WorldWideScience

Sample records for after-hours family medicine

  1. Effect of a reorganized after-hours family practice service on frequent attenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    1999-01-01

    of this reorganization on the use of services by frequent attenders (FAs). METHODS: From 1990 to 1994, methods of contact and annual costs per attender were analyzed in an ecological time-trend study based on aggregated administrative data collected from the database of the Public Health Insurance, Aarhus County......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A governmental reorganization of the after-hours general practice service in Denmark was launched in January 1992. The biggest change was the introduction of mandatory county-wide telephone triage systems staffed by general practitioners. This study assesses the effect......, Denmark (600,000 inhabitants). The study only included attenders ages 18 and over. FAs were defined as the group that, within each calendar year (12 months), had 4 or more contacts with the after-hours family practice service. RESULTS: FAs made up 9.5% of the attenders and accounted for more than 40...

  2. Family medicine in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alemañy Pérez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, the Cuban health system has been developing a roster of programs to ensure its social mission: to achieve a health status of the population consistent with the priority established by the highest authorities of the country. In response to the call of the Commander in Chief, Fidel Castro Ruz, to create a different doctor and a new specialist that would take into account the needs of the Cuban population; the family doctor model was implemented. Thus, in the decade of the eighties, the “Family Doctor and Nurse Working Program” was established, together with the corresponding polyclinic and hospital. At the same time, comprehensive general medicine as a medical specialty was created to serve the primary health care services. Both actions constituted a vital component in the development of Cuban public health services in recent decades. This article presents an account of the unique characteristics of these processes, while highlighting their impact on health indicators, as well as the participation of this specialty in the training of human resources for the health system.

  3. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  4. [Teaching family medicine in Lausanne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Thomas; Junod, Michel; Cornuz, Jacques; Herzig, Lilli; Bonvin, Raphael

    2010-12-01

    The Faculty of Biology and Medicine of Lausanne has integrated education of family medicine all along its new undergraduate medical curriculum. The Institute of general medicine is in charge to implement those offers among which two are presented hereafter. In the new module "Generalism" several courses cover the specificities of the discipline as for example medical decision in the practice. A mandatory one-month internship in the medical practice offers an experiential immersion into family medicine for all students. In a meeting at the end of their internship, students discuss in group with their peers their individual experiences and are asked to identify, based on their personal experience, the general concepts of the specialty of family medicine and general practice.

  5. Teaching evidence based medicine in family medicine

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    Davorka Vrdoljak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of evidence based medicine (EBM as the integrationof clinical expertise, patient values and the best evidence was introduced by David Sackett in the 1980’s. Scientific literature in medicine is often marked by expansion, acummulation and quick expiration. Reading all important articles to keep in touch with relevant information is impossible. Finding the best evidence that answers a clinical question in general practice (GP in a short time is not easy. Five useful steps are described –represented by the acronym “5A+E”: assess, ask, acquire, appraise, apply and evaluate.The habit of conducting an evidence search “on the spot’’ is proposed. Although students of medicine at University of Split School of Medicine are taught EBM from the first day of their study and in all courses, their experience of evidence-searching and critical appraisal of the evidence, in real time with real patient is inadequate. Teaching the final-year students the practical use of EBM in a GP’s office is different and can have an important role in their professional development. It can positively impact on quality of their future work in family practice (or some other medical specialty by acquiring this habit of constant evidence-checking to ensure that best practice becomes a mechanism for life-long learning. Conclusion. EBM is a foundation stone of every branch of medicine and important part of Family Medicine as scientific and professional discipline. To have an EB answer resulting from GP’s everyday work is becoming a part of everyday practice.

  6. Family Medicine: Bridge to Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Reflecting on the suicide of a close friend, this essay explores what comprises, and inspires a will to live, and how those in Family Medicine can address suicide risk even in the face of debilitating or terminal illness. Research indicates that the will to live is a measurable indicator of general well-being, distinct from depression, and an important predictor of a person's motivation to "hold on to life". As such, understanding what is at the heart of a desire to live should alter clinical practice. This essay offers ideas for ways in which to create bridges for patients that could help sustain life.

  7. Night Owl: Maryland's After-Hours Reference Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Deborah C.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses "Night Owl," a Maryland public library's after hours telephone reference service. Issues include project start-up, user profiles, types of questions, volume, after hours reference accessibility, security, costs, service limits, publicity, staffing, and employee turnover. Similar services in other states are cited. (Contains six…

  8. After-Hours Work Email No Friend of The Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... balance out of kilter by blurring boundaries between business time and personal time. In 2014, researchers at ... men and women, he said. Christina Maslach, a psychology professor emerita at the University of California, Berkeley, ...

  9. Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Robin O.

    2012-01-01

    According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

  10. Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Jeffrey A; Stearns, Marjorie A; Paulman, Paul M; Chessman, Alexander W; Davis, Ardis K; Sherwood, Roger A; Sheets, Kent J; Steele, David J; Matson, Christine C

    2007-01-01

    Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies were adopted as the theoretical framework for this project. The FMCR provides materials for the preclerkship years, the third-year family medicine clerkship, the postclerkship year, and faculty development, as well as guidance for integrating topics of special interest to the federal government (such as, geriatrics, Healthy People 2010, genetics, informatics) into a 4-year continuum of medical education. There are challenges inherent in implementing each component of the FMCR. For example, can the ACGME competency-based approach be adapted to undergraduate medical education? Can the densely packed preclerkship years be adapted to include more focused effort on developing these competencies, and whose job is it anyway? What is "core" to being a competent clinician, and what information can be obtained when needed from medical informatics sources? Will family medicine educators embrace the FMCR recommendations for their third-year clerkships? Will exit assessment of the competency levels of graduating medical students be achieved, and can it make them more capable residents? Can faculty in different clinical and educational settings integrate the teaching of "how to learn" into their repertoire? How will faculty development innovation progress in a time of increasing emphasis on clinical productivity? Developing a common language and adoption of core competencies for all levels of medical education is imperative in a society that is focusing on improving health care quality and outcomes. The FMCR Project

  11. Length of training debate in family medicine: idealism versus realism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-06-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by "decompressing" the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates.

  12. Help is just a phone call away: after-hours support for palliative care patients wishing to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird-Bower, Debbie; Roach, Julie; Andrews, Morven; Onslow, Fiona; Curnin, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour support for palliative patients is the gold standard of health care in Australia. However, in the state of Tasmania after-hours telephone support was spatially fragmented and inequitable. In 2014, hospice@HOME, a pilot programme introduced in Tasmania in that year, implemented a state-wide after-hours palliative care support service--1800HOSPICE--offering 24-hour support, 7 days a week for palliative patients, caregivers and the public. Six months of after-hours call logs in combination with additional patient data, were analysed to evaluate the use and wider implications of a state-wide after-hours palliative care support number. Family and caregivers mainly used the after-hours support to request changes to support services (25.1%), report changes in patients' overall condition (23.6%) and request acute medical assistance (16.2%). Through the use of the after-hours services by all individuals involved in the care, end-of-life patients were able to reduce ambulance contact and emergency department admission, and thereby increase their likelihood of dying at home (for patients whose preference was to die at home). Overall, 24-hour palliative care telephone support was found to be a valuable tool for all individuals involved in the care of end-of-life patients.

  13. Final year medical students’ understanding of family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Petek Šter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice / Family Medicine (EURACT has developed an educational agenda, the key document for teaching family medicine in Europe. The aim of our study was to find out how final year medical students at the beginning of their family medicine clerkship understand the discipline of family medicine. Methods. The attitudes toward family medicine were paraphrased and developed into a 164-item questionnaire, which was administered to 335 final-year medical students at the beginning of their clerkship. Using combinatorial optimization with genetic algorithms we selected 30 items which yielded the highest Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient. Finally, we performed a factor analysis to find which dimensions of family medicine were recognised by the students and compared them with the domains defined in the EURACT definition. Results. The 30-item questionnaire had a Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient of 0.919. The differences between male and female students were not very significant (p=0.061. With the factor analysis we recognised seven factors, belonging to three out of six domains of the EURACT educational agenda: primary care management, personcenteredness and comprehensive approach. Conclusion. Final-year medical students at the beginning of their family medicine clerkship understand some of the dimensions of family medicine rather well, but they are not aware of some important competences of family doctors. There is a necessity to teach students about specific problem solving skills and the importance of balance between the health needs of an individual patient and the community.

  14. [Family medicine in Mexico: Present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rueda, Carlos E; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio; Ochoa-Díaz-López, Héctor; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; García-Peña, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the challenges and the future scenario of Family Medicine is a priority to address challenges such as the reduction of benefits granted by social security; to adapt their practice to the changing health profile; and to curb demand for specialized services and contain the high costs of care in the second and third level. The program is aimed at three professional roles: medical care, research, and education. It is imperative review these in the light of changing demographic conditions, the type of health needs arising from new social determinants, the public expectations for greater participation in their care, and the evolution of the health system itself with the advancement of technology and a variety of organizational options with frequently limited resources. For primary care, as the core of a health system that covers principles of equity, solidarity, universality, participation, decentralization, and intra- and inter-sectorial coordination, it is necessary to put at the center of the primary care team the family doctor and not an administrator, who plays an important role in supporting the care team, but can not take the lead.

  15. Behavioral Medicine and University Departments of Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Grantham, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Behavioral medicine brings knowledge and skills from the social sciences to the practice of medicine. Modifying behavior which causes a health problem, disease prevention and health promotion, improving the relationship between patients and health professionals, understanding cultural and ethical issues, and the effect of illness on behavior are all aspects of behavioral medicine. Such `whole person' medicine fits well into family practice. However, careful consideration of the risks, challen...

  16. Undergraduate Courses in Family Medicine in the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands and the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan-Helge

    1993-01-01

    Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries......Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries...

  17. Three generations of family medicine: a comparison of social identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, T G; Cole, D R; Lieberman, J A

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that students and residents choosing Family Medicine career orientations have attained an academic parity with their counterparts in other specialties which was not demonstrated by their general practitioner predecessors. Similarly, the advent of Family Practice residencies and undergraduate course work has significantly altered the educational experience of today's medical students. This study adds to the literature by comparing a third element, the social character of Family Medicine oriented students, residents and practicing physicians. Three subgroups of Family Medicine oriented individuals; students, residents, and physicians, were surveyed through a mailed questionnaire. A study population of 768 individuals yielded a 73% response rate. The findings show that students and residents share a common pattern of identities and that this pattern is not shared with the physician subgroup. This results in rejection of the cohort replication theory. It also suggests a need for Family Practice training to provide role models from the new and emerging generation of family physicians.

  18. Opinions of Primary Care Family Physicians About Family Medicine Speciality Training Program

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    Hamit Sirri Keten

    2014-04-01

    Material and Method: A total of 170 family physicians working in Kahramanmaras were included in the study. After obtaining informed consent a questionnaire comprising questions regarding socio-demographic properties, conveying contracted family physicians as family medicine specialists and organization of the training program was applied to participants. Results: Among physicians participating in the study 130 (76.5% were male and 40 (23.5% were female, with a mean age of 40.7±7.1 (min = 26 years, max = 64 years. The mean duration of professional experience of physicians was 15.3±7.0 (min = 2 years, max = 40 years years. Of all, 91 (53.5% participants had already read the decree on family medicine specialist training program for contracted family physicians. A hundred and fifteen (67.6% family physicians supported that Family Medicine Specialty program should be taken part-time without interrupting routine medical tasks. Only 51 (30.0% participants stated the requirement of an entrance examination (TUS for family medicine specialty training. Conclusion: Family medicine specialty training program towards family physicians should be considered in the light of scientific criteria. In family medicine, an area exhibited a holistic approach to the patient; specialty training should be through residency training instead of an education program. For this purpose, family medicine departments in medical faculties should play an active role in this process. Additionally further rotations in needed branches should be implemented with a revision of area should be performed. In medicine practical training is of high importance and distant or part-time education is not appropriate, and specialist training shall be planned in accordance with the medical specialty training regulations. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 298-304

  19. Defining competency-based evaluation objectives in family medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Tim; Brailovsky, Carlos; Rainsberry, Paul; Lawrence, Katherine; Crichton, Tom; Carpentier, Marie-Pierre; Visser, Shaun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a definition of competence in family medicine sufficient to guide a review of Certification examinations by the Board of Examiners of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Design Delphi analysis of responses to a 4-question postal survey. Setting Canadian family practice. Participants A total of 302 family physicians who have served as examiners for the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Certification examination. Methods A survey comprising 4 short-answer questions was mailed to the 302 participating family physicians asking them to list elements that define competence in family medicine among newly certified family physicians beginning independent practice. Two expert groups used a modified Delphi consensus process to analyze responses and generate 2 basic components of this definition of competence: first, the problems that a newly practising family physician should be competent to handle; second, the qualities, behaviour, and skills that characterize competence at the start of independent practice. Main findings Response rate was 54%; total number of elements among all responses was 5077, for an average 31 per respondent. Of the elements, 2676 were topics or clinical situations to be dealt with; the other 2401 were skills, behaviour patterns, or qualities, without reference to a specific clinical problem. The expert groups identified 6 essential skills, the phases of the clinical encounter, and 99 priority topics as the descriptors used by the respondents. More than 20% of respondents cited 30 of the topics. Conclusion Family physicians define the domain of competence in family medicine in terms of 6 essential skills, the phases of the clinical encounter, and priority topics. This survey represents the first level of definition of evaluation objectives in family medicine. Definition of the interactions among these elements will permit these objectives to become detailed enough to effectively guide assessment. PMID

  20. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  1. [Education in family medicine--a new approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zildzić, M; Masić, I; Hasanović, M; Beganlić, A; Tulumović, A; Herenda, S; Salihefendić, N

    2001-01-01

    The subject of the family medicine on the medical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina existed from recently as a separate curiculum of the medical study. Until recently the contents of this discipline interpreted within the subject of the social medicine or the object of the primary healthcare protection, and programs of teaching were based mainly on Anglosaxon experiences. The fact is that some teachers of the medical faculty in Sarajevo had their own visions and programs of the family medicine which by years were tested in the units of the family healthcare protection in Sarajevo, Mostar, and Banja Luka, about what was published in our and foreign literature. New approach from the family medicine should be based on as follows: greater use of the standardized procedures for the improvement of the communication skills; revised educational procedure of all the participants 6 interdisciplinaryilly in the education of the family medicine; improvement of knowledge about methodlogy and the principles of the research; improvement of the techniques and knowledge about the maipulatin of the medical informations; development of the skills of the continued studying through the total working aga; to the development of the capability of the critical estimation of the own work important; by the defining of the important educational goals in the curriculum of the urgent medicine; to the development and use of the methods feed-back informations from the students; to the modernizing of the methods of the evaluation of the educational process-adopted knowledge and the attitudes and the carrying out of the practice of the patients, and the ethic values in that process. In this work the authors consider the stated experiences in the education from the subject family medicine at our faculties realting to the foreign, and suggest that new concept of the education on the basis of these experiences in the practice.

  2. Importance of international networking in academic family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalika Klemenc-Ketiš

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available European family medicine/general practice (FM/GP has travelled the long and successful journey of profiling the discipline and has produced valuable position papers on education and research. Nowadays, academic medicine is one of the pillars in the future development of FM/GP in Europe. A common European curriculum on undergraduate and postgraduate family medicine is needed. Also, a sound international platform of teaching institutions and/or teachers of family medicine would foster the further development of family medicine as an academic discipline. This would stimulate students and teachers to engage in international exchange to gain new knowledge and experiences, present their work and ideas abroad and prepare the conditions for further exchange of students and teachers. Conclusion. Established departments of FM/GP, led by a teacher who is a family physician/general practitioner, at each Medical School in Europe should provide students with knowledge and skills related to the core attributes of FM/GP. International exchanges of teachers and students should foster the development of a common curriculum on FM in Europe and foster improvement in the quality of FM education.

  3. Influence of folk medicine on the family practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gums, J G; Carson, D S

    1987-02-01

    The practice of folk medicine in the United States is increasing. Awareness by the family practitioner is essential in order to effectively communicate and successfully recommend medical treatment to those patients who hold belief in these traditional practices. Root medicine is particularly thriving in the southeastern United States. The influx of refugees into the southern coastal states has introduced new concepts into traditional medical practices. Interaction with patients who are involved with traditional health care providers and the modern medical community occurs more frequently than may be appreciated by the physicians. This article is intended to increase physicians' knowledge of some of the basic philosophies and practices of folk medicine, particularly root medicine, and to provide some insight into the reasons why the practitioners of folk medicine can be strongly influential in the medical and psychologic concerns of patients who believe in the power of the supernatural.

  4. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Turki N; Afify AAM; AlAteeq M

    2016-01-01

    Nouf Al-Turki,1 Ayman AM Afify,1 Mohammed AlAteeq2 1Family Medicine Department, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, 2Department of Family Medicine and PHC, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are lim...

  5. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015.

  6. Family Medicine and Primary Care: Trends and Student Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Mary W.; Veloski, Jon

    1977-01-01

    Using data from a longitudinal study of medical students at Jefferson Medical College, the authors analyzed trends in senior student interest in primary care specialties between 1971 and 1975 and selected background characteristics and performance levels of students choosing family medicine compared with those in other specialties. (Author/LBH)

  7. Pharmacist educators in family medicine residency programs: A qualitative analysis

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    Jorgenson Derek

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 25-29% of North American family medicine residency programs utilize a pharmacist to teach residents. Little is known about the impact that these pharmacist educators have on residency training. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of residents, residency directors and pharmacists within Canadian family medicine residency programs that employ a pharmacist educator to better understand the impact of the role. Methods Recruitment from three cohorts (residents, residency directors, pharmacists within family medicine residency programs across Canada for one-on-one semi-structured interviews followed by thematic analysis of anonymized transcript data. Results 11 residents, 6 residency directors and 17 pharmacist educators participated in interviews. Data themes were: (1 strong value of the teaching with respect to improved resident knowledge, confidence and patient care delivery; (2 lack of a formal pharmacotherapy curriculum; (3 desire for expansion of pharmacist teaching; (4 impact of teaching on collaboration; (5 impact of teaching on residency program faculty; and (6 lack of criticism of the role. Conclusions The pharmacist educator role is valued within residency programs across Canada and the role has a positive impact on several important aspects of family medicine resident training. Suggestions for improvement focused on expanding the teaching role and on implementing a formal curriculum for pharmacist educators to follow.

  8. Teaching prenatal ultrasound to family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresang, Lee T; Rodney, William MacMillan; Dees, Jason

    2004-02-01

    Prenatal ultrasound is a powerful diagnostic tool, but there has been little research on how to teach ultrasound to family physicians. The available evidence supports teaching through didactics followed by supervised scanning. Didactic topics include physics and machine usage, indications, fetal biometry, anatomic survey, practice management, ethical issues, and resources. Supervised scanning reinforces the didactic components of training. A "hand-on-hand" supervised scanning technique is recommended for the transmission of psychomotor skills in these sessions. Curricula for teaching ultrasound should include information on which residents will be taught prenatal ultrasound, who will teach them, how to create time for learning ultrasound skills, and how to test for competency. The literature suggests that competency can be achieved within 25-50 supervised scans. Measures of competency include examination and qualitative analysis of scanning. Competency-based testing needs further development because no uniform standards have been established.

  9. NON-MUSCULOSKELETAL SPORTS MEDICINE LEARNING IN FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAMS

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    Pasqualino Caputo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of primary care sports medicine fellowships, as evidenced by the more than two-fold increase in family medicine sports medicine fellowships from a total of 31 accredited programs during the 1998/1999 academic year (ACGME, 1998 to 63 during the 2003/2004 academic year (ACGME, 2006, there are few empirical studies to support the efficacy of such programs. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted to assess the impact of primary care sports medicine fellowships on family medicine residents' learning of non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics. Rigorous evaluations of the outcomes of such programs are helpful to document the value of such programs to both the lay public and interested medical residents. In order to evaluate such programs, it is helpful to apply the same objective standards to residents trained across multiple programs. Hence, we would like to know if there is a learning effect with respect to non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics identified on yearly administered American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM in-training exams (ITE to family medicine residents in family medicine residency programs in the United States with and without primary care sports medicine fellowship programs. Review and approval for the research proposal was granted by the ABFM, who also allowed access to the required data. Permission to study and report only non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics excluding musculoskeletal topics was granted at the time due to other ongoing projects at the ABFM involving musculoskeletal topics. ABFM allowed us access to examinations from 1998 to 2003. We were given copies of each exam and records of responses to each item (correct or incorrect by each examinee (examinees were anonymous for each year.For each year, each examinee was classified by the ABFM as either (a belonging to a program that contained a sports medicine fellowship, or (b not belonging to a program

  10. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Paul; White, David; Meaney, Christopher; Kwong, Jeffrey; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty members. Design A comprehensive Web-based survey of all faculty members in an academic department of family medicine. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with job satisfaction. Setting The Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario and its 15 affiliated community teaching hospitals and community-based teaching practices. Participants All 1029 faculty members in the Department of Family and Community Medicine were invited to complete the survey. Main outcome measures Faculty members’ demographic and practice information; teaching, clinical, administration, and research activities; leadership roles; training needs and preferences; mentorship experiences; health status; stress levels; burnout levels; and job satisfaction. Faculty members’ perceptions about supports provided, recognition, communication, retention, workload, teamwork, respect, resource distribution, remuneration, and infrastructure support. Faculty members’ job satisfaction, which was the main outcome variable, was obtained from the question, “Overall, how satisfied are you with your job?” Results Of the 1029 faculty members, 687 (66.8%) responded to the survey. Bivariate analyses revealed 26 predictors as being statistically significantly associated with job satisfaction, including faculty members’ ratings of their local department and main practice setting, their ratings of leadership and mentorship experiences, health status variables, and demographic variables. The multivariable analyses identified the following 5 predictors of job satisfaction: the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment; being born in Canada; the overall quality of mentorship that was received being rated as very good or excellent; and teamwork being rated as very

  11. Differences between family and emergency medicine training before sports medicine fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark; Christensen, Heidi K

    2015-01-01

    Residency training clearly impacts physicians' approach toward fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine. Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sets strict standards for all programs, family medicine and emergency medicine training differ a great deal in general and provide physicians from both backgrounds varied perspectives and skill sets. The family physician acquires a substantial amount of experience in continuity of care and integration of health care into a patient's everyday life. On the other hand, the emergency physician receives exceptional training in the management of acutely ill and injured patients and leadership of a large health care team. Furthermore, while the emergency physician may be skilled in procedures such as fracture reduction and diagnostic ultrasound, the family physician is proficient in developing patient rapport and compliance with a treatment plan. Although physicians from different backgrounds may start with many differences, fellowship training is essential in bridging those gaps.

  12. After-hours equine emergency admissions at a university referral hospital (1998 - 2007) : causes and interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Viljoen, A; M.N. Saulez; C.M. Donnellan; Bester, L; B. Gummow

    2009-01-01

    Medical records of equine after-hours admissions from 1998 to 2007 are reviewed. Data extracted from the medical records included signalment, reason for admission, pre-admission treatment, clinical presentation, procedures performed, final diagnoses, complications occurring in hospital, length of stay and outcome. Eight hundred and twenty after-hours admissions were available of which 75 % were classified as emergencies. Most horses originated from Gauteng province (82 %), with Thoroughbred, ...

  13. Folk medicinal uses of Verbenaceae family plants in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullah, Mohammed; Jahan, Rownak; Azam, F M Safiul; Hossan, S; Mollik, M A H; Rahman, Taufiq

    2011-01-01

    Folk medicinal practitioners form the first tier of primary health-care providers to most of the rural population of Bangladesh. They are known locally as Kavirajes and rely almost solely on oral or topical administration of whole plants or plant parts for treatment of various ailments. Also about 2% of the total population of Bangladesh are scattered among more than twenty tribes residing within the country's borders. The various tribes have their own tribal practitioners, who use medicinal plants for treatment of diseases. The objective of the present survey was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey among the Kavirajes and tribal practitioners to determine which species of plants belonging to the Verbenaceae family are used by the practitioners. The Verbenaceae family plants are well known for constituents having important bio-active properties. The present survey indicated that 13 species belonging to 8 genera are used by the folk and tribal medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh. A comparison of their folk medicinal uses along with published reports in the scientific literature suggests that the Verbenaceae family plants used in Bangladesh can potentially be important sources of lead compounds or novel drugs for treatment of difficult to cure debilitating diseases like malaria and rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Competency-based evaluation tools for integrative medicine training in family medicine residency: a pilot study

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    Schneider Craig

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more integrative medicine educational content is integrated into conventional family medicine teaching, the need for effective evaluation strategies grows. Through the Integrative Family Medicine program, a six site pilot program of a four year residency training model combining integrative medicine and family medicine training, we have developed and tested a set of competency-based evaluation tools to assess residents' skills in integrative medicine history-taking and treatment planning. This paper presents the results from the implementation of direct observation and treatment plan evaluation tools, as well as the results of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs developed for the program. Methods The direct observation (DO and treatment plan (TP evaluation tools developed for the IFM program were implemented by faculty at each of the six sites during the PGY-4 year (n = 11 on DO and n = 8 on TP. The OSCE I was implemented first in 2005 (n = 6, revised and then implemented with a second class of IFM participants in 2006 (n = 7. OSCE II was implemented in fall 2005 with only one class of IFM participants (n = 6. Data from the initial implementation of these tools are described using descriptive statistics. Results Results from the implementation of these tools at the IFM sites suggest that we need more emphasis in our curriculum on incorporating spirituality into history-taking and treatment planning, and more training for IFM residents on effective assessment of readiness for change and strategies for delivering integrative medicine treatment recommendations. Focusing our OSCE assessment more narrowly on integrative medicine history-taking skills was much more effective in delineating strengths and weaknesses in our residents' performance than using the OSCE for both integrative and more basic communication competencies. Conclusion As these tools are refined further they will be of value both in improving

  15. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Design Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. Participants A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Results Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement “I am a leader” received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. Conclusion The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. PMID:28292816

  16. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  17. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey

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    Uzuner Arzu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27 and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11 by e-mail and by personal contact. Results A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%. Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e

  18. Patterns of Benzodiazepine Usage in a Family Medicine Centre

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    In a one year survey of the use of diazepam, chlordiazepoxide and flurazepam at a university family medicine centre, the per capita prescribing of the three drugs rose with the age of the patients. Diazepam was used approximately four times as frequently as chlordiazepoxide and for four times as many problems, even though it has similar pharmacological properties and a half-life nearly three times that of chlordiazepoxide. The over 65 age group received 36% of prescriptions for diazepam for m...

  19. The Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: implications for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Kent J; Quirk, Mark E; Davis, Ardis K

    2007-01-01

    Faculty development implications related to implementing the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR) Project provide an opportunity to look at the recommendations of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's federally funded Faculty Futures Initiative (FFI) and the recent Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project. Implications for faculty development include the importance of the clerkship setting, originally defined in 1991, with new features added in today's practice environment as outlined by the FFM and the changing assumptions in approaching faculty development. Previously, faculty development focused on teaching learners to master current knowledge. Now, faculty must teach learners how to master new competencies throughout their lives; learners need to learn how they and others learn now. Teaching must focus on how to learn in the future as well as what to learn for the present. Competence ("what individuals know or are able to do in terms of knowledge, skills, and attitudes") has become the focus of curriculum development efforts over the last few years and most appropriately serves as the focus of curriculum development in the FMCR Project. Implications for developing teachers and preceptors focus on the skills and circumstances required to teach and evaluate all types (cognitive, metacognitive, and affective) of competence. In the new culture, novel teaching methods will serve as the focus of faculty development in teaching and of educational ("best practices") research.

  20. The new Australian after-hours general practice incentive payment mechanism: equity for rural general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Amanda L; Nelson, Mark; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    In July 2015, a national scheme for after-hours incentive funding for general practices was re-introduced in Australia, 2-years after funding was transferred to regional primary health care organisations (Medicare Locals). The re-introduction was recommended in a 2014 review of after-hours primary care reflecting the "overwhelming desire" among general practice. Given the centrality of after-hours care provision in rural and remote practices identified in the review, we compare and contrast the current and historical after-hours incentive funding mechanisms focussing on fairness towards rural general practices. While there are similarities between the current and historical mechanisms, significant differences exist. The comparison is not straightforward. The major consistency is utilisation of practice standardised whole patient equivalents (SWPE) as the basis of funding, inherently favouring large urban general practices. This bias is expected to increase given a shift in focus from practices with no option but to provide 24/7 care to any practice providing 24/7 care; and an associated increased funding per SWPE. Differences primarily pertain to classification processes, in which the realities of rural service provision and recognition of regional support mechanisms are given minimal consideration. Rapid introduction of the new general practice after-hours incentive funding mechanism has led to inconsistencies and has exacerbated inherent biases, particularly inequity towards rural providers. Impact on morale and service provision in non-urban areas should be monitored.

  1. The new curriculum for family medicine at the University of Split, School of Medicine

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    Ivančica Pavličević

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the new curriculum at the University of Split School ofMedicine for the 2010/2011 academic year, the Department of FamilyMedicine based its teaching on its own expert and research work. Theadequacy of the communication with the patient, his or her familyand the social environment, as well as the concept of evidence-basedmedicine (EBM have been defined as the foundation of expert andresearch work in family medicine. In accordance with this strategy,the members of the Department are involved in conducting journalclubs, Cochrane systematic reviews, research into the health of families where the father is absent working abroad (there are many such families with emigrant fathers in the region, and some are working on developing student letters to patients as an instrument for encouraging communication and empathy. The proportion of theoreticalclasses was reduced to provide more time for practice-based classes for students. The Work Diary was also introduced, as well as the student letter to the patient, practice of clinical skills and objective, structured, clinical examination (OSCE. The assessment of students is performed in four parts: the grade given by the student’s practice supervisor, the grade for student letters to patients, the OSCE exam grade and the written exam grade. Students achieved, on average, very high grades. The Department is also involved in the course on clinical and social skills to first and second year students, taking on the task of introducing students to patients and their surroundings.

  2. A Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship Based in an Academic Family Practice Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert B; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A 5-week family medicine clerkship is described that uses several innovative techniques: problem-based learning focusing on patient management tutorials; consultation with specialists; supervised patient care and a nursing home inpatient teaching service; and workshops on topics such as office-surgical techniques, practice management, and…

  3. Interdisciplinary, interinstitutional and international collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The family medicine researches flourished worldwide in the past decade. However, the collaborative patterns of family medicine publications had not been reported. Our study analyzed the collaborative activity of family medicine researchers in Taiwan. We focused on the types of collaboration among disciplines, institutions and countries. We searched "family medicine" AND "Taiwan" in address field from Web of Science and documented the disciplines, institutions and countries of all authors. We analyzed the collaborative patterns of family medicine researchers in Taiwan from 2010 to 2014. The journal's impact factor of each article in the same publication year was also retrieved. Among 1,217 articles from 2010 to 2014, interdisciplinary collaboration existed in 1,185 (97.3%) articles, interinstitutional in 1,012 (83.2%) and international in 142 (11.7%). Public health was the most common collaborative discipline. All international researches were also interdisciplinary and interinstitutional. The United States (75 articles), the United Kingdom (21) and the People's Republic of China (20) were the top three countries with which family medicine researchers in Taiwan had collaborated. We found a high degree of interdisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration of family medicine researches in Taiwan. However, the collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan with family medicine colleagues of other domestic or foreign institutions was insufficient. The future direction of family medicine studies could focus on the promotion of communication among family medicine researchers.

  4. Context and trade-offs in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehusen, Dean A; Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This issue contains several articles that highlight the effect of context and tradeoffs encountered in the practice of family medicine. Some articles demonstrate how context affects the implementation of the patient-centered medical home model, the community risk of a measles outbreak, the rate of complementary and alternative medicine among different generations, and the number of family physicians primarily providing urgent and emergent care in a region. Tradeoffs are explored in articles that look at how electronic medical record use has changed the composition of workload in primary care and how the burgeoning number of clinical guidelines affects the choices made by family physicians. A look at diabetic patients' perceptions of their risk of negative outcomes reveals an interesting pattern of underestimation of the risk of death. Patients with chronic mental disorders are at risk of having significant difficulties in the workplace, which may place a heavy cost on the individual and society. An interesting retrospective study found that it takes a surprising amount of replacement therapy to correct vitamin D deficiency.

  5. Employees' views on home-based, after-hours telephone triage by Dutch GP cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Backhaus (Ramona); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Background:__ Dutch out-of-hours (OOH) centers find it difficult to attract sufficient triage staff. They regard home-based triage as an option that might attract employees. Specially trained nurses are supposed to conduct triage by telephone from home for after-hour

  6. Interdisciplinary, interinstitutional and international collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Lin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The family medicine researches flourished worldwide in the past decade. However, the collaborative patterns of family medicine publications had not been reported. Our study analyzed the collaborative activity of family medicine researchers in Taiwan. We focused on the types of collaboration among disciplines, institutions and countries. We searched “family medicine” AND “Taiwan” in address field from Web of Science and documented the disciplines, institutions and countries of all authors. We analyzed the collaborative patterns of family medicine researchers in Taiwan from 2010 to 2014. The journal’s impact factor of each article in the same publication year was also retrieved. Among 1,217 articles from 2010 to 2014, interdisciplinary collaboration existed in 1,185 (97.3% articles, interinstitutional in 1,012 (83.2% and international in 142 (11.7%. Public health was the most common collaborative discipline. All international researches were also interdisciplinary and interinstitutional. The United States (75 articles, the United Kingdom (21 and the People’s Republic of China (20 were the top three countries with which family medicine researchers in Taiwan had collaborated. We found a high degree of interdisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration of family medicine researches in Taiwan. However, the collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan with family medicine colleagues of other domestic or foreign institutions was insufficient. The future direction of family medicine studies could focus on the promotion of communication among family medicine researchers.

  7. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-06-26

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  8. Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donovan Casas Patiño

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  9. A vascular laboratory protocol for improving and managing after-hours suspected acute deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Angela H; Eckert, George; Lemmon, Gary W; Sawchuk, Alan; Dalsing, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    This study reviews the clinical and workforce impact of a suggested protocol designed for the management of suspected acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients seen after standard vascular laboratory business hours. The protocol included the use of Wells score, D-dimer and a single dose of therapeutic anticoagulant to defer venous duplex ultrasound (VDU) testing until routine business hours unless contraindicated. Information was collected on medical history, physical exam and the timing of any diagnostic studies and treatment provided. Over 15% of studies done after-hours were deemed unnecessary by our protocol and in every individual the results were negative for an acute DVT. There were no adverse events from a one-time dose of anticoagulant. Limiting emergency VDU coverage to evaluate for acute DVT based on a management protocol can eliminate unnecessary after-hours VDU testing without having a negative impact on patient care.

  10. After-hours equine emergency admissions at a university referral hospital (1998 - 2007 : causes and interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Viljoen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical records of equine after-hours admissions from 1998 to 2007 are reviewed. Data extracted from the medical records included signalment, reason for admission, pre-admission treatment, clinical presentation, procedures performed, final diagnoses, complications occurring in hospital, length of stay and outcome. Eight hundred and twenty after-hours admissions were available of which 75 % were classified as emergencies. Most horses originated from Gauteng province (82 %, with Thoroughbred, Arabian, and Warmbloods representing 46 %, 10 % and 7 % of horses. Horses had a median age of 7 years and were predominantly male (60 %. Gastrointestinal (64 % and musculoskeletal (19 % disorders were the primary reasons for admission. Anti-inflammatories, sedation and antibiotics were given in 51 %, 20 % and 15 % of cases respectively prior to referral. On admission, 23 % of horses had surgical intervention. Intravenous catheterisation (64 %, rectal examination (61 %, nasogastric intubation (56 %, abdominocentesis (33 % and ultrasonography (19 % were the procedures performed most frequently. Surgical and medical colics constituted 28 % and 27 % respectively of the overall diagnoses, while piroplasmosis was diagnosed in 5 % of horses. Post-admission complications occurred in <2 % of horses. The median length of stay was 4 days (95 % CI: 1 to 21 days. Overall survival to discharge was 74 %. This study demonstrates that the majority of after-hours equine admissions to a university referral hospital required medical intervention and were mostly due to gastrointestinal disorders. Information obtained from this study can be used in emergency referral planning.

  11. Instruction to the authors of the Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Editor RBMFC

    2010-01-01

    The Journal of Family Medicine and Community RBMFC) is a quarterly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family Medicine and Community, which aims to: raise awareness among professionals and health authorities in the area of interest of Family Medicine and Community; stimulate and disseminate research on issues and Primary Health Care (PHC), enabling the exchange between academia, service and social movement organizations, to promote the dissemination of abordageminterdisciplinar and serve ...

  12. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

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    Al-Turki N

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nouf Al-Turki,1 Ayman AM Afify,1 Mohammed AlAteeq2 1Family Medicine Department, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, 2Department of Family Medicine and PHC, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are limited and the results are conflicting.Objective: To estimate the prevalence and determine the demographic and occupational characteristics associated with workplace violence in primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Methods: A cross-sectional study included 270 health care workers in 12 family medicine centers in Riyadh during November and December 2014. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to estimate the frequency, timing, causes, reactions, and consequences of workplace violence plus participants’ demographic and occupational data.Results: A total 123 health care workers (45.6% experienced some kind of violence over 12 months prior to the study. These included physical (6.5% and nonphysical violence (99.2%, including verbal violence (94.3% and intimidation (22.0%. Offenders were patients (71.5% in the majority of cases, companions (20.3%, or both (3.3%. Almost half (48.0% of health care workers who experienced violence did nothing, 38.2% actively reported the event, and 13.8% consulted a colleague. A significant association of workplace violence was found with working multiple shifts, evening or night shift, and lack of an encouraging environment to report violence.Conclusion: Workplace violence is still a significant problem in primary care centers. The high frequency of violence together with underreporting may indicate the inefficiency of the current safety program. More safety programs and training activities for health care

  13. Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, E H

    2008-12-01

    The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information.

  14. Satisfaction of trainees of Saudi Diploma Family Medicine, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, Yahia M; AlDawood, Kassim M; AlKhudeer, Basima K; AlSaqqaf, Abdullah A

    2016-09-01

    This paper aims to assess trainees' satisfaction with the process and assessment aspects of the Saudi Diploma of Family Medicine (SDFM). This cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2015 among trainees undertaking the SDFM. A questionnaire was distributed to all trainees in four examination centres in Saudi Arabia, under the supervision and guidance of the investigators (four members of the scientific committee of SDFM). There was a total of 97 participants in this study, the majority of whom were Saudis. More than 85% were satisfied with most elements of training including; an adequate number and variety of patients and cases, allocating time for training, giving regular written evaluation. Satisfaction with mentoring and giving constructive feedback scored less well and trainees were less satisfied with some hospital clinical rotations, which requires further exploration.

  15. Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Its Use in Family Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Taştan1

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP is reprogramming the brain nerve language (or NLP means that you can program the language of your mind. NLP helps to the effective use of language in order to achieve a success behavior and provides us programs and techniques to organize the nervous system for achieving our goals which were determined before. NLP is particularly assertive in this field because of the fact that NLP takes its roots from psychotherapy (or because of the roots of NLP are based on the psychotherapy. On the other hand, due to the effect of human psychology on a person’s body and that the healing process can be modeled NLP is also used as a powerful tool in other branches of therapy. In this article it is intended to give information about the nature of NLP as it is practiced today and it’s usage in family medicine practice.

  16. Development and validation of a questionnaire for evaluation of students' attitudes towards family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šter, Marija Petek; Švab, Igor; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2015-03-01

    The development of the EURACT (European Academy of Teachers in General Practice) Educational Agenda helped many family medicine departments in development of clerkship and the aims and objectives of family medicine teaching. Our aims were to develop and validate a tool for assessment of students' attitudes towards family medicine and to evaluate the impact of the clerkship on students' attitudes regarding the competences of family doctor. In the pilot study, experienced family doctors were asked to describe their attitudes towards family medicine by using the Educational Agenda as a template for brainstorming. The statements were paraphrased and developed into a 164-items questionnaire, which was administered to 176 final-year students in academic year 2007/08. The third phase consisted of development of a final tool using statistical analysis, which resulted in the 60-items questionnaire in six domains which was used for the evaluation of students' attitudes. At the beginning of the clerkship, person-centred care and holistic approach scored lower than the other competences. Students' attitudes regarding the competences at the end of 7 weeks clerkship in family medicine were more positive, with exception of the competence regarding primary care management. The students who named family medicine as his or her future career choice, found holistic approach as more important than the students who did not name it as their future career. With the decision tree, which included students' attitudes to the competences of family medicine, we can successfully predict the future career choice in family medicine in 93.5% of the students. This study reports on the first attempt to develop a valid and reliable tool for measuring attitudes towards family medicine based on EURACT Educational Agenda. The questionnaire could be used for evaluating changes of students' attitudes in undergraduate curricula and for prediction of students' preferences regarding their future professional

  17. Compensation and Production in Family Medicine by Practice Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C. Essary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing focus on high performance, patient-centered, team-based care calls for a strategy to evaluate cost-effective primary care. The trend toward physician practice consolidation further challenges the primary care health care system. Productivity measures establish provider value and help inform decision making regarding resource allocation in this evolving health care system. In this national survey of family medicine practices, physician assistant (PA productivity, as defined by mean annual patient encounters, exceeds that of both nurse practitioners (NPs and physicians in physician-owned practices and of NPs in hospital or integrated delivery system-owned practices. Total compensation, defined as salary, bonus, incentives, and honoraria for physicians, is significantly more compared to both PAs and NPs, regardless of practice ownership or productivity. Physician assistants and NPs earn equivalent compensation, regardless of practice ownership or productivity. Not only do these data support the value and role of PAs and NPs on the primary care team but also highlight differences in patient encounters between practice settings. Rural and underserved community practices, where physician-owned practices persist, also merit further consideration. Further research is needed to inform both organizational and policy decisions for the provision of high-quality, cost-effective, and accessible primary health care.

  18. Development and Validation of Search Filters to Identify Articles on Family Medicine in Online Medical Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, David H J; Bramer, Wichor M; Bindels, Patrick J E; van de Laar, Floris A; Bohnen, Arthur M

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to identify research studies of relevance to family medicine. Using a new and objective method for search filter development, we developed and validated 2 search filters for family medicine. The sensitive filter had a sensitivity of 96.8% and a specificity of 74.9%. The specific filter had a specificity of 97.4% and a sensitivity of 90.3%. Our new filters should aid literature searches in the family medicine field. The sensitive filter may help researchers conducting systematic reviews, whereas the specific filter may help family physicians find answers to clinical questions at the point of care when time is limited.

  19. Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs' Decisions to Do After-hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Barbara; Kalb, Guyonne; Li, Jinhu; Scott, Anthony

    2017-02-20

    This paper analyses doctors' supply of after-hours care (AHC), and how it is affected by personal and family circumstances as well as the earnings structure. We use detailed survey data from a large sample of Australian General Practitioners (GPs) to estimate a structural, discrete choice model of labour supply and AHC. This allows us to jointly model GPs' decisions on the number of daytime-weekday working hours and the probability of providing AHC. We simulate GPs' labour supply responses to an increase in hourly earnings, both in a daytime-weekday setting and for AHC. GPs increase their daytime-weekday working hours if their hourly earnings in this setting increase, but only to a very small extent. GPs are somewhat more likely to provide AHC if their hourly earnings in that setting increase, but again, the effect is very small and only evident in some subgroups. Moreover, higher earnings in weekday-daytime practice reduce the probability of providing AHC, particularly for men. Increasing GPs' earnings appears to be at best relatively ineffective in encouraging increased provision of AHC and may even prove harmful if incentives are not well targeted. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Roberson, Judy A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown,Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2005-10-13

    Office equipment is expected to be the fastest-growingsegment of commercial energy use over the next 20 years, yet many aspectsof office equipment energy use are poorly understood. User behavior, suchas turning off devices at night or enabling power management, influencesenergy use to a great extent. The computing environment also plays a roleboth in influencing user behavior and in the success of power management.Information about turn-off rates and power management rates for officeequipment was collected through a series of after-hours audits incommercial buildings. Sixteen businesses were recruited, includingoffices (small, medium and large offices in a variety of industries),schools, and medical buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania.The types and power states of office equipment found in these buildingswere recorded and analyzed. This article presents these data forcomputers, monitors, printers, copiers, fax machines, scanners andmulti-function devices. These data can be used to improve estimates ofboth energy consumption for these devices and savings from energyconservation efforts.

  1. Long-term evaluation of undergraduate family medicine curriculum in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švab Igor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In 1994, as a result of curriculum reform, the Ljubljana medical school established its first department of family medicine and introduced its first curriculum of family medicine. The new subject was well accepted by the students and the medical school. Nevertheless, there was no comprehensive analysis of the curriculum during this period. Objective Our aims were to assess the quality of teaching based on fulfilled expectations, pre-defined learning objectives and satisfaction in a 10-year period, and to measure changes in career preference towards family medicine. Method An analysis of two sets of questionnaires, routinely given to medical students in academic years 1997/1998 and 2006/2007, was made. Results Most of the students' expectations were met, and the level increased over ten years. The level of achievement of learning objectives has been high and increased over the ten-year period. Family medicine still receives high scores in students' satisfaction. Although there is evidence that the family medicine curriculum is well accepted and that it improves some of the attitudes towards family medicine, it does not influence the career choice of students. Conclusion The level of achievement of learning objectives increased with the experiences of the teachers. We improved the attitude of medical students toward general practice and general practitioners. We have not been successful in influencing career choice of students, which is an objective that is probably outside our reach.

  2. Acute asthma management by a pediatric after-hours call center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kyle A; Freiner, Donna; Garbutt, Jane; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Bruns, Julie; Sterkel, Randal; Smith, Sharon R; Strunk, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    To describe an asthma management protocol used in a nurse-staffed pediatric After-Hours Call Center (AHCC) that incorporates severity-based home treatment recommendations and follow-up call assessments. Call records for asthma advice from January 1, 2004 to June 30, 2004 were identified retrospectively and reviewed. Descriptive statistics were used to report patient demographics, frequencies of symptom severity zones (Red, Yellow, or Green) at initial calls, frequencies of call dispositions designating care advice provided (including home treatment recommendations and seeking emergency department [ED] care), and changes in severity zones between initial calls and follow-up calls when nurses reassessed patients after recommended home treatment. During the study period, 3,632 asthma calls (2,439 initial; 1,193 follow-up) were managed by AHCC nurses. Initial calls were classified mostly as Red (28%) or Yellow (42%) severity zones; 27% were Green zone and 3% could not be categorized. Fifty-two percent of initial calls with Red or Yellow severity zones involved home treatment recommendations; 50% of those Red zone and 63% of those Yellow zone calls had improved severity zones at follow-up call assessments. Twenty-eight percent of patients with home treatment recommendations were referred to the ED at the time of follow-up call nurse reassessment. This telephone-based nurse-staffed pediatric acute asthma management protocol includes provision of severity-based home treatment recommendations and follow-up assessments, and improved symptoms for many children with acute exacerbations. This protocol may also be successful in other locations and may improve outcomes, such as reduction in ED visits.

  3. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-01-22

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in

  4. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Setlhare

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators.Keywords: task shifting, Family Medicine, Family Physician, Denmark, health expenditure, egalitarian

  5. After-Hours Telephone Coverage: The Application of an Area-Wide Telephone Triage and Advice System for Pediatric Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Steven R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines data from four years of operation of a program to manage after-hours pediatrics calls using specially trained pediatric nurses with standardized protocols to provide triage and advice. Found that over 100,000 calls had been successfully managed without adverse clinical outcomes. Satisfaction among subscribing pediatricians was 100%, and…

  6. The challenge of training for family medicine across different contexts: Insights from providing training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sandars

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Physicians with expertise in providing training for family medicine, at both undergraduate level and postgraduate level, are frequently invited to run training workshops in countries with developing systems of family medicine but this approach is often a challenge for the incoming external trainers. There are general challenges in working across different contexts, especially cultural factors, the different approaches to training, including the aims, methods, and assessment, and additional organizational factors, influenced by the wider sociopolitical environment of the host country. Practical responses to these challenges are discussed, with relevance to both external trainers and those responsible for requesting training. This commentary contains insights from the experiences of the authors in providing training for family medicine in China.

  7. [USE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AMONG FAMILY MEDICINE PATIENTS--EXAMPLE OF THE TOWN OF ČAKOVEC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Ksenija; Munđar, Roko; Sović, Slavica; Bergman-Marković, Biserka; Janev Holcer, Nataša

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread around the world including Croatia. The number of studies that investigate both quantitative and qualitative use of CAM in Croatia is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of CAM among family medicine patients in the town of Čakovec and the rate they report it to their family doctor. This was a cross-sectional study in a sample of 300 patients that visited primary health center for any reason. We used anonymous questionnaire already employed in a previous investigation (Čižmešija et al. 2008), which describes socioeconomic characteristics, modalities of CAM use, and reasons for use. We also added questions on the type of herbs used and use of over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements. On data analysis we used descriptive statistics, χ2-test and Fisher's exact test, while the level of statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. The response rate was 76%. Out of the total number of patients, 82% used some modality of CAM. Women, patients with secondary school education, employed and retired persons used CAM more often. Students and pupils reported least use of CAM. The most commonly used were herbs (87%), bioenergy (29%), diet therapy (28%), chiropractics (22%), and homeopathy and acupuncture (11% each). Vitamin and mineral supplements were used by 77% of study subjects. CAM was most frequently used for respiratory, urinary and musculoskeletal problems, as well as to improve overall health condition. Of the respondents that reported CAM use, 55% believed it would help them, 43% used it because they wanted to try something new, while only 2% indicated dissatisfaction with their physician as the reason for using CAM. Statistically, there were more subjects that used CAM and did not notify their family doctor about it, which could indicate poor communication between family doctors and health care users. Our results are consistent with a previous quantitative study

  8. The Role of Family and Emergency Medicine in Undergraduate Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Sawchuk, Victor N.

    1980-01-01

    Clinical clerks electing emergency and family medicine rotations during the 1977 and 1978 academic years at the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine evaluated their clerkships on the opportunities provided to learn new useful medical knowledge, learn new clinical skills and practice them. All rotations were perceived as providing excellent opportunities to learn medical knowledge. However, nearly 20% of students felt that four of the teaching hospital ward based specialty and subspecialt...

  9. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  10. A Problem-Solving Oral Examination for Family Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Arthur D.

    1974-01-01

    The College of Family Physicians of Canada has used in its certification examination a new type of structured problem-solving examination called the Formal Oral. A series of preselected problem areas such as the complaint, relevant data base, investigation, and treatment are scored by two examiners. (Editor/PG)

  11. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform).

  12. A Significant Number of Charter Diplomates Participate in American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Maintenance of Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, James C

    2015-01-01

    Considerable controversy about the value of participating in Maintenance of Certification has recently arisen within the medical community. Despite this controversy, large numbers of family physicians certified by the American Board of Family Medicine participate in Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians. Surprisingly, a small but significant number of charter diplomats--those initially certified by the American Board of Family Medicine at its founding--are engaged in the process.

  13. Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South–South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. PMID:24857843

  14. An ethnomedicinal survey of cucurbitaceae family plants used in the folk medicinal practices of Bangladesh 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rahmatullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Cucurbitaceae family comprising about 125 genera and 960 species is a family that is further characterized by commonly having five-angled stems and coiled tendrils and is also known as gourd family of flowering plants. Plant species belonging to this family have a worldwide distribution, but most species can be found in tropical and subtropical countries. A number of the plants belonging to this family have reported important pharmacological activities. Cucurbitaceae family plants are also in use in the folk medicinal system of Bangladesh-a traditional medicinal system, which mainly relies on medicinal plants for treatment of diverse ailments. Aims: Since folk medicinal practitioners form the first tier of primary health care in Bangladesh, the objective of this study was to conduct ethnomedicinal surveys among 75 folk medicinal practitioners (Kavirajes practicing among the mainstream Bengali-speaking population of randomly selected 75 villages in 64 districts of Bangladesh and 8 tribal practitioners (1 each from 8 major indigenous communities or tribes, namely, Bede, Chakma, Garo, Khasia, Marma, Murong, Santal, and Tripura of the country. Materials and Methods: Surveys were carried out with the help of a semi-structured questionnaire and the guided field-walk method. Results: It was observed that the folk and tribal medicinal practitioners use a total of 19 Cucurbitaceae family species for treatment of ailments such as dysentery, diabetes, edema, skin disorders, leukoderma, hypertension, jaundice, typhoid, spleen disorders, respiratory problems, leprosy, rheumatoid arthritis, chicken pox, and cancer. The 19 species of Cucurbitaceae family plants in use were Benincasa hispida, Bryonopsis laciniosa, Citrullus colocynthis, Citrullus lanatu, Coccinia grandis, Cucumis melo, Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita pepo, Hodgsonia macrocarpa, Lagenaria vulgaris, Luffa acutangula, Luffa cylindrica, Momordica charantia, Momordica

  15. Palliative medicine fellows attend to compassion fatigue using John Stone's 'Talking to the Family'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groninger, Hunter

    2015-04-01

    For graduate medical education trainees, as well as contemporary practitioners, developing skills in recognizing compassion fatigue and practising self-care is vital to professional sustainability. The field of palliative medicine is no exception. In our fellowship programme, we use John Stone's poem, 'Talking to the Family,' to engage trainees in a professional development workshop on personal experiences and strategies for self-care.

  16. Views and Experiences of Malaysian Family Medicine Trainees of Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Tan, Sing Yee; Liew, Su May

    2016-11-01

    Sociocultural factors have been shown to be important influencers of sexual health and sexuality. Hence, the aim of our study was to explore the views and experiences of family medicine trainees regarding female sexual dysfunction (FSD) with a focus on the barriers and facilitators towards the initiation of conversation on this topic. A qualitative study design involving semi-structured focus group discussions (FGDs) was conducted with 19 family medicine trainees in Malaysia. The conceptual framework used was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Participants perceived FSD as being uncommon and unimportant. According to our participants, patients often presented with indirect complaints, and doctors were not proactive in asking about FSD. Three main barriers were identified: doctor factors, perceived patient factors, and system factors. Lack of confidence, knowledge, experience, time, and embarrassment were the key barriers identified at the doctors' level. Lack of awareness, among patients regarding FSD, and local cultural and religious norms were the perceived patient barriers. System barriers were lack of time and privacy. Various facilitators, such as continuous medical education and public forums, were suggested as means to encourage family medicine trainees to initiate discussion on sexual matters during consultations. In conclusion, family medicine trainees found it difficult to initiate conversation on FSD with patients. Interventions to encourage conversation on FSD should target this and other identified barriers.

  17. Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little SH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sahoko H Little,1,2 Sunil S Menawat,1,3 Michael Worzniak,1 Michael D Fetters2 1Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency, Wayne, Michigan, USA; 2University of Michigan, Department of Family Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; 3Ghent Family Medicine Residency, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA Abstract: Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. Keywords: wound care education, primary care, residency education, surgery rotation, curriculum development

  18. Development and Validation of Search Filters to Identify Articles on Family Medicine in Online Medical Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, D.H.; Bramer, W.M.; Bindels, P.J.; Laar, F.A. van de; Bohnen, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to identify rese

  19. Development and validation of search filters to identify articles on family medicine in online medical databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J. Pols (David); W.M. Bramer (Wichor M); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick J.E.); F.A. van de Laar (Floris A.); A.M. Bohnen

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPhysicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to i

  20. Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

  1. Acting as Standardized Patients Enhances Family Medicine Residents' Self-Reported Skills in Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory…

  2. Aromatic Medicinal Plants of the Lamiaceae Family from Uzbekistan: Ethnopharmacology, Essential Oils Composition, and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufar Z. Mamadalieva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants of the Lamiaceae family are important ornamental, medicinal, and aromatic plants, many of which produce essential oils that are used in traditional and modern medicine, and in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industry. Various species of the genera Hyssopus, Leonurus, Mentha, Nepeta, Origanum, Perovskia, Phlomis, Salvia, Scutellaria, and Ziziphora are widespread throughout the world, are the most popular plants in Uzbek traditional remedies, and are often used for the treatment of wounds, gastritis, infections, dermatitis, bronchitis, and inflammation. Extensive studies of the chemical components of these plants have led to the identification of many compounds, as well as essentials oils, with medicinal and other commercial values. The purpose of this review is to provide a critical overview of the literature surrounding the traditional uses, ethnopharmacology, biological activities, and essential oils composition of aromatic plants of the family Lamiaceae, from the Uzbek flora.

  3. The role of family therapists in veterinary medicine: opportunities for clinical services, education, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R; Reisbig, Allison M J; McDaniel, Kara Z; White, Mark B

    2007-04-01

    Marriage and family therapists (MFTs) are applying their specific skill set in a variety of arenas. A new area for collaboration is veterinary medicine. The veterinary medical profession is emphasizing the importance of non-biomedical skills such as communication skills, acknowledging that human clientele are likely to view their pets as family members, and discussing veterinarian personal well-being. Each of these trends has clear application for intervention by MFTs. A discussion of how MFTs may be uniquely positioned to assist veterinary medicine is presented. An example of collaboration between MFT and veterinary medicine at Kansas State University is highlighted. Recommendations are made for development of effective educational relationships and possible private sector collaborations.

  4. Breaking bad news: structured training for family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Lea; Alperin, Mordechai; Amiel, Gilad E; Beharier, Zvi; Reis, Shmuel

    2002-09-01

    Previous research has shown that physicians experience incompetence and difficulty in dealing with patients' feelings after they have broken bad news to them. During the past 10 years, we have implemented a longitudinal training program targeting these issues. The present article describes this training and discusses its contribution to doctors' skills at approaching distressed patients. In order to cope with breaking bad news to patients and their families, physicians should be skilled at crisis intervention and communication techniques. They should also be aware of their personal attitudes and emotional reactions when breaking bad news. Each session encompassed these areas, as well as the most prominent issues arising when breaking bad news. In a 1-5 Likert scale, the course received an overall score of 4.47 (S.D. 0.51). Participants noted that they had gained relevant communication skills for future patient encounters.

  5. The aquaporin family of water channel proteins in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M D; King, L S; Agre, P

    1997-05-01

    The aquaporins are a family of membrane channel proteins that serve as selective pores through which water crosses the plasma membranes of many human tissues and cell types. The sites where aquaporins are expressed implicate these proteins in renal water reabsorption, cerebrospinal fluid secretion and reabsorption, generation of pulmonary secretions, aqueous humor secretion and reabsorption, lacrimation, and multiple other physiologic processes. Determination of the aquaporin gene sequences and their chromosomal locations has provided insight into the structure and pathophysiologic roles of these proteins, and primary and secondary involvement of aquaporins is becoming apparent in diverse clinical disorders. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed in multiple tissues including red blood cells, and the Colton blood group antigens represent a polymorphism on the AQP1 protein. AQP2 is restricted to renal collecting ducts and has been linked to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans and to lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and fluid retention from congestive heart failure in rat models. Congenital cataracts result from mutations in the mouse gene encoding the lens homolog Aqp0 (Mip). The present understanding of aquaporin physiology is still incomplete; identification of additional members of the aquaporin family will affect future studies of multiple disorders of water distribution throughout the body. In some tissues, the aquaporins may participate in the transepithelial movement of fluid without being rate limiting, so aquaporins may be involved in clinical disorders without being causative. As outlined in this review, our challenge is to identify disease states in which aquaporins are involved, to define the aquaporins' roles mechanistically, and to search for ways to exploit this information therapeutically.

  6. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Briana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. Methods A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes for Canadian Family Medicine training. Results The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. Conclusions The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the

  7. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlhare, Vincent

    2016-03-30

    Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs) in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW) may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators.

  8. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so.

  9. ocial representation of family support for diabetic patients in users of a family medicine unit in Chalco, State of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Rodríguez Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The goal of this study is to compare and interpret the meaning of family support for diabetic patients and their families using social representations according to a structural approach of Abric’s theory. METHODS The study was carried out in a Family Medicine Center of the Chalco Municipality in Mexico State. The population studied comprised ten diabetic patient-family pairs. The first part of the study was a simple word association test that aimed to find terms or statements related to the concept of “family support”, as well as its frequency of appearance and range of association. Once the terms or statements were obtained, they were categorized according to their “support” capabilities. A semi-structured interview for each category was conducted as well as a graphic analysis of Friedman’s meanings. The discourse of diabetic patients was compared to that of the families in order to find similarities and differences. RESULTS Evocation of terms was done in the first part of the study, and it was found that the emotional domain was central to the discourse. However, in the second part of the study, when categorization and analysis of discourse is performed, there are differences in the centrality of terms and statements. The family tends to center in the active domain, whereas the patient centers in the emotional domain. CONCLUSIONS This study brings up the emotional needs of the patient as essential components of support efforts. This promotes reflection about changing strategies in the design of public healthcare programs in that they may include family support from the viewpoint of otherness.

  10. Dimensions and singularities of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A edição nº 24 da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade (RBMFC traz importantes temas a nossa reflexão, tanto para a Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF - quanto à sua efetividade e abrangência - como para a especialidade em Medicina de Família e Comunidade (MFC, visto que apresenta temas que nos distinguem de outras áreas da biomedicina. A primeira temática poderia ser definida enquanto o potencial da ESF para a produção de saúde no Brasil. Um exemplo é o artigo Desempenho de indicadores nos municípios com alta cobertura da Estratégia Saúde da Família no Estado de São Paulo que destaca como alguns municípios desse Estado apresentam melhores resultados com relação aos indicadores pactuados, quando comparados com municípios que não expandiram a cobertura da ESF. A segunda temática resgata aspectos centrais da especialidade em MFC. Apesar da morte e sofrimento serem comuns a todas as especialidades médicas, na MFC, em particular, ela é problematizada na relação médico-paciente e nos programas de formação, como, por exemplo, na ferramenta Ciclo de vida1. Nesta ferramenta, a morte se destaca como uma das crises normativas que marcam a existência, visto que nela se encerra o drama do sofrimento e da condição humana2. Assim, o artigo Crying Patients in General/Family Practice: incidence, reasons for encounter and health problems resgata o potencial do MFC para ressignificar o sofrimento humano através do cuidado personalizado e longitudinal dos pacientes. Quais os significados das lágrimas? Estamos preparados para um aprofundamento nesta dimensão do cuidado? Esses matizes da profissão do MFC também se descortinam no caso clínico intitulado Ser Médico de (sua Família. Nele, o autor explora os limites da ética e da relação profissional-familiar ao contextualizar a tomada de decisão frente ao processo de cuidado, adoecimento e morte de um membro da família. Entretanto, a morte ainda segue

  11. Making the 2007-2010 Action Plan work for women in family medicine in the Asia Pacific

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    Coles Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Wonca Working Party for Women and Family Medicine (WWPWFM was organized in 2001 with the following objectives: to identify the key issues for women doctors; to review Wonca policies and procedures for equity and transparency; to provide opportunities to network at meetings and through the group's listserve and website; and to promote women doctors' participation in Wonca initiatives. In October 2008, at the Asia Pacific Regional conference, the Wonca Working Party on Women in Family Medicine (WWPWFM held a preconference day and conference workshops, building on the success and commitment to initiatives which enhance women's participation in Wonca developed in Ontario, Canada (2006 and at the Singapore World Congress (2007. At this meeting fifty women workshopped issues for women in Family Medicine in the Asia Pacific. Using the Action Plan formulated in Singapore (2007 the participants identified key regional issues and worked towards a solution. Key issues identified were professional issues, training in family medicine and women's health. Solutions were to extend the understanding of women's contributions to family medicine, improved career pathways for women in family medicine and improving women's participation in practices, family medicine organizations and academic meetings.

  12. E-Learning in family medicine education: faculty support in a community clerkship

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    Gensichen, Jochen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available E-learning was planned as a test for medical students within their curriculum of family medicine. A multi-modular online-offer specific to the target group accompanies the 10th term medical students during their peripheral practical courses in family practices. Teaching objectives are as follows: (1 Introduction into e-learning, (2 clinical general medicine - online-module, (3 chronic care online-module, (4 online-application. The systematic evaluation shows that e-learning promotes the communication of students both among themselves and with the university during their practical courses. On the basis of the experiences from this pilot test the combination with more traditional teaching methods (blended learning seems to be a promising option for medical education.

  13. The Declaration of Alma Ata on its 30th anniversary: relevance for family medicine today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixon, Allen L; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2008-09-01

    The Declaration of Alma Ata, issued on September 12, 1978, provides a moral vision for primary care that remains valuable today at a time of transformation of the specialty of family medicine. The Declaration asserts a comprehensive definition of health that recognizes health as a fundamental human right, argues persuasively that gross inequalities in health status are politically, socially, and economically unacceptable, and identifies primary health care as the key to improving health and reducing health status inequalities. The values of Alma Ata can guide the specialty of family medicine to lead positive health system change through renewed collaboration, addressing inequalities, efficient use of resources and appropriate technology, and advocacy in the spirit of social justice.

  14. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L; Becvar, Dorothy S

    2006-01-01

    Respondents to a mail survey of a random sample (N = 424) of Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy provided information about their contexts of practice, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and relationships with CAM providers. Consistent with both national trends and the experience of psychologists as reported in a similar survey, the results of this survey suggest that marriage and family therapists have been affected significantly by and have a growing awareness of CAM practices. Limitations of the study and implications for the field are discussed.

  15. Federal Research Funding for Family Medicine: Highly Concentrated, with Decreasing New Investigator Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of National Institutes of Health and other federal research funding is received by university departments of family medicine, the largest primary care specialty. That limited funding is also concentrated, with roughly a quarter of all National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality funding awarded to 3 departments, almost half of that funding coming from 3 agencies, and a recent trend away from funding for new investigators.

  16. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation.

  17. Qualitative Evaluation of Theses Written in area of Family Medicine in Turkey

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    Yaman H et al.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate qualitatively thesis written in Family medicine and to investigate their status of citation and publication as article.Material and Method: the descriptive and cross-sectional included 140 thesis, indexed by ULAKBIM, in area of Family Medicine written between 1981 and 2008 according to status of their citation and publication as article were analyzed as regards of their subjects, date of presentation and publication, study type and place in which to be written were registered in the study. To access data of thesis, ULAKBIM, SCI, CINAHL, Google and PUBMED was screened. Keywords such as “family medicine”, “primary care”, “family practitioner” have been used during the search.Results: Average page of thesis was 82.9±37.0 (19-258. Majority of manager for thesis was academic degree of professor. It was found that several theses were associated with other areas of specialization. Theses were usually designed as descriptive, cross-sectional and observational. Of 140 theses, 15 ones were indexed by international publication. Three different articles in SCI were cited four times until date of present study. When evaluating date of thesis according to years, it peaked in 1999 (27; 19.3% and 2007 (25; 17.9%. Conclusion: Although discipline of Family Medicine was not achieved to come at targets, it was considered that thesis preparation and writing was able with association and cooperation with other medical department disciples. However, it was considered that majority of thesis was not published as article.

  18. Development and professional qualification of general practice and family medicine in Germany

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    Markus Herrmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article aims to analyze the professional and faculty development of general practice and family medicine (GP/FM in Germany and discuss its facing challenges. Methods: It is a case study identifying characteristics and potential intervention tools, describing training and qualification requirements in family medicine in Germany. Results: The traditional caring role of GP in Germany has a long history, but GP has no gatekeeper function, which weakens its position in the system. In the past decades, GP has undergone several transformations; it is no longer a practice based on the traditional “Hausarzt” style. It has become a medical specialty of primary care with more modern foundations; it requires five years of practical training in internal medicine, paediatrics, surgery and general medicine, and it is governed by the Physician Chambers. In undergraduate education, courses in General Practice are mandatory. In recent years, the new curriculum requirements have led to an intense process of academic development with the creation of General Practice departments in 20 of the 36 public medical schools in the country. Conclusions: The process of professionalization and faculty development in GP/FM as well as the expansion of undergraduate training in the specialty aim to enhance the appeal of GP/FM to young doctors. This development strengthens academic research on GP/FM, which contributes to enhancing the institutional basis of GP/FM as a science, allowing bolder interaction and collaboration with other branches of medicine and real appreciation of this subject (GP/FM.

  19. [Mental Health in General Family Medicine - obstacles and expectations perceived by Family Physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Liliana; Basílio, Nuno; Figueira, Sofia; Nunes, José Mendes

    2017-03-01

    This study seeks to understand the difficulties experienced by family physicians (FP) in the management of mental disorders (MD) and their proposals to improve the quality of care. It is qualitative study with semi-structured interviews with ten family physicians. These were recorded, transcribed and their content analyzed. Eight thematic categories were identified: perceived working conditions and available resources; perceived level of training in mental health; therapies used for treatment of MD; mental health instruments used in consultation; MD addressed in Primary Health Care (PHC) and referral to hospitals; patient's reaction to referral; articulation of PHC with hospitals; proposals to improve mental health care in PHC. Articulation with the Mental Health Services suffers from lack of accessibility, one-way communication and delayed response. The FP propose creation of consultancies; multidisciplinary teams in the community; creating a two-way communication platform; continuous learning through discussion of cases. The FP have responsibilities in providing MHC. This requires working in a multidisciplinary team. Services should be organized to function as a learning system that allows the progressive improvement of the professionals and the improvement of the interfaces between them.

  20. Public Health Aspects of the Family Medicine Concepts in South Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Miran; Donev, Doncho; Pollhozani, Azis; Ramadani, Naser; Skopljak, Amira; Pasagic, Almir; Roshi, Enver; Zunic, Lejla; Zildzic, Muharem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Family medicine as a part of the primary health care is devoted to provide continuous and comprehensive health care to the individuals and families regardless of age, gender, types of diseases and affected system or part of the body. Special emphasis in such holistic approach is given to the prevention of diseases and health promotion. Family Medicine is the first step/link between doctors and patients within patients care as well as regular inspections/examinations and follow-up of the health status of healthy people. Most countries aspire to join the European Union and therefore adopting new regulations that are applied in the European Union. Aim: The aim of this study is to present the role and importance of family medicine, or where family medicine is today in 21 Century from the beginning of development in these countries. The study is designed as a descriptive epidemiological study with data from 10 countries of the former Communist bloc, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, just about half of them are members of the EU. We examined the following variables: socio-organizational indicators, health and educational indicators and health indicators. The data used refer to 2002 and as a source of data are used official data from reference WebPages of family medicine doctors associations, WONCA website (EURACT, EQuiP, EGPRN), WebPages of Bureau of Statistics of the countries where the research was conducted as well as the Ministries of Health. Results: Results indicates that the failures and shortcomings of health care organizations in Southeast Europe. Lack of money hinders the implementation of health care reform in all mentioned countries, the most of them that is more oriented to Bismarck financing system. Problems in the political, legal and economic levels are obstacles for efficient a problem reconstructing health care system toward

  1. Breast imaging after dark: patient outcomes following evaluation for breast abscess in the emergency department after hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Melissa S; Morden, Kasey L; Klein, Katherine A; Neal, Colleen H; Knoepp, Ursula S; Patterson, Stephanie K

    2016-02-01

    In our study, we sought to report the management, clinical outcomes, and follow-up rates of patients who presented for evaluation of breast abscess in the Emergency Department (ED) after hours. A retrospective search of ultrasound reports at our institution identified all patients from January 1, 2009 to June 30, 2013 who were scanned in the ED after hours to evaluate for breast abscess. Patient demographics, clinical information, imaging findings, follow-up rates, and outcomes were reviewed. One hundred eighty-five patients were included in the study. Forty-four percent (86/185) of the patients were diagnosed with abscess based on ultrasound findings in the ED. Twenty-seven percent (23/86) were recently post-operative, and 12 % (10/86) were postpartum/breastfeeding. Mastitis was the diagnosis in the remaining 54 % (99/185). Only 1/86 cases were associated with breast cancer. Seventy-seven percent (66/86) of patients were treated with an invasive procedure; 39 % (26/66) had surgical evacuation, 30 % (20/66) image-guided drainage, 23 % (15/66) bedside or clinic incision and drainage, and 8 % (5/66) palpation-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA). Seventy-seven percent (143/185) of patients had clinical and/or imaging follow-up. Forty-four percent (63/143) had long-term follow-up (≥ 3 months). Almost 50 % of the patients who presented to the ED for evaluation of abscess were diagnosed with abscess while the remaining patients were diagnosed with mastitis. Appropriate clinical and/or imaging follow-up occurred in 77 %. Long-term follow-up (≥ 3 months) occurred more frequently in patients older than 30 years of age. Appropriate follow-up does not occur in approximately one fourth of cases, suggesting that additional clinician and patient education is warranted.

  2. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

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    Wilson Mark C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate, 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%. The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  3. Exploring the experience of residents during the first six months of family medicine residency training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dawn; Nasmith, Louise; Takahashi, Susan Glover; Harvey, Bart J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The shift from undergraduate to postgraduate education signals a new phase in a doctor’s training. This study explored the resident’s perspective of how the transition from undergraduate to postgraduate (PGME) training is experienced in a Family Medicine program as they first meet the reality of feeling and having the responsibility as a doctor. Methods Qualitative methods explored resident experiences using interpretative inquiry through monthly, individual in-depth interviews with five incoming residents during the first six months of training. Focus groups were also held with residents at various stages of training to gather their reflection about their experience of the first six months. Residents were asked to describe their initial concerns, changes that occurred and the influences they attributed to those changes. Results Residents do not begin a Family Medicine PGME program knowing what it means to be a Family Physician, but learn what it means to fulfill this role. This process involves adjusting to significant shifts in responsibility in the areas of Knowledge, Practice Management, and Relationships as they become more responsible for care outcomes. Conclusion This study illuminated the resident perspective of how the transition is experienced. This will assist medical educators to better understand the early training experiences of residents, how these experiences contribute to consolidating their new professional identity, and how to better align teaching strategies with resident learning needs. PMID:28344713

  4. Postgraduate family medicine training in Singapore--a new way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teck Yee; Chong, Phui Nah; Chng, Shih Kiat; Tay, Ee Guan

    2012-05-01

    Postgraduate Family Medicine (FM) training is important to train future primary care doctors to provide accessible and cost effective healthcare. In Singapore, a structured postgraduate FM training programme has been available for 20 years. This programme is characterised by involvement of both FM and non-FM doctors, well written modules and a rigorous assessment process. However, challenges faced by both the current healthcare system and training structure underlie the need to review the training structure to ensure its relevancy for future Family Physicians (FPs) to manage the needs of their patients. A workgroup was formed to review the current FM postgraduate programme and to explore the possibility of using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) framework to enhance our current system. The workgroup felt that broad-based training and comprehensive coverage of topics are areas that are important to retain in any new FM residency programme. Weaknesses identified included a lack of early FM exposure and the need to strengthen formative assessments. New organisational structures such as Family Medicine Centres (FMC) need to be established and the involvement of the private sector in any FM residency progammes could be enhanced. The implementation of the FM Residency Programme in 2011 presented a unique opportunity to realign FM postgraduate education in line with the national objectives and to equip FPs with the necessary knowledge and skills for managing the future healthcare needs of Singaporeans.

  5. Challenges facing postgraduate training in family medicine in Saudi Arabia: Patterns and solutions

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    Yahia M Al-Khaldi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this paper was to show the challenges that are faced by the Family Medicine Training Programmes in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as well as suggests appropriate and practical solutions. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from 2010 - 2013 using a semi-structured questionnaire to achieve the objective. The questionnaire was designed and completed by the investigators during their visits to accredit the training centres all over the Kingdom. It consisted of questions concerning the trainers′ and trainees′ opinions regarding all the aspects of training. Another tool used was the accreditation checklist, which contained a comprehensive list of training structures and processes mandatory for any training centre. The accreditation checklist and questionnaire were reviewed by the investigators after visiting all the training centres. The challenges were then classified manually and solutions were reviewed as well as approved by the members of the Accreditation Committee. Results: Seventy-five training centres were visited and 250 trainees along with 75 trainers participated in this study. Twenty-five challenges were identified and classified under 6 major groups. The practical solutions to these challenges were discussed with participants and then approved by the investigators. Conclusion: This study showed that Family Medicine Training in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia faces many different challenges. Early identification along with key solutions to these difficulties are extremely important in the efforts to produce a new generation of competent Saudi Family Physicians who can improve the quality of healthcare for the population of Saudi Arabia.

  6. Practical training in family medicine in the Dalmatian hinterland: first-hand experience of four physicians

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    Minka Jerčić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Four physicians working in private family medicine offices in Dalmatian Hinterland described their first hand experience of teaching sixthyear medical students. They supervised students during the 2010/2011 academic year, in an area that is economically undeveloped, rural, and where a number of people live in extended families. Although hesitant at first, the patients came to like the interaction with students, and later even yearned to provide students with as much information as possible. They also liked the letters that students had to write to them about their illness, because they could take them home and look for information without needing to see the doctor. The students showed diverse attitudes to different types of work in family medicine offices, mostly depending on their plans for future career. In general, they either complained or hesitated to perform duties that they did not fully master during earlier education, especially working with children. They needed several days to adapt to direct contact with the patients, and were more relaxed and cooperative when working in pairs than alone. The physicians themselves felt that they profited both from the novelty in the everyday routine and from the exchange of their experiences with the students. They liked their young colleagues and admitted they could not objectively review their own work, knowledge and skills.

  7. A Methodological Strategy for the Family Health Course in General Internal Medicine Residency

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    Mabel Rocha Vázquez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the continuous improvement of the educational process is one of the permanent challenges of medical education in Cuba. When dealing particularly with family medicine it must be ensured that physicians are always getting a better clinical approach to the management of families, since this is one of the key areas that have been identified as problematic in professional practices. Objective: to design a methodological strategy for the improvement of educational activities in the Family Health Course of the General Internal Medicine Residency. Method: a development research, conducted at the University of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos, from November 2005 to January 2007 is presented. Document analysis and validation by expert criteria were also implemented. Results: for each of the four themes that make up this course, the following aspects are stated: teaching organization, length, contents, activity objectives, methodological guidelines to implement these activities, assessment proposals for some of them and some literature. Conclusions: the design of educational activities, with emphasis on actual or simulated medical practice, could help improving the quality of the teaching process. In addition, following the logical structure of activities, teachers can develop similar proposals to address other health problems according to the different learning needs.

  8. Exploration of Medicinal Species of Lamiaceae family in Ilkhji and Sharafaldin Regions of Esat Azarbaijan in Iran

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    Leila Joudi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research medicinal species of Lamiaceae family were detected. As medicinal plants are suitable alternatives for synthetic and chemical drugs (Idu and Osemwegie also because of medical and nutritional importance and valuable protein contents of Lamiaceae sp., all plants of Lamiaceae family are collected in Ilkhji and sharafaldin regions during growth seasons of 2007-2009. Plants were collected in 2 regions according to the classical method of regional floristical studies. Collected plants were recognized by valid references (Parsa 1943-1950; Reshinger, 1963-1990. Then medical species are chosen by using pharmacopeias. The results of the current study demonstrated that at Ilkhji region 16 species belong to 8 genuses and at Sharafaldin region 4 species belong to 4 genuses that all of them belong to Lamiaceae family. Among these species, 18 species at Ilkhji and sharafaldin region had medicinal properties. Medicinal species of these 2 regions consist of: Marrubium vulgare, Mentha longifolia, Nepeta meyeri, Nepeta persica, Nepeta racemosa, Phlomis olivieri, Salvia nemorasa, Salvia sahendica, Salvia spinosa, Stachys virgata, Stachys inflate, Stachys lavandifolia, Stachys turcomanica, Stachys persica, Thymus cotschyanus, Thymus pubescens, Ziziphora tenuior Lamium amplexicaule. The results of this study showed that the region has a great potential for producing respective medicinal plants species belong to those families. Medicinal plants recently become more important because of their medicinal uses and in addition they are valuable source of protein.

  9. Improving health care globally : a critical review of the necessity of family medicine research and recommendations to build research capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Rosser, W.W.

    2004-01-01

    An invitational conference led by the World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) involving selected delegates from 34 countries was held in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, March 8 to12, 2003. The conference theme was "Improving Health Globally: The Necessity of Family Medicine Research." Guiding confer

  10. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: interventions in the family medicine setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    The practice of family medicine includes the care of many patients with mental health or behavior change needs. Patients in mild to moderate distress may benefit from brief interventions performed in the family physician's office. Patients in more extreme distress may be helped by referral to behavioral health clinicians for short-term or open-ended therapies. Electronic therapy programs and bibliotherapy are also useful resources. The transition to the patient-centered medical home model may allow for more widespread integration of behavioral health care clinicians into primary care, in person and through telemental health care. Integrated care holds the promise of improved access, greater effectiveness of behavioral health service provision, and enhanced efficiency of primary care for patients with behavioral health care needs.

  11. Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying...... analyses were compared. RESULTS: An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system...... was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine....

  12. Patient empowerment, an additional characteristic of the European definitions of general practice/family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Ernesto

    2013-06-01

    Growing evidence supports the inclusion of patient empowerment as a key ingredient of care for patients with chronic conditions. In recent years, several studies based on patient empowerment, have been carried out in different European countries in the context of general practice and primary care to improve management of chronic diseases. These studies have shown good results of the care model, increasing patient and health professionals' satisfaction, adherence to guidelines and to treatment, and improving clinical outcomes. In 2011, the Wonca European Council included as the twelfth characteristic of the European definitions of general practice/family medicine: 'promote patient empowerment'. The aim of this paper is to clarify the meaning of 'patient empowerment' and to explain why family medicine should be considered the most suitable setting to promote it. The inclusion of patient empowerment as one of the essential characteristics of general practice fills a conceptual gap and clearly suggests to the European health care systems a tested model to face chronic diseases: involving and empowering patients in managing their own conditions to improve health and well-being.

  13. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

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    Christine Runyan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives: The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods: The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results: Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions: This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction.

  14. Educational Competitions of the Family Doctor in their Acting as Tutor in the Career of Medicine

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    José de la Caridad Lorenzo López

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: for the identification of a group of competitions characteristic of the educational work of the Family doctors that you/they act as tutors in the formative scenarios of the Primary Attention of Health in University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate. Objective: to identify the educational main competitions of the doctors of the family like tutors in the career of Medicine, in the Area II of the municipality of Cienfuegos. Method: pedagogic investigation of descriptive type in the mark of the medical education that looked for to define the group of educational basic competitions, what can favor a pedagogic management of more quality in the medical clinics as formative scenario of University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate during the year 2010. Results: 61,5% of our tutors has more than 10 years of medical formation; more than the half, their 73.1% is not categorized, 84.6% is specialist of general integral medicine, but of the half they received the preparation shop for tutors and 96.2% they consider the basic competitions as very important. Conclusion: deficiencies exist in the way of the tutor's performance for categorized personnel's lack, pedagogic scarce preparation and the assistance load of the professors in the primary attention of health.

  15. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Christine; Savageau, Judith A.; Potts, Stacy; Weinreb, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction. PMID:27282276

  16. Evaluation of four commonly used DNA barcoding Loci for chinese medicinal plants of the family schisandraceae.

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    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Min; Dong, Xiaoyu; Lin, Ruozhu; Fan, Jianhua; Chen, Zhiduan

    2015-01-01

    Many species of Schisandraceae are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are faced with contamination and substitution risks due to inaccurate identification. Here, we investigated the discriminatory power of four commonly used DNA barcoding loci (ITS, trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL) and corresponding multi-locus combinations for 135 individuals from 33 species of Schisandraceae, using distance-, tree-, similarity-, and character-based methods, at both the family level and the genus level. Our results showed that the two spacer regions (ITS and trnH-psbA) possess higher species-resolving power than the two coding regions (matK and rbcL). The degree of species resolution increased with most of the multi-locus combinations. Furthermore, our results implied that the best DNA barcode for the species discrimination at the family level might not always be the most suitable one at the genus level. Here we propose the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA+matK+rbcL as the most ideal DNA barcode for discriminating the medicinal plants of Schisandra and Kadsura, and the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA as the most suitable barcode for Illicium species. In addition, the closely related species Schisandra rubriflora Rehder & E. H. Wilson and Schisandra grandiflora Hook.f. & Thomson, were paraphyletic with each other on phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they should not be distinct species. Furthermore, the samples of these two species from the southern Hengduan Mountains region formed a distinct cluster that was separated from the samples of other regions, implying the presence of cryptic diversity. The feasibility of DNA barcodes for identification of geographical authenticity was also verified here. The database and paradigm that we provide in this study could be used as reference for the authentication of traditional Chinese medicinal plants utilizing DNA barcoding.

  17. Evaluation of four commonly used DNA barcoding Loci for chinese medicinal plants of the family schisandraceae.

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    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Many species of Schisandraceae are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are faced with contamination and substitution risks due to inaccurate identification. Here, we investigated the discriminatory power of four commonly used DNA barcoding loci (ITS, trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL and corresponding multi-locus combinations for 135 individuals from 33 species of Schisandraceae, using distance-, tree-, similarity-, and character-based methods, at both the family level and the genus level. Our results showed that the two spacer regions (ITS and trnH-psbA possess higher species-resolving power than the two coding regions (matK and rbcL. The degree of species resolution increased with most of the multi-locus combinations. Furthermore, our results implied that the best DNA barcode for the species discrimination at the family level might not always be the most suitable one at the genus level. Here we propose the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA+matK+rbcL as the most ideal DNA barcode for discriminating the medicinal plants of Schisandra and Kadsura, and the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA as the most suitable barcode for Illicium species. In addition, the closely related species Schisandra rubriflora Rehder & E. H. Wilson and Schisandra grandiflora Hook.f. & Thomson, were paraphyletic with each other on phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they should not be distinct species. Furthermore, the samples of these two species from the southern Hengduan Mountains region formed a distinct cluster that was separated from the samples of other regions, implying the presence of cryptic diversity. The feasibility of DNA barcodes for identification of geographical authenticity was also verified here. The database and paradigm that we provide in this study could be used as reference for the authentication of traditional Chinese medicinal plants utilizing DNA barcoding.

  18. An assessment of implementation of CommunityOriented Primary Care in Kenyan family medicine postgraduate medical education programmes

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    Ian J. Nelligan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya are examining the benefits of Community-Oriented Primary Care (COPC curriculum, as a method to train residents in population-based approaches to health care delivery. Whilst COPC is an established part of family medicine training in the United States, little is known about its application in Kenya. We sought to conduct a qualitative study to explore the development and implementation of COPC curriculum in the first two family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya. Method: Semi-structured interviews of COPC educators, practitioners, and academic stakeholders and focus groups of postgraduate students were conducted with COPC educators, practitioners and academic stakeholders in two family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya. Discussions were transcribed, inductively coded and thematically analysed. Results: Two focus groups with eight family medicine postgraduate students and interviews with five faculty members at two universities were conducted. Two broad themes emerged from the analysis: expected learning outcomes and important community-based enablers. Three learning outcomes were (1 making a community diagnosis, (2 understanding social determinants of health and (3 training in participatory research. Three community-based enablers for sustainability of COPC were (1 partnerships with community health workers, (2 community empowerment and engagement and (3 institutional financial support. Conclusions: Our findings illustrate the expected learning outcomes and important communitybased enablers associated with the successful implementation of COPC projects in Kenya and will help to inform future curriculum development in Kenya.

  19. Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum

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    Shellenberger Sylvia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008, presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. Methods The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and their Family Medicine Residency Review Committee. A proposed eight-module curriculum was developed, based on substance abuse competencies defined by Project MAINSTREAM and linked to core competencies defined by the ACGME. The curriculum provides basic training in high risk substance use to all residents, while also addressing current training challenges presented by U.S. work hour regulations, increasing international diversity of Family Medicine resident trainees, and emerging new primary care practice models. Results This paper offers a core curriculum, focused on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, which can be adapted by residency programs to meet their individual needs. The curriculum encourages direct observation of residents to ensure that core skills are learned and trains residents with several "new skills" that will expand the basket of substance abuse services they will be equipped to provide as they enter practice. Conclusions Broad-based implementation of a comprehensive Family Medicine residency curriculum should increase the ability of family physicians to provide basic substance abuse services in a primary care context. Such efforts should be coupled with faculty development initiatives which ensure that sufficient trained faculty are available to teach these concepts and with efforts by major Family Medicine organizations to implement and enforce residency requirements for

  20. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

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    Dantas Guilherme

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were: a to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM in primary care; b to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour.

  1. Reliability testing of a portfolio assessment tool for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa

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    Louis Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Competency-based education and the validity and reliability of workplace-based assessment of postgraduate trainees have received increasing attention worldwide.Family medicine was recognised as a speciality in South Africa six years ago and a satisfactory portfolio of learning is a prerequisite to sit the national exit exam. A massive scaling up of the number of family physicians is needed in order to meet the health needs of the country.Aim: The aim of this study was to develop a reliable, robust and feasible portfolio assessment tool (PAT for South Africa.Methods: Six raters each rated nine portfolios from the Stellenbosch University programme, using the PAT, to test for inter-rater reliability. This rating was repeated three months later to determine test–retest reliability. Following initial analysis and feedback the PAT was modified and the inter-rater reliability again assessed on nine new portfolios. An acceptable intra-classcorrelation was considered to be > 0.80.Results: The total score was found to be reliable, with a coefficient of 0.92. For test–retest reliability, the difference in mean total score was 1.7%, which was not statistically significant. Amongst the subsections, only assessment of the educational meetings and the logbook showed reliability coefficients > 0.80.Conclusion: This was the first attempt to develop a reliable, robust and feasible national portfolio assessment tool to assess postgraduate family medicine training in the South African context. The tool was reliable for the total score, but the low reliability of several sections in the PAT helped us to develop 12 recommendations regarding the use of the portfolio, the design of the PAT and the training of raters.

  2. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

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    Amoako AO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adae O Amoako,1 Agyenim B Amoako,2 George GA Pujalte3 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3Sports Medicine, Divisions of Primary Care, and Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Waycross, GA, USA Background and objective: Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results: Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7% compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8% respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively. Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort

  3. Conference report: Undergraduate family medicine and primary care training in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reflections of the PRIMAFAMED network

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    Innocent Besigye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internationally, there is a move towards strengthening primary healthcare systems and encouraging community-based and socially responsible education. The development of doctors with an interest in primary healthcare and family medicine in the African region should begin during undergraduate training. Over the last few years, attention has been given to the development of postgraduate training in family medicine in the African region, but little attention has been given to undergraduate training. This article reports on the 8th PRIMAFAMED (Primary Care and Family Medicine Education network meeting held in Nairobi from 21 to 24 May 2016. At this meeting the delegates spent time presenting and discussing the current state of undergraduate training at 18 universities in the region and shared lessons on how to successfully implement undergraduate training. This article reports on the rationale for, information presented, process followed and conclusions reached at the conference.

  4. After-hours power status of office equipment and energy use of miscellaneous plug-load equipment

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    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Marageret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-05-27

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of miscellaneous plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. For most types of miscellaneous equipment, we also estimated typical unit energy consumption in order to estimate total energy consumption of the miscellaneous devices within our sample. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from sixteen commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: four education buildings, two medical buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees each), and five small

  5. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a qualitative study.

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    Becvar, Dorothy S; Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we delineate the qualitative phase of a mixed-method research study focused on understanding the relationship between Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) and complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Based on an analysis of the data derived from telephone interviews with 54 respondents, we describe four themes: definitional issues, depth of awareness of CAM, fit with MFT, and ethical considerations. Our discussion focuses on the findings of this phase, considerations from the quantitative phase, and reflections on the research study as a whole. While acknowledging the limitations of the study, we conclude that the growing awareness of and involvement with CAM approaches and practitioners among MFTs suggest a need for further education for both professionals and clients. We also note the importance of additional research support for the use of CAM practices.

  6. Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program

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    Abdullah T Khoja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM, was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach′s alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1. The PHEEM′s domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13 for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88, for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6, for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach′s alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents′ learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians.

  7. Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study

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    Moheet Amir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%, 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%. The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76% and journal clubs (64%. Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%, although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54% while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%. Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence.

  8. Barriers to Screening and Possibilities for Active Detection of Family Medicine Attendees Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

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    Kopčavar Guček Nena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1996 the World Health Organization declared intimate partner violence (IPV the most important public health problem. Meta-analyses in 2013 showed every third female globally had been a victim of violence. Experts find screening controversial; family medicine is the preferred environment for identifying victims of violence, but barriers on both sides prevent patients from discussing it with doctors.

  9. Toward competency-based curricula in patient-centered spiritual care: recommended competencies for family medicine resident education.

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    Anandarajah, Gowri; Craigie, Frederic; Hatch, Robert; Kliewer, Stephen; Marchand, Lucille; King, Dana; Hobbs, Richard; Daaleman, Timothy P

    2010-12-01

    Spiritual care is increasingly recognized as an important component of medical care. Although many primary care residency programs incorporate spiritual care into their curricula, there are currently no consensus guidelines regarding core competencies necessary for primary care training. In 2006, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's Interest Group on Spirituality undertook a three-year initiative to address this need. The project leader assembled a diverse panel of eight educators with dual expertise in (1) spirituality and health and (2) family medicine. The multidisciplinary panel members represented different geographic regions and diverse faith traditions and were nationally recognized senior faculty. They underwent three rounds of a modified Delphi technique to achieve initial consensus regarding spiritual care competencies (SCCs) tailored for family medicine residency training, followed by an iterative process of external validation, feedback, and consensus modifications of the SCCs. Panel members identified six knowledge, nine skills, and four attitude core SCCs for use in training and linked these to competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. They identified three global competencies for use in promotion and graduation criteria. Defining core competencies in spiritual care clarifies training goals and provides the basis for robust curricula evaluation. Given the breadth of family medicine, these competencies may be adaptable to other primary care fields, to medical and surgical specialties, and to medical student education. Effective training in this area may enhance physicians' ability to attend to the physical, mental, and spiritual needs of patients and better maintain sustainable healing relationships.

  10. Development of a portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a Delphi study

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    Jenkins Louis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the 52 health districts in South Africa, the family physician is seen as the clinical leader within a multi-professional district health team. Family physicians must be competent to meet 90% of the health needs of the communities in their districts. The eight university departments of Family Medicine have identified five unit standards, broken down into 85 training outcomes, for postgraduate training. The family medicine registrar must prove at the end of training that all the required training outcomes have been attained. District health managers must be assured that the family physician is competent to deliver the expected service. The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA require a portfolio to be submitted as part of the uniform assessment of all registrars applying to write the national fellowship examinations. This study aimed to achieve a consensus on the contents and principles of the first national portfolio for use in family medicine training in South Africa. Methods A workshop held at the WONCA Africa Regional Conference in 2009 explored the purpose and broad contents of the portfolio. The 85 training outcomes, ideas from the WONCA workshop, the literature, and existing portfolios in the various universities were used to develop a questionnaire that was tested for content validity by a panel of 31 experts in family medicine in South Africa, via the Delphi technique in four rounds. Eighty five content items (national learning outcomes and 27 principles were tested. Consensus was defined as 70% agreement. For those items that the panel thought should be included, they were also asked how to provide evidence for the specific item in the portfolio, and how to assess that evidence. Results Consensus was reached on 61 of the 85 national learning outcomes. The panel recommended that 50 be assessed by the portfolio and 11 should not be. No consensus could be reached on the remaining 24 outcomes and these were

  11. A new paradigm for teaching behavior change: Implications for residency training in family medicine and psychiatry

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    Triana A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care physicians (PCPs provide ~50 % of all mental health services in the U.S. Given the widening gap between patient mental health needs and resources available to meet those needs, there is an increasing demand for family medicine and psychiatry trainees to master competencies in both behavioral medicine and primary care counseling during residency-if for no other reason than to accommodate the realities of medical practice given the oft present gap between the need for psychiatric services and the availability, quality, and/or affordability of specialized psychiatric care. To begin to address this gap, a skills-based, interactive curriculum based on motivational interviewing (MI as a teaching method is presented. Methods The curriculum described in this paper is a four-week block rotation taught in the second year of residency. Motivational interviewing (MI is used as a teaching approach toward the goal of clinical behavior change. Residents’ strengths, personal choice and autonomy are emphasized. Each week of the rotation, there is a clinical topic and a set of specific skills for mastery. Residents are offered a “menu” of skills, role modeling, role/real play, practice with standardized patients (SP, and direct supervision in clinic. Results Thirty-nine residents have completed the curriculum. Based on residents’ subjective reporting using pre-post scales (i.e., importance and confidence, all participants to date have reported substantial increases in confidence/self-efficacy using primary care counseling skills in their continuity clinic. Conclusions This paper presents an innovative, empirically based model for teaching the essential skills necessary for physicians providing care for patients with mental/emotional health needs as well as health-behavior change concerns. Implications for training in the broader context, particularly as it relates to multi-disciplinary and collaborative models of

  12. Seeing the other through the screen: movies, humanization of medical education and Family and Community Medicine

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    Gustavo de Araújo Porto Landsberg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented technological development observed in the last century and beginning of this one has expanded the horizons of the medical science exponentially, making the content to be envisaged by the colleges practically unfeasible. The incorporation of this knowledge in the curricula took place in detriment to human sciences, formerly included as a routine in the schools of medicine all over the world. Negligence of the humanization of medical education may keep from endowing future physicians with the affective resources necessary to the establishment of a satisfactory physical-patient relationship. This study proposes evaluating the use of motion pictures in the humanization of the way graduates see patients, providing them with capability and empathy toward their patients. Three documentaries that correlate indirectly with themes relative to Family and Community Medicine were selected: worker’s mental and community health. After screening to small groups of students, there was a multidisciplinary discussion covering all the several themes relevant to the medical practice. Finally, questionnaires were applied where the students evaluated the importance of the experience in their education, as well as replied to questions about their contact with arts and personal interests. All the students considered the level of correlation of the motion pictures chosen as a good or excellent medical practice. Questioned on the relevance of the themes covered in their education, 94,1% of them answered good or fine. The same percentage considered the curricular inclusion of methodology also good or fine. It was observed that the students evaluated read less than the national average, and a considerable amount of them is not interested in or has never been to a theater, an art exposition or a dance show. The movies, however, proved to be very popular - confirming its potential as a humanizing teaching resource.

  13. Quality of osteoarthritis care in family medicine - a cross-sectional study

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    Račić Maja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Effective treatments for osteoarthritis are available, yet little is known about the quality of primary care in the Republic of Srpska for this disabling condition. Objective. The main objective of this study was to analyze the overall quality of osteoarthritis treatment in a family medicine setting, as well as to explore whether the achievement of quality indicators was associated with particular patient characteristics and severity of osteoarthritis. Methods. The cross-sectional study included 120 patients with confirmed hand, knee, and hip osteoarthritis, recruited at seven family practices in the town of Ugljevik, Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Data were extracted from a patient questionnaire on quality indicators, as well as from their electronic and paper records, to assess care against 14 indicators. The included quality indicators were based on the Arthritis Foundation’s Quality Indicator set for Osteoarthritis. Summary achievement rates for hip, knee, or hand osteoarthritis, as well as for the total sample, were calculated. Results. The mean achievement rate for all 14 quality indicators obtained from medical records was 74%, and 77% obtained from patient interview. The quality indicators concerning referral for weight reduction (23% and pharmacological treatment (24% had the lowest achievement rates, whereas the highest achievement rates were related to physical examination (100%, pain and functional assessment (100%, and education (90.8%. Patients physical functioning was significantly associated with the quality indicator achievement rate (p = 0.001. Conclusion. Pharmacological therapy and the referral of osteoarthritis patients in need of weight reduction seem to have the greatest potential for improvement in primary health care.

  14. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

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    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  15. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

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    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required.

  16. Effectiveness of a Formal Mentorship Program in Family Medicine Residency: The Residents’ Perspective

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    Marie Andrades

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mentoring is a recognized form of teaching learning strategy in postgraduate medical education. This paper describes the effectiveness of a formal mentorship program from the residents’ perspective after a year of implementation. Methods. The Aga Khan University Family Medicine Residency Program is the first program in Pakistan to our knowledge to implement formal mentorship for all four years of residency. A mentorship program was developed, implemented, and evaluated a year later using a rating scale. The 10-point Likert scale consisted of questions on academics, clinical work, research, administrative issues, and personal/social issues. Results. The response rate was 95% (. Eighty percent ( were women. Satisfaction level in seeking help was the highest for academics (75%. Residents scored mentorship as low in helping to tackle their personal problems (20%. Barriers reported in rapport building with mentor were time constraints and gender difference. The most useful attributes of the mentor which helped rapport building were accessibility, active listening, support for emotional needs, and trustworthiness. Conclusion. Mentoring has a role in trainees’ personal and professional growth especially when their needs are addressed. The effectiveness of the mentorship program in residency can improve if the residents are allowed to choose their own mentors.

  17. GP and nurses' perceptions of how after hours care for people receiving palliative care at home could be improved: a mixed methods study

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    Miles Gail

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary health care providers play a dominant role in the provision of palliative care (PC in Australia but many gaps in after hours service remain. In some rural areas only 19% of people receiving palliative care achieve their goal of dying at home. This study, which builds on an earlier qualitative phase of the project, investigates the gaps in care from the perspective of general practitioners (GPs and PC nurses. Methods Questionnaires, developed from the outcomes of the earlier phase, and containing both structured and open ended questions, were distributed through Divisions of General Practice (1 urban, 1 rural, 1 mixed to GPs (n = 524 and through a special interest group to palliative care nurses (n = 122 in both rural and urban areas. Results Questionnaires were returned by 114 GPs (22% and 52 nurses (43%. The majority of GPs were associated with a practice which provided some after hours services but PC was not a strong focus for most. This was reflected in low levels of PC training, limited awareness of the existence of after hours triage services in their area, and of the availability of Enhanced Primary Care (EPC Medicare items for care planning for palliative patients. However, more than half of both nurses and GPs were aware of accessible PC resources. Factors such as poor communication and limited availability of after hours services were identified the as most likely to impact negatively on service provision. Strategies considered most likely to improve after hours services were individual patient protocols, palliative care trained respite carers and regular multidisciplinary meetings that included the GP. Conclusion While some of the identified gaps can only be met by long term funding and policy change, educational tools for use in training programs in PC for health professionals, which focus on the utilisation of EPC Medicare items in palliative care planning, the development of advance care plans and good

  18. Status and progress of family health in Latin America and the Caribbean: the Ibero-American Confederation of Family Medicine (ICPM perspective

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    María Inez Padula Anderson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the XXI century, much of humanity does not have access to comprehensive health care, or even basic equitable health care. If studies show that countries with organized health systems based on a qualified and inclusive model of Primary Health Care (PHC and family physicians as permanent staff are achieving unquestionable results, why a large part of the countries with lower socio-economic development have not committed strongly to implement an efficient reform of their health systems based on PHC and family medicine (FM? These issues are at the core of the Latin American Confederation of Family Medicine’s concerns, an international non-profit organization composed of national associations of countries of FM from Latin America, Spain and Portugal. Its primary mission is to drive the implementation of a proper PHC system in all countries of the region and to ensure that family medicine, as a specialty, is considered critical to health systems, thereby transforming it into a public policy.

  19. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

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    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine   The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including

  20. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

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    Liesbeth Borgermans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  1. Relevance of chronic lyme disease to family medicine as a complex multidimensional chronic disease construct: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgermans, Liesbeth; Goderis, Geert; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  2. Training Standards Statements of Family Medicine Postgraduate Training - A Review of Existing Documents Worldwide.

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    Elisabeth Flum

    Full Text Available For the effective and safe management of complex care needs for patients in community settings, high quality family medicine (FM training programmes are needed. In less primary care oriented countries, training standards statements for FM postgraduate training are less commonly found. The aim of this study was to review international training standards statements in FM postgraduate training and to catalogue these statements to be used as a best practice standard guide for FM training programs in Germany.A structured three-tiered search was performed: a systematic literature search in MEDLINE®; a search of international indicator databases; and a search in grey literature, consisting of a survey of international experts and a search in "Google (Scholar". From all identified documents, training standards statements were extracted, translated and summarized into categories referring to the same quality aspect.The search strategy revealed 25 relevant documents (MEDLINE® n = 15, databases n = 2, experts n = 7, "Google" n = 1, containing 337 training standards statements. These were summarized into 80 statements. They covered structure quality (n = 35; process quality (n = 43; and two training standards statements referred to outcome quality (n = 2.A broad range of internationally sourced training standards statements for FM postgraduate training could be identified from countries with well-established primary care systems. Only few statements internationally referred to outcome quality, expressing the difficulty in assessing outcome. The resulting inventory of training standards statements for FM postgraduate training can serve as a resource for institutions seeking to formalise and systematise FM training at regional or national levels.

  3. Family Medicine Residents' Performance with Detected Versus Undetected Simulated Patients Posing as Problem Drinkers

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    Mark B. Sobell, PhD

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simulated patients are commonly used to evaluate medical trainees. Unannounced simulated patients provide an accurate measure of physician performance. Purpose: To determine the effects of detection of SPs on physician performance, and identify factors leading to detection. Methods: Fixty-six family medicine residents were each visited by two unannounced simulated patients presenting with alcohol-induced hypertension or insomnia. Residents were then surveyed on their detection of SPs. Results: SPs were detected on 45 out of 104 visits. Inner city clinics had higher detection rates than middle class clinics. Residents’ checklist and global rating scores were substantially higher on detected than undetected visits, for both between-subject and within-subject comparisons. The most common reasons for detection concerned SP demographics and behaviour; the SP “did not act like a drinker” and was of a different social class than the typical clinic patient. Conclusions: Multi-clinic studies involving residents experienced with SPs should ensure that the SP role and behavior conform to physician expectations and the demographics of the clinic. SP station testing does not accurately reflect physicians’ actual clinical behavior and should not be relied on as the primary method of evaluation. The study also suggests that physicians’ poor performance in identifying and managing alcohol problems is not entirely due to lack of skill, as they demonstrated greater clinical skills when they became aware that they were being evaluated. Physicians’ clinical priorities, sense of responsibility and other attitudinal determinants of their behavior should be addressed when training physicians on the management of alcohol problems.

  4. A Feminist Perspective of Family Medicine%家庭治疗的女性主义思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐振敏

    2011-01-01

    主要通过女性主义的眼光审视传统家庭治疗流派的理念,反映当前家庭治疗中存在的对女性经验的忽视等不足,探索治疗实践中治疗目标、治疗关系和使用的技术等方面所需要做出的改变,同时简要分析这一现状中家庭治疗师的责任和治疗理念变化的趋向。从家庭治疗自身演变发展的角度,展望未来家庭治疗的发展方向。%This paper adopts a feminist perspective to examine the neglect of women in the traditional theory and practice of family medicine that still prevails today. It investigates in necessary changes in the goals of medicine, relationships in treatment, and technolo- gy used. It also foresees the direction in which changes in responsibilities of family doctors and their perspective of treatment could be made. In so doing, the paper looks into the future development of family medicine.

  5. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

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    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  6. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade RBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  7. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Lima Wagner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  8. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion and conclusion

  9. Relevance of clerkship characteristics in changing students' interest in family medicine: a questionnaire survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Anna; Viehmann, Anja; Thielmann, Anika; Gesenhues, Stefan; Weltermann, Birgitta

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Exposure to family medicine (FM) can serve to promote students' interest in this field. This study aimed at identifying clerkship characteristics which decrease or increase students' interest in FM. Design This cross-sectional questionnaire study analysed students' clerkship evaluations between the years 2004 and 2014. Descriptive statistics were used to compare four predefined groups: (1) high interest in FM before and after the clerkship (Remained high), (2) poor interest before and after the clerkship (Remained low), (3) poor interest before the clerkship which improved (Increased) and (4) high interest before the clerkship which decreased (Decreased). Setting Students' evaluations of FM clerkships in the fourth of 6 years of medical school. Participants All questionnaires with complete answers on students' interest in FM and its change as a result of the clerkship (2382 of 3963; 60.1%). The students' mean age was 26 years (± 3.9), 62.7% (n=1505) were female. Outcome measure The outcome was a change in students' interest in FM after completing the clerkship. Results Interest in FM after the clerkship was as follows: 40.1% (n=954) Remained high, 5.5% (n=134) Remained low, 42.1% (n=1002) Increased and 12.3% (n=292) Decreased. Students with decreased interest had performed a below-average number of learning activities (4 vs 6 activities). A total of 45.9% (n=134 of 292) of the students with decreased interest reported that the difficulty of the challenge was inadequate for their educational level: 81.3% (n=109) felt underchallenged and 18.7% (n=25) overchallenged. Conclusions In more than 50% of cases, the clerkship changed the students' interest in FM. Those with decreased interest were more frequently underchallenged. We observed an increase in FM if at least six learning activities were trained. Our findings stress the importance of well-designed FM clerkships. There is a need for standardised educational strategies which enable teaching

  10. Experience with using second life for medical education in a family and community medicine education unit

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    Melús-Palazón Elena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of new technologies to the education of health professionals is both a challenge and a necessity. Virtual worlds are increasingly being explored as a support for education. Aim: The aim of this work is to study the suitability of Second Life (SL as an educational tool for primary healthcare professionals. Methods Design: Qualitative study of accredited clinical sessions in SL included in a continuing professional development (CPD programme for primary healthcare professionals. Location: Zaragoza I Zone Family and Community Medicine Education Unit (EU and 9 health centres operated by the Aragonese Health Service, Aragon, Spain. Method: The EU held two training workshops in SL for 16 healthcare professionals from 9 health centres by means of two workshops, and requested them to facilitate clinical sessions in SL. Attendance was open to all personnel from the EU and the 9 health centres. After a trail period of clinical sessions held at 5 health centres between May and November 2010, the CPD-accredited clinical sessions were held at 9 health centres between February and April 2011. Participants: 76 healthcare professionals attended the CPD-accredited clinical sessions in SL. Main measurements: Questionnaire on completion of the clinical sessions. Results Response rate: 42-100%. Questionnaire completed by each health centre on completion of the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Access to SL: 2 centres were unable to gain access. Sound problems: 0% (0/9. Image problems: 0% (0/9. Voice/text chat: used in 100% (10/9; 0 incidents. Questionnaire completed by participants in the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Preference for SL as a tool: 100% (76/76. Strengths of this method: 74% (56/76 considered it eliminated the need to travel; 68% (52/76 believed it made more effective use of educational resources; and 47% (36/76 considered it improved accessibility. Weaknesses: 91% (69/76 experienced technical problems, while; 9

  11. Admission to hospital with community-onset bloodstream infection during the 'after hours' is not associated with an increased risk for death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laupland, Kevin B

    2010-12-01

    Several studies conducted in diverse patient populations have found that patients presenting with acute illness during weekends or evening/nights are at increased risk for death. This study was conducted to examine whether patients with community-onset bloodstream infections who are admitted during evenings, nights, and weekends suffer increased mortality rates. All residents within the Calgary area who had first admissions with community-onset bloodstream infections during 2000-2008 were included. One thousand eight hundred and seventy-eight (27%) patients were admitted on a weekend. Among all admissions, 2753 (40%) were during the hours of 08:00-17:59, 1996 (29%) during 18:00-22:59, and 2174 (31%) during 23:00-07:59. More than two-thirds (n = 4867; 70%) of cases were admitted during the 'after hours' (evenings, nights, and/or weekends). The 30-day case-fatality rate was 13% (882/6923) and did not significantly vary between daytime (364/2753; 13%), evening (246/1996; 12%), and night (272/2174; 13%) admissions (p = 0.6), or with patients admitted on weekends as compared to weekdays (252/1878 (13%) vs. 630/5045 (12%); p = 0.3). Admission during the after hours (weekends and evenings/nights) was not associated with increased risk for death in logistic regression analysis (odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.16; p = 0.88). Admission with community-onset bloodstream infection during the after hours is not associated with adverse outcome in this region.

  12. Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A Sattar; Akturk, Zekeriya; Al-Megbil, Tarek

    2010-11-29

    The primary healthcare system is at a turning point in Saudi Arabia. However, the sustainability of family medicine as the core element of that system is increasingly being called into question because of lack of family physicians. In keeping view this problem; a postgraduate diploma program in family medicine has started in 2008. A validated measure of educational environment i.e., Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire consisting of 50 questions having five domains of perception was administered to all 13 trainees of the diploma course at the completion of the program to check their perception about learning evironment. The trainees comprised of 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%). The overall score showed more positive than negative side (147/200). There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean scores of five different domains of perception. The subclasses of five domains showed that teaching perceived as positive by 50%, moving towards right direction by 80%, feeling more positive by 50%, positive attitude by 80% and the 70% scored the course as not too bad. The overall high score and positive attitude towards the course assures the better teaching environment. However, there are areas to improve and it requires continuous evaluation.

  13. Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

  14. Accelerating Momentum Toward Improved Health for Patients and Populations: Family Medicine as a Disruptive Innovation-A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stream, Glen; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    This paper was prepared in follow up to the G. Gayle Stephens Keystone IV Conference by authors who attended the conference and are also members of the Family Medicine for America's Health board of directors (FMAHealth.org). It connects the aspirations of the current strategic and communications efforts of FMAHealth with the ideas developed at the conference. The FMAHealth project is sponsored by 8 national family medicine organizations and seeks to build on the work of the original Future of Family Medicine project. Among its objectives are a robust family physician workforce practicing in a continually improving medical home model, supported by a comprehensive payment model sufficient to sustain the medical home and enable the personal physician relationship with patients.

  15. Approaching confidentiality at a familial level in genomic medicine: a focus group study with healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheensa, Sandi; Fenwick, Angela; Lucassen, Anneke

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Clinical genetics guidelines from 2011 conceptualise genetic information as confidential to families, not individuals. The normative consequence of this is that the family's interest is the primary consideration and genetic information is shared unless there are good reasons not to do so. We investigated healthcare professionals' (HCPs') views about, and reasoning around, individual and familial approaches to confidentiality and how such views influenced their practice. Method 16 focus groups with 80 HCPs working in/with clinical genetics services were analysed, drawing on grounded theory. Results Participants raised seven problems with, and arguments against, going beyond the individual approach to confidentiality. These problems fell into two overlapping categories: ‘relationships’ and ‘structures’. Most participants had never considered ways to—or thought it was impossible to—treat familial genetic information and personal information differently. They worried that putting the familial approach into practice could disrupt family dynamics and erode patient trust in the health service. They also thought they had insufficient resources to share information and feared that sharing might change the standard of care and make them more vulnerable to liability. Conclusions A familial approach to confidentiality has not been accepted or adopted as a standard, but wider research suggests that some of the problems HCPs perceived are surmountable and sharing in the interest of the family can be achieved. However, further research is needed to explore how personal and familial genetic information can be separated in practice. Our findings are relevant to HCPs across health services who are starting to use genome tests as part of their routine investigations. PMID:28159847

  16. Protective Effects of Some Medicinal Plants from Lamiaceae Family Against Beta-Amyloid Induced Toxicity in PC12 Cell

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    S Saeidnia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive accumulation of beta-amyliod peptide (Aβ, the major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes neuronal cell death through induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidants may be of use in the treatment of AD. The medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family have been widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. These plants contain compounds with antioxidant activity and some species in this family have been reported to have neuroprotective properties. In the present study, methanolic extract of seven plants from salvia and satureja species were evaluated for their protective effects against beta-amyloid induced neurotoxicity.Methods: Aerial parts of the plants were extracted with ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively, by percolation at room temperature and subsequently, methanolic extracts of the plants were prepared. PC12 cells were incubated with different concentrations of the extracts in culture medium 1h prior to incubation with Aβ. Cell toxicity was assessed 24h after addition of Aβ by MTT assay.Results: Satureja bachtiarica, Salvia officinalis and Salvia macrosiphon methanolic extracts exhibited high protective effects against Aβ induced toxicity (P<0.001. Protective effects of Satureja bachtiarica and Salvia officinalis were dose-dependent.Conclusion: The main constituents of these extracts are polyphenolic and flavonoid compounds such as rosmarinic acid, naringenin, apigenin and luteolin which have antioxidant properties and may have a role in neuroprotection. Based on neuroprotective effect of these plants against Aβ induced toxicity, we recommend greater attention to their use in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  17. The standard of knowledge for cesarean section in women who applied to family medicine: Two centered cross-sectional study

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    Metin Canbal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to examine, mothers' level of knowledge about complications of cesarean section and the factors that influence preference for cesarean section in this study Methods: The universe of the study consisted of the women who admitted to the family medicine outdoor clinics in two different regions of Turkey namely Doğansehir State Hospital, Malatya and Kadışehri Entegrated State Hospital, Yozgat. Two hundred and one women included in the study who recruited the family medicine outdoor clinic irrespective of their primary complaint. The data was analyzed by the SPSS program. Results: Statistically significant difference was observed in terms of caesarean section operation rates in high school graduates. 29% of all the participants in this study had caesarean section operation in their first delivery. Conclusion: Personal predilections appear to be an influencing factor in deciding the type of the delivery currently. It is assumed that knowledge may be converted into the behaviors by giving the evidence based information to our patients in consistence with their perceptions along with the shared decision model in a collaborative manner.

  18. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

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    Patti Pagels

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents’ health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents N=25 participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents’ ability to measure their patients’ health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge p=0.001 and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8% and a translator more effectively (77.8% three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  19. Twenty-five years of the international Bled course for teachers of family medicine in Europe: Glancing back and looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Svab, Igor; Petek-Ster, Marija; Bulc, Mateja; Buchanan, Josephine; Finnegan, Henry; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Yaphe, John

    2016-12-01

    The international Bled course for teacher training has played a central role in faculty development in family medicine for the past 25 years. The course was originally designed to promote faculty development for family medicine teachers in the new academic discipline of family medicine in Slovenia in 1990 and to introduce new topics into the family medicine curriculum. In this background paper, we perform a SCOT analysis (strengths, challenges, opportunities, and threats) of the current course, evaluating participant feedback and reviewing past topics and their impact on local and international teaching programmes. We also review the place of the course in the context of other teacher-training programmes in family medicine in Europe. We found that the structure and learning aims of the Bled course have remained stable over 25 years. It provides a safe, well-structured learning environment for the participants even though the course topic is different every year. The course has had a significant impact on curriculum development and teacher training in Slovenia as well as in many other countries in Europe and beyond. Because of the positive impact of the course and the high degree of satisfaction of the participants and course directors, it seems worthwhile to continue this endeavour. New directions for the course will depend on the learning needs of the participants and the evolving medical curricula in the countries they represent.

  20. Self-reported colorectal cancer screening of Medicare beneficiaries in family medicine vs. internal medicine practices in the United States: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Angela Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefit of screening for decreasing the risk of death from colorectal cancer (CRC has been shown, yet many patients in primary care are still not undergoing screening according to guidelines. There are known variations in delivery of preventive health care services among primary care physicians. This study compared self-reported CRC screening rates and patient awareness of the need for CRC screening of patients receiving care from family medicine (FPs vs. internal medicine (internists physicians. Methods Nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized beneficiaries who received medical care from FPs or internists in 2006 (using Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. The main outcome was the percentage of patients screened in 2007. We also examined the percentage of patients offered screening. Results Patients of FPs, compared to those of internists, were less likely to have received an FOBT kit or undergone home FOBT, even after accounting for patients' characteristics. Compared to internists, FPs' patients were more likely to have heard of colonoscopy, but were less likely to receive a screening colonoscopy recommendation (18% vs. 27%, or undergo a colonoscopy (43% vs. 46%, adjusted odds ratios [AOR], 95% confidence interval [CI]-- 0.65, 0.51-0.81 or any CRC screening (52% vs. 60%, AOR, CI--0.80, 0.68-0.94. Among subgroups examined, higher income beneficiaries receiving care from internists had the highest screening rate (68%, while disabled beneficiaries receiving care from FPs had the lowest screening rate (34%. Conclusion Patients cared for by FPs had a lower rate of screening compared to those cared for by internists, despite equal or higher levels of awareness; a difference that remained statistically significant after accounting for socioeconomic status and access to healthcare. Both groups of patients remained below the national goal of 70 percent.

  1. The importance of longitudinal studies in family medicine: experiences of two practice-based research networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Mold, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For evidence-based decision making in family practice, it is essential to know the long-term (natural) course of common diseases and their outcomes under care and treatment. This article, based on a research methodology workshop, aims to raise awareness and interest in longitudinal resea

  2. Crew Resource Management Use in U.S. Air Force Flight and Family Medicine Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    The study was designed as a cross-sectional quantitative analysis. Inclusion criteria were active duty Air Force base-level flight surgeons and family...Remember the Titans [videorecording]. Burbank, CA: Walt Disney Home Video; 2001. 14 Distribution A: Approved for public release

  3. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory, Antioxidant and Phytochemical Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants of the Lamiaceae Family

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    Sanda Vladimir-Knežević

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman’s colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus vulgaris at 1 mg/mL showed strong inhibitory activity against AChE. The antioxidant potential of the investigated Lamiaceae species was assessed by DPPH• scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays, in comparison with hydroxycinnamic acids and trolox. The extracts differed greatly in their total hydroxycinnamic derivatives content, determined spectrophotometrically. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the predominant constituent in most of the investigated medicinal plants (by RP-HPLC and had a substantial influence on their AChE inhibitory and antioxidant properties, with the exception of Teucrium species. These findings indicate that Lamiaceae species are a rich source of various natural AChE inhibitors and antioxidants that could be useful in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s and other related diseases.

  4. [Learning concepts of diagnosis in family medicine: the "mark robinson sign" - the traces that should not be there].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turabián, José Luis; Samarín-Ocampos, Elena; Minier, Luis; Pérez-Franco, Benjamín

    2015-11-01

    We review the mechanisms of the mental operation to identify the disease in family medicine, using five cases where the diagnosis process began in "the trace that should not be there" or "Robinson sign" as happened to Robinson Crusoe when he saw a human footprint on the beach of the "desert island". How could it be there?; It was a mystery, and based on metaphors, we framed the mechanism of "the trace that should not be there" mainly in the first phase of clinical or intuitive reasoning, but this intuition of the doctor should be accompanied by the diagnostic process, like the "basso continuo" of Baroque music, allowing improvisation and personal style, and in this way, eventually observing the footprint "that should not have been there" that may arise in the analytical, as well as in the verification phase of the assumptions made.

  5. Bending the cost curve and increasing revenue: a family medicine model that works!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Bernard J; Needham, Mark R

    2012-12-01

    This article attempts to illustrate ways in which family physician practices are able to demonstrate high value, enhanced quality, and streamlined costs, essential components of practice sustainability. Specific examples are provided to assist practices to consider questions and information that allow for skillful engagement during contract negotiations, consider increasing practice revenues by adopting practice enhancements that make sense for the location of the practice and community needs, develop workflow analyses, and review opportunities for expense reduction.

  6. A cultural diversity seen in Croatian family medicine: a lady from Janjevo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Renata

    2014-12-01

    The role of cultural diversities in doctor's everyday work is going more and more important in globalised world, therefore it draws lots of attention in literature. Cultural differences that exist between people, such as language, dress and traditions, are usually distinguished from the term cultural diversity which is mainly understood as having different cultures respect each other's differences. The great effort is made to educate culturally competent practitioners, nurses or doctors. The presented case of lady from Janjevo was a good role model for work with all patients with culturally different background coming to family practice. This lady example could also help to other colleagues to learn from experience on systematic way.

  7. Family medicine education in rural communities as a health service intervention supporting recruitment and retention of physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soles, Trina Larsen; Ruth Wilson, C.; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a pan-Canadian rural education road map to advance the recruitment and retention of family physicians in rural, remote, and isolated regions of Canada in order to improve access and health care outcomes for these populations. Composition of the task force Members of the task force were chosen from key stakeholder groups including educators, practitioners, the College of Family Physicians of Canada education committee chairs, deans, chairs of family medicine, experts in rural education, and key decision makers. The task force members were purposefully selected to represent a mix of key perspectives needed to ensure the work produced was rigorous and of high quality. Observers from the Canadian Medical Association and Health Canada’s Council on Health Workforce, and representatives from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, were also invited to provide their perspectives and to encourage and coordinate multiorganization action. Methods The task force commissioned a focused literature review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature to examine the status of rural medical education, training, and practice in relation to the health needs of rural and remote communities in Canada, and also completed an environmental scan. Report The environmental scan included interviews with more than 100 policy makers, government representatives, providers, educators, learners, and community leaders; 17 interviews with practising rural physicians; and 2 surveys administered to all 17 faculties of medicine. The gaps identified from the focused literature review and the results of the environmental scan will be used to develop the task force’s recommendations for action, highlighting the role of key partners in implementation and needed action. Conclusion The work of the task force provides an opportunity to bring the various partners together in a coordinated way. By understanding who is responsible and the actions each stakeholder

  8. "Taibai seven medicine" is the buttercup family plant resources research%"太白七药"属毛茛科植物资源调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白吉庆; 王小平; 王西芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To pass to "taibai seven medicine" is the buttercup family plant resources survey for reasonable development and application of the resources, provides the basis. Methods: using GPS satellite tracking elevation position determination field investigation and finishing material. Results: the buttercup family medicinal plants is "too white seven medicine" in one of the largest number of families, about 12. Conclusion: in "taibai seven medicine" resource should pay full attention to the buttercup family medical plant resource protection, and properly conducted wild resources in parenting or artificial cultivation, so as to realize the sustainable utilization of resources.%目的:通过对"太白七药"属毛茛科植物资源调查,为合理开发和应用该科资源提供依据.方法:应用GPS全球卫星定位仪测定海拔方位进行实地调查并整理资料.结果:毛茛科药用植物是"太白七药"中数量最多的科之一,约有12种.结论:在"太白七药"资源中应充分重视毛茛科药用植物资源的保护,并适当开展野生资源抚育或开展人工栽培,以实现资源可持续利用.

  9. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS FROM LAMIACEAE FAMILY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Laudy, Agnieszka E; Przybył, Jarosław; Ziarno, Małgorzata; Majewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) extracts from herbs often used in Polish cuisine and traditional herbal medicine including thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) were compared. The aqueous ethanolic extracts contained slightly higher levels of phenolics compared to the aqueous methanolic extracts. In turn, GC-MS analysis showed that the aqueous methanolic extracts of thyme, rosemary and sage contained several additional compounds such as eugenol or ledol. The present studies also indicated that the bacterial species applied in the experiment exhibited different sensitivities towards tested extracts. Staphylococcus aureus strains were found to be the most sensitive bacteria to aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) rosemary and sage extracts and aqueous methanolic thyme extract. Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 and Proteus vulgaris NCTC 4635 were more susceptible to the aqueous methanolic thyme extract. However, Listeria monocytogenes 1043S was the most sensitive to the aqueous ethanolic rosemary extract. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the tested extracts than Gram-negative ones.

  10. Early detection of ovarian cancer in FB&H - role of family medicine team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dž. Ljuca

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of problems with ovarian malignancy in the Federation B&H requires a comprehensive and precise analysis of the population characteristics with particular focus on risk factors such as age, parity, hereditary factors, menstrual cycle characteristics (short cycle, early menarche, late menopause. A retrospective study of medical documentation involving 272 patients with ovarian cancer within the Federation of BiH in the period from 1996 to 2000 was conducted. Usual statistical methods were used (T- test, 2 -Test, Fisher exact test. The research showed that the disease was in most cases diagnosed too late, in the stages III and IV (60% whereas histology of the tissue showed epithelial cancer in 88,6% cases, most frequently between the age of 55 to 70. Out of 272 patients null-parity was recorded in 16,9 %, whereas 19,8 % of patients had just one pregnancy. Menstrual cycle duration shorter than 21 days was recorded in 26,5% cases. Approximately 1,8% patients had close relatives that suffered of cancer of breast, ovary or colon. Prerequisites for application of algorhithms in diagnostic procedures would be met by identification of risk groups consisting of those with one or more risk factors in their history. Bearing in mind the role of the family doctors in the future health system reform, it can be concluded that they could have an important role in the process.

  11. Patient safety principles in family medicine residency accreditation standards and curriculum objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Aliya; Sharma, Nishan; Harvie, Margot; O’Beirne, Maeve; Topps, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To conduct a thematic analysis of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s (CFPC’s) Red Book accreditation standards and the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum objectives with respect to patient safety principles. Design Thematic content analysis of the CFPC’s Red Book accreditation standards and the Triple C curriculum. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Coding frequency of the patient safety principles (ie, patient engagement; respectful, transparent relationships; complex systems; a just and trusting culture; responsibility and accountability for actions; and continuous learning and improvement) found in the analyzed CFPC documents. Results Within the analyzed CFPC documents, the most commonly found patient safety principle was patient engagement (n = 51 coding references); the least commonly found patient safety principles were a just and trusting culture (n = 5 coding references) and complex systems (n = 5 coding references). Other patient safety principles that were uncommon included responsibility and accountability for actions (n = 7 coding references) and continuous learning and improvement (n = 12 coding references). Conclusion Explicit inclusion of patient safety content such as the use of patient safety principles is needed for residency training programs across Canada to ensure the full spectrum of care is addressed, from community-based care to acute hospital-based care. This will ensure a patient safety culture can be cultivated from residency and sustained into primary care practice. PMID:27965349

  12. Lack of chart reminder effectiveness on family medicine resident JNC-VI and NCEP III guideline knowledge and attitudes

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    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature demonstrates that medical residents and practicing physicians have an attitudinal-behavioral discordance concerning their positive attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines (CPG, and the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice patterns. Methods A pilot study was performed to determine if change in a previously identified CPG compliance factor (accessibility would produce a significant increase in family medicine resident knowledge and attitude toward the guidelines. The primary study intervention involved placing a summary of the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI and the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP III CPGs in all patient (>18 yr. charts for a period of three months. The JNC VI and NCEP III CPGs were also distributed to each Wayne State family medicine resident, and a copy of each CPG was placed in the preceptor's area of the involved clinics. Identical pre- and post- intervention questionnaires were administered to all residents concerning CPG knowledge and attitude. Results Post-intervention analysis failed to demonstrate a significant difference in CPG knowledge. A stastically significant post-intervention difference was found in only on attitude question. The barriers to CPG compliance were identified as 1 lack of CPG instruction; 2 lack of critical appraisal ability; 3 insufficient time; 4 lack of CPG accessibility; and 5 lack of faculty modeling. Conclusion This study demonstrated no significant post intervention changes in CPG knowledge, and only one question that reflected attitude change. Wider resident access to dedicated clinic time, increased faculty modeling, and the implementation of an electronic record/reminder system that uses a team-based approach are compliance factors that

  13. Development of the quality assessment model of EHR software in family medicine practices: research based on user satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Kralj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Family medicine practices (FMPs make the basis for the Croatian health care system. Use of electronic health record (EHR software is mandatory and it plays an important role in running these practices, but important functional features still remain uneven and largely left to the will of the software developers.Objective The objective of this study was to develop a novel and comprehensive model for functional evaluation of the EHR software in FMPs, based on current world standards, models and projects, as well as on actual user satisfaction and requirements.Methods Based on previous theoretical and experimental research in this area, we made the initial framework model consisting of six basic categories as a base for online survey questionnaire. Family doctors assessed perceived software quality by using a five-point Likert-type scale. Using exploratory factor analysis and appropriate statistical methods over the collected data, the final optimal structure of the novel model was formed. Special attention was focused on the validity and quality of the novel model.Results The online survey collected a total of 384 cases. The obtained results indicate both the quality of the assessed software and the quality in use of the novel model. The intense ergonomic orientation of the novel measurement model was particularly emphasised.Conclusions The resulting novel model is multiple validated, comprehensive and universal. It could be used to assess the user-perceived quality of almost all forms of the ambulatory EHR software and therefore useful to all stakeholders in this area of the health care informatisation. 

  14. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1 a recruitment page, 2 a summary page, and 3 a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27% enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps

  15. A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Mark; Mangold, Karen; Trainor, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship. The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course. Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p 4. A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills required for pediatric-related residencies was well received and led to improved performance of targeted skills and increased self-reported preparedness in many targeted domains. PMID:27014522

  16. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

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    Zhichao Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Auxin response factors (ARFs can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza. Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza.

  17. Quality evaluation and pattern recognition analyses of marker compounds from five medicinal drugs of Rutaceae family by HPLC/PDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing Tian; Kim, Eun Jung; Son, Kun Ho; Son, Jong Keun; Min, Byung Sun; Woo, Mi Hee

    2015-08-01

    To establish a standard of quality control and to identify different origins for the Rutaceae family [Citri Unshiu Peel (CU), Citri Unshiu Immature Peel (CI), Ponciri Immature Fructus (PI), Aurantii Immature Fructus (AI), and Aurantii Fructus (AU)], 13 standards including rutin (1), narirutin (2), naringin (3), hesperidin (4), neohesperidin (5), neoponcirin (6), poncirin (7), naringenin (8), isosinensetin (9), sinensetin (10), nobiletin (11), heptamethoxyflavone (12), and tangeretin (13) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/photo-diode array (PDA) analysis. A YMC ODS C18 (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) column was used and the ratio of mobile phases of water (A) and acetonitrile (B) delivered to the column for gradient elution was applied. This method was fully validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, stability, and robustness. The HPLC/PDA method was applied successfully to quantify 13 major compounds in the extracts of CU, CI, PI, AI, and AU. The pattern recognition analysis combined with LC chromatographic data was performed by repeated analysis of 27 reference samples in the above five Rutaceae oriental medicinal drugs. The established HPLC method was rapid and reliable for quantitative analysis and quality control of multiple components in five Rutaceae species with different origins.

  18. Predictors of Work-Family Role Conflict and Its Impact on Professional Women in Medicine, Engineering, and Information Technology in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoigwe, Anthonia Ginika; Low, Wah Yun; Noor, Siti Nurani Mohd

    2016-10-01

    This study examines work-family role conflict and the factors predicting it, with a sample of 173 professional women in engineering and information technology (IT) firms, including 2 hospitals-1 public and 1 private. Our findings show no significant difference in the level of work-family role conflict encountered by women across medicine, engineering, and IT, whereas hours of work, family responsibilities, job demand, and work role overload were significantly correlated with work-family role conflict. Multiple linear regression analysis indicates that only work role overload, family responsibilities, and hours of work significantly predicted 45.9% of work-family role conflict. This implies that working women are burdened by work demands, which invariably affects the work-family role conflict they experience and leads to deterioration of their occupational health. It is suggested that employers should create a flexible work schedule and establish family-friendly policies in the workplace to promote a healthy work-life balance for women in science careers.

  19. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  20. Developing and successfully implementing a competency-based portfolio assessment system in a postgraduate family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Contributing Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction in Family Medicine Service Clinics at Brooke Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-06

    physicians, Doctors of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.); physician assistants; or clinical nurse practitioners. Physicians, physician...treatment methods including spinal manipulation and the whole body concept and confer the Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) degree. After completion of...medical school, both Doctors of Medicine and Doctors of Osteopathy are licensed by their state boards and may become board certified in any medical

  2. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 2. Results: Primary care management and community orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    At the WONCA Europe conference 2009 the recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' was presented. It is a background paper and reference manual, providing advocacy of general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) in Europe. The Research Agenda summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the WONCA Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In this second article, the results for the core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' are presented. Though there is a large body of research on various aspects of 'primary care management', it represents a very scattered rather than a meta view. Many studies focus on care for specific diseases, the primary/secondary care interface, or the implications of electronic patient records. Cost efficiency or process indicators of quality are current outcomes. Current literature on community orientation is mainly descriptive, and focuses on either care for specific diseases, or specific patient populations, or on the uptake of preventive services. Most papers correspond poorly to the WONCA concept. For both core competencies, there is a lack of research with a longitudinal perspective and/or relevant health or quality of life outcomes as well as research on patients' preferences and education for organizational aspects of GP/FM.

  3. Postgraduate training for family medicine in a rural district hospital in South Africa: Appropriateness and sufficiency of theatre procedures as a sentinel indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawie Du Plessis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 2007, the postgraduate training of family physicians for South African district hospitals has been formalised. This training differs from European and North American programmes as up to 30% of the skills needed rely on district hospital surgical, obstetrics and anaesthetics procedures, particularly in rural areas, as outlined in the national unit standards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness and sufficiency of learning opportunities for these skills in a rural district hospital.Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was undertaken of the number and type of procedures performed in theatre for a 1-year period and compared with the required procedural skills stipulated in the national unit standards. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to analyse categorical data.Results: Three thousand seven hundred and forty-one procedures were performed during the study period. Anaesthesia was the most common procedure, followed by Caesarean section. There were adequate opportunities for teaching most core skills.Conclusions: Sufficient and appropriate learning opportunities exist for postgraduate family medicine training in all the core skills performed in a theatre according to the national unit standards.Keywords: Post Graduate Training, Family Medicine, Procedural Skills, Rural, District hospitals

  4. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Kołodziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wołoszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic

  5. Excellence in Family Paediatricians: the FIMP-MCRN (Medicines for Children Research Network becomes a member of ENPR-EMA (European Network of Paediatric Research at the European Medicines Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleone Ettore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the objectives of the Paediatric Regulation (EC No 1901/2006, is to foster high quality ethical research on medicinal products to be used in children. To achieve this objective, the EMA is responsible for developing a European paediatric network of existing national and European networks and centres with specific expertise in research and clinical trials relating to paediatric medicines. The purpose of this article is to disseminate knowledge of the structure and goals of ENPR-EMA and to highlight the cultural and organizational difficulties for its implementation. Following the publication of research quality requirements, a set of recognition criteria, which have to be fulfilled to become a member of ENPR-EMA were agreed. So far, 32 networks and centres (of 62 identified networks submitted self-assessment reports indicating whether or not they fulfill the agreed minimum criteria. Sixteen networks (26% of 62 identified networks fulfilled all minimum criteria and became therefore members of ENPR-EMA. The Family Paediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network (FIMP-MCRN, established with the aim of developing competence, infrastructure, networking and education for paediatric clinical trials, became member of the ENPR-EMA responding satisfactorily to all the points of the self-assessment report.

  6. Excellence in Family Paediatricians: the FIMP-MCRN (Medicines for Children Research Network) becomes a member of ENPR-EMA (European Network of Paediatric Research at the European Medicines Agency).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoleone, Ettore

    2011-01-19

    One of the objectives of the Paediatric Regulation (EC) No 1901/2006, is to foster high quality ethical research on medicinal products to be used in children. To achieve this objective, the EMA is responsible for developing a European paediatric network of existing national and European networks and centres with specific expertise in research and clinical trials relating to paediatric medicines. The purpose of this article is to disseminate knowledge of the structure and goals of ENPR-EMA and to highlight the cultural and organizational difficulties for its implementation.Following the publication of research quality requirements, a set of recognition criteria, which have to be fulfilled to become a member of ENPR-EMA were agreed. So far, 32 networks and centres (of 62 identified networks) submitted self-assessment reports indicating whether or not they fulfill the agreed minimum criteria. Sixteen networks (26% of 62 identified networks) fulfilled all minimum criteria and became therefore members of ENPR-EMA. The Family Paediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network (FIMP-MCRN), established with the aim of developing competence, infrastructure, networking and education for paediatric clinical trials, became member of the ENPR-EMA responding satisfactorily to all the points of the self-assessment report.

  7. Medizinstudierende Eltern – die Dichotomie der Erfahrungswelten [Parents Studying Medicine – the dichotomy of studying with a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iden, Kirstin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: In this article the personal study and life situation of parents who are also medical students at the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main is discussed. There is a special focus on the topics “studying with children” and “family-friendly university”, which have been present in discussions about university development and in the daily life of academics, especially during the last decade. The workgroup “Individual Student Services” at the medical faculty at the Goethe University tries to meet the necessities of the individual study courses and to support the study success with a new counselling and student service concept.Methods: The experience of parents studying medicine was recorded in semi-structured interviews (Date: April 2010, which were held as part of the sponsored pilot project on part-time medical studies (“Pilot Project Part-time Medical Studies”. Additionally, study results from the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main were integrated as well as a literature analysis.Results: It was found that the teaching demands and support services, which have been suggested and needed for years now, have been partially implemented and are without sufficient support at the faculty level to date. Thus the current situation of medical students with children is still difficult and seems a big challenge for everyone involved.Solution: As part of the “Individual Student Services” a new pilot project on part-time medical studies was established in November 2009. Only the use of new, unconventional and innovative ideas allows universities to adequately support the changing and heterogeneous student population and support them to successfully completing their medical studies.[german] Einleitung: In dem vorliegenden Artikel wird die persönliche Studien- und Lebenssituation von Studierenden mit Kindern am Fachbereich Medizin der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

  8. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most...

  9. Family medicine, 'La Herencia' and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-06-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban public and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on 'the family' in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as 'community genetics', including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba.

  10. Family medicine, ‘La Herencia’ and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-01-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban publics and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on ‘the family’ in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as ‘community genetics’, including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba. PMID:21239101

  11. [Gustav Klimt and the field of medicine. Painting of the medical faculty--relationship with the Zuckerkandl family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, D

    2007-09-01

    The art nouveau painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a cofounder of the Vienna Secession movement, was commissioned in 1894 to prepare three ceiling paintings for the Great Hall of the University of Vienna portraying the faculties of "Philosophy," "Medicine," and "Jurisprudence." After the first public presentations of these paintings starting in 1900 fierce protests erupted since the artist had not painted a historical allegory but rather had created a modern symbolic picture in the Secessionism style. The controversy over the so-called faculty paintings escalated to the point that in 1905 Klimt irrevocably distanced himself from the commission and bought back his pictures from the state. The paintings were later purchased by the Austrian Gallery and in 1943 placed in storage in Lower Austria at the Immendorf Castle where they were destroyed by a fire in May 1945 when the German troops withdrew. Besides Klimt's preliminary sketches, only black and white photographs of the three paintings now exist as well as a color reproduction of the section depicting Hygieia from the "Medicine" painting. Due to the public rejection of the faculty paintings, Gustav Klimt broke away from official government-commissioned art and focused on private clients from among Viennese society. One of these intensive associations was with the anatomist Emil Zuckerkandl and his wife Berta, who was very active in cultural affairs. During the dispute over the faculty paintings, Zuckerkandl was one of the few university professors who signed a petition in favor of retaining the paintings. His brother, the industrialist Victor Zuckerkandl, was one of the major collectors and patrons of Secessionist art. The third brother, the well-known urologist Otto Zuckerkandl (1861-1921), president of the Second and Third Congresses of the German Society of Urology in 1909 and 1911, was also in close contact with Klimt. A portrait of his wife Amalie was a work in progress between 1913 and 1917, but it remained

  12. Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age in family medicine clinics in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Arreola Laura del Pilar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico, inappropriate prescription of drugs with potential interactions causing serious risks to patient health has been little studied. Work in this area has focused mainly on hospitalized patients, with only specific drug combinations analyzed; moreover, the studies have not produced conclusive results. In the present study, we determined the frequency of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, who used Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS family medicine clinics. In addition, we aimed to identify the associated factors for these interactions. Methods We collected information on general patient characteristics, medical histories, and medication (complete data. The study included 624 ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, with non-malignant pain syndrome, who made ambulatory visits to two IMSS family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The patients received 7-day prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics. The potential interactions were identified by using the Thompson Micromedex program. Data were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The average number of prescribed drugs was 5.9 ± 2.5. About 80.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug-drug interactions and 3.8% of patients were prescribed drug combinations with interactions that should be avoided. Also, 64.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug disease interactions. The factors significantly associated with having one or more potential interactions included: taking 5 or more medicines (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR: 4.34, 95%CI: 2.76–6.83, patient age 60 years or older (adjusted OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.01–2.74 and suffering from cardiovascular diseases (adjusted OR: 7.26, 95% CI: 4.61–11.44. Conclusion The high frequency of prescription of drugs with potential drug interactions showed in

  13. The interpretation of the reasons for encounter ‘cough’ and ‘sadness’ in four international family medicine populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean K Soler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background This is a study of the relationships between common reasons for encounter and common diagnoses (episode titles within episodes of care in family practice populations in four countries.Method Participating family doctors recorded details of all their patient contacts in an EoC structure using the International Classification of Primary Care, including RfEs presented by the patient, and the FDs’ diagnostic labels. The relationships between RfEs and episode titles were studied using Bayesian methods.Results The RfE ‘cough’ is a strong, reliable predictor for the diagnoses ‘cough’, ‘acute bronchitis’, ‘URTI’ and ‘acute laryngitis/tracheitis’ and a less strong, but reliable predictor for ‘sinusitis’, ‘pneumonia’, ‘influenza’, ‘asthma’, ‘other viral diseases’, ‘whooping cough’, ‘chronic bronchitis’, ‘wheezing’ and ‘phlegm’. The absence of cough is a weak but reliable predictor to exclude a diagnosis of ‘cough’, ‘acute bronchitis’ and ‘tracheitis’. Its presence allows strong, reliable exclusion of the diagnoses ‘gastroenteritis’, ‘no disease’ and ‘health promotion/prevention’, and less strong exclusion of ‘adverse effects of medication’. The RfE ‘sadness’ is a strong, reliable predictor for the diagnoses ‘feeling sad/depressed’ and ‘depressive disorder’. It is a less strong, but reliable predictor of a diagnosis of ‘acute stress reaction’. The absence of sadness is a weak but reliable predictor to exclude the symptom diagnosis ‘feeling sad/depressed’. Its presence does not support the exclusion of any diagnosis.Conclusions We describe clinically and statistically significant diagnostic associations observed between the RfEs ‘cough’ and ‘sadness’, presenting as a new problem in family practice, and all the episode titles in ICPC.

  14. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 5: Needs and implications for future research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-12-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and highlights related needs and implications for future research and policy. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In three subsequent, articles the results for the six core competencies of the European Definition of GP/FM were presented. This article formulates the common aims for further research and appropriate research methodologies, based on the missing evidence and research gaps identified form the comprehensive literature review. In addition, implications of this research agenda for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers, research organizations, patients and policy makers are presented. The concept of six core competencies should be abandoned in favour of a model with four dimensions, including clinical, person related, community oriented and management aspects. Future research and policy should consider more the involvement and rights of patients; more attention should be given to how new treatments or technologies are effectively translated into routine patient care, in particular primary care. There is a need for a European ethics board. The promotion of GP/FM research demands a good infrastructure in each country, including access to literature and databases, appropriate funding and training possibilities.

  15. The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 3. Results: person centred care, comprehensive and holistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-06-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In a second article, the results for the two core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' were presented. This article reflects on the three core competencies, which deal with person related aspects of GP/FM, i.e. 'person centred care', 'comprehensive approach' and 'holistic approach'. Though there is an important body of opinion papers and (non-systematic) reviews, all person related aspects remain poorly defined and researched. Validated instruments to measure these competencies are lacking. Concerning patient-centredness, most research examined patient and doctor preferences and experiences. Studies on comprehensiveness mostly focus on prevention/care of specific diseases. For all domains, there has been limited research conducted on its implications or outcomes.

  16. Effects of traditional herbal medicine, Hwaotang, on atherosclerosis using the spontaneous familial hypercholesterolemia model, Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic rabbits and the venous thrombosis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Hwan; Hong, Mun-Yeob; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-10-01

    Hwaotang (HOT), a traditional Korean medicinal formulation, is a dried decoctum of a mixture of seven herbal medicines, consisting of Angelica gigantis Radix, Rehmanniae Radix, Paeoniae Radix, Ciniamomi Cortex, Cnidii Rhizoma, Persicae Semen and Carthami Flos. In the present study, the inhibitory effects and anti thrombic properties of HOT on the progression of atherosclerotic lesions were studied using the spontaneous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) model, Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic (KHC) rabbits and rats. Changes in blood chemistry, pathology and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation were measured in a control and HOT group. In the control group, the area of atheromatous plaques of the aorta progressed between week 12 (36.65%) and week 14 (46.22%). This progression of atherosclerotic lesions did not occur in the HOT-treated group after 12 (24.24%) and 14 (23.34%) weeks. Antioxidative effects on LDL were seen in the HOT in weeks 12 and 14. HOT improved the hypercholesterolemia in the KHC rabbits. On the other hand, HOT and five of the seven herbs, except Cnidii Rhizoma and Carthami Flos, inhibited the endotoxin-induced hepatic venous thrombosis in high cholesterol diet-treated rats. However, Ciniamomi Cortex showed a very weak inhibitory effect on the endotoxin-induced hepatic venous thrombosis. The extract also inhibited the endotoxin-induced decrease in blood platelets and fibrinogen, and endotoxin-induced increase in fibrin degradation products (FDP) on disseminated intravascular coagulation in normal rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that HOT has inhibitory effects on the development of atheromatous plaque formation in spontaneous FH rabbits. It is also suggested that the antioxidative effects of HOT on LDL led to the beneficial effects observed in this study. The protection by HOT and its herbs on the artificially induced ischemic infarction might be related to their inhibitory effects on disseminated intravascular coagulation

  17. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Tan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims: To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010–2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods: A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students’ educational experience of using this case. Results: Ninety five percent (130/137 of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127 increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001. The students’ self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001. Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as ‘Good to Excellent’, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions: The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

  18. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects.

  19. Association of common mental disorders and quality of life with the frequency of attendance in Slovenian family medicine practices: longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Rifel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most research on frequent attendance has been cross-sectional and restricted to one year attendance rates. A few longitudinal studies suggest that frequent attendance is self-limiting. Frequent attenders are more likely to have social and psychiatric problems, medically unexplained physical symptoms, chronic somatic diseases (especially diabetes and are prescribed more psychotropic medication and analgesics. RESEARCH QUESTION: To describe the attendance rates in a longitudinal study and to test if depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome, alcohol misuse and general quality of life are associated with frequent attendance in next two consecutive years. METHODS: 1118 consecutive family practice attendees, aged 18 to 75 years from randomly selected family medicine practices were recruited at baseline and followed up at 12 and 24 months. We identified frequent attenders in the top 10 centile within one year. Using a multivariate model, we ascertained if presence of common mental disorders and quality of life assessed at baseline in 2003 predict frequent attendance in 2004 and 2005. RESULTS: 40% of frequent attenders continue to be frequent attenders in the following year and 20% of the frequent attenders were so for the 24 month period. Lower physical scores on the SF-12 questionnaire were strongly associated with future frequent attendance at 12 and 24 months. There was a trend for people with greater than elementary school education to be less likely to become frequent attenders at both 12 and 24 months. For other variables these effects were less consistent. Presence of major depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome and alcohol misuse were not predictive of frequent attendance in the following two years. CONCLUSION: Low physical quality of life is strongly predictive of higher frequent attendance and similar finding was observed for people with lower educational level but further confirmatory research is required to

  20. An Analysis of the Degree of Importance of Plant Families in the Medicinal Ferns of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region%广西药用蕨类植物所在科的重要度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金标; 卢家仕; 黄敏; 宋日云

    2008-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the degree of importance of plant families in the medicinal ferns of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. A regression residual analysis was carried out on the number of medicinal ferns and the total number of ferns in each family for 56 fern families in the region. According to the residual values the 56 families were divided into 31 high use families and 25 low use families.%旨在确定广西药用蕨类植物所在各科的重要程度,用回归残差分析法对该地区56科蕨类植物中各科的植物种数和药用植物种数之间的关系进行了分析,根据残差值将56科分成31个高利用科和25个低利用科.

  1. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goertz Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits

  2. A nationwide postal survey on the perception of Malaysian public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists' (PERMFAMS) clinical performance, professional attitudes and research visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon-How; Yasin, Mazapuspavina Md; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan A; Hamzah, Zuhra; Ismail, Mastura; Ali, Norsiah; Bashah, Baizury; Mohd-Salleh, Noridah

    2015-01-01

    Perception of healthcare providers who worked with family medicine specialists (FMSs) could translate into the effectiveness of primary healthcare delivery in daily practices. This study examined perceptions of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) on FMSs at public health clinics throughout Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study in 2012-2013 using postal method targeting PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely health clinics, health offices and hospitals. A structured questionnaire was developed to assess PHCP's perception of FMS's clinical competency, safety practice, ethical and professional values, and research involvement. It consists of 37 items with Likert scale of strongly disagree (a score of 1) to strongly agree (a score of 5). Interaction and independent effect of the independent variables were tested and adjusted means score were reported. The participants' response rate was 58.0% (780/1345) with almost equal proportion from each of the three public healthcare facilities. There were more positive perceptions than negative among the PHCPs. FMSs were perceived to provide effective and safe treatment to their patients equally disregards of patient's social background. However, there were some concerns of FMSs not doing home visits, not seeing walk-in patients, had long appointment time, not active in scientific research, writing and publication. There were significant differences in perception based on a respondent's health care facility (p perceptions on FMSs across all the domains investigated. PHCPs from different health care facilities and frequency of encounter with FMSs had different perception. Practicing FMSs could improve on the critical service areas that were perceived to be important but lacking. FMSs might need further support in conducting research and writing for publication.

  3. Creating a family health history

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ginsburg GS, Willard HF, eds. Genomic and Personalized Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Academic Press; 2013:chap 26. Review Date 12/10/2016 Updated by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, ... Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, ...

  4. Gastroenterological Diseases and Family and Community Medicine Medicina de Família e Comunidade e doenças gastroenterológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Brunelli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: the Family Physician is a key figure in any health system that intends to follow the Primary Care Model defined at the Alma-Ata Conference in 1978. His actions are guided by commitment to the individual and focus on prevention and management of resources. His function is to diagnose and treat the most prevalent diseases until a more complex technology be required. The symptoms related to diseases of the digestive tract are very common complaints and as such part of the daily work of the general practitioner. Methods: A literature search for studies relating Family and Community Medicine (FCM and gastroenterological diseases published over the last 30 years in English, Spanish or Portuguese was conducted in the bibliographic databases Pub Med, Lilacs, and Cochrane library. FCM and Internal Medicine Text-books were consulted as well. Results: great part of cases of epigastric pain, retroesternal burning, rectal bleeding and diarrhea could be completely resolved by the family and community physician. He is also qualified for looking after patients with stabilized chronic gastroenterological diseases such as viral hepatitis. Conclusions: The greater part of cases of gastroenterological complaints brought to the general practice consultation need not to be referred to a specialist and can be resolved at Primary Care level. As a consequence the health system is optimized, specialist consultations become less time-consuming; the positive predictive value of diagnostic proofs increases and there is less possibility of error in the secondary and tertiary levels.

    O médico de família e comunidade é figura central em um sistema de saúde que pretende seguir o modelo de Atenção Primária à Saúde (APS, definido na conferência de Alma Ata, em 1978. Fazem parte das suas competências: comprometimento com a pessoa e enfoque em prevenção e gestão de recursos. É sua função diagnosticar e tratar os quadros mais prevalentes tendo

  5. Are patients who use alternative medicine dissatisfied with orthodox medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, W J; Spykerboer, J E; Thong, Y H

    1985-05-13

    Approximately 45% of asthmatic families and 47% of non-asthmatic families had consulted an alternative-medicine practitioner at some time. The most popular form of alternative medicine was chiropractic (21.1% and 26.4%, respectively), followed by homoeopathy/naturopathy (18.8% and 12.7%, respectively), acupuncture (9.4% and 10.9%, respectively), and herbal medicine (4.7% and 6.4%, respectively), while the remainder (20.3% and 11.8% respectively) was distributed among iridology, osteopathy, hypnosis, faith healing and megavitamin therapy. More families were satisfied with orthodox medicine (87.1% and 93.6%, respectively) than with alternative medicine (84.2% and 75.1%, respectively). Crosstabulation analysis of pooled data both from asthma and from non-asthma groups showed that 76.4% were satisfied both with orthodox and with alternative medicine, and 16.4% were satisfied with orthodox, but not with alternative, medicine. In contrast, only 2.7% were dissatisfied with orthodox medicine and satisfied with alternative medicine (chi2 = 9.33; P less than 0.01). These findings do not support the view that patients who use alternative medicine are those who are disgruntled with orthodox medicine.

  6. Relationship between working through information and communication technologies after hours and well-being among Chinese dual-earner couples:A spillover-crossover perspective%工作性通信工具使用与双职工夫妻的幸福感:基于溢出-交叉效应的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红宇; 谢菊兰; 唐汉瑛; 申传刚; 张晓翔

    2016-01-01

    People are working around the clock communicating with one another on the electronic platform even after work. We examined the outcomes of Working through Information and Communication Technologies after Hours (W_ICTs), and attempted to delineate the mechanism of W_ICTs. Findings of previous researches on W_ICTs’ were inconsistent in terms of their impacts on people’s work and life, with some being positive while others being negative. This obscured people’s general perceptions of the possible effects of W_ICTs’, thus challenging our recommendation on the management of W_ICTs. Furthermore, previous studies on the mechanism of W_ICTs focused more on the impact on the individuals or the organizations, without considering the effect on individuals’ spouses. Most previous studies were also limited in the sense that they had been conducted in the western cultural context, with a lack of localized research in the Chinese culture. The present study based on the Spillover-Crossover Effect among dual-earner Chinese couples, therefore, is intended to fill the gap by investigating the positive and negative effects of W_ICTs on the well-being of both husbands and wives in China. The study surveyed 278 Chinese dual-earner couples who had fixed working hours. They completed the W_ICTs scale, the work-to-family conflict scale, the work-to-family facilitation scale, the social undermining scale, the work satisfaction scale and the marital satisfaction scale. In the study, ‘whether the couples have children under the age of 18’ and ‘whether the couples’ parents help with the children’s housework’ were treated as control variables. The structural equation model, the dyadic data analysis method, and the bias corrected bootstrap method were used to examine the research hypotheses. The results showed that: (1) W_ICTs was positively related to work-to-family conflict and work-to-family facilitation; (2) work-to-family conflict was positively related to spouses

  7. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  8. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  9. Unique Family Living Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be treated with medicine?ResourcesAmerican Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Divorce and Children Last Updated: January 2017 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: Adolescent, child, Psychiatric and Psychologic Emotional Well-Being, Family ...

  10. An Analysis of Primary Care Provider Productivity in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-08

    are shown in Table 2. Table 2 MEPRS Codes for the DFCM Clinics in the Analysis MEPRS Code Clinic MEPRS Code Clinic BGAV TMHC ADULT BGAN MHC BDAV TMHC...BHC ADULT) 282 22.52 47.60 BGAN (MHC) 312 24.92 72.52 BGAV (TMHC ADULT) 344 27.48 100.00 Total 1252 100.00 The Department of Family and Community...has over 6,000 enrolled (32% Active Duty, 37% Active Duty Family Member, 31% Retirees/Retirees Family Members). Monroe Health Clinic ( BGAN ) averages

  11. Health and medical education - going back to the way Family Medicine Saúde e educação médica ? voltando ao caminho pela Medicina de Família

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Dala Bernardina Dalla

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The current health’s conceptions and health education, still conformed in XVI’s Century. Flexner report, was the most important document, in the earlier XX’s Century, it’s define the definitive hospitals incorporation as the axle of the learning and the practical medicine. Today there are some ways to break the distance in the patients and medical relations, as well as the rescue of the natural environment of cure, as the family medicine, who ayms the individual and its family attention but not only its illnesses.

    As concepções atuais da saúde e da educação em saúde, começaram a se conformar ainda no século XVI. No século XX considera – se como marcante a influência do relatório Flexner para definitiva incorporação do hospital como eixo do aprendizado e da prática médica. Entre o caminhos trilhados para romper o distanciamento na relação médico – paciente, bem como o resgate do ambiente natural de cura, destaca – se a medicina de família , que busca a atenção ao indivíduo e não somente às suas doenças.

  12. Practical occupational medicine in "practice"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann Larsen, Anders; Schmidt, Jan; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    In Denmark, the practice of occupational medicine tends to be carried out by specialists in occupational medicine and less so by family physicians. The provision of health service to workers is therefore limited. This constraint may also apply in other developed countries and even more in countries...... with few occupational health resources. This Editorial argues that family physicians are indeed in a position where they can make a major positive difference for their working patients and for the enterprises where they work. Without specialist knowledge in occupational medicine, the family physician......’s empiric knowledge in combination with a narrative approach to the patient permits the contribution from family medicine not only with regard to diagnosis and treatment, but also relating to actions targeted to optimize the patient’s future accommodation at work as well as to protect other similarly...

  13. Sodelovanje med zdravniki družinske medicine in specialisti psihiatri pri zdravljenju bolnikov z depresijo: Cooperation between family practitioners and psychiatrist in treating patients with depression:

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: By 2015, mental illness will become the greatest healthcare burdenin the world. Within the community, people with depression are most often treated by family doctors. Treatment for depression also includes psychiatric specialists, with varying cooperation between the primary care provider and the psychiatrist. This studyćs goal was to define cooperation between family doctors and psychiatric specialists when treating patients withdepression. Methods: In 2009 six focus groups were ...

  14. O impacto da MFC na saúde do Brasil The impact of Family and Community Medicine upon health in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inez Padula Anderson

    2010-11-01

    de Medicina de Família e Comunidade, em maio de 2008, na bela cidade de Fortaleza, os autores possam apresentar esses dados, dando mais um passo no sentido do reconhecimento e da valorização de nossa especialidade e da Atenção Primária à Saúde. Referência: 1. The Domain of Family Practice: Scope, Role, and Function. William R. Phillips, MD, MPH; Deborah G. Haynes, MD (Dr Phillips; and Preferred Medical Associates Northeast, Wichita, Ks (Dr Haynes. From the Department of Family Medicine, University of  Washington. The Keystone Papers: Formal Discussion Papers From Keystone III.[s.d.]; 33(4: 273-277.

  15. Evaluación nutricional comparada del adulto mayor en consultas de medicina familiar Compared nutritional assessment for older adults at family medicine settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Calderón Reyes

    2010-08-01

    adults, via Mini Nutritional Assessment with those obtained via evaluation of caloric ingest and anthropometric, biochemical and immunological parameters at family medicine centers. Population and methods: The nutritional status was assessed in 153 older adults, 93 men and 64 women, whose received medical attention at a primary care unit, the age average was 69.66 ± 7.94 years old. The nutritional assessment obtained with Mini Nutritional assessment was compared to those obtained via biochemical and immunological parameters (hemoglobin, serum total proteins, albumin, cholesterol and lymphocytes and anthropometric parameters (size, weight, body mass index. Resultados: Body Mass Index (BMI was 26.96 ± 5.1 kg/m². Once the adults were evaluated with the MNA questionnaire, malnourishment was found in 47 patients (29.9%, risk of malnutrition in 86 patients (54.8%, and no risk for malnutrition 24 patients (15.3%. The MNA questionnaire was the strongest instrument to assess the nutritional status in older adults and to predict the risk of malnutrition in such population, (sensibility =96%, specificity= 98%, positive predictive value=97% and negative predictive value= 88%. The most important relations founded among variables to assess the nutritional status in older adults were the following: MNA-BMI (c² = 51.314 con gl = 6, p < 0.001; MNA-serum total proteins (c² = 46.989, gl = 2; p < 0.001; BMI-serum albumin (c² = 37.508, gl = 3; p < 0.001; MNA-Daily Carbone-hidrate ingestion (c² = 21.50, gl = 4; p < 0.001; MNA-Daily lipids ingestion (c² = , gl = 2; p < 0.001. Conclusion: The MNA predicts in opportune form the risk of malnutrition and the state of malnutrition the older adults previously to anthropometric, biochemical and immunological parameters. We recommend to use it, to do nutritional evaluation of older adults one time a year and in those adults in whom the risk of malnutrition or malnutrition have been detected, we recommend to complete the nutritional evaluation

  16. Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade RBMFC

    2010-11-01

    responder pela autoria dos trabalhos, tendo como justificada a sua participação de forma significativa no trabalho para assumir responsabilidade pública pelo seu conteúdo. Deverão, portanto, assinar a seguinte declaração de autoria e de responsabilidade:“Declaro que participei de forma significativa na construção e formação deste estudo ou da análise e interpretação dos dados, como também na redação deste texto, tendo, enquanto autor, responsabilidade pública pelo conteúdo deste. Revi a versão final deste trabalho e aprovo para ser submetido à publicação. Declaro que nem o presente trabalho nem outro com conteúdo semelhante de minha autoria foi publicado ou submetido à apreciação do Conselho Editorial de outra publicação.”Artigos com mais de um autor deverão conter uma exposição sobre a contribuição específica de cada um no trabalho. Os autores de cada artigo receberão, após a publicação de seu trabalho, três exemplares da revista em que o seu estudo foi publicado.Ética em pesquisaCom relação às pesquisas iniciadas após janeiro de 1997, nas quais exista a participação de seres humanos nos termos do inciso II.2 da Resolução 196/ 96 do Conselho Nacional de Saúde (“pesquisa que, individual ou coletivamente, envolva o ser humano de forma direta ou indireta, em sua totalidade ou partes dele, incluindo o manejo de informações ou materiais”, sempre que pertinente, deve ser declarado no texto que o trabalho foi aprovado pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa em Seres Humanos.Os trabalhos devem ser enviados para:Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade - SBMFCCorrespondênciaRua 28 de Setembro, 44 sala 804Rio de Janeiro - RJCep: 20551-031Tel/fax: 21 2264-5117Endereço eletrônico:rbmfc@sbmfc.org.brThe Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this

  17. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  18. Folk Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lead Poisoning Prevention Training Center (HHLPPTC) Training Tracks Folk Medicine Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Jump ... products Lead has been found in some traditional (folk) medicines used by East Indian, Indian, Middle Eastern, ...

  19. Use of Medicinal Plants of District Bannu in Unani Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahzeb

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research work was carried out during 2012 in district Bannu to study the use of medicinal plants in Unani medicine. A total of 35 Unani medicines were reported and arranged systematically along with name of product, available form, company name, name of the plants/parts used in the drugs, family name and purpose of uses. During the research it was found that most of the members of Lamiaceae, Asteraceae and Rhamnaceae are used in these medicines. Plants which were used commonly in these medicines in one form or the other are Ziziphus jujuba, Foeniculum vulgare, Solanum nigrum, Ocimum cannum and Zingber officinale. It was noted that these products are mostly available in syrup form, rarely in tablets form (Hab –khoom Safa, Mensorine, Scony Tablets and one only one product in dry powder (Supari Pak. It is generally believed that these medicines have no side effect. Interestingly one medicine is suggested for many diseases as per the given instructions in the medicine pack. It was also noted that the manufacturers of these medicines are mostly not registered that’s why incomplete addresses along with the wrongly spellings plant name given on the medicine packs. The main purpose of the research was to identify and enlist the plants systematically used in these medicines.

  20. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process.

  1. Leguminosae (Fabaceae in Tribal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwani Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available According to Sushruta, no plant in this world is useless. A large number of crude drugs used in Ayurvedic system employ plants of family Fabaceae. The family Fabaceae popularly known as legumes, is the third largest order of seed-plants containing about 600 genera with 12,000 speices. All the three subfamilies of Fabaceae have been given the status of family and hence they will be treated here as distinct families. Details of medicinal plants of these families and their uses are presented here.

  2. After-Hours Science: Microchips and Onion Dip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Steve

    1984-01-01

    Computer programs were developed for a science center nutrition exhibit. The exhibit was recognized by the National Science Teachers Association Search for Excellence in Science Education as an outstanding science program. The computer programs (Apple II) and their use in the exhibit are described. (BC)

  3. Preventive and Community Medicine in Primary Care. Teaching of Preventive Medicine Vol. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, William H., Ed.

    This monograph is the result of a conference on the role of preventive and community medicine in primary medical care and education. The following six papers were presented at the conference: (1) Roles of Departments of Preventive Medicine; (2) Competency-Based Objectives in Preventive Medicine for the Family Physician; (3) Preventive Medicine…

  4. [Expedition medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlagić, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Expedition and wildeness medicine is a term that combines rescue medicine, sport medicine as well as more specific branches as polar or high altitude medicine. It is being intensively studied both at the reaserch institutes and on expeditions. Ophtalmologists are concentrated on the reaserch of HARH (High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhage), neurologists on HACE reaserch (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), psychologists are developing tests to decsribe cognitive functions and many physicians are being trained to work in extreme enviroment. The result of all this effort are numerous new findings in pathophysiology and therapy of altitude illness, increased security on expedition and further development of expeditionism.

  5. 建设以全科医生为核心的中国家庭医学服务诊所的探讨%Setup of General Practitioner-led Family Medicine Clinics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国平; 牛丽娟; 王家骥

    2016-01-01

    2009年国家新医改方案确定了建设中国基本医疗卫生服务制度, 最终达到全国居民人人享有基本医疗卫生服务的宏伟计划. 建设结构合理、 覆盖城乡医疗卫生服务体系的基础是建设好基层医疗卫生机构, 即农村乡镇卫生院和城市社区卫生服务中心, 完善高效规范的运行机制. 加强基层医疗卫生人才队伍建设, 特别是正规 (5+3) 全科医生的培养, 是着力提高基层医疗卫生机构服务水平和质量的重要环节. 本文根据发达国家的成熟经验结合中国目前的现实情况和将来的发展方向提出建设以全科医生为核心, 具有中国特色的规范化家庭医学服务诊所 ( Family Medicine Clinic , FMC) 的概念、 原则和方法. 认为创建合理有效的基层医疗服务运行机制和建立以高质量全科主治医生为核心团队的服务体系是成功建设中国基本医疗卫生服务制度的关键.%In 2009 Chinese government promulgated an ambitious plan to establish a primary healthcare system and to provide universal coverage for all 1.3 billion residents.The foundation for building an accessible , high quality and efficient primary health care system is to set up rural township hospitals and urban community health centers with a standardized and efficient performance mechanism.Building up a well trained primary care workforce -general practitioners (5+3) to practice in rural and urban communities is crucial for providing high quality care for all residents .This article described the concept , principles and methods for the setup of general practitioner -led family medicine clinic ( FMC ) in China by incorporating successful models from other countries into China′s current and future context in primary health care development .A dynamic , well performing family medicine clinic with attending general practitioner -led teams to provide high quality care is pivotal for the success in China′s primary health care

  6. Case reports 1964, medicine: infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in four siblings. Retinopathy and keratopathy due to chloroquine. The first instance of hemoglobin E in a Japanese family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, R.E.; Hamilton, H.B.; Hinds, M.J.A.; Slavin, R.E.; Kamata, Nanao; Shibata, Susumu; Miller, R.J.; Phair, J.P.; Kasahara, Masayuki; Shibata, Susumu

    1964-06-18

    This document contains 3 reports. In the first report four siblings are presented who had infantile pyloric stenosis unequivocally demonstrated when pyloromyotomy was performed in the early neonatal period. Their father had symptoms of stenosis as an infant but he was treated medically and it cannot be stated with certainty that he had the disease. Blood groups, determined for the four children and their parents, were not unusual. Chromosome karyotypes, obtained from peripheral blood cultures, were apparently normal. In the second report, a case study of a patient exhibiting side effects due to chloroquine used in the treatment of lupus vulgaris is presented. In the third report, in a survey for hemoglobinopathies in Nagasaki, Japan four members in two generations of a Japanese family were found to have an abnormal hemoglobin, which on detailed chemical analyses was demonstrated to be hemoglobin E. The question of prior introduction of the gene into Japan from Southeast Asia versus independent mutation is briefly discussed. 70 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  7. [Sport medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Yoram

    2012-02-01

    It is only since the late 20th century that Sport and Exercise Medicine has emerged as a distinct entity in health care. In Israel, sports medicine is regulated by a State Law and a sport physician is certified after graduating a structured program. In the past, sports medicine was related to the diagnosis and treatment of injuries encountered by top athletes. In recent years, the scope of sport medicine has broadened to reflect the awareness of modern society of the dangers of physical inactivity. In this perspective the American College of Sport Medicine (ACSM) recently launched a program--"Exercise is Medicine", to promote physical activity in order to improve health and well-being and prevention of diseases through physical activity prescriptions. This program is from doctors and healthcare providers, adjusted to the patient or trainee. The sport physician does not replace a medical specialist, but having a thorough understanding about the etiology of a sport-related injury enables him to better focus on treatment and prevention. Therefore, Team Physicians in Elite Sport often play a role regarding not only the medical care of athletes, but also in the physiological monitoring of the athlete and correcting aberrations, to achieve peak physical performance. The broad spectrum of issues in sport and exercise medicine cannot be completely covered in one issue of the Journal. Therefore, the few reports that are presented to enhance interest and understanding in the broad spectrum of issues in sports and exercise medicine are only the tip of the iceberg.

  8. Social class variation in medicine use among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, Bjørn E; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Due, Pernille

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about social determinants of adolescents' medicine use. The objective was to analyse the association between the family's social class and adolescents' use of medicine for headache, stomachache, difficulties in getting to sleep, and nervousness.......Little is known about social determinants of adolescents' medicine use. The objective was to analyse the association between the family's social class and adolescents' use of medicine for headache, stomachache, difficulties in getting to sleep, and nervousness....

  9. Music therapy in palliative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, L M; Huston, M J; Nelson, K A; Walsh, D; Steele, A L

    2001-05-01

    A partnership between The Cleveland Clinic Foundation and The Cleveland Music School Settlement has resulted in music therapy becoming a standard part of the care in our palliative medicine inpatient unit. This paper describes a music therapy program and its impact on patients, their families, and staff. A service delivery model is suggested for implementation and integration of music therapy within palliative medicine. Specific music therapy interventions, evaluation and documentation techniques are also mentioned. A description of patient and family responses to music therapy, staff satisfaction, and effectiveness of interventions is presented.

  10. Genomic medicine implementation: learning by example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marc S

    2014-03-01

    Genomic Medicine is beginning to emerge into clinical practice. The National Human Genome Research Institute's Genomic Medicine Working Group consists of organizations that have begun to implement some aspect of genomic medicine (e.g., family history, systematic implementation of Mendelian disease program, pharmacogenomics, whole exome/genome sequencing). This article concisely reviews the working group and provides a broader context for the articles in the special issue including an assessment of anticipated provider needs and ethical, legal, and social issues relevant to the implementation of genomic medicine. The challenges of implementation of innovation in clinical practice and the potential value of genomic medicine are discussed.

  11. A Methodological Strategy for the Family Health Course in General Internal Medicine Residency Estrategia metodológica para el módulo salud familiar en la residencia Medicina General Integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Aurelia San Juan Bosch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The continuous improvement of the educational process is one of the permanent challenges of medical education in Cuba. When dealing particularly with family medicine it must be ensured that physicians are always getting a better clinical approach to the management of families, since this is one of the key areas that have been identified as problematic in professional practices. Objective: To design a methodological strategy for the improvement of educational activities in the Family Health Course of the General Internal Medicine Residency. Method: A development research, conducted at the University of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos, from November 2005 to January 2007 is presented. Document analysis and validation by expert criteria were also implemented. Results: For each of the four themes that make up this course, the following aspects are stated: teaching organization, length, contents, activity objectives, methodological guidelines to implement these activities, assessment proposals for some of them and some literature. Conclusions: The design of educational activities, with emphasis on actual or simulated medical practice, could help improving the quality of the teaching process. In addition, following the logical structure of activities, teachers can develop similar proposals to address other health problems according to the different learning needs.Fundamento: El perfeccionamiento permanente del proceso docente educativo, es uno de los retos permanentes de la Educación Médica en Cuba. La medicina familiar, en particular, debe lograr que los médicos tengan cada vez mejor actitud clínica en el manejo de las familias, por constituir una de las áreas claves en las cuales se han determinado deficiencias en la actuación profesional. Objetivo: Diseñar una estrategia metodológica para el perfeccionamiento de

  12. COPD Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Treatment & Programs Medications COPD Medications COPD Medications Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer ... control the symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Most people with COPD take long-acting medicine ...

  13. Medicine Man

    OpenAIRE

    Paola, Frederick Adolf

    2012-01-01

    It becomes imperative that our doctors bring to the practice of medicine a true scientific perspective; it may be just as important that those of us doing biomedical research try to learn more of what doctors know.

  14. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for ... administered by inhalation, by oral ingestion, or by direct injection into an organ. The mode of tracer ...

  15. Network medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune

    2008-01-01

    for new therapeutic intervention. We argue that by targeting the architecture of aberrant signaling networks associated with cancer and other diseases new therapeutic strategies can be implemented. Transforming medicine into a network driven endeavour will require quantitative measurements of cell...... signaling processes; we will describe how this may be performed and combined with new algorithms to predict the trajectories taken by a cellular system either in time or through disease states. We term this approach, network medicine....

  16. Medicinal Moves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine is becoming a new source of growth in China-Africa trade LIU Tao never expected that his traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) products would be so warmly welcomed at the annual Canton Fair last year.His surprise came after a large number of African businessmen expressed a keen interest in importing the products.That knowledge left a broad smile on his face.

  17. Integrative Medicine in a Preventive Medicine Residency: A Program for the Urban Underserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berz, Jonathan P B; Gergen Barnett, Katherine A; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    The Preventive Medicine Residency Program collaborated with the Department of Family Medicine's Program for Integrative Medicine and Health Disparities at Boston Medical Center to create a new rotation for preventive medicine residents starting in autumn 2012. Residents participated in integrative medicine group visits and consults, completed an online curriculum in dietary supplements, and participated in seminars all in the context of an urban safety net hospital. This collaboration was made possible by a federal Health Resources and Services Administration grant for integrative medicine in preventive medicine residencies and helped meet a need of the program to increase residents' exposure to clinical preventive medicine and integrative health clinical skills and principles. The collaboration has resulted in a required rotation for all residents that continues after the grant period and has fostered additional collaborations related to integrative medicine across the programs.

  18. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of ... limitations of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  1. Meiotic analysis of the germoplasm of three medicinal species from Asteraceae family Análise meiótica do germoplasma de três espécies medicinais da família Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Olkoski

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic characterization was carried out on 12 accessions from Aster squamatus (Spreng. Hieron., Pterocaulon polystachyum DC, and Solidago microglossa DC by studying their meiotic behavior and pollen viability. These species are from the Asteraceae family, native to Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, and are important for medicinal use. Young inflorescences with four accessions of each species were collected, fixed in ethanol-acetic acid (3:1, and conserved in ethanol 70% until use. The method used was that of squashing the anthers and coloring with acetic orcein 2%. Meiosis was regular in all accessions, presenting chromosomal associations preferentially bivalent, where n=10 was found for Aster squamatus and n=9 for Pterocaulon polystachyum, and Solidago microglossa. The studied accessions presented a Meiotic Index (MI that varied from 65% to 87% in Aster squamatus, 85% to 92% in Pterocaulon polystachyum, and 64% to 92% in Solidago microglossa, indicating meiotic stability, although irregularities appeared during the cellular division. The pollen viability estimative was high in all studied accessions. These results indicate that the studied species can be included in future studies of genetic breeding.Foi realizada a caracterização citogenética de doze acessos de Aster squamatus, Pterocaulon polystachyum e Solidago microglossa, espécies da família Asteraceae, nativas do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, por meio do estudo do comportamento meiótico e da viabilidade polínica, que possuem grande importância para uso medicinal. Inflorescências jovens de quatro acessos de cada espécie foram fixadas em álcool-ácido acético (3:1 e conservadas em álcool 70% até o uso. O método utilizado foi o de esmagamento de anteras e a coloração com orceína acética 2%. A meiose foi regular em todos os acessos, apresentando associações cromossômicas preferencialmente em bivalentes, encontrando-se n=10 para Aster squamatus e n=9 para Pterocaulon

  2. Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

  3. Social class variation in medicine use among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, Bjørn E; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Due, Pernille

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about social determinants of adolescents' medicine use. The objective was to analyse the association between the family's social class and adolescents' use of medicine for headache, stomachache, difficulties in getting to sleep, and nervousness. METHODS: Cross...... social classes were: medicine for headache 1.35 (1.11-1.65), medicine for stomachache 1.41 (1.08-1.84), medicine for difficulties in getting to sleep 2.00 (1.30-3.08), and medicine for nervousness 3.22 (1.87-5.56). CONCLUSION: Symptom-adjusted medicine use in a representative sample of Danish adolescents...

  4. Educational Competitions of the Family Doctor in their Acting as Tutor in the Career of Medicine Competencias docentes del médico de familia en su desempeño como tutor en la carrera de Medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de la Caridad Lorenzo López

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: for the identification of a group of competitions characteristic of the educational work of the Family doctors that you/they act as tutors in the formative scenarios of the Primary Attention of Health in University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate. Objective: to identify the educational main competitions of the doctors of the family like tutors in the career of Medicine, in the Area II of the municipality of Cienfuegos. Method: pedagogic investigation of descriptive type in the mark of the medical education that looked for to define the group of educational basic competitions, what can favor a pedagogic management of more quality in the medical clinics as formative scenario of University Policlínico Cecilio Ruíz of Zárate during the year 2010. Results: 61,5% of our tutors has more than 10 years of medical formation; more than the half, their 73.1% is not categorized, 84.6% is specialist of general integral medicine, but of the half they received the preparation shop for tutors and 96.2% they consider the basic competitions as very important. Conclusion: deficiencies exist in the way of the tutor's performance for categorized personnel's lack, pedagogic scarce preparation and the assistance load of the professors in the primary attention of health.Fundamento: es importante la identificación de un grupo de competencias propias de la labor docente de los médicos de familia, que actúan como tutores en los escenarios formativos en la Atención Primaria de Salud. Objetivo: identificar las competencias docentes principales de los médicos de la familia, que se desempeñan como tutores en la carrera de Medicina, en el policlínico Área II del municipio de Cienfuegos. Método: investigación pedagógica de tipo descriptiva, en el que buscaba definir el grupo de competencias docentes básicas (acad

  5. [Medicinal cannabis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meersch, H; Verschuere, A P; Bottriaux, F

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical grade cannabis is available to Dutch patients from public pharmacies in the Netherlands. The first part of this paper reviews the pharmaceutical and pharmacological properties of medicinal cannabis. Detailed information about its composition and quality, potential applications, methods of administration, adverse reactions, drug interactions and safety during pregnancy or breastfeeding are given. The second part deals with the legal aspects of dispensing medicinal cannabis through pharmacies in view of the Belgian and Dutch legislation. The last part discusses the present Belgian regulation about the possession of cannabis.

  6. Family medicine obstetrics: pregnancy and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnisch, Jean M; Harnisch, Patricia H; Harnisch, David R

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses pregnancy and nutrition in 3 main timeframes, the prepregnancy nutritional health evaluation, nutrition during pregnancy, and nutrition during the puerperium, and also includes comments on nutrition and lactation. This article begins with a brief review of the risks of obesity (increased body mass index [BMI]) and anorexia (decreased BMI), with special attention to these undesired conditions during pregnancy, followed by a section on nutrients other than calories. Information on body weight, minerals, and vitamins during pregnancy is reviewed. This article ends with information on nutrition in the postpartum period.

  7. [Teacher's perfomance assessment in Family Medicine specialization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Adrián; Gómez-Clavelina, Francisco J; Hernández-Torres, Isaías; Flores-Hernández, Fernando; Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: en México no hay una evaluación sistemática del desempeño docente en las especializaciones médicas, lo que reduce la posibilidad de identificación de prácticas educativas adecuadas, su mejora y reconocimiento. El estudio pretende analizar la opinión de los residentes acerca de las actividades docentes de los profesores-tutores responsables del curso de especialización en medicina familiar, y valorar la fiabilidad y validez del instrumento aplicado en línea. Método: estudio observacional y transversal, la población de estudio fueron setenta y ocho profesores titulares de medicina familiar de la residencia médica de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México evaluados por 734 residentes. Se utilizó un cuestionario anónimo de evaluación del desempeño docente por opinión del residente, integrado por 37 enunciados y 5 dimensiones con una escala de respuesta tipo Likert. Se utilizó estadística descriptiva e inferencial (t de Student, ANOVA de un factor y análisis factorial). Resultados: los residentes opinaron que el desempeño docente en general es aceptable, con una media de 4.25 ± 0.93, la dimensión con mayor puntaje fue la de metodología con 4.34 ± 0.92 en contraste con la dimensión de evaluación con la menor media de 4.16 ± 1.04. Conclusiones: los profesores de la especialización tienen un desempeño aceptable según la opinión de los residentes. El instrumento de evaluación en línea reúne los criterios de validez y confiabilidad.

  8. Tibetan traditional medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Tibetan medicine companies in T.A.R can manufacture more than 360 Tibetan patent medicines. There are 18 Tibetan medicine factories in Tibet, and total out value exceeds 3 billion yuan. 24 kinds of Tibetan patent medicines have been incorporated into State Fundamental Medicine List, in which 14 Tibetan patent medicines are listed in national protected traditional medicine category.

  9. The family Asteraceae: General introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. J. Herman

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The family Asteraceae (the daisy family is probably the largest plant family in the world. It is cosmopolitan in distribution and is economically important as many members are used for food, medicinal purposes, grazing for stock, or ornamentals, while some are troublesome weeds or poisonous to animals. The ‘flower ’is actually a collection of flowers grouped together to form a capitulum.

  10. Familial risk factors in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, Michael; Xue Ming; Parikh, Amisha

    2007-05-01

    Familial history risk factors in relation to autism were examined in a cohort of 164 autistic children referred to The Autism Center at New Jersey Medical School-University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, over a 2-year period (2001-2003). Information related to familial history was obtained from each family and reviewed by a clinician. It is shown that these families carry a higher overall burden of psychiatric and developmental illnesses compared to reported national levels. These families also carry a relatively high incidence of medical disorders, independently of developmental and psychiatric disorders. This work supports the underlying presence of genetic factors in the etiology of autism.

  11. Predictive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boenink, Marianne; Have, ten Henk

    2015-01-01

    In the last part of the twentieth century, predictive medicine has gained currency as an important ideal in biomedical research and health care. Research in the genetic and molecular basis of disease suggested that the insights gained might be used to develop tests that predict the future health sta

  12. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...

  13. Medicinal Mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindequist, U.; Won Kim, H.; Tiralongo, E.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Since beginning of mankind nature is the most important source of medicines. Bioactive compounds produced by living organisms can be used directly as drugs or as lead compounds for drug development. Besides, the natural material can be used as crude drug for preparation of powder or extracts. Plants

  14. Sports Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2004-01-01

    Sports medicine has become one of the biggest and fastest growing medical fields in recent years. That is because sports have become a major part of most societies. As work becomes more stressful (紧张的,压力重

  15. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  16. Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... your outlook on the future. Friends and adult family members The effects of cancer on your relationships ...

  17. Dissolved families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The situation in the family preceding a family separation is studied here, to identify risk factors for family dissolution. Information registers covering prospective statistics about health aspects, demographic variables, family violence, self-destructive behaviour, unemployment, and the spousal...

  18. Medicinal plants sold at the El Rio Market, Camaguey, Cuba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godinez-Caraballo, D.; Volpato, G.

    2008-01-01

    Information regarding medicinal plants sold in the El Rio Market, Camaguey, Cuba, revealed 184 species belonging to 69 vascular plant families. The most important family was Fabaceae s.l. with 13 species, followed by Lamiaceae with 12, and Asteraceae with 8. More than 90 general medicinal indication

  19. Addiction Medicine in Canada: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Guebaly, Nady; Crockford, David; Cirone, Sharon; Kahan, Meldon

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, the qualification of physicians is the jurisdiction of the College of Family Physicians and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Colleges have promoted the training of "generalists" in family medicine and "sophisticated generalists" among the traditional specialties, and the development of subspecialties…

  20. Addiction Medicine in Canada: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Guebaly, Nady; Crockford, David; Cirone, Sharon; Kahan, Meldon

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, the qualification of physicians is the jurisdiction of the College of Family Physicians and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Colleges have promoted the training of "generalists" in family medicine and "sophisticated generalists" among the traditional specialties, and the development of subspecialties has not been…

  1. Pregnancy and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not all medicines are safe to take when you are pregnant. Some medicines can harm your baby. That includes over-the- ... care provider before you start or stop any medicine. Not using medicine that you need may be ...

  2. Managing Your Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems & Solutions for Being Active - FAQs About Physical Activity Managing Your Medicines - Introduction - Taking Control of Your Medicines - Medicine Assistance Programs - Medicine Checklist - Medication Tracker Communicating with Professionals - Introduction - Preparing for Medical Visits - ...

  3. Remote medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-29

    The international oil industry, catalyzed by a surge in exploration and production projects in remote regions, is giving health care for its travelers and expatriates a high priority. L.R. Aalund, the Journal`s Managing Editor--Technology, reports on why and how this is happening now. He covers this in articles on: health care in Russia, air ambulance evacuations, and the deployment of remote paramedics. Aalund gathered the information during trips to Finland and Russia and interviews with oil industry personnel, physicians, and other medical professionals in North America, Europe, and Siberia. Titles of the four topics presented in this special section on remote medicine are as follows: Oil companies focus on emergency care for expats in Russia; Air ambulance plan can be critical; Remote paramedics have high level of training; and Other facets of remote medicine.

  4. Community medicine in India - Which way forward?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, the Community Medicine professionals in India feel both "confused" and "threatened" by the mushrooming of schools of public health and departments of family medicine. The phenomenon of identity crisis and low-self esteem is not a recent one, nor is it restricted to India. The disciplines of community medicine and public health have evolved differently and despite some overlaps have differences especially in the need for clinical training. The core of the issue is that while the community medicine fraternity is keen to retain its clinical tag, what differentiates it from clinicians is the use of public health approach. I believe the strength of community medicine is that it bridges the gap between traditional fields of public health and clinical medicine and brings community perspective into health. The perceived threat from non-medical persons led public health is largely a result of us undervaluing our strength and our inability to foster partnership on equal footing with non-clinicians. While departments of community medicine have a fully functional rural or urban field practice area used for training at primary level care, these can serve as an excellent platform for training in secondary level care required for family medicine. National needs dictate that all three disciplines are required for improvement of population health, whether these are housed together or separately can be left to individual institutions to decide as long as they enable collaborations between them. We need to strengthen community medicine and market it appropriately to ministries of health.

  5. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  6. Transfusion medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  7. 家庭医生开展中医预防保健服务的做法和作用%The method and role of the family doctors in development of prevention and health care services of traditional Chinese medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峻

    2014-01-01

    目的:基于中医治未病理论,以体质辨识为抓手,在家庭医生责任制模式中引入中医预防保健服务功能,推进社区中医预防保健服务的开展。方法:在现有家庭医生责任制模式中,建立中医预防保健服务的管理、宣传和健康管理机制,为签约居民开展体质辨识,根据辨识结果将人群分为未病、欲病和已病3种,提供不同的中医健康管理服务。结果:初步形成家庭医生责任制模式中中医预防保健服务的运行方法,形成家庭医生、社区护士和中医师分工合作机制。结论:中医预防保健服务符合经济、适用、有效、覆盖面广的社区卫生服务要求,与家庭医生责任制结合将进一步完善社区卫生服务中心的服务内涵,符合社区卫生改革发展的方向。%Objective:Based on the theory of prevention of disease with traditional Chinese medicine, and the physical identiifcation as the starting point, prevention and health care services of traditional Chinese medicine were introduced into the family doctors responsibility system to give impetus to the development of prevention and health care service of traditional Chinese medicine in community. Methods: In the current family doctors responsibility system model, the mechanism of management, advocacy and health management of prevention and health care services of traditional Chinese medicine were established for the residents who signed the contracts to carry out the physical identification. According to the results of recognition, the population was divided into three groups that was not ill, would be ill, and had been ill and different health managements of traditional Chinese medicine were provided. Results:The operative method of prevention and health care services of traditional Chinese medicine was initially established in the family doctors responsibility system which formed the mechanism of sharing out the work and cooperating

  8. [Travel medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, S; Grimm, M

    2009-07-01

    Travel medicine deals with travellers' diseases. The target group is therefore distinct from tropical medicine. It has gained in significance due to the increase in tourism and professional work abroad in the last 50 years. Dangerous and widespread diseases in tropical countries, in particular tropical malaria, have come into focus in industrialized countries because of their appearance in travellers. Travel medicine deals not only with infectious or transmittable diseases, but also with the ability of patients with chronic diseases to travel, the medical aspects of flying, as well as the health hazards of professional work or high-risk sports abroad. The risk of disease as a result of travelling can be minimized by advice and prophylactic measures, such as vaccinations and drug prophylaxis against malaria, if indicated. On return, medical symptoms should be investigated promptly to ensure early detection of life-threatening disease courses, particularly tropical malaria, as well as to prevent the occurrence of small-scale epidemics. A small number of diseases can also emerge after several years, such as benign types of malaria, amoebic liver abscess and visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar). Aids also belongs to these diseases. Therefore, in this era of HIV pandemic travellers concerned should be made aware of the risks.

  9. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Applied Consciousness-Based Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Joav Merrick

    2004-01-01

    Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense) turning back to the “old medicine”, where the family physician was the all-concerned “old country doctor” who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic...

  10. Plasma medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This comprehensive text is suitable for researchers and graduate students of a 'hot' new topic in medical physics. Written by the world's leading experts,  this book aims to present recent developments in plasma medicine, both technological and scientific, reviewed in a fashion accessible to the highly interdisciplinary audience consisting of doctors, physicists, biologists, chemists and other scientists, university students and professors, engineers and medical practitioners. The book focuses on major topics and covers the physics required to develop novel plasma discharges relevant for medic

  11. [Psychiatric medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez Dominguez, J

    1984-06-01

    The author, after a short historical introduction which shows the Medicine, especially the Neurology, as the predecessor of the Psychiatry, intents to relate in a theorico-practical way the anxiety and the depression within a bio-chemical and endocrinological frame. He presents the hipo and hipercalcemia signals and symptoms demonstrating with a casuistic from his clinical practice the similitude between anxiety and depression respectively. Finally he realizes a theorical analysis about the investigations published over the AMP-ciclic and infers about the hormonal interference and the clinical data linked with the manic-depressive disease.

  12. Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  13. Family Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Disruptions Page Content Article Body No matter how ...

  14. Family Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  15. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be credentialed by the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Family therapy is often short term. ... challenging situations in a more effective way. References Marriage and family therapists: The friendly mental health professionals. American Association ...

  16. Clinical holistic medicine: applied consciousness-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2004-03-03

    Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense) turning back to the "old medicine", where the family physician was the all-concerned "old country doctor" who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic medicine, we would like to present the classic art of healing, where the physician works mostly with his hands, then show how the modern biomedical physician performs with biochemistry, and finally introduce consciousness-based medicine. Some of our questions will be: If you improve your quality of life, will you also improve your health? Will learning more about yourself bring more purpose in your life? Will finding someone to live with in a loving and mutually respectful relationship improve your health? Scientists and thinkers like Antonovsky, Frankl, Maslow, and Jung have pointed to love as a unique way to coherence in life, and thus to biological order and a better health. Several scientific studies have also suggested that patients who focus on improving their quality of life usually will not follow the general statistics for survival, since somehow other factors are at play, which sometimes you will find referred to as "exceptional".

  17. Evolutionary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swynghedauw, B

    2004-04-01

    Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. Evolutionary, or darwinian, medicine takes the view that contemporary diseases result from incompatibility between the conditions under which the evolutionary pressure had modified our genetic endowment and the lifestyle and dietary habits in which we are currently living, including the enhanced lifespan, the changes in dietary habits and the lack of physical activity. An evolutionary trait express a genetic polymorphism which finally improve fitness, it needs million years to become functional. A limited genetic diversity is a necessary prerequisite for evolutionary medicine. Nevertheless, search for a genetic endowment would become nearly impossible if the human races were genetically different. From a genetic point of view, homo sapiens, is homogeneous, and the so-called human races have only a socio-economic definition. Historically, Heart Failure, HF, had an infectious origin and resulted from mechanical overload which triggered mechanoconversion by using phylogenically ancient pleiotropic pathways. Adaptation was mainly caused by negative inotropism. Recently, HF was caused by a complex remodelling caused by the trophic effects of mechanics, ischemia, senescence, diabetes and, neurohormones. The generally admitted hypothesis is that cancers were largely caused by a combination of modern reproductive and dietary lifestyles mismatched with genotypic traits, plus the longer time available for a confrontation. Such a concept is illustrated for skin and breast cancers, and also for the link between cancer risk and dietary habits.

  18. GENOMIC MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence. The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others.There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine. For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc..Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine. For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others.We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the disease

  19. Genomic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence.  The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others. There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine.  For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc.. Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine.  For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others. We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the

  20. Cinnamon: A Multifaceted Medicinal Plant

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, and Cinnamon cassia), the eternal tree of tropical medicine, belongs to the Lauraceae family. Cinnamon is one of the most important spices used daily by people all over the world. Cinnamon primarily contains vital oils and other derivatives, such as cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, and cinnamate. In addition to being an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, anticancer, lipid-lowering, and cardiovascular-disease-lowering compound, cinnamon...

  1. 2nd Research Meeting on Family and Community Medicine of Rio Grande do Sul 2ª Reunión de Investigación en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria de Rio Grande do Sul 2º Salão de Pesquisa em Medicina de Família e Comunidade do Rio Grande do Sul

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Given the importance of encouraging the production and dissemination of researches in the specialty of Family and Community Medicine, an event, which aimed at creating opportunities to show research papers carried out by medical residents of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in 2008, was reported. At the end, the authors and the abstracts of their papers are listed.

    Dada la importancia de fomentar la producción y difusión de las investigaciones realizadas en la especialidad de...

  2. A Practice of Social Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Kark

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available SOCIAL MEDICINE may be regarded as a practice of medicine concerned with health and disease as a function of group living. It is interested in the health of people in relation to their behaviour in social groups and as such is concerned with care of the individual patient as a member of a family and of other significant groups in his daily life. It is also concerned with the health of these groups as such and with that of the whole community as a community. Concern with the health needs of larger communities and territorial groups such as cities, regions and nations is also an important area of social medicine in which the public health physician is involved. Special interest groups have been the focus of attention of yet other practitioners of social medicine. Children at school, university students and occupational groups are among the more important of these groups for whom special health services, oriented to their specific needs, have been developed. Less formal groupings are now receiving increasing attention by those concerned with community health services, such as the family, in which the relationships between the members have intimate and enduring qualities. Other significant informal groups, in which face-to-face relationships are characteristic, are friendship groups, play groups of children and the neighbourhood community, in rural village or urban neighbourhood.

  3. Family Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  4. SURVEY ON MEDICINAL SPICES OF THE NILGIRIS

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, K.

    1995-01-01

    A survey is made on the medicinal spices of the Nilgiris. Totally, there are 25 species available in various parts of the Nilgiris and they belong to 16 different families of angiosperms. Gudalur, Kothagiri, Kookalthorai, Aruvankadu, Coonoor, Burliar, Masinagudi and Ootacamund are some of the important places in the Nilgiris have a variety of medicinal properties that are put to use in homoeopathic and ayurvedic preparations.

  5. Survey on medicinal spices of the nilgiris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, K

    1995-04-01

    A survey is made on the medicinal spices of the Nilgiris. Totally, there are 25 species available in various parts of the Nilgiris and they belong to 16 different families of angiosperms. Gudalur, Kothagiri, Kookalthorai, Aruvankadu, Coonoor, Burliar, Masinagudi and Ootacamund are some of the important places in the Nilgiris have a variety of medicinal properties that are put to use in homoeopathic and ayurvedic preparations.

  6. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  7. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  8. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative medicine refers to treatments that are used instead of conventional (standard) ones. If you use an alternative ... with conventional medicine or therapy, it is considered complementary therapy. There are many forms of alternative medicine. Acupuncture ...

  9. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Traveling Safely with Medicines Planes, trains, cars – even boats ... your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you ...

  10. Personalized Medicine and Pharmacogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medications. Pharmacogenomics is part of a field called personalized medicine — also called individualized or precision medicine — that ... may be part of routine medical care. References Personalized medicine. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www. ...

  11. Medicines by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Search the NIGMS Website Search the NIGMS Website NIGMS Home Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Medicines By Design Medicines By Design Spotlight Nature's Medicine Cabinet A ...

  12. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  13. Medicines for osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... when: A bone density test shows you have osteoporosis, even if you have not had a fracture ...

  14. Medicines for sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzodiazepines; Sedatives; Hypnotics; Sleeping pills; Insomnia - medicines; Sleep disorder - medicines ... are commonly used to treat allergies. While these sleep aids are not addictive, your body becomes used ...

  15. Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Journal of Family and Community Medicine   The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC. Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process. All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish. Categories and formats of papers The journal is divided into the following sections: Editorial Original articles Review articles Directives in Family and Community Medicine Essays Case reports Theses Letters to the Editor The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request. The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles are criticisms or creations on science, technology and the art of health sciences, contributing to the evolution of knowledge about Man, nature and social and cultural inclusion. The papers - including introduction, material or rationale, methods, results, discussion

  16. [Disaster medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, Pierre; Telionri, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    For over 30 years, the French hospital and pre-hospital medical teams are trained in disaster medicine. In fact, they are regularly confronted with the management of multiple casualties in accidents or even terrorist attacks, and more rarely to large-scale disasters. The intervention of physicians of the EMS system (SAMU-SMUR) in the field allows an original healthcare organization: in an advanced medical post, the victims are triaged according to their severity and benefit if needed of initial resuscitation. SAMU medical regulating center then organize their transport and repartition in several hospitals put on alert. To cope with a mass casualty situation, the hospital also has a specific organization, the White Plan. This plan, initiated by the director, assisted by a medico-administrative cell crisis can mobilize all the resources of the institution. Personnel are recalled and the ability of emergency units is increased. Care, less urgent, other patients are postponed. There are many plans for responding to disasters. ORSEC plans of the ministry of Interior articulate with the ORSAN plans of the ministry of Health. This complementarity allows a global mobilization of public services in disasters or exceptional medical situations.

  17. Medicine organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ricardo; Belchior, Ismael

    2015-04-01

    In the last year of secondary school, students studying physics and chemistry are incentivized to do a project where they must put in practice their improvement of scientific knowledge and skills, like observation of phenomena and analysis of data with scientific knowledge. In this project a group of students, tutored by the teacher, wanted to build an instrument that helps people to take their medical drugs at the right time. This instrument must have some compartments with an alarm and an LED light where the people can put their medical drugs. The instrument must be easily programed using an android program that also registers if the medicine has been taken. The students needed to simulate the hardware and software, draw the electronic system and build the final product. At the end of the school year, a public oral presentation was prepared by each group of students and presented to the school community. They are also encouraged to participate in national and international scientific shows and competitions.

  18. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Applied Consciousness-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense turning back to the “old medicine”, where the family physician was the all-concerned “old country doctor” who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic medicine, we would like to present the classic art of healing, where the physician works mostly with his hands, then show how the modern biomedical physician performs with biochemistry, and finally introduce consciousness-based medicine. Some of our questions will be: If you improve your quality of life, will you also improve your health? Will learning more about yourself bring more purpose in your life? Will finding someone to live with in a loving and mutually respectful relationship improve your health? Scientists and thinkers like Antonovsky, Frankl, Maslow, and Jung have pointed to love as a unique way to coherence in life, and thus to biological order and a better health. Several scientific studies have also suggested that patients who focus on improving their quality of life usually will not follow the general statistics for survival, since somehow other factors are at play, which sometimes you will find referred to as “exceptional”.

  19. Obstetric medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Balbi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Obstetric assistance made major advances in the last 20 years: improved surgical technique allows quicker caesarean sections, anaesthesiology procedures such as peripheral anaesthesia and epidural analgesia made safer operative assistance, remarkably reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, neonatology greatly improved the results of assistance to low birth weight newborns. A new branch of medicine called “obstetric medicine” gained interest and experience after the lessons of distinguished physicians like Michael De Swiet in England. All together these advances are making successful pregnancies that 20 years ago would have been discouraged or even interrupted: that’s what we call high risk pregnancy. High risk of what? Either complications of pregnancy on pre-existing disease or complications of pre-existing disease on pregnancy. Nowadays, mortality in pregnancy has a medical cause in 80% of cases in Western countries (Confidential Enquiry on Maternal Deaths, UK, 2004. DISCUSSION The background is always changing and we have to take in account of: increase of maternal age; widespread use of assisted fertilization techniques for treatment of infertility; social feelings about maternity desire with increasing expectations from medical assistance; immigration of medically “naive” patients who don’t know to have a chronic disease, but apt and ready to conceive; limited knowledge of feasibility of drug use in pregnancy which may induce both patients and doctors to stopping appropriate drug therapy in condition of severe disease. Preconception counseling, planning the pregnancy, wise use of drugs, regular follow-up throughout the pregnancy and, in selected cases, preterm elective termination of pregnancy may result in excellent outcome both for mother and foetus. CONCLUSIONS Highly committed and specifically trained physicians are required to counsel these patients and to plan their treatment before and during pregnancy.

  20. Familial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W. de Herder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  1. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Lima Wagner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC.

    Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process.

    All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish.

    Categories and formats of papers

    The journal is divided into the following sections:

    Editorial

    Original articles

    Review articles

    Directives in Family and Community Medicine

    Essays

    Case reports

    Theses

    Letters to the Editor

    The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request.

    The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles

  2. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Familia e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC.

    Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process.

    All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish.

    Categories and formats of papers

    The journal is divided into the following sections:

    Editorial

    Original articles

    Review articles

    Directives in Family and Community Medicine

    Essays

    Case reports

    Theses

    Letters to the Editor

    The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request.

    The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles

  3. Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade SBMFC

    2010-11-01

    participação de forma significativa no trabalho para assumir responsabilidade pública pelo seu conteúdo. Deverão, portanto, assinar a seguinte declaração de autoria e de responsabilidade: “Declaro que participei de forma significativa na construção e formação deste estudo ou da análise e interpretação dos dados, como também na redação deste texto, tendo, enquanto autor, responsabilidade pública pelo conteúdo deste. Revi a versão final deste trabalho e aprovo para ser submetido à publicação. Declaro que nem o presente trabalho nem outro com conteúdo semelhante de minha autoria foi publicado ou submetido à apreciação do Conselho Editorial de outra publicação. Artigos com mais de um autor deverão conter uma exposição sobre a contribuição específica de cada um no trabalho. Os autores de cada artigo receberão, após a publicação de seu trabalho, três exemplares da revista em que o seu estudo foi publicado. Ética em pesquisa Com relação às pesquisas iniciadas após janeiro de 1997, nas quais exista a participação de seres humanos nos termos do inciso II.2 da Resolução 196/ 96 do Conselho Nacional de Saúde (pesquisa que, individual ou coletivamente, envolva o ser humano de forma direta ou indireta, em sua totalidade ou partes dele, incluindo o manejo de informações ou materiais, sempre que pertinente, deve ser declarado no texto que o trabalho foi aprovado pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa em Seres Humanos. Os trabalhos devem ser enviados para: Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade - SBMFC Correspondência Rua 28 de Setembro, 44 sala 605 Rio de Janeiro - RJ Cep: 20551-031 Tel: 21 2264-5117 / 21 3259-6934 Fax: 21 3259-6931   Endereço eletrônico: rbmfc@sbmfc.org.brThe Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating

  4. Instructions to authors of the Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine Instrução aos autores da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade RBMFC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Brazilian Journal of Family and Community Medicine (BJFCM is a three-monthly publication of the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine, aimed at sensitizing professionals and health authorities to this field of interest, stimulating and disseminating Primary Health Care (PHC issues and investigations, and facilitating interchange between academic institutions, health care services and organized social movements. The periodical also aims to promote an interdisciplinary approach to this area and to serve as a vehicle for continued and permanent education in the field of Family and Community Health, with emphasis to the central subject PHC.

    Manuscripts will be reviewed by members of the Scientific and Editorial Board as well as by outside referees. This peer-review process safeguards the identity of authors and their institutions of origin, which only will be revealed to the Editorial Board in the end of the evaluation process.

    All manuscripts should be prepared in Portuguese language. Foreign authors, not living in Brazil, can submit their papers in English or Spanish.

    Categories and formats of papers

    The journal is divided into the following sections:

    Editorial

    Original articles

    Review articles

    Directives in Family and Community Medicine

    Essays

    Case reports

    Theses

    Letters to the Editor

    The Editorial is responsibility of the editor of the journal, but can be prepared by third persons on his request.

    The section Original Articles is dedicated to reports on scientific investigations, presenting original data on findings from experiments or observation with emphasis to qualitative or quantitative studies in fields of interest for PHC. Original articles

  5. Familial dermographism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedele, K B; Michels, V V

    1991-05-01

    Urticaria in response to various physical stimuli has been reported in sporadic and familial patterns. The most common of these physical urticarias, dermographism, is a localized urticarial response to stroking or scratching of the skin and has not been reported previously to be familial. A four-generation family with dermographism, probably inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, is presented along with a discussion of sporadic dermographism and other types of familial physical urticarias.

  6. Being the Family's Therapist: An Integrative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, James K.; La Sorsa, Valerie A.

    There is strong justification in the counseling literature for bridging individual and family perspectives. The Adolescent Depression and Suicide Program at Montefiore Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine (New York) is a brief treatment, outpatient clinic designed to provide mental health services for suicidal adolescents and their families.…

  7. Alternative models for academic family practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarnall Kimberly SH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Future of Family Medicine Report calls for a fundamental redesign of the American family physician workplace. At the same time, academic family practices are under economic pressure. Most family medicine departments do not have self-supporting practices, but seek support from specialty colleagues or hospital practice plans. Alternative models for academic family practices that are economically viable and consistent with the principles of family medicine are needed. This article presents several "experiments" to address these challenges. Methods The basis of comparison is a traditional academic family medicine center. Apart of the faculty practice plan, our center consistently operated at a deficit despite high productivity. A number of different practice types and alternative models of service delivery were therefore developed and tested. They ranged from a multi-specialty office arrangement, to a community clinic operated as part of a federally-qualified health center, to a team of providers based in and providing care for residents of an elderly public housing project. Financial comparisons using consistent accounting across models are provided. Results Academic family practices can, at least in some settings, operate without subsidy while providing continuity of care to a broad segment of the community. The prerequisites are that the clinicians must see patients efficiently, and be able to bill appropriately for their payer mix. Conclusion Experimenting within academic practice structure and organization is worthwhile, and can result in economically viable alternatives to traditional models.

  8. TRADITIONAL CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZHU, YP; WOERDENBAG, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Herbal medicine, acupuncture and moxibustion, and massage and the three major constituent parts of traditional Chinese medicine. Although acupuncture is well known in many Western countries, Chinese herbal medicine, the mos important part of traditional Chinese medicine, is less well known in the We

  9. The personalised medicine: a paradigm of evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhavendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of "evidence-based medicine" aims at the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the individualised patient care. The clinical genetics evolved from translational genetics research and contributes to the clinical care of patients and families through evidence-based health care in managing inherited disorders through accurate diagnosis, molecular pathology and assessing phenotypic correlations. Translational genetics and genomics research has led to the development of powerful tools for clinical diagnosis, assessing individual's genomic profile for disease prediction/prevention, high-throughput genome-wide screening for predisposition and/or protection to complex medical conditions, and discovery and development of new drugs and vaccines. Gene mapping and deciphering pathogenic mutations have helped in unravelling the basic biological mechanisms leading to new drug discovery and development. Targeted pharmacotherapy is now possible for managing the highly penetrant multi-system dominantly inherited conditions. Notable examples include rapamycin (sirolimus in suppressing the mTOR pathway associated hamartomas in dominantly inherited cancer family syndromes and angiotensin converting enzyme receptor blockers (ACE-RB in preventing aortic dilatation in Marfan syndrome and related familial arteriopathies. The translational genomic research is the essential prerequisite for developing sound evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic clinical protocols for the practice of personalised clinical medicine.

  10. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Developments in "omics" are creating a paradigm shift in Laboratory Medicine leading to Personalised Medicine. This allows the increasing in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether Laboratory Medicine is able to implement new...... diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...

  11. Family as a Total Package: Restoring and Enhancing Psychological Health for Citizen Soldiers and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    substance abuse research on traumatized populations. Presentation at the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, 72nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Palm ...Professionals & College of Medicine, University of Florida at Gainesville, December 9, 2013. 2014 18. Van den Berk-Clark C. Trauma and mental health outcomes...Louis University School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine 1402 South Grand, St. Louis, MO 63104 ***Washington University School of

  12. Family focused nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. E. Thompson

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available At the present time the majority of nurse education programmes are firmly tied to the perspectives of curative medicine within hospitals - they are disease and hospital oriented. This model, which indicates a 'sickness’ concept of nursing is entirely inappropriate if contemporary and future health care needs are to be met. The shift in education should be towards a health, family and whole person centered approach. The family is the most fundamental and dynamic unit in society with a profound influence upon its members. Besides performing a variety of other functions, the family has a central role in promoting and maintaining the health of its members. Because the family unit is the microcosm of society and accurately reflects the needs of society at large it is appropriate that this should be a key area of experience. Family attachments during training provide opportunities for close and committed contact with people in their everyday world and for learning what is really important to them.

  13. From Livingstone to ecotourism. What's new in travel medicine?

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent developments in the field of travel medicine and to outline the knowledge and resources family physicians need for providing health advice to travelers headed for tropical or developing countries. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Personal files; references from review articles and from a recent textbook of travel medicine; current guidelines on pretravel advice; and a review of the 1996 to 1999 MEDLINE database using "travel medicine" as a term and subject heading, "trave(l)le...

  14. Traditional medicinal plants in Ben En National Park, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Sam, Hoang; Baas, P.; Keßler, P.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper surveys the medicinal plants and their traditional use by local people in Ben En National Park, Vietnam. A total of 230 medicinal plant species (belonging to 200 genera and 84 families) is used by local people for treatment of 68 different diseases. These include species that are collecte

  15. Mozart and medicine in the eighteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J S

    1995-07-01

    Over the years the medical history and death of Mozart have been the subject of many studies, but in spite of all this attention much remains controversial. In an attempt to resolve some of the difficulty it is useful to see his life, and that of his family as recorded in their letters, in the context of medicine in eighteenth-century Europe.

  16. Palliative medicine update: a multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, K.C.P.; Brand, M.W. van den; Jacobs, J.; Groot, M. de; Veldhoven, C.; Verhagen, C.; Hasselaar, J.; Engels, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Palliative medicine is a young specialty that is officially recognized in relatively few countries. The World Health Organization published an adapted definition in 2002, describing palliative care as an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems as

  17. Current status of family health in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolinar Membrillo Luna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Family Health (FH has three main elements: individual health, life material conditions and family functioning. Its main actors are the individual, the family and society. A common framework is the basis of FH, as each one of these elements is extremely important. Currently, in Mexico two aspects are considered: epidemiological studies and those inherent to the family medicine specialty. That latter has a residency and an integrated specialty curriculum, as well as certification from the corresponding board. All of this allows us to apply the HF approach to each and every family and individual that is cared for.

  18. Uso de medicamentos armazenados em domicílio em uma população atendida pelo Programa Saúde da Família The use of medicines storaged in the household in a population assisted by Family Health Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geandra Batista Lima

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abordar epidemiologicamente o uso de medicamentos impõe reconhecer que tal prática não se limita a fatores farmacoterapêuticos. O armazenamento adequado e a preservação de medicamentos são fatores fundamentais para a sua eficácia. O presente estudo teve como objetivo verificar a forma de armazenamento/uso de medicamentos em uma comunidade atendida pelo Programa/Estratégia Saúde da Família no município de Cristino Castro (PI, bem como o grau de conhecimento a respeito dos medicamentos mantidos sob sua guarda. Os dados foram obtidos em visitas domiciliares a 52 famílias, a partir de observações e da aplicação de um questionário. Observaram-se baixa renda e baixa escolaridade da população, fatores agravantes na efetiva orientação terapêutica e acesso aos fármacos. Elevado percentual dos medicamentos estocados é adquirido sem prescrição. Destacamos a classe dos antimicrobianos, reforçando o perigo da automedicação. 62% dos responsáveis pela guarda não possuem a orientação mínima para assegurar o uso racional, e 66% não tem ciência da toxicidade. 54,10% dos medicamentos estavam ao alcance de crianças e animais domésticos e 15,92% não possuíam rótulo ou qualquer identificação. Algumas famílias mantêm em estoque medicações básicas, outras acumulam um "arsenal terapêutico".To approach the epidemiological use of medicines is necessary to recognize that such practice is not strictly limited to pharmacotherapy. The appropriate storage and the preservation of medicines are fundamental factors for effectiveness. This study was aimed at verifying the storage form/use of medicines in a community assisted by the Family Health Program in the district of Cristino Castro (PI, Brazil, as well as the level of the people's knowledge regarding drugs storage at home. The data were obtained visiting 52 families, starting with observations and applying a questionnaire. It was observed a low income and education levels, a

  19. [ETHICS, MORALS AND SOCIETY IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flugelman, Anath

    2015-09-01

    Following the completion of the human genome project, genomic medicine including personalized medicine, widely based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, is rapidly developing. This breakthrough should benefit humankind thanks to tailoring the most appropriate prevention, interventions and therapies to each individual, minimizing adverse side effects, based on inter-personal genetic variety and polymorphism. Yet wide spectrum ethical, legal and social issues carry significant implications regarding individuals, families, society and public health. The main issues concern genomic information and autonomy, justice and equity, resources allocation and solidarity, challenging the traditional role of medicine and dealing with unlimited boundaries of knowledge. Those issues are not new nor exceptional to genomic medicine, yet their wide unlimited scope and implications on many aspects of life renders them crucial. These aspects will be discussed in light of Beauchamp and Childress' four principles: non-maleficence, beneficence, autonomy and justice, and main moral philosophies, Kant's autonomy, Utilitarianism which promotes the common good, and Rawls' Theory of Justice.

  20. A review on chemical and medicobiological applications of capparidaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are the nature′s gift to human being to make disease free healthy life. It plays a vital role to preserve our health. Capparidaceae family comprises various important medicinal properties distributed in tropical and subtropical India, whose medicinal usage has been reported in the traditional systems of medicine such as Ayurvedha, Siddha and Unani. Plants belongs to the Capparidaceae family has been described as a rasayana herb and has been used extensively as an adaptogen to increase the non specific resistance of antioxidant and immunostimulant effects. The C. sepiaria, C. spinosa, C. tomentosa and C. zeylanica etc., belongs to this family is reported as used in traditional medicine. The diverse phytoconstituents and various medicobiological uses of the plants belonging to this family were reviewed here.

  1. Family Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    safety and flexibility at the level of multi-object systems. We are granted the flexibility of using different families of kinds of objects, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. This paper highlights the inability of traditional polymorphism to handle multiple objects, and presents family...... polymorphism as a way to overcome this problem. Family polymorphism has been implemented in the programming language gbeta, a generalized version of Beta, and the source code of this implementation is available under GPL....

  2. My Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Everyone has a family.We live in it and feel very warm.There are three persons in my family,my mother,father and I.We live together very happily and there are many interesting stories about my family. My father is a hard-working man.He works as a doctor.He always tries his best to help every,patient and make patients comfortable.But sonetimes he works so hard

  3. Reflections on preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Olli S

    2014-10-01

    Having thought much about medicine in my career-long effort to understand it and the research for its advancement, I have come to views rather different form the now-prevailing ones in respect to what preventive medicine is about; what epidemiology is in relation to preventive medicine; what distinguishes preventive medicine in preventive healthcare at large; the relation of preventive medicine to public health; the concept of health promotion; and also the core principles of preventive medicine. All of these views I set forth in this article, for the readers' critical reflection.

  4. Plantas medicinais: transmissão do conhecimento nas famílias de agricultores de base ecológica no Sul do RS Plantas medicinales: transmisión de conocimientos en las familias de agricultores de base ecológica en el Sur de RS Medicinal plants: knowledge transmission in families of ecological farmers in souther Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teila Ceolin

    2011-03-01

    parte de las familias es predominantemente oral, realizada a través de la convivencia diaria entre sus miembros y compartidas con los demás miembros de la comunidad en la cual están insertos.The aim of this study was to investigate the process of knowledge transmission related to medicinal plants among family generations in the context of ecological farmers in Southern Rio Grande do Sul. This qualitative study was conducted with eight farming families, comprising 19 respondents living in the municipalities of Pelotas, Morro Redondo, Canguçu and Arroio do Padre. The interviews took place from January to May 2009. Data analysis was performed using the hermeneutic-dialectic method. The family was referred to as the main source in the transmission of knowledge about medicinal plants. Most subjects reported first completing treatment with medicinal plants, to then seek formal health service. The construction of knowledge related to medicinal plants by the families is predominantly oral, and takes place by the daily contact between its members and is shared with other members of the community to which they belong.

  5. Family literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    I Projekt familielæsning, der er et samarbejde mellem Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning og Hillerød Bibliotek, arbejder vi med at få kontakt til de familier, som biblioteket ellers aldrig ser som brugere og dermed også de børn, der vokser op i familier, for hvem bøger og oplæsningssituationer ikke...... er en selvfølgelig del af barndommen. Det, vi vil undersøge og ønsker at være med til at udvikle hos disse familier, er det, man kan kalde family literacy....

  6. Medical School Hotline: Developing communication skills for leading family meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Michiko; Bell, Christina; Tamura, Bruce; Kasuya, Richard; Masaki, Kamal

    2011-06-01

    Good clinician-family communication is essential for the provision of high-quality patient care. Families rate the communication skills of clinicians as critical clinical skills. However, there has been no structured training of fellow communication skills while leading family meetings in the University of Hawai'i Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program. Effective training to develop communication skills with families will better prepare Geriatric Medicine fellows for this important task, and ultimately improve the quality of care they provide to these patients and patients' families.

  7. Cold and Cough Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  8. Medicine safety and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000619.htm Medicine safety and children To use the sharing features ... especially careful if you have toddlers around. Keep Medicines out of Reach and Sight Safety tips: DO ...

  9. National Farm Medicine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Areas Applied Sciences Biomedical Informatics Clinical Research Epidemiology Farm Medicine Human Genetics Oral-Systemic Health Clinical ... Consulting Agritourism Farm MAPPER Lyme Disease ROPS Rebate Zika Virus National Farm Medicine Center The National Farm ...

  10. Taking multiple medicines safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your wallet and at home. Review your medicine list with your health care providers and pharmacists. Discuss ... all of your providers a copy of your medicine list. Ask questions about any new drugs you are ...

  11. Society for Vascular Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certification with this new online course from the Society for Vascular Medicine. Learn more. Looking for a ... jobs are listed right now. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Medicines for ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abuse. Teach your child not to share or sell their medicines. Monitor your child's medicines closely. References ... the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A. ...

  13. Veterinary medicines update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-11

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues.

  14. ADHD Medicines (for Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray ADHD Medicines KidsHealth > For Kids > ADHD Medicines Print A ... Help en español Medicamentos para el TDAH About ADHD Have you ever been so bored that you ...

  15. FAMILY PLATYSTOMATIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Lisiane Dilli

    2016-06-14

    Platystomatidae (Signal Flies) are one of the largest families of Tephritoidea, with about 1200 species and four subfamilies, worldwide distributed. However, Platystomatidae are not well represented in the New World, and in the Neotropical Region only four genera and 26 species, belonging to Platystomatinae, are recorded. The family is a group understudied in Colombia and only one species is recorded to the country.

  16. Minimizing and communicating radiation risk in pediatric nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S Ted; Adelstein, S James

    2012-03-01

    The value of pediatric nuclear medicine is well established. Pediatric patients are referred to nuclear medicine from nearly all pediatric specialties including urology, oncology, cardiology, gastroenterology, and orthopedics. Radiation exposure is associated with a potential, small, risk of inducing cancer in the patient later in life and is higher in younger patients. Recently, there has been enhanced interest in exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Thus, it is incumbent on practitioners of pediatric nuclear medicine to have an understanding of dosimetry and radiation risk to communicate effectively with their patients and their families. This article reviews radiation dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals and also CT given the recent proliferation of PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It also describes the scientific basis for radiation risk estimation in the context of pediatric nuclear medicine. Approaches for effective communication of risk to patients' families are discussed. Lastly, radiation dose reduction in pediatric nuclear medicine is explicated.

  17. Performing Narrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langellier, Kristin M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author weaves narrative medicine and performance together to consider what might it mean to call narrative medicine a performance. To name narrative medicine as performance is to recognize the texts and bodies, the stories and selves, that participate in its practice--patients' and physicians' embodied stories as well as the…

  18. Changing academic medicine: strategies used by academic leaders of integrative medicine-a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Holmberg, Christine

    2012-01-01

    In Western countries, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is more and more provided by practitioners and family doctors. To base this reality of health care provision on an evidence-base, academic medicine needs to be included in the development. In the study we aimed to gain information on a structured approach to include CAM in academic health centers. We conducted a semistructured interview study with leading experts of integrative medicine to analyze strategies of existing academic institutions of integrative medicine. The study sample consisted of a purposive sample of ten leaders that have successfully integrated CAM into medical schools in the USA, Great Britain, and Germany and the Director of the National Center for Alternative and Complementary Medicine. Analysis was based on content analysis. The prerequisite to foster change in academic medicine was a strong educational and professional background in academic medicine and research methodologies. With such a skill set, the interviewees identified a series of strategies to align themselves with colleagues from conventional medicine, such as creating common goals, networking, and establishing well-functioning research teams. In addition, there must be a vision of what should be needed to be at the center of all efforts in order to implement successful change.

  19. Family history in pediatric primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Tracy L; Martin, Helen M

    2007-09-01

    The family history is a critical element in pediatric medicine and represents the gateway to the molecular age of medicine for both pediatric clinicians and their patients. The pediatric clinician has several opportunities to obtain a family history and multiple clinical and educational uses for that information. Available methods include paper and digital forms, classical pedigrees, online programs, and focused family history at the time of a new diagnosis or problem. Numerous barriers impede the application of family history information to primary pediatric practice. The most common barrier is the limited amount of time the typical primary care encounter allows for its collection. The family history can be used in many facets of pediatric practice: (1) as a diagnostic tool and guide to testing and evaluation; (2) to identify patterns of inheritance; and (3) as a patient-education tool. The most exciting future use of family history is as a tool for public health and preventive medicine. More accurately identifying children at risk for common chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma, and cardiovascular disease could change the primary care clinician's approach to pediatric medicine.

  20. Plantas medicinais utilizadas pela população atendida no "Programa de Saúde da Família", Governador Valadares, MG, Brasil Medicinal plants used by the population assisted by the "Programa de Saúde da Família" (Family Health Program in Governador Valadares County - MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gonçalves Brasileiro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo realizar um estudo sobre a utilização de plantas medicinais pela população atendida no Programa de Saúde da Família em Governador Valadares, Estado de Minas Gerais, a fim de resgatar, preservar e utilizar este conhecimento em trabalhos com a comunidade. Foi usada a metodologia de questionários pré-estabelecidos, que foram aplicados pelos Agentes de Saúde da Família. O estudo foi feito em 27 bairros da cidade, sendo aplicados 2454 questionários, resultando em 232 plantas citadas como medicinais pela população entrevistada. As principais indicações de uso das plantas medicinais foram como calmante (10%, contra gripe (18% e infecções (9%. A maioria das plantas utilizadas são preparadas na forma de chá (78% e obtidas em cultivo próprio (57%, sendo que, em geral, o conhecimento sobre o uso e modo de preparo da plantas medicinais foi obtido dos familiares (67%. A maioria das espécies citadas e utilizadas popularmente possui atividade farmacológica já comprovada na literatura necessitando, entretanto, de orientação correta sobre seu cultivo e emprego terapêutico.This study was conducted to evaluate the use of medicinal plants by the population assisted by the "Programa de Saúde da Família" in Governador Valadares -MG, in order to rescue, preserve and use this knowledge in works carried out with the community. The preestablished questionnaire methodology was used. Those questionnaires were applied by the Family Health Agents. The study was accomplished in 27 residential quarters, as being applied 2454 questionnaires, and 232 plants were mentioned as medicinal ones by the interviewed population. The main indications for using the medicinal plants were: as sedative (10%, against influenza (18% and infections (9%. Most plants under use are prepared as tea (78% and are obtained in own cropping (57%. In general, the knowledge on the use and preparation of the medicinal plants proceeded from their

  1. Catastrophic expenditure on medicines in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiza, Vera Lucia; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the magnitude of the expenditure on medicines in Brazil according to region, household size and composition in terms of residents in a situation of dependency. METHODS Population-based data from the national household survey were used, with probabilistic sample, applied between September 2013 and February 2014 in urban households. The expenditure on medicines was the main outcome of interest. The prevalence and confidence intervals (95%CI) of the outcomes were stratified according to socioeconomic classification and calculated according to the region, the number of residents dependent on income, the presence of children under five years and residents in a situation of dependency by age. RESULTS In about one of every 17 households (5.3%) catastrophic health expenditure was reported and, in 3.2%, the medicines were reported as one of the items responsible for this situation. The presence of three or more residents (3.6%) and resident in a situation of dependency (3.6%) were the ones that most reported expenditure on medicines. Southeast was the region with the lowest prevalence of expenditure on medicines. The prevalence of households with catastrophic health expenditure and on medicines in relation to the total of households showed a regressive tendency for economic classes. CONCLUSIONS Catastrophic health expenditure was present in 5.3%, and catastrophic expenditure on medicines in 3.2% of the households. Multi-person households, presence of residents in a situation of economic dependency and belonging to the class D or E had the highest proportion of catastrophic expenditure on medicines. Although the problem is important, permeated by aspects of iniquity, Brazilian policies seem to be protecting families from catastrophic expenditure on health and on medicine. PMID:27982383

  2. Nuclear medicine physics

    CERN Document Server

    De Lima, Joao Jose

    2011-01-01

    Edited by a renowned international expert in the field, Nuclear Medicine Physics offers an up-to-date, state-of-the-art account of the physics behind the theoretical foundation and applications of nuclear medicine. It covers important physical aspects of the methods and instruments involved in modern nuclear medicine, along with related biological topics. The book first discusses the physics of and machines for producing radioisotopes suitable for use in conventional nuclear medicine and PET. After focusing on positron physics and the applications of positrons in medicine and biology, it descr

  3. [Resources and application of She's nationality wild medicinal plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hou-Xing; Li, Jian-Liang; Zheng, Song-Ming; Fan, Li-Hua; Li, Shui-Fu; Cheng, Wen-Liang; Hua, Jin-Wei; Yu, Hua-Li; Dai, De-Xiong; Xie, Yuan-Wei

    2014-08-01

    To make a thorough investigation of the common She's nationality wild medicinal plants resources in our country, including the species, the distribution, the folk application and the endemic medicinal plant species, Field surveyed was conducted with 25 She people mainly lived area (county, district or city) throughout the country, the folk prescription and treatment cases provided by She's medical personnel, the drug usage and dosage, the commonly used traditional She's medicine and drug samples were collected. And the distribution, growing environment of these plants were investigated, their characteristics, photographs, GPS data and track were record , and the fresh wax leaf or plants specimens were collected. In total 1 600 varieties of folk medicine of She's nationality, 450 disease names and 1 016 prescriptions were collected. 520 kinds of these medicinal plants were commonly used, growing mainly distributed in the southeastern China, about 200 meters above sea level to 1 500 meters. There are 5 First-Grade State protection wild plants (medicinal), 15 second-Grade State protection wild plants (medicinal), and 11 She characteristic medicinal plants in our study, they belong to 144 families, 312 genera 494 species, 2 subspecies, 17 varieties, 3 forms and 1 cultivated varieties of She's nationality. Folk medicine usage is different from the traditional Chinese medicine and ethnic medicine. This survey finds out the common She's nationality wild medicinal plants resources in China, including the species, the distribution, the folk application and commonly used drugs, and found the rare and endangered medicinal plants and the She's nationality endemic medicinal plants, which provides a basis for further development and use the traditional She's medicine resources.

  4. [Contribution of occupational medicine to social medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraut, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Occupational medicine has always been part of social medicine, but focuses on the part of the population in paid employment. Investigations of occupational diseases have identified several toxic chemicals that can affect other sectors of society: examples include cancers due to sawdust, asbestos, benzene, as well as carcinogens, mutagens and reproductive toxins. Better knowledge of the risks posed by epoxy resins, cements, formaldehyde, lead, toluene and other chemical agents has helped to understand certain diseases in the population. Knowledge of musculoskeletal disorders due to repetitive work has been of help in other areas; gradual resumption of appropriate activity seems to be the best basic treatment. Studies of mental overload and its consequences in the workplace (suicide, depression, etc.) have implications for human relations in society as a whole. Multidisciplinary networking helps to regularly take stock of findings in occupational medicine that may be applicable to social medicine.

  5. Family matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To relate illness and family factors to emotional and behavioural problems in school-age children (7–14 years old) of parents with acquired brain injury and their healthy spouses. PARTICIPANTS, MATERIALS/METHODS: Members of 35 families in which a parent had been diagnosed with acquired...... brain injury participated. Family and brain injury characteristics were reported by the ill and healthy parents. Children self-reported post-traumatic stress symptoms (PSS) using the Child Impact of Events revised (CRIES). Emotional and behavioural problems among the children were also identified...... by the parents using the Achenbach’s Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). RESULTS: The family stress variables relating to the healthy spouse in all six comparisons were significant (p

  6. Small Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neighborhood activity centers also can fulfill these needs. Even if your relatives are scattered, try to strengthen your child's sense of family by keeping in touch by phone and letters. Encourage your child to draw pictures for relatives, ...

  7. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypercholesterolemia or early heart attacks High level of LDL cholesterol in either or both parents People from families ... called fibroblasts to see how the body absorbs LDL cholesterol Genetic test for the defect associated with this ...

  8. [Requirements of a future-oriented social medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecke, R

    2005-02-01

    With the new national licensing regulations for physicians subsections of the social medicine became discrete subjects. The question arises, which contents the social medicine can have in the future, with consideration of important basic conditions. Such are the progress of medical knowledge, the representation of social medicine at medical faculties, changes of the medical supply, the transformation of jobs and the globalization. On a long-term basis effects of the demographic development, changes of the family structure and the financing of health and illness are important too. The social medicine should promptly make quality-assured contents available with consideration of the Internet. Such contents could be the comprehensive consultation, investigation and control of patient careers as well as the consultation and investigation from health problems in municipalities and in the society. In addition an inductive and practical oriented curriculum should be compiled, using the subject catalogue of the social medicine as well as a new basic textbook of social medicine.

  9. [Interaction between medicines and medicinal plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tres, J C

    2006-01-01

    In recent years there has been a notable increase in the consumption of medicinal plants in Spanish society. This might be due to the fact that in some cases they have shown themselves to be efficient in treating certain pathologies and to the erroneous perception that these products are innocuous. Medicinal plants behave as authentic medicines since the chemical substances of which they are formed can have a biological activity in humans. For this reason, their joint administration with "conventional medicines" can produce variations in the magnitude of the effect. This type of interaction, just like those produced between two or more medicines, can produce pharmacokinetic mechanisms if they affect the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, or pharmacodynamic mechanisms if they affect the result of the pharmacological action. In the medical literature there are few articles and notifications of cases concerning the adverse effects and interactions that affect medicinal plants, which probably reflects an under-notification of these phenomena. If we add to this the lack of experimental data and controlled studies, perception of their prevalence is difficult or nearly impossible. This article sets out, in an order that will be explained later, the findings of an exhaustive review of the medical literature with the aim of making its existence known to the reader, without going into other considerations, such as the degree of evidence for example, which will be the subject of forthcoming articles.

  10. Books, children, dogs, artists: library programs for the entire family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haver, Mary Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The promotion of library resources and services is a continuous process for all libraries, especially hospital family resource center libraries. Like public libraries, a family resource center can utilize programs as a pathway for connecting with and developing awareness of library resources and services available to patient families. This column describes the programs currently offered for All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine patient families, marketing initiatives to promote these programs, and utilization of grant funding to supplement a program.

  11. Ethics in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Warren R; George, Michael S; Churchill, Larry; Spindler, Kurt P

    2007-05-01

    Physicians have struggled with the medical ramifications of athletic competition since ancient Greece, where rational medicine and organized athletics originated. Historically, the relationship between sport and medicine was adversarial because of conflicts between health and sport. However, modern sports medicine has emerged with the goal of improving performance and preventing injury, and the concept of the "team physician" has become an integral part of athletic culture. With this distinction come unique ethical challenges because the customary ethical norms for most forms of clinical practice, such as confidentiality and patient autonomy, cannot be translated easily into sports medicine. The particular areas of medical ethics that present unique challenges in sports medicine are informed consent, third parties, advertising, confidentiality, drug use, and innovative technology. Unfortunately, there is no widely accepted code of sports medicine ethics that adequately addresses these issues.

  12. Advances in Regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    PREFACE In order to better introduce this book, it is important to define regenerative medicine as this field is built through a combination of multiple elements including living cells, matrix to support the living cells (i.e. a scaffold), and cell communicators (or signaling systems) to stimulate the cells, and their surrounding environment to grow and develop into new tissue or organ. Indeed, regenerative medicine is an emerging multidisciplinary field involving biology, medicine, and ...

  13. Implementations of translational medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sonntag Kai-Christian

    2005-01-01

    Abstract New developments in science are rapidly influencing and shaping basic and clinical research and medicine. This has led to the emergence of multiple opportunities and challenges on many levels in the bio-medical and other associated fields. To face these opportunities and challenges, new concepts and strategies are needed. These can be provided by translational research/medicine as an integrative concept based on a multidirectional understanding of research and medicine embedded in a ...

  14. Occupational medicine and toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This editorial is to announce the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. Occupational medicine and toxicology belong to the most wide ranging disciplines of all medical specialties. The field is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, management and scientific analysis of diseases from the fields of occupational and environmental medicine and toxicology. It also covers the promotion of occupational ...

  15. The FIMP Medicines for Children Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleone Ettore

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The European Paediatric Regulation (EUPR calls for the fostering of high quality ethical research and medicinal products to be used in children. The EUPR provides the background, goals, and requirements for paediatric clinical trials. Paediatric clinical trials in children are mandatory to generate data on new drugs as well as on drugs used off-label or for unlicensed indications. The Family Paediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network (FIMP-MCRN was established in 2003 with the aim of developing competence, infrastructure, networking and education for paediatric clinical trials. The network, consisting of twenty Paediatric Regional Networks has progressed very well and has achieved valuable improvements concerning the conduct of paediatric clinical trials. Furthermore, ad hoc training programs have incremented knowledge about clinical trials in Family Paediatrician Investigators (FPI and have made medical professionals as well as the public aware of the need and advantages of trials in children.

  16. [Italy's Slow Medicine: a new paradigm in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldi, Antonio; Vernero, Sandra

    2015-02-01

    Italy's Slow Medicine was founded in 2011 as a movement aimed to promote processes of care based on appropriateness, but within a relation of listening, dialogue and decision sharing with the patient. The mission of Slow Medicine is synthetized by three key words: measured, because it acts with moderation, gradually and without waste; respectful, because it is careful in preserving the dignity and values of each person; and equitable, because it is committed to ensuring access to appropriate care for all. In a short time, the association spreads at national and international level, gathering the needs of change of a growing number of health professionals, patients and citizens, committed to manage health problems with a new cultural and methodological paradigm. Medicine is soaked with inappropriateness, wastes, conflicts of interest, and many clichés induce professionals and patients to consume more and more healthcare services in the illusion that it is always better doing more for improving health. Moreover, the dominant reductionist cultural model, on which the concept of health and disease is based today, considers man as a machine, investigated by a growing number of specialists, particularly interested in the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases. The interest is mainly focused on technologies, while the person along with the relations with his/her family and the social environment are completely neglected. The systemic approach adopted by Slow Medicine, on the contrary, teaches us that health and disease are complex phenomena and the life of a person is more than the sum of the chemical reactions that occur in its cells. At different levels of complexity, in fact, new and unexpected properties appear, such as thinking, emotions, pleasure, health. These properties are not detectable in the individual elements and can only be studied using methods of analysis and knowledge belonging to other domains of knowledge, such as humanity sciences: philosophy

  17. Personalized medicine in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Personalized medicine is a model in which a patient's unique clinical, genetic, and environmental characteristics are the basis for treatment and prevention. Aim, method, and results: This review aims to describe the current tools, phenomenological features, clinical risk factors......, and biomarkers used to provide personalized medicine. Furthermore, this study describes the target areas in which they can be applied including diagnostics, treatment selection and response, assessment of risk of side-effects, and prevention. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Personalized medicine in psychiatry....... The discussion proposes possible solutions to narrow this gap and to move psychiatric research forward towards personalized medicine....

  18. Fluorine in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Since its first use in the steroid field in the late 1950s, the use of fluorine in medicinal chemistry has become commonplace, with the small electronegative fluorine atom being a key part of the medicinal chemist's repertoire of substitutions used to modulate all aspects of molecular properties including potency, physical chemistry and pharmacokinetics. This review will highlight the special nature of fluorine, drawing from a survey of marketed fluorinated pharmaceuticals and the medicinal chemistry literature, to illustrate key concepts exploited by medicinal chemists in their attempts to optimize drug molecules. Some of the potential pitfalls in the use of fluorine will also be highlighted.

  19. Music and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Lippi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Donatella Lippi1, Paolo Roberti di Sarsina2, John Patrick D’Elios11History of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Histology, and Forensic Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Health Local Unit, Department of Mental Health, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Healing sounds have always been considered in the past an important aid in medical practice, and nowadays, medicine has confirmed the efficacy of music therapy in many diseases. The aim of this study is to assess the curative power of music, in the frame of the current clinical relationship.Keywords: history of medicine, medical humanities, healing music

  20. Technologists for Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Huey D.

    1974-01-01

    Physicians need support personnel for work with radioisotopes in diagnosing dangerous diseases. The Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) Program at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida, is described. (MW)

  1. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Know Getting Rid of Old Medicines Dealing With Addiction Understanding Medications and What They Do Prescription Drug Abuse Bath Salts Depressants Ketamine MDMA (Ecstasy) Contact Us Print Resources ...

  2. Family Structure and Family Processes in Mexican American Families

    OpenAIRE

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2011-01-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans (MA), few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single parent families reported greater school misconduct,...

  3. Perspectives on China's Development in General Practice(Family Medicine) Residency Programs and Curriculum%对中国全科医师规范化培训基地和培训大纲的研究和建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国平; 牛丽娟; 王家骥

    2014-01-01

    近年来我国全科医生制度的建立已经取得明显的进展。一系列关于全科医学住院医生培训基地建设的方针政策和培训大纲指南的制定和完善,促进了在岗/转岗全科医生、骨干全科医生的培养和师资队伍从无到有的发展。同时也显示出这些大纲存在着一些不足和缺陷。主要表现在没有完全抓住全科医学培训的核心内容,即全科医学自身的重点培训,造成全科医学病房训练和长期连续的社区门诊服务培训缺失,过度重视临床专科轮转培训。随着全国应急性在岗/转岗全科医生及骨干全科医生培训逐渐过渡到规范化全科医生的长远培训上来,尽快修订现行大纲纠正这些重大缺陷十分迫切,从而为保障高水平的全科医学人才培训打下长远的坚实基础。%Establishment of family physician( General Practice,GP) system in China has made some noticeable pro-gress. A series of government policies and training curriculums on " residency programs" promoted growth of GP work force and teaching/education power through on-job training and job-switch training in GP. It has been also noted,however,some major flaws exist in the current national residency program curriculum,as it misses the core training components:the training in GP it-self,thanks to lack of GP department inpatient training and longitutive outpatient clinic training. The training program has been wrongly focused on various specialty rotation training. As current emergency models of on-job/job switch GP training are gradual-ly transitioned into long term formal residency programs,those major flaws in the current curriculum must be recognized and a-mended as soon as possible,in order to lay down a solid foundation for effective training of high quality GP( future family physi-cians)and for achieving healthcare reform goal in 2020 to provide better primary care for all people.

  4. Finding Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YUNYUN

    2010-01-01

    @@ It took 14 years--and just two min-utes-for an adopted Chinese girl to find her biological family. July 21 this year marked the first anniversary of Haley Butler's finding of her biological parents in Maanshan in east China's Anhui Province.

  5. Finding Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Discovering her birth parents was an exciting adventure for a 15-year-old girl It took 14 years-and just two minutes-for an adopted Chinese girl to find her biological family.July 21 this year marked the first

  6. Family Genericity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Type abstraction in object-oriented languages embody two techniques, each with its own strenghts and weaknesses. The first technique is extension, yielding abstraction mechanisms with good support for gradual specification. The prime example is inheritance. The second technique is functional abst...... the result as family genericity. The presented language design has been implemented....

  7. My Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘才来

    2002-01-01

    There are four people in my family. They are grandma, father,mother and I. Now we all live in Wuhan. They are from different places. My grandma comes from Sichuan. She likes hot(辣4的) meat very much. She doesn't like bread or noodles at all. She likes vegetables a little. My father is from Guang Zhou.

  8. Family Circle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Foster care is conducive to giving orphaned children a better life For most children living in orphanages, having a real home is just a pipe dream. Although they may be well looked after, receive a good education and proper nutrition, the love and care that come from being part of a real family just aren't there.

  9. FAMILY RICHARDIIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Lisiane Dilli; Ale-Rocha, Rosaly

    2016-06-14

    Richardiidae are a family of "acalyptrate" Diptera represented by ca. 180 species distributed in the New World, mostly in the Neotropical region. The species that occur in Colombia have received little attention from taxonomists, and the great majority of them are known only from their type localities. Currently, 14 genera and 23 species are known to occur in the country.

  10. My Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅

    2012-01-01

    There are four people in my family--my parents, my brother and I. My name is Li Mei. I'm fifteen years old. I am of medium height and build. I like English very much. It's very interesting. I can play the piano very well. It makes me feel very happy.

  11. Folklore medicinal plants of North Andaman Islands, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, P Rama Chandra; Reddy, C Sudhakar; Raza, S H; Dutt, C B S

    2008-09-01

    The rural folk of North Andaman, India use the traditional medicine for their primary health care. Folklore medicinal uses of 72 interesting medicinal plant species along with botanical name, local name, family, habit, part used, disease for which the drug is administrated, mode of administration are presented. These 72 plant species which provide the crude drugs pertain to 67 genera and 43 families of Magnoliophyta from tropical rainforests. These plants used to cure 40 ailments. Most remedies were taken orally, accounting for 76% of medicinal use. Most of the remedies were reported to have been from trees (55.6%) and herb (22.2%) species. The most widely sought after plant parts in the preparation of remedies in the areas are the stem bark (33.8%) and root (23.9%).

  12. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents.

  13. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects (Last updated 1/17/2017; last reviewed 1/17/2017) Key Points HIV medicines help people with ... will depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people ...

  14. The effects of achievement motivation and family environment of undergraduates majoring in preventive medicine on creativity tendency%预防医学本科生成就动机和家庭环境对其创造力倾向的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周政华; 刘振中; 潘池梅; 敬媛媛; 陈金

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析预防医学本科生成就动机和家庭环境对其创造力倾向的影响。方法选择某医学院预防医学本科一至五年级学生243人为研究对象,用自填式调查表调查一般情况、成就动机、家庭环境和威廉斯创造力倾向,用多重线性回归分析成就动机和家庭环境对创造力倾向的影响。使用SPSS 17.0进行统计分析。各指标在男生与女生之间的比较采用成组t检验,在年级之间的比较采用单因素方差分析,两两比较采用SNK法;两指标之间的相关性采用直线相关分析,进一步分析采用多重线性回归分析。结果本次调查共回收有效调查表226份。学生的成就动机、家庭环境、创造力倾向及各维度在年级之间、男女之间的差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05)。对创造力倾向各维度及总分正向影响因素有追求成功、知识性、娱乐性和组织性,负向影响因素有避免失败,R2为0.094~0.265,P=0.000~0.048。结论预防医学本科生成就动机和家庭环境可能对其创造力倾向有积极影响。应采取多方面综合措施改善家庭环境、增强成就动机,促进创造力倾向的提高,培养学生创造力和科研能力。%Objective To analyze the effects of achievement motivation and family environ-ment of undergraduates majoring in preventive medicine on creativity tendency. Methods The self-administered questionnaire was used to survey the general characteristics , achievement motivation , family environment, and Williams creativity tendency of undergraduates (n=243) from grade 1 to grade 5 majoring in preventive medicine in a medical college. The effects of achievement motivation and family environment on creativity tendency were tested with multiple linear regression analysis. SPSS 17.0 software was used for statistical analysis. The indexes between boys and girls was compared with group t test, and single factor analysis of variance

  15. A educação da infância: entre a família, a escola e a medicina Childhood education: among family, school and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Helena Pimenta Rocha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo examina comunicações apresentadas no II Congresso de Higiene Escolar e Pedagogia Fisiológica, realizado em Paris, em 1905, como fruto da iniciativa da Liga dos Médicos e das Famílias para a Higiene Escolar. Elegendo as comunicações que abordam questões ligadas à institucionalização da inspeção médica das escolas e aos dispositivos de registro dos dados obtidos por meio dos exames individuais dos alunos, procura-se flagrar as representações sobre a infância e sua educação produzidas no campo da higiene escolar, num momento marcado por intensas transformações sociais, importantes reformas voltadas para a universalização da escola primária, difusão de ideais de renovação e modernização pedagógica, bem como pela significativa ampliação das preocupações com a infância, sua proteção e sua educação. A análise das comunicações apresentadas nesse fórum põe em cena as disputas que marcaram o projeto de constituição de uma pedagogia científica calcada no conhecimento das leis que regiam o desenvolvimento da criança.This article is aimed at examining papers presented on the 2nd Congress of School Hygiene and Physiological Education held in Paris in 1905, as a result of the initiative of the Guild of Physicians and Families for School Hygiene. We aim at verifying the representations about childhood and education produced on the field of school hygiene in a period marked by intense social transformations, important reforms focused on the universalization of the elementary school, diffusion of ideals for the pedagogical renovation and modernization, as well as for the meaningful growth of concerns for childhood and children's protection and education. Therefore, we have selected papers that approach issues linked to the institutionalization of medical inspection of schools, and mechanisms of data collection obtained by means of individual students examination. The analysis of the papers presented in

  16. Preventive Medicine Redefined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, George

    1981-01-01

    Departments of preventive medicine can survive through unity, which can be achieved through majority agreement on a new and specific definition of preventive medicine. A definition is proposed that is based on a review and analysis of recent progress in the prevention of the major causes of mortality. (MLW)

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or hand. Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and ... medicine exams will involve an injection into a vein in your child's arm or hand. Children should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to ...

  18. Personalized Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Babak; Goodarzi, Parisa; Mohamadi-Jahani, Fereshteh; Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-03-01

    Personalized medicine as a novel field of medicine refers to the prescription of specific therapeutics procedure for an individual. This approach has established based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information and data. The terms precision and personalized medicines are sometimes applied interchangeably. However, there has been a shift from "personalized medicine" towards "precision medicine". Although personalized medicine emerged from pharmacogenetics, nowadays it covers many fields of healthcare. Accordingly, regenerative medicine and cellular therapy as the new fields of medicine use cell-based products in order to develop personalized treatments. Different sources of stem cells including mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been considered in targeted therapies which could give many advantages. iPSCs as the novel and individual pluripotent stem cells have been introduced as the appropriate candidates for personalized cell therapies. Cellular therapies can provide a personalized approach. Because of person-to-person and population differences in the result of stem cell therapy, individualized cellular therapy must be adjusted according to the patient specific profile, in order to achieve best therapeutic results and outcomes. Several factors should be considered to achieve personalized stem cells therapy such as, recipient factors, donor factors, and the overall body environment in which the stem cells could be active and functional. In addition to these factors, the source of stem cells must be carefully chosen based on functional and physical criteria that lead to optimal outcomes.

  19. Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Bremner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on structural elucidation of some of the alkaloids is reported briefly.

  20. Pharmacognostical evaluation of medicinally important Ficus retusa (Leaves and bark)

    OpenAIRE

    Alok Semwal; Ratendra Kumar; Udai Vir Singh Teotia; Ramandeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Ficus retusa (F. retusa) belongs to family Moraceae is a large and extensively growing tree across Indian continent. It's commonly known as Chilkan and Marabuten. This tree is claimed to have medicinal properties. The aim of present study is to investigate the pharmacognostical characters of important medicinal plant, F. retusa L. The pharmacognostic studies were carried out in terms of macroscopical, microscopical characters, standardization, phytoconstituents and chromatographic analysis of...

  1. Foucault and modern medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerson, A

    1995-06-01

    Modernity as a concept or ideal, resulting from the age of Enlightenment and the French Revolution gave hope of a better future and new possibilities. To be modern means an 'enlightened' individual and society, welcoming change and development. In this paper, I will discuss Foucault's analysis (1973) of problematics in medicine in eighteenth century France. Three themes prominent in the text are: 'the birth of the clinic', 'the clinical gaze' and the power-knowledge relationship. Three problematics identified in modern medicine by Foucault and which are particularly relevant to twentieth century medicine are: (i) the extension of the clinical gaze from the individual body to the wider population; (ii) the increasing medical intervention and use of technology in fundamental life processes; and (iii) the relationship between society and medicine. I will argue that Foucault's analysis is fraught with ambiguities. It is useful, however, for establishing an explanation for medicine today and for presenting a particular interpretation of modernity.

  2. Maimonides’ Appreciation for Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Gesundheit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moses Maimonides, the illustrious medieval rabbi and philosopher, dedicated the last decade of his life primarily to medicine. His strong interest in medicine was an integral component of his religious-philosophical teachings and world view. In this paper various sources from his rabbinic writings are presented that explain Maimonides’ motivation regarding and deep appreciation for medicine: (A The physician fulfills the basic biblical obligation to return lost objects to their owner, for with his knowledge and experience the physician can restore good health to his sick fellow human being; (B medicine provides a unique opportunity to practice imitatio dei, as it reflects the religious duty to maintain a healthy life-style; (C as an important natural science, medicine offers tools to recognize, love, and fear God. These three aspects address man’s relationship and obligation towards his fellow-man, himself and God. Biographical insights supported by additional sources from Maimonides’ writings are discussed.

  3. 2nd Research Meeting on Family and Community Medicine of Rio Grande do Sul 2ª Reunión de Investigación en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria de Rio Grande do Sul 2º Salão de Pesquisa em Medicina de Família e Comunidade do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Henrique Godinho Kolling

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Given the importance of encouraging the production and dissemination of researches in the specialty of Family and Community Medicine, an event, which aimed at creating opportunities to show research papers carried out by medical residents of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in 2008, was reported. At the end, the authors and the abstracts of their papers are listed.

    Dada la importancia de fomentar la producción y difusión de las investigaciones realizadas en la especialidad de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, se hace un informe de un evento que buscaba crear oportunidades para presentar trabajos de investigación realizados por médicos residentes del estado de Rio Grande do Sul, en 2008. Por último, enumeran a los autores y los resúmenes de los trabajos.
    Tendo em vista a importância de incentivar a produção e divulgação das pesquisas realizadas na especialidade de Medicina de Família e Comunidade, foi feito o relato de um evento que buscava oportunizar a apresentação de trabalhos de pesquisa desenvolvidos por médicos residentes do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, em 2008. Ao final, são listados os autores e respectivos resumos dos trabalhos.

  4. Natural Family Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex and Birth Control Birth Control Natural Family Planning Natural Family Planning Birth ControlPrevention and WellnessSex and Birth Control Share Natural Family Planning Natural Family PlanningWhat is natural family planning?Natural ...

  5. [A preliminary report on the investigation of medicinal plant resources in the Liupan Mountains of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Pu, X; Sun, J; Zhang, G

    1990-02-01

    In this paper, 423 species of medicinal plants belonging to 94 families in Liupan Mountains of Ningzia Hui Autonomous Region have been reported, of which 403 species belonging to 79 families are medicinal spermatophytes. The paper may serve as a reference for medical authorities in developing and utilizing plant resources.

  6. Health promotion. Strategies for family physicians.

    OpenAIRE

    McWilliam, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    The current emphasis on health promotion raises questions among experienced health professionals. Many wonder whether such care differs from what we have always done and have doubts about cost effectiveness and government motives. This paper explores the latest meaning of the term health promotion, the evolution of strategies to promote health, and the implications of these strategies for practising family medicine.

  7. Satisfaction of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension with care offered in family medicine clinics in Mexico Satisfacción en pacientes con diabetes mellitus o hipertensión arterial atendidos en clínicas de medicina familiar en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladislavovna Doubova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the satisfaction and the factors related to dissatisfaction in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension with care offered in family medicine clinics. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A secondary data analysis was conducted. Main outcome measures were two indices of satisfaction: family doctor-patient relationship (FDPR and clinic organizational arrangements (OA. RESULTS: Approximately half of patients (n=1 323 were satisfied with care. In the FDPR index the items "kindness of the family doctor" (FD scored high, while the lowest score was for the items: "the FD allows the patient to give an opinion about his/her treatment," "the patient understands the information" and "the FD spends enough time on the consultation." As for satisfaction with OA, the items "cleanliness of the clinic" and "ease of administrative procedures" obtained the lowest scores. In the logistic regression analysis the covariate "negative self-rated health" and "type of institution" were associated with dissatisfaction. CONCLUSIONS:There are aspects of the FDPR and OA that reveal dissatisfaction of patients with chronic conditions.OBJETIVO:Analizar la satisfacción y los factores relacionados con insatisfacción en pacientes con diabetes mellitus (DM o hipertensión arterial (HTA atendidos en clínicas de medicina familiar (MF. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS:Se realizó análisis secundario de datos. Las variables de resultado fueron dos índices de satisfacción: relación médico familiar-paciente (RMFP y aspectos organizacionales (AO. RESULTADOS:Aproximadamente la mitad de los pacientes (n=1 323 estuvieron satisfechos. Para la RMFP, "la amabilidad del MF" obtuvo la mayor calificación, y la más baja fue para "el MF permite la opinión del paciente sobre los tratamientos", "comprensión de la información" y "tiempo que el MF dedica al paciente". Para satisfacción con AO, "la limpieza de la clínica" y "fácil solución de los trámites administrativos

  8. American Academy of Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the field of sleep medicine. Join the American Academy of Sleep Medicine to further your career and ... MD Sept. 21 - As president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, I am keenly aware of ...

  9. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  11. Alternative Medicine and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Parents > Complementary and Alternative Medicine A ... works. previous continue How CAM Differs From Traditional Medicine CAM is frequently distinguished by its holistic methods, ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  13. Generic and biosimilar medicines: quid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Simoens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Once intellectual property protection, data and marketing exclusivity of reference medicines have expired, generic medicines and biosimilar medicines can enter the off-patent market. This market entry is conditional on the approval of marketing authorization, pricing and reimbursement. Given that there tends to be confusion surrounding generic and biosimilar medicines, this Editorial introduces basic concepts related to generic and biosimilar medicines and presents the different studies and articles included in this supplement dedicated to generic and biosimilar medicines.

  14. Dimensions and singularities of Family and Community Medicine Dimensiones y singularidades de la Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria Dimensões e singularidades da Medicina de Família e Comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A edição nº 24 da Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade (RBMFC traz importantes temas a nossa reflexão, tanto para a Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF - quanto à sua efetividade e abrangência - como para a especialidade em Medicina de Família e Comunidade (MFC, visto que apresenta temas que nos distinguem de outras áreas da biomedicina. A primeira temática poderia ser definida enquanto o potencial da ESF para a produção de saúde no Brasil. Um exemplo é o artigo Desempenho de indicadores nos municípios com alta cobertura da Estratégia Saúde da Família no Estado de São Paulo que destaca como alguns municípios desse Estado apresentam melhores resultados com relação aos indicadores pactuados, quando comparados com municípios que não expandiram a cobertura da ESF. A segunda temática resgata aspectos centrais da especialidade em MFC. Apesar da morte e sofrimento serem comuns a todas as especialidades médicas, na MFC, em particular, ela é problematizada na relação médico-paciente e nos programas de formação, como, por exemplo, na ferramenta Ciclo de vida1. Nesta ferramenta, a morte se destaca como uma das crises normativas que marcam a existência, visto que nela se encerra o drama do sofrimento e da condição humana2. Assim, o artigo Crying Patients in General/Family Practice: incidence, reasons for encounter and health problems resgata o potencial do MFC para ressignificar o sofrimento humano através do cuidado personalizado e longitudinal dos pacientes. Quais os significados das lágrimas? Estamos preparados para um aprofundamento nesta dimensão do cuidado? Esses matizes da profissão do MFC também se descortinam no caso clínico intitulado Ser Médico de (sua Família. Nele, o autor explora os limites da ética e da relação profissional-familiar ao contextualizar a tomada de decisão frente ao processo de cuidado, adoecimento e morte de um membro da família. Entretanto, a morte ainda segue

  15. Practical nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Gemmell, Howard G; Sharp, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in patient care, and this book is an essential guide for all practitioners to the many techniques that inform clinical management. The first part covers the scientific basis of nuclear medicine, the rest of the book deals with clinical applications. Diagnostic imaging has an increasingly important role in patient management and, despite advances in other modalities (functional MRI and spiral CT), nuclear medicine continues to make its unique contribution by its ability to demonstrate physiological function. This book is also expanded by covering areas of d

  16. [Development of external medicine and dermatology of TCM in the Republican period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhongjun; Wang, Li

    2015-05-01

    The inheritance of the theory in external medicine in the Republican period was mainly derived from Wai ke zheng zong (Orthodox Manual of External Medicine) and Yi zong jin jian (Golden Mirror of Medicine) and the sorting out of medical plasters, pills, and powders from Wai ke shi san fang (Thirteen Recipes of External Medicine). Zhang Shanlei's Yang ke gang yao (Guidelines for Ulcerations), based on the five-year experience of Zhu's family, offers new experience and ideas for syndrome differentiation; Ding Ganren's diagnosis for external medicine is exquisite with many well known formulae prescribed by himself; Monographs on leprosy and syphilis were published by famous physicians. Departments of external medicine and anal diseases, and classes on external medicine and dermatology and venereal diseases were set up in TCM schools in Guangdong and Zhejiang provinces with teaching materials compiled. All these mark the development of external medicine in modern age.

  17. [Virology of the family Togaviridae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshio; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakata, Masafumi; Okamoto, Kiyoko

    2011-12-01

    Many pathogens important for medicine, veterinary medicine or public health belong to the genera alphavirus and rubivirus within the family Togaviridae. 29 species of alphaviruses have been reported, and most of them are arboviruses. Chikungnya virus re-emerged in Kenya in 2004 and the epidemics spread to the Indian Ocean islands and many countries in South Asia, South-East Asia and Europe. On the other hand, rubella virus, a sole member of the genus rubivirus, is the causative agent of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Because human is only a natural host of the virus and effective live attenuated vaccines are available, immunization activities are strengthened globally to eliminate rubella and CRS, together with measles.

  18. American Academy of Pediatrics. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Vohra, Sunita; Walls, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics is dedicated to optimizing the well-being of children and advancing family-centered health care. Related to these goals, the American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes the increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and, as a result, the need to provide information and support for pediatricians. From 2000 to 2002, the American Academy of Pediatrics convened and charged the Task Force on Complementary and Alternative Medicine to address issues related to the use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and to develop resources to educate physicians, patients, and families. One of these resources is this report describing complementary and alternative medicine services, current levels of utilization and financial expenditures, and associated legal and ethical considerations. The subject of complementary and alternative medicine is large and diverse, and consequently, an in-depth discussion of each method of complementary and alternative medicine is beyond the scope of this report. Instead, this report will define terms; describe epidemiology; outline common types of complementary and alternative medicine therapies; review medicolegal, ethical, and research implications; review education and training for complementary and alternative medicine providers; provide resources for learning more about complementary and alternative medicine; and suggest communication strategies to use when discussing complementary and alternative medicine with patients and families.

  19. Essentials of periodontal medicine in preventive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of systemic disorders on periodontal diseases is well established. However, of growing interest is the effect of periodontal diseases on numerous systemic diseases or conditions like cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, pre-term low birth weight babies, preeclampsia, respiratory infections and others including osteoporosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, Alzheimer′s disease, gastrointestinal disease, prostatitis, renal diseases, which has also been scientifically validated. This side of the oral-systemic link has been termed Periodontal Medicine and is potentially of great public health significance, as periodontal disease is largely preventable and in many instances readily treatable, hence, providing many new opportunities for preventing and improving prognosis of several systemic pathologic conditions. This review article highlights the importance of prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases as an essential part of preventive medicine to circumvent its deleterious effects on general health.

  20. Mipomersen and other therapies for the treatment of severe familial hypercholesterolemia

    OpenAIRE

    Bell DA; Hooper AJ; Watts GF; Burnett JR

    2012-01-01

    Damon A Bell,1–3 Amanda J Hooper,1,2,4 Gerald F Watts,2,3 John R Burnett1–41Department of Core Clinical Pathology and Biochemistry, PathWest Laboratory Medicine, 2School of Medicine and Pharmacology, 3Lipid Disorders Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 4School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) i...

  1. Some Medicinal Plants Used in Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    prescriptions for treating dysentery, nephritis, hypertension and other diseases. The bark is also a sourse for the production of the alkaloid berberine ...which is produced in large wuantities in the Chinese People’s Republic. Berberine preparations have become widely used in medicine for treating...many alkaloids (up to 6-9$), the most important being berberine . There is an annual harvest of approximately 900 tons of wild coptis which is also a

  2. PALB2 germline mutations in familial breast cancer cases with personal and family history of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    PALB2 germline mutations in familial breast cancer cases with personal and family history of pancreatic cancer phone: +39-02-23903224 (Radice, Paolo) (Radice, Paolo) IFOM, Fondazione Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare - Milan - ITALY (Peterlongo, Paolo) Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Unit of Molecular Bases of Genetic Risk and Genetic Testing, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori - Milan - ITALY (Peterlongo, Pao...

  3. Perceptions and patterns of use of generic drugs among Italian family pediatricians: first round results of a web survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Valentina; Mameli, Chiara; Cattaneo, Dario; Delle Fave, Antonella; Preziosa, Alessandra; Mele, Giuseppe; Clementi, Emilio; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2012-03-01

    Prescription of generic medicines represents an efficacious healthcare cost containment strategy. In some European countries and in the US, generic medicines are largely prescribed. In Italy, generic drugs prescription rate is lower. General Practitioners and Family Pediatricians may be less confident in prescribing generic equivalents instead of "branded" medicines. There are currently no data about Italian Family Pediatricians' perceptions and patterns of use of generic drugs. This is a first nationwide web survey conducted with the aim to evaluate generic medicines knowledge and prescribing habits of Italian Family Pediatricians. 303 Family Pediatricians completed the online questionnaire. 37.2% and 32.6% of them declared to have a sufficient or fairly good knowledge of generic medicines, respectively, and the majority of them believed that efficacy of generic medicines was sufficient (33.6%) or good (45.2%). Nevertheless, Italian Family Pediatricians are still prone to prescribe trade medicines more frequently, since only 13.5% of them declared that more than a half of their patients were treated with generic medicines. Major issues related with generic medicines prescriptions by Italian Family Pediatricians seem to be represented by diffuse scepticism about reliability of bioequivalence tests and safety of switchability from branded to generic equivalents. More information about generic drugs and more research in the field of pediatric pharmacology are needed for increasing generic medicines prescription rate among Italian Family Pediatricians.

  4. Pregnancy and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control long-term health problems like asthma, diabetes, depression, or seizures. Also, some women have a pregnancy problem that needs treatment with medicine. These problems might include severe nausea and vomiting, ...

  5. Astronomy, Astrology, and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Dorian Gieseler

    Astronomy and astrology were combined with medicine for thousands of years. Beginning in Mesopotamia in the second millennium BCE and continuing into the eighteenth century, medical practitioners used astronomy/astrology as an important part of diagnosis and prescription. Throughout this time frame, scientists cited the similarities between medicine and astrology, in addition to combining the two in practice. Hippocrates and Galen based medical theories on the relationship between heavenly bodies and human bodies. In an enduring cultural phenomenon, parts of the body as well as diseases were linked to zodiac signs and planets. In Renaissance universities, astronomy and astrology were studied by students of medicine. History records a long tradition of astrologer-physicians. This chapter covers the topic of astronomy, astrology, and medicine from the Old Babylonian period to the Enlightenment.

  6. Terpenoids for medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischedick, Justin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is concerns research on monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, and diterpenoids with medicinal properties. Terpenoids from commond herbs as well as Cannabis sativa, Inula britannica, Tanacetum parthenium, and Salvia officinalis were investigated

  7. Occupational Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Learning Objectives are: (1) Understand the unique work environment of astronauts. (2) Understand the effect microgravity has on human physiology (3) Understand how NASA Space Medicine Division is mitigating the health risks of space missions.

  8. Challenges in sexual medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cellek, Selim; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2012-01-01

    The sexual medicine field has been in mode of revolution until recently. Like all other fields of biomedical research, the economic situation around the world has had a negative impact on the field's momentum-research funding bodies, regulatory bodies and pharmaceutical companies seem to have...... placed sexual medicine in their low-priority list. But this is not the only challenge the field is facing. The successful development of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors for treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) means that research in this area seems to have slowed. However, there remain...... several unmet medical needs within sexual medicine such as premature ejaculation, severe ED and hypoactive sexual desire disorder, which await novel therapeutic approaches. Despite these challenges, research into finding and developing such therapies is likely to continue in the sexual medicine field...

  9. Exercise as medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Saltin, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    This review provides the reader with the up-to-date evidence-based basis for prescribing exercise as medicine in the treatment of 26 different diseases: psychiatric diseases (depression, anxiety, stress, schizophrenia); neurological diseases (dementia, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis...

  10. Occupational medicine and toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Axel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This editorial is to announce the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. Occupational medicine and toxicology belong to the most wide ranging disciplines of all medical specialties. The field is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, management and scientific analysis of diseases from the fields of occupational and environmental medicine and toxicology. It also covers the promotion of occupational and environmental health. The complexity of modern industrial processes has dramatically changed over the past years and today's areas include effects of atmospheric pollution, carcinogenesis, biological monitoring, ergonomics, epidemiology, product safety and health promotion. We hope that the launch of the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology will aid in the advance of these important areas of research bringing together multi-disciplinary research findings.

  11. Darwin, medicine and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, A D; Sullivan, R

    2010-02-01

    'Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution'! So said Theodore Dobzhansky. It is extraordinary how little Darwinism and post-Darwinian evolutionary science has penetrated medicine despite the fact that all biology is built upon its foundations. Randy Nesse, one of the fathers of Darwinian medicine, recently observed that doctors 'know the facts but not the origins'. Clearly, then, in this auspicious year-200 years since Charles Darwin's birth and 150 years since the first edition of the Origin of Species-it is time to reconsider Darwin's legacy to medicine and to invite evolution back into the biomedical fold. Here, we consider the legacy of Darwin and the contribution of the other great evolutionists such as Ernst Mayr to cancer and medicine.

  12. Submarine Medicine Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Submarine Medicine Team conducts basic and applied research on biomedical aspects of submarine and diving environments. It focuses on ways to optimize the health...

  13. Medicine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... registry for your medicine. www.fda.gov/pregnancyregistries Pregnancy Social Media Toolkit The FDA Office of Women's Health offers ... and other products used during pregnancy. Use the Pregnancy Social Media Toolkit to inform pregnant women in your network ...

  14. [Palliative psychosomatic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, U

    2001-07-01

    Psychotherapeutic medicine, the area of medicinal specialisation dealing with the foundations of psychosomatic medicine, so far dealt mostly with diagnosis and therapy of acute diseases. The course of illness in patients with bio-psycho-social disorders however ist most often chronic. Sigmund Freud the founder of scientific psychotherapy himself was a patient in palliative care for 26 years and underwent over 30 surgical procedures to treat his carcinoma of the palate and jaw. Some goals and psychotherapeutic strategies of intervention that can be used in palliative psychosomatic medicine are laid out. This important field has in itself so far not reached a wide spread recognition and there are hardly any theoretical concepts or empirical validation to be found.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... beforehand, especially if sedation is to be used. Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in ... PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed ... the thyroid gland. top of page How does the procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an ...

  17. Physicochemical and Phytochemical Examination of Medicinal Plants Used in Indigenous System of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Santosh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the physicochemical and phytochemical examination of seventy-six medicinal plants belonging to thirty-six dicot and six monocot families. These are used in indigenous system of medicine as well as local inhabitants either as single drugs or in combination, for the cure of various ailments. In physicochemical study, the parameters such as moisture content, pH (1% aqueous, total ash, acid insoluble ash, water-soluble extractive and alcohol soluble extractive were carried out. The preliminary phytochemical study was done for the detection of secondary metabolites such as alkaloid, flavonoid, glycoside, phenol, saponin, resin, steroid and tannin. The preliminary phytochemical study revealed the presence of alkaloid and saponin in 68.4%; flavonoid in 44.7%; glycoside, phenol and steroid in 72.37%; resin in 60.5% and tannin in 71% of selected medicinal plants.

  18. CURRENT STATE OF THE COLLECTION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS OF THE YAKUTSK BOTANICAL GARDEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenova V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article considers data on the stocktaking of plants in the collection of medicinal plants of the Yakut Botanical Garden on the following parameters: the study of the component composition, the inclusion in the Pharmacopoeia articles and the Russian State Register of medicinal products. Introduction test in the collection has been performed for 158 species from 99 genera and 41 families, currently the collection has 101 species from 79 genera and 34 families. Chemical composition of plants is known for 61 species. 17 species are pharmacopoeal and 15 species make medicinal products available. The rest of the medicinal plants can be used in folk medicine. Most represented are Asteraceae family (25, Ranunculaceae (20, Rosaceae (16, Fabaceae (15, Lamiaceae (13, among tested plants. According to the assessment of introduction capabilities, 49 species in the collection are highly stable, 51 - stable and just one is unstable

  19. Biomarkers in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael J; Smith, Emily R; Turfle, Phillip G

    2017-02-08

    This article summarizes the relevant definitions related to biomarkers; reviews the general processes related to biomarker discovery and ultimate acceptance and use; and finally summarizes and reviews, to the extent possible, examples of the types of biomarkers used in animal species within veterinary clinical practice and human and veterinary drug development. We highlight opportunities for collaboration and coordination of research within the veterinary community and leveraging of resources from human medicine to support biomarker discovery and validation efforts for veterinary medicine.

  20. Traditional Medicinal Flora of the District Buxar (Bihar, India)

    OpenAIRE

    Ritesh Singh; Manavendra Kumar Singh; Arvind Singh

    2013-01-01

    Buxar district (Bihar,India) is one of the less floristically studied regions of central Gangetic plain. The district lacks dense forests and its medicinal flora exclusively consists of dicot angiosperms. A total of 84 species belonging to 27 families were reported in this study. Majority of the reported plants were herbs with highest contribution from family Fabaceae (12). The present paper deals with the traditional uses of these plants. Plants and their part thereof were used to treat dise...

  1. Robotics in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, D. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technologies play a very important role in our lives. It is hard to imagine how people can get along without personal computers, and companies - without powerful computer centers. Nowadays, many devices make modern medicine more effective. Medicine is developing constantly, so introduction of robots in this sector is a very promising activity. Advances in technology have influenced medicine greatly. Robotic surgery is now actively developing worldwide. Scientists have been carrying out research and practical attempts to create robotic surgeons for more than 20 years, since the mid-80s of the last century. Robotic assistants play an important role in modern medicine. This industry is new enough and is at the early stage of development; despite this, some developments already have worldwide application; they function successfully and bring invaluable help to employees of medical institutions. Today, doctors can perform operations that seemed impossible a few years ago. Such progress in medicine is due to many factors. First, modern operating rooms are equipped with up-to-date equipment, allowing doctors to make operations more accurately and with less risk to the patient. Second, technology has enabled to improve the quality of doctors' training. Various types of robots exist now: assistants, military robots, space, household and medical, of course. Further, we should make a detailed analysis of existing types of robots and their application. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the most popular types of robots used in medicine.

  2. Biobanking for Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Angen; Pollard, Kai

    2015-01-01

    A biobank is an entity that collects, processes, stores, and distributes biospecimens and relevant data for use in basic, translational, and clinical research. Biobanking of high-quality human biospecimens such as tissue, blood and other bodily fluids along with associated patient clinical information provides a fundamental scientific infrastructure for personalized medicine. Identification of biomarkers that are specifically associated with particular medical conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and neurological disorders are useful for early detection, prevention, and treatment of the diseases. The ability to determine individual tumor biomarkers and to use those biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy is having a very significant impact on personalized medicine and is rapidly changing the way clinical care is conducted. As a critical requirement for personalized medicine is the availability of a large collection of patient samples with well annotated patient clinical and pathological data, biobanks thus play an important role in personalized medicine advancement. The goal of this chapter is to explore the role of biobanks in personalized medicine and discuss specific needs regarding biobank development for translational and clinical research, especially for personalized medicine advancement.

  3. Integration of Traditional Chinese Medicine and modern medicine promotes the unification of human medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nThere are two mutually supportive systems in medical profession: modern medicines and traditional medicine. The current status is that although the modern medicine occupies the major position in healthcare system, the therapeutic effect of traditional medicines should not be omitted. If all of them merged and unified as one, it will be beneficial to the development of human medicine. In this paper, the integration of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM and modern medicine was exemplified to elucidate the mutual complements, mutual benefits of traditional medicines and modern medicine to maintain the unification of human medicine via the development of molecular biology, cytology etc. We believed that TCM theory may share the same mechanism with western medicine at some extent which need to be explored in the future research. In our point of view, although the road may twist and turn, the results are promising.

  4. Pediatric integrative medicine: pediatrics' newest subspecialty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vohra Sunita

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrative medicine is defined as relationship-centered care that focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing, including evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine. Pediatric integrative medicine (PIM develops and promotes this approach within the field of pediatrics. We conducted a survey to identify and describe PIM programs within academic children’s hospitals across North America. Key barriers and opportunities were identified for the growth and development of academic PIM initiatives in the US and Canada. Methods Academic PIM programs were identified by email and eligible for inclusion if they had each of educational, clinical, and research activities. Program directors were interviewed by telephone regarding their clinical, research, educational, and operational aspects. Results Sixteen programs were included. Most (75% programs provided both inpatient and outpatient services. Seven programs operated with less than 1 FTE clinical personnel. Credentialing of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM providers varied substantially across the programs and between inpatient and outpatient services. Almost all (94% programs offered educational opportunities for residents in pediatrics and/or family medicine. One fifth (20% of the educational programs were mandatory for medical students. Research was conducted in a range of topics, but half of the programs reported lack of research funding and/or time. Thirty-one percent of the programs relied on fee-for-service income. Conclusions Pediatric integrative medicine is emerging as a new subspecialty to better help address 21st century patient concerns.

  5. Family Resilience in the Military: Definitions, Models, and Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    also seen increased rates of traumatic brain injury, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and suicide among service members. Many families have...or chronic . For example, a family member’s deployment could be considered an adverse situation that is both a single stressful event and an...resilience in chronic psychiatric illnesses,” Medicine and Health Rhode Island, 94(2), 2011, 45–46. Hill, R., “Generic features of families under stress

  6. A primary study on curative effect of a family rehabilitation model by combination of medi-cine with education for children with severe cerebral palsy%“医教结合”的家庭康复对重度脑瘫患儿运动功能的疗效初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张树新; 包惠萍; 杜青; 周璇; 邓巍巍; 陈楠; 宋琰萍; 于虹; 朱慧; 张洪鑫

    2014-01-01

    Objective To preliminarily investigate the effectiveness of a family rehabilitation treatment model of combining medicine with education in promotion of motor function in children with severe cerebral palsy .Methods A treatment plan for 3 chil-dren (2 males and one female ) with severe cerebral palsy was made by physiatrician ,physical therapist and special education teacher after periodic assessment .Their parents and special education teachers received guidance and training to perform a family education .All of the children were assessed with Gross Motor Function Measure ( GMFM) and Fine Motor Function Measure ( FMFM) before and af-ter 6 months treatment.Results The total scores of GMFM-66,FMFM and each dimension score of GMFM-88 were improved in all children after 6 months treatment when compared to treatment before .Conclusion The combining medicine with education model can effectively improve the recovery of gross and fine motor function in children with cerebral palsy .%目的:初步探讨采用“医教结合”的家庭康复模式对重度脑瘫患儿运动功能促进的有效性。方法重度脑瘫患儿3名(男2例,女1例),由专业康复机构医师和治疗师定期进行康复评估和治疗方案制订,并对家长(照料者)和特殊教育学校教师进行指导与培训,开展家庭康复治疗。治疗前、后6个月采用粗大运动功能测试量表( gross motor function measure , GMFM)、精细运动功能测试量表( fine motor function measure scale ,FMFM)对患儿的粗大和精细运动功能进行评估。结果治疗6个月后,GMFM66项总分、GMFM88项坐位、爬与跪两项和FMFM能力分均高于治疗前,差异具有统计学意义(均P<0.05)。结论“医教结合”的家庭康复模式可以发挥医学康复和特殊教育的共同促进作用,充分利用家庭康复资源,从而有效改善脑瘫患儿运动功能。

  7. Herbal Remedies for Functional Dyspepsia and Traditional Iranian Medicine Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeian, Mahmoud; Naseri, Mohsen; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Emadi, Fatemeh; Feizi, Awat; Hosseini Yekta, Nafiseh; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Context: Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a functional gastro-intestinal disorder with high prevalence. Among various treatment options, treatment by complementary and alternative medicines especially herbal remedies also practiced. Traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), a valuable resource of valid applied studies of ancient Iranian scholars, recommends numerous medicinal plants to treat dyspepsia symptoms. In this study, through investigation of TIM references, we aimed to identify medicinal plants for treatment of digestion insufficiency. Evidence Acquisition: In this qualitative study, dyspepsia symptoms including fullness, early satiety, bloating, nausea, and belching were checked under reliable sources of traditional medicine. Then medicinal plants recommended for the treatment of the symptoms were extracted from the books. Likewise, for investigating the pharmacological properties of medicinal plants used for the relieving of dyspepsia symptoms, electronic databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar and some Iranian databases like SID and IranMedex were employed. Results: The study yielded 105 plants from 37 families which could treat various dyspepsia symptoms; fifty-seven plants, mainly from Apiaceae, Lamiaceae, Amaryllidaceae and Zingiberaceae had digestive effects. In this research, based on the information in TIM reference texts, we obtained 58 plants effective for bloating, 40 for nausea, 37 for appetite loss and 7 for belching. In human clinical trials conducted on medicinal plants effective for FD symptoms, 7 single plants were used. Conclusions: Finding the medicinal plants effective on digestion insufficiency based on TIM could suggest a better strategy for the relieving of dyspepsia symptoms. Traditional Iranian medicine prescribes medicinal plants based on each patient’s personal characteristics and practices multiple target therapies. PMID:26734483

  8. Roles within the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Text Size Email Print Share Roles Within the Family Page Content Article Body Families are not democracies. ...

  9. Geriatric management in medieval Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Morteza; Sadeghpour, Omid; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2013-10-01

    In Iran, a large group of patients are elderly people and they intend to have natural remedies as treatment. These remedies are rooted in historical of Persian and humoral medicine with a backbone of more than 1000 years. The current study was conducted to draw together medieval pharmacological information related to geriatric medicine from some of the most often manuscripts of traditional Persian medicine. Moreover, we investigated the efficacy of medicinal plants through a search of the PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar databases. In the medieval Persian documents, digestible and a small amount of food such as chicken broth, honey, fig and plum at frequent intervals as well as body massage and morning unctioning are highly recommended. In the field of pharmacotherapy, 35 herbs related to 25 families were identified. Plants were classified as tonic, anti-aging, appetizer, memory and mood enhancer, topical analgesic and laxative as well as health improvement agents. Other than historical elucidation, this paper presents medical and pharmacological approaches that medieval Persian practitioners applied to deal with geriatric complications.

  10. Some Ethical Issues in Prehospital Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbay, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Prehospital emergency medical care has many challenges including unpredictable patient profiles, emergency conditions, and administration of care in a non-medical area. Many conflicts occur in a prehospital setting that require ethical decisions to be made. An overview of the some of ethical issues in prehospital emergency care settings is given in this article. Ethical aspects of prehospital emergency medicine are classified into four groups: the process before medical interventions, including justice, stigmatization, dangerous situations, and safe driving; the treatment process, including triage, refusal of treatment or transport, and informed consent; the end of life and care, including life-sustaining treatments, prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), withholding or withdrawal of CPR, and family presence during resuscitation; and some ambulance perception issues, including ambulance misuse, care of minors, and telling of bad news. Prehospital emergency medicine is quite different from emergency medicine in hospitals, and all patients and situations are unique. Consequently, there are no quick formulas for the right action and emotion. It is important to recognize the ethical conflicts that occur in prehospital emergency medicine and then act to provide the appropriate care that is of optimal value.

  11. Transformation of medicinal plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurska, Katarzyna; Berdowska, Agnieszka; Król, Małgorzata

    2016-12-20

    For many years attempts are made to develop efficient methods for transformation of medicinal plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. It is a soil bacteria which possess a natural ability to infect plants in places of injures which results in arise of cancerous growths (crown gall). This is possible thanks a transfer of fragment of Ti plasmid into plant cells and stable integration with a plant genome. Efficiency of medicinal plant transformation depends on many factors for example: Agrobacterium strain, methods and procedures of transformation as well as on plant species, type and age of the explants and regeneration conditions. The main goal of plant transformation is to increase the amount of naturally occurring bioactive compounds and the production of biopharmaceuticals. Genetic plant transformation via bacteria of the genus Agrobacterium is a complex process which requires detailed analysis of incorporated transgene expression and occurs only in the case when the plant cell acquires the ability to regenerate. In many cases, the regeneration efficiency observed in medicinal plants are inefficient after applied transformation procedures. To date there have been attempts of genetic transformation by using A. tumefaciens of medicinal plants belonging to the families: Apocynaceae, Araceae, Araliaceae, Asphodelaceae, Asteraceae, Begoniaceae, Crassulaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Linaceae, Papaveraceae, Plantaginaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Solanaceae.

  12. Genomic medicine, precision medicine, personalized medicine: what's in a name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, D M; Tyndale, R F

    2013-08-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics is devoted to genomic medicine, and a reader may reasonably ask what we mean when we use those words. In the initial issue of the journal Genomics in 1987, McKusick and Ruddle pointed out that the descriptor "genome" had been coined in 1920 as a hybrid of "gene" and "chromosome," and that their new journal would focus on the "newly-developing discipline of mapping/sequencing (including analysis of the information)." A key milestone in the field was the generation of the first draft of a human genome in 2000, but this success really represents only one of many milestones in the journey from Mendel to MiSeq.

  13. Intention to Encourage Complementary and Alternative Medicine among General Practitioners and Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Gaston; Beaulieu, Dominique; Touchette, Jean-Sebastien; Lambert, Leo-Daniel; Dodin, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    The authors' goal was to identify factors explaining intention to encourage a patient to follow complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment among general practitioners (GPs), fourth-year medical students, and residents in family medicine. They surveyed 500 GPs and 904 medical students via a self-administered mailed questionnaire that…

  14. [Influenza-like illness. Therapeutic experience in family medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Cortés, Gerardo; García-Zavala, Guadalupe Ulises; Estrada-Andrade, María Elena

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la influenza es una enfermedad respiratoria muy contagiosa. Se debe iniciar el tratamiento antiviral en las primeras 48 horas para evitar la neumonía. El objetivo de este informe es describir la experiencia en el tratamiento de la enfermedad tipo influenza en una unidad de medicina familiar. Métodos: estudio descriptivo de pacientes que acudieron a urgencias con enfermedad tipo influenza (fiebre de 38 °C, cefalea y tos, acompañadas de otro síntoma) y que fueron contactados por vía telefónica. Los datos se expresan en media ± desviación estándar. Resultados: de 537 consultas por infecciones respiratorias agudas, 1.3 % reunió los criterios de enfermedad tipo influenza; 85.7 % era del sexo masculino. El promedio de la edad fue de 18 ± 24.21 años. La atención inicial ocurrió a las 19.14 horas después de que se iniciaron los síntomas. Todos los pacientes recibieron oseltamivir y zanamivir; 14.3 % presentó neumonía. El 100 % se restableció. No hubo enfermedades concomitantes. Conclusiones: existe un protocolo para el manejo de la enfermedad tipo influenza que hace posible el diagnóstico y el tratamiento oportunos de los pacientes.

  15. All in the family: law, medicine and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Malcolm

    2008-02-01

    In this first Bioethical Issues column the author outlines some of the distinctions and congruities between ethics and law, and between bioethics and medical law. The evidence for connections is obvious and wide-ranging, appearing within health and medical education, the academic literature, statute and case law, professional guidelines and the activities of professional associations, the history of legal practice and philosophical inquiry, and the emergence of human rights theory and applications. The interpenetration of morals and law is examined first by briefly tracing the development of natural law and legal positivism. These links are then developed through a number of examples which are the subjects of both bioethical and legal interest: decision-making capacity, what constitutes good medical practice in the advance care planning context, sex selection, embryo experimentation and posthumous conception. These topics illustrate some of the explicit and some of the less obvious ways in which moral considerations and medical law interact, and suggest that biolaw can involve inconsistencies and even obfuscation which, while difficult to avoid in plural societies, are appropriate areas for examination. In the final section the author argues that bioethics and medical law share some important logical features, including a prescriptivist, principled structure, which is subject to the related requirements of specification and universalisability. Again, medico-legal illustrations are used to support this proposal, which also constitutes a suitable topic for critique. Future columns will provide the opportunity for those who care about the issues of bioethics and medical law to share their thoughts and those of their colleagues.

  16. Implementation of Advanced Access in a Family Medicine Residency Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ann; Wiser, Eric; Barclay, Emily; Aiello, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Several models of scheduling have been documented in the literature, including the traditional model, the carve-out model, and the advanced access model. We describe the implementation of the advanced access model in our clinic, which has been very successful. Advanced access has decreased third next available appointments to less than seven days for many of our providers and has increased individual primary care physician continuity for 40% of our providers. Interestingly, we had no gains in patient satisfaction, which is consistent with other previously published studies on advanced access.

  17. Can scientific medicine incorporate alternative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, G; Vettor, R

    2000-06-01

    The authors examine the problem of defining alternative medicine, and after a brief analysis conclude that a satisfactory unifying definition of the different practices is not possible. Scientific knowledge is a function of scientific method. In turn the principle of falsifiability proposed by Karl Popper is used as a demarcation line between science and pseudoscience. They assert that the various alternative modalities do not represent authentic scientific disciplines, as they lack many of the minimum requirements of scientific discourse and, above all, because they violate the principle of falsifiability. Until they overcome these methodological shortcomings, alternative medical practices cannot become authentic scientific disciplines.

  18. Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    The construct, family resilience, is defined differently by practitioners and researchers. This study tries to clarify the concept of family resilience. The foundation is family stress and coping theory, particularly the stress models that emphasize adaptation processes in families exposed to major adversities. (JDM)

  19. Ethnoveterinary medicine of the Shervaroy Hills of Eastern Ghats, India as alternative medicine for animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usha, Swaminathan; Rajasekaran, Chandrasekaran; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    The Eastern Ghats of India is well known for its wealth of natural vegetation and Shervaroy is a major hill range of the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu. Ethnomedicinal studies in the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu or the Shervaroy Hills have been carried out by various researchers. However, there is not much information available on ethnoveterinary medicine in the Eastern Ghats of India. The aim of this study was to examine the potential use of folk plants as alternative medicine for cattle to cure various diseases in the Shervaroy Hills of the Eastern Ghats. Based on interactions with traditional medicine practitioners, it has been observed that a total of 21 medicinal plants belonging to 16 families are used to cure various diseases such as mastitis, enteritis, arthritis, stomatitis, salivation from the mouth, wounding, and conjunctivitis in animals. It has been observed that the traditional knowledge of ethnoveterinary medicine is now confined only among the surviving older people and a few practitioners in the tribal communities of the Shervaroy Hills. Unfortunately, no serious attempts have been made to document and preserve this immense treasure of traditional knowledge.

  20. Cross-cultural comparison of medicinal floras used against snakebites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molander, Marianne; Saslis-Lagoudakis, C Haris; Jäger, Anna K;

    2012-01-01

    highlighted families respectively). At the genus level, only Piper (Piperaceae) was recovered as a 'hot' genus in at least two floras. Seven genera were highlighted by both analyses (25-44% of the highlighted genera). CONCLUSIONS: Cross-cultural comparison of medicinal floras used against snakebites appears...

  1. Potential applications of electron emission membranes in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilevych, Yevgen [Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration (IZM), Berlin (Germany); University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Brunner, Stefan E. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Chan, Hong Wah; Charbon, Edoardo [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Graaf, Harry van der, E-mail: vdgraaf@nikhef.nl [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hagen, Cornelis W. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nützel, Gert; Pinto, Serge D. [Photonis, Roden (Netherlands); Prodanović, Violeta [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Rotman, Daan [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Santagata, Fabio [State Key Lab for Solid State Lighti Changzhou base, F7 R& D HUB 1, Science and Education Town, Changzhou 213161, Jangsu Province (China); Sarro, Lina; Schaart, Dennis R. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Sinsheimer, John; Smedley, John [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Tao, Shuxia; Theulings, Anne M.M.G. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-11

    With a miniaturised stack of transmission dynodes, a noise free amplifier is being developed for the detection of single free electrons, with excellent time- and 2D spatial resolution and efficiency. With this generic technology, a new family of detectors for individual elementary particles may become possible. Potential applications of such electron emission membranes in medicine are discussed.

  2. [Multiprofessional team working in palliative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Iwao

    2013-04-01

    Now, more than ever, palliative medicine has been gaining recognition for its essential role in cancer treatment. Since its beginning, it has emphasized the importance of collaboration among multidisciplinary professionals, valuing a comprehensive and holistic philosophy, addressing a wide range of hopes and suffering that patients and families experience. There are three models (approaches) for the medical teams: multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary. Palliative care teams often choose the interdisciplinary team model, and the teams in the palliative care units may often choose the transdisciplinary team model. Recently, accumulating research has shown the clinical benefits of the interdisciplinary/transdisciplinary approach in palliative care settings. Clarifying appropriate functions and ideal features of physicians in the health care team, and enforcing the suitable team approach will contribute to improve the quality of whole medical practice beyond the framework of "palliative medicine".

  3. Women residents, women physicians and medicine's future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Karen

    2007-08-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased dramatically in the last few decades, and women now represent half of all incoming medical students. Yet residency training still resembles the historical model when there were few women in medicine. This article reviews the issues facing women in residency today. Data suggest that the experience of female residents is more negative than that of males. Unique challenges facing female residents include the existence of gender bias and sexual harassment, a scarcity of female mentors in leadership positions, and work/family conflicts. Further research is needed to understand the experience of female residents and to identify barriers that hinder their optimal professional and personal development. Structural and cultural changes to residency programs are needed to better accommodate the needs of female trainees.

  4. A national survey of family physicians: perspectives on collaboration with marriage and family therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rebecca E; Linville, Deanna; Rosen, Karen H

    2009-04-01

    Recognizing the fit between family medicine and marriage and family therapy (MFT), members of both fields have made significant advances in collaborative health research and practice. To add to this work, we surveyed a nationwide random sample of 240 family physicians (FPs) and asked about their perspectives and experiences of collaboration with MFTs. We found that FPs frequently perceive a need for their patients to receive MFT-related care, but their referral to and collaboration with MFTs were limited. Through responses to an open-ended question, we gained valuable information as to how MFTs could more effectively initiate collaboration with FPs.

  5. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  6. Anticipation and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    In this book, practicing physicians and experts in anticipation present arguments for a new understanding of medicine. Their contributions make it clear that medicine is the decisive test for anticipation. The reader is presented with a provocative hypothesis: If medicine will align itself with the anticipatory condition of life, it can prompt the most important revolution in our time. To this end, all stakeholders—medical practitioners, patients, scientists, and technology developers—will have to engage in the conversation. The book makes the case for the transition from expensive, and only marginally effective, reactive treatment through “spare parts” (joint replacements, organ transplants) and reliance on pharmaceuticals (antibiotics, opiates) to anticipation-informed healthcare. Readers will understand why the current premise of treating various behavioral conditions (attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, schizophrenia) through drugs has to be re-evaluated from the perspective of anticipation...

  7. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, B.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Ionizing Radiation Div., Gaithersburg MD (United States); Judge, St. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient. (authors)

  8. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Brian E.; Judge, Steven

    2007-08-01

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient.

  9. Engineering in translational medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a broad area of engineering research in translational medicine. Leaders in academic institutions around the world contributed focused chapters on a broad array of topics such as: cell and tissue engineering (6 chapters), genetic and protein engineering (10 chapters), nanoengineering (10 chapters), biomedical instrumentation (4 chapters), and theranostics and other novel approaches (4 chapters). Each chapter is a stand-alone review that summarizes the state-of-the-art of the specific research area. Engineering in Translational Medicine gives readers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of a broad array of related research areas, making this an excellent reference book for scientists and students both new to engineering/translational medicine and currently working in this area.

  10. Polypharmacy in Zoological Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Hunter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Polypharmacy is a term that describes the inappropriate, concurrent use of multiple drugs in an individual patient. Zoological medicine practitioners must take approved agents (veterinary or human and extrapolate their use to non-approved species often with little species-specific pharmacological evidence to support their decisions. When considering polypharmacy, even less information exists concerning multi-drug pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, or potential drug-drug interactions in non-domestic species. Unfortunately, captive, zoological species are susceptible, just like their domestic counterparts, to chronic diseases and co-morbidities that may lead to the usage of multiple drugs. Polypharmacy is a recognized and important issue in human medicine, as well as an emerging issue for veterinarians; thus, this paper will discuss the novel, potential risks of polypharmacy in zoological medicine. Hopefully, this discussion will help bring the attention of veterinarians to this issue and serve as an interesting discussion topic for pharmacologists in general.

  11. Cytomics in predictive medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnok, Attila; Valet, Guenther K.

    2004-07-01

    Predictive Medicine aims at the detection of changes in patient's disease state prior to the manifestation of deterioration or improvement of the current status. Patient-specific, disease-course predictions with >95% or >99% accuracy during therapy would be highly valuable for everyday medicine. If these predictors were available, disease aggravation or progression, frequently accompanied by irreversible tissue damage or therapeutic side effects, could then potentially be avoided by early preventive therapy. The molecular analysis of heterogeneous cellular systems (Cytomics) by cytometry in conjunction with pattern-oriented bioinformatic analysis of the multiparametric cytometric and other data provides a promising approach to individualized or personalized medical treatment or disease management. Predictive medicine is best implemented by cell oriented measurements e.g. by flow or image cytometry. Cell oriented gene or protein arrays as well as bead arrays for the capture of solute molecules form serum, plasma, urine or liquor are equally of high value. Clinical applications of predictive medicine by Cytomics will include multi organ failure in sepsis or non infectious posttraumatic shock in intensive care, or the pretherapeutic identification of high risk patients in cancer cytostatic. Early individualized therapy may provide better survival chances for individual patient at concomitant cost containment. Predictive medicine guided early reduction or stop of therapy may lower or abrogate potential therapeutic side effects. Further important aspects of predictive medicine concern the preoperative identification of patients with a tendency for postoperative complications or coronary artery disease patients with an increased tendency for restenosis. As a consequence, better patient care and new forms of inductive scientific hypothesis development based on the interpretation of predictive data patterns are at reach.

  12. Technology And Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ashokan Nambiar

    2014-01-01

    One is stuck at the amazing strides in technology as applied to medicine these days. When I had just finished school and was about to join college my seniors said if you learn zoology it is the stepping-stone for a career in medicine. However I was fascinated with chemistry, physics and maths. Later in medical college I soon realized knowledge in chemistry and physics was worthwhile. Zoology was not relevant. Much later while training in cardiology it was that the advantage of learning mathem...

  13. Physics in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, Simon R; Phelps, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Physics in Nuclear Medicine - by Drs. Simon R. Cherry, James A. Sorenson, and Michael E. Phelps - provides current, comprehensive guidance on the physics underlying modern nuclear medicine and imaging using radioactively labeled tracers. This revised and updated fourth edition features a new full-color layout, as well as the latest information on instrumentation and technology. Stay current on crucial developments in hybrid imaging (PET/CT and SPECT/CT), and small animal imaging, and benefit from the new section on tracer kinetic modeling in neuroreceptor imaging.

  14. Holistic pediatric veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Holistic veterinary medicine treats the whole patient including all physical and behavioral signs. The root cause of disease is treated at the same time as accompanying clinical signs. Herbal and nutritional supplements can help support tissue healing and proper organ functioning, thereby reducing the tendency of disease progression over time. Proper selection of homeopathic remedies is based on detailed evaluation of clinical signs. Herbal medicines are selected based on organ(s) affected and the physiologic nature of the imbalance. Many herbal and nutraceutical companies provide support for veterinarians, assisting with proper formula selection, dosing, drug interactions, and contraindications.

  15. BHASMA AND NANO MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Santosh S.

    2013-01-01

    The Metals and Minerals are heavy, nonabsorbable and toxic substances. Metals are used as medicines in Ayurveda since from Samhita period in the fine powder form named as ‘Ayaskriti’1. Latter with the development of ‘Marana’ technique (7th Cent AD) the Metals and Minerals are converted in to very very fine and absorbable, therapeutically most effective and least or Nontoxic form of Medicines known as ‘Bhasma’2. According to Ayurvedic concept the change in the qualities is due to ‘Samskara’ do...

  16. Benjamin Franklin and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, J V

    2005-12-01

    Benjamin Franklin, called Dr. Franklin after receiving an honorary degree in 1759 for his contributions to understanding electricity, was not formally trained as a physician. Nevertheless, he had numerous interests in medicine, including experimentation, shrewd observations about health and disease in himself and others, civic activities, and inventions of medical devices. These achievements show his capacity for detailed, perceptive insights; his fastidiousness in recording his observations; and his thoughtful analyses of scientific phenomena and human conduct. In medicine, perhaps uniquely in his life, his major interests intersected: scientific pursuits, civic activities, amused scrutiny of human behavior, and the desire to improve the lot of his fellow man.

  17. Medicinal cannabis in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Frederike K; de Jong, Floris A; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Erkens, Joëlle A; Herings, Ron M; Verweij, Jaap

    2007-12-01

    In The Netherlands, since September 2003, a legal medicinal cannabis product, constituting the whole range of cannabinoids, is available for clinical research, drug development strategies, and on prescription for patients. To date, this policy, initiated by the Dutch Government, has not yet led to the desired outcome; the amount of initiated clinical research is less than expected and only a minority of patients resorts to the legal product. This review aims to discuss the background for the introduction of legal medicinal cannabis in The Netherlands, the past years of Dutch clinical experience in oncology practice, possible reasons underlying the current outcome, and future perspectives.

  18. Are mushrooms medicinal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Nicholas P

    2016-04-01

    Despite the longstanding use of dried mushrooms and mushroom extracts in traditional Chinese medicine, there is no scientific evidence to support the effectiveness of these preparations in the treatment of human disease. Consumers should evaluate assertions made by companies about the miraculous properties of medicinal mushrooms very critically. The potential harm caused by these natural products is another important consideration. In a more positive vein, the presence of potent toxins and neurotropic compounds in basidiomycete fruit bodies suggests that secondary metabolites with useful pharmacological properties are widespread in these fungi. Major investment in controlled experiments and objective clinical trials is necessary to develop this natural pharmacopeia.

  19. [Informatics, robotics and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, A

    1999-01-01

    Information technology is becoming common use in Medicine. Among the numerous applications are data processing, image analysis, 3D reconstruction, telemedicine, to mention only few of them. The interest of computers in surgical research and development is lesser known. Two examples are given: computer aided conception and simulation of physiologic systems. Robotics has been introduced more recently. There are three types of robotics corresponding to three types of use: targetting used by neural surgeons to localize tumors or anatomical structures, visualization used by general surgeons to hold and mobilize laparoscopes, instrumentation introduced more recently by cardiac surgeons to perform totally endoscopic cardiac operations. All these techniques open new ways for tomorrow "Instrumental Medicine".

  20. Spreadsheets in Clinical Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Croll, Grenville J

    2006-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that the continued and widespread use of untested spreadsheets in business gives rise to regular, significant and unexpected financial losses. Whilst this is worrying, it is perhaps a relatively minor concern compared with the risks arising from the use of poorly constructed and/or untested spreadsheets in medicine, a practice that is already occurring. This article is intended as a warning that the use of poorly constructed and/or untested spreadsheets in clinical medicine cannot be tolerated. It supports this warning by reporting on potentially serious weaknesses found while testing a limited number of publicly available clinical spreadsheets.

  1. [Intensive medicine in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Intensive care medicine is a medical specialty that was officially established in our country in 1978, with a 5-year training program including two years of common core training followed by three years of specific training in an intensive care unit accredited for training. During this 32-year period, intensive care medicine has carried out an intense and varied activity, which has allowed its positioning as an attractive and with future specialty in the hospital setting. This document summarizes the history of the specialty, its current situation, the key role played in the programs of organ donation and transplantation of the National Transplant Organization (after more than 20 years of mutual collaboration), its training activities with the development of the National Plan of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, with a trajectory of more than 25 years, its interest in providing care based on quality and safety programs for the severely ill patient. It also describes the development of reference registries due to the need for reliable data on the care process for the most prevalent diseases, such as ischemic heart disease or ICU-acquired infections, based on long-term experience (more than 15 years), which results in the availability of epidemiological information and characteristics of care that may affect the practical patient's care. Moreover, features of its scientific society (SEMICYUC) are reported, an organization that agglutinates the interests of more than 280 ICUs and more than 2700 intensivists, with reference to the journal Medicina Intensiva, the official journal of the society and the Panamerican and Iberian Federation of Critical Medicine and Intensive Care Societies. Medicina Intensiva is indexed in the Thompson Reuters products of Science Citation Index Expanded (Scisearch(®)) and Journal Citation Reports, Science Edition. The important contribution of the Spanish intensive care medicine to the scientific community is also analyzed, and in relation to

  2. Use of medicinal plants by people with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Gabrielle Santos Nunes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the use of medicinal plants in the treatment of high blood pressure for people with hypertension enrolled in the Family Health Program in a city in Pernambuco State. Methods: a descriptive study, whose data were obtained through semi-structured interview script applied to 172 patients. Results: the use of medicinal plants for hypertension control was reported by 39.5%, of which 57.4% used only one medicinal plant. Among the species cited, there was predominant use of chayote [Sechium edule (Jacq. Sw.-34.8%]. Conclusion: medicinal plants constitute an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of hypertension. However, there is need for monitoring of handling and listed species.

  3. Sense of coherence and medicine use for headache among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke; Holstein, Bjørn E

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between headache, sense of coherence (SOC), and medicine use for headaches in a community-based sample of adolescents. METHODS: Epidemiological cross-sectional study, encompassing 20 out of 23 schools in the network of health-promoting schools in the county...... weekly experience of headaches, that is, frequency of headaches modified the association between SOC and medicine use. CONCLUSIONS: We found that adolescents with low SOC used medicine to cope with headaches to a greater extent than adolescents with high SOC....... standardized questionnaire. The outcome measure was self-reported medicine use for headaches. The determinants were headache frequency and SOC measured by Wold and Torsheim's version for children of Antonovsky's 13-item SOC scale. RESULTS: Analyses adjusted for age group, family social class, exposure...

  4. Glycoconjugates of Quinolines: Application in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Valentina; Vecchio, Graziella

    2016-09-02

    Compounds with the quinoline scaffold are widely investigated and offer a variety of therapeutical properties. A number of quinoline derivatives have been synthesized and among these there are glycoconjugated derivatives. Based on the interest for this family of compounds, we reviewed the different biological activities (molecular probes, antiinfective, antiproliferative, antiaggregant and antioxidant) and the potential applications in medicinal chemistry of quinoline glycoconjugates. This review wants to show an example of the glycoconjugation strategy which arose not only to modify the water solubility of the quinolines but also to influence their activity and targeting properties.

  5. Sports Medicine: What is a Sports Medicine Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both the treatment and prevention of illness and injury. The Sports Medicine Specialist helps patients maximize function and minimize ... of these conditions. However, approximately 90% of all sports injuries are non-surgical. The Sports Medicine Specialist can ...

  6. HERBAL MEDICINE AMONG COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ruban; Rodioniva, T.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative medicine methods may incorporate or base themselves on traditional medicine [1], folk knowledge [2], spiritual beliefs, or newly conceived approaches to healing. The major complementary and alternative medicine systems have many common characteristics, treating the whole person, including a focus on individualizing treatments, promoting self-care and self-healing, and recognizing the spiritual nature of each individual. Complementary and alternative medicine often lacks or has onl...

  7. Pediatric Integrative Medicine Approaches to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Esparham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most common neuropsychiatric disorder in children and is increasing in prevalence. There has also been a related increase in prescribing stimulant medication despite some controversy whether ADHD medication makes a lasting difference in school performance or achievement. Families who are apprehensive about side effects and with concerns for efficacy of medication pursue integrative medicine as an alternative or adjunct to pharmacologic and cognitive behavioral treatment approaches. Integrative medicine incorporates evidence-based medicine, both conventional and complementary and alternative therapies, to deliver personalized care to the patient, emphasizing diet, nutrients, gut health, and environmental influences as a means to decrease symptoms associated with chronic disorders. Pediatric integrative medicine practitioners are increasing in number throughout the United States because of improvement in patient health outcomes. However, limited funding and poor research design interfere with generalizable treatment approaches utilizing integrative medicine. The use of research designs originally intended for drugs and procedures are not suitable for many integrative medicine approaches. This article serves to highlight integrative medicine approaches in use today for children with ADHD, including dietary therapies, nutritional supplements, environmental hygiene, and neurofeedback.

  8. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: which differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanel, Maïa; Blond, Laurent; Vanel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that prognostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the aggressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all.

  9. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: Which differences?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanel, Maïa, E-mail: maiavanel@yahoo.fr [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, PO Box 5000, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC (Canada); Blond, Laurent [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, PO Box 5000, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC (Canada); Vanel, Daniel [The Rizzoli Institute, Via del Barbiano 1-10, 40136, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that pronostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the agressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all.

  10. Nanobiotechnology and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, K K

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will start with a definition and scope of personalized medicine and describe how various nanobiotechnologies will contribute to its development. Nanodiagnostics and its combination with therapeutics as well as nanoparticle-based drug delivery will play an important role. The most important applications of nanobiotechnology will be personalized management of cancer, neurological disorders, and cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Technology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, C

    1985-05-22

    Technology, which is older than science, has been of vital importance in the development of modern medicine. Even so, there are voices of dissent to be heard. The disenchantment with technology expressed by Aldous Huxley in Brave new world has been echoed by contemporary writers on the technology of modern medicine. Medicine is seen by some to have been dehumanized by technology, and techniques that are expensive are thought to be consuming a greater proportion of health resources than they deserve. The practice of medicine has, nevertheless, been transformed by modern technology and diagnostic techniques and therapeutic measures undreamed of a few short decades ago are now commonplace. There is no reason why these developments should be any more dehumanizing than the use of similar techniques in modern transportation or communication, nor is their expense out of proportion when compared with other demands on the nation's purse. British workers have been at the forefront of many recent advances. Yet, even though the National Health Service provides a ready market for the products of British medical technology, the nation depends to an inordinate degree on imported products. In the development of appropriate medical technology there is an urgent need for better communication between inventors, scientists, industrialists and the National Health Service. At the same time there is an equal need for improved evaluation of untried techniques. The pressure for a central integrating body to coordinate resources could well be supported by the establishment of evaluation units in the different health authorities in this country.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures and provides molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce special views, a practice known as image fusion or co-registration. These views allow the information ...

  13. [Phronesis: Medicine's indispensable virtue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Facing those who defend that Medicine is not but an applied science, Pellegrino argues that the ultimate goal of Medicine is facing to a human being in his illness condition. Thus, it is not sufficient to have scientific knowledge but proximity to man kindness. Cure is not the only goal -achievable in only a few cases- but healing, caring with a person as an ill person and as a person. For this reason, professional competence is not enough; the physician needs to have the necessary dispositions to be a good person, a good professional. To get the goals of Medicine, the physician has to achieve those qualities who allow him to do the good he is intended to, that is, he needs to be virtuous. Prudence -phronesis- is the virtue that allows him to apply a general rule to a particular case and, furthermore, addresses his actions to be not only technically correct, but excellent. Prudence is, then, the link between intellectual virtues and moral virtues. Pellegrino's main objective has been to elaborate a Philosophy of Medicine, different from the Philosophy of Science, useful for clinical practice and used by clinical practitioners. By nurturing prudence, a small bit of the final goal is reached: the healing, the goodness for the sick. This should be possible if we are embedded in a moral community, and for Pellegrino, sharing knowledge and ethical values is the way of being part of a moral community.

  14. 50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlesky, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

  15. Cannabis; extracting the medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazekamp, Arno

    2007-01-01

    The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) has a long history as a recreational drug, but also as part of traditional medicine in many cultures. Nowadays, it is used by a large number of patients worldwide, to ameliorate the symptoms of diseases varying from cancer and AIDS to multiple sclerosis and mi

  16. The medicine from behind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, Van Tinde; Onselen, Van Sabine; Myren, Britt; Towns, Alexandra; Quiroz, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Purgative enemas form an integral part of African traditional medicine. Besides possible benefits, serious health risks of rectal herbal therapy have been described in literature. To design appropriate health education programs, it is essential to understand traditi

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnoses. In addition, manufacturers are now making single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and ... nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also ...

  18. Tablet Use within Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the scholarly literature related to tablet computer use in medicine. Forty-four research-based articles were examined for emerging categories and themes. The most studied uses for tablet computers include: patients using tablets to complete diagnostic survey instruments, medical professionals using tablet computers to view…

  19. Dendrimers in Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Ficker, Mario; Christensen, Jørn Bolstad

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers are three-dimensional macromolecular structures originating from a central core molecule and surrounded by successive addition of branching layers (generation). These structures exhibit a high degree of molecular uniformity, narrow molecular weight distribution, tunable size and shape ...... as challenging issues surrounding the future development of dendrimer-based medicines....

  20. History of Disaster Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suner, Selim

    2015-10-01

    Erik Noji, mentioned, tongue in cheek, Noah as the first disaster manager during a lecture in 2005. The canonical description of "The Genesis Flood" does describe Noah as a master planner and executer of an evacuation of biblical proportions. After gaining knowledge of a potential catastrophic disaster he planned and executed an evacuation to mitigate the effects of the "Genesis Flood" by building the Ark and organizing a mass exodus. He had to plan for food, water, shelter, medical care, waste disposal and other needs of all the evacuees. Throughout history, management of large disasters was conducted by the military. Indeed, the military still plays a large role in disaster response in many countries, particularly if the response is overseas and prolonged. The histories of emergency preparedness, disaster management and disaster medicine have coevolved and are inextricably intertwined. While disaster management in one form or another existed as long as people started living together in communities, the development of disaster medicine took off with the emergence of modern medicine. Similar to disaster management, disaster medicine also has roots in military organizations.

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like? Special camera or imaging devices used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation camera, detects radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and ...

  2. Preventive medicine in 2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    This invited commentary imagines two futures for preventive medicine and public health in the Year 2030. Using satire, the commentary describes one future in which large corporations control public health and another where a robust public sector plays the leading role.

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... using or might want to try. As with modern medicine, CAM treatments that are effective for one problem ... All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or hand. Your child should ... body, they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s ...

  5. Chinese Medicine Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Yan Xijun (闫希军) may have studied both busi- ness and medicine, but the founder of Tasly Group(天士力集团), one of China's leading pharmaceutical firms,attributes most of his success to his military background.

  6. The future of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Russ

    2012-03-01

    The recent innovation of prediction markets is examined, and their significant applications to the science of medicine are demonstrated. According to one comprehensive study, these markets make "uncannily accurate" predictions of every type of event. In the medical field, being able to predict cures, epidemics, medical discoveries, and myriad other medical variables can greatly further the advances of medical science and its clinical applications.

  7. Plants and Medicinal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, D.

    1977-01-01

    This is the first of two articles showing how plants that have been used in folk medicine for many centuries are guiding scientists in the design and preparation of new and potent drugs. Opium and its chemical derivatives are examined at length in this article. (Author/MA)

  8. Swarm-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putora, Paul Martin; Oldenburg, Jan

    2013-09-19

    Occasionally, medical decisions have to be taken in the absence of evidence-based guidelines. Other sources can be drawn upon to fill in the gaps, including experience and intuition. Authorities or experts, with their knowledge and experience, may provide further input--known as "eminence-based medicine". Due to the Internet and digital media, interactions among physicians now take place at a higher rate than ever before. With the rising number of interconnected individuals and their communication capabilities, the medical community is obtaining the properties of a swarm. The way individual physicians act depends on other physicians; medical societies act based on their members. Swarm behavior might facilitate the generation and distribution of knowledge as an unconscious process. As such, "swarm-based medicine" may add a further source of information to the classical approaches of evidence- and eminence-based medicine. How to integrate swarm-based medicine into practice is left to the individual physician, but even this decision will be influenced by the swarm.

  9. Rational use of medicines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holloway, K.; Dijk, L. van

    2011-01-01

    1. Irrational use of medicines is an extremely serious global problem that is wasteful and harmful. In developing and transitional countries, in primary care less than 40% of patients in the public sector and 30% of patients in the private sector are treated in accordance with standard treatment gui

  10. Cytomics in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz

    2008-02-01

    Cytomics is the high-content analysis of cell-systems [6, 78]. The area of Cytomics and Systems Biology received great attention during the last years as it harbours the promise to substantially impact on various fields of biomedicine, drug discovery, predictive medicine [6] and may have major potential for regenerative medicine. In regenerative medicine Cytomics includes process control of cell preparation and culturing using non-invasive detection techniques, quality control and standardization for GMP and GLP conformity and even prediction of cell fate based on sophisticated data analysis. Cytomics requires quantitative and stoichiometric single cell analysis. In some areas the leading cytometric techniques represent the cutting edge today. Many different applications/variations of multicolour staining were developed for flow- or slide-based cytometry (SBC) analysis of suspensions and sections to whole animal analysis [78]. SBC has become an important analytical technology in drug discovery, diagnosis and research and is an emerging technology for systems analysis [78]. It enables high-content high-throughput measurement of cell suspensions, cell cultures and tissues. In the last years various commercial SBC instruments were launched principally enabling to perform similar tasks. Standardisation as well as comparability of different instruments is a major challenge. Hyperspectral optical imaging may be implemented in SBC analysis for label free cell detection based on cellular autofluorescence [3]. All of these developments push the systemic approach of the analysis of biological specimens to enhance the outcome of regenerative medicine.

  11. Bioprinting in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Monti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Turksen is a very well known scientist in the stem cell biology field and he is also internationally known for his fundamental studies on claudin-6. In addition to his research activity he is editor for the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine series (Humana Press and editor-in-chief of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports.....

  12. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Mancini, Irene; Brandslund, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Developments in "-omics" are creating a paradigm shift in laboratory medicine leading to personalized medicine. This allows the increase in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether laboratory medicine is ready to play a key role ...

  13. The Relationship between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingcheng Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The essence of the traditional Chinese medicine has always been the most advanced and experienced therapeutic approach in the world. It has knowledge that can impact the direction of future modern medical development; still, it is easy to find simple knowledge with mark of times and special cultures. The basic structure of traditional Chinese medicine is composed of three parts: one consistent with modern medicine, one involuntarily beyond modern medicine, and one that needs to be further evaluated. The part that is consistent with modern medicine includes consensus on several theories and concepts of traditional Chinese medicine, and usage of several treatments and prescriptions of traditional Chinese medicine including commonly used Chinese herbs. The part that is involuntarily beyond modern medicine contains several advanced theories and important concepts of traditional Chinese medicine, relatively advanced treatments, formula and modern prescriptions, leading herbs, acupuncture treatment and acupuncture anesthesia of traditional Chinese medicine that affect modern medicine and incorporates massage treatment that has been gradually acknowledged by modern therapy. The part that needs to be further evaluated consists not only the knowledge of pulse diagnosis, prescription, and herbs, but also many other aspects of traditional Chinese medicine.

  14. Errors in medicine administration - profile of medicines: knowing and preventing

    OpenAIRE

    Reis,Adriano Max Moreira; Marques, Tatiane Cristina; Opitz,Simone Perufo; Silva,Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; GIMENES, Fernanda Raphael Escobar; Teixeira,Thalyta Cardoso Alux; LIMA, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the pharmacological characteristics of medicines involved in administration errors and determine the frequency of errors with potentially dangerous medicines and low therapeutic index, in clinical units of five teaching hospitals, in Brazil. METHODS: Multicentric study, descriptive and exploratory, using the non-participant observation technique (during the administration of 4958 doses of medicines) and the anatomical therapeutic chemical classification (ATC). RESULTS:...

  15. The Traditional Medicine and Modern Medicine from Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haidan; Ma, Qianqian; Ye, Li; Piao, Guangchun

    2016-04-29

    Natural products and traditional medicines are of great importance. Such forms of medicine as traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, Kampo, traditional Korean medicine, and Unani have been practiced in some areas of the world and have blossomed into orderly-regulated systems of medicine. This study aims to review the literature on the relationship among natural products, traditional medicines, and modern medicine, and to explore the possible concepts and methodologies from natural products and traditional medicines to further develop drug discovery. The unique characteristics of theory, application, current role or status, and modern research of eight kinds of traditional medicine systems are summarized in this study. Although only a tiny fraction of the existing plant species have been scientifically researched for bioactivities since 1805, when the first pharmacologically-active compound morphine was isolated from opium, natural products and traditional medicines have already made fruitful contributions for modern medicine. When used to develop new drugs, natural products and traditional medicines have their incomparable advantages, such as abundant clinical experiences, and their unique diversity of chemical structures and biological activities.

  16. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized.

  17. Over-the-counter medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used for moderate and severe diarrhea (Enfalyte or Pedialyte) Medicines for nausea and vomiting: Liquids and pills ... used to replace fluids from vomiting (Enfalyte or Pedialyte) Medicines for motion sickness: Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine); meclizine (Bonine, ...

  18. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meehan, Appointed Dean of the Naval Postgraduate Dental School Board Members Featured in FOX News Story Upcoming ... AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline ...

  19. Essential Medicines: An Indian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; Bhatia, Vikas; Padhy, Biswa Mohan; Hota, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    The concept of defining essential medicines and establishing a list of them was aimed to improve the availability of affordable medicines for the world's poor. Access to essential medicines is a major determinant of health outcomes. Several countries have made substantial progress towards increasing access to essential medicines, but access to essential medicines in developing countries like India is not adequate. In this review we have tried to present the Indian scenario in respect to availability and accessibility of essential medicines over last one decade. To enhance the credibility of Indian healthcare system, procurement and delivery systems of essential medicines have to be strengthened through government commitment, careful selection, adequate public sector financing, efficient distribution systems, control on taxes and duties, and inculcating a culture of rational use of medicines in current and future prescribers.

  20. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.