tumorkontrolle als auch ein gutes funktionelles und kosmetisches Ergebnis. Lokale Kontrolle, Toxizitaet sowie funktionelle und kosmetische Ergebnisse bei Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids, die mit interstitieller Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, sollten analysiert werden. Sechzig Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids wurden mit interstitieller Brachytherapie mit Iridium-192-Draehten

  9. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  10. Prostate Brachytherapy in Men ≥75 Years of Age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in prostate cancer patients aged ≥75 years undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and August 2004, 145 consecutive patients aged ≥75 years underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 5.8 years. Biochemical progression-free survival was defined by a prostate-specific antigen level ≤0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or hormone-refractory disease without obvious metastases who died of any cause were classified as dead of prostate cancer. All other deaths were attributed to the immediate cause of death. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Nine-year CSS, bPFS, and OS rates for the entire cohort were 99.3%, 97.1%, and 64.5%, respectively. None of the evaluated parameters predicted for CSS, whereas bPFS was most closely predicted by percentage positive biopsies. Overall survival and non-cancer deaths were best predicted by tobacco status. Thirty-seven patients have died, with 83.8% of the deaths due to cardiovascular disease (22 patients) or second malignancies (9 patients). To date, only 1 patient (0.7%) has died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: After brachytherapy, high rates of CSS and bPFS are noted in elderly prostate cancer patients. Overall, approximately 65% of patients are alive at 9 years, with survival most closely related to tobacco status. We believe our results support an aggressive locoregional approach in appropriately selected elderly patients

  11. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V100Prostate>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V75Bladder75Rectum125Urethra<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter patterns may

  12. Prosper: image and robot-guided prostate brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Michael; Daanen, Vincent; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Hungr, Nikolai; Leroy, Antoine; Long, Jean-Alexandre; Martin, Sébastien; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer consists in destroying cancer by introducing iodine radioactive seeds into the gland through hollow needles. The planning of the position of the seeds and their introduction into the prostate is based on intra-operative ultrasound (US) imaging. We propose to optimize the global quality of the procedure by: i) using 3D US; ii) enhancing US data with MRI registration; iii) using a specially designed needle-insertion robot, connected to the imaging data. The imaging methods have been successfully tested on patient data while the robot accuracy has been evaluated on a realistic deformable phantom.

  13. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  14. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  15. 三维适形放疗配合腔内后装治疗宫颈癌的临床研究%Clinical study of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with intracavitary brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yeqin Zhou; Daiyuan Ma; Tao Ren; Xianfu Li; Jing Hu; Bangxian Tan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcome and complications of cervical cancer patients undergoing conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) treated with 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Methods: Sixty cervical cancer patients were divided randomly into the conformal group and the conventional group. Thirty patients treated with 3D-conformal radiotherapy in the 3DCRT group, when the whole pelvic received DT 40 Gy, a planning CT scan of each patient was obtained and the second 3DCRT therapy plan was taken. Then, continued to irradiate to 50 Gy. At last, 3DCRT was boosted at local involved volumes to the total close of 60 Gy. When 3DCRT was combined with intracavitary brachytherapy, the dose of brachytherapy to point A was 30 Gy/5 fractions. In the conventional group, after a total tumor dose of 40 Gy was delivered by the whole pelvic irradiation, the four-field technique was used to irradiate the total pelvic and regional nodes (median close of 10 Gy), and the involved volumes were boosted to 60 Gy and the dose of brachytherapy to point A was 30 Gy-36 Gy/5-6 fractions. Moreover, both groups were combined with intracavitary brachytherapy respectively. Results: The 1, 2, 3-year survival rates for the 3DCRT group and the conventional group were 96.7%, 93.3%, 90.0% and 86.6%, 76.7%,70% respectively (P = 0.04, P = 0.02 and P = 0.02). There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups.Compared to the two groups each other in toxic effects, except for the Ⅰ-Ⅱ grade rectal and bladder reaction and pelvic fibrosis which was lower in the 3DCRT group (P = 0. 007, P = 0. 006 and P = 0. 015), the side effects were similar and well tolerated in two groups. Conclusion: The all-course 3DCRT combined with intracavitary brachytherapy can be considered as an effective and feasible approach to cervical cancer and may significantly improve the survival rate and reduce the late toxicity. This new rote for 3DCRT merits need further

  16. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J;

    2015-01-01

    included the standard clinical dose of minimum 145Gy to the CTVProstate. Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) parameters were expressed in equivalent 2Gy fractionation doses. RESULTS: The median D90% to the GTV and CTVHR significantly increased by 44Gy and 17Gy, respectively when comparing Planrisk-adapt to Planref......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our study....../MRI registration. An intermediate-risk target volume (CTVProstate) and a high-risk target volume (CTVHR=GTV+5mm margin) were defined. Two virtual dose plans were made: Planrisk-adapt consisted of a de-escalated dose of minimum 125Gy to the CTVProstate and an escalated dose to 145-250Gy to the CTVHR; Planref...

  17. A case of percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy for superior pulmonary sulcus tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Tamaki; Imamura, Masahiro; Murata, Takashi [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    A 64-year-old man with advanced superior pulmonary sulcus tumor suffered severe unrelieved pain even after chemotherapy, external irradiation and hyperthermia. So we planned to introduce a percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy using the microselectron HDR {sup 192}Ir. With the estimation using the Pain Score, satisfying pain relief was attainable with a combination of the percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy and conventional treatment. So the percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy had the possibility to contribute to the alleviation of the pain. (author)

  18. Study of factors influencing dose distribution of brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the factors which influence the dose distribution of brachytherapy in cervical cancer.Methods Ninety-five patients with cervical cancer Ⅱ-Ⅲb received fundamental radiation therapy including brachytherapy in our department from Aug.2004 to Nov.2005.The deviation of isodose curve of brachytherapy was based on A-B reference system,and the deviation of dose was defined by measuring in a practical standard body model.Results The factors influencing isodose offset significantly were parametrial...

  19. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  20. SU-E-J-232: Feasibility of MRI-Based Preplan On Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y; Tward, J; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Huang, L; Szegedi, M; Kokeny, K; Salter, B [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using MRI-based preplan for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Methods: 12 patients who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate brachytherapy with Pd-103 were retrospectively studied. Our care-standard of the TRUS-based preplan served as the control. One or more prostate T2-weighted wide and/or narrow-field of view MRIs obtained within the 3 months prior to the implant were imported into the MIM Symphony software v6.3 (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) for each patient. In total, 37 MRI preplans (10 different image sequences with average thickness of 4.8mm) were generated. The contoured prostate volume and the seed counts required to achieve adequate dosimetric coverage from TRUS and MRI preplans were compared for each patient. The effects of different MRI sequences and image thicknesses were also investigated statistically using Student’s t-test. Lastly, the nomogram from the MRI preplan and TRUS preplan from our historical treatment data were compared. Results: The average prostate volume contoured on the TRUS and MRI were 26.6cc (range: 12.6∼41.3cc), and 27.4 cc (range: 14.3∼50.0cc), respectively. Axial MRI thicknesses (range: 3.5∼8.1mm) did not significantly affect the contoured volume or the number of seeds required on the preplan (R2 = 0.0002 and 0.0012, respectively). Four of the MRI sequences (AX-T2, AX-T2-Whole-Pelvis, AX-T2-FSE, and AXIALT2- Hi-Res) showed statistically significant better prostate volume agreement with TRUS than the other seven sequences (P <0.01). Nomogram overlay between the MRI and TRUS preplans showed good agreement; indicating volumes contoured on MRI preplan scan reliably predict how many seeds are needed for implant. Conclusion: Although MRI does not allow for determination of the actual implant geometry, it can give reliable volumes for seed ordering purposes. Our future work will investigate if MRI is sufficient to reliably replace TRUS preplanning in patients

  1. SU-E-J-232: Feasibility of MRI-Based Preplan On Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using MRI-based preplan for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Methods: 12 patients who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate brachytherapy with Pd-103 were retrospectively studied. Our care-standard of the TRUS-based preplan served as the control. One or more prostate T2-weighted wide and/or narrow-field of view MRIs obtained within the 3 months prior to the implant were imported into the MIM Symphony software v6.3 (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) for each patient. In total, 37 MRI preplans (10 different image sequences with average thickness of 4.8mm) were generated. The contoured prostate volume and the seed counts required to achieve adequate dosimetric coverage from TRUS and MRI preplans were compared for each patient. The effects of different MRI sequences and image thicknesses were also investigated statistically using Student’s t-test. Lastly, the nomogram from the MRI preplan and TRUS preplan from our historical treatment data were compared. Results: The average prostate volume contoured on the TRUS and MRI were 26.6cc (range: 12.6∼41.3cc), and 27.4 cc (range: 14.3∼50.0cc), respectively. Axial MRI thicknesses (range: 3.5∼8.1mm) did not significantly affect the contoured volume or the number of seeds required on the preplan (R2 = 0.0002 and 0.0012, respectively). Four of the MRI sequences (AX-T2, AX-T2-Whole-Pelvis, AX-T2-FSE, and AXIALT2- Hi-Res) showed statistically significant better prostate volume agreement with TRUS than the other seven sequences (P <0.01). Nomogram overlay between the MRI and TRUS preplans showed good agreement; indicating volumes contoured on MRI preplan scan reliably predict how many seeds are needed for implant. Conclusion: Although MRI does not allow for determination of the actual implant geometry, it can give reliable volumes for seed ordering purposes. Our future work will investigate if MRI is sufficient to reliably replace TRUS preplanning in patients

  2. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: acute toxicity and biochemical behavior analysis; Braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose no tratamento do carcinoma da prostata: analise da toxicidade aguda e do comportamento bioquimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Cardoso, Herbeni; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Castelo, Roberto [Beneficencia Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital Sao Joaquim. Servico de Radioterapia]. E-mail: estevesrt@uol.com.br; D' Imperio, Marcio [Beneficencia Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital Sao Joaquim. Servico de Urologia

    2006-03-15

    Objective: this study focuses on the biochemical response of the following variables: prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, staging, the risk of the disease, and hormone therapy. Objective: in the period between February of 1998 and July of 2001, 46 patients with prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy, in a combination of teletherapy and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The age ranged from 51 to 79 years (averaging 66.4 years). T1c stage was the most frequent one: 30 (65%). The Gleason score was below 7 in 78% of the patients. PSA ranged from 3.4 to 33.3, being below 10 in 39% of the cases. The average prostatic volume was 32.3 cc. Twenty-eight percent of the patients received hormone therapy. Teletherapy dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy, associated to four fractions of 4 Gy of HDR brachytherapy. Results: the follow-up period varied from 6 to 43 months. Four patients missed the follow-up and four died (one due to the disease). Out of the 39 patients that were analyzed, 76% presented a less than 1.5 PSA. None of the analyzed variables were found to be of statistical significance (p > 0.05) regarding biochemical control. Conclusion: the use of HDR brachytherapy was found to be effective in the treatment of prostate cancer and, in this study, the variables considered as prognostic factors did not interfere in the biochemical control. (author)

  3. A quality indicator to evaluate high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix; Determinacao de um indicador de qualidade para avaliar a braquiterapia intracavitaria com alta taxa de dose no cancer do colo uterino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Francisco Contreras; Soboll, Daniel Scheidegger [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radioterapia. Servico de Fisica Medica

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this report is to prevent a simple quality indicator (QI) that can be promptly used to evaluate the high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cancer of the cervix, and if necessary, to correct applicators' geometry before starting the treatment. We selected 51 HDR intracavitary applications of brachytherapy of patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with 60 mm uterine tandem and small Fletcher colpostat, according to the Manchester method (dose prescription on point A). A QI was defined as the ratio between the volume of 100% isodose curve of the study insertion and the volume of the 100% isodose curve of an insertion considered to be ideal. The data obtained were distributed in three groups: the group with tandem placement slippage (67,5%), a group with colpostat placement slippage (21,9%), and a third group, considered normal (10,6%). Each group showed particular characteristics (p < 0.0001). QI can be the best auxiliary method to establish the error tolerance (%) allowed for HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. (author)

  4. Stereotactic iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumors: temporary versus permanent implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic brachytherapy (SBT) has been described in several publications as an effective, minimal invasive and safe highly focal treatment option in selected patients with well circumscribed brain tumors <4 cm. However, a still ongoing discussion about indications and technique is hindering the definition of a clear legitimation of SBT in modern brain tumor treatment. These controversies encompass the question of how intense the irradiation should be delivered into the target volume (dose rate). For instance, reports about the use of high does rate (HDR) implantation schemes (>40 cGy/h) in combination with adjuvant external beam radiation and/or chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas and metastases resulted in increased rates of radiation induced adverse tissue changes requiring surgical intervention. Vice versa, such effects have been only minimally observed in numerous studies applying low dose rate (LDR) regiments (3–8 cGy/h) for low grade gliomas, metastases and other rare indications. Besides these observations, there are, however, no data available directly comparing the long term incidences of tissue changes after HDR and LDR and there is, furthermore, no evidence regarding a difference between temporary or permanent LDR implantation schemes. Thus, recommendations for effective and safe implantation schemes have to be investigated and compared in future studies

  5. Calibration coefficient of reference brachytherapy ionization chamber using analytical and Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D

    2010-06-01

    A cylindrical graphite ionization chamber of sensitive volume 1002.4 cm(3) was designed and fabricated at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for use as a reference dosimeter to measure the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The air kerma calibration coefficient (N(K)) of this ionization chamber was estimated analytically using Burlin general cavity theory and by the Monte Carlo method. In the analytical method, calibration coefficients were calculated for each spectral line of an HDR (192)Ir source and the weighted mean was taken as N(K). In the Monte Carlo method, the geometry of the measurement setup and physics related input data of the HDR (192)Ir source and the surrounding material were simulated using the Monte Carlo N-particle code. The total photon energy fluence was used to arrive at the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) using mass energy absorption coefficients. The energy deposition rates were used to simulate the value of charge rate in the ionization chamber and N(K) was determined. The Monte Carlo calculated N(K) agreed within 1.77 % of that obtained using the analytical method. The experimentally determined RAKR of HDR (192)Ir sources, using this reference ionization chamber by applying the analytically estimated N(K), was found to be in agreement with the vendor quoted RAKR within 1.43%.

  6. Characterization of ceramic seeds with samarium-153 for use in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Sarmento Valente

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic seeds were synthesized by the sol-gel technique with Si:Sm:Ca. One sample was irradiated in the TRIGA nuclear reactor IPR-R1. After irradiation, the seeds were submitted to instrumental neutron activation analysis to determine the 153Sm concentration in weight. The same irradiated seed sample was submitted to gamma spectrometry analysis to determine all existing radionuclides as well as its individual activities. A second sample was submitted to ICP-AES atomic emission spectrometry. A third sample was submitted to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to determine qualitative chemical composition. The measured activity was due to 153Sm with a well-characterized gamma spectrum. The X-ray fluorescence spectrum demonstrates that there is no discrepancy in seed composition. Maximum range of beta particles from 153Sm were evaluated, as well as the total dose and dose rate on its range´s volume. The results are relevant for investigation of the viability of producing 153Sm radioactive seeds for use in brachytherapy.

  7. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans

  8. Observations on rotating needle insertions using a brachytherapy robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meltsner, M A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ferrier, N J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Thomadsen, B R [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2007-09-21

    A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy implantations has the potential to greatly improve treatment success. Much of the research in robotic surgery focuses on measuring accuracy. However, there exist many factors that must be optimized before an analysis of needle placement accuracy can be determined. Some of these parameters include choice of the needle type, insertion velocity, usefulness of the rotating needle and rotation speed. These parameters may affect the force at which the needle interacts with the tissue. A reduction in force has been shown to decrease the compression of the prostate and potentially increase the accuracy of seed position. Rotating the needle as it is inserted may reduce frictional forces while increasing accuracy. However, needle rotations are considered to increase tissue damage due to the drilling nature of the insertion. We explore many of the factors involved in optimizing a brachytherapy robot, and the potential effects each parameter may have on the procedure. We also investigate the interaction of rotating needles in gel and suggest the rotate-cannula-only method of conical needle insertion to minimize any tissue damage while still maintaining the benefits of reduced force and increased accuracy.

  9. Observations on rotating needle insertions using a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, M. A.; Ferrier, N. J.; Thomadsen, B. R.

    2007-09-01

    A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy implantations has the potential to greatly improve treatment success. Much of the research in robotic surgery focuses on measuring accuracy. However, there exist many factors that must be optimized before an analysis of needle placement accuracy can be determined. Some of these parameters include choice of the needle type, insertion velocity, usefulness of the rotating needle and rotation speed. These parameters may affect the force at which the needle interacts with the tissue. A reduction in force has been shown to decrease the compression of the prostate and potentially increase the accuracy of seed position. Rotating the needle as it is inserted may reduce frictional forces while increasing accuracy. However, needle rotations are considered to increase tissue damage due to the drilling nature of the insertion. We explore many of the factors involved in optimizing a brachytherapy robot, and the potential effects each parameter may have on the procedure. We also investigate the interaction of rotating needles in gel and suggest the rotate-cannula-only method of conical needle insertion to minimize any tissue damage while still maintaining the benefits of reduced force and increased accuracy.

  10. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT) system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. A 46-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a cervical tumor with direct invasion of the right parametrium, bilateral hydronephrosis, and multiple uterine myomas. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIIB cervical cancer was diagnosed. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) followed by SBRT delivered via HT was administered instead of brachytherapy because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas with bleeding tendency. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed after 6 weeks of treatment because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas. Neither pelvic MRI nor results of histopathologic examination at X-month follow-up showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Only grade 1 nausea and vomiting during treatment were noted. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding was noted at 14-month follow-up. No fistula formation and no evidence of haematological, gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were noted on the most recent follow-up. CCRT followed by SBRT appears to be an effective and safe modality for treatment of cervical cancer. Larger-scale studies are warranted

  11. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. Case Presentation A 46-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a cervical tumor with direct invasion of the right parametrium, bilateral hydronephrosis, and multiple uterine myomas. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage IIIB cervical cancer was diagnosed. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT followed by SBRT delivered via HT was administered instead of brachytherapy because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas with bleeding tendency. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed after 6 weeks of treatment because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas. Neither pelvic MRI nor results of histopathologic examination at X-month follow-up showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Only grade 1 nausea and vomiting during treatment were noted. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding was noted at 14-month follow-up. No fistula formation and no evidence of haematological, gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were noted on the most recent follow-up. Conclusions CCRT followed by SBRT appears to be an effective and safe modality for treatment of cervical cancer. Larger-scale studies are warranted.

  12. Iodine-125 orbital brachytherapy with a prosthetic implant in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, Clare [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Maree, Gert; Munro, Roger [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lecuona, Karin [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Ophthalmology; Sauerwein, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Strahlenklinik, NCTeam

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is one method of irradiating the orbit after enucleation of an eye with a malignant tumor that has a potential to recur. It consists of 6 trains of I-125 seeds placed around the periphery of the orbit, a shorter central train, and a metal disc, loaded with seeds, placed beneath the eyelids. The presence of a prosthetic orbital implant requires omission of the central train and adjustment of the activity of the seeds in the anterior orbit around the prosthesis. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the technical modifications and outcome of 12 patients treated in this manner: 6 with retinoblastoma, 5 with malignant melanoma, and 1 with an intraocular rhabdomyosarcoma. The median dose was 35.5 Gy in 73 hours for retinoblastoma and 56 Gy in 141 hours for malignant melanoma. Patients with retinoblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma also received chemotherapy. Results: The tubes can be placed satisfactorily around the prosthesis. The increased activity in the anterior half of the tubes produced comparable dose distributions. There have been no orbital recurrences, no extrusion of the prosthesis, and cosmesis is good. Conclusion: Insertion of a prosthetic implant at the time of enucleation greatly enhances the subsequent cosmetic appearance. This should be encouraged unless there is frank tumor in the orbit. Orbital brachytherapy without the central train continues to give excellent local control. The short treatment time and good cosmesis are added advantages. The patient is spared the expense and inconvenience of removing and replacing the prosthetic implant. (orig.)

  13. In vivo visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds with photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. A fiber coupled to a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into high-dose-rate brachytherapy needles, which diffused light spherically. These needles were inserted through the perineum into the prostate for interstitial light delivery and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. Postoperative computed tomography images and ex vivo photoacoustic images confirmed seed locations. Limitations with insufficient light delivery were mitigated with short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming, providing a 10-20 dB contrast improvement over delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming for pulse energies ranging from 6.8 to 10.5 mJ with a fiber-seed distance as large as 9.5 mm. For the same distance and the same range of energy densities, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were similar while the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was higher in SLSC compared to DAS images. Challenges included visualization of signals associated with the interstitial fiber tip and acoustic reverberations between seeds separated by ≤2 mm. Results provide insights into the potential for clinical translation to humans.

  14. Methodology of quality control for brachytherapy {sup 125}I seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Manzoli, Jose E.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: esmoura@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology of quality control of {sup 125}I seeds used for brachytherapy. The {sup 125}I seeds are millimeter titanium capsules widely used in permanent implants of prostate cancer, allowing a high dose within the tumour and a low dose on the surrounding tissues, with very low harm to the other tissues. Besides, with this procedure, the patients have a low impotence rate and a small incidence of urinary incontinence. To meet the medical standards, an efficient quality control is necessary, showing values with the minimum uncertainness possible, concerning the seeds dimensions and their respective activities. The medical needles are used to insert the seeds inside the prostate. The needles used in brachytherapy have an internal diameter of 1.0 mm, so it is necessary {sup 125}I seeds with an external maximum diameter of 0.85 mm. For the seeds and the spacer positioning on the planning sheet, the seeds must have a length between 4.5 and 5.0 mm. The activities must not vary more than 5% in each batch of {sup 125}I seeds. For this methodology, we used two ionization chamber detectors and one caliper. In this paper, the methodology using one control batch with 75 seeds manufactured by GE Health care Ltd is presented. (author)

  15. Current status and perspectives of brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toita, Takafumi

    2009-02-01

    Standard definitive radiotherapy for cervical cancer consists of whole pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). In Japan, high-dose-rate ICBT (HDR-ICBT) has been utilized in clinical practice for more than 40 years. Several randomized clinical trials demonstrated that HDR-ICBT achieved comparative outcomes, both for pelvic control and incidences of late complications, to low-dose-rate (LDR) ICBT. In addition, HDR-ICBT has some potential advantages over LDR-ICBT, leading to further improvement in treatment results. Prior to the current computer planning systems, some excellent treatment planning concepts were established. At present, systems modified from these concepts, or novel approaches, such as image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) are under investigation. One serious problem to be solved in HDR-ICBT for cervical cancer is that of the discrepancy in standard treatment schedules for combination HDR-ICBT and EBRT between the United States and Japan. Prospective studies are ongoing to assess the efficacy and toxicity of the Japanese schedule. PMID:19225920

  16. SU-E-T-285: Revisiting the Nomogram for Intra-Operative Planning Based Pd-103 Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, S; Cho, P [Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The seed implant technique at our institution involves using a published nomogram for seed ordering based on CT based volume studies of the prostate. Ultrasound volume studies are subsequently used in the operating room for planning a modified peripheral loading with urethra sparing seed implant. The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriate modality for prostate volume measurement and creating an updated nomogram for intra-operative planning specific to our technique for pd-103 brachytherapy for efficient seed ordering. Methods: Prostate volumes based on pre-implant CT (Pre-CT), intra-operative ultrasound (TRUS), and post-implant CT (post-CT) studies as well as the total airkerma strength (AKS) of the implants were analyzed for 135 seed implant cases (69 monotherapy, 66 boost). Regression analysis was performed to derive the relationship between the total AKS and pre-CT and TRUS volumes. The correlation between TRUS and pre-CT volumes and TRUS and post-CT volumes were also studied. Results: Ultrasound based prostate volume exhibited a stronger correlation with total AKS than the pre-implant CT volume (R{sup 2} = 0.97 vs 0.88 for monotherapy and 0.96 vs 0.89 for boost). In general the pre-CT overestimated the prostate volume leading to ordering of a larger number of seeds and thus leading to higher number of unused/wasted seeds. Newly derived TRUS based nomogram was better suited for our technique than the published data. The post-implant CT volume closely followed the ultrasound volume (R{sup 2} = 0.88) as compared to pre-implant CT volumes (R{sup 2} = 0.57). Conclusion: In an era of costconscious health care where waste reduction is of utmost importance, an updated technique-specific nomogram is useful for ordering optimal number of seeds resulting in significant cost savings. In addition, our study shows that ultrasound based prostate volume is a better predictor for seed ordering for intra-operative planning than pre-implant CT.

  17. SU-E-T-285: Revisiting the Nomogram for Intra-Operative Planning Based Pd-103 Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The seed implant technique at our institution involves using a published nomogram for seed ordering based on CT based volume studies of the prostate. Ultrasound volume studies are subsequently used in the operating room for planning a modified peripheral loading with urethra sparing seed implant. The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriate modality for prostate volume measurement and creating an updated nomogram for intra-operative planning specific to our technique for pd-103 brachytherapy for efficient seed ordering. Methods: Prostate volumes based on pre-implant CT (Pre-CT), intra-operative ultrasound (TRUS), and post-implant CT (post-CT) studies as well as the total airkerma strength (AKS) of the implants were analyzed for 135 seed implant cases (69 monotherapy, 66 boost). Regression analysis was performed to derive the relationship between the total AKS and pre-CT and TRUS volumes. The correlation between TRUS and pre-CT volumes and TRUS and post-CT volumes were also studied. Results: Ultrasound based prostate volume exhibited a stronger correlation with total AKS than the pre-implant CT volume (R2 = 0.97 vs 0.88 for monotherapy and 0.96 vs 0.89 for boost). In general the pre-CT overestimated the prostate volume leading to ordering of a larger number of seeds and thus leading to higher number of unused/wasted seeds. Newly derived TRUS based nomogram was better suited for our technique than the published data. The post-implant CT volume closely followed the ultrasound volume (R2 = 0.88) as compared to pre-implant CT volumes (R2 = 0.57). Conclusion: In an era of costconscious health care where waste reduction is of utmost importance, an updated technique-specific nomogram is useful for ordering optimal number of seeds resulting in significant cost savings. In addition, our study shows that ultrasound based prostate volume is a better predictor for seed ordering for intra-operative planning than pre-implant CT

  18. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Quality MediPhys LLC, Denville, New Jersey 07834 (United States); New York Eye Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Physics, Elekta Inc., Norcross, Georgia 30092 (United States); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  19. Systematic Review of Focal Prostate Brachytherapy and the Future Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, M Sean; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in North American and European men and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Since the practice of PSA screening has become common the disease is most often found early and can have a long indolent course. Current definitive therapy treats the whole gland but has considerable long-term side effects. Focal therapies may be able to target the cancer while decreasing dose to organs at risk. Our objective was to determine if focal prostate brachytherapy could meet target objectives while permitting a decrease in dose to organs at risk in a way that would allow future salvage treatments. Further, we wanted to determine if focal treatment results in less toxicity. Utilizing the Medline repository, dosimetric papers comparing whole gland to partial gland brachytherapy and clinical papers that reported toxicity of focal brachytherapy were selected. A total of 9 dosimetric and 6 clinical papers met these inclusion criteria. Together, these manuscripts suggest that focal brachytherapy may be employed to decrease dose to organs at risk with decreased toxicity. Of current technology, image-guided HDR brachytherapy using MRI registered to transrectal ultrasound offers the flexibility and efficiency to achieve such focal treatments. PMID:27293899

  20. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  1. External radiotherapy plus intracavitary brachytherapy for recurrent chordoma of the nasopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orecchia, R. [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy]|[Milan Univ. (Italy); Leonardi, M.C. [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy; Krengli, M. [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy]|[Ospedale Maggiore, Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy Div.]|[Torino Univ. (Italy); Zurrida, S. [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Scientific Director`s Office; Brambilla, M.G. [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (Italy). Physics Div.

    1998-09-01

    We report a case of recurrent nasopharyngeal chordoma treated by external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy, and discuss this technique in relation to treatment modalities reported in the literature. (orig.)

  2. Optimization of 125I ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Episcleral plaques containing 125I sources are often used in the treatment of ocular melanoma. Within four years post-treatment, however, the majority of patients experience some visual loss due to radiation retinopathy. The high incidence of late complications suggests that careful treatment optimization may lead to improved outcome. The goal of optimization would be to reduce the magnitude of vision-limiting complications without compromising tumor control. We have developed a three-dimensional computer model for ophthalmic plaque therapy which permits us to explore the potential of various optimization strategies. One simple strategy which shows promise is to maximize the ratio of dose to the tumor apex (T) compared to dose to the macula (M). By modifying the parameters of source location, activity distribution, source orientation, and shielding we find that the calculated T:M ratio can be varied by a factor of 2 for a common plaque design and posterior tumor location. Margins and dose to the tumor volume remain essentially unchanged

  3. Proceedings of the Second Congress of Radiochemotherapy and Brachytherapy and the Fifth Meeting of Medical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Marie Curie Foundation in the city of Cordoba in Argentina, has organized the Second Congress of radiochemotherapy and brachytherapy and the Fifth Meeting of Medical Physics in order to collaborate with the scientific growth of radiation oncology and medical physics. The main topics covered were: patient's radioprotection, brachytherapy with iodine, radiation protection regulatory issues in Argentina, risk analysis in radiotherapy, medical radiation therapy, EPID dosimetry (Electronic Portal Image Device), accidents in radiotherapy, among others.

  4. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhiro Yamada; Koji Okihara; Tsuyoshi Iwata; Koji Masui; Kazumi Kamoi; Kei Yamada; Tsuneharu Miki

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatm...

  5. PDR brachytherapy with flexible implants for interstitial boost after breast-conserving surgery and external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: For radiobiological reasons the new concept of pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy seems to be suitable to replace traditional CLDR brachytherapy with line sources. PDR brachytherapy using a stepping source seems to be particularly suitable for the interstitial boost of breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery and external beam irradiation since in these cases the exact adjustment of the active lengths is essential in order to prevent unwanted skin dose and consequential unfavorable cosmetic results. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and morbidity of a PDR boost with flexible breast implants. Materials and methods: Sixty-five high risk patients were treated with an interstitial PDR boost. The criteria for an interstitial boost were positive margin or close margin, extensive intraductal component (EIC), intralymphatic extension, lobular carcinoma, T2 tumors and high nuclear grade (GIII). Dose calculation and specification were performed following the rules of the Paris system. The dose per pulse was 1 Gy. The pulse pauses were kept constant at 1 h. A geometrically optimized dose distribution was used for all patients. The treatment schedule was 50 Gy external beam to the whole breast and 20 Gy boost. PDR irradiations were carried out with a nominal 37 GBq 192-Ir source. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (minimum 12 months, maximum 54 months). Sixty percent of the patients judged their cosmetic result as excellent, 27% judged it as good, 11% judged it as fair and 2% judged it as poor. Eighty-six percent of the patients had no radiogenous skin changes in the boost area. In 11% of patients minimal punctiform telangiectasia appeared at single puncture sites. In 3% ((2(65))) of patients planar telangiectasia appeared on the medial side of the implant. The rate of isolated local recurrences was 1.5%. In most cases geometrical volume optimization (GVO) yields improved dose distributions with respect to

  6. Non-invasive assessment of left ventricular contractility from end-systolic pressure-volume relation (E(max)) determined by gated radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Left ventricular end-systolic pressure-volume relation has been shown experimentally to be an useful index of left ventricular contractility relatively independent of preload or afterload. But the clinical application has been reported less frequently because of the invasiveness in the measurement of ventricular volume and simultaneous intraventricular pressure. We evaluated this relationship using non-invasive method such as the volume determination by gated radionuclide angiocartiography and the pressure measurement by cuff sphyngomanometer in arm. In measuring ventricular volume, gated radionuclide angiocardiography is a non-invasive method less affected by the geometry of left ventricle. Using the volume by radionuclide and the blood pressure by cuff, non-invasive determination of endsystolic pressure-volume relation provides much clinical usefulness in the assessment of left ventricular contractility

  7. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment; Braquiterapia no tratamento do rabdomiossarcoma da infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1995-07-01

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold{sup 198}, Cesium{sup 137} and Iridium{sup 192}. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  8. Palliative endobronchial HDR-brachytherapy in obstructing malignancies: influence on survival and pattern of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the influence of endobronchial HDR-brachytherapy on survival and pattern of failure 117 patients with central obstructing bronchial carcinoma with EBRT and endobronchial brachytherapy were prospectively investigated and retrospectively matched with a group of patients who received EBRT but no HDR-brachytherapy. The matching criteria were Sex, Age, Histology, TNM-status and EBRT dose. 94 pairs of patient could be evaluated. Taken the two groups as a whole, no difference in suvival could be detected in both groups. However, those patients in whom (by endoscopic findings) a complete remission could be achieved by HDR-brachytherapy, had a significant (p< 0,01) longer survival than the matched group. Patients with endobronchial HDR-brachytherapy died significantly more often by final hemorrhage (26 versus 10). However, survival in the combined modality group was significantly longer. 90 % of the patients in both groups who died by final hemorrhage had a squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion palliative endobronchial HDR-brachytherapy offers not always benefit in survival to patients with a far advanced disease. However those patients who achieve a complete remission have a significant survival benefit, but with a consequence of a higher rate of final hemorrhage

  9. Intraluminal brachytherapy after metallic stent placement in primary bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on stent patency and survival after metallic stent placement in patients with primary bile duct carcinoma. Twenty-seven patients with primary bile duct carcinoma underwent metallic stent placement; in 16 of the 27 intraluminal brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source (dose, 25 Gy) was the performed. Obstuction was due to either hilar (n=14) or non-hilar involvement (n=13). For statistical comparison of patients who underwent/did not undergo intraluminal brachytherapy, stent patency and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and an independent t test. The mean durations of stent patency and survival were 9.1 and 10.0 months respectively in patients who underwent intraluminal brachytherapy, and 4.2 and 5.0 months in those who did not undergo this procedure (ρ<0.05). The mean durations of stent patency and survival among the 22 patients who died were 7.6 (range, 0.8-16.1) and 8.3 (range, 0.8-17.3) months, respectively, in the eleven patients who underwent intraluminal brachytherapy, and 4.2 (range, 0.9-8.0) and 5.0 (range, 0.9-8.4) months in those whom the procedure was not performed (ρ<0.05). Intraluminal brachytherapy after stent placement extended both stent patency and survival in patients with primary bile duct carcinoma

  10. HDR-192Ir intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Chen; Xiao-Lin Wang; Zhi-Ping Yan; Jie-Min Cheng; Jian-Hua Wang; Gao-Quan Gong; Sheng Qian; Jian-Jun Luo; Qing-Xin Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice (MOJ) and to evaluate the clinical effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on stent patency and patient survival.METHODS: Thirty-four patients with MOJ were included in this study. Having biliary stent placed, all patients were classified into intraluminal brachytherapy group (group A,n = 14) and control group (group B, n = 20) according to their own choice. Intraluminal brachytherapy regimen included: HDR-192Ir was used in the therapy, fractional doses of 4-7 Gy were given every 3-6 d for 3-4 times, and standard points were established at 0.5-1.0 cm. Some patients of both groups received transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) after stent placement.RESULTS: In group A, the success rate of intraluminal brachytherapy was 98.0%, RTOG grade 1 acute radiation morbidity occurred in 3 patients, RTOG/EORTC grade 1 late radiation morbidity occurred in 1 patient. Mean stent patency of group A (12.6 mo) was significantly longer than that of group B (8.3 mo) (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in the mean survival (9.4 mo vs6.0 mo) between the two groups.CONCLUSION: HDR-192Ir intraluminal brachytherapy is a safe palliative therapy in treating MOJ, and it may prolong stent patency and has the potentiality of extending survival of patients with MOJ.

  11. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genebes, Caroline, E-mail: genebes.caroline@claudiusregaud.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Jonca, Frédéric [Department of Urology, Clinique Ambroise Paré, Toulouse (France); Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard [Department of Urology and Andrology, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  12. Study of Dosimetric and Thermal Properties of a Newly Developed Thermo-brachytherapy Seed for Treatment of Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Bhoj R.

    Studies on the curative effects of hyperthermia and radiation therapy on treatment of cancer show strong evidence of synergistic enhancement when both radiation and hyperthermia treatment modalities are applied simultaneously. A variety of tissue heating approaches developed to date still fail to overcome essential limitations such as inadequate temperature control, temperature non-uniformity, and prolonged time delay between hyperthermia and radiation treatments. We propose a new self-regulating Thermo-brachytherapy (TB) seed, which serves as a source of both radiation and heat for concurrent administration of brachytherapy and hyperthermia. The proposed seed is based on the BestRTM Iodine-125 seed model 2301, where the tungsten marker core and the air gap are replaced with ferromagnetic material. The ferromagnetic core produces heat when subjected to an alternating electromagnetic (EM) field and effectively shuts off after reaching the Curie temperature (TC) of the ferromagnetic material, thus establishing temperature self-regulation. The seed has a ferromagnetic Ni-Cu alloy core having a Curie transition at a temperature of 52 °C. This study summarizes the design and development of the self regulating ferromagnetic core TB seed for the concurrent hyperthermia and brachytherapy treatments. An experimental study of the magnetic properties of the Ni1-xCu x (0.28≤ x ≤0.3) alloys, and the simulation studies of radiation and thermal distribution properties of the seed have been performed. A preliminary experiment for the ferromagnetic induction heating of Ni-Cu needles has been carried out to ensure the practical feasibility of the induction heating. Radiation dose characterizing parameters (dose rate constant and other TG-43 factors) were calculated using the Monte Carlo method. For the thermal characteristics, we studied a model consisting of single or multiple seeds placed in the central region of a cylindrical phantom using a finite-element analysis method

  13. Curative high dose rate vaginal apex brachytherapy in stage I papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We describe the presentation, local and distant control, survival, salvage rate, and complications for patients undergoing whole abdominal radiation therapy (WART), low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy, or high dose rate (HDR) vaginal brachytherapy in patients with stage I UPSC. Methods: Between 1976 and 1994 more than 1700 patients with endometrial carcinoma were treated with radiation therapy, 30 patients with stage I UPSC (1.8%) were treated with radiation before or following TAH/BSO. All patients underwent either preoperative Simon's packing or tandem and plaque which delivered 30-40 Gy to the serosa, WART, or HDR Ir-192 vaginal apex brachytherapy to a total dose of 21 Gy in 3 fractions at 0.5 cm from the vaginal mucosa. A total of 14 patients received HDR vaginal brachytherapy and (5(14)) patients received systemic chemotherapy. All patients presented with vaginal bleeding at a median age of 67 years (range 34-88). The group of 30 patients underwent TAH/BSO, 17 patients were completely staged pathologically (pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes, omentectomy, and pelvic washings), and 2 patients underwent omental biopsy and pelvic washings only. All specimens revealed UPSC, nuclear grade 3, and lymphovascular invasion (23%). The pathologic stage was IA: 23% (7), IB: 67% (20), and IC: 10% (3). The median follow-up for all patients was 49 months (range 13-187 months). For the patients receiving postoperative HDR vaginal brachytherapy the median time from surgery to radiation was 42 days (range 29-91). Results: The 5-year actuarial disease free survival for Figo stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 100% compared to 74% for stage I UPSC patient

  14. Comparison of Measurements of the Uterus and Cervix Obtained by Magnetic Resonance and Transabdominal Ultrasound Imaging to Identify the Brachytherapy Target in Patients With Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Sylvia van, E-mail: sylvia.vandyk@petermac.org [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas [Rural Clinical School, University of Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Schneider, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Bernshaw, David [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Narayan, Kailash [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare measurements of the uterus and cervix obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transabdominal ultrasound to determine whether ultrasound can identify the brachytherapy target and be used to guide conformal brachytherapy planning and treatment for cervix cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients undergoing curative treatment with radiation therapy between January 2007 and March 2012 were included in the study. Intrauterine applicators were inserted into the uterine canal while patients were anesthetized. Images were obtained by MRI and transabdominal ultrasound in the longitudinal axis of the uterus with the applicator in treatment position. Measurements were taken at the anterior and posterior surface of the uterus at 2.0-cm intervals along the applicator, from the external os to the tip of the applicator. Data were analyzed using Bland Altman plots examining bias and 95% limits of agreement. Results: A total of 192 patients contributed 1668 measurements of the cervix and uterus. Mean (±SD) differences of measurements between imaging modalities at the anterior and posterior uterine surface ranged from 1.5 (±3.353) mm to 3.7 (±3.856) mm, and −1.46 (±3.308) mm to 0.47 (±3.502) mm, respectively. The mean differences were less than 3 mm in the cervix. The mean differences were less than 1.5 mm at all measurement points on the posterior surface. Conclusion: Differences in the measurements of the cervix and uterus obtained by MRI and ultrasound were within clinically acceptable limits. Transabdominal ultrasound can be substituted for MRI in defining the target volume for conformal brachytherapy treatment of cervix cancer.

  15. An intrauterine ultrasound applicator for targeted delivery of thermal therapy in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy to the cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Juang, Titania; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2009-02-01

    An intracavitary hyperthermia applicator for targeted heat delivery to the cervix was developed based on a linear array of sectored tubular ultrasound transducers that provides truly 3-D heating control (angular and along the length). A central conduit can incorporate an HDR source for sequential or simultaneous delivery of heat and radiation. Hyperthermia treatment volumes were determined from brachytherapy treatment planning data and used as a basis for biothermal simulations analyzing the effects of device parameters, tissue properties, and catheter materials on heating patterns. Devices were then developed with 1-3 elements at 6.5-8 MHz with 90-180° sectors and a 15-35 mm heating length, housed within a 6-mm diameter water-cooled PET catheter. Directional heating from sectored transducers could extend lateral penetration of therapeutic heating (41°C) >2 cm while maintaining rectum and bladder temperatures within 12 mm below thermal damage thresholds. Imaging artifacts were evaluated with standard CT, cone beam CT, and MR images. MR thermal imaging was used to demonstrate shaping of heating profiles in axial and coronal slices with artifact <2 mm from the device. The impact of the high-Z applicator materials on the HDR dose distribution was assessed using a well-type ionization chamber and was found to be less than 6% attenuation, which can readily be accounted for with treatment planning software. The intrauterine ultrasound device has demonstrated potential for 3-D conformal heating of clinical tumors in the delivery of targeted hyperthermia in conjunction with brachytherapy to the cervix.

  16. Correction factors for Farmer-type chambers for absorbed dose determination in 60Co and 192Ir brachytherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents experimentally determined correction factors for Farmer-type chambers for absorbed dose determination in 60Co and 192Ir brachytherapy dosimetry. The correction factors were determined from measurements made in a PMMA phantom and calculation of ratios of measured charges. The ratios were corrected for the different volumes of the ionization chambers, determined in external high-energy electron beams. The correction factors for the central electrode effect and the wall material dependency in 60Co brachytherapy dosimetry agree with those used in external 60Co beam dosimetry. In 192Ir dosimetry, the central aluminium electrode increases the response of an NE2571 chamber compared with that of a chamber with a central graphite electrode. The increase is 1.1 and 2.1% at 1.5 and 5.0 g cm-2 distance, respectively. Similar values are obtained with an NE2577 chamber. The wall correction factor in 192Ir dosimetry for a chamber with an A-150 wall has been determined to be 1.018, independent of the measurement distance. For a graphite walled chamber, the correction factor is 0.996 and 1.001 at 1.5 and 5.0 g cm-2 distance, respectively. The values of the wall correction factors are evaluated by a theory presented. If the chamber is used according to the 'large cavity' principle, the correction factor to account for the replacement of the phantom material by the ionization chamber was determined to be 0.982 for an NE2571 chamber when used with a Delrin cap, and 0.978 for an NE2581 when used with a polystyrene cap. The correction factors for the 'large cavity' principle are valid at both 60Co and 192Ir qualities. (author)

  17. Primary Causes of Death After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the primary causes of death in low-risk (low-risk), intermediate-risk (intermediate-risk), and high-risk (high-risk) patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through November 2004, a total of 1,354 consecutive patients underwent prostate brachytherapy. All patients underwent brachytherapy >3 years before analysis. Of the patients, 532 (39.3%) received androgen deprivation therapy and 703 (51.9%) received supplemental radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 5.4 years. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, and overall survival. Results: The 10-year cause-specific survival was 97.0% (99.7%, 99.0%, and 90.1% for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients). Overall survival was 76.7% (82.5%, 78.3%, and 67.6% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively). The cumulative death rate for cardiovascular disease was 11.5% (8.7%, 9.3%, and 19.8% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients). The death rate from second malignancies (nonprostate cancer) was 7.2% and was not substantially different when stratified by risk group. Death from all other causes was 6.5% for the entire cohort but 1.3%, 5.0%, and 10.8% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. In multivariate analysis, death from prostate cancer was best predicted by Gleason score and risk group, whereas death from cardiovascular disease, nonprostate cancer, and all other causes were most closely related to patient age and tobacco use. Conclusions: Although cardiovascular mortality was the predominant cause of death, prostate cancer was responsible for approximately 10% of all deaths. In particular, overall survival was poorest in the high-risk group. Although high-risk patients were most likely to die of prostate cancer, the divergence in overall survival between high-risk and lower-risk patients primarily

  18. Effectiveness of brachytherapy in treating carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapeutic management of vulvar cancer often incorporates brachytherapy as a portion of the treatment regimen. However, few studies using this modality alone to manage vulvar cancer have been published. Methods and Materials: Thirty four patients were treated with iridium-192 (192Ir) brachytherapy for vulvar cancer between 1975 and 1993 at Centre Alexis Vautrin. Twenty-one patients were treated at first presentation when surgery was contraindicated or declined. Of these patients, 12 had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Classification Stage III or IV disease, 8 were Stage II, 1 was Stage I, and 1 was Stage 0. Thirteen patients were treated for recurrent disease. Paris system rules for implantation and dose prescription were followed. The median reference dose was 60 Gy (range 53 to 88 Gy). At the time of analysis, 10 of 34 patients were alive. Median follow-up in these 10 patients was 31 months (range: 21 months to 107 months). Fourteen of the 24 deaths were from causes other than vulvar cancer. Results: Kaplan-Meier actuarial 5-year local control was 47% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 23 to 73%) and 5-year actuarial loco-regional control was 45% (95% CI = 21 to 70%). Kaplan-Meier actuarial 5-year disease-specific survival was 56% (95% CI = 33 to 76%) and actuarial 5-year survival was 29% (95% CI = 15 to 49%). Median time to death was 14 months. Subset analysis revealed a higher actuarial 5-year local control in patients treated at first presentation than those treated for recurrence (80 vs. 19%, log rank, p = 0.04). Similarly, actuarial 5-year loco-regional control was higher in patients treated at first presentation (80 vs. 16%, log rank, p 0.01). The two groups did not differ significantly in disease-specific or overall survival. The actuarial 5-year disease specific survival of 56% is somewhat less than the expected 5-year disease-specific survival after surgery in a group having a similar proportion of early stage

  19. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J. [University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  20. Tissue modeling schemes in low energy breast brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-11-21

    Breast tissue is heterogeneous and is mainly composed of glandular (G) and adipose (A) tissues. The proportion of G versus A varies considerably among the population. The absorbed dose distributions in accelerated partial breast irradiation therapy with low energy photon brachytherapy sources are very sensitive to tissue heterogeneities. Current clinical algorithms use the recommendations of the AAPM TG43 report which approximates the human tissues by unit density water. The aim of this study is to investigate various breast tissue modeling schemes for low energy brachytherapy. A special case of breast permanent seed implant is considered here. Six modeling schemes are considered. Uniform and non-uniform water breast (UWB and NUWB) consider the density but neglect the effect of the composition of tissues. The uniform and the non-uniform G/A breast (UGAB and NUGAB) as well the age-dependent breast (ADB) models consider the effect of the composition. The segmented breast tissue (SBT) method uses a density threshold to distinguish between G and A tissues. The PTV D(90) metric is used for the analysis and is based on the dose to water (D(90(w,m))). D(90(m,m)) is also reported for comparison to D(90(w,m)). The two-month post-implant D(90(w,m)) averaged over 38 patients is smaller in NUWB than in UWB by about 4.6% on average (ranging from 5% to 13%). Large average differences of G/A breast models with TG43 (17% and 26% in UGAB and NUGAB, respectively) show that the effect of the chemical composition dominates the effect of the density on dose distributions. D(90(w,m)) is 12% larger in SBT than in TG43 when averaged. These differences can be as low as 4% or as high as 20% when the individual patients are considered. The high sensitivity of dosimetry on the modeling scheme argues in favor of an agreement on a standard tissue modeling approach to be used in low energy breast brachytherapy. SBT appears to generate the most geometrically reliable breast tissue models in this

  1. Synthesis of phosphosilicate matrix for application to brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy with beta sources can be useful for in situ radiotherapy of cancers where tiny radioactive seeds are injected directly into the tumor. Phosphorus 31P can be activated to b-emitter 32P by neutron activation with a half-life of 14.3 days. In this work, phosphosilicate matrices were synthesized through sol-gel process by hydrolysis and condensation of the tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) under two different conditions of synthesis. In both conditions the phosphoric acid and drying control chemical additives (DCCA's) were the same. Three drying control chemical additives were utilized: propylene carbonate, N,N-dimethylformamide and ethylene glycol. The casting solutions were prepared with phosphorus content of 3.2 wt.% and xerogels were thermally treated at 900 deg C. Different microstructures were observed under different conditions of synthesis. The microstructures of phosphosilicate matrices obtained with ethylene glycol and without DCCA's have shown the presence of a globular structure regions with large amount of phosphorous. (author)

  2. Evaluating the cost of therapy for restenosis: considerations for brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, W S

    1996-11-01

    Costs have become increasingly important in medicine in recent years as demand for services has outstripped readily available resources. Clinical microeconomics offers an approach to understanding cost and outcomes in an environment of economic scarcity. In this article the types of costs and methods for determining cost are presented. In addition, methods for assessing outcome and outcome in relation to cost are developed. Restenosis after coronary angioplasty is a prime example of a clinical problem requiring economic evaluation. This is because it results in little serious morbidity except for recurrent chest pain, but it has serious economic consequences which occur some time after the original angioplasty. This makes the economic assessment of restenosis complicated. The application of health care microeconomic principles to brachytherapy for restenosis in the coronary arteries is presented. PMID:8960526

  3. Evaluating the cost of therapy for restenosis: considerations for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costs have become increasingly important in medicine in recent years as demand for services has outstripped readily available resources. Clinical microeconomics offers an approach to understanding cost and outcomes in an environment of economic scarcity. In this article the types of costs and methods for determining cost are presented. In addition, methods for assessing outcome and outcome in relation to cost are developed. Restenosis after coronary angioplasty is a prime example of a clinical problem requiring economic evaluation. This is because it results in little serious morbidity except for recurrent chest pain, but it has serious economic consequences which occur some time after the original angioplasty. This makes the economic assessment of restenosis complicated. The application of health care microeconomic principles to brachytherapy for restenosis in the coronary arteries is presented

  4. Design and implementation of an intravascular brachytherapy installation in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intravascular Brachytherapy (IVB) is a very promising technique for reducing restenosis rates. However, neither the exact absolute dose needed nor the optimal spatial and temporal distribution of dose inside the vessel wall for a successful treatment, nor the physical dosimetry of the various radioactive sources and devices for dose delivery, are well known. In this paper, an overview will be given of the design strategy, the dosimetric and radiation protection-related problems that we have met during the implementation of this technique at San Carlos hospital, adopted or foreseen solutions, and future research fields that we intend to carry out in order to reduce uncertainties and to achieve a deeper knowledge of the parameters that have an influence on the treatment. (author)

  5. Cs-137 brachytherapy sources calibration with well chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the procedures and actions developed for the identification and reference air kerma rate (Sk) verification of Cs-137 sources used in gynecological brachytherapy practices. Following the IAEA TECDOC 1151 recommendations, the first stage consisted in designing the documentation required for the inventory and shipping registry of sources, along with the digital spreadsheets for calculating the decay and Sk of the sources at the moment of implantation. As a second stage, the Sk of sources was measured, following the low dose rate sources protocol advise, with a Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber calibrated at the University of Wisconsin SSDL. The documentation generated through this procedure allows identify each source clearly and uni-vocally. No significant differences were found between the Sk values obtained from the well chamber calibration procedure and those reported by the manufacturer in the corresponding certificates. The highest percent difference found was 2.3%. (author)

  6. Radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista Nogueira, Luciana, E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Propedeutica Complementar, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Pampulha 31270901, BH/MG (Brazil); Passos Ribeiro de Campos, Tarcisio, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Pampulha 31270901, BH/MG (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    In the present study, the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was investigated for future applications in brachytherapy. The main goal was to determine the radiological viability of ceramic and polymeric devices in vitro by performing simple radiological diagnostic methods such as conventional X-ray analysis and mammography due to its easy access to the population. The radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was determined using conventional X-ray, mammography and CT analysis. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The barium incorporation in the seed improves the radiological contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiological monitoring shows the position, orientation and degradation of devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple radiological methods such as X-ray and mammography were used for radiological monitoring.

  7. Multidisciplinary treatment for advanced and recurrent breast cancer including brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Ohno, Tatsuya (Tochigi Cancer Center, Utsunomiya (Japan). Hospital); Takizawa, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Egawa, Sunao; Ogino, Takashi

    1994-06-01

    Between 1986 and 1992, 10 patients (12 lesions) of advanced breast cancer were treated with multidisciplinary treatment including brachytherapy. The lesions treated included 5 primary breast tumors, 3 metastatic lesions in the contra lateral breast, 2 recurrences after external beam irradiation, 1 metastasis to the axillary lymph node and 1 metastasis to the upper arm skin. The interstitial irradiation techniques used were [sup 192]Ir low dose-rate irradiation for 5 lesions and high dose-rate for 7 lesions (including 3 with mould irradiation). External hyperthermia as performed for 6 lesions and interstitial hyperthermia were performed for 4 lesions. The local response was CR for 3 lesions, PRa for 8 lesions, PRb for 1 lesion with the local response rate being 100%. Excellent local control could be achieved by combination external and interstitial irradiation, indicating that radiotherapy is definitely useful for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author).

  8. A new human eye model for ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work proposes a new mathematical eye model for ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry. This new model includes detailed description of internal structures that were not treated in previous works, allowing dose determination in different regions of the eye for a more adequate clinical analysis. Dose calculations were determined with the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo particle transport code running n parallel environment using PVM. The Amersham CKA4 ophthalmic applicator has been chosen and the depth dose distribution has been determined and compared to those provide by the manufacturer. The results have shown excellent agreement. Besides, absorbed dose values due to both 125I seeds and 60Co plaques were obtained for each one of the different structures which compose the eye model and can give relevant information in eventual clinical analyses. (authors)

  9. Dosimetry of the 198Au Source used in Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauffy, L; Braby, L; Berner, B

    2004-05-18

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report, AAPM TG-43, provides an analytical model and a dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy dose calculations, as well as documentation and results for some sealed sources. The radionuclide {sup 198}Au (T{sub 1/2} = 2.70 days, E{gamma} = 412 keV) has been used in the form of seeds for brachytherapy treatments including brain, eye, and prostate tumors. However, the TG-43 report has no data for {sup 198}Au seeds, and none have previously been obtained. For that reason, and because of the conversion of most treatment planning systems to TG-43 based methods, both Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP 4C) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used in this work to determine these data. The geometric variation in dose is measured using an array of TLDs in a solid water phantom, and the seed activity is determined using both a well ion chamber and a High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe). The results for air kerma strength, S{sub k}, per unit apparent activity, are 2.06 (MCNP) and 2.09 (measured) U mCi{sup -1}. The former is identical to what was published in 1991 in the AAPM Task Group 32 report. The dose rate constant results, {Lambda}, are 1.12 (MCNP) and 1.10 (measured), cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The radial dose function, g(r), anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and anisotropy factor, {psi}{sub an}(r), are given. The anisotropy constant values are 0.973 (MCNP) and 0.994 (measured) and are consistent with both source geometry and the emitted photon energy.

  10. A Monte Carlo investigation of lung brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-125 (125I) and Caesium-131 (131Cs) brachytherapy have been used in conjunction with sublobar resection to reduce the local recurrence of stage I non-small cell lung cancer compared with resection alone. Treatment planning for this procedure is typically performed using only a seed activity nomogram or look-up table to determine seed strand spacing for the implanted mesh. Since the post-implant seed geometry is difficult to predict, the nomogram is calculated using the TG-43 formalism for seeds in a planar geometry. In this work, the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to recalculate nomograms using a variety of tissue models for 125I and 131Cs seeds. Calculated prescription doses are compared to those calculated using TG-43. Additionally, patient CT and contour data are used to generate virtual implants to study the effects that post-implant deformation and patient-specific tissue heterogeneity have on perturbing nomogram-derived dose distributions. Differences of up to 25% in calculated prescription dose are found between TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations with the TG-43 formalism underestimating prescription doses in general. Differences between the TG-43 formalism and Monte Carlo calculated prescription doses are greater for 125I than for 131Cs seeds. Dose distributions are found to change significantly based on implant deformation and tissues surrounding implants for patient-specific virtual implants. Results suggest that accounting for seed grid deformation and the effects of non-water media, at least approximately, are likely required to reliably predict dose distributions in lung brachytherapy patients. (paper)

  11. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  12. Brachytherapy as sole treatment modality in initial cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate brachytherapy as the only treatment modality in inoperable early cervix carcinoma patients (carcinoma in situ, IA and IBocc). In a retrospective analysis 36 patients were treated with intracavitary irradiation between 1984 and 1988 in the Radiotherapy Department of the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases. Distribution by stage was; carcinoma in situ: one patient (2,47%), IA: six patients (16,6%), IBooc: twenty-nine patients (80,7%). Histology revealed epidermoid carcinoma in all cases. Mean age 55 years (range: 32-78). Treatment consisted in: two intracavitary applications of Radium, for 120 hours each, with a month interval, in 30 patients (carcinoma in situ: one, IA: four, IBocc: twenty-five patients), two applications of 72 hours each, with 15 days interval in four patients (IA: one, IBocc: 3) and one single intracavitary radium application in two patients (IA and IBocc). Local control was complete in all carcinoma in situ and IA patients. Only 1 of 29 patients with IBocc stage failed to respond, in spite of having received two applications, this shows that local response is independent of the number of insertions. Incidence of complications was low, and resolved with medical treatment. One patient had rectal adenocarcinoma 3 years after treatment -it was considered as radio induced neoplasm, since time of appearance was more than two years and localization was within irradiated area. Two patients died form intercurrent diseases, one (IBocc) from persistent diseases. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Three years survival was: 100% for carcinoma in situ and IA 86,2% for IBocc. Five years survival was 80% for IA and IBocc. Brachytherapy as unique modality of treatment is highly effective in initial cervix carcinoma stages. (author). 41 refs., 14 tabs., 2 figs., 1 ill

  13. CT use for nasopharingeal molds realization in endocavitary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present the following procedure for the making of individual molds with dental silicone for endocavitary brachytherapy of nasopharingeal cancer aided by CT scan. Procedure: Head immobilization during the realization of nasopharynx CT. Planification of treatment using these CT images, to determine the optimum position of radioactive sources. Printing on paper CT images with the nasopharynx contoured walls and the radioactive sources position. Realization of the mold in plastiline with the aid of the cuts of printer paper cut out with the nasopharynx form. Obtaining of the negative of the mold of plastiline by means of the use of alginate. Placement of two number 20 rectal rigid catheters with metal malleable bars inside them, in order to give them an adequate form in relation to the previous carried out planning. Filling in of alginato negative, where rectal catheters were placed, with Provil MCD Bayer Dental, a silicone based material for precision impression. We recommend to crossing the catheters' end with a number 2 silk thread to secure the catheter. An end of the silk thread is left outside the mold in order to help the extraction at the end of application. We advise to carry out a neuroleptic anaesthesia for its insertion, for the purpose of achieving a soft palate suitable relaxation. It makes the insertion easier. Repeat CT with the mold and phantoms in position to know a definitive dose distribution calculation. Conclusion: This method avoids the necessity of general anaesthesia in the realization of individual molds of nasopharyx for endocavitary brachytherapy and it improves the implant dosimetry

  14. Deterministic calculations of radiation doses from brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is used for treating certain types of cancer by inserting radioactive sources into tumours. CDTN/CNEN is developing brachytherapy seeds to be used mainly in prostate cancer treatment. Dose calculations play a very significant role in the characterization of the developed seeds. The current state-of-the-art of computation dosimetry relies on Monte Carlo methods using, for instance, MCNP codes. However, deterministic calculations have some advantages, as, for example, short computer time to find solutions. This paper presents a software developed to calculate doses in a two-dimensional space surrounding the seed, using a deterministic algorithm. The analysed seeds consist of capsules similar to IMC6711 (OncoSeed), that are commercially available. The exposure rates and absorbed doses are computed using the Sievert integral and the Meisberger third order polynomial, respectively. The software also allows the isodose visualization at the surface plan. The user can choose between four different radionuclides (192Ir, 198Au, 137Cs and 60Co). He also have to enter as input data: the exposure rate constant; the source activity; the active length of the source; the number of segments in which the source will be divided; the total source length; the source diameter; and the actual and effective source thickness. The computed results were benchmarked against results from literature and developed software will be used to support the characterization process of the source that is being developed at CDTN. The software was implemented using Borland Delphi in Windows environment and is an alternative to Monte Carlo based codes. (author)

  15. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of 192Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results indicate an

  16. Bile duct sensitivity to high-dose-rate afterloading irradiation with iridium 192. Experimental investigations in pigs. Strahlenempfindlichkeit des gesunden Gallengangs bei High-dose-rate-Afterloadingbestrahlung mit Iridium 192. Experimentelle Untersuchungen am Schwein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambs, H.J. (Abt. Roentgendiagnostik und Roentgen- und Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany) Pathologisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Germany) Tierhygienisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Germany)); Freund, U. (Abt. Roentgendiagnostik und Roentgen- und Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany) Pathologisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Germany) Tierhygienisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Germany)); Bruggmoser, G. (Abt. Roentgendiagnostik und Roentgen- und Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany) Pathologisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Germany) Tierhygienisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Germany)); Laaff, H. (Abt. Roentgendiagnostik und Roentgen- und Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany) Pathologisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Germany) Tierhygienisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Germany)); Kluger, U.W. (Abt. Roentgendiagnostik und Roentgen- und Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany) Pathologisches Inst., Freiburg Univ. (Ger

    1993-12-01

    This animal study was designed to assess the tolerance of the normal bile duct to a single intraluminal high-dose-rate afterloading irradiation. This information is essential for treatment recommendations in irradiation therapy of malignant bile duct stenoses. In 16 pigs bile duct catheters were inserted surgically. Over these devices single intraductal doses of 7.5 Gy and 15 Gy were applied using an iridium-192 source. After a period of two to three months the bile ducts and the surrounding structures were investigated by means of cholangiography, angiography, and macropathological and histological investigations. A single intraductal dose of 7.5 Gy leads to a slightly scarred shrinkage of the bile duct with sclerosis and obliteration of the capillary vessels. Vasculitis and necrosis of the bile duct wall are still evident three months after irradiation. A single dose of 15 Gy leads to severe lesions with widespread necroses of the bile duct wall which tend to bleed, and result in a high degree of shrinkage of the bile duct. The radiation damage is most prevalent near the papilla and in the narrow segments near the liver. Single intraluminal high-dose-rate afterloading doses of 7.5 and 15 Gy cause significant lesions and complications at the bile ducts. As the intact bile duct is the Achilles heel of intraductal therapy, considerably lower single doses are recommended for a fractioned treatment. (orig.)

  17. Radiation risk to patient and intervention personell from intracoronary brachytherapy; Die Dosisbelastung von Patienten und Interventionspersonal in der intravaskulaeren Brachytherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hefner, A. [Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf (Austria); Kirisits, C.; Georg, D.; Poetter, R. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Strahlenbiologie, Wien (Austria); Aiginger, H. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Wien (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    During the last years coronary brachytherapy has been extensively explored as a new treatment to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary interventions. While clinical and physical aspects of such treatments are addressed in literature, there is little information available on radiation protection and radiation safety aspects. In this paper we estimate the radiation risk for the patient using analytical methods and Monte Carlo calculations for three delivering systems currently used in clinics. Additionally, radiation risk to personell involved in such treatments is investigated. For gamma emitting sources the radiation exposure to patients is in the order of magnitude of the exposure due to diagnostic angiography. Doses to organs at risk when applying beta emitting sources are significantly lower. Measured doses for intervention personell are consistent with the estimated whole body dose. They are smaller than 7,5 {mu} {mu}Sv per intervention, which is a dose much less than 0,1 permille of the annual radiation workers maximum permissible dose (MPD) recommended by EC regulations. (orig.) [German] Intrakoronaere Brachytherapie ist in den letzten Jahren zu einer vielversprechenden Methode der Strahlenbehandlung geworden, um die Rate an Wiederverschluessen von Gefaessen nach revaskularisierenden Eingriffen zu verringern. Waehrend ueber die klinischen Behandlungsmethoden ausreichend Literatur vorhanden ist, stehen auf dem Gebiete des Strahlenschutzes fast keine Veroeffentlichungen zur Verfuegung. In dieser Veroeffentlichung gehen wir insbesondere auf die Abschaetzung des Strahlenrisikos des Patienten durch analytische Methoden und Monte Carlo-Rechnung fuer die drei derzeit in den Kliniken verwendeten Systeme ein. Ausserdem geben wir eine Abschaetzung des Strahlenrisikos des mit der Behandlung betrauten Personals. Die Strahlenbelastung des Patienten mit Systemen mit Gammastrahlern lieht in der Groessenordnung der Dosisbelastung bei der diagnostischen Angiographie

  18. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 11: Estimation of Bladder-Wall Cumulative Dose in Multi-Fraction Image-Based Gynaecological Brachytherapy Using Deformable Point Set Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakariaee, R [Physics Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Brown, C J; Hamarneh, G [School of Computing Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Parsons, C A; Spadinger, I [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetric parameters based on dose-volume histograms (DVH) of contoured structures are routinely used to evaluate dose delivered to target structures and organs at risk. However, the DVH provides no information on the spatial distribution of the dose in situations of repeated fractions with changes in organ shape or size. The aim of this research was to develop methods to more accurately determine geometrically localized, cumulative dose to the bladder wall in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The CT scans and treatment plans of 20 cervical cancer patients were used. Each patient was treated with five high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy fractions of 600cGy prescribed dose. The bladder inner and outer surfaces were delineated using MIM Maestro software (MIM Software Inc.) and were imported into MATLAB (MathWorks) as 3-dimensional point clouds constituting the “bladder wall”. A point-set registration toolbox for MATLAB, Coherent Point Drift (CPD), was used to non-rigidly transform the bladder-wall points from four of the fractions to the coordinate system of the remaining (reference) fraction, which was chosen to be the emptiest bladder for each patient. The doses were accumulated on the reference fraction and new cumulative dosimetric parameters were calculated. The LENT-SOMA toxicity scores of these patients were studied against the cumulative dose parameters. Based on this study, there was no significant correlation between the toxicity scores and the determined cumulative dose parameters.

  19. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 11: Estimation of Bladder-Wall Cumulative Dose in Multi-Fraction Image-Based Gynaecological Brachytherapy Using Deformable Point Set Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetric parameters based on dose-volume histograms (DVH) of contoured structures are routinely used to evaluate dose delivered to target structures and organs at risk. However, the DVH provides no information on the spatial distribution of the dose in situations of repeated fractions with changes in organ shape or size. The aim of this research was to develop methods to more accurately determine geometrically localized, cumulative dose to the bladder wall in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The CT scans and treatment plans of 20 cervical cancer patients were used. Each patient was treated with five high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy fractions of 600cGy prescribed dose. The bladder inner and outer surfaces were delineated using MIM Maestro software (MIM Software Inc.) and were imported into MATLAB (MathWorks) as 3-dimensional point clouds constituting the “bladder wall”. A point-set registration toolbox for MATLAB, Coherent Point Drift (CPD), was used to non-rigidly transform the bladder-wall points from four of the fractions to the coordinate system of the remaining (reference) fraction, which was chosen to be the emptiest bladder for each patient. The doses were accumulated on the reference fraction and new cumulative dosimetric parameters were calculated. The LENT-SOMA toxicity scores of these patients were studied against the cumulative dose parameters. Based on this study, there was no significant correlation between the toxicity scores and the determined cumulative dose parameters

  20. Calculations radiobiological using the quadratic lineal model in the use of the medium dose rate absorbed in brachytherapy. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations with the quadratic lineal model for medium rate using the equation dose-effect. Several calculations for system of low dose rate brachytherapy plus teletherapy, calculations for brachytherapy with medium dose rate together with teletherapy, dose for fraction and the one numbers of fractions in medium rate

  1. Towards real-time 3D ultrasound planning and personalized 3D printing for breast HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different end-to-end procedures were tested for real-time planning in breast HDR brachytherapy treatment. Both methods are using a 3D ultrasound (3DUS) system and a freehand catheter optimization algorithm. They were found fast and efficient. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept approach for personalized real-time guidance and planning to breast HDR brachytherapy treatments

  2. Size Effects of Gold and Iron Nanoparticles on Radiation Dose Enhancement in Brachytherapy and Teletherapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Ollah Ezzati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to calculate dose enhancement factor (DEF for gold (Au and iron (Fe nanoparticles (NPs in brachytherapy and teletherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC method. Materials and Methods In this study, a new algorithm was introduced to calculate dose enhancement by AuNPs and FeNPs for Iridium-192 (Ir-192 brachytherapy and Cobalt-60 (Co-60 teletherapy sources, using the MC method. In this algorithm, the semi-random distribution of NPs was used instead of the regular distribution. Diameters were assumed to be 15, 30, and 100 nm in brachytherapy and 15 and 30 nm in teletherapy. Monte Carlo MCNP4C code was used for simulations, and NP density values were 0.107 mg/ml and 0.112 mg/ml in brachytherapy and tele