WorldWideScience

Sample records for after-hours family medicine

  1. Effect of a reorganized after-hours family practice service on frequent attenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    1999-01-01

    of this reorganization on the use of services by frequent attenders (FAs). METHODS: From 1990 to 1994, methods of contact and annual costs per attender were analyzed in an ecological time-trend study based on aggregated administrative data collected from the database of the Public Health Insurance, Aarhus County......, Denmark (600,000 inhabitants). The study only included attenders ages 18 and over. FAs were defined as the group that, within each calendar year (12 months), had 4 or more contacts with the after-hours family practice service. RESULTS: FAs made up 9.5% of the attenders and accounted for more than 40......% of the contacts and the aggregate costs. The effect of the reorganization was a 12% decrease in the number of attenders, a 16% decrease in the number of contacts, and a 29% decrease in the costs. Reorganization had a significantly bigger effect on FA attendance than on non-FA attendance, and more than half...

  2. The family medicine cabinet *

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, G. P. L.

    1982-01-01

    Medicine selection and storage was examined in 130 families. Over 50 per cent were found to be less than adequate. Health education advice helped half the inadequate group to change to adequate. Age and social class were not related to hoarding of prescribed drugs, to initial standards of storage or selection, nor to the likelihood of a response to advice. Those who hoarded medicines but stored them well were highly likely to change. Those who stored and selected poorly were unlikely to make ...

  3. Family medicine in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alemañy Pérez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, the Cuban health system has been developing a roster of programs to ensure its social mission: to achieve a health status of the population consistent with the priority established by the highest authorities of the country. In response to the call of the Commander in Chief, Fidel Castro Ruz, to create a different doctor and a new specialist that would take into account the needs of the Cuban population; the family doctor model was implemented. Thus, in the decade of the eighties, the “Family Doctor and Nurse Working Program” was established, together with the corresponding polyclinic and hospital. At the same time, comprehensive general medicine as a medical specialty was created to serve the primary health care services. Both actions constituted a vital component in the development of Cuban public health services in recent decades. This article presents an account of the unique characteristics of these processes, while highlighting their impact on health indicators, as well as the participation of this specialty in the training of human resources for the health system.

  4. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  5. Family Medicine: A Resident's Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Bipin

    2012-01-01

    Though family medicine has existed as a qualification for more than a decade in India, structured residency based training is a recent phenomenon. A growing number of young physicians are opting for this challenging and exciting new speciality as post graduate qualification through NBE (National Board of Examination) affiliated three year DNB (Diplomate of National Board) training program. MD family medicine is also in offing as Medical Council of India (MCI) has recently notified curriculum ...

  6. Teaching evidence based medicine in family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorka Vrdoljak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of evidence based medicine (EBM as the integrationof clinical expertise, patient values and the best evidence was introduced by David Sackett in the 1980’s. Scientific literature in medicine is often marked by expansion, acummulation and quick expiration. Reading all important articles to keep in touch with relevant information is impossible. Finding the best evidence that answers a clinical question in general practice (GP in a short time is not easy. Five useful steps are described –represented by the acronym “5A+E”: assess, ask, acquire, appraise, apply and evaluate.The habit of conducting an evidence search “on the spot’’ is proposed. Although students of medicine at University of Split School of Medicine are taught EBM from the first day of their study and in all courses, their experience of evidence-searching and critical appraisal of the evidence, in real time with real patient is inadequate. Teaching the final-year students the practical use of EBM in a GP’s office is different and can have an important role in their professional development. It can positively impact on quality of their future work in family practice (or some other medical specialty by acquiring this habit of constant evidence-checking to ensure that best practice becomes a mechanism for life-long learning. Conclusion. EBM is a foundation stone of every branch of medicine and important part of Family Medicine as scientific and professional discipline. To have an EB answer resulting from GP’s everyday work is becoming a part of everyday practice.

  7. Rural family medicine training in Canada.

    OpenAIRE

    Rourke, J. T.; Rourke, L. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the status of postgraduate family medicine training that occurs in rural family practice settings in Canada and to identify problems and how they are addressed. DESIGN: A retrospective questionnaire sent to all 18 Canadian family medicine training programs followed by a focus group discussion of results. SETTING: Canadian university family medicine training programs. PARTICIPANTS: Chairs or program directors of all 18 Canadian family medicine training programs and people...

  8. Family Medicine: Bridge to Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Reflecting on the suicide of a close friend, this essay explores what comprises, and inspires a will to live, and how those in Family Medicine can address suicide risk even in the face of debilitating or terminal illness. Research indicates that the will to live is a measurable indicator of general well-being, distinct from depression, and an important predictor of a person's motivation to "hold on to life". As such, understanding what is at the heart of a desire to live should alter clinical practice. This essay offers ideas for ways in which to create bridges for patients that could help sustain life.

  9. Family medicine 360°: Global exchanges in family medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Ana N.; Rigon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The global world of the 21st century has created communities and cultures that are interconnected, thanks to the development both in the field of transportation and technology. In this global intercultural community, future physicians, and even more so future general practitioners (GPs)/family physicians (FPs), need to be clinically competent and culturally sensitive and flexible in order to adapt to different social settings while delivering holistic care in multiethnic teams and environments with professionalism. As such, exchange programs are exceptional opportunities for international collaboration and the development of personal and professional competencies of these health care professionals. Materials and Methods: This article presents a review of the literature on the value of exchanges as well as the results of exchange programs with educational content that are aimed at junior GPs/FPs. Results: Exchange programs have been growing in popularity, especially among junior GPs/FPs. Since its launch in 2013, The “Family Medicine 360° (FM360°) program has been receiving up to 163 inquires till date, promoting global cooperation among the World Organization of family Doctors (WONCA)'s Young Doctors’ Movementd (YDMs). Conclusions: By participating in an exchange program, future GPs/FPs are given the chance to experience intercultural communication and peer collaboration. They also develop personal and professional skills and thus, actively contribute to the growth and development of primary care all over the world. PMID:26288763

  10. Scaling up Family Medicine in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocent K. Besigye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 It is evident that politicians, health managers and academics are realising the potential contribution of Family Medicine to health systems in sub-Saharan Africa. The challenge is in training institutions to recruit and train enough Family Physicians in order to meet expectations. The 3rd Family Medicine Conference in Uganda, held in October 2013, explored innovative ways of scaling up Family Medicine training and practice in Uganda.

  11. Statistical Trends in Family Medicine Journals

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Hae-Jin; Park, Yong-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    Background This study proposed a desirable direction for the future development of the Korean Journal of Family Medicine (KJFM) by comparing with the overseas SCI journals, Family Medicine (FM) and The Journal of Family Practice (JFP) based on the statistical viewpoints. Methods All of the original articles published in KJFM from January 1981 to June 2011, FM from January 1998 to June 2011, and JFP from January 1978 to June 2011, were reviewed and compared in terms of content, data size, rese...

  12. What shall we do for family medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainge Biggs, John Sydney

    2016-06-01

    In November 2014 the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council directed that Family Medicine should be taught to final year medical students. Family Medicine will be strengthened as a result. This paper considers some implications of the decision, identifying first the need for more information on primary care services, especially in the private sector, to enable planning of the curriculum and attachments to public and private units. The challenges to medical colleges in providing what will be largely experiential learning are described and the importance of training practitioners is emphasised. The urgent need to overcome the virtual absence in Pakistan of postgraduate training in Family Medicine described, and the quality standards of primary care are explored and the need for attention in the face of student learning is described. Recommendations are offered, including an advisory board on Family Medicine to audit its introduction and performance. PMID:27339579

  13. Generalism: The Discipline of Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Peter J.

    1981-01-01

    The term ‘discipline’, as applied to family medicine, is widely used, yet poorly understood. The dictionary definitions of discipline as “a branch of knowledge or learning; training that develops self-control, character, or orderliness and efficiency” are related in this article to the personal discipline of family physicians. This discipline requires a commitment to whole person medicine, learning and growth; it is both efficient and humane.

  14. Comparison of Research Trends in Korean and International Family Medicine in Journals of Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Jin-Kyung; Lee, Jungun; Lee, Dong Ryul

    2014-01-01

    Background Research is important for the development of family medicine as a professional field in primary care. The aim of this study was to suggest directions for the development of family medicine research by analyzing research trends in original papers published in the Korean Journal of Family Medicine (KJFM) and international journals. Methods We investigated original research papers published in KJFM and 4 international journals from August 2009 to July 2010. Analysis was conducted acco...

  15. After-Hours Work Email No Friend of The Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... balance out of kilter by blurring boundaries between business time and personal time. In 2014, researchers at ... men and women, he said. Christina Maslach, a psychology professor emerita at the University of California, Berkeley, ...

  16. Access to palliative medicine training for Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneschuk, D; Bruera, E

    1998-01-01

    The authors conducted a nine-item mail questionnaire of the 16 Canadian family medicine teaching programme directors to determine the accessibility and operation of palliative care education for their respective family medicine residents. All 16 faculties of medicine responded (100%). The survey revealed that while all universities offer elective time in palliative care only five out of 16 (31%) have a mandatory rotation. The median durations of the mandatory and elective rotations are limited to two and three-and-a-half weeks, respectively. The majority of the universities offer formal lectures in palliative care (12/16, 75%) and educational reading material (13/16, 81%), with the main format in 14/16 (87%) of the sites being case-based learning. The two most common sites for teaching to occur for the residents are the community/outpatient environment and an acute palliative care unit. Fifty-six per cent (9/16) of the universities have designated faculty positions for palliative medicine with a median number of two positions per site. Only one centre offers a specific palliative medicine examination during the rotation. Feedback from the residents regarding their respective palliative medicine programmes were positive overall. Findings from our survey indicate an ongoing need for improved education in palliative medicine at the postgraduate level. PMID:9616456

  17. Family and General Medicine in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Costa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available General and Family Medicine in Portugal as a medical specialty has evolved in the past few decades much the same way as in other European countries. This article aims to describe the various changes that have taken place over the years, in terms of career reform and medical training, which together have brought about the present model for General and Family Medicine training.  It succinctly delineates the stages in training, including the main objectives at each step, the difficulties and the many challenges encountered along the way, as well as the methods of evaluation during the internship. The main objective of this article is to inform how training in family medicine is conducted and how one can embark on this career path in Portugal. 

  18. Effective teaching behaviours of rural family medicine preceptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Goertzen, J.; Stewart, M; Weston, W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe effective teaching behaviours of rural family medicine preceptors. DESIGN: Descriptive qualitative study using the critical incident technique. SETTING: Rural Manitoba community practices affiliated with the University of Manitoba's 8-week family medicine/community medicine rotation (clinical clerkship). PARTICIPANTS: All family medicine preceptors and fourth-year medical students involved in two family medicine rotations from Mar. 11 to June 14, 1991. During the first ...

  19. Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Robin O.

    2012-01-01

    According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

  20. [General and family medicine: a gratifying choice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Dina

    2006-01-01

    The problematic discussion of speciality choice have been largely studied in other countries, where we can see the same setting of the announced crises of Primary Care and the so called decline of Family Medicine. In Portugal, many authors have shown an increasing concern in the way of getting more attention by the political policies/entities for the reduction of the number of family doctors. The decline of the interest of the medical students for Family Medicine is a complex and multifactorial problem that exists at international level, as in other generalist specialities, without technical procedures and technological investment. The importance of human values in medical education, by the new challenges that we have in the XXI century medicine, puts us the question about the students we are graduating today in our schools. The educational and health system reform, and the medical schools support, may influence the choices of medical graduates and motivate them for this speciality, developing a more real and more close medical care that responds to the interests and the needs of the population. PMID:17187715

  1. Length of Training Debate in Family Medicine: Idealism Versus Realism?

    OpenAIRE

    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the gr...

  2. Family medicine as a model of transition from academic medicine to academic health care: Estonia's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the development of academic family medicine in an environment of traditional academic medicine at the Tartu University, Estonia. The introduction of university family medicine teachers to everyday practice and practitioners to academic teaching and research helps bridge the gap between theory and practice, and it shows changed approach to academic medicine. PMID:15495281

  3. Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Jeffrey A; Stearns, Marjorie A; Paulman, Paul M; Chessman, Alexander W; Davis, Ardis K; Sherwood, Roger A; Sheets, Kent J; Steele, David J; Matson, Christine C

    2007-01-01

    Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies were adopted as the theoretical framework for this project. The FMCR provides materials for the preclerkship years, the third-year family medicine clerkship, the postclerkship year, and faculty development, as well as guidance for integrating topics of special interest to the federal government (such as, geriatrics, Healthy People 2010, genetics, informatics) into a 4-year continuum of medical education. There are challenges inherent in implementing each component of the FMCR. For example, can the ACGME competency-based approach be adapted to undergraduate medical education? Can the densely packed preclerkship years be adapted to include more focused effort on developing these competencies, and whose job is it anyway? What is "core" to being a competent clinician, and what information can be obtained when needed from medical informatics sources? Will family medicine educators embrace the FMCR recommendations for their third-year clerkships? Will exit assessment of the competency levels of graduating medical students be achieved, and can it make them more capable residents? Can faculty in different clinical and educational settings integrate the teaching of "how to learn" into their repertoire? How will faculty development innovation progress in a time of increasing emphasis on clinical productivity? Developing a common language and adoption of core competencies for all levels of medical education is imperative in a society that is focusing on improving health care quality and outcomes. The FMCR Project

  4. Length of training debate in family medicine: idealism versus realism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-06-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by "decompressing" the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates. PMID:24404258

  5. Revolutionary leadership and family medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saultz, John W

    2008-04-01

    Reform of the payment and delivery systems in American health care is now being discussed at the highest levels of business and government. Family medicine educators, researchers, and program leaders have an opportunity to provide substantial leadership to this process in their own communities and nationally. To do so, they must reconsider the assumptions made in creating our current systems of practice and education, and this will require new leadership skills that focus on innovation and adaptability. It will also require a more aggressive willingness to test new ideas and a new scientific method to prove or disprove their value. This essay outlines essential elements of such leadership for those responsible for the education of future generations of family physicians. PMID:18382841

  6. Family Medicine Residency Training: Where, How Much, How and When?

    OpenAIRE

    İsmail Hamdi Kara; Tolga Günvar; Didem Sunay3; Okay Başak4

    2016-01-01

    In this article, it will be discussed of the setting and the importance of the family medicine residency training in field related workshop framework that was made in the WONCA Europe Conference 2015. Family medicine residency training consists of three basic pillars: Rotations in hospital and other health care facilities, educational activities in family medicine departments and training in primary care settings. Between 1985 and 2011, formal residency training was consisted only of hospi...

  7. Help is just a phone call away: after-hours support for palliative care patients wishing to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird-Bower, Debbie; Roach, Julie; Andrews, Morven; Onslow, Fiona; Curnin, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour support for palliative patients is the gold standard of health care in Australia. However, in the state of Tasmania after-hours telephone support was spatially fragmented and inequitable. In 2014, hospice@HOME, a pilot programme introduced in Tasmania in that year, implemented a state-wide after-hours palliative care support service--1800HOSPICE--offering 24-hour support, 7 days a week for palliative patients, caregivers and the public. Six months of after-hours call logs in combination with additional patient data, were analysed to evaluate the use and wider implications of a state-wide after-hours palliative care support number. Family and caregivers mainly used the after-hours support to request changes to support services (25.1%), report changes in patients' overall condition (23.6%) and request acute medical assistance (16.2%). Through the use of the after-hours services by all individuals involved in the care, end-of-life patients were able to reduce ambulance contact and emergency department admission, and thereby increase their likelihood of dying at home (for patients whose preference was to die at home). Overall, 24-hour palliative care telephone support was found to be a valuable tool for all individuals involved in the care of end-of-life patients.

  8. Final year medical students’ understanding of family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Petek Šter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice / Family Medicine (EURACT has developed an educational agenda, the key document for teaching family medicine in Europe. The aim of our study was to find out how final year medical students at the beginning of their family medicine clerkship understand the discipline of family medicine. Methods. The attitudes toward family medicine were paraphrased and developed into a 164-item questionnaire, which was administered to 335 final-year medical students at the beginning of their clerkship. Using combinatorial optimization with genetic algorithms we selected 30 items which yielded the highest Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient. Finally, we performed a factor analysis to find which dimensions of family medicine were recognised by the students and compared them with the domains defined in the EURACT definition. Results. The 30-item questionnaire had a Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient of 0.919. The differences between male and female students were not very significant (p=0.061. With the factor analysis we recognised seven factors, belonging to three out of six domains of the EURACT educational agenda: primary care management, personcenteredness and comprehensive approach. Conclusion. Final-year medical students at the beginning of their family medicine clerkship understand some of the dimensions of family medicine rather well, but they are not aware of some important competences of family doctors. There is a necessity to teach students about specific problem solving skills and the importance of balance between the health needs of an individual patient and the community.

  9. [Family medicine in Mexico: Present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rueda, Carlos E; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio; Ochoa-Díaz-López, Héctor; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; García-Peña, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the challenges and the future scenario of Family Medicine is a priority to address challenges such as the reduction of benefits granted by social security; to adapt their practice to the changing health profile; and to curb demand for specialized services and contain the high costs of care in the second and third level. The program is aimed at three professional roles: medical care, research, and education. It is imperative review these in the light of changing demographic conditions, the type of health needs arising from new social determinants, the public expectations for greater participation in their care, and the evolution of the health system itself with the advancement of technology and a variety of organizational options with frequently limited resources. For primary care, as the core of a health system that covers principles of equity, solidarity, universality, participation, decentralization, and intra- and inter-sectorial coordination, it is necessary to put at the center of the primary care team the family doctor and not an administrator, who plays an important role in supporting the care team, but can not take the lead.

  10. Undergraduate Courses in Family Medicine in the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands and the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan-Helge

    1993-01-01

    Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries......Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries...

  11. Quality Assessment of Family Medicine Teams Based on Accreditation Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Valjevac, Salih; Ridjanovic, Zoran; Masic, Izet

    2009-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED In order to speed up and simplify the self assessment and external assessment process, provide better overview and access to Accreditation Standards for Family Medicine Teams and better assessment documents archiving, Agency for Healthcare Quality and Accreditation in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (AKAZ) has developed self assessment and externals assessment software for family medicine teams. This article presents the development of standardized sof...

  12. Erasmus exchange in the field of family medicine in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica Rotar-Pavlič

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Erasmus exchange of students at the University of Ljubljana, Department of family medicine in the period from 2005 to 2010. The beginnings of an Erasmus exchange in the field of family medicine in Europe are described. Ljubljana Medical School has currently 60 bilateral agreements with universities or medical faculties in the EU and EFTA countries. Materials and methods. We collected data of all students who come from the foreign faculties to the Department of family medicine and those from Slovenia who went to study abroad. In addition to basic descriptive statistics, we used the elements of qualitative analysis, where we reviewed the reports of the Slovenian Erasmus students, who went on exchange in the field of family medicine. Results. Department of family medicine cooperated with 14 foreign medical schools since 2005. 42 Slovenian students went on academic exchange in the field of family medicine. 21 foreign students came to Department of family medicine in Ljubljana. Female students were more frequent in exchange compared with male students. The largest proportion of students went abroad in 2009. Most foreign students visited Department of Family medicine in Ljubljana in 2011. Reports of students show that they learned a lot. Students were able to compare the organization of health care in a foreign country and Slovenian health care system. Conclusion. Erasmus exchange has proven to be an important addition to the existing educational system. Students are acquainted with the progress of health care in Europe in this way. They are able to compare the benefits and disadvantages of foreign health care systems with home health care organization.

  13. State and prospects of introduction of family medicine in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salo, Anastasiya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Ukraine, implementation of family practice is declared to be a priority. Development of primary health care on the basis of family practice is defined by legislative acts. Nevertheless, family clinical practice is neglected. Funds are spent on expensive inpatient treatment, while cheap primary health care is forgotten. Hospitals and outpatient clinics, ambulance cars are used to provide everyday medical care. Approximately one third of hospital patients should get out-patient treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze the functioning of the national system of primary health care based on family medicine, to identify the main trends of its development and current problems.MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study is exploratory. Eight semi-structured interviews with family doctors from Kyiv city and Kyiv region were conducted with "snowball" sampling. The data was analyzed through qualitative content analysis of the content of the interviews.RESULTS: All respondents expressed a positive attitude to the implementation of family medicine. They emphasized that the development of family medicine is economically feasible and socially effective. Most respondents pointed out that not enough time is devoted to the training of family doctors. None of the respondents provides gynecological care and manages pregnancies. Family doctors are not interested in independent treatment of patients, taking responsibility for them, and thus expanding their skills and enriching their experience. All respondents stated that the current system of family practice financing and remuneration is not up-to-date and must be changed.CONCLUSION: The interviewed family practitioners believe that the implementation of family clinical practice in health care institutions is appropriate for improvements of the health care system. Meeting the task of family medicine development is possible, provided that the approach to financing of the sector, specialist training and

  14. Opinions of Primary Care Family Physicians About Family Medicine Speciality Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Sirri Keten

    2014-04-01

    Material and Method: A total of 170 family physicians working in Kahramanmaras were included in the study. After obtaining informed consent a questionnaire comprising questions regarding socio-demographic properties, conveying contracted family physicians as family medicine specialists and organization of the training program was applied to participants. Results: Among physicians participating in the study 130 (76.5% were male and 40 (23.5% were female, with a mean age of 40.7±7.1 (min = 26 years, max = 64 years. The mean duration of professional experience of physicians was 15.3±7.0 (min = 2 years, max = 40 years years. Of all, 91 (53.5% participants had already read the decree on family medicine specialist training program for contracted family physicians. A hundred and fifteen (67.6% family physicians supported that Family Medicine Specialty program should be taken part-time without interrupting routine medical tasks. Only 51 (30.0% participants stated the requirement of an entrance examination (TUS for family medicine specialty training. Conclusion: Family medicine specialty training program towards family physicians should be considered in the light of scientific criteria. In family medicine, an area exhibited a holistic approach to the patient; specialty training should be through residency training instead of an education program. For this purpose, family medicine departments in medical faculties should play an active role in this process. Additionally further rotations in needed branches should be implemented with a revision of area should be performed. In medicine practical training is of high importance and distant or part-time education is not appropriate, and specialist training shall be planned in accordance with the medical specialty training regulations. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 298-304

  15. Psychiatry Training in Canadian Family Medicine Residency Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Kates, Nick; Toews, John; Leichner, Pierre

    1985-01-01

    Family physicians may spend up to 50% of their time diagnosing and managing mental disorders and emotional problems, but this is not always reflected in the training they receive. This study of the teaching of psychiatry in the 16 family medicine residency programs in Canada showed that although the majority of program directors are reasonably satisfied with the current training, they see room for improvement—particularly in finding psychiatrists with a better understanding of family practice...

  16. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  17. Sexual Health Care in Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Gerald; Cohen, May

    1985-01-01

    Although patients frequently present with sexual concerns, family doctors generally do not handle them well. Sexual issues may present in many ways: as specific concerns; as a component of non-sexual complaints or as a factor in relationship or marital problems. The family doctor must include sexual enquiry and counselling as part of overall health care, and in the management of illnesses. In order to be effective counsellors, physicians must examine their own attitudes, and become knowledgea...

  18. Importance of international networking in academic family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalika Klemenc-Ketiš

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available European family medicine/general practice (FM/GP has travelled the long and successful journey of profiling the discipline and has produced valuable position papers on education and research. Nowadays, academic medicine is one of the pillars in the future development of FM/GP in Europe. A common European curriculum on undergraduate and postgraduate family medicine is needed. Also, a sound international platform of teaching institutions and/or teachers of family medicine would foster the further development of family medicine as an academic discipline. This would stimulate students and teachers to engage in international exchange to gain new knowledge and experiences, present their work and ideas abroad and prepare the conditions for further exchange of students and teachers. Conclusion. Established departments of FM/GP, led by a teacher who is a family physician/general practitioner, at each Medical School in Europe should provide students with knowledge and skills related to the core attributes of FM/GP. International exchanges of teachers and students should foster the development of a common curriculum on FM in Europe and foster improvement in the quality of FM education.

  19. Impact of telephone triage on emergency after hours GP Medicare usage: a time-series analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dunt, David; Wilson, Robert; Day, Susan E; Kelaher, Margaret; Gurrin, Lyle

    2007-01-01

    Background The Australian government sponsored trials aimed at addressing problems in after hours primary medical care service use in five different parts of the country with different after hours care problems. The study's objective was to determine in four of the five trials where telephone triage was the sole innovation, if there was a reduction in emergency GP after hours service utilization (GP first call-out) as measured in Medicare Benefits Schedule claim data. Monthly MBS claim data i...

  20. Five Weekend National Family Medicine Fellowship. Program for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Y; Batty, H; Rosser, W W

    1997-12-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSEDMany faculty development programs are thought time-consuming and inaccessible to academic family physicians or physicians wanting to move into academic positions. This is largely due to difficulty in leaving their practices for extended periods. Canadian family medicine needs trained leaders who can work in teams and are well grounded in the principles of their discipline as they relate to education, management, research, and policy making.OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAMTo develop a team of leaders in family medicine.MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAMThe Five Weekend National Family Medicine Fellowship Program focuses on the essentials of education, management, communication, critical appraisal skills, and the principles of family medicine to develop leadership and team-building skills for faculty and community-based family physicians entering academic careers. This unique 1-year program combines intensive weekend seminars with small-group projects between weekends. It emphasizes a broader set of skills than just teaching, has regional representation, and focuses on leadership and teamwork using a time-efficient format.CONCLUSIONThe program has graduated 34 Fellows over the last 3 years. More than 90% of the 35 projects developed through course work have been presented in national or provincial peer-reviewed settings. Quantitative ratings of program structure, course content, and course outcomes have been positive. PMID:9426934

  1. Quality of after-hours primary care in the Netherlands: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesen, P.H.J.; Smits, M.; Huibers, L.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Many Western countries are seeking an organizational model for after-hours primary care that is safe, efficient, and satisfactory for patients and health care professionals. Around the year 2000, Dutch primary care physicians (PCPs) reorganized their after-hours primary care and shifted from small r

  2. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015.

  3. Language and medicine in the Zamenhof family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Lebard Zamenhof, Pierre; Zaleski-Zamenhof, Maryse Wanda; Zaleski-Zamenhof, Ludwik Krzysztof; Lieberman, James; Zamenhof, Robert; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sulkowska, Mariola; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2010-01-01

    The Zamenhof family is famous for Dr Ludwik Lejzer Zamenhof (1859-1917), who created the artificial language Esperanto and who initiated a social movement for peace and against any sort of discrimination. Ludwik was an ophthalmologist. Adam, Leon, Alexander, and Julian Zamenhof were medical doctors and noted surgeons, while Sophia Zamenhof was a paediatrician. Ludwik Zamenhof often referred to the biblical story of the Tower of Babel, in which diversity of languages was the punishment for builders who were arrogant and uncaring. With the help of Esperanto, the Zamenhofs metaphorically wanted to overcome the curse of Babel and restore the sense of human unity. PMID:21192117

  4. Residents' Expectation of Family Medicine-Specific Training Program and Its Current State

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yong Jun; Park, Eal Whan; Cheong, Yoo Seock; Choi, Eun Young; Baek, Kuk Hyun; Sung, Hwa Yoen; Lee, Hong-Yeon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Background The family medicine residency program consists mainly of clinical rotations in other specialties and the family medicine-specific training. We conducted this study to investigate how family medicine residents evaluated their training program that include family-oriented medicine, clinical preventive medicine, behavioral science and research in primary care. Methods In 2009, third-year residents of 129 training hospitals in Korea were surveyed to investigate the current state and th...

  5. Pharmacist educators in family medicine residency programs: A qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgenson Derek

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 25-29% of North American family medicine residency programs utilize a pharmacist to teach residents. Little is known about the impact that these pharmacist educators have on residency training. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of residents, residency directors and pharmacists within Canadian family medicine residency programs that employ a pharmacist educator to better understand the impact of the role. Methods Recruitment from three cohorts (residents, residency directors, pharmacists within family medicine residency programs across Canada for one-on-one semi-structured interviews followed by thematic analysis of anonymized transcript data. Results 11 residents, 6 residency directors and 17 pharmacist educators participated in interviews. Data themes were: (1 strong value of the teaching with respect to improved resident knowledge, confidence and patient care delivery; (2 lack of a formal pharmacotherapy curriculum; (3 desire for expansion of pharmacist teaching; (4 impact of teaching on collaboration; (5 impact of teaching on residency program faculty; and (6 lack of criticism of the role. Conclusions The pharmacist educator role is valued within residency programs across Canada and the role has a positive impact on several important aspects of family medicine resident training. Suggestions for improvement focused on expanding the teaching role and on implementing a formal curriculum for pharmacist educators to follow.

  6. NON-MUSCULOSKELETAL SPORTS MEDICINE LEARNING IN FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino Caputo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of primary care sports medicine fellowships, as evidenced by the more than two-fold increase in family medicine sports medicine fellowships from a total of 31 accredited programs during the 1998/1999 academic year (ACGME, 1998 to 63 during the 2003/2004 academic year (ACGME, 2006, there are few empirical studies to support the efficacy of such programs. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted to assess the impact of primary care sports medicine fellowships on family medicine residents' learning of non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics. Rigorous evaluations of the outcomes of such programs are helpful to document the value of such programs to both the lay public and interested medical residents. In order to evaluate such programs, it is helpful to apply the same objective standards to residents trained across multiple programs. Hence, we would like to know if there is a learning effect with respect to non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics identified on yearly administered American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM in-training exams (ITE to family medicine residents in family medicine residency programs in the United States with and without primary care sports medicine fellowship programs. Review and approval for the research proposal was granted by the ABFM, who also allowed access to the required data. Permission to study and report only non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics excluding musculoskeletal topics was granted at the time due to other ongoing projects at the ABFM involving musculoskeletal topics. ABFM allowed us access to examinations from 1998 to 2003. We were given copies of each exam and records of responses to each item (correct or incorrect by each examinee (examinees were anonymous for each year.For each year, each examinee was classified by the ABFM as either (a belonging to a program that contained a sports medicine fellowship, or (b not belonging to a program

  7. Differences between family and emergency medicine training before sports medicine fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark; Christensen, Heidi K

    2015-01-01

    Residency training clearly impacts physicians' approach toward fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine. Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sets strict standards for all programs, family medicine and emergency medicine training differ a great deal in general and provide physicians from both backgrounds varied perspectives and skill sets. The family physician acquires a substantial amount of experience in continuity of care and integration of health care into a patient's everyday life. On the other hand, the emergency physician receives exceptional training in the management of acutely ill and injured patients and leadership of a large health care team. Furthermore, while the emergency physician may be skilled in procedures such as fracture reduction and diagnostic ultrasound, the family physician is proficient in developing patient rapport and compliance with a treatment plan. Although physicians from different backgrounds may start with many differences, fellowship training is essential in bridging those gaps.

  8. Key informants' perspectives on development of family medicine training programs in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossa, Weyinshet; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Mekonnen, Demeke; Eshetu, Wondwossen; Abebe, Zerihun; Fetters, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    As a very low-income country, Ethiopia faces significant development challenges, though there is great aspiration to dramatically improve health care in the country. Family medicine has recently been recognized through national policy as one potential contributor in addressing Ethiopia's health care challenges. Family medicine is a new specialty in Ethiopia emerging in the context of family medicine development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Addis Ababa University family medicine residency program started in 2013 and is the first and the only family medicine program in the country as of March 2016. Stakeholders on the ground feel that family medicine is off to a good start and have great enthusiasm and optimism for its success. While the Ministry of Health has a vision for the development of family medicine and a plan for rapid upscaling of family medicine across the country, significant challenges remain. Continuing discussion about the potential roles of family medicine specialists in Ethiopia and policy-level strategic planning to place family medicine at the core of primary health care delivery in the country is needed. In addition, the health care-tier system needs to be restructured to include the family medicine specialists along with appropriately equipped health care facilities for training and practice. Key stakeholders are optimistic that family medicine expansion can be successful in Ethiopia through a coordinated effort by the Ministry of Health and collaboration between institutions within the country, other Sub-Saharan African countries, and international partners supportive of establishing family medicine in Ethiopia. PMID:27175100

  9. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  10. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzuner Arzu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27 and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11 by e-mail and by personal contact. Results A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%. Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e

  11. Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan Casas Patiño; Edgar Jarillo Soto; Alejandra Rodríguez Torres

    2014-01-01

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/st...

  12. The new Australian after-hours general practice incentive payment mechanism: equity for rural general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Amanda L; Nelson, Mark; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    In July 2015, a national scheme for after-hours incentive funding for general practices was re-introduced in Australia, 2-years after funding was transferred to regional primary health care organisations (Medicare Locals). The re-introduction was recommended in a 2014 review of after-hours primary care reflecting the "overwhelming desire" among general practice. Given the centrality of after-hours care provision in rural and remote practices identified in the review, we compare and contrast the current and historical after-hours incentive funding mechanisms focussing on fairness towards rural general practices. While there are similarities between the current and historical mechanisms, significant differences exist. The comparison is not straightforward. The major consistency is utilisation of practice standardised whole patient equivalents (SWPE) as the basis of funding, inherently favouring large urban general practices. This bias is expected to increase given a shift in focus from practices with no option but to provide 24/7 care to any practice providing 24/7 care; and an associated increased funding per SWPE. Differences primarily pertain to classification processes, in which the realities of rural service provision and recognition of regional support mechanisms are given minimal consideration. Rapid introduction of the new general practice after-hours incentive funding mechanism has led to inconsistencies and has exacerbated inherent biases, particularly inequity towards rural providers. Impact on morale and service provision in non-urban areas should be monitored.

  13. The new Australian after-hours general practice incentive payment mechanism: equity for rural general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Amanda L; Nelson, Mark; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    In July 2015, a national scheme for after-hours incentive funding for general practices was re-introduced in Australia, 2-years after funding was transferred to regional primary health care organisations (Medicare Locals). The re-introduction was recommended in a 2014 review of after-hours primary care reflecting the "overwhelming desire" among general practice. Given the centrality of after-hours care provision in rural and remote practices identified in the review, we compare and contrast the current and historical after-hours incentive funding mechanisms focussing on fairness towards rural general practices. While there are similarities between the current and historical mechanisms, significant differences exist. The comparison is not straightforward. The major consistency is utilisation of practice standardised whole patient equivalents (SWPE) as the basis of funding, inherently favouring large urban general practices. This bias is expected to increase given a shift in focus from practices with no option but to provide 24/7 care to any practice providing 24/7 care; and an associated increased funding per SWPE. Differences primarily pertain to classification processes, in which the realities of rural service provision and recognition of regional support mechanisms are given minimal consideration. Rapid introduction of the new general practice after-hours incentive funding mechanism has led to inconsistencies and has exacerbated inherent biases, particularly inequity towards rural providers. Impact on morale and service provision in non-urban areas should be monitored. PMID:27237945

  14. Mentorship perceptions and experiences among academic family medicine faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Barbara; Krueger, Paul; White, David; Meaney, Christopher; Kwong, Jeffrey; Antao, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To collect information about the types, frequency, importance, and quality of mentorship received among academic family medicine faculty, and to identify variables associated with receiving high-quality mentorship. Design Web-based survey of all faculty members of an academic department of family medicine. Setting The Department of Family and Community Medicine of the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants All 1029 faculty members were invited to complete the survey. Main outcome measures Receiving mentorship rated as very good or excellent in 1 or more of 6 content areas relevant to respondents’ professional lives, and information about demographic and practice characteristics, faculty ratings of their local departments and main practice settings, teaching activities, professional development, leadership, job satisfaction, and health. Bivariate and multivariate analyses identified variables associated with receiving high-quality mentorship. Results The response rate was 66.8%. Almost all (95.0%) respondents had received mentorship in several areas, with informal mentorship being the most prevalent mode. Approximately 60% of respondents rated at least 1 area of mentoring as very good or excellent. Multivariate logistic regression identified 5 factors associated with an increased likelihood of rating mentorship quality as very good or excellent: positive perceptions of their local department (odds ratio [OR] = 4.02, 95% CI 2.47 to 6.54, P < .001); positive ratings of practice infrastructure (OR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.80, P = .003); increased frequency of receiving mentorship (OR = 2.78, 95% CI 1.59 to 4.89, P < .001); fewer years in practice (OR = 1.93, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.12, P = .007); and practising in a family practice teaching unit (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.27, P = .040). Conclusion With increasing emphasis on distributed education and community-based teachers, family medicine faculties will need to develop strategies to support

  15. Context and trade-offs in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehusen, Dean A; Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This issue contains several articles that highlight the effect of context and tradeoffs encountered in the practice of family medicine. Some articles demonstrate how context affects the implementation of the patient-centered medical home model, the community risk of a measles outbreak, the rate of complementary and alternative medicine among different generations, and the number of family physicians primarily providing urgent and emergent care in a region. Tradeoffs are explored in articles that look at how electronic medical record use has changed the composition of workload in primary care and how the burgeoning number of clinical guidelines affects the choices made by family physicians. A look at diabetic patients' perceptions of their risk of negative outcomes reveals an interesting pattern of underestimation of the risk of death. Patients with chronic mental disorders are at risk of having significant difficulties in the workplace, which may place a heavy cost on the individual and society. An interesting retrospective study found that it takes a surprising amount of replacement therapy to correct vitamin D deficiency.

  16. Interdisciplinary, interinstitutional and international collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The family medicine researches flourished worldwide in the past decade. However, the collaborative patterns of family medicine publications had not been reported. Our study analyzed the collaborative activity of family medicine researchers in Taiwan. We focused on the types of collaboration among disciplines, institutions and countries. We searched “family medicine” AND “Taiwan” in address field from Web of Science and documented the disciplines, institutions and countries of all authors. We ...

  17. Young women's use of medicines: autonomy and positioning in relation to family and peer norms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dana Lee; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2009-01-01

    taking practices and ideas about appropriate medicine use within their family and peer group. Young women possessed a keen awareness of medicine-related norms, although medicine use was a topic only rarely discussed with others. At the interface of these themes pertaining to family and peer norms, a...... unifying concept involving growing autonomy in medicine use emerged. This concept consisted of three parts: the great influence of family norms when autonomy was limited, growing autonomy under changing influences and assertion of autonomy and positioning of own behaviour relative to the norm. This study...... influential role that perceived norms in peer and family contexts can play in young women's use of medicine....

  18. Commissioning for healthcare: a case study of the general practitioners After Hours Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Karen; Fleming, Rhonda; Berrigan, Alison

    2016-01-01

    A strong primary healthcare system that is effective and efficient is a priority for health reform in Australia. Commissioning to support primary healthcare delivery has received increasing attention as part of healthcare reform in Australia and beyond. The aim of this paper is to present a case study of transitioning to an activity-based model for the provision of GP after-hours services in Australia. The GP After-Hours Program utilised a commissioning model that comprised of needs assessment, service development, provider engagement and evaluation. Evaluation of the new model showed a 17% increase in after-hours services, with service providers indicating that they were satisfied with the new process. Examination of the experience of implementation suggests that the commissioning model provided a useful framework for guiding activity-based funding for after-hours services. However, relational factors, such as engagement with the community, knowledge of the wider context and legitimacy of the commissioning body, can affect the implementation process. PMID:27469050

  19. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-06-26

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  20. Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donovan Casas Patiño

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  1. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system. PMID:25375148

  2. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-01-01

    Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine   The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM) is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC) issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and or...

  3. Geriatric Core Competencies for Family Medicine Curriculum and Enhanced Skills: Care of Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A.C.; Dobbs, Bonnie M.; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents’ clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Methods Iterative expert panel...

  4. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Turki N

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nouf Al-Turki,1 Ayman AM Afify,1 Mohammed AlAteeq2 1Family Medicine Department, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, 2Department of Family Medicine and PHC, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are limited and the results are conflicting.Objective: To estimate the prevalence and determine the demographic and occupational characteristics associated with workplace violence in primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Methods: A cross-sectional study included 270 health care workers in 12 family medicine centers in Riyadh during November and December 2014. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to estimate the frequency, timing, causes, reactions, and consequences of workplace violence plus participants’ demographic and occupational data.Results: A total 123 health care workers (45.6% experienced some kind of violence over 12 months prior to the study. These included physical (6.5% and nonphysical violence (99.2%, including verbal violence (94.3% and intimidation (22.0%. Offenders were patients (71.5% in the majority of cases, companions (20.3%, or both (3.3%. Almost half (48.0% of health care workers who experienced violence did nothing, 38.2% actively reported the event, and 13.8% consulted a colleague. A significant association of workplace violence was found with working multiple shifts, evening or night shift, and lack of an encouraging environment to report violence.Conclusion: Workplace violence is still a significant problem in primary care centers. The high frequency of violence together with underreporting may indicate the inefficiency of the current safety program. More safety programs and training activities for health care

  5. A vascular laboratory protocol for improving and managing after-hours suspected acute deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Angela H; Eckert, George; Lemmon, Gary W; Sawchuk, Alan; Dalsing, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    This study reviews the clinical and workforce impact of a suggested protocol designed for the management of suspected acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients seen after standard vascular laboratory business hours. The protocol included the use of Wells score, D-dimer and a single dose of therapeutic anticoagulant to defer venous duplex ultrasound (VDU) testing until routine business hours unless contraindicated. Information was collected on medical history, physical exam and the timing of any diagnostic studies and treatment provided. Over 15% of studies done after-hours were deemed unnecessary by our protocol and in every individual the results were negative for an acute DVT. There were no adverse events from a one-time dose of anticoagulant. Limiting emergency VDU coverage to evaluate for acute DVT based on a management protocol can eliminate unnecessary after-hours VDU testing without having a negative impact on patient care.

  6. After hours availability of general practitioners in Canterbury/Westland: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, J P; Waghorne, M S

    1977-04-27

    The results of a postal questionnaire to 185 general practitioners in the Canterbury-Westland agea are discussed. The intention was to describe the after hours provision for patients made by general practitioners. The study indicates that about one half of doctors are on call on weekdays evenings and about a third on weekends. Only a handful of doctors provide no cover. The kind of cover provided is discussed and the patient load during such hours is analysed. Figures are presented which suggest that Canterbury practitioners are marginally younger than the national average; that most doctors (100 out of 106 responding) have formal cover arrangements; that 82% are on duty no more than one weekend a month (less often for group practitioners); that about two-thirds have a regular half-day free during the week; that about two-thirds of after hours call are judged to be justified. PMID:271815

  7. After-hours equine emergency admissions at a university referral hospital (1998 - 2007 : causes and interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Viljoen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical records of equine after-hours admissions from 1998 to 2007 are reviewed. Data extracted from the medical records included signalment, reason for admission, pre-admission treatment, clinical presentation, procedures performed, final diagnoses, complications occurring in hospital, length of stay and outcome. Eight hundred and twenty after-hours admissions were available of which 75 % were classified as emergencies. Most horses originated from Gauteng province (82 %, with Thoroughbred, Arabian, and Warmbloods representing 46 %, 10 % and 7 % of horses. Horses had a median age of 7 years and were predominantly male (60 %. Gastrointestinal (64 % and musculoskeletal (19 % disorders were the primary reasons for admission. Anti-inflammatories, sedation and antibiotics were given in 51 %, 20 % and 15 % of cases respectively prior to referral. On admission, 23 % of horses had surgical intervention. Intravenous catheterisation (64 %, rectal examination (61 %, nasogastric intubation (56 %, abdominocentesis (33 % and ultrasonography (19 % were the procedures performed most frequently. Surgical and medical colics constituted 28 % and 27 % respectively of the overall diagnoses, while piroplasmosis was diagnosed in 5 % of horses. Post-admission complications occurred in <2 % of horses. The median length of stay was 4 days (95 % CI: 1 to 21 days. Overall survival to discharge was 74 %. This study demonstrates that the majority of after-hours equine admissions to a university referral hospital required medical intervention and were mostly due to gastrointestinal disorders. Information obtained from this study can be used in emergency referral planning.

  8. Extending the boundaries of family medicine to perform manual procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Haim; Vinker, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    A recent survey by Menahem and colleagues revealed that 65% of the surveyed primary care physicians reported that they performed any minor surgical procedures, and 46% reported performance of any musculoskeletal injections. Lack of allocated time and lack of training were the main reported barriers confronting higher performance rates. Healthcare systems are shifting large chunks of traditional hospital-centered activities to competent and comprehensive community-based structures. These changes are very well aligned with key trends in modern consumerism that prefer a close to home availability of medical services. Minor surgical procedures and musculoskeletal injections are good examples of medical activities that had been performed mainly by hospital and community based specialists. The syllabus of specialty training in Family Medicine in Israel includes these skills and trainees should acquire them during the residency program. We estimate that hundreds of family physicians obtain different levels of such training. Yet, only few family physicians have allocated protected time for performance of the procedures. For the skilled physician, performance of such relatively simple procedures extends his professional boundaries and the comprehensiveness of his service. For the healthcare system the "extra effort" and investment needed for performance of minor surgical procedures in primary care clinics is small. The results of the present study reflect on wider issues of care delivery. This study highlights the need for formalized and documented training of family physicians together with allocation of managerial and technical requirements needed to encourage these and similar medically and economically justified endeavors that seem to be perfectly aligned with the wishes of healthcare consumers. PMID:25383180

  9. Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, E H

    2008-12-01

    The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information.

  10. Teaching family medicine residents brief interventions for alcohol misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, J Chris; Samuel, Pearl

    2015-01-01

    Across the lifespan, alcohol misuse affects a large percentage of patients seen in primary care clinics. It can lead to alcohol use disorders, ranging from risky use to alcohol dependence. Alcohol use disorders frequently complicate acute and chronic illnesses of patients seen in FM clinics. Screening patients for alcohol and substance use has become a standard of practice in most primary care settings. This report describes how a family medicine residency program solidified a residency curriculum in substance abuse screening, assessment, and brief intervention by merging three presentation-style didactics into a blended approach. The curriculum combines didactic teaching, motivational interviewing, and behavioral rehearsal of clinical practice skills. Qualitative feedback suggests that the curriculum has been successful in exposing residents to a variety of practical assessment methods and, through rehearsal, has improved resident confidence in addressing alcohol use and misuse in a primary care population. PMID:26130770

  11. Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, E H

    2008-12-01

    The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information. PMID:19227968

  12. Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Its Use in Family Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Taştan1

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP is reprogramming the brain nerve language (or NLP means that you can program the language of your mind. NLP helps to the effective use of language in order to achieve a success behavior and provides us programs and techniques to organize the nervous system for achieving our goals which were determined before. NLP is particularly assertive in this field because of the fact that NLP takes its roots from psychotherapy (or because of the roots of NLP are based on the psychotherapy. On the other hand, due to the effect of human psychology on a person’s body and that the healing process can be modeled NLP is also used as a powerful tool in other branches of therapy. In this article it is intended to give information about the nature of NLP as it is practiced today and it’s usage in family medicine practice.

  13. Strengthening Primary Health Care with Family and Community Medicine in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia Haq; Gustavo Gusso; Maria Inez Padula Anderson

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the specialty of family medicine with attention to strategies that may be used to strengthen Brazilian health care with appropriately trained family doctors. These strategies include establishing academic departments of family and community medicine in all Brazilian medical schools, ensuring a common core curriculum in training programs, and defining standards for the evaluation and certification of family doctors. These strategies could enhance the quali...

  14. Work-based assessment within Malta’s specialist training programme in family medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Mario R.; Abela, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    The Specialist Training Programme in Family Medicine (STPFM) – Malta was drawn up by the Malta College of Family Doctors in 2006, approved by Malta’s Specialist Accreditation Committee, and launched in 2007 by the Primary Health Care Department and the Malta College of Family Doctors. This article regarding the work-based assessment of specialist training in family medicine in Malta was prepared by consulting various local / international documents and publications tha...

  15. Evaluation of a Dementia Education Program for Family Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prorok, Jeanette C.; Stolee, Paul; Cooke, Martin; McAiney, Carrie A.; Lee, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Dementia diagnosis and management is increasing in importance in the training of future family physicians. This study evaluated the impact of a dementia education program for family medicine residents (FMR) on residents’ knowledge, attitudes, and confidence with respect to dementia assessment and management. A three-part questionnaire was developed and validated for these purposes. Methods A mixed methods study design was employed. The questionnaire’s internal consistency and test–retest reliability was determined and content validity was assessed. Twelve FMR participated in questionnaire validation. Program participants completed the validated questionnaire at baseline, at interim, and following program completion. Twenty-seven FMR completed the questionnaire as part of the program evaluation. Willing residents also participated in program feedback interviews. Differences in questionnaire scores between program participants and the comparison group were examined. Results Each questionnaire component demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α: 0.83–0.91) and test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.74–0.91). Program participants (n = 15) scored significantly higher than the comparison group (n = 12) on the knowledge component and also reported greater confidence in several areas. Qualitative data indicated that residents felt the program focused on important topic areas and appreciated the opportunity to work in an interprofessional team. Conclusion Evaluation results indicate that the program improved FMRs’ knowledge on dementia assessment and management, as well as increased the residents’ confidence levels. PMID:26180561

  16. Gender Issues in Family Medicine Research: Improving the quality of research

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, May

    1991-01-01

    Gender is a significant determinant of health, yet the choice of topic for research, as well as the methodology, analysis, and interpretation, are often insensitive to the biologic, psychologic, social, economic, and cultural differences between men and women. Family medicine researchers could study a broad range of gender-related topics; such research could lead to improved family medicine.

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine use by visitors to rural Japanese family medicine clinics: results from the international complementary and alternative medicine survey

    OpenAIRE

    Shumer, Gregory; Warber, Sara; Motohara, Satoko; Yajima, Ayaka; Plegue, Melissa; Bialko, Matthew; Iida, Tomoko; Sano, Kiyoshi; Amenomori, Masaki; Tsuda, Tsukasa; Fetters, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) throughout the world, however previous research done in Japan has focused primarily on CAM use in major cities. The purpose of this study was to develop and distribute a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to assess the use of CAM among people who visit rural Japanese family medicine clinics. Methods Using a Japanese version of the In...

  18. Task Force 1. Report of the Task Force on Patient Expectations, Core Values, Reintegration, and the New Model of Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Larry A.; Graham, Robert; Bagley, Bruce; Kilo, Charles M.; Spann, Stephen J.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Swanson, John

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND To lay the groundwork for the development of a comprehensive strategy to transform and renew the specialty of family medicine, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with identifying the core values of family medicine, developing proposals to reform family medicine to meet consumer expectations, and determining systems of care to be delivered by family medicine in the future.

  19. Filling the gaps between theory and daily clinical procedural skills training in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Performance of procedures is an integral part of any family physician/general practitioner's practice. Unfortunately, discrepancy occurs between the existing theoretical methods of procedural teaching and the training imparted during real daily practice, which creates gaps that need to be overcome. This article identifies and reviews teaching gaps in family medicine training and presents suggestions to overcome them with a view to forming holistic psychomotor skills based on the learner's characteristics within the patient-centred philosophy of family medicine. PMID:27073067

  20. Compensation and Production in Family Medicine by Practice Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C. Essary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing focus on high performance, patient-centered, team-based care calls for a strategy to evaluate cost-effective primary care. The trend toward physician practice consolidation further challenges the primary care health care system. Productivity measures establish provider value and help inform decision making regarding resource allocation in this evolving health care system. In this national survey of family medicine practices, physician assistant (PA productivity, as defined by mean annual patient encounters, exceeds that of both nurse practitioners (NPs and physicians in physician-owned practices and of NPs in hospital or integrated delivery system-owned practices. Total compensation, defined as salary, bonus, incentives, and honoraria for physicians, is significantly more compared to both PAs and NPs, regardless of practice ownership or productivity. Physician assistants and NPs earn equivalent compensation, regardless of practice ownership or productivity. Not only do these data support the value and role of PAs and NPs on the primary care team but also highlight differences in patient encounters between practice settings. Rural and underserved community practices, where physician-owned practices persist, also merit further consideration. Further research is needed to inform both organizational and policy decisions for the provision of high-quality, cost-effective, and accessible primary health care.

  1. Teaching adaptive leadership to family medicine residents: what? why? how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubank, Daniel; Geffken, Dominic; Orzano, John; Ricci, Rocco

    2012-09-01

    Health care reform calls for patient-centered medical homes built around whole person care and healing relationships. Efforts to transform primary care practices and deliver these qualities have been challenging. This study describes one Family Medicine residency's efforts to develop an adaptive leadership curriculum and use coaching as a teaching method to address this challenge. We review literature that describes a parallel between the skills underlying such care and those required for adaptive leadership. We address two questions: What is leadership? Why focus on adaptive leadership? We then present a synthesis of leadership theories as a set of process skills that lead to organization learning through effective work relationships and adaptive leadership. Four models of the learning process needed to acquire such skills are explored. Coaching is proposed as a teaching method useful for going beyond information transfer to create the experiential learning necessary to acquire the process skills. Evaluations of our efforts to date are summarized. We discuss key challenges to implementing such a curriculum and propose that teaching adaptive leadership is feasible but difficult in the current medical education and practice contexts. PMID:22906156

  2. Why does teaching research skills to family medicine trainees make sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersnik, Janko; Ungan, Mehmet; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika

    2015-01-01

    There are only a few countries in Europe that have incorporated research skills training in specialty training programmes. In the eyes of most practising family physicians, research traditionally is a field reserved for colleagues with academic ambitions; an activity that often is not associated with the clinical practice of family medicine. However, residents became aware that research is essential to improving healthcare provision. Research in family medicine has a long tradition. Performing or taking part in research projects opens new horizons to present and future family physicians and provides support to increase their self-esteem. Consequently, this could foster future family medicine development. The authors urge the whole family physician community to raise the awareness every single family physician towards teaching and learning research skills in specialty training and basic medical education as a generic subject. PMID:26414382

  3. Development and Validation of Search Filters to Identify Articles on Family Medicine in Online Medical Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, David H J; Bramer, Wichor M; Bindels, Patrick J E; van de Laar, Floris A; Bohnen, Arthur M

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to identify research studies of relevance to family medicine. Using a new and objective method for search filter development, we developed and validated 2 search filters for family medicine. The sensitive filter had a sensitivity of 96.8% and a specificity of 74.9%. The specific filter had a specificity of 97.4% and a sensitivity of 90.3%. Our new filters should aid literature searches in the family medicine field. The sensitive filter may help researchers conducting systematic reviews, whereas the specific filter may help family physicians find answers to clinical questions at the point of care when time is limited.

  4. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitamura Kazuya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments. Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1 circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2 approach to starting the program; 3 how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4 future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1 few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2 developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3 start with undergraduates; 4 emphasize clinical skills; and 5 train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  5. Geriatric Core Competencies for Family Medicine Curriculum and Enhanced Skills: Care of Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A.C.; Dobbs, Bonnie M.; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents’ clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Methods Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Results Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Conclusions Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit. PMID:24883163

  6. [Intensive care medicine from the viewpoint of patients, their family and nursing personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, W; Küchle, R; Schrapers, S; Junginger, T

    1998-01-01

    We wanted to know how our intensive care unit would be graded by the patients, their family members and the staff, as well as the impression that intensive care medicine made on them. A total of 82% of the patients and 90% of the family members were of the opinion that they owed their lives to intensive care medicine, and 100% of the patients and 96% of family members deemed intensive care medicine significant. The patients and their family members judged the medical and nursing care, the medical technology, the care of basic needs and their accommodation altogether positive. The nursing staff held a contrary opinion and were more critical. Competent explanation and transmission of information represented the most important factor in forming a positive opinion of intensive care medicine. PMID:9931723

  7. Educating physicians about women's health. Survey of Canadian family medicine residency programs.

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, M. A.; Sorbie, J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which women's health issues are taught in the 2-year core curriculum of Canadian family medicine residency programs and whether educators think their current teaching of women's health is adequate. DESIGN: Mailed survey using a questionnaire. PARTICIPANTS: All program and unit directors of the 16 Canadian family medicine residency training programs were surveyed. Replies were received from 63% (10 of 16) of program directors and 79% (55 of 70) of unit directors. MAIN OU...

  8. Shaping the Future of Academic Health Centers: The Potential Contributions of Departments of Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Warren P.; DuBard, C Annette

    2006-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) must change dramatically to meet the changing needs of patients and society, but how to do this remains unclear. The purpose of this supplement is to describe ways in which departments of family medicine can play leadership roles in helping AHCs evolve. This overview provides background for case studies and commentaries about the contribution of departments of family medicine in 5 areas: (1) ambulatory and primary care, (2) indigent care, (3) education in commun...

  9. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-01-01

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM) is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC) issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approa...

  10. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton Lima Wagner

    2010-01-01

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM) is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC) issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplina...

  11. Using field notes to evaluate competencies in family medicine training: a study of predictors of intention

    OpenAIRE

    Lacasse, Miriam; Douville, Frédéric; Desrosiers, Émilie; Côté, Luc; Turcotte, Stéphane; Légaré, France

    2013-01-01

    Background Documenting feedback during clinical supervision using field notes (FN) is a recommended competency-based evaluation strategy that will require changes in the culture of medical education. This study identified factors influencing the intention to adopt FN in family medicine training, using the theory of planned behaviour. Methods This mixed-methods study involved clinical teachers (CT) and residents from two family medicine units. Main outcomes were: 1) intention (and its predicto...

  12. Long-term evaluation of undergraduate family medicine curriculum in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Švab Igor; Petek-Šter Marija

    2008-01-01

    Introduction In 1994, as a result of curriculum reform, the Ljubljana medical school established its first department of family medicine and introduced its first curriculum of family medicine. The new subject was well accepted by the students and the medical school. Nevertheless, there was no comprehensive analysis of the curriculum during this period. Objective Our aims were to assess the quality of teaching based on fulfilled expectations, pre-defined learning objectives and satisfaction in...

  13. Challenges for Healthcare in the 21st Century: How Family Medicine Can Help

    OpenAIRE

    Beswal, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Career in medicine is challenging. Medical education system is a ever evolving entity. Due to certain bottle necks in the medical education system, young medical graduates in India are facing difficulties in career progression. Author draws from the experience of Britain and explores how family medicine could be answer to many question which the Indian health system is challenged with.

  14. Family Medicine: A Solution for Career Inequalities among Doctors in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswal, Gaurav

    2013-07-01

    Career in medicine is challenging. Medical education system is a ever evolving entity. Due to certain bottle necks in the medical education system, young medical graduates in India are facing difficulties in career progression. Author draws from the experience of Britain and explores how family medicine could be answer to many question which the Indian health system is challenged with. PMID:24479085

  15. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Roberson, Judy A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown,Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2005-10-13

    Office equipment is expected to be the fastest-growingsegment of commercial energy use over the next 20 years, yet many aspectsof office equipment energy use are poorly understood. User behavior, suchas turning off devices at night or enabling power management, influencesenergy use to a great extent. The computing environment also plays a roleboth in influencing user behavior and in the success of power management.Information about turn-off rates and power management rates for officeequipment was collected through a series of after-hours audits incommercial buildings. Sixteen businesses were recruited, includingoffices (small, medium and large offices in a variety of industries),schools, and medical buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania.The types and power states of office equipment found in these buildingswere recorded and analyzed. This article presents these data forcomputers, monitors, printers, copiers, fax machines, scanners andmulti-function devices. These data can be used to improve estimates ofboth energy consumption for these devices and savings from energyconservation efforts.

  16. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  17. Solidarity in family medicine in Brazil and in Italy: reflecting on ethical issues and contemporary challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Gabrielli Souza Lima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reflects on solidarity in the practice of family medicine in two realities. The objective is to search for solidarity as an ethical principle in the relationship between family doctor and subject. It is a descriptive exploratory research carried out in Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, and in the Province of Rome, Lazio Region, Italy. It included fourteen Brazilian family doctors and fifteen Italian family doctors. The theoretical framework consisted of Pierre Bourdieu's theory of Symbolic Power. The results show the importance of the role of the family doctor in the materialization of this ethical principle, as a spokesman for scientific knowledge and as an agent of a State policy. Solidarity was understood within distinct domains and the discursive productions also demonstrated the negation of solidarity in such practice. Globalization proved to be a contemporary challenge for an ethical practice of family medicine that is marked by solidarity.

  18. [Experience and problems of implementation of family medicine in post-socialist countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopey, I V

    2014-01-01

    The experience of medical-insurance organisations that provide medical services basing on family medicine principles (HMO-type organizations) shows huge potential opportunities for optimization of health care systems through family physicians operating as fundholders. The experience of training of health care specialists, in particular, family physicians at the Department of Post-Graduate Training calls for further improvement of the training in applied issues of legal, financial and economic nature that provide work of family medicine specialists under the conditions of market economy development and health insurance, in particular. In this article shows huge opportunities for optimization of financial and economic provisions of the system, as well as medical and report facility structure and network that are included in the plans of establishment of medical-insurance organizations working on the principles of family medicine and organized by family physicians. ln this regard, it is very important to provide personnel of such medical-insurance organizations with appropriate training in legal, financial and economic issues. Special attention should be paid to the training of facility administrators and managers of family medicine subunits in legal and economic issues. As this is one of the milestones of their work.

  19. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Setlhare

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators.Keywords: task shifting, Family Medicine, Family Physician, Denmark, health expenditure, egalitarian

  20. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-01-22

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in

  1. The Diversity of Providers on the Family Medicine Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazemore, Andrew; Wingrove, Peter; Peterson, Lars; Petterson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Family physicians are increasingly incorporating other health care providers into their practice teams to better meet the needs of increasingly complex and comorbid patients. While a majority of family physicians report working with a nurse practitioner, only 21% work with a behavioral health specialist. A better understanding of optimal team composition and function in primary care is essential to realizing the promise of a patient-centered medical home and achieving the triple aim. PMID:26769871

  2. The Role of Family and Emergency Medicine in Undergraduate Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Sawchuk, Victor N.

    1980-01-01

    Clinical clerks electing emergency and family medicine rotations during the 1977 and 1978 academic years at the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine evaluated their clerkships on the opportunities provided to learn new useful medical knowledge, learn new clinical skills and practice them. All rotations were perceived as providing excellent opportunities to learn medical knowledge. However, nearly 20% of students felt that four of the teaching hospital ward based specialty and subspecialt...

  3. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  4. A Problem-Solving Oral Examination for Family Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Arthur D.

    1974-01-01

    The College of Family Physicians of Canada has used in its certification examination a new type of structured problem-solving examination called the Formal Oral. A series of preselected problem areas such as the complaint, relevant data base, investigation, and treatment are scored by two examiners. (Editor/PG)

  5. Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publication output, Suez Canal University, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Mansour, Nadia M.; Abdulmajeed A. Abdulmajeed

    2015-01-01

    Background: The completion of a thesis is a significant requirement for both a Master's and a doctorate degree in general practice/family medicine (GP/FM). A postgraduate thesis is a well-planned, time-intensive activity carried out over several years. The quality of the theses can be judged by the proportion of published papers. Objective: This study aimed to describe Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publications between 1982 and 2014. Materials and Methods: GP/FM de...

  6. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform). PMID:16219440

  7. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform).

  8. No psychiatry? Assessment of family medicine residents' training in mental health issues.

    OpenAIRE

    Bethune, C; Worrall, G.; Freake, D; Church, E.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the mental health component of the family medicine residency program at Memorial University of Newfoundland, which contains no formal mental health training with psychiatrists, adequately prepares residents for practice, and to assess which aspects of their training enhanced their mental health skills most. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: A 2-year family practice residency program with a focus on training for rural practice offering integrated and ...

  9. A Significant Number of Charter Diplomates Participate in American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Maintenance of Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, James C

    2015-01-01

    Considerable controversy about the value of participating in Maintenance of Certification has recently arisen within the medical community. Despite this controversy, large numbers of family physicians certified by the American Board of Family Medicine participate in Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians. Surprisingly, a small but significant number of charter diplomats--those initially certified by the American Board of Family Medicine at its founding--are engaged in the process.

  10. Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South–South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. PMID:24857843

  11. An ethnomedicinal survey of cucurbitaceae family plants used in the folk medicinal practices of Bangladesh 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rahmatullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Cucurbitaceae family comprising about 125 genera and 960 species is a family that is further characterized by commonly having five-angled stems and coiled tendrils and is also known as gourd family of flowering plants. Plant species belonging to this family have a worldwide distribution, but most species can be found in tropical and subtropical countries. A number of the plants belonging to this family have reported important pharmacological activities. Cucurbitaceae family plants are also in use in the folk medicinal system of Bangladesh-a traditional medicinal system, which mainly relies on medicinal plants for treatment of diverse ailments. Aims: Since folk medicinal practitioners form the first tier of primary health care in Bangladesh, the objective of this study was to conduct ethnomedicinal surveys among 75 folk medicinal practitioners (Kavirajes practicing among the mainstream Bengali-speaking population of randomly selected 75 villages in 64 districts of Bangladesh and 8 tribal practitioners (1 each from 8 major indigenous communities or tribes, namely, Bede, Chakma, Garo, Khasia, Marma, Murong, Santal, and Tripura of the country. Materials and Methods: Surveys were carried out with the help of a semi-structured questionnaire and the guided field-walk method. Results: It was observed that the folk and tribal medicinal practitioners use a total of 19 Cucurbitaceae family species for treatment of ailments such as dysentery, diabetes, edema, skin disorders, leukoderma, hypertension, jaundice, typhoid, spleen disorders, respiratory problems, leprosy, rheumatoid arthritis, chicken pox, and cancer. The 19 species of Cucurbitaceae family plants in use were Benincasa hispida, Bryonopsis laciniosa, Citrullus colocynthis, Citrullus lanatu, Coccinia grandis, Cucumis melo, Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita pepo, Hodgsonia macrocarpa, Lagenaria vulgaris, Luffa acutangula, Luffa cylindrica, Momordica charantia, Momordica

  12. After-hour home care service provided by a hospice in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, M H; Koo, W H; Huang, D T

    2002-03-01

    A home care Hospice programme was set up to provide care to the patients with advanced diseases and their families in Singapore. After office-hour, the service is managed by a doctor on weekdays, with the assistance of a nurse during daytime on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays. The doctor on-call made an average of 3.1 phone calls and 1.3 visits each weekday evening. Over the weekends and public holidays, there were a mean of 16.7 phone calls and 6 visits each day. More than half of the visits (50.3%) were made for certification of death. The commonest symptoms that prompted visits were dyspnoea (20%) and pain (12.2%). The busiest period during weekdays was between 6.00 pm and 11.00 pm, when our doctors did most of their visits. The workload of the hospice home care service is likely to increase and resources such as family health physicians can be explored to help to meet this increasing demand. This can be achieved through the provision of comprehensive training and easy accessibility to medical records which are kept with patients. PMID:14569717

  13. Health Literacy Teaching in U.S. Family Medicine Residency Programs: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Clifford A; Nguyen, Nancy T; Garvin, Roger; Sou, Channbunmorl; Carney, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Health care providers, including medical residents, often lack adequate knowledge and skills to work effectively with patients who have limited health literacy. Little is known about the degree to which medical residents are trained to communicate effectively with people who have limited health literacy. This study aimed to assess the status of health literacy training for physicians in U.S. family medicine residency programs. We conducted an online survey of residency directors at 444 U.S. family medicine residencies. Among 138 respondents (31% response rate), 58 programs (42%) reported teaching residents about health literacy as part of the required curriculum. Most instruction occurred during the 1st year of training. Hours of instruction ranged from 2 to 5 during Years 1 through 3. Skills-based training (e.g., plain language techniques) was taught by most programs. Not having access to a faculty authority on health literacy was strongly associated with lack of a required health literacy curriculum. Respondents overwhelmingly agreed that increasing health literacy training for medical students and residents would help improve residents' clinical skills. This study provides a baseline snapshot of health literacy curricula in U.S. family medicine residencies and likely overestimates the prevalence of such curricula. Additional studies are needed to determine the quality of health literacy instruction in U.S. family medicine residencies and the most effective methods for teaching residents about health literacy. PMID:27043758

  14. Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

  15. Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little SH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sahoko H Little,1,2 Sunil S Menawat,1,3 Michael Worzniak,1 Michael D Fetters2 1Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency, Wayne, Michigan, USA; 2University of Michigan, Department of Family Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; 3Ghent Family Medicine Residency, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA Abstract: Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. Keywords: wound care education, primary care, residency education, surgery rotation, curriculum development

  16. Instruction to the authors of the Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor RBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Journal of Family Medicine and Community RBMFC is a quarterly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family Medicine and Community, which aims to: raise awareness among professionals and health authorities in the area of interest of Family Medicine and Community; stimulate and disseminate research on issues and Primary Health Care (PHC, enabling the exchange between academia, service and social movement organizations, to promote the dissemination of abordageminterdisciplinar and serve as a vehicle for continuous and permanent education in the field of Family Medicine and Community taking as its theme the APS. Entries will be judged by the editors of Scientific and Editorial Board, as well as by invited peer ad hoc. The peer review process preserves the identity of the authors and their affiliations, which are reported to the Editorial Board only in the final stage of evaluation. All papers must be written in Portuguese, with the exception of written by foreign authors not resident in Brazil who can do it in English or Spanish

  17. Impact of Pharmacy Student Interventions in an Urban Family Medicine Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Ginzburg, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the number of interventions made by pharmacy students at an urban family medicine clinic and the acceptance rate of these recommendations by the healthcare providers. The secondary objective was to investigate the cost avoidance value of the interventions.

  18. Development and Validation of Search Filters to Identify Articles on Family Medicine in Online Medical Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, D.H.; Bramer, W.M.; Bindels, P.J.; Laar, F.A. van de; Bohnen, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to identify rese

  19. Development and validation of search filters to identify articles on family medicine in online medical databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J. Pols (David); W.M. Bramer (Wichor M); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick J.E.); F.A. van de Laar (Floris A.); A.M. Bohnen

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPhysicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to i

  20. The role of family therapists in veterinary medicine: opportunities for clinical services, education, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R; Reisbig, Allison M J; McDaniel, Kara Z; White, Mark B

    2007-04-01

    Marriage and family therapists (MFTs) are applying their specific skill set in a variety of arenas. A new area for collaboration is veterinary medicine. The veterinary medical profession is emphasizing the importance of non-biomedical skills such as communication skills, acknowledging that human clientele are likely to view their pets as family members, and discussing veterinarian personal well-being. Each of these trends has clear application for intervention by MFTs. A discussion of how MFTs may be uniquely positioned to assist veterinary medicine is presented. An example of collaboration between MFT and veterinary medicine at Kansas State University is highlighted. Recommendations are made for development of effective educational relationships and possible private sector collaborations. PMID:17437457

  1. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Briana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. Methods A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes for Canadian Family Medicine training. Results The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. Conclusions The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the

  2. Family medicine's search for manpower: the American Osteopathic Association accreditation option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Mark; Kunkle, Judith L; Doane, Cheryl

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, family medicine has encountered problems recruiting and filling its Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited residencies. In addressing these reverses, one increasingly popular strategy has been to acquire American Osteopathic Association (AOA) accreditation as a way to tap into the growing number of osteopathic graduates. This stratagem is founded on assumptions that parallel-accredited postdoctoral programs are attractive to doctor of osteopathy (DO) graduates, that collaboration with sponsoring colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs) provides direct access to osteopathic students, and that DOs can play an important role in replacing the increasing scarcity of United States medical graduates who are selecting specialty residencies. Within the past 5 years, nearly 10% of all ACGME family medicine residency programs have voluntarily obtained a second level of accreditation to also qualify as AOA-accredited family medicine residency programs. This strategy has produced mixed outcomes, as noted from the results of the osteopathic matching program. The flood of osteopathic graduates into these parallel-accredited programs has not occurred. In addition, recent AOA policy changes now require ACGME-accredited programs to make a deeper educational commitment to osteopathic postdoctoral education. The most successful ACGME/AOA-accredited programs have been those that are closely affiliated with and in near proximity of a COM and also train osteopathic students in required clerkship rotations. PMID:16518739

  3. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so.

  4. ocial representation of family support for diabetic patients in users of a family medicine unit in Chalco, State of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Rodríguez Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The goal of this study is to compare and interpret the meaning of family support for diabetic patients and their families using social representations according to a structural approach of Abric’s theory. METHODS The study was carried out in a Family Medicine Center of the Chalco Municipality in Mexico State. The population studied comprised ten diabetic patient-family pairs. The first part of the study was a simple word association test that aimed to find terms or statements related to the concept of “family support”, as well as its frequency of appearance and range of association. Once the terms or statements were obtained, they were categorized according to their “support” capabilities. A semi-structured interview for each category was conducted as well as a graphic analysis of Friedman’s meanings. The discourse of diabetic patients was compared to that of the families in order to find similarities and differences. RESULTS Evocation of terms was done in the first part of the study, and it was found that the emotional domain was central to the discourse. However, in the second part of the study, when categorization and analysis of discourse is performed, there are differences in the centrality of terms and statements. The family tends to center in the active domain, whereas the patient centers in the emotional domain. CONCLUSIONS This study brings up the emotional needs of the patient as essential components of support efforts. This promotes reflection about changing strategies in the design of public healthcare programs in that they may include family support from the viewpoint of otherness.

  5. Dimensions and singularities of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A edição nº 24 da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade (RBMFC traz importantes temas a nossa reflexão, tanto para a Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF - quanto à sua efetividade e abrangência - como para a especialidade em Medicina de Família e Comunidade (MFC, visto que apresenta temas que nos distinguem de outras áreas da biomedicina. A primeira temática poderia ser definida enquanto o potencial da ESF para a produção de saúde no Brasil. Um exemplo é o artigo Desempenho de indicadores nos municípios com alta cobertura da Estratégia Saúde da Família no Estado de São Paulo que destaca como alguns municípios desse Estado apresentam melhores resultados com relação aos indicadores pactuados, quando comparados com municípios que não expandiram a cobertura da ESF. A segunda temática resgata aspectos centrais da especialidade em MFC. Apesar da morte e sofrimento serem comuns a todas as especialidades médicas, na MFC, em particular, ela é problematizada na relação médico-paciente e nos programas de formação, como, por exemplo, na ferramenta Ciclo de vida1. Nesta ferramenta, a morte se destaca como uma das crises normativas que marcam a existência, visto que nela se encerra o drama do sofrimento e da condição humana2. Assim, o artigo Crying Patients in General/Family Practice: incidence, reasons for encounter and health problems resgata o potencial do MFC para ressignificar o sofrimento humano através do cuidado personalizado e longitudinal dos pacientes. Quais os significados das lágrimas? Estamos preparados para um aprofundamento nesta dimensão do cuidado? Esses matizes da profissão do MFC também se descortinam no caso clínico intitulado Ser Médico de (sua Família. Nele, o autor explora os limites da ética e da relação profissional-familiar ao contextualizar a tomada de decisão frente ao processo de cuidado, adoecimento e morte de um membro da família. Entretanto, a morte ainda segue

  6. Making the 2007-2010 Action Plan work for women in family medicine in the Asia Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coles Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Wonca Working Party for Women and Family Medicine (WWPWFM was organized in 2001 with the following objectives: to identify the key issues for women doctors; to review Wonca policies and procedures for equity and transparency; to provide opportunities to network at meetings and through the group's listserve and website; and to promote women doctors' participation in Wonca initiatives. In October 2008, at the Asia Pacific Regional conference, the Wonca Working Party on Women in Family Medicine (WWPWFM held a preconference day and conference workshops, building on the success and commitment to initiatives which enhance women's participation in Wonca developed in Ontario, Canada (2006 and at the Singapore World Congress (2007. At this meeting fifty women workshopped issues for women in Family Medicine in the Asia Pacific. Using the Action Plan formulated in Singapore (2007 the participants identified key regional issues and worked towards a solution. Key issues identified were professional issues, training in family medicine and women's health. Solutions were to extend the understanding of women's contributions to family medicine, improved career pathways for women in family medicine and improving women's participation in practices, family medicine organizations and academic meetings.

  7. E-Learning in family medicine education: faculty support in a community clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gensichen, Jochen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available E-learning was planned as a test for medical students within their curriculum of family medicine. A multi-modular online-offer specific to the target group accompanies the 10th term medical students during their peripheral practical courses in family practices. Teaching objectives are as follows: (1 Introduction into e-learning, (2 clinical general medicine - online-module, (3 chronic care online-module, (4 online-application. The systematic evaluation shows that e-learning promotes the communication of students both among themselves and with the university during their practical courses. On the basis of the experiences from this pilot test the combination with more traditional teaching methods (blended learning seems to be a promising option for medical education.

  8. Taxonomy and Traditional Medicinal Uses of Apocynaceae (Dogbane Family of Rajshahi District, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbubur Rahman AHM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomy and traditional medicinal uses on the family Apocynaceae growing throughout the Rajshahi district has been made. A total of 14 species under 12 genera belonging to the family Apocynaceae were collected and identified. Out of the total number of species Allamanda cathartica Linn, Alstonia scholaris (L. R.Br. Carissa carandas Linn, Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don, Ichnocarpus frutescens (L. R. Br., Nerium oleander Linn., Plumeria alba Linn., Plumeria rubra Linn., Rauvolfia serpentina Linn., Tabernaemontana divaricata Linn., Thevetia peruviana (Pers K. Schum. were common and Cerbera odollam Gaertn, Holarrhena antidysenterica Linn, Rauvolfia tetraphylla Linn were rare species in the study area. For each species English name, botanical name, local name, status of occurrence, flowering season, distribution, voucher number and traditional medicinal uses have been mentioned. This information will be beneficial in public health, research and providing lead to plants that can be useful in drug discovery.

  9. Electronic Chronic Disease Registers Based on Accreditation Standards for Family Medicine Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Valjevac, Salih; Ridjanovic, Zoran; Masic, Izet

    2009-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED SUMMARY Agency for Quality and Accreditation of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (AKAZ) has developed computer based chronic disease register based on the accreditation standards in order to facilitate maintenance of chronic disease registers in the absence of electronic health records, and to speed up and simplify calculation for over 70 clinical indicators from accreditation standards for family medicine teams. This article presents development of the...

  10. Federal Research Funding for Family Medicine: Highly Concentrated, with Decreasing New Investigator Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of National Institutes of Health and other federal research funding is received by university departments of family medicine, the largest primary care specialty. That limited funding is also concentrated, with roughly a quarter of all National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality funding awarded to 3 departments, almost half of that funding coming from 3 agencies, and a recent trend away from funding for new investigators.

  11. Misinterpreting Odds Ratio in the Articles Published in Korean Journal of Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ju Heon; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Soo Young; Hwang, In Hong; Kang, En Jin

    2012-01-01

    Background In reporting results of case-control studies, odds ratios are useful methods of reporting findings. However, odds ratios are often misinterpreted in the literature and by general readers. Methods We searched all original articles which were published in the Korean Journal of Family Medicine from 1980 to May 2011 and identified those that report "odds ratios." Misinterpretation of odds ratios as relative risks has been identified. Estimated risk ratios were calculated when possible ...

  12. Students’ letters to patients as a part of education in family medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Nataša Mrduljaš-Đujić; Ivančica Pavličević; Ana Marušić; Matko Marušić

    2012-01-01

    Family medicine fosters holistic approach to patient-centered practice. Current medical curriculum in Croatia does not have well-structured courses or tools to prepare medicals students for successful communication with the patient and for building lasting and beneficial doctor-patient relationship. We explored the value of students’ practice in writing letters to patients about their illness as a way of building personal and compassionate relationship with patients. Sixth year students at th...

  13. Patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction with a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program in a family medicine clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Lisa; Young, Stephanie; Twells, Laurie; Dillon, Carla; Hawboldt, John

    2015-01-01

    Background A pharmacist managed anticoagulation service was initiated in a multi-physician family medicine clinic in December 2006. In order to determine the patient and physician satisfaction with the service, a study was designed to describe the patients’ satisfaction with the warfarin education and management they received from the pharmacist, and to describe the physicians’ satisfaction with the level of care provided by the pharmacist for patients taking warfarin. A self-administered sur...

  14. Early COPD Diagnosis in Family Medicine Practice: How to Implement Spirometry?

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalie Saad; Maria Sedeno; Katrina Metz; Jean Bourbeau

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. COPD is often diagnosed at an advanced stage because symptoms go unrecognized. Furthermore, spirometry is often not done. Methods. Study was conducted in diverse family medicine practice settings. Patients were targeted if respiratory symptoms were present. Patients had a spirometry to confirm the presence of airflow obstruction and COPD diagnosis. An evaluation of the process was done to better understand facilitating/limiting factors to the implementation of a primary care ...

  15. Ethnomedicinal review of folklore medicinal plants belonging to family Apiaceae of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of herbs for therapeutic purpose is as old as human history. In Pakistan a major part of population is dependent on the traditional medicine derived from plants for primary health care system. The interest in the use of traditional system of medicine has gained popularity globally. The developed countries are shifting their focus to further research based on the indigenous knowledge collected from aboriginal people. The present study reviews the ethno-medicinal uses of family Apiaceae reported from Pakistan. Out of 167 species reported from Pakistan, 66 are found to be used medicinally. Most commonly treated disorders by use of Apiaceae herbal flora are gastrointestinal tract and liver disorders (28%) followed by cough, cold and respiratory tract problems (11%). The plant parts frequently used are roots (22%) followed by whole plant material (19%), leaf material (18%), fruit (13%), seed (12%), stem, flower, aerial parts (5%) and sap (1%). It is suggested to carry out similar studies for other families to explore the indigenous knowledge for the development of commercial products and to collectively document the scattered existing knowledge. (author)

  16. Social Justice as the Moral Core of Family Medicine: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    A recurring conference theme was the essential place of social justice within family medicine, especially the need to focus on denominator populations, exalt the personal and caring qualities of doctoring, and address social determinants of health. Many expressed solidarity with "community," but it is not always easy to define community in our large and diverse nation. Exhortations for health advocacy were frequently voiced, but putting these into meaningful action agendas is a challenge. There was general agreement that medicine is in flux and that the many expressions of "commodity-centered consumerism" have altered organization and financing. The increasing demands by "consumers", who want low cost, instant availability, and shared decision-making, and yet change doctors when health plans alter coverage also differentially impact high-volume, low-margin specialties such as family medicine. Additional challenges were the electronic health record and calibrating an appropriate work/life balance. Five action steps are recommended: 1) speak out on the important social and moral issues; 2) be the experts on personal care; 3) make common cause with potential allies; 4) help institutions perceive the value of generalism; and 5) help find ways to enrich generalist disciplines to increase the joy of medicine and decrease the threat of burn out. PMID:27387169

  17. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation.

  18. Qualitative Evaluation of Theses Written in area of Family Medicine in Turkey

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    Yaman H et al.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate qualitatively thesis written in Family medicine and to investigate their status of citation and publication as article.Material and Method: the descriptive and cross-sectional included 140 thesis, indexed by ULAKBIM, in area of Family Medicine written between 1981 and 2008 according to status of their citation and publication as article were analyzed as regards of their subjects, date of presentation and publication, study type and place in which to be written were registered in the study. To access data of thesis, ULAKBIM, SCI, CINAHL, Google and PUBMED was screened. Keywords such as “family medicine”, “primary care”, “family practitioner” have been used during the search.Results: Average page of thesis was 82.9±37.0 (19-258. Majority of manager for thesis was academic degree of professor. It was found that several theses were associated with other areas of specialization. Theses were usually designed as descriptive, cross-sectional and observational. Of 140 theses, 15 ones were indexed by international publication. Three different articles in SCI were cited four times until date of present study. When evaluating date of thesis according to years, it peaked in 1999 (27; 19.3% and 2007 (25; 17.9%. Conclusion: Although discipline of Family Medicine was not achieved to come at targets, it was considered that thesis preparation and writing was able with association and cooperation with other medical department disciples. However, it was considered that majority of thesis was not published as article.

  19. The Quality of Reporting of Cohort, Case-Control Studies in the Korean Journal of Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Ra; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Soo Young; Hwang, In Hong; Yoon, Yeo Jung

    2012-01-01

    Background The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement was developed to improve the reporting of observational studies. We aimed to evaluate the quality of reporting in cohort studies and case-control studies among observational studies published in the Korean Journal of Family Medicine. Methods We searched for cohort studies and case-control studies published as original articles in the Journal of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine during th...

  20. Career advising in family medicine: a theoretical framework for structuring the medical student/faculty advisor interview

    OpenAIRE

    Bradner, Melissa; Crossman, Steven H.; Vanderbilt, Allison A.; Gary, Judy; Munson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are unique challenges to recruiting students into the specialty of family medicine within academic medical centers.Methods: At Virginia Commonwealth University, we developed an advising framework to help students address institutional and personal obstacles to choosing family medicine as a career.Results: The role of a faculty advisor is not to direct the student to a career choice but rather to foster a mentor relationship and help the student come to his or her own realiza...

  1. Exploration of Medicinal Species of Lamiaceae family in Ilkhji and Sharafaldin Regions of Esat Azarbaijan in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Joudi; Ghassem Habibi Bibalani; Hamide Shadkami

    2011-01-01

    In this research medicinal species of Lamiaceae family were detected. As medicinal plants are suitable alternatives for synthetic and chemical drugs (Idu and Osemwegie) also because of medical and nutritional importance and valuable protein contents of Lamiaceae sp., all plants of Lamiaceae family are collected in Ilkhji and sharafaldin regions during growth seasons of 2007-2009. Plants were collected in 2 regions according to the classical method of regional floristical studies. Collected pl...

  2. Protective Effects of Some Medicinal Plants from Lamiaceae Family Against Beta-Amyloid Induced Toxicity in PC12 Cell

    OpenAIRE

    S. Saeidnia; M Soodi; P Balali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Excessive accumulation of beta-amyliod peptide (Aβ), the major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD), causes neuronal cell death through induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidants may be of use in the treatment of AD. The medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family have been widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. These plants contain compounds with antioxidant activity and some species in this family have been reported to have neuroprotective pro...

  3. Teaching team membership to family medicine residents: what does it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubank, Daniel; Orzano, John; Geffken, Dominic; Ricci, Rocco

    2011-03-01

    Primary care reform proponents advocate for patient-centered medical homes built on interdisciplinary teamwork. Recent efforts document the difficulty achieving reform, which requires personal transformation by doctors. Currently no widely accepted curriculum to teach team membership in Family Medicine residencies exists. Organizational Development (OD) has 40 years of experience assessing and teaching the skills underlying teamwork. We present a curriculum that adapts OD insights to articulate a framework describing effective teamwork; define and teach specific team membership skills; reframe residents' perception of medicine to make relationships relevant; and transform training experiences to provide practice in interdisciplinary teamwork. Curriculum details include a rotation to introduce the new framework, six workshops, experiential learning in the practice, and coaching as a teaching method. We review program evaluations. We discuss challenges, including institutional resources and support, incorporation of a new language and culture into residency training, recruitment "for fit," and faculty/staff development. We conclude that teaching the relationship skills of effective team membership is feasible, but hard. Succeeding has transformative implications for patient relationships, residency training and the practice of family medicine. PMID:21417522

  4. Training in Childhood Obesity Management in the United States: A Survey of Pediatric, Internal Medicine-pediatrics and Family Medicine Residency Program Directors

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes Erinn T; Wolff Margaret S; Ludwig David S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents f...

  5. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

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    Wilson Mark C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate, 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%. The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  6. Challenges facing postgraduate training in family medicine in Saudi Arabia: Patterns and solutions

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    Yahia M Al-Khaldi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this paper was to show the challenges that are faced by the Family Medicine Training Programmes in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as well as suggests appropriate and practical solutions. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from 2010 - 2013 using a semi-structured questionnaire to achieve the objective. The questionnaire was designed and completed by the investigators during their visits to accredit the training centres all over the Kingdom. It consisted of questions concerning the trainers′ and trainees′ opinions regarding all the aspects of training. Another tool used was the accreditation checklist, which contained a comprehensive list of training structures and processes mandatory for any training centre. The accreditation checklist and questionnaire were reviewed by the investigators after visiting all the training centres. The challenges were then classified manually and solutions were reviewed as well as approved by the members of the Accreditation Committee. Results: Seventy-five training centres were visited and 250 trainees along with 75 trainers participated in this study. Twenty-five challenges were identified and classified under 6 major groups. The practical solutions to these challenges were discussed with participants and then approved by the investigators. Conclusion: This study showed that Family Medicine Training in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia faces many different challenges. Early identification along with key solutions to these difficulties are extremely important in the efforts to produce a new generation of competent Saudi Family Physicians who can improve the quality of healthcare for the population of Saudi Arabia.

  7. Practical training in family medicine in the Dalmatian hinterland: first-hand experience of four physicians

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    Minka Jerčić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Four physicians working in private family medicine offices in Dalmatian Hinterland described their first hand experience of teaching sixthyear medical students. They supervised students during the 2010/2011 academic year, in an area that is economically undeveloped, rural, and where a number of people live in extended families. Although hesitant at first, the patients came to like the interaction with students, and later even yearned to provide students with as much information as possible. They also liked the letters that students had to write to them about their illness, because they could take them home and look for information without needing to see the doctor. The students showed diverse attitudes to different types of work in family medicine offices, mostly depending on their plans for future career. In general, they either complained or hesitated to perform duties that they did not fully master during earlier education, especially working with children. They needed several days to adapt to direct contact with the patients, and were more relaxed and cooperative when working in pairs than alone. The physicians themselves felt that they profited both from the novelty in the everyday routine and from the exchange of their experiences with the students. They liked their young colleagues and admitted they could not objectively review their own work, knowledge and skills.

  8. Exploration of Medicinal Species of Lamiaceae family in Ilkhji and Sharafaldin Regions of Esat Azarbaijan in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Joudi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research medicinal species of Lamiaceae family were detected. As medicinal plants are suitable alternatives for synthetic and chemical drugs (Idu and Osemwegie also because of medical and nutritional importance and valuable protein contents of Lamiaceae sp., all plants of Lamiaceae family are collected in Ilkhji and sharafaldin regions during growth seasons of 2007-2009. Plants were collected in 2 regions according to the classical method of regional floristical studies. Collected plants were recognized by valid references (Parsa 1943-1950; Reshinger, 1963-1990. Then medical species are chosen by using pharmacopeias. The results of the current study demonstrated that at Ilkhji region 16 species belong to 8 genuses and at Sharafaldin region 4 species belong to 4 genuses that all of them belong to Lamiaceae family. Among these species, 18 species at Ilkhji and sharafaldin region had medicinal properties. Medicinal species of these 2 regions consist of: Marrubium vulgare, Mentha longifolia, Nepeta meyeri, Nepeta persica, Nepeta racemosa, Phlomis olivieri, Salvia nemorasa, Salvia sahendica, Salvia spinosa, Stachys virgata, Stachys inflate, Stachys lavandifolia, Stachys turcomanica, Stachys persica, Thymus cotschyanus, Thymus pubescens, Ziziphora tenuior Lamium amplexicaule. The results of this study showed that the region has a great potential for producing respective medicinal plants species belong to those families. Medicinal plants recently become more important because of their medicinal uses and in addition they are valuable source of protein.

  9. Improving health care globally : a critical review of the necessity of family medicine research and recommendations to build research capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Rosser, W.W.

    2004-01-01

    An invitational conference led by the World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) involving selected delegates from 34 countries was held in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, March 8 to12, 2003. The conference theme was "Improving Health Globally: The Necessity of Family Medicine Research." Guiding confer

  10. Variation of free phenolic acids in medicinal plants belonging to the Lamiaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgórka, G; Głowniak, K

    2001-08-01

    Ten species belonging to the family Lamiaceae and representing the most popular medicinal plants used in Polish phytotherapy were examined for the content of free phenolic acids (PhAs). Two depsides, rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids, as well as eight simple PhAs, protocatechuic, gentisic, p-hydroxybenzoic, caffeic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids, in different qualitative and quantitative proportions depending on the plant examined were determined by the rapid, selective and accurate method combining solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:11451645

  11. Going global: considerations for introducing global health into family medicine training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evert, Jessica; Bazemore, Andrew; Hixon, Allen; Withy, Kelley

    2007-10-01

    Medical students and residents have shown increasing interest in international health experiences. Before attempting to establish a global health training program in a family medicine residency, program faculty must consider the goals of the international program, whether there are champions to support the program, the resources available, and the specific type of program that best fits with the residency. The program itself should include didactics, peer education, experiential learning in international and domestic settings, and methods for preparing learners and evaluating program outcomes. Several hurdles can be anticipated in developing global health programs, including finances, meeting curricular and supervision requirements, and issues related to employment law, liability, and sustainability. PMID:17932801

  12. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: interventions in the family medicine setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    The practice of family medicine includes the care of many patients with mental health or behavior change needs. Patients in mild to moderate distress may benefit from brief interventions performed in the family physician's office. Patients in more extreme distress may be helped by referral to behavioral health clinicians for short-term or open-ended therapies. Electronic therapy programs and bibliotherapy are also useful resources. The transition to the patient-centered medical home model may allow for more widespread integration of behavioral health care clinicians into primary care, in person and through telemental health care. Integrated care holds the promise of improved access, greater effectiveness of behavioral health service provision, and enhanced efficiency of primary care for patients with behavioral health care needs.

  13. Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying...... analyses were compared. RESULTS: An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system...... was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine....

  14. Establishing the need for family medicine training in intimate partner violence screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany B; Reyna, Guadalupe; Lam, Kenrick; Silver, Mandy; Gimpel, Nora E

    2015-06-01

    In 2012, the USPSTF updated its guidelines and now recommends that all women of childbearing age be screened for IPV and services provided for women who screen positive. Based on these recommendations, objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate IPV knowledge, attitudes, and practices of physicians from different specialties and (2) determine significant differences by medical specialty. We recruited (n = 183) Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine (FM) and Obstetrics/Gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and attending physicians to complete a 15-question online survey assessing knowledge, attitudes and current IPV screening practices. We evaluated associations between medical specialty and knowledge, attitudes and practice measures before and after controlling for covariates. Knowledge of how often IPV occurs in society, community resources, and screening tools were significantly different by specialty (all p's screening female patients for IPV before (OR = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.08, 0.86) and after adjusting for confounders (OR = 0.11; 95% CI = 0.03, 0.47). Our results indicate that FM physicians have positive attitudes towards finding and treating IPV yet need enhanced training to improve their comfort level with screening for and discussing IPV with their patients. PMID:25352415

  15. Educational Competitions of the Family Doctor in their Acting as Tutor in the Career of Medicine

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    José de la Caridad Lorenzo López

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: for the identification of a group of competitions characteristic of the educational work of the Family doctors that you/they act as tutors in the formative scenarios of the Primary Attention of Health in University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate. Objective: to identify the educational main competitions of the doctors of the family like tutors in the career of Medicine, in the Area II of the municipality of Cienfuegos. Method: pedagogic investigation of descriptive type in the mark of the medical education that looked for to define the group of educational basic competitions, what can favor a pedagogic management of more quality in the medical clinics as formative scenario of University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate during the year 2010. Results: 61,5% of our tutors has more than 10 years of medical formation; more than the half, their 73.1% is not categorized, 84.6% is specialist of general integral medicine, but of the half they received the preparation shop for tutors and 96.2% they consider the basic competitions as very important. Conclusion: deficiencies exist in the way of the tutor's performance for categorized personnel's lack, pedagogic scarce preparation and the assistance load of the professors in the primary attention of health.

  16. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

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    Christine Runyan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives: The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods: The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results: Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions: This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction.

  17. Evaluation of four commonly used DNA barcoding Loci for chinese medicinal plants of the family schisandraceae.

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    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Many species of Schisandraceae are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are faced with contamination and substitution risks due to inaccurate identification. Here, we investigated the discriminatory power of four commonly used DNA barcoding loci (ITS, trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL and corresponding multi-locus combinations for 135 individuals from 33 species of Schisandraceae, using distance-, tree-, similarity-, and character-based methods, at both the family level and the genus level. Our results showed that the two spacer regions (ITS and trnH-psbA possess higher species-resolving power than the two coding regions (matK and rbcL. The degree of species resolution increased with most of the multi-locus combinations. Furthermore, our results implied that the best DNA barcode for the species discrimination at the family level might not always be the most suitable one at the genus level. Here we propose the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA+matK+rbcL as the most ideal DNA barcode for discriminating the medicinal plants of Schisandra and Kadsura, and the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA as the most suitable barcode for Illicium species. In addition, the closely related species Schisandra rubriflora Rehder & E. H. Wilson and Schisandra grandiflora Hook.f. & Thomson, were paraphyletic with each other on phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they should not be distinct species. Furthermore, the samples of these two species from the southern Hengduan Mountains region formed a distinct cluster that was separated from the samples of other regions, implying the presence of cryptic diversity. The feasibility of DNA barcodes for identification of geographical authenticity was also verified here. The database and paradigm that we provide in this study could be used as reference for the authentication of traditional Chinese medicinal plants utilizing DNA barcoding.

  18. Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum

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    Shellenberger Sylvia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008, presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. Methods The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and their Family Medicine Residency Review Committee. A proposed eight-module curriculum was developed, based on substance abuse competencies defined by Project MAINSTREAM and linked to core competencies defined by the ACGME. The curriculum provides basic training in high risk substance use to all residents, while also addressing current training challenges presented by U.S. work hour regulations, increasing international diversity of Family Medicine resident trainees, and emerging new primary care practice models. Results This paper offers a core curriculum, focused on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, which can be adapted by residency programs to meet their individual needs. The curriculum encourages direct observation of residents to ensure that core skills are learned and trains residents with several "new skills" that will expand the basket of substance abuse services they will be equipped to provide as they enter practice. Conclusions Broad-based implementation of a comprehensive Family Medicine residency curriculum should increase the ability of family physicians to provide basic substance abuse services in a primary care context. Such efforts should be coupled with faculty development initiatives which ensure that sufficient trained faculty are available to teach these concepts and with efforts by major Family Medicine organizations to implement and enforce residency requirements for

  19. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

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    Dantas Guilherme

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were: a to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM in primary care; b to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour.

  20. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

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    Amoako AO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adae O Amoako,1 Agyenim B Amoako,2 George GA Pujalte3 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3Sports Medicine, Divisions of Primary Care, and Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Waycross, GA, USA Background and objective: Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results: Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7% compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8% respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively. Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort

  1. Career advising in family medicine: a theoretical framework for structuring the medical student/faculty advisor interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bradner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are unique challenges to recruiting students into the specialty of family medicine within academic medical centers. Methods: At Virginia Commonwealth University, we developed an advising framework to help students address institutional and personal obstacles to choosing family medicine as a career. Results: The role of a faculty advisor is not to direct the student to a career choice but rather to foster a mentor relationship and help the student come to his or her own realizations regarding career choice. The faculty advisor/medical student interview is conceptualized as five discussion topics: self-knowledge, perception, organizational voice, cognitive dissonance, and anticipatory counseling. Conclusion: This framework is intended to assist faculty in their efforts to encourage students to consider a career in family medicine.

  2. Assessing prescribing of NSAIDs, antiplatelets, and anticoagulants in Canadian family medicine using chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kevin; Davis, Christine; Falk, Jamie; Singer, Alex; Bugden, Shawn

    2016-10-01

    Background Drug-related problems have been identified as a major contributor to emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and death. The most commonly implicated medications are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antiplatelets, and anticoagulants. Considering a significant proportion of these harms are preventable, indicators to identify risky prescribing before they lead to harm have been developed. Objective To examine the prevalence and patterns of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs) in a primary care population who are using high-risk medications. Setting This study was performed within two multi-disciplinary family medicine teaching clinics in Winnipeg, Canada. Method A cross-sectional electronic/paper chart audit was conducted within two multi-disciplinary family medicine teaching clinics to evaluate the prevalence of 13 evidence-based high-risk prescriptions. Patients were included if they were prescribed an oral NSAID, antiplatelet, or an anticoagulant within the 12 month period between June 2012 and June 2013. Main outcome measure The proportion of PIPs associated with an increased bleeding risk for NSAIDs, antiplatelets, and anticoagulants. Results Of the 567 patients included in the review, 198 (35 %) patients had received at least 1 PIP in the past year. The most common PIP was the use of an oral NSAID with one or more GI risk factors without adequate gastro-protection. Only 34 (6 %) of these patients received a full medication review performed by a pharmacist. Although not statistically significant, patients who received a medication review had fewer inappropriate prescriptions (27 % with review, 35 % without). Conclusion Over one-third of the patients who were using high-risk medications were using them potentially inappropriately. Although pharmacists have been shown to reduce the amount of inappropriate prescribing, very few patients using these medications were referred to the pharmacist for a full medication review

  3. Reasons, challenges and contributions of the specialty training programme in family and community medicine in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Casado Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past 30 years, specialty training in medicine, by means of residency programmes, has undoubtedly been one of the instruments that helped raise care quality and patient safety homogenously across the country, efficiently achieving important health outcomes in Spain in relation to surrounding countries. The specialty of Family and Community Medicine (FCM is one of 44 medical specialties which require a residency training programme. It is developed in 97 teaching units that count on 887 health centres and 212 accredited hospitals, and train approximately 1800 residents per year. Currently, the specialty programme in FCM lasts four years and it is a competency-oriented programme whose key elements encompass flexibility, pluripotency, a resident-preceptor axe, and formative assessment. It originates from the firm will to update and consolidate the doctrines and values of FCM, as well as from a deep commitment to education and the National Health System. It is based on the evidence that an equitable, efficient and viable health care system must rely on a forceful and resolute Primary Care, which should provide well-prepared and trained physicians. Therefore, it is critical that the Ministries (and other organisations responsible for the health and educational systems of different countries regard the provision of adequate funding and empowerment as an essential objective, so that primary care services can play a central role within the Health System and FCM can be seen as a discipline, specialty and health profession.

  4. After-hours power status of office equipment and energy use of miscellaneous plug-load equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Marageret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-05-27

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of miscellaneous plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. For most types of miscellaneous equipment, we also estimated typical unit energy consumption in order to estimate total energy consumption of the miscellaneous devices within our sample. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from sixteen commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: four education buildings, two medical buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees each), and five small

  5. Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheet Amir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%, 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%. The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76% and journal clubs (64%. Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%, although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54% while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%. Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence.

  6. Barriers to Screening and Possibilities for Active Detection of Family Medicine Attendees Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopčavar Guček Nena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1996 the World Health Organization declared intimate partner violence (IPV the most important public health problem. Meta-analyses in 2013 showed every third female globally had been a victim of violence. Experts find screening controversial; family medicine is the preferred environment for identifying victims of violence, but barriers on both sides prevent patients from discussing it with doctors.

  7. Seeing the other through the screen: movies, humanization of medical education and Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo de Araújo Porto Landsberg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented technological development observed in the last century and beginning of this one has expanded the horizons of the medical science exponentially, making the content to be envisaged by the colleges practically unfeasible. The incorporation of this knowledge in the curricula took place in detriment to human sciences, formerly included as a routine in the schools of medicine all over the world. Negligence of the humanization of medical education may keep from endowing future physicians with the affective resources necessary to the establishment of a satisfactory physical-patient relationship. This study proposes evaluating the use of motion pictures in the humanization of the way graduates see patients, providing them with capability and empathy toward their patients. Three documentaries that correlate indirectly with themes relative to Family and Community Medicine were selected: worker’s mental and community health. After screening to small groups of students, there was a multidisciplinary discussion covering all the several themes relevant to the medical practice. Finally, questionnaires were applied where the students evaluated the importance of the experience in their education, as well as replied to questions about their contact with arts and personal interests. All the students considered the level of correlation of the motion pictures chosen as a good or excellent medical practice. Questioned on the relevance of the themes covered in their education, 94,1% of them answered good or fine. The same percentage considered the curricular inclusion of methodology also good or fine. It was observed that the students evaluated read less than the national average, and a considerable amount of them is not interested in or has never been to a theater, an art exposition or a dance show. The movies, however, proved to be very popular - confirming its potential as a humanizing teaching resource.

  8. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes Erinn T

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds, and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results The response rate was 42.2% (299/709 and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%, diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%, diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%, and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%. However, only 18.1% (N = 54 of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p Conclusions While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  9. The didactics component of the Family and Community Medicine Residency Program of the Community Health Service of the Grupo Hospitalar Conceição, Porto Alegre, RS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Caprio Leite de Castro; Margarita Luz Marina Silva Diercks; Felipe Anselmi Corrêa; Ney Bragança Gyrão; Renata Pekelman; Roberto Nunes Umpierre

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, based on resolutions of the National Commission of Medical Residency, recommends that Family and Community Medicine Medical Residency Programs (FCMMRP) dedicate between 10% and 20% of their workload to didactics. It also highlights that, when designing the pedagogical process of these activities, adult learning must be considered, which occurs on the basis of the daily problems faced by them. The objective of the Family and Community Med...

  10. Effectiveness of a Formal Mentorship Program in Family Medicine Residency: The Residents’ Perspective

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    Marie Andrades

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mentoring is a recognized form of teaching learning strategy in postgraduate medical education. This paper describes the effectiveness of a formal mentorship program from the residents’ perspective after a year of implementation. Methods. The Aga Khan University Family Medicine Residency Program is the first program in Pakistan to our knowledge to implement formal mentorship for all four years of residency. A mentorship program was developed, implemented, and evaluated a year later using a rating scale. The 10-point Likert scale consisted of questions on academics, clinical work, research, administrative issues, and personal/social issues. Results. The response rate was 95% (. Eighty percent ( were women. Satisfaction level in seeking help was the highest for academics (75%. Residents scored mentorship as low in helping to tackle their personal problems (20%. Barriers reported in rapport building with mentor were time constraints and gender difference. The most useful attributes of the mentor which helped rapport building were accessibility, active listening, support for emotional needs, and trustworthiness. Conclusion. Mentoring has a role in trainees’ personal and professional growth especially when their needs are addressed. The effectiveness of the mentorship program in residency can improve if the residents are allowed to choose their own mentors.

  11. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models. PMID:24261270

  12. Model of Family Medicine: From the Side of Primary Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Nur

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: As the influence of the variations in demographics, average incomes, and living conditions in the length of time, health systems sometimes need to be revised (e.g. size, comprehension, organization, etc. to meet health problems. As a consequence of these changes Model of Family Medicine (MFM has implemented in Sivas Province. This study, therefore, was done to evaluate the current knowledge of this model (MFM of the healthcare workers in inner city of Sivas. METHODS: This descriptive study was performed by face to face interview with 224 people (64,2% out of 349 healthcare workers in 19 primary care units in Sivas city. RESULTS: Nearly half of (49,1% healthcare workers affirmed that the project (MFM was pertaining to the Ministry of Health. Overall, 47,8% of healthcare workers did not suppose the MFM will be efficiently improve the health service. Additionally, healthcare workers believed that MFM will not improve the employees personal rights (60,7%, 73,2% of them declared that they worry about competitive pressure of their employment and scared of unemployment, and finally, 62,1% of them did not want to be a MFM personal in the future. CONCLUSION: Healthcare workers seemed to be poorly-informed about MFM, and they seemed worried about the application of the model. These problems should be taken into account by health system planners. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(1.000: 13-16

  13. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  14. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required.

  15. Radiomodulatory potential of hydroalcoholic extract of a medicinal plant Cynodon dactylon (Family: Poaceae), against radiation-induced cytogenetic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure of humans to ionizing radiations may be advertently by routine diagnostic and therapeutic purposes or inadvertently during natural, occupational and nuclear accident situations. Therefore, in order to overcome the deleterious biological effects of radiation several chemical agents have been studied for their radioprotective potential. The medicinal plants being one of the resources for such clinically important natural agents, used extensively in several drug discovery related research. Here the radiomodulatory potential of hydroalcoholic extract of a medicinal plant Cynodon dactylon (Family: Poaceae), against radiation-induced cytogenetic damage was analyzed using Chinese hamster fibroblast cells (V79) and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) growing in vitro is reported

  16. Status and progress of family health in Latin America and the Caribbean: the Ibero-American Confederation of Family Medicine (ICPM perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Inez Padula Anderson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the XXI century, much of humanity does not have access to comprehensive health care, or even basic equitable health care. If studies show that countries with organized health systems based on a qualified and inclusive model of Primary Health Care (PHC and family physicians as permanent staff are achieving unquestionable results, why a large part of the countries with lower socio-economic development have not committed strongly to implement an efficient reform of their health systems based on PHC and family medicine (FM? These issues are at the core of the Latin American Confederation of Family Medicine’s concerns, an international non-profit organization composed of national associations of countries of FM from Latin America, Spain and Portugal. Its primary mission is to drive the implementation of a proper PHC system in all countries of the region and to ensure that family medicine, as a specialty, is considered critical to health systems, thereby transforming it into a public policy.

  17. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

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    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine   The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including

  18. An ethnomedicinal survey of cucurbitaceae family plants used in the folk medicinal practices of Bangladesh 1

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Rahmatullah; Anup Biswas; Wahid Mozammel Haq; Syeda Seraj; Rownak Jahan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Cucurbitaceae family comprising about 125 genera and 960 species is a family that is further characterized by commonly having five-angled stems and coiled tendrils and is also known as gourd family of flowering plants. Plant species belonging to this family have a worldwide distribution, but most species can be found in tropical and subtropical countries. A number of the plants belonging to this family have reported important pharmacological activities. Cucurbitaceae family pl...

  19. GP and nurses' perceptions of how after hours care for people receiving palliative care at home could be improved: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles Gail

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary health care providers play a dominant role in the provision of palliative care (PC in Australia but many gaps in after hours service remain. In some rural areas only 19% of people receiving palliative care achieve their goal of dying at home. This study, which builds on an earlier qualitative phase of the project, investigates the gaps in care from the perspective of general practitioners (GPs and PC nurses. Methods Questionnaires, developed from the outcomes of the earlier phase, and containing both structured and open ended questions, were distributed through Divisions of General Practice (1 urban, 1 rural, 1 mixed to GPs (n = 524 and through a special interest group to palliative care nurses (n = 122 in both rural and urban areas. Results Questionnaires were returned by 114 GPs (22% and 52 nurses (43%. The majority of GPs were associated with a practice which provided some after hours services but PC was not a strong focus for most. This was reflected in low levels of PC training, limited awareness of the existence of after hours triage services in their area, and of the availability of Enhanced Primary Care (EPC Medicare items for care planning for palliative patients. However, more than half of both nurses and GPs were aware of accessible PC resources. Factors such as poor communication and limited availability of after hours services were identified the as most likely to impact negatively on service provision. Strategies considered most likely to improve after hours services were individual patient protocols, palliative care trained respite carers and regular multidisciplinary meetings that included the GP. Conclusion While some of the identified gaps can only be met by long term funding and policy change, educational tools for use in training programs in PC for health professionals, which focus on the utilisation of EPC Medicare items in palliative care planning, the development of advance care plans and good

  20. [Development of standards for education and training in family and community medicine - contributions by WONCA IberoAmerica (CIMF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos Piva; Marin, Anibal; Padula Anderson, Maria Inez; De Castro Filho, Eno Dias; Kidd, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The WONCA Education Working Party (WEP) is developing a set of standards for medical student education, postgraduate training in family medicine / general practice and continuing professional development for family doctors. At this point the contributions by WONCA world regions are very important, and for this reason the main objective of this report is to present the standards developed by the Iberoamerican WONCA Region (CIMF). To be comprehensive and effective, standards should reflect regional realities and so the contributions from CIMF may reinforce and strengthen the key initiative of WEP and the implementation of the standards throughout the world. PMID:21145135

  1. Relevance of chronic lyme disease to family medicine as a complex multidimensional chronic disease construct: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgermans, Liesbeth; Goderis, Geert; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  2. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Borgermans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Based Program for Assessing Quality of Family Medicine Teams Based on Accreditation Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Valjevac, Salih; Ridjanovic, Zoran; Masic, Izet

    2009-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED SUMMARY Introduction Agency for healthcare quality and accreditation in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (AKAZ) is authorized body in the field of healthcare quality and safety improvement and accreditation of healthcare institutions. Beside accreditation standards for hospitals and primary health care centers, AKAZ has also developed accreditation standards for family medicine teams. Methods Software development was primarily based on Accreditation Sta...

  4. Survey of Third-Year Postgraduate Training Positions in Family Medicine: Adding more positions for adequate training in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Busing, Nick

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 16 program directors of residency training in family medicine, respondents were asked about numbers and types of third-year positions they offer. As Canadian educational programs move toward implementing or expanding 2-year prelicensure requirements, many directors are exploring the need to add even more positions for adequate training in primary care. Respondents offered suggestions on tailoring strategies in view of the educational, political, and economic climate.

  5. Blood glucose self-monitoring among patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in family medicine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herenda Samira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Good knowledge of diabetic patients about their disease is often not related with good glycemic control. The aim of this study was to determine the level of application of acquired knowledge about diabetes in recognizing and resolving hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions in patients who did or did not do blood glucose self-monitoring as well as the impact of self-monitoring on HbA1c during education of patients with diabetes type 2. Material and methods. There were 91 patients with the type 2 diabetes who completed six months education about their disease in four family medicine practices in Tuzla Canton during the period from March to September 2005. The patients who did or did not do self-monitoring with glucometer were interviewed on knowledge about recognizing and resolving hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia by family physician and HbA1c was assessed at the beginning of the education, 3 months after reading the brochure (passive education and additional 3 months of group (intensive education. Results. Out of 91 interviewed patients, there were 29 who did self-monitoring by glucometer at the beginning of the education, 30 patients during the passive education and 34 after the intensive education. At the beginning of education, regardless of doing self-monitoring, the patients were less able to recognize and resolve hypoglycemia and even less hyperglycemia. At the end of education, their knowledge was better at both recognizing and resolving hypoglycemia (P=0.01 as well as at recognizing (P=0.01 and resolving hyperglycemia (P=0.001. In the patients who did self-monitoring the average value of the HbA1c did not improve significantly (P=0.44 compared to those who did not practice self-monitoring (P=0.10 during education. Conclusion. Only one third of patients with type 2 diabetes had done self-monitoring with glucometer and although their knowledge about hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia was improved during education, these patients

  6. Training Standards Statements of Family Medicine Postgraduate Training - A Review of Existing Documents Worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Flum

    Full Text Available For the effective and safe management of complex care needs for patients in community settings, high quality family medicine (FM training programmes are needed. In less primary care oriented countries, training standards statements for FM postgraduate training are less commonly found. The aim of this study was to review international training standards statements in FM postgraduate training and to catalogue these statements to be used as a best practice standard guide for FM training programs in Germany.A structured three-tiered search was performed: a systematic literature search in MEDLINE®; a search of international indicator databases; and a search in grey literature, consisting of a survey of international experts and a search in "Google (Scholar". From all identified documents, training standards statements were extracted, translated and summarized into categories referring to the same quality aspect.The search strategy revealed 25 relevant documents (MEDLINE® n = 15, databases n = 2, experts n = 7, "Google" n = 1, containing 337 training standards statements. These were summarized into 80 statements. They covered structure quality (n = 35; process quality (n = 43; and two training standards statements referred to outcome quality (n = 2.A broad range of internationally sourced training standards statements for FM postgraduate training could be identified from countries with well-established primary care systems. Only few statements internationally referred to outcome quality, expressing the difficulty in assessing outcome. The resulting inventory of training standards statements for FM postgraduate training can serve as a resource for institutions seeking to formalise and systematise FM training at regional or national levels.

  7. Family Medicine Residents' Performance with Detected Versus Undetected Simulated Patients Posing as Problem Drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B. Sobell, PhD

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simulated patients are commonly used to evaluate medical trainees. Unannounced simulated patients provide an accurate measure of physician performance. Purpose: To determine the effects of detection of SPs on physician performance, and identify factors leading to detection. Methods: Fixty-six family medicine residents were each visited by two unannounced simulated patients presenting with alcohol-induced hypertension or insomnia. Residents were then surveyed on their detection of SPs. Results: SPs were detected on 45 out of 104 visits. Inner city clinics had higher detection rates than middle class clinics. Residents’ checklist and global rating scores were substantially higher on detected than undetected visits, for both between-subject and within-subject comparisons. The most common reasons for detection concerned SP demographics and behaviour; the SP “did not act like a drinker” and was of a different social class than the typical clinic patient. Conclusions: Multi-clinic studies involving residents experienced with SPs should ensure that the SP role and behavior conform to physician expectations and the demographics of the clinic. SP station testing does not accurately reflect physicians’ actual clinical behavior and should not be relied on as the primary method of evaluation. The study also suggests that physicians’ poor performance in identifying and managing alcohol problems is not entirely due to lack of skill, as they demonstrated greater clinical skills when they became aware that they were being evaluated. Physicians’ clinical priorities, sense of responsibility and other attitudinal determinants of their behavior should be addressed when training physicians on the management of alcohol problems.

  8. Medical student attitudes towards family medicine in Spain: a statewide analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Family and community medicine (FM) became a recognized specialty in Spain in 1978; however, most medical schools in Spain still lack mandatory core courses in FM. In order to explore the perceptions, expectations and level of information amongst medical students in Spain in relation to FM and PC, and the training in these areas in the curriculum of the Medical Schools, a survey was developed to be administered in medical schools every two years. This article presents data from the first questionnaire administration. Methods The study population was all first-, third-, and fifth-year students (2009–2010) in 22 participating medical schools in Spain (of 27 total). The 83-item survey had three sections: personal data, FM training, professional practice expectations, and preferences). Chi-squared test or analyses of variance were used, as appropriate. Results We had a 41.8% response rate (n = 5299/12924); 89.8% considered the social role of FM to be essential, while only 20% believed the specialty was well respected within the medical profession. The appeal of FM increased with years of study, independent of student characteristics or medical school attended. Among third and fifth-year students, 54.6% said their specialty preferences had changed during medical school; 73.6% felt that FM specialists should teach FM courses, and 83.3% thought that FM rotations in primary care centres were useful. Conclusions Students valued the social role of FM more highly than its scientific standing. The vast majority believe that FM training should be mandatory. Only 25% of first-year students have clear preferences for a specialization. Interest in FM increases moderately over their years of study. Working conditions in FM have decisive influence in choosing a specialty. PMID:22642617

  9. A Feminist Perspective of Family Medicine%家庭治疗的女性主义思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐振敏

    2011-01-01

    主要通过女性主义的眼光审视传统家庭治疗流派的理念,反映当前家庭治疗中存在的对女性经验的忽视等不足,探索治疗实践中治疗目标、治疗关系和使用的技术等方面所需要做出的改变,同时简要分析这一现状中家庭治疗师的责任和治疗理念变化的趋向。从家庭治疗自身演变发展的角度,展望未来家庭治疗的发展方向。%This paper adopts a feminist perspective to examine the neglect of women in the traditional theory and practice of family medicine that still prevails today. It investigates in necessary changes in the goals of medicine, relationships in treatment, and technolo- gy used. It also foresees the direction in which changes in responsibilities of family doctors and their perspective of treatment could be made. In so doing, the paper looks into the future development of family medicine.

  10. Telemedicine and E-Learning in a Primary Care Setting in Sudan: The Experience of the Gezira Family Medicine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, K G; Hunskaar, S; Abdelrahman, S H; Malik, E M

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) is progressively used in the health sector (e-health), to provide health care in a distance (telemedicine), facilitate medical education (e-learning), and manage patients' information (electronic medical records, EMRs). Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) in Sudan provides a 2-year master's degree in family medicine, with ICT fully integrated in the project. This cross-sectional study describes ICT implementation and utilization at the GFMP for the years 2011-2012. Administrative data was used to describe ICT implementation, while questionnaire-based data was used to assess candidates' perceptions and satisfaction. In the period from April 2011 to December 2012, 3808 telemedicine online consultations were recorded and over 165000 new patients' EMRs were established by the study subjects (125 candidates enrolled in the program). Almost all respondents confirmed the importance of telemedicine. The majority appreciated also the importance of using EMRs. Online lectures were highly rated by candidates in spite of the few challenges encountered by combining service provision with learning activity. Physicians highlighted some patients' concerns about the use of telemedicine and EMRs during clinical consultations. Results from this study confirmed the suitability of ICT use in postgraduate training in family medicine and in service provision. PMID:26839704

  11. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Lima Wagner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  12. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  13. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade RBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  14. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  15. GP and nurses' perceptions of how after hours care for people receiving palliative care at home could be improved: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Miles Gail; O'Connor Margaret M; Tan Heather M; Klein Britt; Schattner Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary health care providers play a dominant role in the provision of palliative care (PC) in Australia but many gaps in after hours service remain. In some rural areas only 19% of people receiving palliative care achieve their goal of dying at home. This study, which builds on an earlier qualitative phase of the project, investigates the gaps in care from the perspective of general practitioners (GPs) and PC nurses. Methods Questionnaires, developed from the outcomes of ...

  16. Development and implementation of a geriatric care/case management program in a military community-based family medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C M; Petrelli, J; Murphy, M

    2000-11-01

    This article discusses how the development of a longitudinal geriatric assessment form facilitated a case management program in identifying high-risk frail elders within a military family practice clinic. A careful review of geriatric assessment tools was performed. From this review, a model geriatric assessment form was developed. A "SWOT" (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of the family medicine department was completed to determine if the environment was ready for case management. Analysis of the SWOT data revealed that the environment was favorable for a population-based approach to case management. Results of this initial study are encouraging. The new longitudinal geriatric assessment form has assisted family practice residents in organizing problems and data while seeing elderly patients. As a direct result, higher-risk frail elders have been identified for closer evaluation and follow-up. Future goals are to measure outcomes-based data and to refine the geriatric assessment process. PMID:11143424

  17. Experience with using second life for medical education in a family and community medicine education unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melús-Palazón Elena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of new technologies to the education of health professionals is both a challenge and a necessity. Virtual worlds are increasingly being explored as a support for education. Aim: The aim of this work is to study the suitability of Second Life (SL as an educational tool for primary healthcare professionals. Methods Design: Qualitative study of accredited clinical sessions in SL included in a continuing professional development (CPD programme for primary healthcare professionals. Location: Zaragoza I Zone Family and Community Medicine Education Unit (EU and 9 health centres operated by the Aragonese Health Service, Aragon, Spain. Method: The EU held two training workshops in SL for 16 healthcare professionals from 9 health centres by means of two workshops, and requested them to facilitate clinical sessions in SL. Attendance was open to all personnel from the EU and the 9 health centres. After a trail period of clinical sessions held at 5 health centres between May and November 2010, the CPD-accredited clinical sessions were held at 9 health centres between February and April 2011. Participants: 76 healthcare professionals attended the CPD-accredited clinical sessions in SL. Main measurements: Questionnaire on completion of the clinical sessions. Results Response rate: 42-100%. Questionnaire completed by each health centre on completion of the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Access to SL: 2 centres were unable to gain access. Sound problems: 0% (0/9. Image problems: 0% (0/9. Voice/text chat: used in 100% (10/9; 0 incidents. Questionnaire completed by participants in the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Preference for SL as a tool: 100% (76/76. Strengths of this method: 74% (56/76 considered it eliminated the need to travel; 68% (52/76 believed it made more effective use of educational resources; and 47% (36/76 considered it improved accessibility. Weaknesses: 91% (69/76 experienced technical problems, while; 9

  18. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most...... commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient......-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. METHODS/DESIGN: This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least...

  19. Can Credit Systems Help in Family Medicine Training in Developing Countries? An Innovative Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Raji, J. Beulah; Velavan, Jachin; Anbarasi, Sahaya; Grant, Liz

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that health systems perform best when supported by a Family Physician network. Training a critical mass of highly skilled Family Physicians can help developing countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals and deliver comprehensive patient-centered health care to their population. The challenge in developing countries is the need to rapidly train these Family Physicians in large numbers, while also ensuring the quality of the learning, and assuring the qu...

  20. Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

  1. Culticultural Problem of Woman’s Position in Society and Family in Focus of Literary Studies and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Ljudmila Jacovlevna Voronova; Alexei Nikolajevich Pashkurov; Anatolij Ilich Razzhivin; Rinat Badrievich Sabirov; Natalja Nikolajevna Muslimova

    2015-01-01

    A new systemic pattern of perception of social and cultural problem of woman’s position in the family and society based on analytical data of literary studies and medicine is proposed in the article. A typology of the problem of women’s rights restriction in the society, violence against them, feminism is in the focus of attention. The study is carried out with the account of diachrony and synchrony against the broad historical and cultural, and social and cultural backgrounds. Up-to-date inf...

  2. The content of family practice: a family medicine resident's 2 1/2-year experience with the E-book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, J C

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the content of office family practice problems seen over a 2 1/2-year residency period and to afford comparison with the well-known Virginia Study. It illustrates the usefulness of the diagnostic E-Book, with which all the data were collected and preserved. Over a 2 1/2-year period, the author cared for 592 patients in the family practice office. The ratio of one physician to 592 patients compares to the Virginia Study's one physician to approximately 745 patients. A total of 1,640 problems were coded in the E-Book. In this study 55 problems/physician/month were seen, whereas in the Virginia Study approximately 177 problems/physician/month were noted. Respiratory illnesses were the most common diagnostic category in both studies. Among specific problems, obesity ranked first at Hershey, with afebrile colds second, hypertension and Beta streptococcal pharyngitis third, and smoking fourth. Obesity and smoking were ranked considerably lower in the Virginia Study, whereas "health maintenance examinations" were ranked number one. Finally, for age-sex practice profiles, the present data revealed two peak age groups for both sexes, whereas the Virginia work noted only one peak age range. PMID:903750

  3. Protective Effects of Some Medicinal Plants from Lamiaceae Family Against Beta-Amyloid Induced Toxicity in PC12 Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saeidnia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive accumulation of beta-amyliod peptide (Aβ, the major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes neuronal cell death through induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidants may be of use in the treatment of AD. The medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family have been widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. These plants contain compounds with antioxidant activity and some species in this family have been reported to have neuroprotective properties. In the present study, methanolic extract of seven plants from salvia and satureja species were evaluated for their protective effects against beta-amyloid induced neurotoxicity.Methods: Aerial parts of the plants were extracted with ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively, by percolation at room temperature and subsequently, methanolic extracts of the plants were prepared. PC12 cells were incubated with different concentrations of the extracts in culture medium 1h prior to incubation with Aβ. Cell toxicity was assessed 24h after addition of Aβ by MTT assay.Results: Satureja bachtiarica, Salvia officinalis and Salvia macrosiphon methanolic extracts exhibited high protective effects against Aβ induced toxicity (P<0.001. Protective effects of Satureja bachtiarica and Salvia officinalis were dose-dependent.Conclusion: The main constituents of these extracts are polyphenolic and flavonoid compounds such as rosmarinic acid, naringenin, apigenin and luteolin which have antioxidant properties and may have a role in neuroprotection. Based on neuroprotective effect of these plants against Aβ induced toxicity, we recommend greater attention to their use in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  4. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Pagels

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents’ health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents N=25 participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents’ ability to measure their patients’ health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge p=0.001 and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8% and a translator more effectively (77.8% three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  5. Physicians' perceptions of and approaches to woman abuse. Does certification in family medicine make a difference?

    OpenAIRE

    Tudiver, F.; Permaul-Woods, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discover whether family physicians who go through residency training and The College of Family Physicians of Canada's (CFPC) certification process are more responsive than other physicians to woman abuse, whether they perceive and approach such abuse more appropriately, and whether they seek out more education on the subject. DESIGN: A national survey using a pretested 43-item mailed questionnaire to examine perceptions of and approaches to detection and management of woman abus...

  6. A Countercultural Heritage: Rediscovering the Relationship-Centered and Social Justice Roots of Family Medicine-A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Richard C; Stoltenberg, Mark; Hughes, Lauren S

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 G. Gayle Stephens Keystone conference convened a cohort of primary care professionals to discuss what promises personal physicians will make to their patients going forward. New physicians were prompted to rediscover the foundational values of and historic context for family medicine. At the heart of this rediscovery was learning of the writings and teachings of Dr. G. Gayle Stephens, a founder of family medicine who emphasized the essentiality of relationship-centered care and social justice to the new specialty. Dr. Stephens viewed family medicine as being in a countercultural relationship to mainstream medicine, as family medicine fought for justice and equity in an inequitable and fragmented health care system. Here we argue that by reaffirming and renewing this countercultural heritage the new generation of family physicians will have better clarity in approaching the many challenges in health care today. Particularly for trainees and new physicians, the historic lens offered by Dr. Stephens's writing and other foundational documents allows us to better see ourselves in a trajectory of ongoing health care reform. PMID:27387164

  7. The didactics component of the Family and Community Medicine Residency Program of the Community Health Service of the Grupo Hospitalar Conceição, Porto Alegre, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Caprio Leite de Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, based on resolutions of the National Commission of Medical Residency, recommends that Family and Community Medicine Medical Residency Programs (FCMMRP dedicate between 10% and 20% of their workload to didactics. It also highlights that, when designing the pedagogical process of these activities, adult learning must be considered, which occurs on the basis of the daily problems faced by them. The objective of the Family and Community Medicine Medical Residency Program of the Community Health Service of the Grupo Hospitalar Conceição (FCMMRP of CHS/GHC is to form qualified and problem-solving physicians for Primary Health Care, with an integrative and continued practice, in multidisciplinary teams, inserted within the communities under their care. This paper introduces the Theoretical Core Program (TCP of the FCMMRP of CHS/GHC, which is the section of the Didactics Program responsible, in this residency, for training in the aspects that are specific to Family and Community Medicine. This report aims to contribute with the methodological praxis of the didactic activities of the FCMMRP in Brazil. First the article introduces the Community Health Service of the Grupo Hospitalar Conceição, its Family and Community Medicine Medical Residency Program and the didactics component of this program. Next, the TCP is presented by means of its four constituent elements: guiding axis; thematic axis and its respective contents; pedagogical process; and evaluation.

  8. Sports Medicine: Does the Family Physician Need to Acquire New Knowledge and Skills?

    OpenAIRE

    Haigh, Geoffrey

    1988-01-01

    The knowledge and skills required to be competent in practising sports medicine can be defined and are discussed. Musculoskeletal injuries are the most common type of sports-related trauma, and their management requires diagnosis, acute treatment, and rehabilitation. Many other areas of management are involved, particularly exercise, with all its ramifications in children, adults, and the chronically sick. Use and abuse of drugs must be discussed with the athlete so that errors of legitimate ...

  9. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory, Antioxidant and Phytochemical Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants of the Lamiaceae Family

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda Vladimir-Knežević; Biljana Blažeković; Marija Kindl; Jelena Vladić; Lower-Nedza, Agnieszka D.; Brantner, Adelheid H.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman’s colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus ...

  10. Self-reported colorectal cancer screening of Medicare beneficiaries in family medicine vs. internal medicine practices in the United States: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Angela Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefit of screening for decreasing the risk of death from colorectal cancer (CRC has been shown, yet many patients in primary care are still not undergoing screening according to guidelines. There are known variations in delivery of preventive health care services among primary care physicians. This study compared self-reported CRC screening rates and patient awareness of the need for CRC screening of patients receiving care from family medicine (FPs vs. internal medicine (internists physicians. Methods Nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized beneficiaries who received medical care from FPs or internists in 2006 (using Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. The main outcome was the percentage of patients screened in 2007. We also examined the percentage of patients offered screening. Results Patients of FPs, compared to those of internists, were less likely to have received an FOBT kit or undergone home FOBT, even after accounting for patients' characteristics. Compared to internists, FPs' patients were more likely to have heard of colonoscopy, but were less likely to receive a screening colonoscopy recommendation (18% vs. 27%, or undergo a colonoscopy (43% vs. 46%, adjusted odds ratios [AOR], 95% confidence interval [CI]-- 0.65, 0.51-0.81 or any CRC screening (52% vs. 60%, AOR, CI--0.80, 0.68-0.94. Among subgroups examined, higher income beneficiaries receiving care from internists had the highest screening rate (68%, while disabled beneficiaries receiving care from FPs had the lowest screening rate (34%. Conclusion Patients cared for by FPs had a lower rate of screening compared to those cared for by internists, despite equal or higher levels of awareness; a difference that remained statistically significant after accounting for socioeconomic status and access to healthcare. Both groups of patients remained below the national goal of 70 percent.

  11. [Learning concepts of diagnosis in family medicine: the "mark robinson sign" - the traces that should not be there].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turabián, José Luis; Samarín-Ocampos, Elena; Minier, Luis; Pérez-Franco, Benjamín

    2015-11-01

    We review the mechanisms of the mental operation to identify the disease in family medicine, using five cases where the diagnosis process began in "the trace that should not be there" or "Robinson sign" as happened to Robinson Crusoe when he saw a human footprint on the beach of the "desert island". How could it be there?; It was a mystery, and based on metaphors, we framed the mechanism of "the trace that should not be there" mainly in the first phase of clinical or intuitive reasoning, but this intuition of the doctor should be accompanied by the diagnostic process, like the "basso continuo" of Baroque music, allowing improvisation and personal style, and in this way, eventually observing the footprint "that should not have been there" that may arise in the analytical, as well as in the verification phase of the assumptions made. PMID:25959290

  12. [Learning concepts of diagnosis in family medicine: the "mark robinson sign" - the traces that should not be there].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turabián, José Luis; Samarín-Ocampos, Elena; Minier, Luis; Pérez-Franco, Benjamín

    2015-11-01

    We review the mechanisms of the mental operation to identify the disease in family medicine, using five cases where the diagnosis process began in "the trace that should not be there" or "Robinson sign" as happened to Robinson Crusoe when he saw a human footprint on the beach of the "desert island". How could it be there?; It was a mystery, and based on metaphors, we framed the mechanism of "the trace that should not be there" mainly in the first phase of clinical or intuitive reasoning, but this intuition of the doctor should be accompanied by the diagnostic process, like the "basso continuo" of Baroque music, allowing improvisation and personal style, and in this way, eventually observing the footprint "that should not have been there" that may arise in the analytical, as well as in the verification phase of the assumptions made.

  13. Bending the cost curve and increasing revenue: a family medicine model that works!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Bernard J; Needham, Mark R

    2012-12-01

    This article attempts to illustrate ways in which family physician practices are able to demonstrate high value, enhanced quality, and streamlined costs, essential components of practice sustainability. Specific examples are provided to assist practices to consider questions and information that allow for skillful engagement during contract negotiations, consider increasing practice revenues by adopting practice enhancements that make sense for the location of the practice and community needs, develop workflow analyses, and review opportunities for expense reduction.

  14. The European general practice research network presents the translations of its comprehensive definition of multimorbidity in family medicine in ten European languages.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Reste, Jean Yves; Nabbe, Patrice; Rivet, Charles; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Doerr, Christa; Czachowski, Slawomir; Lingner, Heidrun; Argyriadou, Stella; Lazic, Djurdjica; Assenova, Radost; Hasaganic, Melida; Munoz, Miquel Angel; Thulesius, Hans; Le Floch, Bernard; Derriennic, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Multimorbidity, according to the World Health Organization, exists when there are two or more chronic conditions in one patient. This definition seems inaccurate for the holistic approach to Family Medicine (FM) and long-term care. To avoid this pitfall the European General Practitioners Research Network (EGPRN) designed a comprehensive definition of multimorbidity using a systematic literature review.

  15. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS FROM LAMIACEAE FAMILY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Laudy, Agnieszka E; Przybył, Jarosław; Ziarno, Małgorzata; Majewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) extracts from herbs often used in Polish cuisine and traditional herbal medicine including thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) were compared. The aqueous ethanolic extracts contained slightly higher levels of phenolics compared to the aqueous methanolic extracts. In turn, GC-MS analysis showed that the aqueous methanolic extracts of thyme, rosemary and sage contained several additional compounds such as eugenol or ledol. The present studies also indicated that the bacterial species applied in the experiment exhibited different sensitivities towards tested extracts. Staphylococcus aureus strains were found to be the most sensitive bacteria to aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) rosemary and sage extracts and aqueous methanolic thyme extract. Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 and Proteus vulgaris NCTC 4635 were more susceptible to the aqueous methanolic thyme extract. However, Listeria monocytogenes 1043S was the most sensitive to the aqueous ethanolic rosemary extract. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the tested extracts than Gram-negative ones. PMID:26647633

  16. Results of chart reviews conducted to evaluate primary care patients seen by second and third year family medicine residents for potential adverse polypharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang LF

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of family medicine residents for patients aged more than 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases and seen at least twice in a 12 month timeframe.Methods: This is a descriptive analysis which was based on chart reviews. The setting was the University of Illinois-Rockford Family Practice Residency. Patients aged 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases who were seen at least twice by second and third year residents.Results: Findings from this chart review include: 28.8% of the prescribed medications were not effective for the documented condition, 26.3% of the prescribed doses were incorrect, and 44.5% of the drugs prescribed were not the least expensive alternative.Discussion: This preliminary study suggests a need for a focused intervention with family medicine residents regarding inappropriate polypharmacy issues with older patients.

  17. Early detection of ovarian cancer in FB&H - role of family medicine team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dž. Ljuca

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of problems with ovarian malignancy in the Federation B&H requires a comprehensive and precise analysis of the population characteristics with particular focus on risk factors such as age, parity, hereditary factors, menstrual cycle characteristics (short cycle, early menarche, late menopause. A retrospective study of medical documentation involving 272 patients with ovarian cancer within the Federation of BiH in the period from 1996 to 2000 was conducted. Usual statistical methods were used (T- test, 2 -Test, Fisher exact test. The research showed that the disease was in most cases diagnosed too late, in the stages III and IV (60% whereas histology of the tissue showed epithelial cancer in 88,6% cases, most frequently between the age of 55 to 70. Out of 272 patients null-parity was recorded in 16,9 %, whereas 19,8 % of patients had just one pregnancy. Menstrual cycle duration shorter than 21 days was recorded in 26,5% cases. Approximately 1,8% patients had close relatives that suffered of cancer of breast, ovary or colon. Prerequisites for application of algorhithms in diagnostic procedures would be met by identification of risk groups consisting of those with one or more risk factors in their history. Bearing in mind the role of the family doctors in the future health system reform, it can be concluded that they could have an important role in the process.

  18. Lack of chart reminder effectiveness on family medicine resident JNC-VI and NCEP III guideline knowledge and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature demonstrates that medical residents and practicing physicians have an attitudinal-behavioral discordance concerning their positive attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines (CPG, and the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice patterns. Methods A pilot study was performed to determine if change in a previously identified CPG compliance factor (accessibility would produce a significant increase in family medicine resident knowledge and attitude toward the guidelines. The primary study intervention involved placing a summary of the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI and the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP III CPGs in all patient (>18 yr. charts for a period of three months. The JNC VI and NCEP III CPGs were also distributed to each Wayne State family medicine resident, and a copy of each CPG was placed in the preceptor's area of the involved clinics. Identical pre- and post- intervention questionnaires were administered to all residents concerning CPG knowledge and attitude. Results Post-intervention analysis failed to demonstrate a significant difference in CPG knowledge. A stastically significant post-intervention difference was found in only on attitude question. The barriers to CPG compliance were identified as 1 lack of CPG instruction; 2 lack of critical appraisal ability; 3 insufficient time; 4 lack of CPG accessibility; and 5 lack of faculty modeling. Conclusion This study demonstrated no significant post intervention changes in CPG knowledge, and only one question that reflected attitude change. Wider resident access to dedicated clinic time, increased faculty modeling, and the implementation of an electronic record/reminder system that uses a team-based approach are compliance factors that

  19. Development of the quality assessment model of EHR software in family medicine practices: research based on user satisfaction

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    Damir Kralj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Family medicine practices (FMPs make the basis for the Croatian health care system. Use of electronic health record (EHR software is mandatory and it plays an important role in running these practices, but important functional features still remain uneven and largely left to the will of the software developers.Objective The objective of this study was to develop a novel and comprehensive model for functional evaluation of the EHR software in FMPs, based on current world standards, models and projects, as well as on actual user satisfaction and requirements.Methods Based on previous theoretical and experimental research in this area, we made the initial framework model consisting of six basic categories as a base for online survey questionnaire. Family doctors assessed perceived software quality by using a five-point Likert-type scale. Using exploratory factor analysis and appropriate statistical methods over the collected data, the final optimal structure of the novel model was formed. Special attention was focused on the validity and quality of the novel model.Results The online survey collected a total of 384 cases. The obtained results indicate both the quality of the assessed software and the quality in use of the novel model. The intense ergonomic orientation of the novel measurement model was particularly emphasised.Conclusions The resulting novel model is multiple validated, comprehensive and universal. It could be used to assess the user-perceived quality of almost all forms of the ambulatory EHR software and therefore useful to all stakeholders in this area of the health care informatisation. 

  20. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1 a recruitment page, 2 a summary page, and 3 a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27% enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps

  1. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Auxin response factors (ARFs) can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF) gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III) were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza. Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27230647

  2. A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Mark; Mangold, Karen; Trainor, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship. The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course. Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p 4. A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills required for pediatric-related residencies was well received and led to improved performance of targeted skills and increased self-reported preparedness in many targeted domains. PMID:27014522

  3. A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Mark; Mangold, Karen; Trainor, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship. The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course. Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p plan to implement in internship,” and “I think all students should participate in a similar experience.” When asked to assess the usefulness of individual modules, all except order writing received a mean Likert score > 4. A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills required for pediatric-related residencies was well received and led to improved performance of targeted skills and increased self-reported preparedness in many targeted domains. PMID:27014522

  4. Quality evaluation and pattern recognition analyses of marker compounds from five medicinal drugs of Rutaceae family by HPLC/PDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing Tian; Kim, Eun Jung; Son, Kun Ho; Son, Jong Keun; Min, Byung Sun; Woo, Mi Hee

    2015-08-01

    To establish a standard of quality control and to identify different origins for the Rutaceae family [Citri Unshiu Peel (CU), Citri Unshiu Immature Peel (CI), Ponciri Immature Fructus (PI), Aurantii Immature Fructus (AI), and Aurantii Fructus (AU)], 13 standards including rutin (1), narirutin (2), naringin (3), hesperidin (4), neohesperidin (5), neoponcirin (6), poncirin (7), naringenin (8), isosinensetin (9), sinensetin (10), nobiletin (11), heptamethoxyflavone (12), and tangeretin (13) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/photo-diode array (PDA) analysis. A YMC ODS C18 (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) column was used and the ratio of mobile phases of water (A) and acetonitrile (B) delivered to the column for gradient elution was applied. This method was fully validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, stability, and robustness. The HPLC/PDA method was applied successfully to quantify 13 major compounds in the extracts of CU, CI, PI, AI, and AU. The pattern recognition analysis combined with LC chromatographic data was performed by repeated analysis of 27 reference samples in the above five Rutaceae oriental medicinal drugs. The established HPLC method was rapid and reliable for quantitative analysis and quality control of multiple components in five Rutaceae species with different origins. PMID:25732613

  5. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF) gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III) were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27230647

  6. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Auxin response factors (ARFs can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza. Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza.

  7. Retrospective analysis of the role and performance of family medicine versus emergency medical services in the pre-hospital management of patients with AMI in Banja Luka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Lakić

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in pre-hospital care of patients with acute myocardial infarction between emergency medical services and family medicine. Patients and methods. This retrospective descriptive study included patients treated for acute myocardial infarction at the University Clinical Centre of Banja Luka, in the period from 1st January to 31st December 2011. The patients were divided into two groups: patients who received a hospital referral from the family medicine service and those who received one from the emergency medical service. Results. The majority of patients (54.8% received pre-hospital care from emergency medical services, while in 24.8% of cases the care was provided by family medicine physicians. The analysis showed that the time that passed from the onset of symptoms to the visit to the health institution of first medical contact was shorter in the emergency medical service (p<0.001. The average time from the onset of symptoms to arrival at the family practice was 24 hours, and to the emergency service 2 hours. The patients who established their first medical contact with the emergency service reported more severe symptoms than the ones who visited a family practice over the same period of time. Conclusion. The severity of symptoms affected the patients’ decisions to seek help in a timely manner and to choose the facility of first medical contact. Interventions to decrease delay must focus on improving public awareness of acute myocardial infarction symptoms and increasing their knowledge of the benefits of early medical contact and treatment. Continuing education of family practitioners in this field is required.

  8. The European General Practice Research Network Presents the Translations of Its Comprehensive Definition of Multimorbidity in Family Medicine in Ten European Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Yves Le Reste; Patrice Nabbe; Charles Rivet; Charilaos Lygidakis; Christa Doerr; Slawomir Czachowski; Heidrun Lingner; Stella Argyriadou; Djurdjica Lazic; Radost Assenova; Melida Hasaganic; Miquel Angel Munoz; Hans Thulesius; Bernard Le Floch; Jeremy Derriennic

    2015-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity, according to the World Health Organization, exists when there are two or more chronic conditions in one patient. This definition seems inaccurate for the holistic approach to Family Medicine (FM) and long-term care. To avoid this pitfall the European General Practitioners Research Network (EGPRN) designed a comprehensive definition of multimorbidity using a systematic literature review. Objective To translate that English definition into European languages and to va...

  9. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  10. Developing and successfully implementing a competency-based portfolio assessment system in a postgraduate family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs. PMID:25993277

  11. A nationwide survey of public healthcare providers’ impressions of family medicine specialists in Malaysia: a qualitative analysis of written comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah; Mohd-Salleh, Noridah; Bashah, Baizury

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine impressions of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs (PERMFAMS). Participants PHCPs from three categories of health facility: hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Main outcome measures Qualitative analyses of written comments of respondents’ general impression of FMSs. Results The participants’ response rate was 58.0% (780/1345), with almost equal proportions from each public healthcare facility. A total of 23 categories for each of the 648 impression comments were identified. The six emerging themes were: (1) importance of FMSs; (2) roles of FMSs; (3) clinical performance of FMSs; (4) attributes of FMSs; (5) FMS practice challenges; (6) misconception of FMS roles. Overall, FMS practice was perceived to be safe and able to provide effective treatments in a challenging medical discipline that was in line with the current standards of medical care and ethical and professional values. The areas of concern were in clinical performance expressed by PHCPs from some hospitals and the lack of personal attributes and professionalism among FMSs mentioned by PHCPs from health clinics and offices. Conclusions FMSs were perceived to be capable of providing effective treatment and were considered to be important primary care physicians. There were a few negative impressions in some areas of FMS practice, which demanded attention by the FMSs themselves and the relevant authorities in order to improve efficiency and safeguard the fraternity's reputation. PMID:26743703

  12. Developing and successfully implementing a competency-based portfolio assessment system in a postgraduate family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs.

  13. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    OpenAIRE

    Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade RBMFC

    2010-01-01

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM) is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC) issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplina...

  14. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 2. Results: Primary care management and community orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    At the WONCA Europe conference 2009 the recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' was presented. It is a background paper and reference manual, providing advocacy of general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) in Europe. The Research Agenda summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the WONCA Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In this second article, the results for the core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' are presented. Though there is a large body of research on various aspects of 'primary care management', it represents a very scattered rather than a meta view. Many studies focus on care for specific diseases, the primary/secondary care interface, or the implications of electronic patient records. Cost efficiency or process indicators of quality are current outcomes. Current literature on community orientation is mainly descriptive, and focuses on either care for specific diseases, or specific patient populations, or on the uptake of preventive services. Most papers correspond poorly to the WONCA concept. For both core competencies, there is a lack of research with a longitudinal perspective and/or relevant health or quality of life outcomes as well as research on patients' preferences and education for organizational aspects of GP/FM.

  15. Postgraduate training for family medicine in a rural district hospital in South Africa: Appropriateness and sufficiency of theatre procedures as a sentinel indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawie Du Plessis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 2007, the postgraduate training of family physicians for South African district hospitals has been formalised. This training differs from European and North American programmes as up to 30% of the skills needed rely on district hospital surgical, obstetrics and anaesthetics procedures, particularly in rural areas, as outlined in the national unit standards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness and sufficiency of learning opportunities for these skills in a rural district hospital.Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was undertaken of the number and type of procedures performed in theatre for a 1-year period and compared with the required procedural skills stipulated in the national unit standards. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to analyse categorical data.Results: Three thousand seven hundred and forty-one procedures were performed during the study period. Anaesthesia was the most common procedure, followed by Caesarean section. There were adequate opportunities for teaching most core skills.Conclusions: Sufficient and appropriate learning opportunities exist for postgraduate family medicine training in all the core skills performed in a theatre according to the national unit standards.Keywords: Post Graduate Training, Family Medicine, Procedural Skills, Rural, District hospitals

  16. The application of multiplex fluorimetric sensor for the analysis of flavonoids content in the medicinal herbs family Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, Rosaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Sytar, Oksana; Bruckova, Klaudia; Elena HUNKOVA; Zivcak, Marek; Konate, Kiessoun; Brestic, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of our research work was to quantify total flavonoid contents in the leaves of 13 plant species family Asteraceae, 8 representatives of family Lamiaceae and 9 plant species belonging to family Rosaceae, using the multiplex fluorimetric sensor. Fluorescence was measured using optical fluorescence apparatus Multiplex(R) 3 (Force-A, France) for non-destructive flavonoids estimation. The content of total flavonoids was estimated by FLAV index (expressed in relative units), that...

  17. Medizinstudierende Eltern – die Dichotomie der Erfahrungswelten [Parents Studying Medicine – the dichotomy of studying with a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iden, Kirstin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: In this article the personal study and life situation of parents who are also medical students at the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main is discussed. There is a special focus on the topics “studying with children” and “family-friendly university”, which have been present in discussions about university development and in the daily life of academics, especially during the last decade. The workgroup “Individual Student Services” at the medical faculty at the Goethe University tries to meet the necessities of the individual study courses and to support the study success with a new counselling and student service concept.Methods: The experience of parents studying medicine was recorded in semi-structured interviews (Date: April 2010, which were held as part of the sponsored pilot project on part-time medical studies (“Pilot Project Part-time Medical Studies”. Additionally, study results from the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main were integrated as well as a literature analysis.Results: It was found that the teaching demands and support services, which have been suggested and needed for years now, have been partially implemented and are without sufficient support at the faculty level to date. Thus the current situation of medical students with children is still difficult and seems a big challenge for everyone involved.Solution: As part of the “Individual Student Services” a new pilot project on part-time medical studies was established in November 2009. Only the use of new, unconventional and innovative ideas allows universities to adequately support the changing and heterogeneous student population and support them to successfully completing their medical studies.[german] Einleitung: In dem vorliegenden Artikel wird die persönliche Studien- und Lebenssituation von Studierenden mit Kindern am Fachbereich Medizin der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

  18. The Effects of Family Nursing and Family Medicine Clinical Rotations on Nursing and Medical Students' Self-Efficacy for Health Promotion Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, Heather K. Spence; McWilliam, Carol L.; Weston, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Pretest-posttest results from 66 students in community nursing and 71 medical students in a family practice rotation showed that nursing students had significantly higher self-efficacy for health counseling at the posttest and 3 months later. Nurses' self-efficacy scores were significantly related to use of health promotion principles. (SK)

  19. Family medicine, 'La Herencia' and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-06-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban public and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on 'the family' in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as 'community genetics', including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba.

  20. Family medicine, ‘La Herencia’ and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-01-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban publics and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on ‘the family’ in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as ‘community genetics’, including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba. PMID:21239101

  1. [Gustav Klimt and the field of medicine. Painting of the medical faculty--relationship with the Zuckerkandl family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, D

    2007-09-01

    The art nouveau painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a cofounder of the Vienna Secession movement, was commissioned in 1894 to prepare three ceiling paintings for the Great Hall of the University of Vienna portraying the faculties of "Philosophy," "Medicine," and "Jurisprudence." After the first public presentations of these paintings starting in 1900 fierce protests erupted since the artist had not painted a historical allegory but rather had created a modern symbolic picture in the Secessionism style. The controversy over the so-called faculty paintings escalated to the point that in 1905 Klimt irrevocably distanced himself from the commission and bought back his pictures from the state. The paintings were later purchased by the Austrian Gallery and in 1943 placed in storage in Lower Austria at the Immendorf Castle where they were destroyed by a fire in May 1945 when the German troops withdrew. Besides Klimt's preliminary sketches, only black and white photographs of the three paintings now exist as well as a color reproduction of the section depicting Hygieia from the "Medicine" painting. Due to the public rejection of the faculty paintings, Gustav Klimt broke away from official government-commissioned art and focused on private clients from among Viennese society. One of these intensive associations was with the anatomist Emil Zuckerkandl and his wife Berta, who was very active in cultural affairs. During the dispute over the faculty paintings, Zuckerkandl was one of the few university professors who signed a petition in favor of retaining the paintings. His brother, the industrialist Victor Zuckerkandl, was one of the major collectors and patrons of Secessionist art. The third brother, the well-known urologist Otto Zuckerkandl (1861-1921), president of the Second and Third Congresses of the German Society of Urology in 1909 and 1911, was also in close contact with Klimt. A portrait of his wife Amalie was a work in progress between 1913 and 1917, but it remained

  2. Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age in family medicine clinics in Mexico City

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    Torres-Arreola Laura del Pilar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico, inappropriate prescription of drugs with potential interactions causing serious risks to patient health has been little studied. Work in this area has focused mainly on hospitalized patients, with only specific drug combinations analyzed; moreover, the studies have not produced conclusive results. In the present study, we determined the frequency of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, who used Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS family medicine clinics. In addition, we aimed to identify the associated factors for these interactions. Methods We collected information on general patient characteristics, medical histories, and medication (complete data. The study included 624 ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, with non-malignant pain syndrome, who made ambulatory visits to two IMSS family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The patients received 7-day prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics. The potential interactions were identified by using the Thompson Micromedex program. Data were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The average number of prescribed drugs was 5.9 ± 2.5. About 80.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug-drug interactions and 3.8% of patients were prescribed drug combinations with interactions that should be avoided. Also, 64.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug disease interactions. The factors significantly associated with having one or more potential interactions included: taking 5 or more medicines (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR: 4.34, 95%CI: 2.76–6.83, patient age 60 years or older (adjusted OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.01–2.74 and suffering from cardiovascular diseases (adjusted OR: 7.26, 95% CI: 4.61–11.44. Conclusion The high frequency of prescription of drugs with potential drug interactions showed in

  3. The interpretation of the reasons for encounter ‘cough’ and ‘sadness’ in four international family medicine populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean K Soler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background This is a study of the relationships between common reasons for encounter and common diagnoses (episode titles within episodes of care in family practice populations in four countries.Method Participating family doctors recorded details of all their patient contacts in an EoC structure using the International Classification of Primary Care, including RfEs presented by the patient, and the FDs’ diagnostic labels. The relationships between RfEs and episode titles were studied using Bayesian methods.Results The RfE ‘cough’ is a strong, reliable predictor for the diagnoses ‘cough’, ‘acute bronchitis’, ‘URTI’ and ‘acute laryngitis/tracheitis’ and a less strong, but reliable predictor for ‘sinusitis’, ‘pneumonia’, ‘influenza’, ‘asthma’, ‘other viral diseases’, ‘whooping cough’, ‘chronic bronchitis’, ‘wheezing’ and ‘phlegm’. The absence of cough is a weak but reliable predictor to exclude a diagnosis of ‘cough’, ‘acute bronchitis’ and ‘tracheitis’. Its presence allows strong, reliable exclusion of the diagnoses ‘gastroenteritis’, ‘no disease’ and ‘health promotion/prevention’, and less strong exclusion of ‘adverse effects of medication’. The RfE ‘sadness’ is a strong, reliable predictor for the diagnoses ‘feeling sad/depressed’ and ‘depressive disorder’. It is a less strong, but reliable predictor of a diagnosis of ‘acute stress reaction’. The absence of sadness is a weak but reliable predictor to exclude the symptom diagnosis ‘feeling sad/depressed’. Its presence does not support the exclusion of any diagnosis.Conclusions We describe clinically and statistically significant diagnostic associations observed between the RfEs ‘cough’ and ‘sadness’, presenting as a new problem in family practice, and all the episode titles in ICPC.

  4. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Tan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims: To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010–2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods: A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students’ educational experience of using this case. Results: Ninety five percent (130/137 of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127 increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001. The students’ self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001. Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as ‘Good to Excellent’, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions: The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

  5. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects. PMID:20825274

  6. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects.

  7. Association of common mental disorders and quality of life with the frequency of attendance in Slovenian family medicine practices: longitudinal study.

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    Janez Rifel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most research on frequent attendance has been cross-sectional and restricted to one year attendance rates. A few longitudinal studies suggest that frequent attendance is self-limiting. Frequent attenders are more likely to have social and psychiatric problems, medically unexplained physical symptoms, chronic somatic diseases (especially diabetes and are prescribed more psychotropic medication and analgesics. RESEARCH QUESTION: To describe the attendance rates in a longitudinal study and to test if depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome, alcohol misuse and general quality of life are associated with frequent attendance in next two consecutive years. METHODS: 1118 consecutive family practice attendees, aged 18 to 75 years from randomly selected family medicine practices were recruited at baseline and followed up at 12 and 24 months. We identified frequent attenders in the top 10 centile within one year. Using a multivariate model, we ascertained if presence of common mental disorders and quality of life assessed at baseline in 2003 predict frequent attendance in 2004 and 2005. RESULTS: 40% of frequent attenders continue to be frequent attenders in the following year and 20% of the frequent attenders were so for the 24 month period. Lower physical scores on the SF-12 questionnaire were strongly associated with future frequent attendance at 12 and 24 months. There was a trend for people with greater than elementary school education to be less likely to become frequent attenders at both 12 and 24 months. For other variables these effects were less consistent. Presence of major depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome and alcohol misuse were not predictive of frequent attendance in the following two years. CONCLUSION: Low physical quality of life is strongly predictive of higher frequent attendance and similar finding was observed for people with lower educational level but further confirmatory research is required to

  8. An Analysis of the Degree of Importance of Plant Families in the Medicinal Ferns of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region%广西药用蕨类植物所在科的重要度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金标; 卢家仕; 黄敏; 宋日云

    2008-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the degree of importance of plant families in the medicinal ferns of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. A regression residual analysis was carried out on the number of medicinal ferns and the total number of ferns in each family for 56 fern families in the region. According to the residual values the 56 families were divided into 31 high use families and 25 low use families.%旨在确定广西药用蕨类植物所在各科的重要程度,用回归残差分析法对该地区56科蕨类植物中各科的植物种数和药用植物种数之间的关系进行了分析,根据残差值将56科分成31个高利用科和25个低利用科.

  9. The European general practice research network presents the translations of its comprehensive definition of multimorbidity in family medicine in ten European languages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Yves Le Reste

    Full Text Available Multimorbidity, according to the World Health Organization, exists when there are two or more chronic conditions in one patient. This definition seems inaccurate for the holistic approach to Family Medicine (FM and long-term care. To avoid this pitfall the European General Practitioners Research Network (EGPRN designed a comprehensive definition of multimorbidity using a systematic literature review.To translate that English definition into European languages and to validate the semantic, conceptual and cultural homogeneity of the translations for further research.Forward translation of the EGPRN's definition of multimorbidity followed by a Delphi consensus procedure assessment, a backward translation and a cultural check with all teams to ensure the homogeneity of the translations in their national context. Consensus was defined as 70% of the scores being higher than 6. Delphi rounds were repeated in each country until a consensus was reached.229 European medical expert FPs participated in the study. Ten consensual translations of the EGPRN comprehensive definition of multimorbidity were achieved.A comprehensive definition of multimorbidity is now available in English and ten European languages for further collaborative research in FM and long-term care.

  10. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  11. A nationwide postal survey on the perception of Malaysian public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists' (PERMFAMS) clinical performance, professional attitudes and research visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon-How; Yasin, Mazapuspavina Md; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan A; Hamzah, Zuhra; Ismail, Mastura; Ali, Norsiah; Bashah, Baizury; Mohd-Salleh, Noridah

    2015-01-01

    Perception of healthcare providers who worked with family medicine specialists (FMSs) could translate into the effectiveness of primary healthcare delivery in daily practices. This study examined perceptions of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) on FMSs at public health clinics throughout Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study in 2012-2013 using postal method targeting PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely health clinics, health offices and hospitals. A structured questionnaire was developed to assess PHCP's perception of FMS's clinical competency, safety practice, ethical and professional values, and research involvement. It consists of 37 items with Likert scale of strongly disagree (a score of 1) to strongly agree (a score of 5). Interaction and independent effect of the independent variables were tested and adjusted means score were reported. The participants' response rate was 58.0% (780/1345) with almost equal proportion from each of the three public healthcare facilities. There were more positive perceptions than negative among the PHCPs. FMSs were perceived to provide effective and safe treatment to their patients equally disregards of patient's social background. However, there were some concerns of FMSs not doing home visits, not seeing walk-in patients, had long appointment time, not active in scientific research, writing and publication. There were significant differences in perception based on a respondent's health care facility (p facilities and frequency of encounter with FMSs had different perception. Practicing FMSs could improve on the critical service areas that were perceived to be important but lacking. FMSs might need further support in conducting research and writing for publication.

  12. Gastroenterological Diseases and Family and Community Medicine Medicina de Família e Comunidade e doenças gastroenterológicas

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    Bruno Brunelli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: the Family Physician is a key figure in any health system that intends to follow the Primary Care Model defined at the Alma-Ata Conference in 1978. His actions are guided by commitment to the individual and focus on prevention and management of resources. His function is to diagnose and treat the most prevalent diseases until a more complex technology be required. The symptoms related to diseases of the digestive tract are very common complaints and as such part of the daily work of the general practitioner. Methods: A literature search for studies relating Family and Community Medicine (FCM and gastroenterological diseases published over the last 30 years in English, Spanish or Portuguese was conducted in the bibliographic databases Pub Med, Lilacs, and Cochrane library. FCM and Internal Medicine Text-books were consulted as well. Results: great part of cases of epigastric pain, retroesternal burning, rectal bleeding and diarrhea could be completely resolved by the family and community physician. He is also qualified for looking after patients with stabilized chronic gastroenterological diseases such as viral hepatitis. Conclusions: The greater part of cases of gastroenterological complaints brought to the general practice consultation need not to be referred to a specialist and can be resolved at Primary Care level. As a consequence the health system is optimized, specialist consultations become less time-consuming; the positive predictive value of diagnostic proofs increases and there is less possibility of error in the secondary and tertiary levels.

    O médico de família e comunidade é figura central em um sistema de saúde que pretende seguir o modelo de Atenção Primária à Saúde (APS, definido na conferência de Alma Ata, em 1978. Fazem parte das suas competências: comprometimento com a pessoa e enfoque em prevenção e gestão de recursos. É sua função diagnosticar e tratar os quadros mais prevalentes tendo

  13. LESS KNOWN USES OF WEEDS AS MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the author presents medicinal or otherwise useful weed species with details of family, vernacular name and its medicinal utility. Information on other general economic importance of medicinal weeds is also described here.

  14. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  15. Relationship between working through information and communication technologies after hours and well-being among Chinese dual-earner couples:A spillover-crossover perspective%工作性通信工具使用与双职工夫妻的幸福感:基于溢出-交叉效应的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红宇; 谢菊兰; 唐汉瑛; 申传刚; 张晓翔

    2016-01-01

    People are working around the clock communicating with one another on the electronic platform even after work. We examined the outcomes of Working through Information and Communication Technologies after Hours (W_ICTs), and attempted to delineate the mechanism of W_ICTs. Findings of previous researches on W_ICTs’ were inconsistent in terms of their impacts on people’s work and life, with some being positive while others being negative. This obscured people’s general perceptions of the possible effects of W_ICTs’, thus challenging our recommendation on the management of W_ICTs. Furthermore, previous studies on the mechanism of W_ICTs focused more on the impact on the individuals or the organizations, without considering the effect on individuals’ spouses. Most previous studies were also limited in the sense that they had been conducted in the western cultural context, with a lack of localized research in the Chinese culture. The present study based on the Spillover-Crossover Effect among dual-earner Chinese couples, therefore, is intended to fill the gap by investigating the positive and negative effects of W_ICTs on the well-being of both husbands and wives in China. The study surveyed 278 Chinese dual-earner couples who had fixed working hours. They completed the W_ICTs scale, the work-to-family conflict scale, the work-to-family facilitation scale, the social undermining scale, the work satisfaction scale and the marital satisfaction scale. In the study, ‘whether the couples have children under the age of 18’ and ‘whether the couples’ parents help with the children’s housework’ were treated as control variables. The structural equation model, the dyadic data analysis method, and the bias corrected bootstrap method were used to examine the research hypotheses. The results showed that: (1) W_ICTs was positively related to work-to-family conflict and work-to-family facilitation; (2) work-to-family conflict was positively related to spouses

  16. Sodelovanje med zdravniki družinske medicine in specialisti psihiatri pri zdravljenju bolnikov z depresijo: Cooperation between family practitioners and psychiatrist in treating patients with depression:

    OpenAIRE

    Rifel, Janez; Rotar-Pavlič, Danica; Selič, Polona; Serec, Maša; Švab, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Background: By 2015, mental illness will become the greatest healthcare burdenin the world. Within the community, people with depression are most often treated by family doctors. Treatment for depression also includes psychiatric specialists, with varying cooperation between the primary care provider and the psychiatrist. This studyćs goal was to define cooperation between family doctors and psychiatric specialists when treating patients withdepression. Methods: In 2009 six focus groups were ...

  17. Practical occupational medicine in "practice"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann Larsen, Anders; Schmidt, Jan; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    In Denmark, the practice of occupational medicine tends to be carried out by specialists in occupational medicine and less so by family physicians. The provision of health service to workers is therefore limited. This constraint may also apply in other developed countries and even more in countries...... with few occupational health resources. This Editorial argues that family physicians are indeed in a position where they can make a major positive difference for their working patients and for the enterprises where they work. Without specialist knowledge in occupational medicine, the family physician......’s empiric knowledge in combination with a narrative approach to the patient permits the contribution from family medicine not only with regard to diagnosis and treatment, but also relating to actions targeted to optimize the patient’s future accommodation at work as well as to protect other similarly...

  18. Practical occupational medicine in "practice"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann Larsen, Anders; Schmidt, Jan; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    ’s empiric knowledge in combination with a narrative approach to the patient permits the contribution from family medicine not only with regard to diagnosis and treatment, but also relating to actions targeted to optimize the patient’s future accommodation at work as well as to protect other similarly......In Denmark, the practice of occupational medicine tends to be carried out by specialists in occupational medicine and less so by family physicians. The provision of health service to workers is therefore limited. This constraint may also apply in other developed countries and even more in countries...... with few occupational health resources. This Editorial argues that family physicians are indeed in a position where they can make a major positive difference for their working patients and for the enterprises where they work. Without specialist knowledge in occupational medicine, the family physician...

  19. O impacto da MFC na saúde do Brasil The impact of Family and Community Medicine upon health in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inez Padula Anderson

    2010-11-01

    de Medicina de Família e Comunidade, em maio de 2008, na bela cidade de Fortaleza, os autores possam apresentar esses dados, dando mais um passo no sentido do reconhecimento e da valorização de nossa especialidade e da Atenção Primária à Saúde. Referência: 1. The Domain of Family Practice: Scope, Role, and Function. William R. Phillips, MD, MPH; Deborah G. Haynes, MD (Dr Phillips; and Preferred Medical Associates Northeast, Wichita, Ks (Dr Haynes. From the Department of Family Medicine, University of  Washington. The Keystone Papers: Formal Discussion Papers From Keystone III.[s.d.]; 33(4: 273-277.

  20. Evaluación nutricional comparada del adulto mayor en consultas de medicina familiar Compared nutritional assessment for older adults at family medicine settings

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    M. E. Calderón Reyes

    2010-08-01

    adults, via Mini Nutritional Assessment with those obtained via evaluation of caloric ingest and anthropometric, biochemical and immunological parameters at family medicine centers. Population and methods: The nutritional status was assessed in 153 older adults, 93 men and 64 women, whose received medical attention at a primary care unit, the age average was 69.66 ± 7.94 years old. The nutritional assessment obtained with Mini Nutritional assessment was compared to those obtained via biochemical and immunological parameters (hemoglobin, serum total proteins, albumin, cholesterol and lymphocytes and anthropometric parameters (size, weight, body mass index. Resultados: Body Mass Index (BMI was 26.96 ± 5.1 kg/m². Once the adults were evaluated with the MNA questionnaire, malnourishment was found in 47 patients (29.9%, risk of malnutrition in 86 patients (54.8%, and no risk for malnutrition 24 patients (15.3%. The MNA questionnaire was the strongest instrument to assess the nutritional status in older adults and to predict the risk of malnutrition in such population, (sensibility =96%, specificity= 98%, positive predictive value=97% and negative predictive value= 88%. The most important relations founded among variables to assess the nutritional status in older adults were the following: MNA-BMI (c² = 51.314 con gl = 6, p < 0.001; MNA-serum total proteins (c² = 46.989, gl = 2; p < 0.001; BMI-serum albumin (c² = 37.508, gl = 3; p < 0.001; MNA-Daily Carbone-hidrate ingestion (c² = 21.50, gl = 4; p < 0.001; MNA-Daily lipids ingestion (c² = , gl = 2; p < 0.001. Conclusion: The MNA predicts in opportune form the risk of malnutrition and the state of malnutrition the older adults previously to anthropometric, biochemical and immunological parameters. We recommend to use it, to do nutritional evaluation of older adults one time a year and in those adults in whom the risk of malnutrition or malnutrition have been detected, we recommend to complete the nutritional evaluation

  1. Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade RBMFC

    2010-11-01

    responder pela autoria dos trabalhos, tendo como justificada a sua participação de forma significativa no trabalho para assumir responsabilidade pública pelo seu conteúdo. Deverão, portanto, assinar a seguinte declaração de autoria e de responsabilidade:“Declaro que participei de forma significativa na construção e formação deste estudo ou da análise e interpretação dos dados, como também na redação deste texto, tendo, enquanto autor, responsabilidade pública pelo conteúdo deste. Revi a versão final deste trabalho e aprovo para ser submetido à publicação. Declaro que nem o presente trabalho nem outro com conteúdo semelhante de minha autoria foi publicado ou submetido à apreciação do Conselho Editorial de outra publicação.”Artigos com mais de um autor deverão conter uma exposição sobre a contribuição específica de cada um no trabalho. Os autores de cada artigo receberão, após a publicação de seu trabalho, três exemplares da revista em que o seu estudo foi publicado.Ética em pesquisaCom relação às pesquisas iniciadas após janeiro de 1997, nas quais exista a participação de seres humanos nos termos do inciso II.2 da Resolução 196/ 96 do Conselho Nacional de Saúde (“pesquisa que, individual ou coletivamente, envolva o ser humano de forma direta ou indireta, em sua totalidade ou partes dele, incluindo o manejo de informações ou materiais”, sempre que pertinente, deve ser declarado no texto que o trabalho foi aprovado pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa em Seres Humanos.Os trabalhos devem ser enviados para:Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade - SBMFCCorrespondênciaRua 28 de Setembro, 44 sala 804Rio de Janeiro - RJCep: 20551-031Tel/fax: 21 2264-5117Endereço eletrônico:rbmfc@sbmfc.org.brThe Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this

  2. Roles of Family Doctors of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Community Health Service%试论中医家庭医生在社区卫生服务中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏长; 浦斌红; 潘明

    2011-01-01

    Based on the responsibility model of family doctor service, this paper analyzes the advantages of family doctors of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in community health service from the following aspects: the individual diagnosis and treatment, the thoughts of "treating preventable diseases", the characteristics of simplicity, convenience, low cost, effectiveness of TCM, and the unique therapies, and thinks that the family doctors of TCM play an important role and have a wide developmental prospect in community health service.%基于家庭医生服务责任制模式下,通过从个体化的诊疗方式、“治未病”思想及中医简、便、廉、效的特点与中医特色疗法等不同角度出发,分析中医家庭医生在社区卫生服务中的优势,认为中医家庭医生在社区卫生服务中有着重要作用和广阔的发展前景.

  3. Phytochemical constituents of some Indian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Dhandapani, R.; Sabna, B.

    2008-01-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phlobatannin and cardie glycoside distribution in seven medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Aegle marmelos, Cynodon dactylon, Eclipta prostrata, Moringa pterygosperma, Pongamia pinnata, Sida acuta and Tridax procumbens. The significance of the plants in traditional medicine and the importance of the distribution of these chemical constituents were discu...

  4. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  5. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  6. Medicine Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.; Jeanotte, Holly, Ed.

    Described as a survival manual for Indian women in medicine, this collected work contains diverse pieces offering inspiration and practical advice for Indian women pursuing or considering careers in medicine. Introductory material includes two legends symbolizing the Medicine or Spirit Woman's role in Indian culture and an overview of Indians Into…

  7. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process.

  8. Family Medicine in USA Today and Its Perspective in China%美国家庭医学对中国全科(家庭)医学发展的展望和建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国平; 李东华; 牛丽娟; 王家骥

    2014-01-01

    Family Medicine,a medical specialty devoted to comprehensive primary care for people of all ages,is orig-inated from USA and evolved from general practice with advanced, standardized residency training, and board certifica-tion. Family medicine has been recognized and developed as the foundation of modern healthcare system in advanced countries, and enjoys a great success in improvement of national health status and constraint of healthcare expenditure. In USA,national healthcare system has failed,because of various reasons,to be established,family medicine has been neglected and the health-care system dominated by specialty care,leading to startling high costs( double those in UK,France,Australia and other devel-oped countries). The new healthcare reform plan and development of family medicine system in China,hailed as a historic mile-stone,will certainly benefit all the people. But to field a colossal GP team on a poor basis,however,has proved to be a tremen-dous challenge. With strong momentum from central government and support of favorable finance and policy,a great achievement can be made when healthcare model is truly switched from specialty care into primary care in medical education institutions and healthcare industry. This article reviews experience and lesions in US family medicine development and her residency training pro-grams,to elucidate some perspectives and strategies on the development of family medicine in China.%家庭医学发源于美国,是在早期全科医学实践的基础上对住院医生进一步规范化培训、延长培训时间、充实全科临床实践内容、严格毕业考察制度等而建立起来的一门综合性医学专科。由于其独特的以综合性基础医疗卫生服务为核心的学科特征,家庭医学在发达国家得到了积极的认可和充分发展,成为各国医药卫生服务的主体,在改善和提高各国居民健康水平、降低医药卫生服务成本等方面取得了广泛成功

  9. Leguminosae (Fabaceae in Tribal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwani Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available According to Sushruta, no plant in this world is useless. A large number of crude drugs used in Ayurvedic system employ plants of family Fabaceae. The family Fabaceae popularly known as legumes, is the third largest order of seed-plants containing about 600 genera with 12,000 speices. All the three subfamilies of Fabaceae have been given the status of family and hence they will be treated here as distinct families. Details of medicinal plants of these families and their uses are presented here.

  10. A Picrinine N-Methyltransferase Belongs to a New Family of γ-Tocopherol-Like Methyltransferases Found in Medicinal Plants That Make Biologically Active Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Dylan; Cázares, Paulo; Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Members of the Apocynaceae plant family produce a large number of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) with different substitution patterns that are responsible for their various biological activities. A novel N-methyltransferase involved in the vindoline pathway in Catharanthus roseus showing distinct similarity to γ-tocopherol C-methyltransferases was used in a bioinformatic screen of transcriptomes from Vinca minor, Rauvolfia serpentina, and C. roseus to identify 10 γ-tocopherol-like N-methyltransferases from a large annotated transcriptome database of different MIA-producing plant species (www.phytometasyn.ca). The biochemical function of two members of this group cloned from V. minor (VmPiNMT) and R. serpentina (RsPiNMT) have been characterized by screening their biochemical activities against potential MIA substrates harvested from the leaf surfaces of MIA-accumulating plants. The approach was validated by identifying the MIA picrinine from leaf surfaces of Amsonia hubrichtii as a substrate of VmPiNMT and RsPiNMT. Recombinant proteins were shown to have high substrate specificity and affinity for picrinine, converting it to N-methylpicrinine (ervincine). Developmental studies with V. minor and R. serpentina showed that RsPiNMT and VmPiNMT gene expression and biochemical activities were highest in younger leaf tissues. The assembly of at least 150 known N-methylated MIAs within members of the Apocynaceae family may have occurred as a result of the evolution of the γ-tocopherol-like N-methyltransferase family from γ-tocopherol methyltransferases. PMID:26848097

  11. COPD Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AerobiKa® Cardiology Medications Anticoagulant Medicine Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions COPD Medications Bronchodilators Anti-Inflammatories Antibiotics Managing Your Medications Devices ...

  12. Medicines in My Home: Information for Students on the Safe Use of Over-the-Counter Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OTC medicine has a Drug Facts Label. The Drug Facts label is there to help you and your family choose and use OTC medicines correctly and safely. All medicines, even OTC medicines, can cause side effects (unwanted or unexpected effects). But if you follow ...

  13. Immunoinformatics in personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulukota, Kamalakar

    2003-01-01

    Diagnosis of human disease has been undergoing steady improvement over the past few centuries. Many ailments that were once considered a single entity have been classified into finer categories on the basis of response to therapy (e.g. type I and type II diabetes), inheritance (e.g. familial and non-familial polyposis coli), histology (e.g. small cell and adenocarcinoma of lung) and most recently transcriptional profiling (e.g. leukaemia, lymphoma). The next dimension in this finer categorization appears to be the typing of the patient rather than the disease i.e. disease X in person of type Y. The problem of personalized medicine is to devise tests which predict the type of individual, especially where the type is correlated with response to therapy. Immunology has been at the forefront of personalized medicine for quite a while, even though the term is not often used in this connection. Blood grouping and cross-matching (for blood transfusion), and anaphylaxis test (for penicillin) are just two examples. In this paper I will argue that immunological tests have an important place in the future of personalized medicine. I will describe methods we developed for personalizing vaccines based on MHC allele frequencies in human populations and methods for predicting peptide binding to class I MHC molecules. In conclusion, I will argue that immunological tests, and consequently immunoinformatics, will play a big role in making personalized medicine a reality. PMID:14712931

  14. SOME RARE HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICINAL PLANTS OF SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    S.rajan

    1993-01-01

    This present study describes 11 species under 11 generate and 10 families of rare Homoeopathic Medicinal Plants introduced and cultivated in the Nilgiri district, Tamil Nadu, South India. The original citation, description, distribution and their medicinal uses are given.

  15. After-Hours Science: Microchips and Onion Dip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Steve

    1984-01-01

    Computer programs were developed for a science center nutrition exhibit. The exhibit was recognized by the National Science Teachers Association Search for Excellence in Science Education as an outstanding science program. The computer programs (Apple II) and their use in the exhibit are described. (BC)

  16. Social class variation in medicine use among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, Bjørn E; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Due, Pernille

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about social determinants of adolescents' medicine use. The objective was to analyse the association between the family's social class and adolescents' use of medicine for headache, stomachache, difficulties in getting to sleep, and nervousness.......Little is known about social determinants of adolescents' medicine use. The objective was to analyse the association between the family's social class and adolescents' use of medicine for headache, stomachache, difficulties in getting to sleep, and nervousness....

  17. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task of the Expert Committee was to review the technical development and efficacy of nuclear medicine methods and to recommend the best possible means of establishing nuclear medicine services at various levels of medical care in different countries. After reviewing the contributions which nuclear medicine can make, the various types of medical institutions and hospitals in existence, the requirements, organization and funding of nuclear medicine services, and the cost/effectiveness of nuclear medicine, a number of recommendations were made. IAEA and WHO should make information on existing methods of cost/effectiveness analysis widely available; invite governments to include a description of such analysis methods in training programmes of their health officers; assist in the acquisition of the necessary data; and encourage and eventually support actual applications of such analyses to carefully selected nuclear medicine procedures in varying medicosocial environments. They were further recommended to study possible ways of improving reliability and ease of servicing nuclear medicine equipment, and extent of possible local construction; the possibility of making available supplies of matched characterized reagents for radioimmunoassay and related techniques; and to study the advantages of establishing a network of collaborating centres on an international basis

  18. Back to the Future:Reflections on the History of the Future of Family Medicine%回到未来:家庭医学未来项目历史的反思

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noemi C. Doohan; Jill Endres; Nerissa Koehn; John Miller; Joseph E. Scherger; James Martin; Jennifer E. Devoe

    2015-01-01

    历史能力对家庭医学的未来发展至关重要,反思家庭医学历史是探讨其未来的首要环节。本期为您带来《Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine 》杂志的最新家庭医学动态———回到未来:家庭医学未来项目( FFM)历史的反思;从多代人的角度对FFM历史和家庭医学过去十年演变进行反思,旨在引发代际对话。此类代际对话能够使年长者与年轻人共享智慧,同时以后代之眼呈现学科历史,期望对我国的全科医学未来发展规划有所启发。

  19. Genomic medicine implementation: learning by example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marc S

    2014-03-01

    Genomic Medicine is beginning to emerge into clinical practice. The National Human Genome Research Institute's Genomic Medicine Working Group consists of organizations that have begun to implement some aspect of genomic medicine (e.g., family history, systematic implementation of Mendelian disease program, pharmacogenomics, whole exome/genome sequencing). This article concisely reviews the working group and provides a broader context for the articles in the special issue including an assessment of anticipated provider needs and ethical, legal, and social issues relevant to the implementation of genomic medicine. The challenges of implementation of innovation in clinical practice and the potential value of genomic medicine are discussed.

  20. A Methodological Strategy for the Family Health Course in General Internal Medicine Residency Estrategia metodológica para el módulo salud familiar en la residencia Medicina General Integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Aurelia San Juan Bosch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The continuous improvement of the educational process is one of the permanent challenges of medical education in Cuba. When dealing particularly with family medicine it must be ensured that physicians are always getting a better clinical approach to the management of families, since this is one of the key areas that have been identified as problematic in professional practices. Objective: To design a methodological strategy for the improvement of educational activities in the Family Health Course of the General Internal Medicine Residency. Method: A development research, conducted at the University of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos, from November 2005 to January 2007 is presented. Document analysis and validation by expert criteria were also implemented. Results: For each of the four themes that make up this course, the following aspects are stated: teaching organization, length, contents, activity objectives, methodological guidelines to implement these activities, assessment proposals for some of them and some literature. Conclusions: The design of educational activities, with emphasis on actual or simulated medical practice, could help improving the quality of the teaching process. In addition, following the logical structure of activities, teachers can develop similar proposals to address other health problems according to the different learning needs.Fundamento: El perfeccionamiento permanente del proceso docente educativo, es uno de los retos permanentes de la Educación Médica en Cuba. La medicina familiar, en particular, debe lograr que los médicos tengan cada vez mejor actitud clínica en el manejo de las familias, por constituir una de las áreas claves en las cuales se han determinado deficiencias en la actuación profesional. Objetivo: Diseñar una estrategia metodológica para el perfeccionamiento de

  1. Folk Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CLPPP CAP Healthy Homes Assessment Tools Lead Health Literacy Initiative Refugee Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and ... As blood lead levels increase, so does lead’s effects on health. How to tell if herbal medicines ...

  2. Network medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune

    2008-01-01

    for new therapeutic intervention. We argue that by targeting the architecture of aberrant signaling networks associated with cancer and other diseases new therapeutic strategies can be implemented. Transforming medicine into a network driven endeavour will require quantitative measurements of cell...... signaling processes; we will describe how this may be performed and combined with new algorithms to predict the trajectories taken by a cellular system either in time or through disease states. We term this approach, network medicine....

  3. Medicinal Moves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine is becoming a new source of growth in China-Africa trade LIU Tao never expected that his traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) products would be so warmly welcomed at the annual Canton Fair last year.His surprise came after a large number of African businessmen expressed a keen interest in importing the products.That knowledge left a broad smile on his face.

  4. Integrative Medicine in a Preventive Medicine Residency: A Program for the Urban Underserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berz, Jonathan P B; Gergen Barnett, Katherine A; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    The Preventive Medicine Residency Program collaborated with the Department of Family Medicine's Program for Integrative Medicine and Health Disparities at Boston Medical Center to create a new rotation for preventive medicine residents starting in autumn 2012. Residents participated in integrative medicine group visits and consults, completed an online curriculum in dietary supplements, and participated in seminars all in the context of an urban safety net hospital. This collaboration was made possible by a federal Health Resources and Services Administration grant for integrative medicine in preventive medicine residencies and helped meet a need of the program to increase residents' exposure to clinical preventive medicine and integrative health clinical skills and principles. The collaboration has resulted in a required rotation for all residents that continues after the grant period and has fostered additional collaborations related to integrative medicine across the programs.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  6. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  9. Meiotic analysis of the germoplasm of three medicinal species from Asteraceae family Análise meiótica do germoplasma de três espécies medicinais da família Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Olkoski

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic characterization was carried out on 12 accessions from Aster squamatus (Spreng. Hieron., Pterocaulon polystachyum DC, and Solidago microglossa DC by studying their meiotic behavior and pollen viability. These species are from the Asteraceae family, native to Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, and are important for medicinal use. Young inflorescences with four accessions of each species were collected, fixed in ethanol-acetic acid (3:1, and conserved in ethanol 70% until use. The method used was that of squashing the anthers and coloring with acetic orcein 2%. Meiosis was regular in all accessions, presenting chromosomal associations preferentially bivalent, where n=10 was found for Aster squamatus and n=9 for Pterocaulon polystachyum, and Solidago microglossa. The studied accessions presented a Meiotic Index (MI that varied from 65% to 87% in Aster squamatus, 85% to 92% in Pterocaulon polystachyum, and 64% to 92% in Solidago microglossa, indicating meiotic stability, although irregularities appeared during the cellular division. The pollen viability estimative was high in all studied accessions. These results indicate that the studied species can be included in future studies of genetic breeding.Foi realizada a caracterização citogenética de doze acessos de Aster squamatus, Pterocaulon polystachyum e Solidago microglossa, espécies da família Asteraceae, nativas do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, por meio do estudo do comportamento meiótico e da viabilidade polínica, que possuem grande importância para uso medicinal. Inflorescências jovens de quatro acessos de cada espécie foram fixadas em álcool-ácido acético (3:1 e conservadas em álcool 70% até o uso. O método utilizado foi o de esmagamento de anteras e a coloração com orceína acética 2%. A meiose foi regular em todos os acessos, apresentando associações cromossômicas preferencialmente em bivalentes, encontrando-se n=10 para Aster squamatus e n=9 para Pterocaulon

  10. Phytochemical constituents of some Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, R; Sabna, B

    2008-04-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phlobatannin and cardie glycoside distribution in seven medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Aegle marmelos, Cynodon dactylon, Eclipta prostrata, Moringa pterygosperma, Pongamia pinnata, Sida acuta and Tridax procumbens. The significance of the plants in traditional medicine and the importance of the distribution of these chemical constituents were discussed with respect to the role of these plants in ethnomedicine in India. PMID:22557280

  11. Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

  12. Quaternary Prevention and limits in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Jamoulle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Quaternary Prevention, a questioning upon the basis of medical action, was born from the articulation of the doctor-patient relationship. It refers to all medical activities being an important tool for family medicine. It is an ethical question about the excesses of too much and too little medicine which provides some answers.

  13. Mesopotamian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2007-01-01

    Although the Mesopotamian civilisation is as old as that of Egypt and might even have predated it, we know much less about Mesopotamian medicine, mainly because the cuneiform source material is less well researched. Medical healers existed from the middle of the 3rd millennium. In line with the strong theocratic state culture, healers were closely integrated with the powerful priestly fraternity, and were essentially of three main kinds: barû (seers) who were experts in divination, âshipu (exorcists), and asû (healing priests) who tended directly to the sick. All illness was accepted as sent by gods, demons and other evil spirits, either as retribution for sins or as malevolent visitations. Treatment revolved around identification of the offending supernatural power, appeasement of the angry gods, for example by offering amulets or incantations, exorcism of evil spirits, as well as a measure of empirical therapy aimed against certain recognised symptom complexes. Medical practice was rigidly codified, starting with Hammurabi's Code in the 18th century BC and persisting to the late 1st millennium BC. Works like the so-called Diagnostic Handbook, the Assyrian Herbal and Prescription Texts describe the rationale of Mesopotamian medicine, based predominantly on supernatural concepts, although rudimentary traces of empirical medicine are discernible. There is evidence that Egyptian medicine might have been influenced by Mesopotamian practices, but Greek rational medicine as it evolved in the 5th/4th centuries BC almost certainly had no significant Mesopotamian roots. PMID:17378276

  14. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  15. Educational Competitions of the Family Doctor in their Acting as Tutor in the Career of Medicine Competencias docentes del médico de familia en su desempeño como tutor en la carrera de Medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de la Caridad Lorenzo López

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: for the identification of a group of competitions characteristic of the educational work of the Family doctors that you/they act as tutors in the formative scenarios of the Primary Attention of Health in University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate. Objective: to identify the educational main competitions of the doctors of the family like tutors in the career of Medicine, in the Area II of the municipality of Cienfuegos. Method: pedagogic investigation of descriptive type in the mark of the medical education that looked for to define the group of educational basic competitions, what can favor a pedagogic management of more quality in the medical clinics as formative scenario of University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate during the year 2010. Results: 61,5% of our tutors has more than 10 years of medical formation; more than the half, their 73.1% is not categorized, 84.6% is specialist of general integral medicine, but of the half they received the preparation shop for tutors and 96.2% they consider the basic competitions as very important. Conclusion: deficiencies exist in the way of the tutor's performance for categorized personnel's lack, pedagogic scarce preparation and the assistance load of the professors in the primary attention of health.Fundamento: es importante la identificación de un grupo de competencias propias de la labor docente de los médicos de familia, que actúan como tutores en los escenarios formativos en la Atención Primaria de Salud. Objetivo: identificar las competencias docentes principales de los médicos de la familia, que se desempeñan como tutores en la carrera de Medicina, en el policlínico Área II del municipio de Cienfuegos. Método: investigación pedagógica de tipo descriptiva, en el que buscaba definir el grupo de competencias docentes básicas (acad

  16. Study of knowledge,attitude and practice on immune adjustment medicine in families of children of repeated respiratory infection%反复呼吸道感染患儿家属免疫调节药知识、态度、行为调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑勋; 陈志才

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand the immune adjustment medicine knowledge, attitude and behavior status in repeated respiratory infection families of children, to provide clinical evidence for the development of the medicine consulting work. Method Using K - A - P questionnaire survey randomly to zhanjiang maternity and children diagnosed with repeated respiratory infection of 120 families children survey the immune adjustment medicine knowledge, attitude, behavior and suffering.Result Immune adjustment medicine knowledge in families of children for lack of good score above only accounted for 33.33﹪ ; the qualified rate of children immune adjustment medicine knowledge score Suffer from respiratory infection was 10 times every year was higher than 7-10 times every year; method of medicine was wrong, treatment using immune adjustment medicine proportion is low, but they generaly have a good learning attitude, wiling to accept more immune adjustment medicine knowledge, wiling to use drugs to increase immune regulation children immunity. Conclusion Measures should be taken to improve the immune adjustment medicine knowledge level suffered repeated respiratory infection families of children ,guide the family of children to take the correct methods to treat the immune adjustment medicine , so as to reduce the repeated respiratory infection.%  目的了解反复呼吸道感染患儿家属免疫调节药知识、态度、行为现状,为开展用药咨询工作提供临床依据.方法采用K-A-P问卷方式随机对湛江市妇幼保健院确诊为反复呼吸道感染的120名患儿家属调查其免疫调节药的知识、态度、行为及患病的情况.结果患儿家属免疫调节药知识普遍缺乏,得分为良好以上的比例仅占33.33﹪;患呼吸道感染≥10次/年的患儿免疫调节药知识得分不合格率比患呼吸道感染7-10次/年的高;患儿使用免设调节药的方法欠佳,疗程使用免疫调节药所占的比例较低,但

  17. Prevention of Diabetes in Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Alibasic, Esad; Ramic, Enisa; Alic, Alma

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Introduction The incidence of diabetes type 2 (diabetes mellitus type 2 – DM 2) is rapidly increasing worldwide. Physical inactivity and obesity are the major determinants of the disease. Primary prevention of DM 2 entails health monitoring of people at risk category. People with impaired glycemic control are at high risk for development of DM 2 and enter the intensive supervision program for primary and secondary prevention. Objective of the research To e...

  18. Tibetan traditional medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Tibetan medicine companies in T.A.R can manufacture more than 360 Tibetan patent medicines. There are 18 Tibetan medicine factories in Tibet, and total out value exceeds 3 billion yuan. 24 kinds of Tibetan patent medicines have been incorporated into State Fundamental Medicine List, in which 14 Tibetan patent medicines are listed in national protected traditional medicine category.

  19. The family Asteraceae: General introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. J. Herman

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The family Asteraceae (the daisy family is probably the largest plant family in the world. It is cosmopolitan in distribution and is economically important as many members are used for food, medicinal purposes, grazing for stock, or ornamentals, while some are troublesome weeds or poisonous to animals. The ‘flower ’is actually a collection of flowers grouped together to form a capitulum.

  20. Medicinal Mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindequist, U.; Won Kim, H.; Tiralongo, E.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Since beginning of mankind nature is the most important source of medicines. Bioactive compounds produced by living organisms can be used directly as drugs or as lead compounds for drug development. Besides, the natural material can be used as crude drug for preparation of powder or extracts. Plants

  1. [Osteopathic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, P; Lepers, Y; Salem, W

    2011-09-01

    Osteopathy is originated in the 19th century in the United States. Andrew Taylor Still seek for an alternative medical system to the orthodox medicine largely empirical and advocating bloodletting, calomel, etc., all of which was resumed with terms like" heroic medicine". Osteopathy as other alternative medical practices (homeopathy, eclecticism, etc.) based on rational and metaphysical postulates as vitalism or the fact that man is a divinely ordained machine. Still's approach was essentially manual and based on manipulation of the joints. Today osteopaths challenge these dogmas and seek to agree their practice within scientific biomedical standards. Even if strong randomized clinical trials are lacking, several surveys report how osteopathy gained public notoriety. Several recent meta-analyses pinpoint the benefit of the spinal manipulative treatment and even if there is no evidence that such an approach is superior to other advocated therapies there is no evidence that these therapies are more effective than the first one. The major indications for such a treatment are cervical and low back pain, either chronic or acute. The quality of the relationship between the practitioner and patient together with the placebo effect are important components of a treatment effect. Osteopathic education is an important aspect and only higher education institutions, i.e. universities can achieve and maintain adequate standards. Materia medica and surgery represent the two major therapeutic mainstreams in medicine; osteopathy considered as manual medicine could be the third one. PMID:22034767

  2. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  3. Medicinal plants sold at the El Rio Market, Camaguey, Cuba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godinez-Caraballo, D.; Volpato, G.

    2008-01-01

    Information regarding medicinal plants sold in the El Rio Market, Camaguey, Cuba, revealed 184 species belonging to 69 vascular plant families. The most important family was Fabaceae s.l. with 13 species, followed by Lamiaceae with 12, and Asteraceae with 8. More than 90 general medicinal indication

  4. Addiction Medicine in Canada: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Guebaly, Nady; Crockford, David; Cirone, Sharon; Kahan, Meldon

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, the qualification of physicians is the jurisdiction of the College of Family Physicians and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Colleges have promoted the training of "generalists" in family medicine and "sophisticated generalists" among the traditional specialties, and the development of subspecialties has not been…

  5. Pregnancy and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not all medicines are safe to take when you are pregnant. Some medicines can harm your baby. That includes over-the- ... care provider before you start or stop any medicine. Not using medicine that you need may be ...

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  7. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  8. Personcentreret medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Personcentreret medicin tager udgangspunkt i den person, lægen møder, hvad enten vedkommende er rask eller syg, og bygger på værdier som fortrolighed, kontinuitet, nærvær, tillid og tilgængelighed. Det er patientens dagsorden, der gælder, og lægen kan i fællesskab med patienten (baseret på en...

  9. Medicine partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Partial medication compliance, where patients do not take enough of their prescribed medicine to achieve adequate outcomes, is common. Research using electronic monitoring to assess compliance has shown that people take approximately 75% of doses as prescribed, irrespective of the condition being treated or its severity. Erratic compliance often leads to discontinuation of therapy, as treatment is perceived to be ineffective. Compliance decreases as frequency of dosing increases. Inadequate c...

  10. Haptic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Cindy; Mason, Earl

    2009-01-01

    The paper introduces haptic medicine--healthcare based on loving touch for healing and preventing disease. We describe the effects of loving touch (a square inch of our skin has over 1000 nerves) on the body, brain and mind. We describe two web-based health education and media projects. The first, HYPERLINK "http://www.21stcenturymed.org" www.21stcenturymed.org is a place for health practitioners to start learning about touch and resources. The second project, Humans Without Borders, is a multi-lingual self help education website for everyday people. Teaching materials for these projects are based on our previous work with a form of haptic medicine known as psychophysiophilosophy with patients at Stanford Hospital, Kaiser Permanente and Lucille Packard Children's Hospital. We describe psychophysiophilosophy, relate motherly love to recent discoveries in neurosciences and give hints on ways to increase motherly love in each of us. We present a plan for moving into the future by re-introducing haptic medicine into our daily lives through self-help and as an adjunct for current physician practice. There is an exercise in self-help for the reader and an appendix of recent clinical research with profound benefits on the use of human touch for over 40 conditions. PMID:19745495

  11. Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 07/ ... treatment become as overwhelming for others in your life as they are for you. Understanding the potential ...

  12. Familial hypertriglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000397.htm Familial hypertriglyceridemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial hypertriglyceridemia is a common disorder passed down through families. ...

  13. Family Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Disruptions Page Content Article Body No matter how ...

  14. Family Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  15. Family Meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  16. VMRCVM observes 25th Anniversary "College Family Day" celebration

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    More than 600 Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine faculty, staff, students, and family members recently gathered for a 25th Anniversary "College Family Day Celebration" on Virginia Tech's campus.

  17. Evolutionary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swynghedauw, B

    2004-04-01

    Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. Evolutionary, or darwinian, medicine takes the view that contemporary diseases result from incompatibility between the conditions under which the evolutionary pressure had modified our genetic endowment and the lifestyle and dietary habits in which we are currently living, including the enhanced lifespan, the changes in dietary habits and the lack of physical activity. An evolutionary trait express a genetic polymorphism which finally improve fitness, it needs million years to become functional. A limited genetic diversity is a necessary prerequisite for evolutionary medicine. Nevertheless, search for a genetic endowment would become nearly impossible if the human races were genetically different. From a genetic point of view, homo sapiens, is homogeneous, and the so-called human races have only a socio-economic definition. Historically, Heart Failure, HF, had an infectious origin and resulted from mechanical overload which triggered mechanoconversion by using phylogenically ancient pleiotropic pathways. Adaptation was mainly caused by negative inotropism. Recently, HF was caused by a complex remodelling caused by the trophic effects of mechanics, ischemia, senescence, diabetes and, neurohormones. The generally admitted hypothesis is that cancers were largely caused by a combination of modern reproductive and dietary lifestyles mismatched with genotypic traits, plus the longer time available for a confrontation. Such a concept is illustrated for skin and breast cancers, and also for the link between cancer risk and dietary habits.

  18. GENOMIC MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence. The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others.There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine. For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc..Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine. For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others.We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the disease

  19. Genomic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence.  The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others. There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine.  For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc.. Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine.  For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others. We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the

  20. The Bottom Line Medicine Clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Gepner, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The financial experience of an actual medical practice was used to develop a spreadsheet model of the business of medicine. The model is designed to provide reasonably accurate predictions of the financial outcome of business decisions affecting the practice. It has been used very successfully to teach practice management to senior residents in Family Practice training at the University of Minnesota. Students are placed in the role of a managing partner presented with a financially ailing pra...

  1. Cinnamon: A Multifaceted Medicinal Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Pasupuleti Visweswara Rao; Siew Hua Gan

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, and Cinnamon cassia), the eternal tree of tropical medicine, belongs to the Lauraceae family. Cinnamon is one of the most important spices used daily by people all over the world. Cinnamon primarily contains vital oils and other derivatives, such as cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, and cinnamate. In addition to being an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, anticancer, lipid-lowering, and cardiovascular-disease-lowering compound, cinnamon...

  2. A Practice of Social Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Kark

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available SOCIAL MEDICINE may be regarded as a practice of medicine concerned with health and disease as a function of group living. It is interested in the health of people in relation to their behaviour in social groups and as such is concerned with care of the individual patient as a member of a family and of other significant groups in his daily life. It is also concerned with the health of these groups as such and with that of the whole community as a community. Concern with the health needs of larger communities and territorial groups such as cities, regions and nations is also an important area of social medicine in which the public health physician is involved. Special interest groups have been the focus of attention of yet other practitioners of social medicine. Children at school, university students and occupational groups are among the more important of these groups for whom special health services, oriented to their specific needs, have been developed. Less formal groupings are now receiving increasing attention by those concerned with community health services, such as the family, in which the relationships between the members have intimate and enduring qualities. Other significant informal groups, in which face-to-face relationships are characteristic, are friendship groups, play groups of children and the neighbourhood community, in rural village or urban neighbourhood.

  3. Medicina de Família no Brasil e excelência acadêmica Brazilian Family Medicine and academic excellence Medicina familiar en Brasil y excelencia académica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domhnall MacAuley

    2012-02-01

    aos pacientes.Enfim, não se foquem nos problemas, mas observem seu potencial. O Brasil pode ser um líder mundial em Medicina de Família.An incredibly young and vibrant college. Who would not be impressed by the tremendous energy, enthusiasm, and dedication of general practitioner colleagues in Brazil – so many young doctors, so committed to Family Medicine. The Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine Conference (11th Brazilian Congress of Family and Community Medicine was an uplifting experience and unique in its scale, youth, and vibrancy. With 4,000 delegates, it was the largest general practitioner conference I had ever attended and, with so few delegates over 40 years of age, it was the youngest one. Up to 18 parallel sessions came together effortlessly and there was no pharmaceutical involvement. I was also struck by the easy dialogue between speakers and the audience – this was a conversation of equals. I have never seen anything quite like that. Brazilians have the potential to be future leaders in primary care, but I do not think they quite appreciate their own potential.How can you build on this potential? In setting the agenda for the development of General Practice as an academic discipline, McWhinney outlined four principles: a unique field of action; a defined body of knowledge; an active area of research; and an intellectually rigorous training1,2. Of these, General Practice has identified a unique field of action; there is a consensus on the defined body of knowledge – as shown in some textbooks by authors, such as Bruce Duncan. Brazil has some excellent postgraduate General Practice training programmes. Not all general practitioners have undertaken this training and, as it evolves, it is important to integrate those who have not had formal training. The three main cornerstones of the academic discipline are already in place. However, like many academic disciplines, the difficulty is nurturing that final component: the research

  4. Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  5. Narrativ medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte; Getz, Linn

    2015-01-01

    Dagens allmänmedicin påverkas av ett växande managementtänkandetillsammans med fragmenterande ekonomiska incitament.Vårdens kvaliteter evalueras med nya metoder som ”värdebaseradvård” där värde räknas i kronor och ören. Produktion går före etik,och det intersubjektiva mötet mellan patient och läk...... läkare håller påatt nedvärderas. Perspektiven från narrativ medicin kan bidra tillatt visa vad som står på spel. Vilken blir annars berättelsen omallmänmedicinen?...

  6. Family Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  7. Medicine Poisoning in Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lígia Montenegro de Albuquerque

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to identify the main medications responsible for exogenous poisoning of children attended at a referral emergency hospital of Fortaleza, Ceará State,Brazil; to describe the most prevalent age and gender, as well as the main reactions presented by poisoned children. It was a documental retrospective study of 203 records of patients attended in 1997 at the Toxicology Center of Ceará. Our results showed that antidepressants, bronchodilators and vitamins were the most common agents; 77% of poisoned children were between 1 and 4 years of age, and 54% were males; somnolence, psicomotor excitement, tachycardia and vomiting were the most commonly encountered reactions. In conclusion, these medicines represents an important cause of children poisoning, Families must attempt to the safe storing and dealing with these products. It is mandatory that the government determines the utilization of special packages for children protection in our country.

  8. Utilização de fitoterápicos nas unidades básicas de atenção à saúde da família no município de Maracanaú (CE The use of herbal medicines in the family health care units in Maracanaú (CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Izabel G. Silva

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Diante da deficiente assistência farmacêutica brasileira, alguns estados no país vêm realizando a implantação de Programas de Fitoterapia na atenção primária à saúde. Com o objetivo de conhecer o perfil de utilização e prescrição dos fitoterápicos desenvolvidos no município de Maracanaú (CE, foram entrevistados 226 pacientes atendidos nas Unidades de Saúde da Família, cujas prescrições medicamentosas continham fitoterápicos. A prevalência de fitoterápicos nas prescrições foi de 20,6%. Nestas, foram encontrados 10 dentre os 15 fitoterápicos produzidas no município, entre cápsulas, pomadas, géis, tinturas e xarope. As principais indicações terapêuticas dos fitoterápicos foram para as afecções respiratórias, cutâneas e para o diabetes mellitus. Observou-se, desta forma, um cenário favorável ao Programa Farmácias Vivas de Maracanaú. No entanto, vale ressaltar que estudos posteriores se tornam necessários para garantir o controle de qualidade, bem como a eficácia e segurança dos fitoterápicos.Currently in Brazil, some herbal therapy programs are being developed in primary healthcare services to supply the communities lacking basic medicines. To investigate the use and prescription of herbal medicines in the city of Maracanú, State of Ceará, Brazil, 226 patients with prescriptions containing herbal medicine were interviewed in Family Health Care Units and their drugs prescription were analyzed. The prevalence of herbal medicines in the prescription was 20.6%. Among the 15 herbal medicines produced in city, 10 were among the prescriptions reviewed, such as capsules, ointments, gels, dyes and syrup. The herbal medicines were mainly indicated for the treatment of respiratory problems skin conditions, and diabetes mellitus. Data support the use of herbal therapy in primary health care in Maracanaú. However, it is important to emphasize that there is a need to conduct further study on the efficacy and

  9. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  10. Preventing HIV with Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) Preventing HIV with medicine Get medicine right after you ... during sex. Return to top More information on Preventing HIV with medicine Explore other publications and websites ...

  11. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Traveling Safely with Medicines Planes, trains, cars – even boats ... your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you ...

  12. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  13. Medicines by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Search the NIGMS Website Search the NIGMS Website NIGMS Home Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Medicines By Design Medicines By Design Spotlight Nature's Medicine Cabinet A ...

  14. What Is Nuclear Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that is used to diagnose and treat diseases in a safe and painless way. Nuclear medicine procedures permit the determination of medical information ...

  15. Muslim Families and Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpour, Manijeh

    1998-01-01

    Examines the applicability of the Anglo-American models of family therapy to Muslim immigrant families. The differences in value systems are the Muslim families' preferences for greater connectedness, a less flexible and more hierarchical family structure, and an implicit communication style. Suggests that directions for change for Muslims need to…

  16. [Specificities of prescribing medicines for children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Droz, Nina; Bourgade, Clara; Vizeneux, Audrey; Cotillon, Marie; de Groc, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of medicines have been developed for adults. Consequently, the prescribing of medicines for children must take into account their pharmacodynamic characteristics and must be calculated individually according to the degree of prematurity, the age, the weight or body area and the clinical condition. Medication errors are the most common type of medical errors, notably in children, due to dosage errors or prescribtion of inappropriate medicines. The best way to avoid them lies in the use of prescribing software, the involvement of pharmacists in care units, and proper communication between prescribing doctors, caregivers, pharmacists and families. PMID:27177480

  17. Medicines for sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzodiazepines; Sedatives; Hypnotics; Sleeping pills; Insomnia - medicines; Sleep disorder - medicines ... are commonly used to treat allergies. While these sleep aids are not addictive, your body becomes used ...

  18. Medicines for osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... when: A bone density test shows you have osteoporosis, even if you have not had a fracture ...

  19. Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Journal of Family and Community Medicine   The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion

  20. [Disaster medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, Pierre; Telionri, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    For over 30 years, the French hospital and pre-hospital medical teams are trained in disaster medicine. In fact, they are regularly confronted with the management of multiple casualties in accidents or even terrorist attacks, and more rarely to large-scale disasters. The intervention of physicians of the EMS system (SAMU-SMUR) in the field allows an original healthcare organization: in an advanced medical post, the victims are triaged according to their severity and benefit if needed of initial resuscitation. SAMU medical regulating center then organize their transport and repartition in several hospitals put on alert. To cope with a mass casualty situation, the hospital also has a specific organization, the White Plan. This plan, initiated by the director, assisted by a medico-administrative cell crisis can mobilize all the resources of the institution. Personnel are recalled and the ability of emergency units is increased. Care, less urgent, other patients are postponed. There are many plans for responding to disasters. ORSEC plans of the ministry of Interior articulate with the ORSAN plans of the ministry of Health. This complementarity allows a global mobilization of public services in disasters or exceptional medical situations.

  1. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Applied Consciousness-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense turning back to the “old medicine”, where the family physician was the all-concerned “old country doctor” who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic medicine, we would like to present the classic art of healing, where the physician works mostly with his hands, then show how the modern biomedical physician performs with biochemistry, and finally introduce consciousness-based medicine. Some of our questions will be: If you improve your quality of life, will you also improve your health? Will learning more about yourself bring more purpose in your life? Will finding someone to live with in a loving and mutually respectful relationship improve your health? Scientists and thinkers like Antonovsky, Frankl, Maslow, and Jung have pointed to love as a unique way to coherence in life, and thus to biological order and a better health. Several scientific studies have also suggested that patients who focus on improving their quality of life usually will not follow the general statistics for survival, since somehow other factors are at play, which sometimes you will find referred to as “exceptional”.

  2. Familial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W. de Herder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  3. Obstetric medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Balbi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Obstetric assistance made major advances in the last 20 years: improved surgical technique allows quicker caesarean sections, anaesthesiology procedures such as peripheral anaesthesia and epidural analgesia made safer operative assistance, remarkably reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, neonatology greatly improved the results of assistance to low birth weight newborns. A new branch of medicine called “obstetric medicine” gained interest and experience after the lessons of distinguished physicians like Michael De Swiet in England. All together these advances are making successful pregnancies that 20 years ago would have been discouraged or even interrupted: that’s what we call high risk pregnancy. High risk of what? Either complications of pregnancy on pre-existing disease or complications of pre-existing disease on pregnancy. Nowadays, mortality in pregnancy has a medical cause in 80% of cases in Western countries (Confidential Enquiry on Maternal Deaths, UK, 2004. DISCUSSION The background is always changing and we have to take in account of: increase of maternal age; widespread use of assisted fertilization techniques for treatment of infertility; social feelings about maternity desire with increasing expectations from medical assistance; immigration of medically “naive” patients who don’t know to have a chronic disease, but apt and ready to conceive; limited knowledge of feasibility of drug use in pregnancy which may induce both patients and doctors to stopping appropriate drug therapy in condition of severe disease. Preconception counseling, planning the pregnancy, wise use of drugs, regular follow-up throughout the pregnancy and, in selected cases, preterm elective termination of pregnancy may result in excellent outcome both for mother and foetus. CONCLUSIONS Highly committed and specifically trained physicians are required to counsel these patients and to plan their treatment before and during pregnancy.

  4. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC.

    Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process.

    All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish.

    Categories and formats of papers

    The journal is divided into the following sections:

    Editorial

    Original articles

    Review articles

    Directives in Family and Community Medicine

    Essays

    Case reports

    Theses

    Letters to the Editor

    The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request.

    The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles

  5. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Lima Wagner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC.

    Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process.

    All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish.

    Categories and formats of papers

    The journal is divided into the following sections:

    Editorial

    Original articles

    Review articles

    Directives in Family and Community Medicine

    Essays

    Case reports

    Theses

    Letters to the Editor

    The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request.

    The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles

  6. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade RBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC.

    Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process.

    All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish.

    Categories and formats of papers

    The journal is divided into the following sections:

    Editorial

    Original articles

    Review articles

    Directives in Family and Community Medicine

    Essays

    Case reports

    Theses

    Letters to the Editor

    The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request.

    The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles

  7. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC.

    Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process.

    All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish.

    Categories and formats of papers

    The journal is divided into the following sections:

    Editorial

    Original articles

    Review articles

    Directives in Family and Community Medicine

    Essays

    Case reports

    Theses

    Letters to the Editor

    The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request.

    The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles

  8. Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    participação de forma significativa no trabalho para assumir responsabilidade pública pelo seu conteúdo. Deverão, portanto, assinar a seguinte declaração de autoria e de responsabilidade: “Declaro que participei de forma significativa na construção e formação deste estudo ou da análise e interpretação dos dados, como também na redação deste texto, tendo, enquanto autor, responsabilidade pública pelo conteúdo deste. Revi a versão final deste trabalho e aprovo para ser submetido à publicação. Declaro que nem o presente trabalho nem outro com conteúdo semelhante de minha autoria foi publicado ou submetido à apreciação do Conselho Editorial de outra publicação. Artigos com mais de um autor deverão conter uma exposição sobre a contribuição específica de cada um no trabalho. Os autores de cada artigo receberão, após a publicação de seu trabalho, três exemplares da revista em que o seu estudo foi publicado. Ética em pesquisa Com relação às pesquisas iniciadas após janeiro de 1997, nas quais exista a participação de seres humanos nos termos do inciso II.2 da Resolução 196/ 96 do Conselho Nacional de Saúde (pesquisa que, individual ou coletivamente, envolva o ser humano de forma direta ou indireta, em sua totalidade ou partes dele, incluindo o manejo de informações ou materiais, sempre que pertinente, deve ser declarado no texto que o trabalho foi aprovado pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa em Seres Humanos. Os trabalhos devem ser enviados para: Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade - SBMFC Correspondência Rua 28 de Setembro, 44 sala 605 Rio de Janeiro - RJ Cep: 20551-031 Tel: 21 2264-5117 / 21 3259-6934 Fax: 21 3259-6931   Endereço eletrônico: rbmfc@sbmfc.org.brThe Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating

  9. Being the Family's Therapist: An Integrative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, James K.; La Sorsa, Valerie A.

    There is strong justification in the counseling literature for bridging individual and family perspectives. The Adolescent Depression and Suicide Program at Montefiore Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine (New York) is a brief treatment, outpatient clinic designed to provide mental health services for suicidal adolescents and their families.…

  10. Alternative models for academic family practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarnall Kimberly SH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Future of Family Medicine Report calls for a fundamental redesign of the American family physician workplace. At the same time, academic family practices are under economic pressure. Most family medicine departments do not have self-supporting practices, but seek support from specialty colleagues or hospital practice plans. Alternative models for academic family practices that are economically viable and consistent with the principles of family medicine are needed. This article presents several "experiments" to address these challenges. Methods The basis of comparison is a traditional academic family medicine center. Apart of the faculty practice plan, our center consistently operated at a deficit despite high productivity. A number of different practice types and alternative models of service delivery were therefore developed and tested. They ranged from a multi-specialty office arrangement, to a community clinic operated as part of a federally-qualified health center, to a team of providers based in and providing care for residents of an elderly public housing project. Financial comparisons using consistent accounting across models are provided. Results Academic family practices can, at least in some settings, operate without subsidy while providing continuity of care to a broad segment of the community. The prerequisites are that the clinicians must see patients efficiently, and be able to bill appropriately for their payer mix. Conclusion Experimenting within academic practice structure and organization is worthwhile, and can result in economically viable alternatives to traditional models.

  11. TRADITIONAL CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZHU, YP; WOERDENBAG, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Herbal medicine, acupuncture and moxibustion, and massage and the three major constituent parts of traditional Chinese medicine. Although acupuncture is well known in many Western countries, Chinese herbal medicine, the mos important part of traditional Chinese medicine, is less well known in the We

  12. The personalised medicine: a paradigm of evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhavendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of "evidence-based medicine" aims at the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the individualised patient care. The clinical genetics evolved from translational genetics research and contributes to the clinical care of patients and families through evidence-based health care in managing inherited disorders through accurate diagnosis, molecular pathology and assessing phenotypic correlations. Translational genetics and genomics research has led to the development of powerful tools for clinical diagnosis, assessing individual's genomic profile for disease prediction/prevention, high-throughput genome-wide screening for predisposition and/or protection to complex medical conditions, and discovery and development of new drugs and vaccines. Gene mapping and deciphering pathogenic mutations have helped in unravelling the basic biological mechanisms leading to new drug discovery and development. Targeted pharmacotherapy is now possible for managing the highly penetrant multi-system dominantly inherited conditions. Notable examples include rapamycin (sirolimus in suppressing the mTOR pathway associated hamartomas in dominantly inherited cancer family syndromes and angiotensin converting enzyme receptor blockers (ACE-RB in preventing aortic dilatation in Marfan syndrome and related familial arteriopathies. The translational genomic research is the essential prerequisite for developing sound evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic clinical protocols for the practice of personalised clinical medicine.

  13. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.;

    2015-01-01

    diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...... that Laboratory Medicine should play a key role to support the implementation of Personalized Medicine in the clinical settings, the participants of this survey think that the current organization of the Laboratory Medicine needs additional/relevant implementations such as: 1. New technological Facilities...

  14. From Livingstone to ecotourism. What's new in travel medicine?

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent developments in the field of travel medicine and to outline the knowledge and resources family physicians need for providing health advice to travelers headed for tropical or developing countries. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Personal files; references from review articles and from a recent textbook of travel medicine; current guidelines on pretravel advice; and a review of the 1996 to 1999 MEDLINE database using "travel medicine" as a term and subject heading, "trave(l)le...

  15. SACRED TULSI (OCIMUM SANCTUM L.) IN TRADITIONAL MEDICINE AND PHARMACOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Khosla, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Scared Tulasi (Ocimum sanctum L.) of family Lamiaceae is a wonder ayurvedic herb which is known for its tremendous medicinal properties both in traditional folklore as well as pharmacological system of medicines. Every part of the plant finds its use in one form or the other. Keeping in view the importance of the plant, an attempt has been made to review the various studies carried out in traditional system of medicine as well as modern pharmacological investigations.

  16. Medicinal Plants with Antiplatelet Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haouari, Mohammed; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-07-01

    Blood platelets play an essential role in the hemostasis and wound-healing processes. However, platelet hyperactivity is associated to the development and the complications of several cardiovascular diseases. In this sense, the search for potent and safer antiplatelet agents is of great interest. This article provides an overview of experimental studies performed on medicinal plants with antiplatelet activity available through literature with particular emphasis on the bioactive constituents, the parts used, and the various platelet signaling pathways modulated by medicinal plants. From this review, it was suggested that medicinal plants with antiplatelet activity mainly belong to the family of Asteraceae, Rutaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Zygophyllaceae, Rhamnaceae, Liliaceae, and Zingiberaceae. The antiplatelet effect is attributed to the presence of bioactive compounds such as polyphenols, flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, and other substances which correct platelet abnormalities by interfering with different platelet signalization pathways including inhibition of the ADP pathway, suppression of TXA2 formation, reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, and phosphoinositide breakdown, among others. The identification and/or structure modification of the plant constituents and the understanding of their action mechanisms will be helpful in the development of new antiplatelet agents based on medicinal plants which could contribute to the prevention of thromboembolic-related disorders by inhibiting platelet aggregation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27062716

  17. Veterinary herbal medicines in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Rastogi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available India has a rich and diversified flora. It is seen that synthetic drugs could pose serious problems, are toxic and costly. In contrast to this, herbal medicines are relatively nontoxic, cheaper and are eco-friendly. Moreover, the people have used them for generations. They have also been used in day-to-day problems of healthcare in animals. 25% of the drugs prescribed worldwide come from plants. Almost 75% of the medicinal plants grow naturally in different states of India. These plants are known to cure many ailments in animals like poisoning, cough, constipation, foot and mouth disease, dermatitis, cataract, burning, pneumonia, bone fractures, snake bites, abdominal pains, skin diseases etc. There is scarce review of such information (veterinary herbals in the literature. The electronic and manual search was made using various key words such as veterinary herbal, ethno-veterinary medicines etc. and the content systematically arranged. This article deals with the comprehensive review of 45 medicinal plant species that are official in Indian Pharmacopoeia (IP 2014. The botanical names, family, habitat, plant part used and pharmacological actions, status in British Pharmacopoeia 2014, USP 36 are mentioned. Also, a relationship between animal and human dose, standardization and regulatory aspects of these selected veterinary herbals are provided.

  18. Sleep Medicine Textbook

    OpenAIRE

    Bassetti, Claudio; Dogas, Zoran; Peigneux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The Sleep Medicine Textbook provides comprehensive, all-in-one educational material (550 pages) structured around the Catalogue of knowledge and skills for sleep medicine (Penzel et al. 2014, Journal of Sleep Research). Written by experts in the field and published by the ESRS, it provides an European approach to sleep medicine education, and represents the knowledge-base for the ESRS-endorsed sleep medicine examinations.The book is available at http://www.esrs.eu/esrs/sleep-medicine-textbook...

  19. Preliminary phytochemical screening of some Indian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, A.

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phenolic compounds and cardie glycoside distribution in five medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Asteracantha longifolia (L.) Nees, Psassiflora edulis Sims, Berberis tinctoria Lesch, Sphaeranthus indicus Linn, and Solanum trilobatum Linn. All the plants were found to contain Phenols, Cardiac glycosides, Steroids, Saponins and Tannin except for the absen...

  20. Traditional medicinal plants in Ben En National Park, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Sam, Hoang; Baas, P.; Keßler, P.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper surveys the medicinal plants and their traditional use by local people in Ben En National Park, Vietnam. A total of 230 medicinal plant species (belonging to 200 genera and 84 families) is used by local people for treatment of 68 different diseases. These include species that are collecte

  1. Mozart and medicine in the eighteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J S

    1995-07-01

    Over the years the medical history and death of Mozart have been the subject of many studies, but in spite of all this attention much remains controversial. In an attempt to resolve some of the difficulty it is useful to see his life, and that of his family as recorded in their letters, in the context of medicine in eighteenth-century Europe.

  2. Current status of family health in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolinar Membrillo Luna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Family Health (FH has three main elements: individual health, life material conditions and family functioning. Its main actors are the individual, the family and society. A common framework is the basis of FH, as each one of these elements is extremely important. Currently, in Mexico two aspects are considered: epidemiological studies and those inherent to the family medicine specialty. That latter has a residency and an integrated specialty curriculum, as well as certification from the corresponding board. All of this allows us to apply the HF approach to each and every family and individual that is cared for.

  3. Silver service : 25 years of activities by the Malta College of Family Doctors (1990-2015)

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Mario R.

    2015-01-01

    The Malta College of Family Doctors is an autonomous academic institution that was formally set up in 1990 with the object to encourage, foster and maintain the highest possible standards in family medicine in Malta, and to sustain and improve the professional qualifications of members of the medical profession in Malta who are engaged in family medicine.

  4. Family therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Altamash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Another major force not letting us succeed in the treatment of diabetes remains right inside the patients home, their family members. Hence, it is important to know the perception of the close family members about this simple and strong tool in diabetes, ′insulin′. The drug is nearing its century, it has not fully being accepted gracefully even in todays electronic savvy society. So, we need to strongly discover the reason for its non-acceptance, while trials are out inventing new drugs. One vital thing that can change this attitude is increasing the understanding of this drug, insulin in depth to close people around the patient, the ′family′. Underestimating family′s perception about disease and treatment for diabetes is detrimental to both diseased and the doctor. This consists of a biopsychosocial model; biological, psychological and social factors. Family forms the most important part of it. The strategies in family therapy include psychodynamic, structural, strategic, and cognitive-behavioral component. Diabetes has and will continue to rise, so will be the treatment options. From the clinicians side its to fix fasting first but from patients its fix family first. Family therapy demonstrates the importance of insulin initiation and maintenance in insulin naive patients, and continuation for others. The specific needs of such patients and their impact on family life are met with family therapy. Who needs family therapy? Benefits of family therapy and a case based approach is covered.

  5. Uso de medicamentos armazenados em domicílio em uma população atendida pelo Programa Saúde da Família The use of medicines storaged in the household in a population assisted by Family Health Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geandra Batista Lima

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abordar epidemiologicamente o uso de medicamentos impõe reconhecer que tal prática não se limita a fatores farmacoterapêuticos. O armazenamento adequado e a preservação de medicamentos são fatores fundamentais para a sua eficácia. O presente estudo teve como objetivo verificar a forma de armazenamento/uso de medicamentos em uma comunidade atendida pelo Programa/Estratégia Saúde da Família no município de Cristino Castro (PI, bem como o grau de conhecimento a respeito dos medicamentos mantidos sob sua guarda. Os dados foram obtidos em visitas domiciliares a 52 famílias, a partir de observações e da aplicação de um questionário. Observaram-se baixa renda e baixa escolaridade da população, fatores agravantes na efetiva orientação terapêutica e acesso aos fármacos. Elevado percentual dos medicamentos estocados é adquirido sem prescrição. Destacamos a classe dos antimicrobianos, reforçando o perigo da automedicação. 62% dos responsáveis pela guarda não possuem a orientação mínima para assegurar o uso racional, e 66% não tem ciência da toxicidade. 54,10% dos medicamentos estavam ao alcance de crianças e animais domésticos e 15,92% não possuíam rótulo ou qualquer identificação. Algumas famílias mantêm em estoque medicações básicas, outras acumulam um "arsenal terapêutico".To approach the epidemiological use of medicines is necessary to recognize that such practice is not strictly limited to pharmacotherapy. The appropriate storage and the preservation of medicines are fundamental factors for effectiveness. This study was aimed at verifying the storage form/use of medicines in a community assisted by the Family Health Program in the district of Cristino Castro (PI, Brazil, as well as the level of the people's knowledge regarding drugs storage at home. The data were obtained visiting 52 families, starting with observations and applying a questionnaire. It was observed a low income and education levels, a

  6. Family Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Kobrak

    2008-01-01

    As Mira Wilkins has argued, there is a curious disconnect between business and financial history. (Wilkins, 2003) Whereas business history literature has rediscovered the importance of family business in many countries and in many sectors of contemporary commercial life, for example, little has been written about family banking as an alternative to joint-stock, management-run financial institutions. This lacuna is odd for many reasons. First, family banking is one of the best-known examples o...

  7. My Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Everyone has a family.We live in it and feel very warm.There are three persons in my family,my mother,father and I.We live together very happily and there are many interesting stories about my family. My father is a hard-working man.He works as a doctor.He always tries his best to help every,patient and make patients comfortable.But sonetimes he works so hard

  8. [ETHICS, MORALS AND SOCIETY IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flugelman, Anath

    2015-09-01

    Following the completion of the human genome project, genomic medicine including personalized medicine, widely based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, is rapidly developing. This breakthrough should benefit humankind thanks to tailoring the most appropriate prevention, interventions and therapies to each individual, minimizing adverse side effects, based on inter-personal genetic variety and polymorphism. Yet wide spectrum ethical, legal and social issues carry significant implications regarding individuals, families, society and public health. The main issues concern genomic information and autonomy, justice and equity, resources allocation and solidarity, challenging the traditional role of medicine and dealing with unlimited boundaries of knowledge. Those issues are not new nor exceptional to genomic medicine, yet their wide unlimited scope and implications on many aspects of life renders them crucial. These aspects will be discussed in light of Beauchamp and Childress' four principles: non-maleficence, beneficence, autonomy and justice, and main moral philosophies, Kant's autonomy, Utilitarianism which promotes the common good, and Rawls' Theory of Justice. PMID:26665754

  9. [ETHICS, MORALS AND SOCIETY IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flugelman, Anath

    2015-09-01

    Following the completion of the human genome project, genomic medicine including personalized medicine, widely based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, is rapidly developing. This breakthrough should benefit humankind thanks to tailoring the most appropriate prevention, interventions and therapies to each individual, minimizing adverse side effects, based on inter-personal genetic variety and polymorphism. Yet wide spectrum ethical, legal and social issues carry significant implications regarding individuals, families, society and public health. The main issues concern genomic information and autonomy, justice and equity, resources allocation and solidarity, challenging the traditional role of medicine and dealing with unlimited boundaries of knowledge. Those issues are not new nor exceptional to genomic medicine, yet their wide unlimited scope and implications on many aspects of life renders them crucial. These aspects will be discussed in light of Beauchamp and Childress' four principles: non-maleficence, beneficence, autonomy and justice, and main moral philosophies, Kant's autonomy, Utilitarianism which promotes the common good, and Rawls' Theory of Justice.

  10. A review on chemical and medicobiological applications of capparidaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are the nature′s gift to human being to make disease free healthy life. It plays a vital role to preserve our health. Capparidaceae family comprises various important medicinal properties distributed in tropical and subtropical India, whose medicinal usage has been reported in the traditional systems of medicine such as Ayurvedha, Siddha and Unani. Plants belongs to the Capparidaceae family has been described as a rasayana herb and has been used extensively as an adaptogen to increase the non specific resistance of antioxidant and immunostimulant effects. The C. sepiaria, C. spinosa, C. tomentosa and C. zeylanica etc., belongs to this family is reported as used in traditional medicine. The diverse phytoconstituents and various medicobiological uses of the plants belonging to this family were reviewed here.

  11. Family literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    I Projekt familielæsning, der er et samarbejde mellem Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning og Hillerød Bibliotek, arbejder vi med at få kontakt til de familier, som biblioteket ellers aldrig ser som brugere og dermed også de børn, der vokser op i familier, for hvem bøger og oplæsningssituationer ikke...... er en selvfølgelig del af barndommen. Det, vi vil undersøge og ønsker at være med til at udvikle hos disse familier, er det, man kan kalde family literacy....

  12. Herbal medicine in healthcare--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosihuzzaman, Mohammed

    2012-06-01

    It is generally accepted by all concerned that modern pharmaceuticals will remain out of reach of many people and 'health for all' may only be realized by the use of adequately assessed herbal products. Mankind has been using herbal medicine for healing right from the beginning of human civilization. With the advent of 'modern medicine' herbal products have been looked down upon, especially by western societies. Yet, in recent times, use of herbal medicine for heathcare has increased steadily all over the world. However, serious concerns are being realized regarding the safety, claimed efficacy and quality of herbal products used as herbal medicine, nutraceuticals, health food and cosmetics. Although herbal products are generally considered safe due to their age-old usage, significant side effects have been reported for many herbal products, including herbal medicine. Accidental contamination and intentional adulteration are considered as primary reasons for the side effects. The historical perspective and the philosophy of herbal medical practice along with its present status in the light of present day science have been reviewed and included in the present article. Assurance of safety by identification of contaminants and assessment of toxicity has been outlined. Assessment of claimed efficacy of herbal medicine is difficult due to its holistic approach. Practical ways of assessing efficacy of herbal medicine by adapting the methodologies used for modern pharmaceutical are described. The maintenance of standard of herbal medicine has been stressed and pragmatic approaches of assuring quality of herbal medicine by using modern tools of fingerprinting the chemical profile of herbal medicine are discussed. As much of the traditional herbal medical knowledge is scattered around the world at the family and community levels, and more so in the indigeneous people, the knowledge base is continuously being lost and so needs immediate documentation. Difficulties in

  13. Some Less Known Medicinal Plants Traditionally Used In Dharmapuri District – Tamilnadu

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, R. Suthar; Arani, M. U. V; Mohanmarugaraja, M.K.; Kumar, K. Suresh; Kumar, K.K. Shiva

    2005-01-01

    A medicinal plants survey was done in various parts of Dharmapuri district, about 260 medicinal plants were identified and collected. Amongst them, few of the plants were less known but had remarkable medicinal properties, they were grouped together and are enumerated by the botanical name, family name, local name, locality and ethnomedical properties.

  14. National Farm Medicine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Areas Applied Sciences Biomedical Informatics Clinical Research Epidemiology Farm Medicine Human Genetics Oral-Systemic Health Clinical ... Consulting Agritourism Farm MAPPER Lyme Disease ROPS Rebate Zika Virus National Farm Medicine Center The National Farm ...

  15. Cold and Cough Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  16. Society for Vascular Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 Learn more Patient Information Pages from Vascular Medicine August 2016 The Vascular Laboratory More info for ... Learn more. Trending Now: Hot Topics in Vascular Medicine Video Series Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD) with Drs. Jeffrey ...

  17. HIV/AIDS Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... few years. But today, there are many effective medicines to fight the infection, and people with HIV ... healthier lives. There are five major types of medicines: Reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors - interfere with a critical ...

  18. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ... at risk for: Returning symptoms, such as severe depression Increased risk of suicide (for some people) Withdrawal ...

  19. Medicine safety and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000619.htm Medicine safety and children To use the sharing features ... especially careful if you have toddlers around. Keep Medicines out of Reach and Sight Safety tips: DO ...

  20. Future of Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. The Future of Personalized Medicine, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past Issues / ... five priorities for NIH is to advance personalized medicine. What does this mean for the average American? ...

  1. Nuclear energy and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of nuclear energy on medicine, as well as the basic principles of these applications, are presented. The radiological diagnosis, the radiotherapy, the nuclear medicine, the radiological protection and the production of radioisotopes are studied. (M.A.C.)

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications and allergies. Depending on the type ... Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material ...

  3. ADHD Medicines (for Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... Crushes What's a Booger? ADHD Medicines KidsHealth > For Kids > ADHD Medicines Print A A A Text Size ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... referring physician. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The information provided by nuclear medicine examinations is ... risk is very low compared with the potential benefits. Nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures have been used for ...

  5. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is approximately $75 billion spent annually on prescription medicine. All too often, however, we overlook the vital ... between prescription and over-the-counter remedies. Prescription medicine is prescribed by a doctor for a specific ...

  6. Family matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2013-01-01

    scores for the children. For the adjusted associations, we again found the family stress variables in the healthy spouse to be related to the risk of emotional and behavioral problems in the children. CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggest that in ABI families, the children’s emotional functioning......OBJECTIVES: To relate illness and family factors to emotional and behavioural problems in school-age children (7–14 years old) of parents with acquired brain injury and their healthy spouses. PARTICIPANTS, MATERIALS/METHODS: Members of 35 families in which a parent had been diagnosed with acquired...... brain injury participated. Family and brain injury characteristics were reported by the ill and healthy parents. Children self-reported post-traumatic stress symptoms (PSS) using the Child Impact of Events revised (CRIES). Emotional and behavioural problems among the children were also identified...

  7. Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine Small Text Medium Text Large Text Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine ...

  8. Performing Narrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langellier, Kristin M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author weaves narrative medicine and performance together to consider what might it mean to call narrative medicine a performance. To name narrative medicine as performance is to recognize the texts and bodies, the stories and selves, that participate in its practice--patients' and physicians' embodied stories as well as the…

  9. Medicines to Treat Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it costs. Ask if they have a drug discount program that can help you pay less for your medicine. Buy your medicine from the pharmacy that gives you the cheapest price.  Sign up for patient assistance programs: Most companies that make medicines have programs that help people ...

  10. Is Marijuana Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications » DrugFacts » Is Marijuana Medicine? DrugFacts: Is Marijuana Medicine? Email Facebook Twitter Revised July 2015 What is ... isn’t the marijuana plant an FDA-approved medicine? The FDA requires carefully conducted studies (clinical trials) ...

  11. Changing academic medicine: strategies used by academic leaders of integrative medicine-a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Holmberg, Christine

    2012-01-01

    In Western countries, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is more and more provided by practitioners and family doctors. To base this reality of health care provision on an evidence-base, academic medicine needs to be included in the development. In the study we aimed to gain information on a structured approach to include CAM in academic health centers. We conducted a semistructured interview study with leading experts of integrative medicine to analyze strategies of existing academic institutions of integrative medicine. The study sample consisted of a purposive sample of ten leaders that have successfully integrated CAM into medical schools in the USA, Great Britain, and Germany and the Director of the National Center for Alternative and Complementary Medicine. Analysis was based on content analysis. The prerequisite to foster change in academic medicine was a strong educational and professional background in academic medicine and research methodologies. With such a skill set, the interviewees identified a series of strategies to align themselves with colleagues from conventional medicine, such as creating common goals, networking, and establishing well-functioning research teams. In addition, there must be a vision of what should be needed to be at the center of all efforts in order to implement successful change. PMID:23093984

  12. Plantas medicinais utilizadas pela população atendida no "Programa de Saúde da Família", Governador Valadares, MG, Brasil Medicinal plants used by the population assisted by the "Programa de Saúde da Família" (Family Health Program in Governador Valadares County - MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gonçalves Brasileiro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo realizar um estudo sobre a utilização de plantas medicinais pela população atendida no Programa de Saúde da Família em Governador Valadares, Estado de Minas Gerais, a fim de resgatar, preservar e utilizar este conhecimento em trabalhos com a comunidade. Foi usada a metodologia de questionários pré-estabelecidos, que foram aplicados pelos Agentes de Saúde da Família. O estudo foi feito em 27 bairros da cidade, sendo aplicados 2454 questionários, resultando em 232 plantas citadas como medicinais pela população entrevistada. As principais indicações de uso das plantas medicinais foram como calmante (10%, contra gripe (18% e infecções (9%. A maioria das plantas utilizadas são preparadas na forma de chá (78% e obtidas em cultivo próprio (57%, sendo que, em geral, o conhecimento sobre o uso e modo de preparo da plantas medicinais foi obtido dos familiares (67%. A maioria das espécies citadas e utilizadas popularmente possui atividade farmacológica já comprovada na literatura necessitando, entretanto, de orientação correta sobre seu cultivo e emprego terapêutico.This study was conducted to evaluate the use of medicinal plants by the population assisted by the "Programa de Saúde da Família" in Governador Valadares -MG, in order to rescue, preserve and use this knowledge in works carried out with the community. The preestablished questionnaire methodology was used. Those questionnaires were applied by the Family Health Agents. The study was accomplished in 27 residential quarters, as being applied 2454 questionnaires, and 232 plants were mentioned as medicinal ones by the interviewed population. The main indications for using the medicinal plants were: as sedative (10%, against influenza (18% and infections (9%. Most plants under use are prepared as tea (78% and are obtained in own cropping (57%. In general, the knowledge on the use and preparation of the medicinal plants proceeded from their

  13. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  14. The Genomic Medicine Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Elvis; de Andrés-Galiana, Enrique J; Benitez, Sonia; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo H

    2016-01-01

    With advancements in genomics technology, health care has been improving and new paradigms of medicine such as genomic medicine have evolved. The education of clinicians, researchers and students to face the challenges posed by these new approaches, however, has been often lagging behind. From this the Genomic Medicine Game, an educational tool, was created for the purpose of conceptualizing the key components of Genomic Medicine. A number of phenotype-genotype associations were found through a literature review, which was used to be a base for the concepts the Genomic Medicine Game would focus on. Built in Java, the game was successfully tested with promising results. PMID:27577486

  15. Nuclear medicine physics

    CERN Document Server

    De Lima, Joao Jose

    2011-01-01

    Edited by a renowned international expert in the field, Nuclear Medicine Physics offers an up-to-date, state-of-the-art account of the physics behind the theoretical foundation and applications of nuclear medicine. It covers important physical aspects of the methods and instruments involved in modern nuclear medicine, along with related biological topics. The book first discusses the physics of and machines for producing radioisotopes suitable for use in conventional nuclear medicine and PET. After focusing on positron physics and the applications of positrons in medicine and biology, it descr

  16. Fundamentals of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alazraki, N.P.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    This guidebook for clinical nuclear medicine is written as a description of how nuclear medicine procedures should be used by clinicians in evaluating their patients. It is designed to assist medical students and physicians in becoming acquainted with nuclear medicine techniques for detecting and evaluating most common disorders. The material provides an introduction to, not a textbook of, nuclear medicine. Each chapter is devoted to a particular organ system or topic relevant to the risks and benefits involved in nuclear medicine studies. The emphasis is on presenting the rationales for ordering the various clinical imaging procedures performed in most nuclear medicine departments. Where appropriate, alternative imaging modalities including ultrasound, computed tomography imaging, and radiographic special procedures are discussed. Comparative data between nuclear medicine imaging and other modalities are presented to help guide the practicing clinician in the selection of the most appropriate procedure for a given problem.

  17. FAMILY RHAGIONIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Charles Morphy D; Carmo, Daniel D D

    2016-01-01

    The family Rhagionidae is one of the oldest Brachyeran lineages. Its monophyly is still uncertain. There are four rhagionid genera distributed in Neotropical Region but only three species of Chrysopilus are found in Colombia. PMID:27395270

  18. FAMILY PIOPHILIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Marta; Pérez, Sandra; Grisales, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Piophilidae is a little family poorly known in Colombia, with only Piophila casei (L.) and Stearibia nigriceps Meigen reported so far. This catalogue expands the distribution of these species to other localities in the country. PMID:27395294

  19. Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  20. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypercholesterolemia or early heart attacks High level of LDL cholesterol in either or both parents People from families ... called fibroblasts to see how the body absorbs LDL cholesterol Genetic test for the defect associated with this ...

  1. Family Business

    OpenAIRE

    UNAI ARTECHE

    2003-01-01

    Family Business, Pitzhanger Manor. Curated by Danielle Arnaud and Matthew Poole. The artists in the exhibition explore how their 'authorship' or 'individuality' is expressed as images. Here, artworks are produced that deal with the public face of the personal, private or local. In brief, the thematic of this exhibition is interested in the consequence and legitimacy of 'individual choice' as a genre or style. Hence, Family Business looks to artworks that claim, utilise and reflect upon lan...

  2. [Interaction between medicines and medicinal plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tres, J C

    2006-01-01

    In recent years there has been a notable increase in the consumption of medicinal plants in Spanish society. This might be due to the fact that in some cases they have shown themselves to be efficient in treating certain pathologies and to the erroneous perception that these products are innocuous. Medicinal plants behave as authentic medicines since the chemical substances of which they are formed can have a biological activity in humans. For this reason, their joint administration with "conventional medicines" can produce variations in the magnitude of the effect. This type of interaction, just like those produced between two or more medicines, can produce pharmacokinetic mechanisms if they affect the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, or pharmacodynamic mechanisms if they affect the result of the pharmacological action. In the medical literature there are few articles and notifications of cases concerning the adverse effects and interactions that affect medicinal plants, which probably reflects an under-notification of these phenomena. If we add to this the lack of experimental data and controlled studies, perception of their prevalence is difficult or nearly impossible. This article sets out, in an order that will be explained later, the findings of an exhaustive review of the medical literature with the aim of making its existence known to the reader, without going into other considerations, such as the degree of evidence for example, which will be the subject of forthcoming articles.

  3. Parental rejection of homosexuals in a family primary health care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan Casas Patiño; Alejandra Rodríguez Torres; Camila Pereira Abagaro

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To know the frequency of parental rejection in homosexual patients in a family primary health care unit. Methods: A descriptive study carried out by the application of the Family Rejection instrument by Lozano-Díaz (2010) to 39 parents of homosexual patients assigned to the Family Medicine Unit no 195 in Chalco, Mexico. The non-probabilistic convenience sample was obtained in family medicine consultations and appointments with the parents of patients recognized as homosexuals were ...

  4. Books, children, dogs, artists: library programs for the entire family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haver, Mary Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The promotion of library resources and services is a continuous process for all libraries, especially hospital family resource center libraries. Like public libraries, a family resource center can utilize programs as a pathway for connecting with and developing awareness of library resources and services available to patient families. This column describes the programs currently offered for All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine patient families, marketing initiatives to promote these programs, and utilization of grant funding to supplement a program.

  5. Books, children, dogs, artists: library programs for the entire family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haver, Mary Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The promotion of library resources and services is a continuous process for all libraries, especially hospital family resource center libraries. Like public libraries, a family resource center can utilize programs as a pathway for connecting with and developing awareness of library resources and services available to patient families. This column describes the programs currently offered for All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine patient families, marketing initiatives to promote these programs, and utilization of grant funding to supplement a program. PMID:24735270

  6. Dulce Wireless Tijuana: A Randomized Control Trial Evaluating the Impact of Project Dulce and Short-Term Mobile Technology on Glycemic Control in a Family Medicine Clinic in Northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Sonia; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana; Menchaca-Díaz, Rufino; Fortmann, Addie; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The global epidemic of diabetes calls for innovative interventions. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Project Dulce model, with and without wireless technology, on glycemic control and other clinical and self-reported outcomes in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in Mexico. Subjects and Methods: Adults with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥8% were recruited from Family Medical Unit #27 of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) in Tijuana, México, and randomly assigned to one of three groups: Project Dulce–only (PD); Project Dulce technology-enhanced with mobile tools (PD-TE); or IMSS standard of care/control group (CG). Clinical and self-reported outcomes were assessed at baseline, Month 4, and Month 10. Time-by-group interactions and within-group changes were analyzed. Results: HbA1c reductions from baseline to Month 10 were significantly greater in PD-TE (−3.0% [−33 mmol/mol]) and PD (−2.6% [−28.7 mmol/mol]) compared with CG (−1.3% [−14.2 mmol/mol]) (P = 0.009 and 0.001, respectively). PD-TE and PD also exhibited significant improvement in diabetes knowledge when compared with CG (P < 0.05 for both). No statistically significant differences were detected between PD and PD-TE on these indicators (P = 0.54 and 0.86, respectively). Several within-group improvements were observed on other clinical and self-report indicators but did not vary significantly across groups. Conclusions: Project Dulce with and without wireless technology substantially improved glycemic control and diabetes knowledge in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes in a Mexican family medical unit, suggesting that integrating peer-led education, nurse coordination, and 3G wireless technology is an effective approach for improving diabetes outcomes in high-risk populations. PMID:26914371

  7. Fundamentals of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alazraki, N.P.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with basic science and statistics relevant to nuclear medicine, and specific organ systems are addressed in separate chapters. A section of the text also covers imaging of groups of disease processes (eg, trauma, cancer). The authors present a comparison between nuclear medicine techniques and other diagnostic imaging studies. A table is given which comments on sensitivities and specificities of common nuclear medicine studies. The sensitivities and specificities are categorized as very high, high, moderate, and so forth.

  8. Children's access to medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Alkahtani, Saad Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Access to health care for children is important. It is dependent on access to health professionals and also parental attitudes towards illness. Children have the right to receive medicines that are scientifically evaluated for both efficacy and safety. Counterfeit and substandard medicines unfortunately result in the death of many children worldwide. There have been particular problems with diethylene glycol which has been used as a solvent in counterfeit medicines. It has also been foun...

  9. Music and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Donatella Lippi; Paolo Roberti di Sarsina; John Patrick D’Elios

    2010-01-01

    Donatella Lippi1, Paolo Roberti di Sarsina2, John Patrick D’Elios11History of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Histology, and Forensic Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Health Local Unit, Department of Mental Health, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Healing sounds have always been considered in the past an important aid in medical practice, and nowadays, medicine has confirmed the efficacy of music therapy in many diseases. The aim of this study is to assess the curative po...

  10. Traditional drug therapies from various medicinal plants of central Karakoram National Park, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional medicines derived from indigenous plants play an important role in treating infectious diseases. This study examined traditional medicinal uses of indigenous plants and documented different traditional recipes used by local communities to treat different diseases in Baltistan Region. Forty-seven medicinal plants belonging to 22 families were collected. Twenty-one families were angiosperms, one was a pteridophyte (Equisetaceae), and one a gymnosperm (Ephedraceae). Crude extracts of these medicinal plants were used by the local people for treating diseases in a traditional system of medicine. Ranunculaceae, Asteraceae, Polygonaceae and Rosaceae were the most important families, each having five species with medicinal value. The species were found across a wide range of altitudes, from 2000 m to over 4000 m. (author)

  11. Family business

    OpenAIRE

    KLUZÁKOVÁ, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on family business companies and above all on their problem of succession planning. For the purposes of this work, I have chosen a family business company that is owned by two shareholders. Both shareholders are going to leave the company within next 5 to 10 years. The thesis deals with the succession plan of both shareholders and this concerning the rate of preparedness as well as the rate of coordination of both plans. Prior to the research, two hypotheses were fixed. Th...

  12. Family therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh Altamash

    1987-01-01

    Another major force not letting us succeed in the treatment of diabetes remains right inside the patients home, their family members. Hence, it is important to know the perception of the close family members about this simple and strong tool in diabetes, ′insulin′. The drug is nearing its century, it has not fully being accepted gracefully even in todays electronic savvy society. So, we need to strongly discover the reason for its non-acceptance, while trials are out inventing new drugs. One ...

  13. [Italy's Slow Medicine: a new paradigm in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldi, Antonio; Vernero, Sandra

    2015-02-01

    Italy's Slow Medicine was founded in 2011 as a movement aimed to promote processes of care based on appropriateness, but within a relation of listening, dialogue and decision sharing with the patient. The mission of Slow Medicine is synthetized by three key words: measured, because it acts with moderation, gradually and without waste; respectful, because it is careful in preserving the dignity and values of each person; and equitable, because it is committed to ensuring access to appropriate care for all. In a short time, the association spreads at national and international level, gathering the needs of change of a growing number of health professionals, patients and citizens, committed to manage health problems with a new cultural and methodological paradigm. Medicine is soaked with inappropriateness, wastes, conflicts of interest, and many clichés induce professionals and patients to consume more and more healthcare services in the illusion that it is always better doing more for improving health. Moreover, the dominant reductionist cultural model, on which the concept of health and disease is based today, considers man as a machine, investigated by a growing number of specialists, particularly interested in the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases. The interest is mainly focused on technologies, while the person along with the relations with his/her family and the social environment are completely neglected. The systemic approach adopted by Slow Medicine, on the contrary, teaches us that health and disease are complex phenomena and the life of a person is more than the sum of the chemical reactions that occur in its cells. At different levels of complexity, in fact, new and unexpected properties appear, such as thinking, emotions, pleasure, health. These properties are not detectable in the individual elements and can only be studied using methods of analysis and knowledge belonging to other domains of knowledge, such as humanity sciences: philosophy

  14. Veterinary nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is presented of the expanding horizons of nuclear medicine, the equipment necessary for a nuclear medicine laboratory is listed, and the value of this relatively new field to the veterinary clinician is indicated. Although clinical applications to veterinary medicine have not kept pace with those of human medicine, many advances have been made, particularly in the use of in vitro techniques. Areas for expanded applications should include competitive protein binding and other in vitro procedures, particularly in connection with metabolic profile studies. Indicated also is more intensive application by the veterinarian of imaging procedures, which have been found to be of such great value to the physician. (U.S.)

  15. Music and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Lippi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Donatella Lippi1, Paolo Roberti di Sarsina2, John Patrick D’Elios11History of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Histology, and Forensic Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Health Local Unit, Department of Mental Health, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Healing sounds have always been considered in the past an important aid in medical practice, and nowadays, medicine has confirmed the efficacy of music therapy in many diseases. The aim of this study is to assess the curative power of music, in the frame of the current clinical relationship.Keywords: history of medicine, medical humanities, healing music

  16. Glimpses of Islamic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S K

    1997-07-01

    The fall of the Roman Empire during the fifth century A.D. Ushered in the beginning of the Dark Ages. After this, in Europe further progress of Greco-Roman medicine originated from Hippocrates was halted. The ideas about medicine and hygiene were kept alive in monasteries only. The Arabs made advances in medicine at a time when the rest of Europe was in the Dark Ages. Islamic system or the rulers of the day actively encouraged scholarship and growth of knowledge. The Islamic gift of the day to the world of medicine was simply unique. PMID:12572570

  17. Perspectives on China's Development in General Practice(Family Medicine) Residency Programs and Curriculum%对中国全科医师规范化培训基地和培训大纲的研究和建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国平; 牛丽娟; 王家骥

    2014-01-01

    近年来我国全科医生制度的建立已经取得明显的进展。一系列关于全科医学住院医生培训基地建设的方针政策和培训大纲指南的制定和完善,促进了在岗/转岗全科医生、骨干全科医生的培养和师资队伍从无到有的发展。同时也显示出这些大纲存在着一些不足和缺陷。主要表现在没有完全抓住全科医学培训的核心内容,即全科医学自身的重点培训,造成全科医学病房训练和长期连续的社区门诊服务培训缺失,过度重视临床专科轮转培训。随着全国应急性在岗/转岗全科医生及骨干全科医生培训逐渐过渡到规范化全科医生的长远培训上来,尽快修订现行大纲纠正这些重大缺陷十分迫切,从而为保障高水平的全科医学人才培训打下长远的坚实基础。%Establishment of family physician( General Practice,GP) system in China has made some noticeable pro-gress. A series of government policies and training curriculums on " residency programs" promoted growth of GP work force and teaching/education power through on-job training and job-switch training in GP. It has been also noted,however,some major flaws exist in the current national residency program curriculum,as it misses the core training components:the training in GP it-self,thanks to lack of GP department inpatient training and longitutive outpatient clinic training. The training program has been wrongly focused on various specialty rotation training. As current emergency models of on-job/job switch GP training are gradual-ly transitioned into long term formal residency programs,those major flaws in the current curriculum must be recognized and a-mended as soon as possible,in order to lay down a solid foundation for effective training of high quality GP( future family physi-cians)and for achieving healthcare reform goal in 2020 to provide better primary care for all people.

  18. Integrative Medicine Program- MD Anderson Cancer Center

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    The Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson Cancer Center was first established in 1998.  Our mission is to empower patients with cancer and their families to become active partners in their own physical, psycho-spiritual, and social health through personalized education and evidenced-based clinical care to optimize health, quality of life, and clinical outcomes across the cancer continuum.  The program consists of three main components: clinical care, research, and education.  The Integr...

  19. FAMILY ROPALOMERIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale-Rocha, Rosaly

    2016-01-01

    Ropalomeridae is a small family with most species distributed in the Neotropical Region, from Mexico to Argentina, and only one Nearctic species. In Colombia, eight species distributed in four genera have been found. This catalogue, based on the study of specimens and available literature records, summarizes and updates the information on the Colombian fauna. PMID:27395300

  20. Familial hyperamylasemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koda Yu Kar Ling

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old white boy was referred to us with a history of 3 attacks of hypogastric pain over the previous 2 years and persistently elevated serum amylase concentrations. At physical examination, he was well with no evidence of clinical abnormalities. His weight and height were normal. Laboratory diagnostic investigations were all normal except for the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides in the feces and persistently elevated serum amylase levels. Serum amylase determinations in the family members were normal in his father and maternal grandmother but elevated in his mother, sister, maternal aunt, and uncle, all of whom asymptomatic. Macroamylasemia was excluded in the child and in the mother. The finding of persistently elevated amylasemia in the child and in the other family members spanning 3 generations, and the exclusion of diseases that lead to hyperamilasemia are consistent with the diagnosis of familial hyperamylasemia. Until now, only 1 similar case has been reported. Familial hyperamylasemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperamylasemias in childhood.

  1. Familial hyperamylasemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Yu Kar Ling; Vidolin, Eliana

    2002-01-01

    A 7-year-old white boy was referred to us with a history of 3 attacks of hypogastric pain over the previous 2 years and persistently elevated serum amylase concentrations. At physical examination, he was well with no evidence of clinical abnormalities. His weight and height were normal. Laboratory diagnostic investigations were all normal except for the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides in the feces and persistently elevated serum amylase levels. Serum amylase determinations in the family members were normal in his father and maternal grandmother but elevated in his mother, sister, maternal aunt, and uncle, all of whom asymptomatic. Macroamylasemia was excluded in the child and in the mother. The finding of persistently elevated amylasemia in the child and in the other family members spanning 3 generations, and the exclusion of diseases that lead to hyperamilasemia are consistent with the diagnosis of familial hyperamylasemia. Until now, only 1 similar case has been reported. Familial hyperamylasemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperamylasemias in childhood. PMID:11981589

  2. Family Circle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Foster care is conducive to giving orphaned children a better life For most children living in orphanages, having a real home is just a pipe dream. Although they may be well looked after, receive a good education and proper nutrition, the love and care that come from being part of a real family just aren't there.

  3. Finding Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Discovering her birth parents was an exciting adventure for a 15-year-old girl It took 14 years-and just two minutes-for an adopted Chinese girl to find her biological family.July 21 this year marked the first

  4. Family Hypnotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  5. Familial hyperaldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowasser, M; Gordon, R D

    2001-09-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PAL) may be as much as ten times more common than has been traditionally thought, with most patients normokalemic. The study of familial varieties has facilitated a fuller appreciation of the nature and diversity of its clinical, biochemical, morphological and molecular aspects. In familial hyperaldosteronism type I (FH-I), glucocorticoid-remediable PAL is caused by inheritance of an ACTH-regulated, hybrid CYP11B1/CYP11B2 gene. Genetic testing has greatly facilitated diagnosis. Hypertension severity varies widely, demonstrating relationships with gender, affected parent's gender, urinary kallikrein level, degree of biochemical disturbance and hybrid gene crossover point position. Analyses of aldosterone/PRA/cortisol 'day-curves' have revealed that (1) the hybrid gene dominates over wild type CYP11B2 in terms of aldosterone regulation and (2) correction of hypertension in FH-I requires only partial suppression of ACTH, and much smaller glucocorticoid doses than those previously recommended. Familial hyperaldosteronism type II is not glucocorticoid-remediable, and is clinically, biochemically and morphologically indistinguishable from apparently sporadic PAL. In one informative family available for linkage analysis, FH-II does not segregate with either the CYP11B2, AT1 or MEN1 genes, but a genome-wide search has revealed linkage with a locus in chromosome 7. As has already occurred in FH-I, elucidation of causative mutations is likely to facilitate earlier detection of PAL and other curable or specifically treatable forms of hypertension. PMID:11595502

  6. The effects of achievement motivation and family environment of undergraduates majoring in preventive medicine on creativity tendency%预防医学本科生成就动机和家庭环境对其创造力倾向的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周政华; 刘振中; 潘池梅; 敬媛媛; 陈金

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析预防医学本科生成就动机和家庭环境对其创造力倾向的影响。方法选择某医学院预防医学本科一至五年级学生243人为研究对象,用自填式调查表调查一般情况、成就动机、家庭环境和威廉斯创造力倾向,用多重线性回归分析成就动机和家庭环境对创造力倾向的影响。使用SPSS 17.0进行统计分析。各指标在男生与女生之间的比较采用成组t检验,在年级之间的比较采用单因素方差分析,两两比较采用SNK法;两指标之间的相关性采用直线相关分析,进一步分析采用多重线性回归分析。结果本次调查共回收有效调查表226份。学生的成就动机、家庭环境、创造力倾向及各维度在年级之间、男女之间的差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05)。对创造力倾向各维度及总分正向影响因素有追求成功、知识性、娱乐性和组织性,负向影响因素有避免失败,R2为0.094~0.265,P=0.000~0.048。结论预防医学本科生成就动机和家庭环境可能对其创造力倾向有积极影响。应采取多方面综合措施改善家庭环境、增强成就动机,促进创造力倾向的提高,培养学生创造力和科研能力。%Objective To analyze the effects of achievement motivation and family environ-ment of undergraduates majoring in preventive medicine on creativity tendency. Methods The self-administered questionnaire was used to survey the general characteristics , achievement motivation , family environment, and Williams creativity tendency of undergraduates (n=243) from grade 1 to grade 5 majoring in preventive medicine in a medical college. The effects of achievement motivation and family environment on creativity tendency were tested with multiple linear regression analysis. SPSS 17.0 software was used for statistical analysis. The indexes between boys and girls was compared with group t test, and single factor analysis of variance

  7. A educação da infância: entre a família, a escola e a medicina Childhood education: among family, school and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Helena Pimenta Rocha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo examina comunicações apresentadas no II Congresso de Higiene Escolar e Pedagogia Fisiológica, realizado em Paris, em 1905, como fruto da iniciativa da Liga dos Médicos e das Famílias para a Higiene Escolar. Elegendo as comunicações que abordam questões ligadas à institucionalização da inspeção médica das escolas e aos dispositivos de registro dos dados obtidos por meio dos exames individuais dos alunos, procura-se flagrar as representações sobre a infância e sua educação produzidas no campo da higiene escolar, num momento marcado por intensas transformações sociais, importantes reformas voltadas para a universalização da escola primária, difusão de ideais de renovação e modernização pedagógica, bem como pela significativa ampliação das preocupações com a infância, sua proteção e sua educação. A análise das comunicações apresentadas nesse fórum põe em cena as disputas que marcaram o projeto de constituição de uma pedagogia científica calcada no conhecimento das leis que regiam o desenvolvimento da criança.This article is aimed at examining papers presented on the 2nd Congress of School Hygiene and Physiological Education held in Paris in 1905, as a result of the initiative of the Guild of Physicians and Families for School Hygiene. We aim at verifying the representations about childhood and education produced on the field of school hygiene in a period marked by intense social transformations, important reforms focused on the universalization of the elementary school, diffusion of ideals for the pedagogical renovation and modernization, as well as for the meaningful growth of concerns for childhood and children's protection and education. Therefore, we have selected papers that approach issues linked to the institutionalization of medical inspection of schools, and mechanisms of data collection obtained by means of individual students examination. The analysis of the papers presented in

  8. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents.

  9. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents. PMID:26477900

  10. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points HIV medicines help people with ... will depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people ...

  11. MEDICINAL PLANTS OF RAJASTHAN IN INDIAN SYSTEM OF MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Y.C.; Prabhu, V V; R S Pal; R N Mishra

    1996-01-01

    Medicinal plants used in Indian system of medicine from Rajasthan state have been surveyed and catagorised systematically. The paper deals with 205 medicinal plants, thoroughly indexed along with their important traditional application for the cure of various ailments.

  12. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the healthcare rituals practiced by a given culture (eg, Asian, Indian, African). Homeopathic Medicine: This alternative medicine system is based on the principle that “like cures like.” In other words, the same substance ... American Brain Tumor Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. ...

  13. [Opening medicine containers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerup, E; Dengsø, H

    1990-07-01

    In connection with self-administration of medicine for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, patients with weak hands and elderly patients in general, the design of many medicine containers makes them awkward to handle for the patients. In this investigation 12 different medicine containers were tested. The 12 containers represent the antirheumatic medicine containers available on the market in Denmark in 1988. Sixty patients participated in the investigation. Thirty had rheumatoid arthritis and 30 had normal hand function. The age range was 40-85 years The patients had the choice between five possible answers concerning each container. In all patients, grip strength was measured. The patients with rheumatoid arthritis were classified in four functional classes, and pulpa-vola distance end thumb--5th MCP point distance were measured. The opening mechanisms of 29% of the antirheumatic medicine containers are unacceptable; these are plastic containers with a "push-off" top and suppository packs. 46%--(containers with screw cap or pressure dispensing) are considered acceptable. For 25% (tablet and capsule blister packs) the patients' estimate varied. It is important that medicine containers can be opened by the patients without difficulty, so that they do not present a hindrance to a correct intake of medicine or result in an unnecessary admission to hospital. The results of this investigation show that it is of continuous importance to encourage the production of medicine containers that comply with the requirements of the patients. PMID:2142351

  14. Children's Knowledge about Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarsdottir, Anna B.; Zimmer, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    Examined knowledge about medicines and perceived benefit among 101 children, ages 7 and 10. Found that medicine knowledge was explained using age, educational environment, and degree of internal locus of control as significant predictors. The negative effect of internal locus of control predicted perceived benefit. Retention of drug advertising…

  15. Prehistoric Iroquois Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosbach, Richard E.; Doyle, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    Study of pre-1750 medicine reveals that Iroquois diagnosis and treatment of disease was more advanced than the medicine of their European counterparts. The Iroquois developed a cure for scurvy, treated hypertension, and head lice, and even designed sauna baths. Indian psychiatry also included modern day techniques such as dream analysis. (MR)

  16. Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    John B. Bremner; Surya Hadi

    2001-01-01

    Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on ...

  17. PHARMACOGNOSTIC AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROFILE OF TRADITIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT: MYRICA NAGI

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Kumar; A C Rana

    2012-01-01

    Myrica nagi belongs to myricaceae family. It is commonly known as Bay berry (English) and Kathphal (Hindi). Myrica nagi has a long history of usage in traditional medicine against various ailments. In Ayurvedic and other traditional medicinal practices the plant has been used against diseases like, fever, Cardiac debility, typhoid, diarrhoea, dysentery. Phytochemicals like glycosides, saponins tannins, flavonoids, triterpenes and sterols have been isolated. Important pharmacological activitie...

  18. Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Bremner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on structural elucidation of some of the alkaloids is reported briefly.

  19. Pharmacognostical evaluation of medicinally important Ficus retusa (Leaves and bark)

    OpenAIRE

    Alok Semwal; Ratendra Kumar; Udai Vir Singh Teotia; Ramandeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Ficus retusa (F. retusa) belongs to family Moraceae is a large and extensively growing tree across Indian continent. It's commonly known as Chilkan and Marabuten. This tree is claimed to have medicinal properties. The aim of present study is to investigate the pharmacognostical characters of important medicinal plant, F. retusa L. The pharmacognostic studies were carried out in terms of macroscopical, microscopical characters, standardization, phytoconstituents and chromatographic analysis of...

  20. 2nd Research Meeting on Family and Community Medicine of Rio Grande do Sul 2ª Reunión de Investigación en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria de Rio Grande do Sul 2º Salão de Pesquisa em Medicina de Família e Comunidade do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Henrique Godinho Kolling

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Given the importance of encouraging the production and dissemination of researches in the specialty of Family and Community Medicine, an event, which aimed at creating opportunities to show research papers carried out by medical residents of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in 2008, was reported. At the end, the authors and the abstracts of their papers are listed.

    Dada la importancia de fomentar la producción y difusión de las investigaciones realizadas en la especialidad de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, se hace un informe de un evento que buscaba crear oportunidades para presentar trabajos de investigación realizados por médicos residentes del estado de Rio Grande do Sul, en 2008. Por último, enumeran a los autores y los resúmenes de los trabajos.
    Tendo em vista a importância de incentivar a produção e divulgação das pesquisas realizadas na especialidade de Medicina de Família e Comunidade, foi feito o relato de um evento que buscava oportunizar a apresentação de trabalhos de pesquisa desenvolvidos por médicos residentes do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, em 2008. Ao final, são listados os autores e respectivos resumos dos trabalhos.

  1. Foucault and modern medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerson, A

    1995-06-01

    Modernity as a concept or ideal, resulting from the age of Enlightenment and the French Revolution gave hope of a better future and new possibilities. To be modern means an 'enlightened' individual and society, welcoming change and development. In this paper, I will discuss Foucault's analysis (1973) of problematics in medicine in eighteenth century France. Three themes prominent in the text are: 'the birth of the clinic', 'the clinical gaze' and the power-knowledge relationship. Three problematics identified in modern medicine by Foucault and which are particularly relevant to twentieth century medicine are: (i) the extension of the clinical gaze from the individual body to the wider population; (ii) the increasing medical intervention and use of technology in fundamental life processes; and (iii) the relationship between society and medicine. I will argue that Foucault's analysis is fraught with ambiguities. It is useful, however, for establishing an explanation for medicine today and for presenting a particular interpretation of modernity.

  2. Maimonides’ Appreciation for Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Gesundheit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moses Maimonides, the illustrious medieval rabbi and philosopher, dedicated the last decade of his life primarily to medicine. His strong interest in medicine was an integral component of his religious-philosophical teachings and world view. In this paper various sources from his rabbinic writings are presented that explain Maimonides’ motivation regarding and deep appreciation for medicine: (A The physician fulfills the basic biblical obligation to return lost objects to their owner, for with his knowledge and experience the physician can restore good health to his sick fellow human being; (B medicine provides a unique opportunity to practice imitatio dei, as it reflects the religious duty to maintain a healthy life-style; (C as an important natural science, medicine offers tools to recognize, love, and fear God. These three aspects address man’s relationship and obligation towards his fellow-man, himself and God. Biographical insights supported by additional sources from Maimonides’ writings are discussed.

  3. [A preliminary report on the investigation of medicinal plant resources in the Liupan Mountains of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Pu, X; Sun, J; Zhang, G

    1990-02-01

    In this paper, 423 species of medicinal plants belonging to 94 families in Liupan Mountains of Ningzia Hui Autonomous Region have been reported, of which 403 species belonging to 79 families are medicinal spermatophytes. The paper may serve as a reference for medical authorities in developing and utilizing plant resources.

  4. Health promotion. Strategies for family physicians.

    OpenAIRE

    McWilliam, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    The current emphasis on health promotion raises questions among experienced health professionals. Many wonder whether such care differs from what we have always done and have doubts about cost effectiveness and government motives. This paper explores the latest meaning of the term health promotion, the evolution of strategies to promote health, and the implications of these strategies for practising family medicine.

  5. Satisfaction of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension with care offered in family medicine clinics in Mexico Satisfacción en pacientes con diabetes mellitus o hipertensión arterial atendidos en clínicas de medicina familiar en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladislavovna Doubova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the satisfaction and the factors related to dissatisfaction in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension with care offered in family medicine clinics. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A secondary data analysis was conducted. Main outcome measures were two indices of satisfaction: family doctor-patient relationship (FDPR and clinic organizational arrangements (OA. RESULTS: Approximately half of patients (n=1 323 were satisfied with care. In the FDPR index the items "kindness of the family doctor" (FD scored high, while the lowest score was for the items: "the FD allows the patient to give an opinion about his/her treatment," "the patient understands the information" and "the FD spends enough time on the consultation." As for satisfaction with OA, the items "cleanliness of the clinic" and "ease of administrative procedures" obtained the lowest scores. In the logistic regression analysis the covariate "negative self-rated health" and "type of institution" were associated with dissatisfaction. CONCLUSIONS:There are aspects of the FDPR and OA that reveal dissatisfaction of patients with chronic conditions.OBJETIVO:Analizar la satisfacción y los factores relacionados con insatisfacción en pacientes con diabetes mellitus (DM o hipertensión arterial (HTA atendidos en clínicas de medicina familiar (MF. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS:Se realizó análisis secundario de datos. Las variables de resultado fueron dos índices de satisfacción: relación médico familiar-paciente (RMFP y aspectos organizacionales (AO. RESULTADOS:Aproximadamente la mitad de los pacientes (n=1 323 estuvieron satisfechos. Para la RMFP, "la amabilidad del MF" obtuvo la mayor calificación, y la más baja fue para "el MF permite la opinión del paciente sobre los tratamientos", "comprensión de la información" y "tiempo que el MF dedica al paciente". Para satisfacción con AO, "la limpieza de la clínica" y "fácil solución de los trámites administrativos

  6. ICRP 60 and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, G. (Rome Univ. Cattolica del S. Cuore (Italy). Ist. di Medicina Nucleare)

    For that which regards the field of nuclear medicine, the new International Commission on Radiation Protection recommendations (ICRP 60) are highly innovative in that the differentiation between 'controlled' and ' monitored' areas is no longer tied to fractions of annual dose limits, but it is instead established locally on the basis of operational experience and judgement. The most notable feature of the new recommendations, however, concerns the new 20 mSv dose limit for exposed workers, the 1 mSv limit for the public (understood as the 5 year annual average), as well as, the modifications to the annual limits on the intake of radionuclides, e.g., inhalation of I 131 passes from 2*10/sup 6/ to 1*10/sup 6/. This paper assesses the impacts of these new limits on the performance of ' in vivo' medical diagnostics and radio-metabolic therapy with unsealed sources. Attention is given to possible negative consequences on the implementation of nuclear medicine due to the current trend towards lower limits, and to the implications of the new recommendations as regards medical support staff and family members of individuals undergoing radiotherapy.

  7. FAMILY BOMBYLIIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Carlos José Einicker; Evenhuis, Neal L

    2016-01-01

    Bombyliidae is one of the largest Diptera families with more than 4,500 recognized species worldwide. Their species vary from robust to thin, and may be small to large (2-20mm) and looks like bees or wasps. They also present great variation in color. Adults can often be seen either resting and sunning themselves on trails, rocks or twigs or feeding on flowering plants as they are nectar feeders. All reared bee flies are predators or parasitoids of arthropods. The Colombian fauna of bombyliids comprises at the moment 22 species, and 12 genera, of which, six are endemic species. Nonetheless, this number may be much higher, as Colombia is a megadiverse country and there are not many specimens of this family deposited in collections all over the world. PMID:27395279

  8. Family Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    This paper takes polymorphism to the multi-object level. Traditional inheritance, polymorphism, and late binding interact nicely to provide both flexibility and safety — when a method is invoked on an object via a polymorphic reference, late binding ensures that we get the appropriate...... implementation of that method for the actual object. We are granted the flexibility of using different kinds of objects and different method implementations, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. Nested classes, polymorphism, and late binding of nested classes interact similarly to provide both...... safety and flexibility at the level of multi-object systems. We are granted the flexibility of using different families of kinds of objects, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. This paper highlights the inability of traditional polymorphism to handle multiple objects, and presents family...

  9. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lahiri Koushik; Lahiri Bhabesh Chandra

    2001-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in...

  10. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients in order to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  11. Familial hyperamylasemia

    OpenAIRE

    Koda Yu Kar Ling; Vidolin Eliana

    2002-01-01

    A 7-year-old white boy was referred to us with a history of 3 attacks of hypogastric pain over the previous 2 years and persistently elevated serum amylase concentrations. At physical examination, he was well with no evidence of clinical abnormalities. His weight and height were normal. Laboratory diagnostic investigations were all normal except for the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides in the feces and persistently elevated serum amylase levels. Serum amylase determinations in the family memb...

  12. TRIBAL MEDICINAL PLANTS OF CHITTOOR

    OpenAIRE

    Vedavathy, S.; Sudhakar, A; Mrdula, V.

    1997-01-01

    Medicinal plants used in tribal medicine from chittoor district have been surveyed and documented systematically. The paper deals with 202 medicinal plants, indexed along with important tribal applications for the cure of various ailments.

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  14. Alternative Medicine and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Parents > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... works. previous continue How CAM Differs From Traditional Medicine CAM is frequently distinguished by its holistic methods, ...

  15. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  16. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meeting Orlando, FL AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... AAOM offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands We ...

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  18. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF PLANTS BELONGING TO LAMIACEAE JUSS. FAMILY

    OpenAIRE

    Shanayda M.I.; Pokryshko O.V

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. One of the important sources of therapeutic and prophylactic agents of modern medicines are essential oils of medicinal plants. Essential oils are the main group of biologically active substances of a number of plants belonging to Lamiaceae Juss. Family. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plants belonging to Lamiaceae Family many scientists associated with containing of essential oils. In this regard, considerable interest presents the comparative analysis of the antimicrobial ...

  19. Characteristics of family firms with family management

    OpenAIRE

    Søndergaard, Kathrine Lærke; Almli, Line Floan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine what characterizes family firms’ decisions when it comes to having a family member being the CEO or the chairman of the board of the company. We define this as family management, which is the dependent variable in our research. This variable has four non-ordered mutually exclusive values; family CEO, family chairman of the board, family CEO and family chairman of the board, and neither family CEO nor family chairman of the board. Using data from the Center for Corpora...

  20. Undertaking safe medicine administration with children: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentin, Jayne; Green, Michelle; Smith, Joanna

    2016-07-01

    This is the first of two articles that aim to provide children's nurses with an opportunity to develop their skills and knowledge of medicines management when caring for children and young people. This first article outlines the principles of effective medicines management including the pharmacology language required to accurately read prescriptions, the way children respond to medicines, managing risk, including the concept of human error, and working in partnership with children, young people and families. The second article, to be published in September, will focus on numeracy and calculation skills, identified as an important risk factor associated with medication errors in children. PMID:27387635

  1. Dimensions and singularities of Family and Community Medicine Dimensiones y singularidades de la Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria Dimensões e singularidades da Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A edição nº 24 da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade (RBMFC traz importantes temas a nossa reflexão, tanto para a Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF - quanto à sua efetividade e abrangência - como para a especialidade em Medicina de Família e Comunidade (MFC, visto que apresenta temas que nos distinguem de outras áreas da biomedicina. A primeira temática poderia ser definida enquanto o potencial da ESF para a produção de saúde no Brasil. Um exemplo é o artigo Desempenho de indicadores nos municípios com alta cobertura da Estratégia Saúde da Família no Estado de São Paulo que destaca como alguns municípios desse Estado apresentam melhores resultados com relação aos indicadores pactuados, quando comparados com municípios que não expandiram a cobertura da ESF. A segunda temática resgata aspectos centrais da especialidade em MFC. Apesar da morte e sofrimento serem comuns a todas as especialidades médicas, na MFC, em particular, ela é problematizada na relação médico-paciente e nos programas de formação, como, por exemplo, na ferramenta Ciclo de vida1. Nesta ferramenta, a morte se destaca como uma das crises normativas que marcam a existência, visto que nela se encerra o drama do sofrimento e da condição humana2. Assim, o artigo Crying Patients in General/Family Practice: incidence, reasons for encounter and health problems resgata o potencial do MFC para ressignificar o sofrimento humano através do cuidado personalizado e longitudinal dos pacientes. Quais os significados das lágrimas? Estamos preparados para um aprofundamento nesta dimensão do cuidado? Esses matizes da profissão do MFC também se descortinam no caso clínico intitulado Ser Médico de (sua Família. Nele, o autor explora os limites da ética e da relação profissional-familiar ao contextualizar a tomada de decisão frente ao processo de cuidado, adoecimento e morte de um membro da família. Entretanto, a morte ainda segue

  2. Practical nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Gemmell, Howard G; Sharp, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in patient care, and this book is an essential guide for all practitioners to the many techniques that inform clinical management. The first part covers the scientific basis of nuclear medicine, the rest of the book deals with clinical applications. Diagnostic imaging has an increasingly important role in patient management and, despite advances in other modalities (functional MRI and spiral CT), nuclear medicine continues to make its unique contribution by its ability to demonstrate physiological function. This book is also expanded by covering areas of d

  3. [Development of external medicine and dermatology of TCM in the Republican period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhongjun; Wang, Li

    2015-05-01

    The inheritance of the theory in external medicine in the Republican period was mainly derived from Wai ke zheng zong (Orthodox Manual of External Medicine) and Yi zong jin jian (Golden Mirror of Medicine) and the sorting out of medical plasters, pills, and powders from Wai ke shi san fang (Thirteen Recipes of External Medicine). Zhang Shanlei's Yang ke gang yao (Guidelines for Ulcerations), based on the five-year experience of Zhu's family, offers new experience and ideas for syndrome differentiation; Ding Ganren's diagnosis for external medicine is exquisite with many well known formulae prescribed by himself; Monographs on leprosy and syphilis were published by famous physicians. Departments of external medicine and anal diseases, and classes on external medicine and dermatology and venereal diseases were set up in TCM schools in Guangdong and Zhejiang provinces with teaching materials compiled. All these mark the development of external medicine in modern age.

  4. American Academy of Pediatrics. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Vohra, Sunita; Walls, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics is dedicated to optimizing the well-being of children and advancing family-centered health care. Related to these goals, the American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes the increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and, as a result, the need to provide information and support for pediatricians. From 2000 to 2002, the American Academy of Pediatrics convened and charged the Task Force on Complementary and Alternative Medicine to address issues related to the use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and to develop resources to educate physicians, patients, and families. One of these resources is this report describing complementary and alternative medicine services, current levels of utilization and financial expenditures, and associated legal and ethical considerations. The subject of complementary and alternative medicine is large and diverse, and consequently, an in-depth discussion of each method of complementary and alternative medicine is beyond the scope of this report. Instead, this report will define terms; describe epidemiology; outline common types of complementary and alternative medicine therapies; review medicolegal, ethical, and research implications; review education and training for complementary and alternative medicine providers; provide resources for learning more about complementary and alternative medicine; and suggest communication strategies to use when discussing complementary and alternative medicine with patients and families.

  5. Family Genericity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Type abstraction in object-oriented languages embody two techniques, each with its own strenghts and weaknesses. The first technique is extension, yielding abstraction mechanisms with good support for gradual specification. The prime example is inheritance. The second technique is functional...... abstraction, yielding more precise knowledge about the outcome. The prime example is type parameterized classes. This paper argues that these techniques should be clearly separated to work optimally, and also that current languages fail to do this. We have applied this design philosophy to a language based...... the result as family genericity. The presented language design has been implemented....

  6. [Overdiagnosis and defensive medicine in occupational medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berral, Alessandro; Pira, Enrico; Romano, Canzio

    2014-01-01

    In clinical medicine since some years overdiagnosis is giving rise to growing attention and concern. Overdiagnosis is the diagnosis of a "disease" that will never cause symptoms or death during a patient's lifetime. It is a side effect of testing for early forms of disease which may turn people into patients unnecessarily and may lead to treatments that do no good and perhaps do harm. Overdiagnosis occurs when a disease is diagnosed correctly, but the diagnosis is irrelevant. A correct diagnosis may be irrelevant because treatment for the disease is not available, not needed, or not wanted. Four drivers engender overdiagnosis: 1) screening in non symptomatic subjects; 2) raised sensitivity of diagnostic tests; 3) incidental overdiagnosis; 4) broadening of diagnostic criteria for diseases. "Defensive medicine" can play a role. It begs the question of whether even in the context of Occupational Medicine overdiagnosis is possible. In relation to the double diagnostic evaluation peculiar to Occupational Medicine, the clinical and the causal, a dual phenomenon is possible: that of overdiagnosis properly said and what we could define the overattribution, in relation to the assessment of a causal relationship with work. Examples of occupational "diseases" that can represent cases of overdiagnosis, with the possible consequences of overtreatment, consisting of unnecessary and socially harmful limitations to fitness for work, are taken into consideration: pleural plaques, alterations of the intervertebral discs, "small airways disease", sub-clinical hearing impairment. In Italy the National Insurance for occupational diseases (INAIL) regularly recognizes less than 50% of the notified diseases; this might suggest overdiagnosis and possibly overattribution in reporting. Physicians dealing with the diagnosis of occupational diseases are obviously requested to perform a careful, up-to-date and active investigation. When applying to the diagnosis of occupational diseases, proper

  7. Perceptions and patterns of use of generic drugs among Italian family pediatricians: first round results of a web survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Valentina; Mameli, Chiara; Cattaneo, Dario; Delle Fave, Antonella; Preziosa, Alessandra; Mele, Giuseppe; Clementi, Emilio; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2012-03-01

    Prescription of generic medicines represents an efficacious healthcare cost containment strategy. In some European countries and in the US, generic medicines are largely prescribed. In Italy, generic drugs prescription rate is lower. General Practitioners and Family Pediatricians may be less confident in prescribing generic equivalents instead of "branded" medicines. There are currently no data about Italian Family Pediatricians' perceptions and patterns of use of generic drugs. This is a first nationwide web survey conducted with the aim to evaluate generic medicines knowledge and prescribing habits of Italian Family Pediatricians. 303 Family Pediatricians completed the online questionnaire. 37.2% and 32.6% of them declared to have a sufficient or fairly good knowledge of generic medicines, respectively, and the majority of them believed that efficacy of generic medicines was sufficient (33.6%) or good (45.2%). Nevertheless, Italian Family Pediatricians are still prone to prescribe trade medicines more frequently, since only 13.5% of them declared that more than a half of their patients were treated with generic medicines. Major issues related with generic medicines prescriptions by Italian Family Pediatricians seem to be represented by diffuse scepticism about reliability of bioequivalence tests and safety of switchability from branded to generic equivalents. More information about generic drugs and more research in the field of pediatric pharmacology are needed for increasing generic medicines prescription rate among Italian Family Pediatricians.

  8. [Herbal medicines alternative to synthetical medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A M; Schilcher, H; Loew, D

    2013-12-16

    Herbal pharmaceuticals in medical practice are similarly used as chemically well defined drugs. Like other synthetical drugs, they are subject to pharmaceutical legislature (AMG) and EU directives. It is to differentiate between phytopharmaceuticals with effectiveness of proven indications and traditional registered herbal medicine. Through the Health Reform Act January 2004 and the policy of the Common Federal Committee (G-BA)on the contractual medical care from March 2009--with four exceptions--Non-prescription Phytopharmaka of the legal Health insurance is no longer (SHI) refundable and must be paid by the patients. The result is that more and more well-established preparations disappear from the market. This article gives an overview of practical relevant indications for herbal medicines, which according to its licensing status, the scientific assessment by the Cochrane Collaboration and the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) and evidence-based Medicine (EBM)/ meta-analyzes as an alternative to synthetics can be used. PMID:24934061

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce ... manufacturers are now making single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and positron emission tomography/ ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities ... and bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically ...

  11. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... take medicine safely, people can vastly lower the quality of their lives and in some extreme cases, ... the other one standing on my head, you know, it really gets to be difficult. Announcer: Some ...

  12. Terpenoids for medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischedick, Justin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is concerns research on monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, and diterpenoids with medicinal properties. Terpenoids from commond herbs as well as Cannabis sativa, Inula britannica, Tanacetum parthenium, and Salvia officinalis were investigated

  13. Challenges in sexual medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cellek, Selim; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2012-01-01

    The sexual medicine field has been in mode of revolution until recently. Like all other fields of biomedical research, the economic situation around the world has had a negative impact on the field's momentum-research funding bodies, regulatory bodies and pharmaceutical companies seem to have...... placed sexual medicine in their low-priority list. But this is not the only challenge the field is facing. The successful development of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors for treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) means that research in this area seems to have slowed. However, there remain...... several unmet medical needs within sexual medicine such as premature ejaculation, severe ED and hypoactive sexual desire disorder, which await novel therapeutic approaches. Despite these challenges, research into finding and developing such therapies is likely to continue in the sexual medicine field...

  14. Occupational Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Learning Objectives are: (1) Understand the unique work environment of astronauts. (2) Understand the effect microgravity has on human physiology (3) Understand how NASA Space Medicine Division is mitigating the health risks of space missions.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... after leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the small amount of radiotracer in your child’s body will lose its radioactivity over time. In many cases, the radioactivity will ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  17. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the United States, most of us, our culture, is that we take antibiotics for seven to ... I take it and for how long? What foods, drinks, other medicines or activities should I avoid ...

  18. Occupational medicine and toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Axel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This editorial is to announce the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. Occupational medicine and toxicology belong to the most wide ranging disciplines of all medical specialties. The field is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, management and scientific analysis of diseases from the fields of occupational and environmental medicine and toxicology. It also covers the promotion of occupational and environmental health. The complexity of modern industrial processes has dramatically changed over the past years and today's areas include effects of atmospheric pollution, carcinogenesis, biological monitoring, ergonomics, epidemiology, product safety and health promotion. We hope that the launch of the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology will aid in the advance of these important areas of research bringing together multi-disciplinary research findings.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... after the procedure? Except for intravenous injections, most nuclear medicine procedures are painless and are rarely associated with significant discomfort or side effects. If the radiotracer is given intravenously, your child ...

  20. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the bacteria, but it might not completely give what they call a "bactericidal effect." That means taking ... be sure to ask the following six questions-- What is the name of the medicine? What is ...

  1. Storing your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your carry-on luggage. To help with security at the airport: Keep medicine in the original ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  2. Emergency medicine in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lowan H; Trunkey, Donald; Rebagliati, G Steve

    2007-01-01

    Recent events, including the development of space tourism and commercial spaceflight, have increased the need for specialists in space medicine. With increased duration of missions and distance from Earth, medical and surgical events will become inevitable. Ground-based medical support will no longer be adequate when return to Earth is not an option. Pending the inclusion of sub-specialists, clinical skills and medical expertise will be required that go beyond those of current physician-astronauts, yet are well within the scope of Emergency Medicine. Emergency physicians have the necessary broad knowledge base as well as proficiency in basic surgical skills and management of the critically ill and injured. Space medicine shares many attributes with extreme conditions and environments that many emergency physicians already specialize in. This article is an introduction to space medicine, and a review of current issues in the emergent management of medical and surgical disease during spaceflight. PMID:17239732

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The information provided by nuclear medicine examinations ... diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. Risks Because the doses of radiotracer administered are small, ...

  4. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... means taking the bacteria completely out of the system. It might be just putting it to rest ... if they occur? And, is there any written information available about the medicine? There are many reasons ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the small amount of radiotracer ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  6. [Homeopathic medicine and magic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angutek, Dorota

    2007-01-01

    The article compares homeopathic medicine and primitive magic. The author realises formal similarities beetwen these two fields of knowledge. The primitive homeopathic magic characterised by J. G. Frazer in his The Golden Bought announces that "similar courses similar". M. Mauss and H. Hubert added to this "low" an another formula: "similar acts on similar that courses a contrary phenomenon". The last formula is an identic one with the "low" of homeopathic medicine. Moreover there is a similarity between pantheistic religion of Hahnemann and magician beliefs in the power named mana in Melanesia and Polinesia or orenda, wakan, manitou and so on, by the Indians from The North America. The amazing thing is that homeopathic chemists belive that kinetic power transforms itself into esoteric one, during preparation of homeopathic medicines.In the end of this article the author ascertains that homeopathic medicine and magic has certain paradigm in common what is opposit to racionalism of official European paradigm of thinking. PMID:19244731

  7. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nearly 2/3 of all visits to the doctor's office end with a prescription for medication. There ... counter remedies. Prescription medicine is prescribed by a doctor for a specific ailment, using his or her ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... referring physician. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The information provided by nuclear medicine examinations is ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  9. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... annually on prescription medicine. All too often, however, we overlook the vital role medication plays in our ... have switched to the non-prescription status so we have a lot of potent medications available for ...

  10. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Announcer: Recent studies show that nearly 2/3 of all visits to the doctor's office end with a prescription for medication. There is approximately $75 billion spent annually on prescription medicine. ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special camera and a computer ... medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of or ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not experience any discomfort. When swallowed, the radiotracer has little or no taste. If inhaled, your child ... after the nuclear medicine scan. If the child has been sedated, you will receive specific instructions to ...

  13. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or eating breakfast. By communicating with our health care providers and by accepting a greater responsibility in our own health care, we can learn to take our medicines safely.

  14. Darwin, medicine and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, A D; Sullivan, R

    2010-02-01

    'Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution'! So said Theodore Dobzhansky. It is extraordinary how little Darwinism and post-Darwinian evolutionary science has penetrated medicine despite the fact that all biology is built upon its foundations. Randy Nesse, one of the fathers of Darwinian medicine, recently observed that doctors 'know the facts but not the origins'. Clearly, then, in this auspicious year-200 years since Charles Darwin's birth and 150 years since the first edition of the Origin of Species-it is time to reconsider Darwin's legacy to medicine and to invite evolution back into the biomedical fold. Here, we consider the legacy of Darwin and the contribution of the other great evolutionists such as Ernst Mayr to cancer and medicine.

  15. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or eating breakfast. By communicating with our health care providers and by accepting a greater responsibility in our own health care, we can learn to take our medicines safely.

  16. Folk medicine and horticulture

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The article discusses the uses of marine organisms in folk medicine and in horticulture in the Philippines. Commonly used marine organisms are the different varieties of seaweeds, sea urchin, sea cucumber, turtle, crocodile and fishes such as grouper and rabbitfish.

  17. OTC Medicines and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with other active ingredients, such as decongestants or antihistamines. Drug Recall Information View information on recent drug ... in nursing babies. Limit long-term use of antihistamines. Just like other medicines you take, antihistamines will ...

  18. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or eating breakfast. By communicating with our health care providers and by accepting a greater responsibility in our own health care, we can learn to take our medicines ...

  19. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I take it and for how long? What foods, drinks, other medicines or activities should I avoid ... twice a day and one of them with food and the other one standing on my head, ...

  20. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if they occur? And, is there any written information available about the medicine? There are many reasons ... seven days of the week. Announcer: Regardless of age or economic status, taking medication can be as ...