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Sample records for after-heat removal

  1. After-heat removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air cooling devices of a plurality of loops are arranged, each of the cooling device comprises a damper and a vane therein, and a heat transfer tube is inserted between the damper and the vane. The minimum limit value for the opening degree of each of the damper and the vane is changed stepwise for each of the loops. After reactor shutdown, the opening degree of the damper and the vane for each of the loops is simultaneously fixed to the minimum opening degree set for each of the loops. Since the amount of inflown air to the loop having the damper and the vane of the maximum opening degree is greater compared with that of other loops, and the amount of heat removal is maximum, coolants in a heat transfer tube portion are frozen in a short period of time and heat removal is impossible. Then, after heat is successively removed by other loops set to smaller opening degree for the damper and the vane. With such procedures, degradation of reliability due to erroneous closure of the damper and the vane can be eliminated with no requirement for an operator's control for the opening degree. (I.N.)

  2. Investigations of after-heat removal pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parameters influencing the pump performance were analysed during stationary and instationary conditions of an original DWR-heat removal pump, which was equipped with special measurement devices. The most important results will be presented by the following: 1) air addition deteriorates pump performance; 2) increasing system temperatures improve cavitation behaviour; 3) instationary tests lead to hysteresis phenomena; 4) pump performance was good within the tested parameter region. With 94 figs

  3. After heat removing device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An annular liquid (water) pool is formed radially surrounding a reactor container and a reactor safety container. An annular cavity wall is formed in the liquid pool, and the inside of the cavity wall is formed as a liquid channel. If the temperature of liquid sodium in the reactor container rises by the after heat of the nuclear fuels, the temperature of the reactor safety container also rises to a high temperature, and the amount of heat radiated from the surface is increased. Water in the liquid channel heated by undergoing the radiation heat forms upward streams in the liquid channel by an air lift-effect caused by rising of boiling air bubbles. Namely, the water in the liquid pool rises the liquid channel while boiling to cool the reactor safety container. With such a constitution, after heat can be removed continuously by the spontaneously circulating water. (I.N.)

  4. After-heat removing device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns an FBR type reactor power generation plant equipped with a once-through steam generator and it is an object thereof to enable to operate the steam generator under a once-through mode in a usual operation state and at a recycling mode capable of stable operation under an extremely low load upon after-heat removing operation after the reactor shutdown. That is, a recycling system used only upon starting/shutdown is added to the once-through steam generator and a lower limit value demanded from the stable operation of the steam generator to feed water flow rate demand signal upon after-heat removing operation, thereby preventing the reduction of feed water flow rate to less than the limit level. Further, by starting the recycling pump again at the instance when the water level is formed in a liquid/water separator, the operation is shifted smoothly from the once-through mode to the recycling mode. In this way, since thermal shocks to important equipments such as nuclear reactors can be moderated, it is possible to improve the reliability and safety, as well as attain a cost-saving plant. (I.S.)

  5. After-heat removal system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An after-heat removal system having a duel low pressure coolant injection mode (LPCI) selects an integral recycling loop based on a pressure difference between reactor recycling loops to inject emergency cooling water to the reactor. In this case, if the pressure difference between the recycling loops is less than such a pressure difference as capable of injecting a sufficient amount of cooling water to the reactor core, injection lines to both of the recycling loops are lined up. With such a constitution, the injection lines of LPCI can be retarded in most of the cases of requiring LPCI, to remarkably improve the reliability and sufficiently utilize the retardation of the four pumps. (I.S.)

  6. Independent system of after-heat removal in a sodium cooled fast neutron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of after-heat removal in sodium cooled fast reactor is described. The device, according to the main patent, is characterized in that each coolant loop includes, in parallel to the secondary sodium circuit, an auxiliary secondary circuit in which a chemically inert gas removes heat from the primary sodium; said auxiliary secondary circuit comprises at least one gas turbine fed with said inert gas and working in closed-cycle with power production. In the present variant the gas turbine also works at least one of the primary sodium pumps and, if required, at least one of the secondary sodium pumps and at least one of the main or emergency pumps feeding the steam generator

  7. Energy-supply-independent after-heat removal in nuclear propulsion plants for ships in combination with sinking and cuntering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy-supply-independent after-heat-removal in nuclear propulsion plants for ships in combination with sinking and cantering are analysed with a numeric simulation model. Inclination on the seaground are 0 to the vertical. Different heat-transfer-mechanism in and out of the reactor vessel and at the structures of the containment are analysed. The computer calculation shows that in the course of the accident melting of the core at each inclination occurs. Nevertheless no melting of the reactor vessel occurs due to good cooling of the outer wall of the vessel with seawater. The accident sequenz has at inclinations of 500 to 600 to the vertical a maximum in time. (orig.)

  8. Concept of a self-sustaining cooling system for after-heat removal in BWR-type reactors; Konzept eines autarken Kuehlsystems zur Nachwaermeabfuhr in Siedewasserreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venker, J. [RWE Technology GmbH, Essen (Germany). Nukleartechnologie; Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE); Lavante, D. von [TUEV Rheinland, Koeln (Germany); Buck, M.; Starflinger, J. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE); Gitzel, D. [RWE Technology GmbH, Essen (Germany). Nukleartechnologie

    2013-07-01

    The concept, technical feasibility and potential capability of a new self-sustaining after-heat removal system based on supercritical carbon dioxide is described. The effect of the system on the plant behavior of appropriately retrofitted BWR-type reactors is discussed. Based on calculations using the thermal hydraulic code ATHLET it is shown that the safe after-heat removal time of existing BWR-type reactors in case of station blackout can be increased for several hours. The calculations have also shown that a enduring control of the station blackout situation cannot be reached by the retrofitting of the pressure relief system. The question is raised whether the pressure relief is reasonable independent of the accident scenario. Without the possibility of further coolant supply in case of station blackout the pressure relief will enhance the dry-out of the reactor core. The high-pressure path for the primary circuit increases the time for possible external measures to activate ECCS or active after-heat removal.

  9. Behavior of fast sodium-cooled reactors during operation and disturbances. Determination of the efficiency of the passive after-heat removal at the SNR-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectivity of the decay heat removal by natural convection in the SNR-300 was analysed by employing the computer codes SSC-L and NATUM. The code SSC-L is a very detailed computer code for the simulation of operational and accident transients in the whole plant of a fast breeder reactor. In comparison with SSC-L, NATUM is a very simplified passive decay heat removal code. For investigations concerning the so-called passive decay heat removal of the scrammed reactor, where a common failure of all active components in the main heat transport systems as well as in the immersion cooling systems is assumed. The analysis of ten transients and the post-calculations of five experiments are presented. The comparison of the experiments with the post-calculations using SSC-L and NATUM indicates a good agreement. The results for the combination of extreme unlikely accident conditions (complete neglection of immersion cooling systems plus no action by the reactor operators) demonstrate the inherent good-natured long-term behaviour of the plant due to favorable features of the large sodium system. (orig.)

  10. Operation method for after-heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To moderate thermal shocks applied to a feedwater pipe plate portion at the inlet of a steam generator thereby maintaining the integrity and safety of an LMFBR type plant. Method: Water with feed from the condenser to a steam generator. Steams generated in the steam generator are introduced to an air/water separator in a recycling system and a control device is actuated. Water separated by the air/water separator is recycled to the steam generator, while monitoring the temperature variation coefficient for the feedwater temperature at the inlet of the steam generator. If the temperature variation coefficient exceeds a predetermined setting value, the recycling flow rate is decreased in accordance with the deviation. This can greatly moderate the thermal shocks applied to the feedwater pipe plate portion at the inlet of the steam generator upon starting of the recycling system. (Takahashi, M.)

  11. After-heat analysis of BN-600 assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of after-heat calculation used in CARE-03 code and OST module of GEFEST package is described. The method was verified with ORIGEN code after-heat calculations. The calculation results validation against after-heat measurements with calorimetric equipment in Beloyarsk NPP fuel storage pool was carried out. The CARE code and ORIGEN code calculation results were shown to be in good agreement. The discrepancy of after-heat calculation data with measurement data is indicated for spent subassemblies under the long cooling times with low after-heat (100-150 W). The calculation results and measurement data agreement was less than 10% under short cooling times

  12. Computer programme for prediction steel parameters after heat treatment

    OpenAIRE

    J. Trzaska; L.A Dobrzanski; A. Jagiełło

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is presentation of the computer program for calculating the Continuous Cooling Transformation diagrams for constructional and engineering steels.Design/methodology/approach: The computer program uses the artificial neural networks for prediction steel properties after heat treatment. Input data are chemical composition and austenitizing temperature. Results of calculation consist of temperature of the beginning and the end of transformation...

  13. Computer programme for prediction steel parameters after heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Trzaska

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is presentation of the computer program for calculating the Continuous Cooling Transformation diagrams for constructional and engineering steels.Design/methodology/approach: The computer program uses the artificial neural networks for prediction steel properties after heat treatment. Input data are chemical composition and austenitizing temperature. Results of calculation consist of temperature of the beginning and the end of transformation in the cooling rate function, the volume fraction of structural components and hardness of steel cooled from austenitizing temperature with a fixed rate.Findings: The algorithm can be use in designing new chemical compositions of steels with assumed hardness after heat treatment.Research limitations/implications: The created method for designing chemical compositions is limited by ranges of mass concentrations of elements. The methodology demonstrated in the paper makes possibility to add new steels to the system.Practical implications: The method may be used in computer steel selection systems for machines parts manufactured from constructional or engineering steels subjected to heat treatment.Originality/value: The presented computer program can be used for selecting steel with required structure after heat treatment.

  14. The corrosion of Zircaloy-4 after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion properties of zircaloy-4 by using potentiodynamic technique have been studied. After heat treatment ( T = 600, 700 and 900 oC ), at difference period of time, the corrosion rate of the samples increased with the increase of the temperature and time. The result was as follows : 0.297 MPY (T = 600 oC, t = 1 hour); 0.383 MPY (T = 600 oC, t = 5 hours); 0.383 MPY (T = 600 oC, t = 7 hours); 0.400 MPY (T = 700 oC, t = 1 hour); 0.667 MPY (T = 700 oC, t = 5 hours); 0.560 MPY (T = 700 oC, t = 7 hours); 0.520 MPY (T = 900 oC, t = 1 hour); 0.493 MPY (T = 900 oC, t = 5 hours) and 0.492 MPY (T = 900 oC, t = 7 hours). The corrosion was homogenous and there were holes on the surface

  15. Oligonol Supplementation Affects Leukocyte and Immune Cell Counts after Heat Loading in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Beom Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, making it a potential promoter of immunity. This study investigates the effects of oligonol supplementation on leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in 19 healthy male volunteers. The participants took a daily dose of 200 mg oligonol or a placebo for 1 week. After a 2-week washout period, the subjects were switched to the other study arm. After each supplement, half-body immersion into hot water was made, and blood was collected. Then, complete and differential blood counts were performed. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and phenotype lymphocyte subsets. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 in blood samples were analyzed. Lymphocyte subpopulation variables included counts of total T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK cells. Oligonol intake attenuated elevations in IL-1β (an 11.1-fold change vs. a 13.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 12.0-fold change vs. a 12.6-fold change 1h after heating and IL-6 (an 8.6-fold change vs. a 9.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 9.1-fold change vs. a 10.5-fold change 1h after heating immediately and 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the placebo group. Oligonol supplementation led to significantly higher numbers of leukocytes (a 30.0% change vs. a 21.5% change immediately after heating; a 13.5% change vs. a 3.5% change 1h after heating and lymphocytes (a 47.3% change vs. a 39.3% change immediately after heating; a 19.08% change vs. a 2.1% change 1h after heating relative to those in the placebo group. Oligonol intake led to larger increases in T cells, B cells, and NK cells at rest (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.001, respectively and immediately after heating (p < 0.001 in comparison to those in the placebo group. In addition, levels of T cells (p < 0.001 and B cells (p < 0.001 were significantly higher 1 h after heating in comparison to those in

  16. Expression of aquaporins in intestine after heat stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Hung; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Kung, Woon-Man; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wen, Ya-Ting; Lin, I-Chan; Huang, Chi-Chang; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heat stroke (HS) has been shown to induce intestinal barrier dysfunction during whole body hyperthermia. HS-induced intestinal permeability change may result from modulation of aquaporin (AQP) expression, which subsequently regulates water homeostasis. This study aimed to evaluate AQP expression in the intestine of rats with HS at different recovery time points. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to an ambient temperature of 40 ± 0.5°C until a maximum core temperature of 40.5°C was attained. The small intestine was surgically removed and histologically examined, and AQP expression was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining. H&E staining revealed those intestinal villi were destroyed from HS0 to HS1 and rebuilt from HS3 to HS12. We further stain with activated caspase 3 found expressed at HS0 and back to normal at HS3. Investigation of AQP mRNA expression identified 10 genes. PCR results of AQP1, 3, 7, 8, and 11 transcripts were significantly higher in the HS group than in the sham group. Immunohistochemical staining showed a more than 11-fold increase in AQP3 and 11 expressions at HS0. AQP1 and 8 increased at HS1 and AQP7 increased at HS3 compared with those in the sham group. In this study, we found HS induced jejunum damage and cell apoptosis. AQPs were upregulation/downregulation after HS in different time point suggested that water/glycerol transport was important when hyperthermia occurred. Furthermore, the biological function of the AQP needs more exploration in response to HS. PMID:26464618

  17. Turbidimetric behavior of Butadiene Rubber (BR) solutions in toluene and dichloromethane after heating at open air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the turbidimetric behavior of Butadiene Rubber BR solutions, a synthetic rubber, in two solvents (toluene and dichloromethane), after heating at open air till 180 Deg Celsius for optimal polymer cracking conditions. Concentration, solvent and temperature effects have been studied using methanol as precipitant. Butadiene rubber exhibits a high sensitivity to autoxidation with high tendency to reticulation.

  18. Inflammatory cytokines and plasma redox status responses in hypertensive subjects after heat exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Fonseca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is characterized by a pro-inflammatory status, including redox imbalance and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be exacerbated after heat exposure. However, the effects of heat exposure, specifically in individuals with inflammatory chronic diseases such as hypertension, are complex and not well understood. This study compared the effects of heat exposure on plasma cytokine levels and redox status parameters in 8 hypertensive (H and 8 normotensive (N subjects (age: 46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years old, body mass index: 25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure: 98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively. They remained at rest in a sitting position for 10 min in a thermoneutral environment (22°C followed by 30 min in a heated environmental chamber (38°C and 60% relative humidity. Blood samples were collected before and after heat exposure. Plasma cytokine levels were measured using sandwich ELISA kits. Plasma redox status was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP. Hypertensive subjects showed higher plasma levels of IL-10 at baseline (P<0.05, although levels of this cytokine were similar between groups after heat exposure. Moreover, after heat exposure, hypertensive individuals showed higher plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR1 and lower TBARS (P<0.01 and FRAP (P<0.05 levels. Controlled hypertensive subjects, who use angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitors, present an anti-inflammatory status and balanced redox status. Nevertheless, exposure to a heat stress condition seems to cause an imbalance in the redox status and an unregulated inflammatory response.

  19. Experimental research on the mechanical property of prestressing steel wire during and after heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Wenzhong; HU Qiong; ZHANG Haoyu

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical property of prestressing steel wire during and after heating is the key factor in the design of fire resistance and after-fire damage evaluation of prestressed structures. Tensile experiment of 16 prestressing steel wires (fptk= 1770 N/mm2, d = 5 mm, low relaxation of stress) at high temperature and tensile experiment of 14 prestressed steel wires after heating are carried out. According to the experiment, the shapes of stress-strain curves of steel wire at high temperature go smooth and the mechanical property indexes of the steel wire such as strength, modulus of elastic- ity, etc., degenerate continuously as temperature increased. According to the experiment after heating, the mechanical property of steel wire varies little when the highest tempera- ture that the steel wire has ever been heated to is lower than 300℃; while the stress-strain curves of steel wire become more ductile and the mechanical property indexes of the steel wire degenerate gradually when the highest temperature is higher than 300℃. By applying the theory of viscoelastic mechanics, stress-strain curves of steel wire at high tempera- tures without loading rate influence are obtained. The law of mechanical property indexes of the wire is presented. The mathematical models of the stress-strain relationship of the pre-stressed steel wire are established. All can serve as basic data for the analysis of fire resistance and after-fire damage evaluation ofpre-stressed structures.

  20. Characterization of VPS-W coating layers on molybdenum after heat exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gue Serb, E-mail: gscho@kitech.re.kr; Choe, Kyeong Hwan; Choi, Soon Yeol

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • W powders were successfully coated on molybdenum using VPS coating technique. • W powders were completely changed into recrystallized grains after heat exposure. • VPS-W coating layer shows good adhesion to the Mo substrate after heat exposure due to the interdiffusion between W and Mo. • W-coated Mo material will extend the service life of hot-zone parts for high-temperature furnace applications. - Abstract: Tungsten (W) coating layers were successfully deposited using a vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) technique on a molybdenum (Mo) substrate. Tungsten powder with a median size of 10 μm was applied to prepare coatings via a plasma spray system. For the VPS process, argon and hydrogen were used as plasma-forming gases, and the coatings were deposited in 35 mbar vacuum pressure. A coating with a thickness of 300 μm was obtained, and some unmelted W powders were observed in the coating layer. This heat exposure experiment was performed in a sapphire crystal growing furnace at 2100 °C up to 110 h. After heat exposure, the VPS-W coating layers were soundly bonded with the Mo substrate due to the interdiffusion between W and Mo.

  1. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  2. Evolution of microstructure and hardness of AE42 alloy after heat treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Y.D.; Dieringa, H.; Hort, N.; Maier, P.; Kainer, K.U.; Liu, Yi-Lin

    The AE42 magnesium alloy was developed for high pressure die casting (HPDC) from low-aluminum magnesium alloys. In this alloy the rare earth (RE) elements were shown to increase creep resistance by forming AlxREy intermetallics along the grain boundaries. The present work investigates the...... microstructure of squeeze cast AE42 magnesium alloy and evaluates its hardness before and after heat treatments. The change in hardness is discussed based on the microstructural observations. Some suggestions are given concerning future design of alloy compositions in order to improve high temperature creep...... properties even further. It is shown that the microstructure of the squeeze-cast AE42 alloy is stable at high temperature 450 degrees C. The subsequent solution and ageing treatments have a limited effect on the hardness. The weak age-hardening is attributed to the precipitation of small amount Of Mg17Al12...

  3. Influence of NH4OH medium concentration on the gel phase formation and characterization after heated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gel particles have been made at various NH4OH medium concentration in the gelation process. The variables of NH4OH concentration were 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 N. The gels after dry were heated at 100, 400, 600 and 800°C during 3 hours. The gel characterizations were examined using an optic microscope and scanning electron microscope to know the shape and microstructure of the surface. The experiment result shown that the gel phase was formed using NH4OH medium with concentration ≥ 8 N, and after be heated at 800°C it was unbreakable. It was also shown that the gel shape and surface morphology was spherical, homogeneous and un breakable after heated gel at 100 until 800°C. (author)

  4. Synchrotron Diffraction of Multilayered LS PGA Films after Heating and Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Nicolini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns of multilayered Langmuir-Schaefer (LS film of penicillin G acylase (PGA enzyme were acquired at the ID11 of Synchrotron Radiation at ESRF (Grenoble, France. In addition to what shown by GISAXS at ID13 and by AFM, the ID11 beamline appears capable to monitor the diffraction and structural properties of the Langmuir-Shaefer multilayered PGA enzyme film similar to what apparent in the corresponding PGA crystals. The dramatic increase of long-range order in the LB multi-layered enzyme films after heating and cooling, made previously apparent by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering using ID13 microbeam, was here utilized at the ID11 beamline to yield unique diffraction patterns of the PGA LB linked to the enzyme atomic structure. This could open the way to bypass the bottleneck of protein crystallization which is leaving still unsolved large part of important proteins, like the membrane ones.

  5. Structural characteristics of nickel super alloy INCONEL 713LC after heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Aircraft industry often uses nickel super-alloys for blades of jet engine turbines. This paper summarises analysis of influence of heat treatment on structural characteristics of nickel super-alloy INCONEL 713LC.Design/methodology/approach: Experimental investigation castings made of commercially produced nickel super-alloy INCONEL 713LC. Material was after heat treatment subjected to detailed structural analysis with use of methods of light microscopy (LM, or scanning electron microscopy (SEM on microscopes OLYMPUS IX71 and JEOL JSM 50A.Findings: Mode of optimum heat treatment was proposed. On the basis of obtained results it is possible to recommend a heat treatment, which would consist of heating and dwell at the temperature exceeding 1240°C (min. 1260°C, so that precipitates at the grain boundaries dissolve completely, with subsequent slow cooling down to the temperature of approx. 940-950°C, so that there occurs intensive intra-granular precipitation of inter-metallic phase γ’.Research limitations/implications: The experiment was limited by occurrence a void in cast alloys.Practical implications: Aircraft industry often uses nickel super-alloys for blades of jet engine turbines.Originality/value: On the basis of obtained results it is possible to recommend the most suitable heat treatment, which produce intensive intra-granular precipitation of inter-metallic phase γ’. It was received a new know-how in this field.

  6. Turbidimetric behavior of Styrene Butadiene Rubber (SBR) solutions in toluene and dichloromethane after heating at open air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the turbidimetric behavior of Styrene Butadiene Rubber SBR solutions, a synthetic rubber, in two solvents (toluene and dichloromethane), after heating at open air till 1800C for optimal polymer cracking conditions. Concentration, solvent and temperature effects have been studied using methanol like precipitant.

  7. The foci of DNA double strand break-recognition proteins localize with γH2AX after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, there have been many reports concerning proteins which can recognize DNA double strand break (DSBs), and such proteins include histone H2AX phosphorylated at serine 139 (γH2AX), ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) phospho-serine 1981, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phospho-threonine 2609, Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (NBS1) phospho-serine 343, checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2), phospho-threonine 68, and structural maintenance of chromosomes 1 (SMC1) phospho-serine 966. Thus, it should be possible to follow the formation of DSBs and their repair using immunohistochemical methods with multiple antibodies to detect these proteins. When normal human fibroblasts (AG1522 cells) were exposed to 3 Gy of X-rays as a control, clearly discernable foci for these proteins were detected, and these foci localized with γH2AX foci. After heat treatment at 45.5 deg C for 20 min, these proteins are partially localized with γH2AX foci. Here we show that there were slight differences in the localization pattern among these proteins, such as a disappearance from the nucleus (phospho-ATM) and translocation to the cytoplasm (phospho-NBS1) at 30 min after heat treatment, and some foci (phospho-DNA-PKcs and phospho-CHK2) appeared at 8 h after heat treatment. These results are discussed from perspectives of heat-induced denaturation of proteins and formation of DSBs. (author)

  8. Synthesis of Differentiation-Specific Proteins in Germlings of the Wheat Stem Rust Fungus after Heat Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Reinhard; Förster, Helga; Mendgen, Kurt; Staples, Richard C.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis of differentiation-specific proteins in germlings of the wheat stem rust fungus after heat shock. Experimental Mycology 9, 279-283. When uredospore germlings of the wheat stem rust fungus (Puccinia graminis tritici) were heat-shocked to induce differentiation, changes in the pattern of proteins synthesized were observed when the substomatal vesicles began to emerge. At this time (1.5 h after end of heat shock) two differentiation-specific proteins of approximately 34.7 and 21.9 kDa ...

  9. The effect of pre- versus postinjury infiltration with lidocaine on thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia after heat injury to the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Brennum, J; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Jensen, T S; Kehlet, H

    1993-01-01

    observed 100-190 min after injury. Likewise, there was no difference in thermal thresholds inside the injury between pre- and postinjury treatment at the end of the study period. It is concluded, that a shortlasting 'preemptive' infiltration with lidocaine may postpone but not prevent the occurrence of......The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of pre- and postinjury infiltration with lidocaine on alterations in mechanical and thermal sensitivity after heat injury to the skin. In the first part of the study, burn injuries (15 x 25 mm rectangular thermode, 50 degrees C, 7 min) were produced...... hyperalgesia outside a thermal injury....

  10. Time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice after heat stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Ling Chen; Yu-Zhong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice after acute heat stress.Methods:Models of mice after acute heat stress were duplicated. Shuttle box test was used to observe the learning and memory function of mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, respectively after heat stress. NADPH-d histochemical staining test was used to observe the time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h respectively after heat stress.Results:Compared with control group, mistakes in heat stress (HS) group was significantly increased while escape latency was significantly shortened at 6 h, 12 h respectively (P<0.05). Compared with control group, NADPH-d positive neuron counts in HS group were significantly increased at 6 h (P<0.05). NADPH-d positive neuron counts in HS group were significantly decreased at 12 h.Conclusions:Acute heat stress could result in obvious damages on learning and memory function of mice, which is possibly related with the increased NADPH-d positive neuron expression.

  11. Changes in time course of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice after heat stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Ling Chen; Yuzhong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice after acute heat stress. Methods:Model of mice after acute heat stress were duplicated. Shuttle box test was used to observe the learning and memory function of mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h respectively after heat stress. NADPH-d histochemical staining test was used to observe the time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h respectively after heat stress. Results:(1) Shuttle box test indicated that:Compared with control group, mistakes (M) in HS (heat stress) group was significantly increased while escape latency (EL) was significantly shortened at 6 h, 12 h respectively. (2) NADPH-d histochemical staining test indicated that:Compared with control group, NADPH-d positive neuron counts in HS group were significantly increased at 6 h, and difference had statistical significance. NADPH-d positive neuron counts in HS group were significantly decreased at 12 h. Conclusion:Acute heat stress could result in obvious damages on learning and memory function of mice, which was possibly related with the increased NADPH-d positive neuron expression.

  12. The Microstructure And Mechanical Properties Of The AlSi17Cu5 Alloy After Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piątkowski J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of the microstructure and mechanical properties (HB, Rm and R0,2 of AlSi17Cu5 alloy, subjected by solution heat treatment (500ºC/6h/woda and aging (200ºC/16h/piec are presented. In next step the alloy was modified and heated significantly above the Tliq temperature (separately and together. It was found that the increase in the strength properties of the tested alloy after heat treatment compared to alloys without solution heat treatment and aging was due to precipitation hardening. The applied aging treatment of ingots (preceded by solution heat treatment, causes not only increase in concentration in α(Al solid solution, but also a favorable change of the primary Si crystals morphology. During stereological measurements significant size reduction and change in the morphology of hypereutectic silicon crystals ware found. This effects can be further enhanced by overheating the alloy to a temperature of 920ºC and rapid cooling before casting of the alloy.

  13. Tick Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ticks Tickborne diseases abroad Borrelia miyamotoi Borrelia mayonii Tick Removal Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir If ... a tick quite effectively. How to remove a tick Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick ...

  14. Tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatto, Maurice A; Halachmi, Shlomit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Over 50,000 new tattoos are placed each year in the United States. Studies estimate that 24% of American college students have tattoos and 10% of male American adults have a tattoo. The rising popularity of tattoos has spurred a corresponding increase in tattoo removal. Not all tattoos are placed intentionally or for aesthetic reasons though. Traumatic tattoos due to unintentional penetration of exogenous pigments can also occur, as well as the placement of medical tattoos to mark treatment boundaries, for example in radiation therapy. Protocols for tattoo removal have evolved over history. The first evidence of tattoo removal attempts was found in Egyptian mummies, dated to have lived 4,000 years BC. Ancient Greek writings describe tattoo removal with salt abrasion or with a paste containing cloves of white garlic mixed with Alexandrian cantharidin. With the advent of Q-switched lasers in the late 1960s, the outcomes of tattoo removal changed radically. In addition to their selective absorption by the pigment, the extremely short pulse duration of Q-switched lasers has made them the gold standard for tattoo removal. PMID:21865802

  15. Hair removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair......Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths......, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available...

  16. Hair Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair......Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths......, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available...

  17. Nevus Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be fundamental to improving a patient’s overall psychosocial state. Other reasons to remove a nevus may ... This is not commonly done and presents many risks and challenges. Can’t they ... on all these same factors again. Different patients are more prone or less ...

  18. Removal of

    OpenAIRE

    Roohan Rakhshaee; Zahra Zamiraee; Somaieh Baghipour; Mohammad Panahandeh

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Azolla Filiculoides as a non-living fern was used in a batch system to remove "Basic Blue 3", which is a cationic dye and a carcinogenic agent.Materials and Methods: We used a batch system by applying certain concentrations of dye contaminant and in the presence of a certain amount of adsorbent under optimum conditions. The main groups presenting in the Azolla cell wall were evaluated by acidification and alkalization of Azolla's media and then potentiometric titrat...

  19. Removal of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roohan Rakhshaee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Azolla Filiculoides as a non-living fern was used in a batch system to remove "Basic Blue 3", which is a cationic dye and a carcinogenic agent.Materials and Methods: We used a batch system by applying certain concentrations of dye contaminant and in the presence of a certain amount of adsorbent under optimum conditions. The main groups presenting in the Azolla cell wall were evaluated by acidification and alkalization of Azolla's media and then potentiometric titration with standard basic and acidic solutions. Results: It was observed that the removal efficiency of dye using non-living Azolla in accordance with the Langmuir isotherms was 82% for the initial dye concentration of 200 mg/lit under reaction conditions consisting of contact time 6 h, pH= 6, temperature 25 ˚C, and dose 5 g/lit. Qmax (maximum uptake capacity by the activated Azolla at three temperatures 5, 25 and 50 ˚C was 0.732, 0.934, and 1.176 mmol/g respectively. ΔG (Gibbs free energy changes was obtained for these temperatures as -0.457, -0.762, and -1.185 kJ/mol respectively.Conclusion: Removal of basic blue 3 using Azolla is an economically and effective method.

  20. Removing Hair Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Removing Hair Safely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... methods of hair removal. back to top Laser Hair Removal In this method, a laser destroys hair ...

  1. Laser Hair Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hair Removal, Laser A A A AFTER: Two laser hair removal treatments were performed. This picture is ... Procedure Overview With just the right type of laser or Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) technology, suitable hairs ...

  2. Methods of urolith removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Cathy; Gisselman, Kelly; Palma, Douglas; McCue, John

    2010-06-01

    Multiple techniques exist to remove uroliths from each section of the urinary tract. Minimally invasive methods for removing lower urinary tract stones include voiding urohydropropulsion, retrograde urohydropropulsion followed by dissolution or removal, catheter retrieval, cystoscopic removal, and cystoscopy-assisted laser lithotripsy and surgery. Laparoscopic cystotomy is less invasive than surgical cystotomy. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy can be used for nephroliths and ureteroliths. Nephrotomy, pyelotomy, or urethrotomy may be recommended in certain situations. This article discusses each technique and gives guidance for selecting the most appropriate technique for an individual patient. PMID:20949423

  3. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  4. Region 9 Removal Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of CERCLA (Superfund) Removal sites. CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act)...

  5. Skin lesion removal-aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aftercare; Nevi - removal aftercare; Scissor excision aftercare; Skin tag removal aftercare; Mole removal aftercare; Skin cancer removal ... to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein ...

  6. Simulation Analysis of Mechanical Properties for Wheel Rim After Heat Treatement%汽车轮辋热处理后的力学性能仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向东

    2013-01-01

    对汽车轮辋结构进行整体建模,分别对热处理前后的汽车轮辋进行了静结构分析,并利用子模型法建立轮辋应力集中区域的子模型.仿真结果表明:最大应力出现在轮辐和轮毂相连接的倒角处,子模型中汽车轮辋的最大等效应力相对于整体模型升高了约9%:经热处理后轮辋强度有一定的提高,但不明显.%The overall modelling on wheel rim was made, and static structural of wheel rim before and after heat treatment were analyzed, respectively. Submodeling was used to model the region of stress concentration in the wheel rim. The simulation results show that the maximum stresses occur in the fillet where the spoke connects to the hub, and maximum stress in the submodel is raised by about 9% than that in overall modelling. The strength of wheel rim after heat treatment raises to a certain extent, but it is not obvious.

  7. Device for removing blackheads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovich, Tamara (116 N. Wetherly Dr., Suite 115, Los Angeles, CA)

    1995-03-07

    A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

  8. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery to remove part or all of your thyroid gland. This operation is called thyroidectomy . You probably ... in just a few weeks. If you had thyroid cancer, you may need to have radioactive iodine ...

  9. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000293.htm Thyroid gland removal - discharge To use the sharing features ... surgery. This will make your scar show less. Thyroid Hormone Replacement You may need to take thyroid ...

  10. Laser Tattoo Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... permanent tattoo for a variety of personal or fashion-related reasons. While there are many methods of ... aspects to trying to remove a stain from clothing. A stain that takes a split second to ...

  11. Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 55. Read More Acute cholecystitis Chronic cholecystitis Gallbladder removal - open Gallstones Patient Instructions Bland diet Surgical wound care - open When you have nausea and vomiting ...

  12. Hardware removal - extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007644.htm Hardware removal - extremity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Surgeons use hardware such as pins, plates, or screws to help ...

  13. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adrenal tumors that appear malignant. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  14. Hardware removal - extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgeons use hardware such as pins, plates, or screws to help fix a broken bone or to correct an abnormality in ... of pain or other problems related to the hardware, you may have surgery to remove the hardware. ...

  15. Graph removal lemmas

    OpenAIRE

    Conlon, David; Fox, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The graph removal lemma states that any graph on n vertices with o(n^{v(H)}) copies of a fixed graph H may be made H-free by removing o(n^2) edges. Despite its innocent appearance, this lemma and its extensions have several important consequences in number theory, discrete geometry, graph theory and computer science. In this survey we discuss these lemmas, focusing in particular on recent improvements to their quantitative aspects.

  16. Metal Removal in Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez Roldan, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study Copper removal capacity of different algae species and their mixtures from the municipal wastewater. This project was implemented in the greenhouse in the laboratories of Tampere University of Applied Sciences and the wastewater used was the one from the Tampere municipal wastewater treatment plant. Five algae species and three mixtures of them were tested for their Copper removal potential in wastewater in one batch test run. The most efficient algae mixture...

  17. Random Sampling with Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Gärtner, Bernd; Lengler, Johannes; Szedlak, May

    2015-01-01

    Random sampling is a classical tool in constrained optimization. Under favorable conditions, the optimal solution subject to a small subset of randomly chosen constraints violates only a small subset of the remaining constraints. Here we study the following variant that we call random sampling with removal: suppose that after sampling the subset, we remove a fixed number of constraints from the sample, according to an arbitrary rule. Is it still true that the optimal solution of the reduced s...

  18. Laser hair removal pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal. PMID:18330794

  19. One piece reactor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Research Reactor No.3 (JRR-3) was the first reactor consisting of 'Japanese-made' components alone except for fuel and heavy water. After reaching its initial critical state in September 1962, JRR-3 had been in operation for 21 years until March 1983. It was decided that the reactor be removed en-bloc in view of the work schedule, cost and management of the reactor following the removal. In the special method developed jointly by the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute and Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd., the reactor main unit was cut off from the building by continuous core boring, with its major components bound in the block with biological shield material (heavy concrete), and then conveyed and stored in a large waste store building constructed near the reactor building. Major work processes described in this report include the cutting off, lifting, horizontal conveyance and lowering of the reactor main unit. The removal of the JRR-3 reactor main unit was successfully carried out safely and quickly by the en-block removal method with radiation exposure dose of the workers being kept at a minimum. Thus the high performance of the en-bloc removal method was demonstrated and, in addition, valuable knowhow and other data were obtained from the work. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Failures of tool steels after heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the work was to determine the most common defects occuring in tool steels of the AISI D-2, S-1, 0-1 and W-2 series during thermal treatment. Defects were evaluated by metallographic analyses, a method used to determine and recognize micro structural defects and their origin in order to be able to eliminate and correct some of the stages that are caused by heat treatment. Results show a large number of defects due to irregularities during thermal heating such as excess or lack of temperature, heating time, and atmosphere, rectifying and handling in service and, to a lesser extent, poor design. In conclusion, with the results obtained for each of the thermal treatments it is necessary to define, particularly the values each of these variables should have since they affect the material properties. (Author)

  1. Arsenic removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  2. Automatic alkaloid removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Muhammad Rizuwan; Hj Razali, Mohd Hudzari; Abu Bakar, Che Abdullah; Ismail, Wan Ishak Wan; Muda, Wan Musa Wan; Mat, Nashriyah; Zakaria, Abd

    2014-01-01

    This alkaloid automated removal machine was developed at Instrumentation Laboratory, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin Malaysia that purposely for removing the alkaloid toxicity from Dioscorea hispida (DH) tuber. It is a poisonous plant where scientific study has shown that its tubers contain toxic alkaloid constituents, dioscorine. The tubers can only be consumed after it poisonous is removed. In this experiment, the tubers are needed to blend as powder form before inserting into machine basket. The user is need to push the START button on machine controller for switching the water pump ON by then creating turbulence wave of water in machine tank. The water will stop automatically by triggering the outlet solenoid valve. The powders of tubers are washed for 10 minutes while 1 liter of contaminated water due toxin mixture is flowing out. At this time, the controller will automatically triggered inlet solenoid valve and the new water will flow in machine tank until achieve the desire level that which determined by ultra sonic sensor. This process will repeated for 7 h and the positive result is achieved and shows it significant according to the several parameters of biological character ofpH, temperature, dissolve oxygen, turbidity, conductivity and fish survival rate or time. From that parameter, it also shows the positive result which is near or same with control water and assuming was made that the toxin is fully removed when the pH of DH powder is near with control water. For control water, the pH is about 5.3 while water from this experiment process is 6.0 and before run the machine the pH of contaminated water is about 3.8 which are too acid. This automated machine can save time for removing toxicity from DH compared with a traditional method while less observation of the user. PMID:24783795

  3. Radioactive ruthenium removing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volatile radioactive ruthenium contained in gas wastes is reacted with a gas incorporating NO2 at an amount of more than 100 molar times of the ruthenium together with a great excess of water, to convert the volatile ruthenium into water soluble ruthenium. The water soluble ruthenium compound is dissolved into the great excess of water used for the reaction and then removed. In this method, ruthenium tetraoxide contained in the gas wastes are sufficiently brought into contact with NO2 gas and water, if they are present, to form a nitrosyl ruthenium compound. Since the thus formed nitrosyl ruthenium compound is water soluble, it is transferred easily from a gas phase to an aqueous phase, and removed efficiently from the gas wastes. In addition, no secondary wastes containing sodium salt are generated. (T.M.)

  4. Method of removing tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To remove trituim in airs simply and reliably in a large amount. Constitution: Tritium contained in air is oxidized in an oxidizing column into water and incorporated in the air. The water-air mixture is caused to flow into and cooled in a first freezing type air drier where almost of tritium water in the air are condensated and separated from the air and, after falling through the drier, recovered by way of a drain tube. The air passing through the freezing type air drier in humidified by a humidifier and then caused to flow into the second freezing drier. Then, a slight amount of tritium water remained in the air is mixed with steams by the humidifier for easier separation, dried in a drier and removed with tritium into cleaned air. After properly humidifying the air in the humidifier, it is flown out through the exit. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Investigations in gallium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Beard, C.A. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  6. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  7. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  8. Power plant removal costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The financial, regulatory and political significance of the estimated high removal costs of nuclear power plants has generated considerable interest in recent years, and the political significance has resulted in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) eliminating the use of conventional depreciation accounting for the decontamination portion of the removal (decommissioning). While nuclear plant licensees are not precluded from utilizing conventional depreciation accounting for the demolition of non-radioactive structures and site restoration, state and federal utility regulators have not been favorably inclined to requests for this distinction. The realization that steam-generating units will be more expensive to remove, relative to their original cost, predates the realization that nuclear units will be expensive. However, the nuclear issues have overshadowed this realization, but are unlikely to continue to do so. Numerous utilities have prepared cost estimates for steam generating units, and this presentation discusses the implications of a number of such estimates that are a matter of public record. The estimates cover nearly 400 gas, oil, coal and lignite generating units. The earliest estimate was made in 1978, and for analysis purposes the author has segregated them between gas and oil units, and coal and lignite units

  9. Phosphate removal from domestic wastewater using thermally modified steel slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian; Liang, Wenyan; Wang, Li; Li, Feizhen; Zou, Yuanlong; Wang, Haidong

    2015-05-01

    This study was performed to investigate the removal of phosphate from domestic wastewater using a modified steel slag as the adsorbent. The adsorption effects of alkalinity, salt, water, and thermal modification were investigated. The results showed that thermal activation at 800°C for 1 hr was the optimum operation to improve the adsorption capacity. The adsorption process of the thermally modified slag was well described by the Elovich kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir model reached 13.62 mg/g. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the surface of the modified slag was cracked and that the texture became loose after heating. The surface area and pore volume did not change after thermal modification. In the treatment of domestic wastewater, the modified slag bed (35.5 kg) removed phosphate effectively and operated for 158 days until the effluent P rose above the limit concentration of 0.5 mg/L. The phosphate fractionation method, which is often applied in soil research, was used to analyze the phosphate adsorption behavior in the slag bed. The analysis revealed that the total contents of various Ca-P forms accounted for 81.4%-91.1%, i.e., Ca10-P 50.6%-65.1%, Ca8-P 17.8%-25.0%, and Ca2-P 4.66%-9.20%. The forms of Al-P, Fe-P, and O-P accounted for only 8.9%-18.6%. The formation of Ca10-P precipitates was considered to be the main mechanism of phosphate removal in the thermally modified slag bed. PMID:25968262

  10. Removal of uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions by carboxyl-rich hydrothermal carbon spheres through low-temperature heat treatment in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboxyl-rich hydrothermal carbon spheres were prepared by simply heating pristine hydrothermal carbon spheres (HCSs) at lower temperature in air, and the textural properties were characterized using Boehm titrations, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and elemental-analysis. The result of Boehm titrations indicated that the content of carboxyl groups on HCSs increased significantly from 0.53 to 3.81 mmol/g after heat-treatment at 300 deg C, which was also confirmed by FT-IR and EA qualitatively. The ability of heat-treated HCSs has been explored for the removal and recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions, and the influences of different experimental parameters, such as heat-treatment temperature, contact time and ionic strength, on adsorption were investigated. The U(VI) sorption capacity of HCSs increased from 55.0 to 179.95 mg/g after heat-treatment at 300 deg C for 5 h. Selective adsorption studies showed that the heat-treated HCSs could selectively remove U(VI), and the selectivity coefficients were improved after heat-treatment in the presence of co-existing ions, Na(I), Ni(II), Sr(II), Mn(II), Mg(II) and Zn(II). The adsorbent HCSs could be effectively regenerated by 0.05 mol/L HCl solution for the removal and recovery of U(VI). Complete removal (99.0 %) of U(VI) from 1.0 L industry wastewater containing 15.0 mg U(VI) ions was possible with 5.0 g heat-treated HCSs. In addition, a reaction mechanism for newly generating carboxyl groups on pristine HCSs surface during heat-treatment process and uranyl ion interaction with carboxyl-rich hydrothermal carbon spheres were also supposed. (author)

  11. Iraq spent fuel removal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the preparation and operations associated with the removal of the 208 spent fuel assemblies from Iraq, with emphasis on the technical challenges that were overcome during this removal process. (author)

  12. Regenerable Contaminant Removal System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Regenerable Contaminant Removal System (RCRS) is an innovative method to remove sulfur and halide compounds from contaminated gas streams to part-per-billion...

  13. Mower/Litter Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Burg Corporation needed to get more power out of the suction system in their Vac 'N Bag grass mower/litter remover. The president submitted a problem statement to the Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Transfer Office, which devised a way to guide heavier items of trash to a point where suction was greatest, and made changes to the impeller and the exhaust port, based on rocket propulsion technology. The improved system is used by highway departments, city governments and park authorities, reducing work time by combining the tasks of grass cutting and vacuuming trash and grass clippings.

  14. Removable molar power arm

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Attachment of force elements from the gingival hook of maxillary molar tubes during the retraction of the anterior teeth is very common in orthodontic practice. As the line of force passes below the center of resistance (CR) of molar, it results its mesial tipping and also anchorage loss. To overcome this problem, the line of force should pass along the CR of molar. This article highlights a method to overcome this problem by attaching a removable power arm to the headgear tube of molar tube ...

  15. Material selection,hardness after heat treatment and use specification of steel extrusion toolings%钢挤压工模具材质选择、热处理硬度及使用规范

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包进平; 赵云路; 薛荣敬

    2012-01-01

    For the high temperature strength and toughness of the traditional hot working die steel materials can not meet the requirement of the steel extrusion toolings, and their comprehensive costs are high, so the hot working die steel material 1. 2367 suiting for steel extrusion toolings was proposed. And the differences between them and the traditional hot working die steel materials were compared. The material selection, suitable hardness after heat treatment and use specification of each steel extrusion toolings were described in detail. The frequently water cooling usually resulted in the die steel thermal fatigue, so the viewpoint of water cooling replaced by several toolings cycle use and natural cooling was proposed.%由于传统热作模具钢的高温强韧性不能满足钢挤压工模具的要求以及综合成本较高等原因,提出了适合用于钢挤压工模具的热作模具钢材质1.2367,并将其与传统热作模具钢进行对比;对各种钢挤压工模具材质选择、适宜的热处理硬度及使用规范进行了较为详细的叙述;对频繁水冷容易造成模具钢热疲劳的问题,提出了利用多件工模具循环使用并采取自然冷却的方法代替水冷的观点.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 08Ni3DR cryogenic steel after heat treatment%低温用08 Ni3 DR钢热处理后的组织与力学性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彩焕

    2013-01-01

    采用Gleeble 3800热模拟试验机测定了08Ni3DR钢的CCT曲线,观察了不同冷却速度下钢的显微组织,并对其热处理后的组织与性能进行了分析。结果表明,08Ni3DR钢奥氏体化后,冷却速度稍高于8℃/s时,淬火组织中会出现贝氏体;当冷却速度高于15℃/s时,组织逐渐变为马氏体+贝氏体,晶粒均匀细小。08Ni3DR钢加热到850℃,快速水冷到300℃以下,之后进行650℃回火处理后,晶粒细小均匀,组织为回火索氏体,综合力学性能良好。%CCT curves of 08Ni3DR steel were measured by Gleeble 3800 thermal simulation testing machine , and microstructure of the steel was observed under different cooling temperature , and microstructure and mechanical properties of the 08Ni3DR steel after heat treatment was analyzed.The results show that austenitized and cooled with the speed above 8℃/s, bainite appears in the quenched microstructure .When the cooling speed is above 15℃/s, the microstructure is composed of martensite and bainitic , and the crystal line grain is uniform and fine . When 08Ni3DR steel is heated to 850 ℃and then rapidly cooled to 300 ℃, and tempered at 650 ℃, the crystal is uniform and fine , the microstructure is tempered sorbite and the comprehensive mechanical properties is preferable .

  17. Tritium removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium-containing gases in a reactor container are discharged to a gas pressurizer and the gases pressurized there are sent to the primary side of a tritium separation device under a high or low pressure. Polyimide polymer separation membranes having selective permeability to elemental tritium and tritium vapor are coated in the tritium separation device. The separation device is divided into primary and secondary sides by the separation membranes and the pressure in the secondary side is lowered by a vacuum pump, etc. Tritium contained in the tritium-containing gases passes through the separation membranes selectively to be moved into the secondary side. Accordingly, tritium is treated in the elemental form and equipments for regeneration such as an adsorption column, etc. are no more necessary and the space can be saved due to minimization of the removing device. Further, since tritium can be removed continuously without storing a great amount of tritium, it is preferable in view of safety. (T.M.)

  18. Mercury removal sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  19. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution by wood millet carbon optimization using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Kokhdan, Syamak Nasiri

    2015-02-01

    The use of cheep, non-toxic, safe and easily available adsorbent are efficient and recommended material and alternative to the current expensive substance for pollutant removal from wastewater. The activated carbon prepared from wood waste of local tree (millet) extensively was applied for quantitative removal of methylene blue (MB), while simply. It was used to re-used after heating and washing with alkaline solution of ethanol. This new adsorbent was characterized by using BET surface area measurement, FT-IR, pH determination at zero point of charge (pHZPC) and Boehm titration method. Response surface methodology (RSM) by at least the number of experiments main and interaction of experimental conditions such as pH of solution, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage was optimized and set as pH 7, contact time 18 min, initial dye concentration 20 ppm and 0.2 g of adsorbent. It was found that variable such as pH and amount of adsorbent as solely or combination effects seriously affect the removal percentage. The fitting experimental data with conventional models reveal the applicability of isotherm models Langmuir model for their well presentation and description and Kinetic real rate of adsorption at most conditions efficiently can be represented pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion. It novel material is good candidate for removal of huge amount of MB (20 ppm) in short time (18 min) by consumption of small amount (0.2 g).

  20. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  1. 热处理前后壮药“国虾薄”中皂苷类化合物研究%Saponins from Zhuang-medicine Gocaekmbaw before and after Heat-processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慧敏; 陈道金; 朴香兰

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Isolation and identification of saponins from Gocaekmbaw before and after heatprocessing was studied.Method:The leaves of Gocaekmbaw were steam-heated at 125 ℃ and 0.24 MPa for 3 h,then extracted with 80% ethanol for 3 h.The extracts were isolated with chromatography using HP-20,silica gel and reversed ODS column.The constituents isolated from Gocaekmbaw before and after heat-processing were identified with 1H-NMR,13 C-NMR and LCMS-IT-TOF spectra.Result:Two dammarane-type saponins were isolated from the original Gocaekmbaw.And four different compounds were got from the heat processed Gocaekmbaw.They were identified as gypenoside XLVI,gypenoside LVI,gypenoside L,gypenoside LI,damulin B and damulin A,respectively.Conclusion:Sugar chains in C20 position of gypenoside XLVI and gypenoside LVI were hydrolyzed by heat-processing to change the constituents of Gocaekmbaw.%目的:分离、鉴定热处理前后国虾薄中皂苷类化合物.方法:国虾薄在温度125℃、压力0.24 MPa的条件下,加热处理3h,用80%乙醇加热回流提取3h,通过大孔树脂HP-20、硅胶柱及反相柱色谱等分离手段对热处理前后的国虾薄成分进行分离,并用核磁共振波谱、离子阱飞行时间质谱(LCMS-IT-TOF)等数据鉴定其成分.结果:从壮药国虾薄原药材中分离得到2个达玛烷类皂苷成分,经热处理后得另外4个达玛烷类皂苷成分,分别鉴定为绞股蓝皂苷gypenoside XLVI,gypenoside LVI,gypenoside L,gypenoside LI,damulin B和damulin A.结论:热处理能够使国虾薄中达玛烷型皂苷gypenoside XLVI,gypenoside LVI的20位上连有的糖链被水解,为国虾薄热处理产物的成分变化提供实验依据.

  2. Radioactive iodine removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a radioactive iodine removing device of an off-gas processing step in a spent fuel reprocessing facility, spiral structures having an inclination of more than about 20deg is disposed at the inside of an iodine adsorbent packing portion, and dampers are disposed at a packing inlet and a discharging exit for iodine adsorbents respectively. After completion of discharge of the iodine adsorbents, a damper disposed in the midway of a adsorbent packing pipeline is opened for packing the iodine absorbents. The iodine adsorbents used have a spherical shape of 10 to 20 mesh (1 to 2mm), and the adsorbents are packed uniformly both radially and vertically to the packing portion upon injection of the adsorbents and, as a result, the packing portion can be made compact. Further, since the discharged iodine adsorbents can be contained in a vessel directly or in a different vessel having an excellent containing performance by taking the dimension of the vessel into consideration, it is possible to reduce the generation amount of wastes than that in a conventional case. (N.H.)

  3. Random triangle removal

    CERN Document Server

    Bohman, Tom; Lubetzky, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Starting from a complete graph on $n$ vertices, repeatedly delete the edges of a uniformly chosen triangle. This stochastic process terminates once it arrives at a triangle-free graph, and the fundamental question is to estimate the final number of edges (equivalently, the time it takes the process to finish, or how many edge-disjoint triangles are packed via the random greedy algorithm). Bollob\\'as and Erd\\H{o}s (1990) conjectured that the expected final number of edges has order $n^{3/2}$. An upper bound of $o(n^2)$ was shown by Spencer (1995) and independently by R\\"odl and Thoma (1996). Several bounds were given for variants and generalizations (e.g., Alon, Kim and Spencer (1997) and Wormald (1999)), while the best known upper bound for the original question of Bollob\\'as and Erd\\H{o}s was $n^{7/4+o(1)}$ due to Grable (1997). No nontrivial lower bound was available. Here we prove that with high probability the final number of edges in random triangle removal is equal to $n^{3/2+o(1)}$, thus confirming the...

  4. Region 9 Removal Sites 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of CERCLA (Superfund) Removal sites. CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act)...

  5. Screw/stud removal tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, K.; Herrick, D. E.; Rothermel, L.

    1980-01-01

    Tool removes stubborn panheaded screws or studs where conventional tools would be either too weak or inconvenient to use. Screws with damaged heads or slots can also be removed this way. Tool can be worked with one hand and easily fits limited-access and blind areas. It can be made in various sizes to fit different screwheads.

  6. Krypton-85 removal and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature survey was made in order to predict the atmospheric Kr-85 concentration in the future and it s effect on the population. As a consequence the need for its treatment and removal as a previous step to gaseous waste disposal is justified. A literature review of possible methods of Kr-85 removal and storage is also included. (Author) 43 refs

  7. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2011-02-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  8. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  9. Aluminum removal from washed sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of this project is to reduce the volume of storage tank sludge to be treated by removing the Al and other nonradioactive components. In initial sludge surrogate studies, Al, Cr, and Zn showed the highest solubility in NaOH solutions; Ce and Zr were the least soluble of the elements tested. Removal of Fe and Bi approached 2%, the rest of the elements studied showed <1% removal. Amount of Al removed increased as the NaOH conc. increased from 0.1 to 6 M. Sequential washing of the sludge surrogate with 3 M NaOH removed 84% of the Al, 39% of the Cr, and 65% of the Zn. Surrogate sludges containing U and Th were also studied

  10. Technetium removal: preliminary flowsheet options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the results of a preliminary investigation into options for preliminary flowsheets for 99Tc removal from Hanford Site tank waste. A model is created to show the path of 99Tc through pretreatment to disposal. The Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) flowsheet (Orme 1995) is used as a baseline. Ranges of important inputs to the model are developed, such as 99Tc inventory in the tanks and important splits through the TWRS flowsheet. Several technetium removal options are discussed along with sensitivities of the removal schemes to important model parameters

  11. Arrhythmia management after device removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmic management is needed after removal of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Patients completely dependent on CIEDs need temporary device back-up until new CIEDs are implanted. Various methods are available for device back-up, and the appropriate management varies among patients. The duration from CIED removal to implantation of a new CIED also differs among patients. Temporary pacing is needed for patients with bradycardia, a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) or catheter ablation is needed for patients with tachyarrhythmia, and sequential pacing is needed for patients dependent on cardiac resynchronization therapy. The present review focuses on arrhythmic management after CIED removal. PMID:27588151

  12. Inked and Regretful: Removing Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Inked and Regretful: Removing Tattoos Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... How Does It Work? Does It Hurt? That tattoo on your arm of a former flame—the ...

  13. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  14. Heat exchanger with removable orifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor steam generator heat exchanger is described which has orifices in the entrance openings of the heat exchange tubes which, although securely fastened to the tubes, can be easily removed by remote handling equipment. (U.K.)

  15. Contaminated concrete surface layer removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equipment is being developed to economically remove contaminated concrete surfaces in nuclear facilities. To be effective this equipment should minimize personnel radiation exposure, minimize the volume of material removed, and perform the operation quickly with the least amount of energy. Several methods for removing concrete surfaces are evaluated for use in decontaminating such facilities. Two unique methods especially suited for decontamination are described: one, the water cannon, is a device that fires a high-velocity jet of fluid causing spallation of the concrete surface; the other, a concrete spaller, is a tool that exerts radial pressure agains the sides of a pre-dilled shallow cylindrical hole causing spallation to occur. Each method includes a means for containing airborne contamination. Results of tests show that these techniques can rapidly and economically remove surfaces, and leave minimal rubble for controlled disposal

  16. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminarse las marcas de acne? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  17. Article removal device for glovebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

    1973-12-01

    An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

  18. Removing Pubic Hair (For Young Women)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Removing Pubic Hair Posted under Health Guides . Updated 7 October 2015. + ... safety guidelines if you decide to remove pubic hair. Removing pubic hair is a personal preference. Some girls trim ...

  19. Technetium removal from aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research discussed in this report has compared several ''state of the art'' techniques for the removal of traces of the radionuclide, technetium, from aqueous wastes. The techniques investigated were: electrochemical reduction to an insoluble oxide, electrochemical ion exchange, seeded ultrafiltration and chemical reduction followed by filtration. Each technique was examined using a simulant based upon the waste generated by the Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant (EARP) at Sellafield. The technique selected for further investigation was direct electrochemical reduction which offers an ideal route for the removal of technetium from the stream (DFs 10-100) and can be operated continuously with a low power consumption 25 kW for the waste generated by EARP. Cell designs for scale up have been suggested to treat the 1000m3 of waste produced every day. Future work is proposed to investigate the simultaneous removal of other key radionuclides, such as ruthenium, plutonium and cobalt as well as scale up of the resulting process and to investigate the effect of these other radionuclides on the efficiency of the electrochemical reduction technique for the removal of technetium. Total development and full scale plant costs are estimated to be of the order of 5 pounds - 10M, with a time scale of 5 -8 years to realisation. (author)

  20. Laser assisted hair-removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, S; Elsaie, M L; Nouri, K

    2009-10-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the hair follicle by targeting melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Laser hair removal is achieved through follicular unit destruction based on selective photothermolysis. The principle of selective photothermolysis predicts that the thermal injury will be restricted to a given target if there is sufficient selective absorption of light and the pulse duration is shorter than the thermal relaxation time of the target. This review will focus on the mechanisms of laser assisted hair removal and provide an update on the newer technologies emerging in the field of lasers assisted hair removal. PMID:19834437

  1. Carious dentine removal: current approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Coeli de Farias Sales

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry is renewed day after day through the results of qualified researches. The approach as regards carious dentin removal is goingthrough questioning and innovation. The scope of this study was to perform a literature review in the sense of elucidating questions pertaining to the problem of whether or not it is necessary to completely remove carious dentin, and the possibility of performing restoration in a single session, in addition to a discussion about which type of material should be applied in this type of substrate. After analyzing the referenced articles, it was concluded that the stepwise treatment controls caries progression; there is a trend in the literature to partially remove the carious dentin in deep lesions and perform definitive restoration; Calcium hydroxide cement is a classical liner in these situations, while glass ionomer cement and resinous materials are other possibilities of materials that can be in close contact with the remaining dentin.

  2. Hair removal on dermoscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglogiannis, Ilias; Delibasis, Kostantinos

    2015-08-01

    Digital Dermoscopy is a tool commonly used by dermatologists for assisting the diagnosis of skin lesions. The presence of hair in such dermoscopic images frequently occludes significant diagnostic information and reduces their value. In this work we propose algorithms that successfully identify and remove hair from the dermoscopic images. The proposed algorithms consist of two parts; the first deals with the identification of hair, while the second part concerns the image restoration using interpolation. For the evaluation of the algorithms we used ground truth images with synthetic hair and compared the results with the commonly used in the literature DullRazor tool. According to the experimental results the proposed hair removal algorithms can be used successfully in the detection and removal of both dark and light colored hair. PMID:26736913

  3. PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL USING STEEL SLAG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Z. Lan; S. Zhang; J.K. Wang; R. W. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Steel slag is a byproduct produced in large amounts in the steel-making process. It is an important resource that can be effectively utilized. An experiment was described in which steel slag was tested as an adsorbent for the removal of phosphorus from waste water. Phosphorus removal depended on the amount of steel slag added, the pH value, the contact time, and the initial concentration. Under laboratory conditions when the added slag was 7.5g/L, the contact time 2h, and the pH value was equivalent to 6.5, over 99% of the phosphorus was removed; the experimental data on steel slag adsorption of phosphorus in the water fitted the Freundlich isotherm model. Steel slag was found to be very effective in adsorbing phosphorus.

  4. AdapterRemoval v2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Mikkel; Lindgreen, Stinus; Orlando, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    process the growing amount of data generated per sequencing run. FINDINGS: We introduce AdapterRemoval v2, a major revision of AdapterRemoval v1, which introduces (i) striking improvements in throughput, through the use of single instruction, multiple data (SIMD; SSE1 and SSE2) instructions and multi......-threading support, (ii) the ability to handle datasets containing reads or read-pairs with different adapters or adapter pairs, (iii) simultaneous demultiplexing and adapter trimming, (iv) the ability to reconstruct adapter sequences from paired-end reads for poorly documented data sets, and (v) native gzip and...... bzip2 support. CONCLUSIONS: We show that AdapterRemoval v2 compares favorably with existing tools, while offering superior throughput to most alternatives examined here, both for single and multi-threaded operations....

  5. Modification of red mud by acid treatment and its application for CO removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Acid treated red mud was more active than as-received red mud for CO oxidation. ► High surface area and presence of hydroxylated iron oxide contributed to higher activity. ► Complete conversion was obtained in the temperature range 350–500 °C. - Abstract: Activated red mud (ARM) samples were tested for carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation in the temperature range of 100–500 °C. Conversion of >90% was obtained for temperatures above 400 °C for all samples. In order to study the effect of hydroxylated phases of iron oxide in red mud on the removal of CO, ‘as-received’ red mud (RM) and acid digested and re-precipitated red mud (TRM) were also tested under similar conditions. It was found that TRM was more effective in removal of CO with the 50% conversion temperature (T50) 80 °C lower than the ARM samples. The samples before and after reaction were characterized by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), BET N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). It was observed that TRM had iron in an amorphous form which then converted to iron oxide after heating. The higher activity of TRM was due to its higher surface area and presence of hydroxylated phase of iron oxide.

  6. Modification of red mud by acid treatment and its application for CO removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushil, Snigdha; Batra, Vidya S

    2012-02-15

    Activated red mud (ARM) samples were tested for carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation in the temperature range of 100-500°C. Conversion of >90% was obtained for temperatures above 400°C for all samples. In order to study the effect of hydroxylated phases of iron oxide in red mud on the removal of CO, 'as-received' red mud (RM) and acid digested and re-precipitated red mud (TRM) were also tested under similar conditions. It was found that TRM was more effective in removal of CO with the 50% conversion temperature (T50) 80°C lower than the ARM samples. The samples before and after reaction were characterized by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), BET N(2) adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). It was observed that TRM had iron in an amorphous form which then converted to iron oxide after heating. The higher activity of TRM was due to its higher surface area and presence of hydroxylated phase of iron oxide. PMID:22204836

  7. Laser-based coatings removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A. [F2 Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  8. Arsenic removal by lime softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaosol, T.; Suksaroj, C.; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    This paper focuses on the study of arsenic removal for drinking water by lime softening. The initial arsenic (V) concentration was 500 and 1,000 ug/L in synthetic groundwater. The experiments were performed as batch tests with varying lime dosages and mixing time. For the synthetic groundwater......, arsenic (V) removal increased with increasing lime dosage and mixing time, as well as with the resulting pH. The residual arsenic (V) in all cases was lower than the WHO guideline of 10 ug/L at pH higher than 11.5. Kinetic of arsenic (V) removal can be described by a first-order equation as C1 = C0*e......^-k*t. The relation between the constant (k value) and increasing lime dosage was found to be linear, described by k = 0.0034 (Dlime). The results support a theory from the literature that the arsenic (V) was removed by precipitation af Ca3(AsO4)2. The results obtained in the present study suggest that lime...

  9. Artificial wetlands performance: nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-de-Bazúa, Carmen; Guido-Zárate, Alejandro; Huanosta, Thalía; Padrón-López, Rosa Martha; Rodríguez-Monroy, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Artificial wetlands (AW) are a promising option for wastewater treatment in small communities due to their high performance in nutrients removal and low operation and maintenance costs. Nitrogen can favour the growth of algae in water bodies causing eutrophication when present at high concentrations. Nitrogen can be removed through different mechanisms (e.g. nitrification-denitrification, adsorption and plant uptake). Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity can play an important role in the performance of these systems by promoting the growth of macrophytes such as reeds and cattails (e.g. Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia respectively). In this paper, two AW systems were compared, one located in Mexico City, Mexico at an altitude higher than 2,000 m above the sea level, and the second one located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico at an a altitude near the sea level (27 m). Both systems comprised five reactors (147-L plastic boxes) filled with volcanic slag and gravel and intermittently fed with synthetic water. The removal nitrogen efficiency found for the system located in Mexico City was higher than that of the Tabasco system (90 and 80% as TKN respectively). The higher temperatures in the Tabasco system did not enhanced the nitrogen removal as expected. PMID:18957747

  10. GLYPHOSATE REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activated-carbon, oxidation, conventional-treatment, filtration, and membrane studies are conducted to determine which process is best suited to remove the herbicide glyphosate from potable water. Both bench-scale and pilot-scale studies are completed. Computer models are used ...

  11. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM INACTIVATION AND REMOVAL RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench- and pilot-scale tests were performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment, ozonation and chlorine dioxide to remove and inactivate Cryptosporidium oocysts. The impacts of coagulant type, coagulant dose, raw water quality, filter loading rates and filter media w...

  12. Removing Defects From Silicon Ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K.

    1982-01-01

    Proposal for removing impurities from silicon ribbon and sheet could be developed into an automated production-line process. New technique which combines ion-cluster bombardment, electron-gun heating, and plasma etching, could be key step in fabricating inexpensive solar-cell arrays. Silicon sheets and ribbons treated this way could have enhanced carrier lifetimes necessary for satisfactory solar-cell performance.

  13. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III and As(V from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration.

  14. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... articles. A brewer may remove malt, malt syrup, wort, and other articles from the brewery. (e) Methods...

  15. VDTT removal system functional design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Velocity Density Temperature Trees (H-2-815016) are to be removed from risers 14A and 1B of tank 241-SY-101. This document provides functional design criteria for the removal system. The removal system consists of a Liquid Removal Tool, Flexible Receiver (H-2-79216), Burial Container, Transport Trailers, and associated equipment

  16. AdapterRemoval v2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Mikkel; Lindgreen, Stinus; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As high-throughput sequencing platforms produce longer and longer reads, sequences generated from short inserts, such as those obtained from fossil and degraded material, are increasingly expected to contain adapter sequences. Efficient adapter trimming algorithms are also needed to...... process the growing amount of data generated per sequencing run. FINDINGS: We introduce AdapterRemoval v2, a major revision of AdapterRemoval v1, which introduces (i) striking improvements in throughput, through the use of single instruction, multiple data (SIMD; SSE1 and SSE2) instructions and multi......-threading support, (ii) the ability to handle datasets containing reads or read-pairs with different adapters or adapter pairs, (iii) simultaneous demultiplexing and adapter trimming, (iv) the ability to reconstruct adapter sequences from paired-end reads for poorly documented data sets, and (v) native gzip and...

  17. Soil washing for brine removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the exploration for oil and thereafter, brine transfer lines get ruptured releasing the brine which contaminates the surrounding soil. The salinity level in brine is very high, sometimes approaching or exceeding that of sea water. Soils contaminated with brine are unproductive and unsuitable for plant growth. Several investigators have documented the pollution of surface water and groundwater due to brine disposal from oil and needed to clean up such sites. The objective of this study is to develop a soil washing technique that can be used to remove brine sites were collected and used in the study. This paper reports on results which indicate that soil washing using various surface active agents is effective in removing the brine

  18. Microalgae removal with Moringa oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrado-Moreno, M M; Beltran-Heredia, J; Martín-Gallardo, J

    2016-02-01

    Moringa oleifera seed extract was tested for algae (Chlorella, Microcystis, Oocystis and Scenedesmus) removal by Jar-test technique. This coagulant can be used in drinking water treatment. Jar-test has been carried out in order to evaluate the efficiency of this natural coagulant agent inside real surface water matrix. The influence of variables has been studied in this process, including operating parameters such as coagulant dosage, initial algae concentration, pH, agitation time and water matrix. Removal capacity is verified for water with high contamination of algae while the process is not affected by the pH and water matrix. Coagulation process may be modelling through Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption hypothesis, so acceptable r2 coefficients are obtained. PMID:26688055

  19. Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

  20. STS-31: APU Controller Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The launch April 10 of the STS-31 was scrubbed at T-4 minutes due to a faulty valve in auxiliary power unit (APU) number one. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. This video shows the removal of the STS-31's auxiliary power unit (APU).

  1. Thorium removal by different adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metaxas, Michail; Kasselouri-Rigopoulou, Vasilia; Galiatsatou, Polymnia; Konstantopoulou, Cathrine; Oikonomou, Dimitrios

    2003-02-28

    The removal of radiotoxic Th{sup 4+} from aqueous solutions has been explored using two different groups of adsorptive materials (e.g. two activated carbons and four zeolites--two natural and two synthetic). The activated carbons were prepared from solvent extracted olive pulp (SEOP) and olive stone (OS) by a two-step physical activation method with steam. They were characterized by N{sub 2} at 77 K adsorption, Hg porosimetry and by determination of their iodine number. All carbons prepared are of the H-type (e.g. contain mainly basic surface oxides) confirmed by the results of the Boehm's method. The natural zeolites, clinoptilolite (NaCLI) and mordenite (NaMOR), were pretreated with Na{sup +} before the adsorption experiments, while the synthetic ones, NaX and NaA, were provided in their commercial sodium form. The natural zeolites, NaCLI and NaMOR, utilized 11.5 and 38.6% of the theoretical ion-exchange capacity, based on Al content, respectively, while NaX and NaA utilized 41.5 and 45.9%, respectively. The activated carbons showed better removal capability than NaCLI. NaMOR, showed comparable results to the carbon originated from OS, but lower removal capability than the carbon originated from SEOP. The synthetic zeolites showed the highest removal ability for thorium ions due to their increased ion-exchange capacity because of their cleaner and larger framework channels and their higher number of ion-exchange sites. The carbons adsorption capacity mainly depends on the content and nature of functional surface groups. The adsorption data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The former achieved best fits and was further applied to obtain the respective Langmuir constant and maximum adsorption capacity for each system.

  2. The removal of sodium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is concentrated on the removal of sodium combustion aerosol. The experimental results are presented in it. Besides, the output of the aerosol, the igniting point and combustion rate of sodium are also obtained. An experimental device for removing of the aerosol consists of a blower, sodium combustion container, water-spraying column, water storage tank and nitrogen bottle. In order to compare the concentrations at the outlet of the column before and after the water-spraying, the concentration distribution was measured in the process of sodium burning. It was found that similar concentration could be obtained from sixth to eighth minute after ignition of sodium in the container. During the interval the water-spraying was performed, the measurement of the aerosol concentrations at different water-spray height was proceeded. The removing efficiency of the aerosol at different water-spraying heights is different. The efficiency at the height of 1220 mm is near to maximum. The results show that further increasing water-spray height could not greatly reduce the concentration of the aerosol at the outlet. (author)

  3. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD and R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P and CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD and R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment

  4. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes

  5. THE REMOVAL OF GLYPHOSATE FROM DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of granulated activated carbon (GAC), packed activated carbon (PAC), conventional treatment, membranes, and oxidation for removing glyphosate from natural waters is evaluated. Results indicate that GAC and PAC are not effective in removing glyphosate, while oxid...

  6. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Removal process: Planning and initiating removals, managing removals, non-CERCLA funded removals. Part 3 Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The videotape is divided into three sections. Section 1 outlines the major components of planning and initiating a removal, such as identifying appropriate response actions, preparing an Action Memorandum (AM), projecting the cost of the removal, obtaining site access, setting up a command post, and overseeing the development of the required plans. The resources available to the OSC to conduct a removal also are discussed. Section 2 discusses the OSC's role in managing the removal and describes how to obtain resources and how to manage site activities and monitor costs. The statutory limits of a removal and the importance of documenting site activities accurately and completely also are outlined. Section 3 outlines the OSC's role in removal actions conducted by parties other than EPA OSCs. Discussed are CERCLA removals conducted by PRPs, States, Federal facilities and Indian tribes. Underground Storage Tank (UST) assessment and removal under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) authority is also discussed

  7. Spikes removal in surface measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several cylinder surface topographies made from grey cast iron were measured by Talysurf CCI white light interferometer with and without use of spikes filter. They were plateau honed by abrasive stones. Measured area was 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm, height resolution was 0.01 nm. The forms were eliminated using polynomial of the 3rd degree. After it, spikes were removed using four methods. These approaches were compared. Parameters of the smaller and highest sensitivity on spikes presence were selected

  8. Radioiodine removal in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical means are reviewed available for the retention of radioiodine in nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing plants, its immobilization, storage, and disposal. The removal of iodine species from gaseous effluents of nuclear power plants using impregnated activated charcoal is dealt with. Various scrubbing techniques for trapping iodine from the head-end and dissolver off-gases are discussed as well as solid adsorbents for iodine which may be used to clean up other gaseous streams. Current practices and activities for radioiodine treatment and management in Belgian, Dutch, Swedish, USSR and UK nuclear installations are presented

  9. Photodynamic therapy for hair removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. M. Ali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted hair is one of the most common medical problems affecting women of reproductive age inducing a lot of psychological stress and threatening their femininity and self-esteem. Old methods of removing unwanted hair include shaving, waxing, chemical depilation, and electrolysis, all of which have temporary results. However laser-assisted hair removal is the most efficient method of long-term hair removal currently available. It is desirable to develop a reduced cost photodynamic therapy (PDT system whose properties should include high efficiency and low side-effects. Method: Mice skin tissues were used in this study and divided into six groups such as controls, free methylene blue (MB incubation, liposome methylene blue (MB incubation, laser without methylene blue (MB, free methylene blue (MB for 3 and 4 hrs and laser, liposome methylene blue (MB for 3 hrs and laser. Methylene blue (MBwas applied to wax epilated areas. The areas were irradiated with CW He-Ne laser system that emits orange-red light with wavelength 632.8 nm and 10 mW at energy density of 5 J/ cm2 for 10 minutes. The UV-visible absorption spectrum was collected by Cary spectrophotometer. Results: Methylene blue (MB is selectively absorbed by actively growing hair follicles due to its cationic property. Methylene blue (MBuntreated sections showed that hair follicle and sebaceous gland are intact and there is no change due to the laser exposure. Free methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed that He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles, leaving an intact epidermis. Treated section with free methylene blue (MB for 4 hrs showed degeneration and necrosis in hair follicle, leaving an intact epidermis. Liposomal methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles with intradermal leucocytic infiltration. Conclusions: Low power CW He:Ne laser and methylene blue (MB offered a successful PDT system

  10. Forced removals embodied as tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Eugene T; Morrow, Carl D; Ho, Theodore; Fürst, Nicole; Cohelia, Rebekkah; Tram, Khai Hoan; Farmer, Paul E; Wood, Robin

    2016-07-01

    South Africa has one of the worst tuberculosis burdens in the world. Several ecological forces have contributed to this, including high HIV prevalence; failing TB control strategies; crowded, poorly ventilated indoor environments-including the complex web of political and economic interests which produce them; the development of racial capitalism; and mining and migration. In the following study, we measure CO2 levels in public transport to investigate the role extended commutes from peri-urban settlements to urban sites of work-a direct result of forced removals-potentially play in propagating the TB epidemic in Cape Town, South Africa. PMID:27239703

  11. Removing oil from produced water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the design, operation, and performance of a new gas-assisted clarifier system which acts to remove oil from waste water. The system has no moving parts and uses no chemical additives. The results show that the system can be successfully used to reduce the oil content of waste water to acceptable effluent limits. The systems are designed for offshore oil and gas production facilities. Test results are provided which show the reduction of oil and grease from 211 mg/L to 3 mg/L

  12. Laser-based coatings removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D ampersand D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building

  13. Active Debris Removal Mapping Project

    OpenAIRE

    Nasseri, S Ali; Borriello, Ciro; Hussein, Alaa; Kebe, Fatoumata

    2014-01-01

    Space debris discussions initiated with the start of the space age 55 years ago and have seen special interest in current years. This is due to the large increase in the number of space debris which has led to an increased threat of collision with operational space systems and of unsafe reentry. Due to this increased interest in this area, many different methods have been proposed in recent years for mitigation and space debris removal, some of which have even secured funding from space a...

  14. Endotoxin removal by charge-modified filters.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerba, C P; Hou, K

    1985-01-01

    The effects of positively charged nylon and depth (cellulose-diatomaceous earth) filters on endotoxin removal from various solutions were evaluated. The charged filter media removed significant amounts of Escherichia coli and natural endotoxin from tap water, distilled water, sugars, and NaCl solutions; no significant removal of endotoxin was observed with negatively charged filter media. The extent of removal was influenced by pH, the presence of salts, and organic matter. Such media may be ...

  15. The Effects of Removable Denture on Swallowing

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Dae-Sik; Seong, Jin Wan; Kim, Younghoon; Chee, Youngjoon; Hwang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between removable dentures and swallowing and describe risks. Methods Twenty-four patients with removable dentures who were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were enrolled. We evaluated the change of swallowing function using VFSS before and after the removal of the removable denture. The masticatory performance by Kazunori's method, sensation of oral cavity by Christian's method, underlying disease, and National Institutes of Hea...

  16. Magmatic expressions of continental lithosphere removal

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huilin; Currie, Claire A.

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational lithosphere removal in continental interior has been inferred from various observations, including anomalous surface deflections and magmatism. We use numerical models and a simplified theoretical analysis to investigate how lithosphere removal can be recognized in the magmatic record. One style of removal is a Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability, where removal occurs through dripping. The associated magmatism depends on the lithosphere thermal structure. Four types of magmatism ar...

  17. Ultrasound-guided removal of Implanon devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Persaud, T

    2008-11-01

    Our study has shown that ultrasound-guided localisation and removal of Implanon rods is safe, practical and highly successful. Over a 4-year period, 119 patients had successful, uncomplicated removal of their subdermal devices.The technique is particularly useful for removal of the device when it is not palpable or when an attempt at removal of a palpable device has not been successful.

  18. Arsenic removal from industrial effluent through electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, N. [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India). Dept. of Pollution Control; Madhavan, K. [Coimbatore Inst. of Technology, Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-05-01

    In the present investigation, it is attempted to remove arsenic from smelter industrial wastewater through electro-coagulation. Experiments covering a wide range of operating conditions for removal of the arsenic present in the smelter wastewater are carried out in a batch electrochemical reactor. It has been observed from the present work that arsenic can be removed effectively through electrocoagulation. (orig.)

  19. Organic micropollutant removal during river bank filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertelkamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors influencing the main removal mechanisms (adsorption and biodegradation) for organic micropollutant (OMP) removal during river bank filtration (RBF) and the possibility of developing a predictive model of this process for OMP removal during RBF. Chapter 2 analysed

  20. System for Removing Pollutants from Incinerator Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, David t.; Bahr, James; Dubovik, Rita; Gebhard, Steven C.; Lind, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    A system for removing pollutants -- primarily sulfur dioxide and mixed oxides of nitrogen (NOx) -- from incinerator exhaust has been demonstrated. The system is also designed secondarily to remove particles, hydrocarbons, and CO. The system is intended for use in an enclosed environment, for which a prior NOx-and-SO2-removal system designed for industrial settings would not be suitable.

  1. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  2. Trace dispersant detection and removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, D.; Volchek, K.; Cathum, S.J.; Peng, H. [SAIC Canada Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Lane, J. [U.S. Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States)

    2003-07-01

    A series of tests have been conducted at the OHMSETT facility to determine the performance of different dispersants used to treat oil spills. The testing was complicated by the fact that even trace amounts of dispersants left in the test tank could alter the performance of subsequent dispersants tested in the same test tank. For that reason, an inexpensive membrane based process was developed to remove trace quantities of dispersant from a water source and purify the tank water after each test. Membrane processes have been used to remove surfactants and oil from various types of aqueous streams such as industrial wastewaters, where surfactants and oils can be found in either dissolved or dispersed forms. Several membrane types were tested to determine key operating and separation parameters. The objective was to find a selective membrane with a high flux. Nanofiltration membranes, ultrafiltration membranes, and micro filtration membranes were the three types of membranes considered for this study. Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527, the two most commonly stocked dispersants in North America, were used to study the relationship between surface tension and dispersant concentration in different solutions. Preliminary results indicate that membrane technology is a viable method to separate surfactants from water. Pilot scale testing was recommended to obtain more accurate estimates and to validate cost estimates. 5 refs., 5 tabs., 9 figs.

  3. Endoscopically removed giant submucosal lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although uncommon, giant submucosal colon lipomas merit attention as they are often presented with dramatic clinical features such as bleeding, acute bowel obstruction, perforation and sometimes may be mistaken for malignancy. There is a great debate in the literature as to how to treat them. Case report. A patient, 67-year old, was admitted to the Clinic due to a constipation over the last several months, increasing abdominal pain mainly localized in the left lower quadrant accompanied by nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Physical examination was unremarkable and the results of the detailed laboratory tests and carcinoembryonic antigen remained within normal limits. Colonoscopy revealed a large 10 cm long, and 4 to 5 cm in diameter, mobile lesion in his sigmoid colon. Conventional endoscopic ultrasound revealed 5 cm hyperechoic lesion of the colonic wall. Twenty MHz mini-probe examination showed that lesion was limited to the submucosa. Since polyp appeared too large for a single transaction, it was removed piecemeal. Once the largest portion of the polyp has been resected, it was relatively easy to place the opened snare loop around portions of the residual polyp. Endoscopic resection was carried out safely without complications. Histological examination revealed the common typical histological features of lipoma elsewhere. The patient remained stable and eventually discharged home. Four weeks later he suffered no recurrent symptoms. Conclusion. Colonic lipomas can be endoscopically removed safely eliminating unnecessary surgery.

  4. Sodium removing facility for core-constitutional elements of FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor core-constitutional elements as spent reactor core fuel assemblies are contained in a containing vessel. An inert gas (N2, Ar or He) is filled in the containing vessel through an inert gas supply channel. The temperature of the inert gas is raised by the remaining after heat of the reactor core-constitutional elements. The inert gas is circulated and heated through a preheating circuit by driving a recycling gas blower and returned to the containing vessel. If the inert gas is heated to a predetermined temperature, metal sodium deposited on the surface of the materials of the reactor core-constitutional elements is evaporated. Next, a vacuum pump unit of a vacuum exhaustion channel is driven to suck an inert gas entraining sodium vapor in the containing vessel, and the sodium vapor is cooled, condensed thereby separated in a sodium separator. Then, the inert gas at a low temperature is introduced to a vacuum exhaustion channel to remove and discharge remained sodium vapor by a sodium trap. (I.N.)

  5. Techniques for removing contaminated concrete surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This discussion compares various techniques that have been used to clean concrete surfaces by removing the surface. Three techniques which have been investigated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for removing surfaces are also described: the water cannon, the concrete spaller, and high-pressure water jet. The equipment was developed with the assumption that removal of the top 1/8 to 1/4 in. of surface would remove most of the contamination. If the contamination has gone into cracks or deep voids in the surface, the removal processes can be repeated until the surface is acceptable

  6. Removing Noise From Pyrosequenced Amplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Russell J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many environmental genomics applications a homologous region of DNA from a diverse sample is first amplified by PCR and then sequenced. The next generation sequencing technology, 454 pyrosequencing, has allowed much larger read numbers from PCR amplicons than ever before. This has revolutionised the study of microbial diversity as it is now possible to sequence a substantial fraction of the 16S rRNA genes in a community. However, there is a growing realisation that because of the large read numbers and the lack of consensus sequences it is vital to distinguish noise from true sequence diversity in this data. Otherwise this leads to inflated estimates of the number of types or operational taxonomic units (OTUs present. Three sources of error are important: sequencing error, PCR single base substitutions and PCR chimeras. We present AmpliconNoise, a development of the PyroNoise algorithm that is capable of separately removing 454 sequencing errors and PCR single base errors. We also introduce a novel chimera removal program, Perseus, that exploits the sequence abundances associated with pyrosequencing data. We use data sets where samples of known diversity have been amplified and sequenced to quantify the effect of each of the sources of error on OTU inflation and to validate these algorithms. Results AmpliconNoise outperforms alternative algorithms substantially reducing per base error rates for both the GS FLX and latest Titanium protocol. All three sources of error lead to inflation of diversity estimates. In particular, chimera formation has a hitherto unrealised importance which varies according to amplification protocol. We show that AmpliconNoise allows accurate estimates of OTU number. Just as importantly AmpliconNoise generates the right OTUs even at low sequence differences. We demonstrate that Perseus has very high sensitivity, able to find 99% of chimeras, which is critical when these are present at high

  7. Removing Cycles in Esterel Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard von Hanxleden

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Esterel belongs to the family of synchronous programming languages, which are affected by cyclic signal dependencies. This prohibits a static scheduling, limiting the choice of available compilation techniques for programs with such cycles. This work proposes an algorithm that, given a constructive synchronous Esterel program, performs a semantics-preserving source code level transformation that removes cyclic signal dependencies. The transformation is divided into two parts: detection of cycles and iterative resolution of these cycles. It is based on the replacement of cycle signals by a signal expression involving no other cycle signals, thereby breaking the cycle. This transformation of cyclic Esterel programs enables the use of efficient compilation techniques, which are only available for acyclic programs. Furthermore, experiments indicate that the code transformation can even improve code quality produced by compilers that can already handle cyclic programs.

  8. Method of removing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A paste prepared by mixing a mixed acid containing HF and at least one of HCl and HNO3 with a paste aid is coated at the surface of radioactive wastes, to dissolve the surface thereof. Water is jetted to remove the dissolved radioactive contaminants and the pastes from the surface of the radioactive wastes. Since the pastes are thus used, the amount of liquid wastes can be remarkably reduced compared with that in a conventional electrolysis method. Further, if it is confirmed that dose rate of the radioactive wastes after decontamination is lower than a predetermined level by adding a step of measuring the extent of contamination of the wastes before and after the steps, they can be handled hereinafter being regarded as ordinary wastes. (T.M.)

  9. Tritium removal using vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an initial examination of the feasibility of separation of tritium from gaseous protium-tritium mixtures using vanadium hydride in cyclic processes is reported. Interest was drawn to the vanadium-hydrogen system because of the so-called inverse isotope effect exhibited by this system. Thus the tritide is more stable than the protide, a fact which makes the system attractive for removal of tritium from a mixture in which the light isotope predominates. The initial results of three phases of the research program are reported, dealing with studies of the equilibrium and kinetics properties of isotope exchange, development of an equilibrium theory of isotope separation via heatless adsorption, and experiments on the performance of a single heatless adsorption stage. In the equilibrium and kinetics studies, measurements were made of pressure-composition isotherms, the HT--H2 separation factors and rates of HT--H2 exchange. This information was used to evaluate constants in the theory and to understand the performance of the heatless adsorption experiments. A recently developed equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was applied to the HT--H2 separation using vanadium hydride. Using the theory it was predicted that no separation would occur by pressure cycling wholly within the β phase but that separation would occur by cycling between the β and γ phases and using high purge-to-feed ratios. Heatless adsorption experiments conducted within the β phase led to inverse separations rather than no separation. A kinetic isotope effect may be responsible. Cycling between the β and γ phases led to separation but not to the predicted complete removal of HT from the product stream, possibly because of finite rates of exchange. Further experimental and theoretical work is suggested which may ultimately make possible assessment of the feasibility and practicability of hydrogen isotope separation by this approach

  10. Nitrogen removal from natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

  11. Passive heat removal in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU has a tradition of incorporating passive systems and passive components whenever they are shown to offer performance that is equal to or better than that of active systems, and to be economic. Examples include the two independent shutdown systems that employ gravity and stored energy respectively, the dousing subsystem of the CANDU 6 containment system, and the ability of the moderator to cool the fuel in the event that all coolant is lost from the fuel channels. CANDU 9 continues this tradition, incorporating a reserve water system (RWS) that increases the inventory of water in the reactor building and profiles a passive source of makeup water and/or heat sinks to various key process systems. The key component of the CANDU 9 reserve water system is a large (2500 cubic metres) water tank located at a high elevation in the reactor building. The reserve water system, while incorporating the recovery system functions, and the non-dousing functions of the dousing tank in CANDU 6, embraces other key systems to significantly extend the passive makeup/heat sink capability. The capabilities of the reserve water system include makeup to the steam generators secondary side if all other sources of water are lost; makeup to the heat transport system in the event of a leak in excess of the D2O makeup system capability; makeup to the moderator in the event of a moderator leak when the moderator heat sink is required; makeup to the emergency core cooling (ECC) system to assure NPSH to the ECC pumps during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), and provision of a passive heat sink for the shield cooling system. Other passive designs are now being developed by AECL. These will be incorporated in future CANDU plants when their performance has been fully proven. This paper reviews the passive heat removal systems and features of current CANDU plants and the CANDU 9, and briefly reviews some of the passive heat removal concepts now being developed. (author)

  12. Removal of radionuclides from household water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research upon methods for removing radionuclides from household water was initiated in Finland in 1995. Three research projects, of which two were carried out with National Technology Agency of Finland and one with CEC, have been completed by the end of 2002. One of the main objectives of the research was to compose a guidebook for consumers and water treatment companies. Radon can be removed from household water by aeration and by activated carbon filtration. Aerators that are well designed and set up can remove over 90% of waterborne radon. The best aerators have achieved removal efficiencies that are nearly 100%. However, setting up an aeration system requires thorough planning. Also, activated carbon filtration removes radon efficiently. The removal efficiencies have been over 90%, often nearly 100%. Depending on the water quality and usage, the carbon batch inside the filter needs to be changed every 2-3 years. Since activated carbon filters emit gamma radiation while in use, they should not be installed inside the dwelling but in a separate building or by the well. It is recommended that uranium be removed from drinking water by anion exchange, which is the most efficient removal method for this purpose. Typically, the removal efficiencies are nearly 100%. The one exception is the so called tap filter, the removal efficiency of which depends on uranium concentration in raw water and the rate of water flow. High saline concentration in water may extricate uranium from ion exchange resin. Changes in plumbing pressure or pH-value do not have any significant influence in uranium retention. Removal efficiencies of lead and polonium vary a lot depending on the chemical form in which they occur in water. They can be reliably removed from water by reverse osmosis only. Other treatment methods, such as ion exchange and activated carbon filtration, remove lead and polonium partly. Lead and polonium are removed more efficiently when they are bound onto smaller particles

  13. Investigation of anodic oxide coatings on zirconium after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxide layers prepared via PEO of zirconium were subjected to heat treatment. • Surface characteristics were determined for the obtained oxide coatings. • Heat treatment led to the partial destruction of the anodic oxide layer. • Pitting corrosion resistance of zirconium was improved after the modification. - Abstract: Herein, results of heat treatment of zirconium anodised under plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) conditions at 500–800 °C are presented. The obtained oxide films were investigated by means of SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the zirconium specimens was evaluated in Ringer's solution. A bilayer oxide coatings generated in the course of PEO of zirconium were not observed after the heat treatment. The resulting oxide layers contained a new sublayer located at the metal/oxide interface is suggested to originate from the thermal oxidation of zirconium. The corrosion resistance of the anodised metal was improved after the heat treatment

  14. Phase transformations of pyrophyllite clay mineral after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The termal transformation of the Pyrophyllite clay mineral, given by the equations: AL sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2).H sub(2) O → Al sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2) + H sub(2) O Pyrophyllite Anhydride Water vapour. 3 (Al sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2)) → 3 Al sub(2) O sub(3). 2SiO sub(2) + 10 (SiO sub(2)) Pyrophyllite Anhydride Mullite Cristobalite, were studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) associated to Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAD), applied to a very pure sample, colected at Diamantina, M.G. Some other tgechniques were also used, as X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), applied to other different Pyrophyllite samples. A thermodynamical theoretical study was undertaken to estimate the values for the entropyu of formation, enthalpy and molar thermal capacity for the Pyrophyllite Anhydride. (author)

  15. Investigation of anodic oxide coatings on zirconium after heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Maciej [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Dercz, Grzegorz [Institute of Materials Science, University of Silesia, 75 Pułku Piechoty Street 1 A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Suchanek, Katarzyna [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Simka, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.simka@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Oxide layers prepared via PEO of zirconium were subjected to heat treatment. • Surface characteristics were determined for the obtained oxide coatings. • Heat treatment led to the partial destruction of the anodic oxide layer. • Pitting corrosion resistance of zirconium was improved after the modification. - Abstract: Herein, results of heat treatment of zirconium anodised under plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) conditions at 500–800 °C are presented. The obtained oxide films were investigated by means of SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the zirconium specimens was evaluated in Ringer's solution. A bilayer oxide coatings generated in the course of PEO of zirconium were not observed after the heat treatment. The resulting oxide layers contained a new sublayer located at the metal/oxide interface is suggested to originate from the thermal oxidation of zirconium. The corrosion resistance of the anodised metal was improved after the heat treatment.

  16. Nuclear phenotype changes after heat shock in Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Simone L

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule epithelial cells of male nymphs of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus, subjected to short- and long-duration heat shocks at 40ºC were analyzed immediately after the shock and 10 and 30 days later. Normal nuclei with a usual heterochromatic body as well as phenotypes indicative of survival (unravelled heterochromatin, giants and death (apoptosis, necrosis responses were observed in control and treated specimens. However, all nuclear phenotypes, except the normal ones, were more frequent in shocked specimens. Similarly altered phenotypes have also been reported in Triatoma infestans following heat shock, although at different frequencies. The frequency of the various nuclear phenotypes observed in this study suggests that the forms of cell survival observed were not sufficient or efficient enough to protect all of the Malpighian tubule cells from the deleterious effects of stress. In agreement with studies on P. megistus survival following heat shock, only long-duration shock produced strongly deleterious effects.

  17. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System''s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section

  18. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  19. Carbon dioxide removal with inorganic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Fain, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere has sparked a great deal of interest in the removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil fueled plants. Presently, several techniques for the removal of CO{sub 2} are considered to have potential, but are lacking in practicality. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is potential, but are lacking in practically. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is effective in removing CO{sub 2}, but costs are high; efficiency suffers; and other acid gases must be removed prior to amine stripping. Membrane systems for CO{sub 2} removal are held in high regard, and inorganic, particularly ceramic, membranes offer the potential for high temperature, thus energy saving, removal.

  20. Removal Of Volatile Impurities From Copper Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Schuler, A.; Frei, A.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2005-03-01

    To study the removal of volatile impurities from two different copper concentrates they have been heated on a thermo balance to temperatures between 900 and 1500 C. This sample treatment revealed that both concentrates undergo strong weight losses at 500 and 700 C. They were attributed to the removal of sulfur. Elemental analyses of the residues by ICP spectrometry have shown that the thermal treatment efficiently removes the volatile impurities. Already below 900 C most of the arsenic is removed by evaporation, the largest fraction of lead and zinc is removed in the temperature interval of 1300-1500 C. It was observed that quartz in the concentrate leads to the formation of a silicon-enriched phase besides a metal rich sulfide phase. The former is interpreted as an early stage of a silicate slag. Elemental analysis showed that the formation of this distinct slag phase does not hinder the efficient removal of volatile impurities. (author)

  1. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities

  2. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities

  3. Motion blur removal with orthogonal parabolic exposures

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Taeg Sang; Levin, Anat; Durand, Fredo; Freeman, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Object movement during exposure generates blur. Removing blur is challenging because one has to estimate the motion blur, which can spatially vary over the image. Even if the motion is successfully identified, blur removal can be unstable because the blur kernel attenuates high frequency image contents. We address the problem of removing blur from objects moving at constant velocities in arbitrary 2D directions. Our solution captures two images of the scene with a parabolic motion in two orth...

  4. Organic micropollutant removal during river bank filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Bertelkamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors influencing the main removal mechanisms (adsorption and biodegradation) for organic micropollutant (OMP) removal during river bank filtration (RBF) and the possibility of developing a predictive model of this process for OMP removal during RBF. Chapter 2 analysed the sorption and biodegradation behaviour of 14 OMPs in soil columns filled with technical sand (representative of the first meter of oxic conditions in RBF systems. Breakthrough curves were modell...

  5. Livestock wastewater treatment: ammonia removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livestock wastewater contains high concentration of ammonia. Removal of this inorganic species of nitrogen could be achieved through nitrification and de-nitrification. Nitrification process was conducted in the laboratory using activated sludge process with HRT of three and five days. After wastewater undergone nitrification process at Livestock Wastewater Treatment Plant the concentration of influent for N-NH4+ reduced from 400 mg/l to 0 mg/l and concentration of N-NO3- increased from 11 mg/l to 300 mg/l. Nitrification using lab-scale activated sludge process also recorded similar result. Concentration of N-NH4+ reduced from 400 mg/l to 2 mg/l and 380 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l for HRT=5 days and HRT=3 days respectively. N-NO3- was increased from 11 mg/l to 398 mg/l and 14 mg/l to 394 mg/l for HRT=5 days and HRT=3 days, respectively. However changes of N-NH4+ and N=NO3- were not observed using gamma irradiation. The combination of gamma irradiation with activated sludge process indicated difference and its contribution is still investigated

  6. IMPROVED MLV FILTER TO REMOVE MULTIPLICATIVE NOISE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Weibin; Liu Fang; Jiao Licheng; Zhang Shuling; Li Zongling

    2006-01-01

    More methods can be used to remove the additive noise, such as the Mean of Least Variance (MLV)filter. When the signal is noised by the multiplicative noise, it is difficult to remove. The paper presents an improved filter to remove multiplicative noise by changing the multiplicative noise to the additive noise, and then using the MLV-like to remove the additive noise. The simulation results show that the performance is better than Minimum Coefficient of Variation (MCV) filter and MLV filter. Both one-dimension and image experiments demonstrate its theoretical performance.

  7. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  8. Removal of silver nanoparticles by coagulation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This study investigated the removal of AgNP suspensions by four regular coagulants. • The optimal removal efficiencies for the four coagulants were achieved at pH 7.5. • The removal efficiency of AgNPs was affected by the natural water characteristics. • TEM and XRD showed that AgNPs or silver-containing NPs were adsorbed onto the flocs. -- Abstract: Commercial use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) will lead to a potential route for human exposure via potable water. Coagulation followed by sedimentation, as a conventional technique in the drinking water treatment facilities, may become an important barrier to prevent human from AgNP exposures. This study investigated the removal of AgNP suspensions by four regular coagulants. In the aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride coagulation systems, the water parameters slightly affected the AgNP removal. However, in the poly aluminum chloride and polyferric sulfate coagulation systems, the optimal removal efficiencies were achieved at pH 7.5, while higher or lower of pH could reduce the AgNP removal. Besides, the increasing natural organic matter (NOM) would reduce the AgNP removal, while Ca2+ and suspended solids concentrations would also affect the AgNP removal. In addition, results from the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed AgNPs or silver-containing nanoparticles were adsorbed onto the flocs. Finally, natural water samples were used to validate AgNP removal by coagulation. This study suggests that in the case of release of AgNPs into the source water, the traditional water treatment process, coagulation/sedimentation, can remove AgNPs and minimize the silver ion concentration under the well-optimized conditions

  9. Removal of heavy metals using waste eggshell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The removal capacity of toxic heavy metals by the reused eggshell was studied. As a pretreatment process for the preparation of reused material from waste eggshell, calcination was performed in the furnace at 800℃ for 2 h after crushing the dried waste eggshell. Calcination behavior, qualitative and quantitative elemental information, mineral type and surface characteristics before and after calcination of eggshell were examined by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. After calcination, the major inorganic composition was identified as Ca (lime, 99.63%) and K, P and Sr were identified as minor components. When calcined eggshell was applied in the treatment of synthetic wastewater containing heavy metals, a complete removal of Cd as well as above 99% removal of Cr was observed after 10 min. Although the natural eggshell had some removal capacity of Cd and Cr, a complete removal was not accomplished even after 60 min due to quite slower removal rate. However, in contrast to Cd and Cr, an efficient removal of Pb was observed with the natural eggshell rather than the calcined eggshell. From the application of the calcined eggshell in the treatment of real electroplating wastewater, the calcined eggshell showed a promising removal capacity of heavy metal ions as well as had a good neutralization capacity in the treatment of strong acidic wastewater.

  10. Biomodification of coal to remove mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biological process for removal of mercury from coal is under investigation. Iron and sulfur oxidizing bacteria have previously been used for desulfurization of coal and for mineral mining. We have shown that removal of mercury from coal is also possible via the same principles. Two pure culture...

  11. Atrazine removal in Danish anaerobic aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Arildskov, N.P.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    process was abiotic since atrazine was also removed from microbially inhibited autoclaved and chloroform amended controls, although in controls amended with mercury, atrazine removal was slowed down. (ring-U-C-14)- atrazine amended samples showed no mineralization to (CO2)-C-14 or transformation to...

  12. 5 CFR 359.403 - Removal: Conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Removal of Career Appointees During... failure to accept a directed reassignment or to accompany a position in a transfer of function. (2) This... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removal: Conduct. 359.403 Section...

  13. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  14. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert,George W.; Hand,Thomas E.; Delaurentiis,Gary M.

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  15. Electrodialytic removal of cadmium from wastewater sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M. R.; Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Nielsen, S.;

    2004-01-01

    /solid (ml/g fresh sludge) ratio was between 1.4 and 2. Three experiments were performed where the sludge was suspended in distilled water, citric acid or HNO"3. The experimental conditions were otherwise identical. The Cd removal in the three experiments was 69, 70 and 67%, respectively, thus the removal...

  16. Atrazine removal in Danish anaerobic aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Arildskov, N.P.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The pesticide atrazine (6-chloro-N-2-ethyl-N-4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine -2,4-diamine) was removed from the water phase in anaerobic laboratory batch incubations with sediment and groundwater from a number of Danish anaerobic aquifers, but not in incubations from aerobic aquifers. The removal...

  17. 40 CFR 300.415 - Removal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Removal action. 300.415 Section 300... PLAN Hazardous Substance Response § 300.415 Removal action. (a)(1) In determining the appropriate extent of action to be taken in response to a given release, the lead agency shall first review...

  18. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, Martinus J.; Busscher, Henk J.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a sa

  19. Asbestos removal in Shippingport Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is being performed under contract to the DOE by the General Electric Company and its integrated subcontractor, MK-Ferguson Company, as the Decommissioning Operations Contractor (DOC). During the planning of this project, it was found that asbestos was the primary insulating material which was used on the nuclear steam supply system and the plant heating system. The original decommissioning plan required that each subcontractor remove the asbestos from the particular component(s) they had to remove. However, since removal of the radioactivity-contaminated asbestos would require special procedures and worker training, the original decommissioning plan was modified so that a single subcontractor removed all of the asbestos prior to other decommissioning tasks. IT Corporation was selected as the asbestos removal subcontractor. Their approach to the project is described

  20. Test Plan for the overburden removal demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of soil overburdens from contaminated pits and trenches involves using equipment that will remove a small layer of soil from 3 to 6 in. at any time. As a layer of soil is removed, overburden characterization techniques perform surveys to a depth that exceeds each overburden removal layer to ensure that the removed soil will be free of contamination. It is generally expected that no contamination will be found in the soil overburden, which was brought in after the waste was put in place. It is anticipated that some containers in the waste zone have lost their integrity, and the waste leakage from those containers has migrated by gravity downward into the waste zone. To maintain a safe work environment, this method of overburden removal should allow safe preparation of a pit or trench for final remediation. To demonstrate the soil overburden techniques, the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program has contracted vendor services to provide equipment and techniques demonstrating soil overburden removal technology. The demonstration will include tests that will evaluate equipment performance and techniques for removal of overburden soil, control of contamination spread, and dust control. To evaluate the performance of these techniques, air particulate samples, physical measurements of the excavation soil cuts, maneuverability measurements, and time versus volume (rate) of soil removal data will be collected during removal operations. To provide a medium for sample evaluation, the overburden will be spiked at specific locations and depths with rare earth tracers. This test plan will be describe the objectives of the demonstration, data quality objectives, methods to be used to operate the equipment and use the techniques in the test area, and methods to be used in collecting data during the demonstration

  1. Removal of metals in constructed wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crites, R.W.; Watson, R.C.; Williams, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Trace metals are difficult to remove from municipal wastewater by conventional wastewater treatment methods. Constructed wetlands have the potential to trap and remove metals from the water column. Long term removal is expected to occur by accumulation and burial in the plant detritus in a manner similar to the removal of phosphorus. Few data are available in the literature on removal of metals by constructed wetlands. A free water surface constructed wetland at Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant treating secondary municipal effluent has been operating since the spring of 1994. Removal data for 13 metals are presented for the period from August 1994 to May 1995. About 3,785 m{sup 3}/d (1 mgd) of pure oxygen activated sludge effluent, disinfected using UV light, is further treated through a 8 ha (20 acre) constructed wetlands Ten separate, parallel treatment cells are available to demonstrate the effects of detention time, vegetation management, and application frequency on the removal of metals, organics and ammonia. Detention time can be varied from 3 to 13 days by varying the flow and the water depth. The vegetation, primarily bulrush with some cattails, will be managed by different techniques to minimize mosquito production. Application frequency varies from continuous flow to batch flow (1 to 2 days of loading with 1 day of discharge).

  2. Removal processes for arsenic in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama A, Katherine; Fletcher, Tim D; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-08-01

    Arsenic pollution in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. This concern has generated increasing interest in the use of different treatment technologies to remove arsenic from contaminated water. Constructed wetlands are a cost-effective natural system successfully used for removing various pollutants, and they have shown capability for removing arsenic. This paper reviews current understanding of the removal processes for arsenic, discusses implications for treatment wetlands, and identifies critical knowledge gaps and areas worthy of future research. The reactivity of arsenic means that different arsenic species may be found in wetlands, influenced by vegetation, supporting medium and microorganisms. Despite the fact that sorption, precipitation and coprecipitation are the principal processes responsible for the removal of arsenic, bacteria can mediate these processes and can play a significant role under favourable environmental conditions. The most important factors affecting the speciation of arsenic are pH, alkalinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, the presence of other chemical species--iron, sulphur, phosphate--,a source of carbon, and the wetland substrate. Studies of the microbial communities and the speciation of arsenic in the solid phase using advanced techniques could provide further insights on the removal of arsenic. Limited data and understanding of the interaction of the different processes involved in the removal of arsenic explain the rudimentary guidelines available for the design of wetlands systems. PMID:21549410

  3. Biological Phosphorus Removal in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Helness, Herman

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) removal from municipal wastewater is performed to prevent or reduce eutrophication in the receiving water.Both P and N can be removed physical/chemically as well as biologically. While biological processes have always dominated in N-removal, chemical P-removal is used in many cases. Biological P-removal using enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is normally carried out in suspended culture (activated sludge) processes while biological N-removal (throug...

  4. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY), Gadre; Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

    2008-04-22

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  5. Phosphorus removal in aerated stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghigliazza, R.; Lodi, A.; Rovatti, M. [Inst. of Chemical and Process Engineering ``G.B. Bonino``, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1999-03-01

    The possibility to obtain biological phosphorus removal in strictly aerobic conditions has been investigated. Experiments, carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), show the feasibility to obtain phosphorus removal without the anaerobic phase. Reactor performance in terms of phosphorus abatement kept always higher then 65% depending on adopted sludge retention time (SRT). In fact increasing SRT from 5 days to 8 days phosphorus removal and reactor performance increase but overcoming this SRT value a decreasing in reactor efficiency was recorded. (orig.) With 6 figs., 3 tabs., 18 refs.

  6. Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal

  7. Computer simulation of tritium removal facility design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a computer simulation of tritium diffusion out of molten salt is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics. The purpose of the simulation is to investigate the efficiency of the permeation window type tritium removal facility, which is proposed for tritium control in FHRs. The result of the simulation suggests a large surface area is one of the key issues in the design of the tritium removal facility, and the simple tube bundle concept is insufficient to provide the surface area needed for an efficient tritium removal process. (author)

  8. Reasons for removal of the moon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Orlov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In article the new concept of an explanation of the reason of removal of the Moon from Earth is offered to consideration. It is based on the theory of vortex gravitation, cosmology and a cosmogony. The main reason for this removal is that gravity, the earth's field does not create our planet, and ether vortex The orbital plane of the Moon doesn't coincide with the plane of a gravitational whirlwind that creates reduction of forces of an attraction of the Moon to Earth on some sites of its orbit. Removal of a lunar orbit happens a consequence of it.

  9. Removal of interference from external coherent signals

    CERN Document Server

    Sintes, A M

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique that we call coherent line removal, for removing external coherent interference from gravitational wave interferometer data. We illustrate the usefulness of this technique applying it to the the data produced by the Glasgow laser interferometer in 1996 and removing all those lines corresponding to the electricity supply frequency and its harmonics. We also find that this method seems to reduce the level of non-Gaussian noise present in the interferometer and therefore, it can raise the sensitivity and duty cycle of the detectors.

  10. Decay Heat Removal System of Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MONJU has three decay heat removal systems. The intermediate heat exchanger of the decay heat removal system is incorporated within the main IHX shell, and the heat from the secondary system is rejected to the air. Forced circulation is adopted for both primary and secondary coolant, though natural circulation capability is designed into the plant itself. Feasibility of rejecting the decay heat through steam plant is also being studied. In this paper, MONJU's decay heat removal system design, operational procedures, and the considerations behind the concept will be presented. (author)

  11. Surgical Removal of the Thyroid Gland

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... removal of an enlarged thyroid from this female patient. As you can see, we are already in ... us. Well before we hear more about the patient, I wonder if you could take just a ...

  12. Surgical Removal of the Thyroid Gland

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have learned to see the best is to stand opposite to the lobe that I’m removing. ... Kulkarni, in that case, would need to be monitoring the heart and may have to intervene with ...

  13. Dye removal by surfactant encapsulated polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Lua, Shun Kuang; Zhang, Lizhi; Wang, Rong; Dong, ZhiLi

    2014-09-15

    A novel surfactant encapsulated polyoxometalate (SEP) has been synthesized by using a simple ion-exchange reaction. The prepared SEP complex was found to self-assemble into nanospherical particles whose morphology and component were characterized by TEM and XPS. The SEP was further incorporated into polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) to fabricate SEP incorporated composite membrane (SEP-M). Both the SEP and SEP-M exhibited excellent dye removal activities, which is for the first time reported as an intriguing property of the SEP. A regeneration scheme for SEP-M was successfully proposed without any loss of dye removal efficiency. Detailed mechanism studies were carried out to elucidate the nature of dye decolorization. Ion exchange was revealed to play a dominant role in the dye removal process. The current research not only renders a new example for the simple and direct synthesis of SEP but more importantly provides an efficient dye removal methodology. PMID:25194560

  14. Chemical - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem...

  15. Physical - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem...

  16. Surgical Removal of the Thyroid Gland

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... effective, more effective than perhaps laparoscopic or even robotic surgery for thyroid removal. Well I think the ... plastic closure. The patients recover very nicely. The robotic surgeries are requiring up to three surgeons. Oh, ...

  17. Surgical Removal of the Thyroid Gland

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the thyroid is removed, does it go into pathology? 11 OR Live Bah 3926 Absolutely. It will ... on is adequate. We’ll discuss the final pathology, and then we’ll reinforce that the patient ...

  18. Surgical Removal of the Thyroid Gland

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some spread, it will destroy the other living cells that are too small to remove surgically that ... often that an enlarged thyroid presents with cancerous cells? It may, yes. Okay. And, again, I believe ...

  19. Removing Pubic Hair (For Young Men)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Removing Pubic Hair Posted under Health Guides . Updated 15 October 2014. +Related Content Some guys trim their pubic hair, others prefer to shave or wax, and most ...

  20. Radon removal from the water resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerning the presence of radioactive substances in groundwater used for public supply, particular attention is paid to radon removal in water treatment process. The processes based on water aeration are the most common methods for the reduction of radon concentrations in water. Simple spraying, bubble aeration in the deeper layers of water and various modifications of water aeration in a horizontal arrangement - Inka system and aeration towers - are used for radon removal from water. Vacuum de-aeration is another possibility of reducing the concentration of radon in water. However, this procedure is not widely used in practice as compared to the above methods. The article presents the results obtained from the pilot tests for radon removal by using the aeration tower and Inka aeration system in the water resource supplying the city of Istebné with drinking water. Key words: radon, radon removal , aeration tower , Inka aerator , water quality

  1. Naso-oropharyngeal rhinosporidiosis: Endoscopic removal

    OpenAIRE

    Sonkhya, N.; P Singhal; P Mishra

    2005-01-01

    Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic infestation by the fungus Rhinosporidium seeberi, which predominantly affects the mucus membranes of the nose and nasopharynx. We report a case of rhinosporidiosis with presentation as an oropharyngeal mass and a discusion about its endoscopic removal.

  2. Surgical Removal of the Thyroid Gland

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... get started and move over to your surgical team. And if you’d be so kind as ... Hospital. General Surgeon Dr. George Tershakovec and his team are removing an enlarged thyroid from their female ...

  3. Phosphorus removal by powdered minerals in wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Y.; Nakai, T.; Sato, Y.; Takahashi, N.; Murayama, K.; Hirai, M. (National Research Institute for Pollution and Resources, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1991-09-25

    In this paper, removal of phosphate in wastewater, which is one of the main nutrients, has been investigated. Various powdered minerals were tested for whether they had abilities as adsorbents for phosphate. For experiments, solution samples of HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} were used. Magnetite, apatite, dolomite, cristobalite, silica, alumina, coal ash, halloysite, quartz, diatomaceous earth, kaolinite, and feldsper were used as powdered minerals. Various dosages of a powdered mineral and a reagent were added to the solutions. These were agitated using a stirrer, and after that, they were analyzed. Consequently, each mineral did not show any good removal ability for HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} by only themselved. Those minerals with Ca{sup 2{plus}} also did not show any good removal abilities for HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} only except dolomite. Dolomite with Ca{sub 2{plus}} showed a high removal rate of above 95%. 18 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY SOFTENING AND COAGULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water regulations for arsenic (As) and disinfection by-product precursor materials (measured as TOC) are becoming increasingly stringent. Among the modifications to conventional treatment that can improve removal of As and TOC, precipitative softening and coagulation are...

  5. Biological - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem...

  6. Laser tattoo removal: A clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie GY Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Techniques for tattoo removal have evolved significantly over the years. The commonly used Quality-switched (QS ruby, alexandrite, and Nd:YAG lasers are the traditional workhorses for tattoo removal. Newer strategies using combination laser treatments, multi-pass treatments, and picosecond lasers offer promising results. The tattoo color and skin type of the patient are important considerations when choosing the appropriate laser. Standard protocols can be developed for the effective and safe treatment of tattoos.

  7. Newer trends in laser tattoo removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil D Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Q switched lasers are the current gold standard for laser tattoo removal. Though these systems are generally quite effective in clearing tattoos & have an established safety record, certain limitations exist while following the standard protocol. To overcome these limitation newer techniques such as multipass method, combination treatments with chemical agent and other laser have been introduced. These methods help in faster, less painful and complication free tattoo removal.

  8. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaik, Martinus J; Busscher, Henk J; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C

    2010-08-01

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a salivary pellicle for 2 h or grown after adhesion for 16 h, after which, their removal was evaluated. In a contact mode, no differences were observed between the manual, rotating, or sonic brushing; and removal was on average 39%, 84%, and 95% for Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces naeslundii, respectively, and 90% and 54% for the dual- and multi-species biofilms, respectively. However, in a non-contact mode, rotating and sonic brushes still removed considerable numbers of bacteria (24-40%), while the manual brush as a control (5-11%) did not. Single A. naeslundii and dual-species (A. naeslundii and S. oralis) biofilms were more difficult to remove after 16 h growth than after 2 h adhesion (on average, 62% and 93% for 16- and 2-h-old biofilms, respectively), while in contrast, biofilms grown from whole saliva were easier to remove (97% after 16 h and 54% after 2 h of growth). Considering the strong adhesion of dual-species biofilms and their easier more reproducible growth compared with biofilms grown from whole saliva, dual-species biofilms of A. naeslundii and S. oralis are suggested to be preferred for use in mechanical plaque removal studies in vitro. PMID:19565279

  9. Laser Tattoo Removal: A Clinical Update

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie GY Ho; Chee Leok Goh

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for tattoo removal have evolved significantly over the years. The commonly used Quality-switched (QS) ruby, alexandrite, and Nd:YAG lasers are the traditional workhorses for tattoo removal. Newer strategies using combination laser treatments, multi-pass treatments, and picosecond lasers offer promising results. The tattoo color and skin type of the patient are important considerations when choosing the appropriate laser. Standard protocols can be developed for the effective and saf...

  10. Removable Urban Pavements: An innovative, sustainable technology

    OpenAIRE

    De Larrard, François; Sedran, Thierry; Balay, Jean Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Removable Urban Pavements: An innovative, sustainable technology By definition, a Removable Urban Pavement (RUP) can be quickly opened and closed, using lightweight equipment, for easy access to underground networks. While no such pavement appears to have ever been constructed, the premises of the concept can be found in certain military paths or industrial soils. A survey conducted among French municipal authorities has revealed the potential benefit of the RUP concept in decreasing the publ...

  11. The many futures of active debris removal

    OpenAIRE

    White, Adam E.; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, space debris modelling studies have suggested that the long-term low Earth orbit (LEO) debris population will continue to grow even with the widespread adoption of mitigation measures recommended by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee. More recently, studies have shown that it is possible to prevent the expected growth of debris in LEO with the additional removal of a small number of selected debris objects, through a process of active debris removal (ADR)...

  12. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-01-01

    Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from ...

  13. Safety characteristics of decay heat removal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety features of the decay heat removal systems including power sunply and final heat sink are described. A rather high reliability and an utmost degree of independence from energy supply are goals to be attained in the design of the European Fast Reactor (EFR) decay heat removal scheme. Natural circulation is an ambitious design goal for EFR. All the considerations are performed within the frame of risk minimization

  14. Removal of cypermethrin with seaweed Gracilaria lemaneiformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Yue, Wenjie

    2015-10-01

    The removal of cypermethrin with a red macroalga, Gracilaria lemaneiformis, was studied under laboratory conditions. Results showed that the residue contents with G. lemaneiformis were significantly lower than those corresponding groups without the algal thalli after 96 h treatment. The removal rates decreased with increasing concentrations, which were about 50% without G. lemaneiformis after 96 h exposure, and increased to 89%, 73%, and 66% in flasks with G. lemaneiformis at the concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000 µg L-1, respectively. The amount of biosorption (absorption and adsorption) by G. lemaneiformis increased with the increasing concentration and exposure time. Adsorption was the main process for the removal by G. lemaneiformis, which accounted for 75%-97% of the total biosorption. However, biosorption only contributed 0.5%-19.3% to the total losses of cypermethrin, which was more efficient under the low concentration. Natural losses contributed the largest portion of losses, which was over 65% in all treatments during the experiment. The unknown pathway of removal, which might be the bio-decomposed by microorganisms attaching the algal thalli, also contributed a lot to the total removal. The results suggested that cultivation of G. lemaneiformis could significantly remove cypermethrin, especially at low concentrations, and large-scale cultivation of G. lemaneiformis has considerable potential of biorestoration of eutrophic and cypermethrin-polluted coastal sea areas.

  15. Beam shaping for cosmetic hair removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Tuttle, Tracie

    2007-09-01

    Beam shaping has the potential to provide comfort to people who require or seek laser based cosmetic skin procedures. Of immediate interest is the procedure of aesthetic hair removal. Hair removal is performed using a variety of wavelengths from 480 to 1200 nm by means of filtered Xenon flash lamps (pulsed light) or 810 nm diode lasers. These wavelengths are considered the most efficient means available for hair removal applications, but current systems use simple reflector designs and plane filter windows to direct the light to the surface being exposed. Laser hair removal is achieved when these wavelengths at sufficient energy levels are applied to the epidermis. The laser energy is absorbed by the melanin (pigment) in the hair and hair follicle which in turn is transformed into heat. This heat creates the coagulation process, which causes the removal of the hair and prevents growth of new hair [1]. This paper outlines a technique of beam shaping that can be applied to a non-contact based hair removal system. Several features of the beam shaping technique including beam uniformity and heat dispersion across its operational treatment area will be analyzed. A beam shaper design and its fundamental testing will be discussed in detail.

  16. Boron removal from geothermal waters by electrocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the geothermal waters in Turkey contain extremely high concentration of boron when they are used for irrigation. The use of geothermal waters for irrigation can results in excess amount deposition of boron in soil. On the other hand, a minimal boron concentration is required for irrigational waters. In this study, electrocoagulation (EC) was selected as a treatment process for the removal of boron from thermal waters obtained from Ilica-Erzurum in Turkey. Current density (CD), pH of solution and temperature of solution were selected as operational parameters. The results showed that boron removal efficiency increased from pH 4.0 to 8.0 and decreased at pH 10.0. Although boron removal efficiency was highest at pH 8.0, energy consumption was very high at this pH value compared to other pH intervals. Boron removal efficiency reached to 95% with increasing current density from 1.5 to 6.0 mA/cm2, but energy consumption was also increased in this interval. At higher temperatures of solution, such as 313 and 333 K, boron removal efficiency increased. At optimum conditions, boron removal efficiency in geothermal water reached up to 95%

  17. IMPLANT REMOVAL: AN UNSOLVED CHALLENGE TO ORTHOPAEDICIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varunjikar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Its general consciences amongst the Orthopaedicians, that Implant removal is a challenging one. Newer generation is not aware of implants used in the past & if there is any patient where its removal is indicated it becomes a challenge. Unavailability of necessary & proper instruments as extractor or hook makes the task difficult. Surgeon has to rely on his mechanical skill, modification in procedure, and way of thinking in tackling the situation in present scenario with whatever things are there on trolley & in the armamentarium. We are presenting a case of intramedullary tibial implant – two V nails, put about 8 years ago having pain &sinus in upper third of leg. It was difficult to predict radiologically the nature of the intra- medullary implant & hence, difficulties during its removal. It is mandatory to discuss all the possible options with the patient and relatives prior to surgery. It is also necessary to explain at times, we might not be able to remove the implant and procedure have to be abandoned. The patient usually considers the removal of implant to be easier than the initial surgery and is usually unaware of the difficulties that can be encountered during removal and the fact that it may need a major procedure followed by a prolonged recovery time.

  18. Position paper -- Waste storage tank heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on the heat removal system to be used on the waste storage tanks currently being designed for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF), project W-236A. The current preliminary design for the waste storage primary tank heat removal system consists of the following subsystems: (1) a once-through dome space ventilation system; (2) a recirculation dome space ventilation system; and (3) an annulus ventilation system. Recently completed and ongoing studies have evaluated alternative heat removal systems in an attempt to reduce system costs and to optimize heat removal capabilities. In addition, a thermal/heat transfer analysis is being performed that will provide assurance that the heat removal systems selected will be capable of removing the total primary tank design heat load of 1.25 MBtu/hr at an allowable operating temperature of 190 F. Although 200 F is the design temperature limit, 190 F has been selected as the maximum allowable operating temperature limit based on instrumentation sensitivity, instrumentation location sensitivity, and other factors. Seven options are discussed and recommendations are made

  19. Enzymes Enhance Biofilm Removal Efficiency of Cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Philipp; Mauerhofer, Stefan; Schneider, Jana; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Rosenberg, Urs; Ren, Qun

    2016-06-01

    Efficient removal of biofilms from medical devices is a big challenge in health care to avoid hospital-acquired infections, especially from delicate devices like flexible endoscopes, which cannot be reprocessed using harsh chemicals or high temperatures. Therefore, milder solutions such as enzymatic cleaners have to be used, which need to be carefully developed to ensure efficacious performance. In vitro biofilm in a 96-well-plate system was used to select and optimize the formulation of novel enzymatic cleaners. Removal of the biofilm was quantified by crystal violet staining, while the disinfecting properties were evaluated by a BacTiter-Glo assay. The biofilm removal efficacy of the selected cleaner was further tested by using European standard (EN) for endoscope cleaning EN ISO 15883, and removal of artificial blood soil was investigated by treating TOSI (Test Object Surgical Instrument) cleaning indicators. Using the process described here, a novel enzymatic endoscope cleaner was developed, which removed 95% of Staphylococcus aureus and 90% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the 96-well plate system. With a >99% reduction of CFU and a >90% reduction of extracellular polymeric substances, this cleaner enabled subsequent complete disinfection and fulfilled acceptance criteria of EN ISO 15883. Furthermore, it efficiently removed blood soil and significantly outperformed comparable commercial products. The cleaning performance was stable even after storage of the cleaner for 6 months. It was demonstrated that incorporation of appropriate enzymes into the cleaner enhanced performance significantly. PMID:27044552

  20. Boron Removal from Silicon by Humidified Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarian, Jafar; Tang, Kai; Hildal, Kjetil; Tranell, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Boron (B) is one of the most problematic impurities to remove from metallurgical grade silicon in the production of more pure solar grade silicon (SoG-Si). In the present work, recent progresses in the application of reactive gases for B removal from molten silicon is reviewed. Moreover, in order to clarify the mechanisms and kinetics of gas-based B-refining, an experimental procedure using humidified Ar, N2, and H2 gases applied to boron-doped silicon melt is described. It is shown that the kinetics and extent of B removal is depending on the type of humidified gas. The thermodynamics and kinetics of B removal from molten silicon are studied to explain experimental observations. The mass transfer coefficients of B are calculated and possible mechanisms for B removal by the reactive gases are proposed: 1/2{{H}}2 ({{g}}) &= \\underset{-{H} ,} \\underset{-}{B} + \\underset{H} + {H}2 {O(g)} &= {HBO(g)} + {H}2 . It is shown that the lower equilibrium partial pressure of HBO gas at higher temperatures causes slower B removal rate.

  1. Boron removal from geothermal waters by electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, A. Erdem [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering., 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: aerdemy@atauni.edu.tr; Boncukcuoglu, Recep [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering., 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Kocakerim, M. Muhtar [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Yilmaz, M. Tolga; Paluluoglu, Cihan [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering., 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2008-05-01

    Most of the geothermal waters in Turkey contain extremely high concentration of boron when they are used for irrigation. The use of geothermal waters for irrigation can results in excess amount deposition of boron in soil. On the other hand, a minimal boron concentration is required for irrigational waters. In this study, electrocoagulation (EC) was selected as a treatment process for the removal of boron from thermal waters obtained from Ilica-Erzurum in Turkey. Current density (CD), pH of solution and temperature of solution were selected as operational parameters. The results showed that boron removal efficiency increased from pH 4.0 to 8.0 and decreased at pH 10.0. Although boron removal efficiency was highest at pH 8.0, energy consumption was very high at this pH value compared to other pH intervals. Boron removal efficiency reached to 95% with increasing current density from 1.5 to 6.0 mA/cm{sup 2}, but energy consumption was also increased in this interval. At higher temperatures of solution, such as 313 and 333 K, boron removal efficiency increased. At optimum conditions, boron removal efficiency in geothermal water reached up to 95%.

  2. Trace elements removal from hot flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahab, M. (Valtion teknillinen tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland). Polttoainejalostustekniikan laboratorio); Mroueh, U.M. (Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland). Kemian Lab.)

    1989-11-01

    Granular-bed filtration was investigated theoretically and experimentally with the view to its applicability to gaseous trace element removal at high temperatures. Granular-bed filters have received a great deal of attention recently as an alternative to the more conventional gas cleanup devices such as cyclones, electrostatic precipitators (ESP) and bag-filters. None of these conventional devices is capable of operating efficiently at high temperatures, (800-900 deg C), typical combined-cycle power generation plants. Moreover, a sizeable proportion of the volatilised trace metals will exit from the reactor in the vapour phase and these purification devices are not generally designed to remove the gaseous species. In an atmospheric test rig, trace elements of concern were removed in a fixed granular-bed filter at 800-900 deg C temperature range using sorbent particles (such as limestone) as the unbonded filter medium. Two configurations of the experimental apparatus were employed to enable an accurate determination of the removal efficiency of various sorbent particles. The results show that volatilised trace elements can be effectively removed from hot flue gases by passing them through a fixed bed of suitably selected solid sorbents. Removal efficiencies of higher than 99% were achieved with solid sorbent particles in the 0.3-3.0 mm size range, operating at 800-900 deg C.

  3. Experience on sodium removal from various components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1970, OEC (O-arai Engineering Center) has been Investigating the following methods for removal of sodium from the components of sodium plants: steam cleaning for the 50 MW Steam Generator, secondary proto-type pump of 'JOYO' and Dummy fuel assembly of 'JOYO', alcohol cleaning for Sector Model of Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) of 'JOYO', a sector model of Sodium-to-Air cooler of 'JOYO' and a proto-type isolation valve of 'JOYO' and cleaning by vacuumization at high temperature for Regenerative Heat Exchanger. This report describes the outline of the Sodium Disposal Facility and experience of sodium removal processing on the 50 MW Steam Generator, the crevices of the experimental sub-assemblies, the Fuel Handling Machine of 'MONJU' and the Regenerative Heat Exchanger of the Sodium Flow Test Facility. Through these experiences it was noted that, (1) Removal of sodium from crevices such as in bolted joints are very difficult. (2) Consideration is needed in the removal process where material damage might occur from the generation of hydro-oxides. (3) Some detection device to tell the completion of sodium removal as well as the end of reaction is required. (4) Requalification rules should be clarified. Efforts in this direction have been made in the case of a 'JOYO' prototype pump by reinstalling it after sodium removal five times. (author)

  4. Electroretinogram Changes following Silicone Oil Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Azarmina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate electroretinogram (ERG changes after silicone oil removal. Methods: Scotopic and photopic ERGs, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA were checked before and shortly after silicone oil removal in eyes that had previously undergone vitrectomy and silicone oil injection for complex retinal detachment. Preand postoperative ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes were compared. Results: Twenty-eight eyes of 28 patients including 20 male and 8 female subjects with mean age of 39.3 ± 0.06 (range, 12 to 85 years were studied. Mean interval from primary vitreoretinal surgery to silicone oil removal was 21.04 ± 0.52 (range, 7 to 39 months. Mean duration from silicone oil removal to second ERG was 13.04 ± 1.75 (range, 10 to 16 days. Before silicone oil removal, mean a-wave amplitudes in maximal combined response, rod response and cone response ERGs were 27.4 ± 19.9, 7.2 ± 4.5 and 5.5 ± 3.4 μv, respectively. These values increased to 48.8 ± 31.9, 15.1 ± 14.4 and 17.4 ± 22.2 μv, respectively after silicone oil removal (P < 0.001. Mean b-wave amplitudes in the same order, were 69.41 ± 51, 41.2 ± 30.4 and 25.1 ± 33.9 μv before silicone oil removal, increasing to 165.6 ± 102.5, 81.7 ± 53.7 and 44.7 ± 34.1 μv respectively, after silicone oil removal (P < 0.001. Mean BCVA significantly improved from 1.10 ± 0.34 at baseline to 1.02 ± 0.33 logMAR after silicone oil removal (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The amplitudes of ERG a- and b-waves under scotopic and photopic conditions increased significantly shortly after silicone oil removal. An increase in BCVA was also observed. These changes may be explained by the insulating effect of silicone oil on the retina.

  5. Controlled biomass removal - the key parameter to achieve enhanced biological phosphorus removal in biofilm systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, E.

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in activated sludge systems mass transfer processes have a major influence on overall phosphorus removal in biofilm reactors. Based on results from a laboratory scale sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) and from a mathematical model......) had only a minor effect on overall phosphorus removal. Soluble components fully penetrate the biofilm at certain times during the SBBR cycle as a consequence of SBBR operation with large concentration variations over the cycle time. The limiting processes for EBPR is the efficient removal...... of phosphorus rich biomass from the reactor. Biomass at the base of the biofilm that is not removed during backwashing will release accumulated phosphorus due to lysis or endogenous respiration and will not contribute to net phosphorus removal. For efficient operation of EBPR in biofilm systems regular...

  6. Economic impact of syndesmosis hardware removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalli, Trapper A J; Matthews, Leslie J; Hanselman, Andrew E; Hubbard, David F; Bramer, Michelle A; Santrock, Robert D

    2015-09-01

    Ankle syndesmosis injuries are commonly seen with 5-10% of sprains and 10% of ankle fractures involving injury to the ankle syndesmosis. Anatomic reduction has been shown to be the most important predictor of clinical outcomes. Optimal surgical management has been a subject of debate in the literature. The method of fixation, number of screws, screw size, and number of cortices are all controversial. Postoperative hardware removal has also been widely debated in the literature. Some surgeons advocate for elective hardware removal prior to resuming full weightbearing. Returning to the operating room for elective hardware removal results in increased cost to the patient, potential for infection or complication(s), and missed work days for the patient. Suture button devices and bioabsorbable screw fixation present other options, but cortical screw fixation remains the gold standard. This retrospective review was designed to evaluate the economic impact of a second operative procedure for elective removal of 3.5mm cortical syndesmosis screws. Two hundred and two patients with ICD-9 code for "open treatment of distal tibiofibular joint (syndesmosis) disruption" were identified. The medical records were reviewed for those who underwent elective syndesmosis hardware removal. The primary outcome measurements included total hospital billing charges and total hospital billing collection. Secondary outcome measurements included average individual patient operative costs and average operating room time. Fifty-six patients were included in the study. Our institution billed a total of $188,271 (USD) and collected $106,284 (55%). The average individual patient operating room cost was $3579. The average operating room time was 67.9 min. To the best of our knowledge, no study has previously provided cost associated with syndesmosis hardware removal. Our study shows elective syndesmosis hardware removal places substantial economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system

  7. Removal of oil from water by bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many materials, included activated carbon, peat, coal, fiberglass, polypropylene, organoclay and bentonite have been used for removing oils and grease from water. However, bentonite has been used only rarely for this purpose. In this study Na-bentonite was used to remove oil from oil-in-water emulsions of various kinds such as standard mineral oil, cutting oils, refinery effluent and produced water from production wells at Estevan, Saskatchewan. Removal efficiencies obtained were 85 to 96 per cent for cutting oils, 84 to 86 per cent for produced water and 54 to 87 per cent for refinery effluent. Bentonite proved to be more effective in the removal of oil from oil-in-water emulsions than from actual waste waters; up to 96 percent from oil-in-water emulsions to only 87 per cent from actual waste water. The percentage of oil removed was found to be a function of the amount of bentonite added and the adsorption time up to the equilibrium time. Result also showed that the Langmuir, Freundlich and BET isotherms are well suited to describe the adsorption of oil by bentonite from the various oily waters employed in this study. 15 refs

  8. Removal of radium from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional, proven process for radium removal are sodium ion exchange softening, lime softening, and reverse osmosis. The newer, radium-specific column processes include adsorption onto the Dow RSC and BaSO4-impregnated alumina. The most promising new radium-specific treatment process for large-scale use is adsorption onto preformed manganese dioxide followed by multimedia or diatomaceous earth filtration The disposal of radium-contaminated wastewaters and sludges from processes under consideration will be a major factor in process selection. The processes of choice for municipal water supply treatment to remove radium are sodium ion exchange softening, lime softening, manganese dioxide adsorption-filtration, and selective adsorption onto the Dow RSC or BaSO4-impregnated alumina. Where the water is brackish, reverse osmosis hyperfiltration should also be considered. The radium removal process of choice for whole-house or point-of-entry treatment is sodium ion exchange softening. For point-of-use radium removal, a standard reverse osmosis system including cartridge filtration, activated carbon adsorption, and reverse osmosis hyperfiltration is recommended. Although no cost estimates have been made, the relative costs from most expensive to least expansive, for radium removal in small community water supplies are reverse osmosis, sodium ion exchange softening, lime soda softening, manganese dioxide adsorption-filtration, and the radium-selective adsorbents. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Equipment for removal of contaminated concrete surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating and developing equipment that will rapidly and economically remove contaminated concrete surfaces while producing a minimal amount of contaminated rubble. Evaluation of various methods for removing concrete surfaces shows that many of the techniques presently used for decontamination require excessive manpower, time, or energy, or they remove more material than is necessary to clean the surface. Excess material removal increases the quantity of waste that must be handled under controlled conditions. Three unique decontamination methods are presented here: the water cannon, the concrete spaller, and the high-pressure water jet. The water cannon fires a small, high-velocity jet of fluid to spall the concrete surface. The concrete spaller ships away the concrete by exerting radial pressure against the sides of a shallow cylindrical hole drilled into the concrete surface. The high-pressure water jet is a 50,000-psi spray that blasts away the concrete surface. Each method includes means for containing airborne contamination. Results of tests show that these techniques can rapidly and economically remove surfaces, leaving minimal rubble for controlled disposal. Also presented are cost comparisons between the water cannon and the concrete spaller

  10. Adsorption and removal of graphene dispersants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irin, Fahmida; Hansen, Matthew J; Bari, Rozana; Parviz, Dorsa; Metzler, Shane D; Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K; Green, Micah J

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate three different techniques (dialysis, vacuum filtration, and spray drying) for removal of dispersants from liquid-exfoliated graphene. We evaluate these techniques for elimination of dispersants from both the bulk liquid phase and from the graphene surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms dispersant removal by these treatments. Vacuum filtration (driving by convective mass transfer) is the most effective method of dispersant removal, regardless of the type of dispersant, removing up to ∼95 wt.% of the polymeric dispersant with only ∼7.4 wt.% decrease in graphene content. Dialysis also removes a significant fraction (∼70 wt.% for polymeric dispersants) of un-adsorbed dispersants without disturbing the dispersion quality. Spray drying produces re-dispersible, crumpled powder samples and eliminates much of the unabsorbed dispersants. We also show that there is no rapid desorption of dispersants from the graphene surface. In addition, electrical conductivity measurements demonstrate conductivities one order of magnitude lower for graphene drop-cast films (where excess dispersants are present) than for vacuum filtered films, confirming poor inter-sheet connectivity when excess dispersants are present. PMID:25681785

  11. How to remove a chest drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allibone, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of a chest drain in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. This procedure requires two practitioners. The chest drain will have been inserted aseptically to remove air, blood, fluid or pus from the pleural cavity. ▶ Chest drains may be small or wide bore depending on the underlying condition and clinical setting. They may be secured with a mattress suture and/or an anchor suture. ▶ Chest drains are usually removed under medical instructions when the patient's lung has inflated, the underlying condition has resolved, there is no evidence of respiratory compromise or failure, and their anticoagulation status has been assessed as satisfactory. ▶ Chest drains secured with a mattress suture should be removed by two practitioners. One practitioner is required to remove the tube and the other to tie the mattress suture (if present) and secure the site. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could be used to educate patients with chest drains. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26443174

  12. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. Olson

    1997-05-12

    Column biooxidation tests with Kentucky coal confirmed results of earlier shake flask tests showing significant removal from the coal of arsenic, selenium, cobalt, manganese, nickel and cadmium. Rates of pyrite biooxidation in Kentucky coal were only slightly more than half the rates found previously for Indiana and Pittsburgh coals. Removal of pyrite from Pittsburgh coal by ferric ion oxidation slows markedly as ferrous ions accumulate in solution, requiring maintenance of high redox potentials in processes designed for removal of pyrite and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors by circulation of ferric solutions through coal. The pyrite oxidation rates obtained in these tests were used by Unifield Engineering to support the conceptual designs for alternative pyrite and HAP precursor bioleaching processes for the phase 2 pilot plant. Thermophilic microorganisms were tested to determine if mercury could be mobilized from coal under elevated growth temperatures. There was no evidence for mercury removal from coal under these conditions. However, the activity of the organisms may have liberated mercury physically. It is also possible that the organisms dissolved mercury and it readsorbed to the clay preferentially. Both of these possibilities are undergoing further testing. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory�s (INEEL) slurry column reactor was operated and several batches of feed coal, product coal, waste solids and leach solutions were submitted to LBL for HAP precursor analysis. Results to date indicate significant removal of mercury, arsenic and other HAP precursors in the combined physical-biological process.

  13. Space Debris Removal: A Game Theoretic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Klima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse active space debris removal efforts from a strategic, game-theoretical perspective. Space debris is non-manoeuvrable, human-made objects orbiting Earth, which pose a significant threat to operational spacecraft. Active debris removal missions have been considered and investigated by different space agencies with the goal to protect valuable assets present in strategic orbital environments. An active debris removal mission is costly, but has a positive effect for all satellites in the same orbital band. This leads to a dilemma: each agency is faced with the choice between the individually costly action of debris removal, which has a positive impact on all players; or wait and hope that others jump in and do the ‘dirty’ work. The risk of the latter action is that, if everyone waits, the joint outcome will be catastrophic, leading to what in game theory is referred to as the ‘tragedy of the commons’. We introduce and thoroughly analyse this dilemma using empirical game theory and a space debris simulator. We consider two- and three-player settings, investigate the strategic properties and equilibria of the game and find that the cost/benefit ratio of debris removal strongly affects the game dynamics.

  14. The removal of amateur tattoos by salabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A M; Jackson, I T

    1979-12-01

    Due to the recent upsurge in self-inflicted tattoos in teenagers it was decided to employ for their removal the method of salabrasion, i.e. abrasion with table salt. This technique was recently used by Manchester (1973, 1974) for the removal of commercial tattoos. Fourteen patients with twenty-eight tattoo or only tiny flecks of pigment remaining visible; eleven showed a fair response, i.e. the tatoo, although much lighter in colour, was still legible but the patient was satisfied with the result; three showed a poor response, i.e. the tattoo appeared as if untreated; four (two patients) defaulted. In general, as could be expected, the darker the tattoo the more difficult was its removal and those on fingers were particularly resistant. PMID:534615

  15. Enhanced NOx removal in wet FGD systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dominant method for high-efficiency NOx removal is ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR). However, no full-scale, commercial SCR process exists for coal-fired power plants in North America. This paper describes wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD), the leading control technology for sulphur dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. The feasibility of using wet FGD systems for simultaneous NOx and SO2 removal was studied in a mini-pilot scale perforated tray absorber by varying the NO to NO2 ratio in the inlet gas. It was shown that the presence of sulphite ions in stoichiometric excess in the liquid phase had a significant positive effect on the absorption of NOx in wet FGD systems. The pH of the absorbing solution was also found to have a major effect on NOx removal efficiency. 49 refs., 6 tabs., 14 figs

  16. Method of removing material contaminated with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To effectively remove radioactive materials contaminating the surface of a substrate of the material to be processed by thermal shock. Method: First the radioactive materials adhering to the surface of the material to be processed are frozen using dry ice, liquified nitrogen gas and other suitable materials. Then the surface is heated strongly using steam, hot water, heat radiation or other means. As a result the radioactive materials adhering to the surface of pipes, and equipment get a thermal shock due to temperature differential. This allows the radioactive materials to be delaminated and removed. In addition, by using dryice, liquified nitrogen and other suitable materials which can be liquified at abbient temperatures, the problem of liquid waste has been considerably lowered. Moreover, as the process of removing the above radioactive materials involves mostly connecting nozzles and opening/closing valves etc., these operations can be done by remote control. This reduces the risk of exposure to radioactivity. (Takahashi, M.)

  17. Techniques for removing contaminants from optical surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle removal procedures such as plasma cleaning, ultrasonic agitation of solvents, detergents, solvent wiping, mild abrasives, vapor degreasing, high pressure solvent spraying and others have been evaluated and the results are reported here. Wiping with a lens tissue wetted with an organic solvent and high pressure fluid spraying are the only methods by which particles as small as 5 μm can be effectively removed. All of the other methods tested were found to be at least two orders of magnitude less effective at removing small insoluble particles. An additional and as yet unresolved problem is the development of a reliable method for evaluating particulate surface cleanliness. Without such a reproducible monitoring technique, the large diversity of cleaning methods currently available cannot be quantitatively evaluated

  18. Contamination removal using various solvents and methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsen, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Critical and non-critical bonding surfaces must be kept free of contamination that may cause potential unbonds. For example, an aft-dome section of a redesigned solid rocket motor that had been contaminated with hydraulic oil did not appear to be sufficiently cleaned when inspected by the optically stimulated electron emission process (Con Scan) after it had been cleaned using a hand double wipe cleaning method. As a result, current and new cleaning methodologies as well as solvent capability in removing various contaminant materials were reviewed and testing was performed. Bonding studies were also done to verify that the cleaning methods used in removing contaminants provide an acceptable bonding surface. The removal of contaminants from a metal surface and the strength of subsequent bonds were tested using the Martin Marietta and double-wipe cleaning methods. Results are reported.

  19. New anaerobic process of nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Mulder, A; Versprille, B

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for the treatment of strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulfide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite within an anaerobic biofilm. The achieved results with a nitrogen loading rate of higher than 1,000 mg/L/d and nitrogen removal of around 90% look very promising because they exceed (by 9-18 times) the corresponding nitrogen removal rates of conventional activated sludge systems. The paper describes also some characteristics of DEAMOX sludge, as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterization. PMID:17163025

  20. Highly heat-removing radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly heat-removing radiation shielding material is constituted with fine particles prepared by coating metals of high heat conductivity to fine particles comprising materials having excellent radiation shielding performance. Then, the fine particles applied with the coating are mixed and filled in a shielding container or applied with hot press into a layerous form and used as a shielding member. In view of the above, since the coated fine particles provide the shielding performance against radiation such as neutrons and gamma rays, and the coating metals provide the heat removing performance, they act as a shielding material having heat removing performance as a whole. The combination of the coated fine particles and the coating metals are selected depending on the respective conditions for use. With such a constitution, radioactive wastes involving a problem of heat generation can be transported or stored safely. (T.M.)

  1. Electrokinetic removal of salt from brick masonry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2006-01-01

    A method to effectively remove salts from masonry is lacking. The present study aims at determining the removal efficiency of salts from bricks in an applied low current electric DC field. At first an investigation on removal of NaCl and Na(NO3)2 from spiked bricks in laboratory scale was conducted...... electrodes, a cathode and an anode, that were placed on a masonry wall of an old stable. The masonry had a high concentration of nitrates and problems with hygroscopic moisture. The electrodes consisted of reinforcement steel in carbonate-rich clay. The clay was chosen mainly to improve electric contact...... between metal and masonry and to hinder the acid produced at the anode in reaching the masonry. In the first set of electrodes the clay was too dry, and electric current was only applied for 7 days. Still the highest concentrations of nitrates and chlorides in the clay measured after these 7 days was...

  2. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS REMOVAL METHODS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Berenjian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs are among the most toxic chemicals which are detrimental to humans and environment. There is a significant need of fully satisfactory method for removal of VOCs. There are several methods including physical, chemical and biological treatments available to remove VOCs by either recovery or destruction. The aim of the present study is to summarize the available methods for VOC removal; trying to find a promising method among the available techniques. A wide range of VOCs can be treated biologically in which it offers advantages over more traditional processes including lower operating and capital costs and a smaller carbon footprint. However, due to a complex nature and diversity of VOCs it is hard to find a simple and promising method. Treatment still requires more research to solve the associate problems with available VOC elimination techniques.

  3. Disturbance of deposition and removal of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chelation therapy using DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) and a new drug, CBMIDA [catechol 3, 6-bis (methyleiminodiacetic acid)] showing more effectiveness on removal of plutonium and lower toxicity than DTPA, is available for occupational exposure but is difficult for public exposure, because there are many reluctant problems on their toxicities, administration routes and times, physical conditions of victims etc. We demonstrated that active amino acid calcium (AAACa), a natural product which mixed oyster shell electrolysate and amino acids of seaweeds, could remove plutonium from bone and liver in rats. The removing methods of radionuclides using the bioavailability of AAACa will be utilized for public exposures and resolve the reluctant problems accompanied with a chelation therapy for occupational exposure. (author)

  4. Dye removal from textile wastewater using bioadsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Textile industries throughout the world produce huge quantities of dyes and pigments annually. Effluents from textile industries are dye wastewater, and disposal of these wastes to freshwater bodies causes damage to the environment. Among the treatment technologies, adsorption is an attractive and viable option, provided that the sorbent is inexpensive and readily available for use. In this study, a typical basic dye, methylene blue, in wastewater was treated using Melia azedarach sawdust. The effects of contact time, adsorbent amount and particle size were investigated on the removal efficiency of adsorbent for methylene blue. Complete removal of the dye were attained at higher adsorbent dose of 3 g/L with 50 mg/L initial dye concentration. The maximum adsorption was at 240 minutes, whereas more than 90% removal with 105 meu m particle size of 1 g/L adsorbent for same initial dye concentration. The experimental data best fits with 2 Langmuir adsorption isotherm (R= 0.991). (author)

  5. Paracetamol removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Verlicchi, Paola; Young, Thomas M.

    2011-07-01

    SummaryIn this study two pilot scale Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands (HSFCWs) near Lecce, Italy, planted with different macrophytes ( Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia) and an unplanted control were assessed for their effectiveness in removing paracetamol. Residence time distributions (RTDs) for the two beds indicated that the Typha bed was characterized by a void volume fraction (porosity) of 0.16 and exhibited more ideal plug flow behavior (Pe = 29.7) than the Phragmites bed (Pe = 26.7), which had similar porosity. The measured hydraulic residence times in the planted beds were 35.8 and 36.7 h when the flow was equal to 1 m 3/d. The Phragmites bed exhibited a range of paracetamol removals from 51.7% for a Hydraulic Loading Rate (HLR) of 240 mm/d to 87% with 120 mm/d HLR and 99.9% with 30 mm/d. The Typha bed showed a similar behavior with percentages of removal slightly lower, ranging from 46.7% (HLR of 240 mm/d) to >99.9% (hydraulic loading rate of 30 mm/d). At the same HLR values the unplanted bed removed between 51.3% and 97.6% of the paracetamol. In all three treatments the paracetamol removal was higher with flow of 1 m 3/d and an area of approx. 7.5 m 2 (half bed) than in the case of flow equal to 0.5 m 3/d with a surface treatment of approx. 3.75 m 2. A first order model for paracetamol removal was evaluated and half lives of 5.16 to 10.2 h were obtained.

  6. Removal of ciprofloxacin from water by birnessite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Wei-Teh, E-mail: atwtj@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Ya-Siang; Tsai, Yolin; Jean, Jiin-Shuh [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin – Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Krukowski, Keith [Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin – Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Ciprofloxacin removal by birnessite was accompanied by interlayer cation exchange. ► Layer expansion and FTIR data suggested ciprofloxacin intercalation into birnessite. ► Adsorption capacity of ciprofloxacin into birnessite was limited by surface area. ► Birnessite in soil systems may provide host for ciprofloxacin accumulation. -- Abstract: With more pharmaceuticals and personal care products detected in the surface and waste waters, studies on interactions between these contaminants and soils or sediments have attracted great attention. In this study, the removal of ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, by birnessite, a layered manganese oxide, in aqueous solution was investigated by batch studies supplemented by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared analyses. Stoichiometric release of exchangeable cations accompanying CIP removal from water confirmed cation exchange as the major mechanism for CIP uptake by birnessite. Interlayer expansion after CIP adsorption on birnessite as revealed by XRD analyses indicated that intercalation contributed significantly to CIP uptake in addition to external surface adsorption. Correlation of CIP adsorption to specific surface area and cation exchange capacity suggested that the former was the limiting factor for CIP uptake. At the adsorption maximum, CIP molecules formed a monolayer on the birnessite surfaces. The adsorbed CIP could be partially removed using a cationic surfactant at a low initial concentration and mostly removed by AlCl{sub 3} at a higher initial concentration, which further supported the cation exchange mechanism for CIP removal by birnessite. The results indicated that the presence of layered Mn-oxide in the soil and waste water treatment systems may provide host for CIP accumulation.

  7. Removal of ciprofloxacin from water by birnessite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Ciprofloxacin removal by birnessite was accompanied by interlayer cation exchange. ► Layer expansion and FTIR data suggested ciprofloxacin intercalation into birnessite. ► Adsorption capacity of ciprofloxacin into birnessite was limited by surface area. ► Birnessite in soil systems may provide host for ciprofloxacin accumulation. -- Abstract: With more pharmaceuticals and personal care products detected in the surface and waste waters, studies on interactions between these contaminants and soils or sediments have attracted great attention. In this study, the removal of ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, by birnessite, a layered manganese oxide, in aqueous solution was investigated by batch studies supplemented by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared analyses. Stoichiometric release of exchangeable cations accompanying CIP removal from water confirmed cation exchange as the major mechanism for CIP uptake by birnessite. Interlayer expansion after CIP adsorption on birnessite as revealed by XRD analyses indicated that intercalation contributed significantly to CIP uptake in addition to external surface adsorption. Correlation of CIP adsorption to specific surface area and cation exchange capacity suggested that the former was the limiting factor for CIP uptake. At the adsorption maximum, CIP molecules formed a monolayer on the birnessite surfaces. The adsorbed CIP could be partially removed using a cationic surfactant at a low initial concentration and mostly removed by AlCl3 at a higher initial concentration, which further supported the cation exchange mechanism for CIP removal by birnessite. The results indicated that the presence of layered Mn-oxide in the soil and waste water treatment systems may provide host for CIP accumulation

  8. Removal of arsenic and iron removal from drinking water using coagulation and biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Pramanik, Sagor Kumar; Suja, Fatihah

    2016-02-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC), biological aerated filter (BAF), alum coagulation and Moringa oleifera coagulation were investigated to remove iron and arsenic contaminants from drinking water. At an initial dose of 5 mg/L, the removal efficiency for arsenic and iron was 63% and 58% respectively using alum, and 47% and 41% respectively using Moringa oleifera. The removal of both contaminants increased with the increase in coagulant dose and decrease in pH. Biological processes were more effective in removing these contaminants than coagulation. Compared to BAF, BAC gave greater removal of both arsenic and iron, removing 85% and 74%, respectively. Longer contact time for both processes could reduce the greater concentration of arsenic and iron contaminants. The addition of coagulation (at 5 mg/L dosage) and a biological process (with 15 or 60 min contact time) could significantly increase removal efficiency, and the maximum removal was observed for the combination of alum and BAC treatment (60 min contact time), with 100% and 98.56% for arsenic and iron respectively. The reduction efficiency of arsenic and iron reduced with the increase in the concentration of dissolved organics in the feedwater due to the adsorption competition between organic molecules and heavy metals. PMID:26837833

  9. Removal of Burkholderia cepacia biofilms with oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, D. W.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect the water system aboard US space shuttles and is the anticipated biocide for the international space station. Water quality on spacecraft must be maintained at the highest possible levels for the safety of the crew. Furthermore, the treatment process used to maintain the quality of water on research must be robust and operate for long periods with minimal crew intervention. Biofilms are recalcitrant and pose a major threat with regard to chronic contamination of spacecraft water systems. We measured the effectiveness of oxidizing biocides on the removal and regrowth of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia biofilms. B. cepacia, isolated from the water distribution system of the space shuttle Discovery, was grown in continuous culture to produce a bacterial contamination source for biofilm formation and removal studies. A 10(7) CFU ml-1 B. cepacia suspension, in distilled water, was used to form biofilms on 3000 micrometers2 glass surfaces. Rates of attachment were measured directly with image analysis and were found to be 7.8, 15.2, and 22.8 attachment events h-1 for flow rates of 20.7, 15.2, and 9.8 ml min-1, respectively. After 18 h of formation, the B. cepacia biofilms were challenged with oxidants (ozone, chlorine, and iodine) and the rates of biofilm removal determined by image analysis. Fifty percent of the biofilm material was removed in the first hour of continous treatment with 24 mg l-1 chlorine or 2 mg l-1 ozone. Iodine (48 mg l-1) did not remove any measurable cellular material after 6 h continuous contact. After this first removal of biofilms by the oxidants, the surface was allowed to refoul and was again treated with the biocide. Iodine was the only compound that was unable to remove cellular debris from either primary or secondary biofilms. Moreover, treating primary biofilms with iodine increased the rate of formation of secondary biofilms, from 4.4 to 5.8 attachment events h-1. All the oxidants tested inactivated the B

  10. Cost estimates for removal of orbital debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Andrew; Ashley, Howard

    1989-01-01

    While there are currently no active measures for the removal of nonfunctional satellites or spent rocket stages from earth orbit, it has been deemed prudent to begin to identify and economically evaluate potential approaches for such orbital decluttering. The methods presently considered encompass retrieval with an OMV, forcible deorbiting via attached propulsive devices, and deorbiting via passive, drag-augmentation devices; the increases in payload-delivery costs they represent are respectively $15-20 million/object, $7.8 million/vehicle, and $5.5-15.5 million/unit. OMV removal appears the least economically feasible method.

  11. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  12. NOM removal technologies – Norwegian experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ødegaard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the methods for removal of natural organic matter (NOM, particularly humic substances (HS, in water with focus on the Norwegian experiences. It is demonstrated that humic substances may be removed by a variety of methods, such as; molecular sieving through nanofiltration membranes, coagulation with subsequent floc separation (including granular media or membrane filtration, oxidation followed by biofiltration and sorption processes including chemisorption (ion exchange and physical adsorption (activated carbon. All these processes are in use in Norway and the paper gives an overview of the operational experiences.

  13. NOM removal technologies – Norwegian experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ødegaard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the methods for removal of natural organic matter (NOM in water, particularly humic substances (HS, with focus on the Norwegian experiences. It is demonstrated that humic substances may be removed by a variety of methods, such as; molecular sieving through nanofiltration membranes, coagulation with subsequent floc separation (including granular media or membrane filtration, oxidation followed by biofiltration and sorption processes including chemisorption (ion exchange and physical adsorption (activated carbon. All these processes are in use in Norway and the paper gives an overview of the operational experiences.

  14. A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana G. Colson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body.

  15. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  16. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    -coated hydroxyapatite. The activity of enzymes against bacterial cells in biofilm was measured by fluorescence microscopy and an indirect conductance test in which evolution of carbon dioxide was measured. Glucose oxidase combined with lactoperoxidase was bactericidal against biofilm bacteria but did not remove the...... biofilm from the substrata. A complex mixture of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes was able to remove bacterial biofilm from steel and polypropylene substrata but did not have a significant bactericidal activity. Combining oxidoreductases with polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes resulted in bactericidal...

  17. [Zirconia in removable prosthodontics. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Nico M; Teubner, Eckart; Marinello, Carlo P

    2011-01-01

    Zirconia as a framework material is well established in fixed prosthodontics. However, for its application for removable dentures little experience exists. Zirkonzahn® has developed a copy-milling unit, that is a manually operated machine for the manufacture not only of frameworks but also of complete removable dentures. The aim of this case report is to show the step-by-step clinical and technical fabrication of a zirconia bar on implants and of a corresponding zirconia complete denture. The advantages and disadvantages of the system are presented and problems are critically discussed. PMID:21861249

  18. Automatic Removal of Sparse Artifacts in Electroencephalogram

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichavský, Petr; Zima, Miroslav; Krajča, V.

    Lisabon: SciTePress, 2011, s. 530-535. ISBN 978-989-8425-35-5. [Biosignals, Int. Conf. on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing. Rome (IT), 26.02.2011-29.01.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/09/1278 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : electroencephalogram * artifact removal * independent component analysis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/SI/tichavsky-automatic removal of sparse artifacts in electroencephalogram.pdf

  19. Removable Window System for Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, James P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A window system for a platform comprising a window pane, a retention frame, and a biasing system. The window pane may be configured to contact a sealing system. The retention frame may be configured to contact the sealing system and hold the window pane against the support frame. The biasing system may be configured to bias the retention frame toward the support frame while the support frame and the retention frame are in a configuration that holds the window pane. Removal of the biasing system may cause the retention frame and the window pane to be removable.

  20. Environmental aspects of coating removal techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of coatings to materials is constantly evolving: the number of techniques for coating application continue to grow and combinations of coating compositions on substrates continue to be expanded. This has lead to the use of ''exotic'' materials for coatings, some of which are considered to be ''toxic''. The growing interest in preserving the environment has begun to impact the coating industry. Residuals from coating removal processes can contaminate the soil, water, and air. Precautions are required to avoid environmental degradation. Coating removal techniques discussed include: microwave, laser ablation, CO, blasting, and plastic blast media. 62 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Removal of humic substances by biosorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VUKOVI(C) Marija; DOMANOVAC Tomislav; BRI(S)KI Felicita

    2008-01-01

    Fungal pellets of Aspergillus niger 405, Aspergillus ustus 326, and Stachybotrys sp. 1103 were used for the removal of humic substances from aqueous solutions. Batchwise biosorption, carried out at pH 6 and 25℃, was monitored spectrophotometrically and the process described with Freundlich's model. Calculated sorption coefficients K/and n showed that A. niger exhibited the highest efficiency. A good match between the model and experimental data and a high correlation coefficient (R2) pointed out to judicious choice of the mechanism for removal of humic substances from the reaction medium. The sorption rate constants (k) for A. ustus and Stachybotrys sp. were almost equal, however higher than that for A. niger. Comparison of test results with the simulated ones demonstrated the applicability of the designed kinetic model for removal of humic substances from natural water by biosorption with fungal pellets. Different morphological structure of the examined fungal pellets showed that faster sorption does not imply the most efficient removal of humic substances. Desorption of humic substances from fungal pellets was complete, rapid, and yielded uniform results.

  2. Section of CMS Beam Pipe Removed

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Seven components of the beam pipe located at the heart of the CMS detector were removed in recent weeks. The delicate operations were performed in several stages as the detector was opened. Video of the extraction of one section: http://youtu.be/arGuFgWM7u0

  3. Optimized coating removal by cold shock treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of removing coatings from nuclear power plant components, especially such with residual contamination, makes use of the self-contained stress developing during heat extraction. In this connection the nitrogen application process without and with preheating by means of hot air, infrared and microwave radiation was tested. The problem of auxiliary coatings was examined, and model coatings were developed. (DG)

  4. Removal of radionuclides at a waterworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäfvert, T.; Ellmark, C.; Holm, E.

    2002-01-01

    filtration and from the municipal distribution network. The samples were analysed with respect to their content of uranium, thorium, polonium, radium, plutonium and caesium. The results show a high removal capacity for uranium (about 85%), thorium (>90%), plutonium (>95%) and polonium (>90...... concentrations for the naturally occurring radionuclides and plutonium....

  5. Surgical Removal of the Thyroid Gland

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... same sensation as we tried to separate the meat from the bone or the skin from the meat. Correct. Okay. Dr. T, can you talk about ... sized walnut and open it and remove the meat from it, that would be the size of ...

  6. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Md Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications. PMID:26743179

  7. IRON REMOVAL PROCESSES: DESIGN OF NEW SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recently promulgated Arsenic Rule will require that many new drinking water systems treat their water to remove arsenic. Many groundwaters that have arsenic in their source water also have iron in their water. As a result, arsenic treatment at these sites will most likely b...

  8. Preliminary investigation of uranium removal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DTPA and NaHCO3 were relatively ineffective in removing 233U and 232U from rats injected intravenously with these isotopes in 1% citrate solution. The body burden of 228Th, a decay product of 232U, was decreased to one-half the control level after DTPA therapy

  9. Distillation of Liquid Xenon to Remove Krypton

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Iida, T; Ikeda, M; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Minamino, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, Y; Namba, T; Ogawa, H; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Ueshima, K; Yamashita, M; Kaneyuki, K; Ebizuka, Y; Kikuchi, J; Ota, A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, T; Hagiwara, H; Kamei, T; Miyamoto, K; Nagase, T; Nakamura, S; Ozaki, Y; Sato, T; Fukuda, Y; Sato, T; Nishijima, K; Sakurai, M; Maruyama, T; Motoki, D; Itow, Y; Ohsumi, H; Tasaka, S; Kim, S B; Kim, Y D; Lee, J I; Moon, S H; Urakawa, Y; Uchino, M; Kamioka, Y

    2008-01-01

    A high performance distillation system to remove krypton from xenon was constructed, and a purity level of Kr/Xe = $\\sim 3 \\times 10^{-12}$ was achieved. This development is crucial in facilitating high sensitivity low background experiments such as the search for dark matter in the universe.

  10. High exposure hardware removal activity readiness evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document comprises the Readiness Evaluation Plan for the High Exposure Rate Hardware (HERH) Removal Activity planned for the N Basin area at the Hanford Reservation in Richland Washington. This activity will consist of collecting hardware, depositing hardware in stainless-steel fuel element storage baskets, placing baskets in specially fabricated steel grout pipe, and encasing the contents in a high-slump grout

  11. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications.

  12. Advanced sludge reduction and phosphorous removal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An advanced sludge reduction process, i.e. sludge reduction and phosphorous removal process, was developed. The results show that excellent sludge reduction and biological phosphorous removal can be achieved perfectly in this system. When chemical oxygen demand ρ(COD) is 332 - 420 mg/L, concentration of ammonia ρ(NH3-N) is 30 - 40 mg/L and concentration of total phosphorous ρ(TP) is 6.0 - 9.0 mg/L in influent, the system still ensures ρ(COD)<23 mg/L, ρ(NH3-N)<3.2 mg/L and ρ(TP)<0.72 mg/L in effluent. Besides, when the concentration of dissolved oxygen ρ(DO) is around 1.0 mg/L, sludge production is less than 0. 140 g with the consumption of 1 g COD, and the phosphorous removal exceeds 91%. Also, 48.4% of total nitrogen is removed by simultaneous nitrification and denitrification.

  13. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU's evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER reg-sign, and VAC-PAC reg-sign. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER reg-sign uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC reg-sign vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout

  14. Removable partial overdentures for the irradiated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, S.W. (New York Univ. School of Dentistry, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Patients who have received radiotherapy to the head and neck area must avoid dental extractions and seek simplicity in treatment and home care follow-up. For partially edentulous patients, removable partial overdenture therapy can fulfill these goals while maintaining the high level of function and aesthetics desired by patients.11 references.

  15. Removable partial overdentures for the irradiated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients who have received radiotherapy to the head and neck area must avoid dental extractions and seek simplicity in treatment and home care follow-up. For partially edentulous patients, removable partial overdenture therapy can fulfill these goals while maintaining the high level of function and aesthetics desired by patients.11 references

  16. How to perform digital removal of faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peate, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Rationale and key points This article provides practitioners with information about how to perform digital removal of faeces in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner, promoting privacy and dignity. Passing faecal matter is essential to enable the elimination of waste. For some people, however, defecation is not possible without some form of intervention; this could be the administration of oral medication or an enema, insertion of suppositories or digital removal of faeces. ▶ Bowel care is a fundamental aspect of patient care. ▶ Digital removal of faeces should be performed by a practitioner competent in this skill. ▶ Digital removal of faeces is an invasive procedure and should only be carried out when necessary following holistic patient assessment. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How you think this article will improve your practice. 2. How the patient receiving the care you delivered might have felt. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:27275913

  17. Removal of Radon from Household Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Research and Development.

    By far, the greatest risk to health from radon occurs when the gas enters the house from underlying soil and is inhaled. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is studying ways to reduce radon in houses, including methods to remove the gas from water to prevent its release in houses when the water is used. While this research has not…

  18. Biological Nutrient Removal in Compact Biofilm Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassin, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The removal of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus from both domestic and industrial wastewaters is imperative since they potentially harm the environment. One of the main consequences of excessive availability of nitrogen and phosphorus in aquatic ecosystems (freshwater, marine and estuarine)

  19. Schools Remove Hazardous Chemicals from Labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes safety committee (New York section, American Chemical Society) survey of college chemistry facilities to assess hazards and make recommendations, and a cooperative project in Iowa to identify and remove hazardous chemicals from college/secondary school classrooms. Includes a partial list of hazardous chemicals identified by the Iowa…

  20. An adaptive strategy for active debris removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Adam E.; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2014-04-01

    Many parameters influence the evolution of the near-Earth debris population, including launch, solar, explosion and mitigation activities, as well as other future uncertainties such as advances in space technology or changes in social and economic drivers that effect the utilisation of space activities. These factors lead to uncertainty in the long-term debris population. This uncertainty makes it difficult to identify potential remediation strategies, involving active debris removal (ADR), that will perform effectively in all possible future cases. Strategies that cannot perform effectively, because of this uncertainty, risk either not achieving their intended purpose, or becoming a hindrance to the efforts of spacecraft manufactures and operators to address the challenges posed by space debris. One method to tackle this uncertainty is to create a strategy that can adapt and respond to the space debris population. This work explores the concept of an adaptive strategy, in terms of the number of objects required to be removed by ADR, to prevent the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris population from growing in size. This was demonstrated by utilising the University of Southampton’s Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture to the Geosynchronous Environment (DAMAGE) tool to investigate ADR rates (number of removals per year) that change over time in response to the current space environment, with the requirement of achieving zero growth of the LEO population. DAMAGE was used to generate multiple Monte Carlo projections of the future LEO debris environment. Within each future projection, the debris removal rate was derived at five-year intervals, by a new statistical debris evolutionary model called the Computational Adaptive Strategy to Control Accurately the Debris Environment (CASCADE) model. CASCADE predicted the long-term evolution of the current DAMAGE population with a variety of different ADR rates in order to identify a removal rate that produced a zero net

  1. 28 CFR 36.305 - Alternatives to barrier removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternatives to barrier removal. 36.305... barrier removal. (a) General. Where a public accommodation can demonstrate that barrier removal is not... achievable. (b) Examples. Examples of alternatives to barrier removal include, but are not limited to,...

  2. 45 CFR 1641.18 - Causes for removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Causes for removal. 1641.18 Section 1641.18 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION AND REMOVAL OF RECIPIENT AUDITORS Removal § 1641.18 Causes for removal. The debarring official...

  3. 27 CFR 25.206 - Removal of beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removal of beer. 25.206... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Beer for Personal Or Family Use § 25.206 Removal of beer. Beer made under § 25.205 may be removed from the premises where made for personal...

  4. Removal of depleted uranium from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of soil and water with depleted uranium (DU) has increased public health concerns due to the chemical toxicity of DU at elevated dosages. For this reason, there is great interest in developing methods for DU removal from contaminated sources. Two DU laden soils, taken from U.S. Army sites, were characterized for particle size distribution, total uranium concentration and removable uranium. Soil A was found to be a well graded sand containing a total of 3210 mg/kg DU (3.99 x 104 Bq/kg, where a Becquerel (Bq) is a unit of radiation). About 83% of the DU in the fines fraction (particle diameter 4 Bq/kg)) was associated with the carbonate, iron and manganese oxide and organic matter fractions of the material. Soil B was classified as a sandy silt with total DU of 1560 mg/kg (1.94 x 104 Bq/kg). The DU content in the fines fraction was 5171 mg/kg (6.43 x 104 Bq/kg). Sequential extraction of the Soil B fines fraction indicated that 64% of the DU was present either as soluble U(VI) minerals or as insoluble U(IV). Citric acid, sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide were used in batch experiments to extract DU from the fines fraction of both soils. Citric acid and sodium bicarbonate were relatively successful for Soil A (50-60% DU removal), but not for Soil B (20-35% DU removal). Hydrogen peroxide was found to significantly increase DU extraction from both soils, attaining removals up to 60-80%

  5. Rheological evaluation of pretreated cladding removal waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Chan, M.K.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    Cladding removal waste (CRW) contains concentrations of transuranic (TRU) elements in the 80 to 350 nCi/g range. This waste will require pretreatment before it can be disposed of as glass or grout at Hanford. The CRW will be pretreated with a rare earth strike and solids removal by centrifugation to segregate the TRU fraction from the non-TRU fraction of the waste. The centrifuge centrate will be neutralized with sodium hydroxide. This neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) is expected to be suitable for grouting. The TRU solids removed by centrifugation will be vitrified. The goal of the Rheological Evaluation of Pretreated Cladding Removal Waste Program was to evaluate those rheological and transport properties critical to assuring successful handling of the NCRW and TRU solids streams and to demonstrate transfers in a semi-prototypic pumping environment. This goal was achieved by a combination of laboratory and pilot-scale evaluations. The results obtained during these evaluations were correlated with classical rheological models and scaled-up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The Program used simulated NCRW and TRU solid slurries. Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) provided 150 gallons of simulated CRW and 5 gallons of simulated TRU solid slurry. The simulated CRW was neutralized by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The physical and rheological properties of the NCRW and TRU solid slurries were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCRW allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic or yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The TRU solids slurry contained very few solids. This slurry exhibited the properties associated with a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid.

  6. Rheological evaluation of pretreated cladding removal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cladding removal waste (CRW) contains concentrations of transuranic (TRU) elements in the 80 to 350 nCi/g range. This waste will require pretreatment before it can be disposed of as glass or grout at Hanford. The CRW will be pretreated with a rare earth strike and solids removal by centrifugation to segregate the TRU fraction from the non-TRU fraction of the waste. The centrifuge centrate will be neutralized with sodium hydroxide. This neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) is expected to be suitable for grouting. The TRU solids removed by centrifugation will be vitrified. The goal of the Rheological Evaluation of Pretreated Cladding Removal Waste Program was to evaluate those rheological and transport properties critical to assuring successful handling of the NCRW and TRU solids streams and to demonstrate transfers in a semi-prototypic pumping environment. This goal was achieved by a combination of laboratory and pilot-scale evaluations. The results obtained during these evaluations were correlated with classical rheological models and scaled-up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The Program used simulated NCRW and TRU solid slurries. Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) provided 150 gallons of simulated CRW and 5 gallons of simulated TRU solid slurry. The simulated CRW was neutralized by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The physical and rheological properties of the NCRW and TRU solid slurries were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCRW allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic or yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The TRU solids slurry contained very few solids. This slurry exhibited the properties associated with a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid

  7. Study on diverse passive decay heat removal approach and principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decay heat removal in post-accident is one of the most important aspects concerned in the reactor safety analysis. Passive decay heat removal approach is used to enhance nuclear safety. In advanced reactors, decay heat is removed by multiple passive heat removal paths through core to ultimate heat sink by passive residual heat removal system, passive injection system, passive containment cooling system and so on. Various passive decay heat removal approaches are summarized in this paper, the common features and differences of their heat removal paths are analyzed, and the design principle of passive systems for decay heat removal is discussed. It is found that. these decay heat removal paths is combined by some basic heat transfer processes, by the combination of these basic processes, diverse passive decay heat removal approach or system design scheme can be drawn. (authors)

  8. Residual Heat Removal System qualitative probabilistic safety analysis before and after auto closure interlock removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis evaluates the consequences of the removal of the auto closure interlock (ACI) on the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) suction/isolation valves at the nuclear power plant. The deletion of the RHRS ACI is in part based on a probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) which justifies the removal based on a criterion of increased availability and reliability. Three different areas to be examined in PSA: the likelihood of an interfacing system LOCA; RHRS availability and reliability; and low temperature overpressurization control. The paper emphasizes particularly the RHRS unavailability and reliability evaluation utilizing the current control circuitry configuration and then with the proposed modification to the control circuitry. (author)

  9. Spray removal of fission products in PWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models and parameters for assessing the rate and extent of removal of various fission product species are described. A range of droplet sizes and of spray additive options is considered and removal of vapour phase inorganic iodine species, of organic iodides and of aerosols containing fission products is discussed. Aerosol removal is assessed in terms of contributing removal mechanisms and the removal rate modelled as a function of the radius of the aerosol particulate species. (author)

  10. Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal: Metabolic Insights and Salinity Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Welles, L.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a biological process for efficient phosphate removal from wastewaters through intracellular storage of polyphosphate by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) and subsequent removal of PAO from the system through wastage of sludge. In comparison to physical and chemical phosphorus removal processes, the biological process has several advantages such as high removal efficiency, low cost, and no chemical sludge production, but disturbances an...

  11. The 'difficult' polyp: pitfalls for endoscopic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, M

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatous polyps are early neoplasias of colorectal cancer (adenoma-carcinoma sequence). The majority of adenomas or early invasive cancers (T1sm1) can be resected by endoscopy. Endoscopic resection techniques include classic loop polypectomy, endoscopic mucosectomy with preceding lifting of the (almost flat) lesion, endoscopic submucosal dissection and transanal microsurgical resection, an alternative to endoscopic submucosal dissection in the rectum. Endoscopic polyp removal should always aim to resect the lesion in 'one piece' and avoid, whenever possible, 'piecemeal resection'. One-piece polypectomy is the basis for a precise histopathological analysis and for proving complete removal of the lesion. Preceding injection of saline solution into the submucosa to lift the targeted polyp is a therapeutic modality to remove even-flat and flat-depressed adenomas. In addition, a positive lifting sign is regarded as a criterion of lower superficial malignancy. Lifting of a polyp can be negatively influenced by an already advanced cancer (T1sm3/T2) in the deep parts of the submucosa as well as by scars and connective tissue in the upper two layers of the colorectal wall. Hence, a negative lifting sign may lead to incorrect macroscopic evaluation of the lesion before removal. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is mostly performed in large laterally spreading tumors in the rectum and in the preanal region. The technique has a relatively long learning curve and is somewhat time consuming. A 'difficult polyp' may be characterized by: (1) the size (>3 cm), pedunculated or sessile (Ip/Is); (2) morphological type (classification of Paris 2003), in particular the flat type II lesions IIa-c flat, flat depressed; laterally spreading tumors and the large sessile-serrated lesions; and (3) the difficult assessment of the grade of malignancy before removal [e.g. dysplasia-associated lesions or masses (DALMs), sporadic adenoma, colitis carcinoma]. Chromoendoscopy (with indigo carmine

  12. Equipments removal and renewal at Plutonium Conversion Development Facility. The Secondary removal and renewal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plutonium Conversion Development Facility (PCDF) periodically carried out old equipment removal / renewal work for stable operation. The First removal / renewal program was carried out from 1993 to 1994. The Secondary removal / renewal of equipment (filter casings, microwave heating denitration apparatus, blender and glove boxes) was carried out from 1998 to 1999. Two new type air-line suits (double-layered type air-line suits and water flushing-decontamination-type air-line suits) were developed. These air-line suits were used for the Secondary removal / renewal program. The results of using these air-line suits the resistance test of the greenhouse against earthquakes and the contamination behavior of the glove box, which is independent from the ventilation system, are reported in this paper. (author)

  13. Integrating organic micropollutant removal into tertiary filtration: Combining PAC adsorption with advanced phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Johannes; Sperlich, Alexander; Jekel, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Direct addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to a deep-bed filter was investigated at pilot-scale as a single advanced treatment stage for simultaneous removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) and phosphorus from secondary effluent. PAC doses of 10-50 mg/L were assessed with regard to their impacts on filter performance and removal of 15 selected OMPs over a period of 18 months. The PAC was effectively retained by the filter and had no negative effect on filter head loss. Filter runtime until particle breakthrough depended mainly on coagulant dose and did not decrease significantly due to the additional PAC load. Removal of suspended solids and phosphorus by coagulation was effective independent of the PAC dose. A PAC dose of 35 mg/L PAC was suitable to remove well-adsorbing OMPs (e.g. carbamazepine, diclofenac) by >80% and medium adsorbing OMPs (e.g. primidone, sulfamethoxazole) by 50-80%. Median removals were 50-80% for well-adsorbing and 30-50% for medium adsorbing OMPs with 20 mg/L PAC. Abatement of all OMPs was low (carbon (DOC) concentrations of 11.2 mg/L). In addition to adsorptive removal, relevant concentration decreases of certain OMPs (e.g. 4-formylaminoantipyrine) were attributed to biological transformation in the filter. Adsorption onto accumulating PAC in the top layer of the filter bed led to improved OMP adsorption with increasing filter runtime. The comparison of OMP removal in the pilot filter with laboratory adsorption tests demonstrates that batch test results can be applied to estimate adsorptive OMP removal in real applications. PMID:26210030

  14. Optodynamic monitoring of laser tattoo removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencič, Boris; Grad, Ladislav; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this research is to use the information contained in the mechanisms occurring during the laser tattoo removal process. We simultaneously employed a laser-beam deflection probe (LBDP) to measure the shock wave and a camera to detect the plasma radiation, both originating from a high-intensity laser-pulse interaction with a tattoo. The experiments were performed in vitro (skin phantoms), ex vivo (marking tattoos on pig skin), and in vivo (professional and amateur decorative tattoos). The LBDP signal includes the information about the energy released during the interaction and indicates textural changes in the skin, which are specific for different skin and tattoo conditions. Using both sensors, we evaluated a measurement of threshold for skin damage and studied the effect of multiple pulses. In vivo results show that a prepulse reduces the interaction strength and that a single strong pulse produces better removal results.

  15. Apparatus for Removing Remaining Adhesives of Filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Large amount of ventilation filter was used at radiation areas not only in nuclear power plants but also in nuclear facilities. These spent ventilation filters are generated as radioactive waste and composed of a steel frame, glass fiber media and aluminum separator. When treated, the spent filter is separated into filter media for air purification and frame. After separation, while the filter media is collected using steel drum for reducing internal exposure, the filter frame is treated further to remove adhesives for recycling the frame as many as possible in order to reduce waste and cost and improve working conditions. Usually, the adhesives are separated from the filter frame manually. As a result, a lot of time and labor is required. So, the objective of this study is to develop a motor-driven apparatus for removing adhesives efficiently

  16. TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min

  17. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva......-coated hydroxyapatite. The activity of enzymes against bacterial cells in biofilm was measured by fluorescence microscopy and an indirect conductance test in which evolution of carbon dioxide was measured. Glucose oxidase combined with lactoperoxidase was bactericidal against biofilm bacteria but did not remove the...... biofilm from the substrata. A complex mixture of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes was able to remove bacterial biofilm from steel and polypropylene substrata but did not have a significant bactericidal activity. Combining oxidoreductases with polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes resulted in bactericidal...

  18. Optodynamic monitoring of laser tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencič, Boris; Grad, Ladislav; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this research is to use the information contained in the mechanisms occurring during the laser tattoo removal process. We simultaneously employed a laser-beam deflection probe (LBDP) to measure the shock wave and a camera to detect the plasma radiation, both originating from a high-intensity laser-pulse interaction with a tattoo. The experiments were performed in vitro (skin phantoms), ex vivo (marking tattoos on pig skin), and in vivo (professional and amateur decorative tattoos). The LBDP signal includes the information about the energy released during the interaction and indicates textural changes in the skin, which are specific for different skin and tattoo conditions. Using both sensors, we evaluated a measurement of threshold for skin damage and studied the effect of multiple pulses. In vivo results show that a prepulse reduces the interaction strength and that a single strong pulse produces better removal results. PMID:22559694

  19. Passive heat removal characteristics of SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Kwang; Kang, Hyung Seok; Yoon, Joo Hyun; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Cho, Bong Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A new advanced integral reactor of 330 MWt thermal capacity named SMART (System-Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor) is currently under development in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for multi-purpose applications. Modular once-through steam generator (SG) and self-pressurizing pressurizer equipped with wet thermal insulator and cooler are essential components of the SMART. The SMART provides safety systems such as Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS). In this study, a computer code for performance analysis of the PRHRS is developed by modeling relevant components and systems of the SMART. Using this computer code, a performance analysis of the PRHRS is performed in order to check whether the passive cooling concept using the PRHRS is feasible. The results of the analysis show that PRHRS of the SMART has excellent passive heat removal characteristics. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  20. Physiological removal of silicon from bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Bioengineering; Garino, J. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery; Flaitz, C.M. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Div. of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology; Ducheyne, P. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Bioengineering; Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Bioactive glass granules were implanted in the paraspinal muscle and tibiae of rabbits in order to determine the pathway of the silicon released from bioactive glass in vivo. We traced and quantified the silicon released by obtaining 24-hour urine samples, as well as blood samples for up to 7 months after implantation. Furthermore, local muscle and bone tissue as well as the following organs were resected for chemical and histopathological analyses: brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus. The concentrations of silicon found in the urine were well below saturation and no accumulation of silicon was found in the major organs after silicon excretion had halted. The removal of silicon from the body matrix was slower overall compared to an intramuscular site, taking a total of 24 weeks versus 19 weeks to complete silicon removal, respectively. (orig.)

  1. Randomly removing g handles at once

    CERN Document Server

    Borradaile, Glencora; Sidiropoulos, Anastasios

    2010-01-01

    Indyk and Sidiropoulos (2007) proved that any orientable graph of genus $g$ can be probabilistically embedded into a graph of genus $g-1$ with constant distortion. Viewing a graph of genus $g$ as embedded on the surface of a sphere with $g$ handles attached, Indyk and Sidiropoulos' method gives an embedding into a distribution over planar graphs with distortion $2^{O(g)}$, by iteratively removing the handles. By removing all $g$ handles at once, we present a probabilistic embedding with distortion $O(g^2)$ for both orientable and non-orientable graphs. Our result is obtained by showing that the nimum-cut graph of Erickson and Har Peled (2004) has low dilation, and then randomly cutting this graph out of the surface using the Peeling Lemma of Lee and Sidiropoulos (2009).

  2. Machine for removal of surface coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns a machine for removing surface coatings. It includes free plates, each plates, each one rotating about an axis itself having a circular rotation movement. The plates take up a radial orientation under the effect of centripetal force and strike the coating to be removed with their tips, whilst at the same time retracting under excessively sharp impacts. The machine is fitted with a hood inside which the pulverized coating is confined. A soft skirt fitted to the edge of the hood prevents the dust from being projected outside the hood by suction of the powdered coating. This machine is used in the nuclear industry for the decontamination of wall coatings without dispersion of radioactive dust into the atmosphere

  3. Advanced Hydraulic Studies on Enhancing Particle Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Cheng

    The removal of suspended solids and attached pollutants is one of the main treatment processes in wastewater treatment. This thesis presents studies on the hydraulic conditions of various particle removal facilities for possible ways to increase their treatment capacity and performance by utilizing...... and improving hydraulic conditions. Unlike most traditional theses which usually focus only on one particular subject of study, this thesis contains four relatively independent studies which cover the following topics: a newly proposed particle settling enhancement plate, the redesign of the inlet zone...... of a high-flow rate clarifier, identify the hydraulic problems of an old partially functioned CSO facility and investigate possible ways to entirely eliminate untreated CSO by improving its hydraulic capacity and performance. In order to be easily understood, each part includes its own abstract...

  4. Removal of mercury by adsorption: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Yue, Bao-Yu; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Liu, Qi; Jiao, Fei-Peng; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2016-03-01

    Due to natural and production activities, mercury contamination has become one of the major environmental problems over the world. Mercury contamination is a serious threat to human health. Among the existing technologies available for mercury pollution control, the adsorption process can get excellent separation effects and has been further studied. This review is attempted to cover a wide range of adsorbents that were developed for the removal of mercury from the year 2011. Various adsorbents, including the latest adsorbents, are presented along with highlighting and discussing the key advancements on their preparation, modification technologies, and strategies. By comparing their adsorption capacities, it is evident from the literature survey that some adsorbents have shown excellent potential for the removal of mercury. However, there is still a need to develop novel, efficient adsorbents with low cost, high stability, and easy production and manufacture for practical utility. PMID:26620868

  5. Should nuclear liability limits be removed. Yes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguing in favor of unlimited liability in the event of a nuclear accident, the author cites a mathematical probability of a core meltdown in the US as 45% during the next 20 years. The liability insurance carried by the nuclear industry is less than for large hotels and industrial parks, and is only a small fraction of the potential costs of damage and compensation. If nuclear technology is safe, limits are not needed. If liability is limited, it removes the incentive to improve safety and sends inaccurate price signals to utilities choosing among competing technologies. There is also the ethical aspect of shifting liability costs from ratepayers and stockholders to accident victims and general taxpayers. There are other ways to finance nuclear risks, such as a sinking fund, the removal of the nuclear exclusion in property insurance policies, and annual retrospective assessments per reactors

  6. Organically modified clay removes oil from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When bentonite or other clays and zeolites are modified with quaternary amines, they become organophilic. Such modified bentonites are used to remove mechanically emulsified oil and grease, and other sparingly soluble organics. If the organoclay is granulated, it is placed into a liquid phase carbon filter vessel to remove FOG's and chlorinated hydrocarbons. In this application the clay is mixed with anthrazite to prevent early plugging of the filter by oil or grease droplets. In batch systems a powered organoclay is employed. Types of oil found in water can include fats, lubricants, cutting fluids, heavy hydrocarbons such as tars, grease, crude oil, diesel oils; and light hydrocarbons such as kerosene, jet fuel, and gasoline

  7. Biochemical Capture and Removal of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    We devised an enzyme-based facilitated transport membrane bioreactor system to selectively remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the space station environment. We developed and expressed site-directed enzyme mutants for CO2 capture. Enzyme kinetics showed the mutants to be almost identical to the wild type save at higher pH. Both native enzyme and mutant enzymes were immobilized to different supports including nylons, glasses, sepharose, methacrylate, titanium and nickel. Mutant enzyme could be attached and removed from metal ligand supports and the supports reused at least five times. Membrane systems were constructed to test CO2 selectivity. These included proteic membranes, thin liquid films and enzyme-immobilized teflon membranes. Selectivity ratios of more than 200:1 were obtained for CO2 versus oxygen with CO2 at 0.1%. The data indicate that a membrane based bioreactor can be constructed which could bring CO2 levels close to Earth.

  8. Radium removal from aqueous sulphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for removing radium from an aqueous sulphate solution also containing magnesium is claimed. The pH of the solution is less than 10. A soluble barium salt is added to the solution to precipitate radium as barium radium sulphate. The pH of the solution is then raised to at least 11 to precipitate an insoluble magnesium compound which collects the barium radium sulphate precipitate. The precipitates are separated from the solution. If the sulphate solution contains dissolved magnesium and other impurities at a pH not greater than 7, then the first step in the process involves raising the pH of the solution to a value not greater than 10 to precipitate some of the magnesium and a substantial proportion of the other impurities and separating the precipitate from the solution. The radium removal is a step in the treatment of liquids resulting from the sulphuric acid leaching of uranium ores

  9. Removal of 10-hydroxycarbazepine by plasmapheresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J; Balslev, T; Villadsen, J;

    2001-01-01

    Removal of the oxcarbazepine metabolite 10-hydroxycarbazepine (MHD) by plasmapheresis was evaluated during a series of six plasmaphereses of a 13-year-old boy with Rasmussen encephalitis. Plasmapheresis was performed after steady-state concentrations of MHD had been achieved with a dose of 2550 mg...... oxcarbazepine daily. The mean amount of MHD removed per plasmapheresis was 78.9 mg (SD: 6.0 mg), representing 3% to 4% of the daily oxcarbazepine dose and approximately 5% to 6% of body stores of MHD. The mean steady-state trough MHD concentration was 33.3 mg/L (SD: 1.8 mg/L), and this was remarkably stable...... during the entire plasmapheresis period. The serum concentration of MHD was only mildly reduced by the procedure. The areas under the concentration curve of MHD on the first and sixth day of plasmapheresis were 99% and 94%, respectively, of the pre-plasmapheresis values. The results are in agreement with...

  10. CAREM-25: Residual heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was the definition and consolidation of the residual heat removal system for the CAREM 25 reactor. The function of this system is cool down the primary circuit, removing the core decay heat from hot stand-by to cold shutdown and during refueling. In addition, this system heats the primary water from the cold shutdown condition to hot stand-by condition during the reactor start up previous to criticality. The system has been designed according to the requirements of the standards: ANSI/ANS 51.1 'Nuclear safety criteria for the design of stationary PWR plants'; ANSI/ANS 58.11 'Design criteria for safe shutdown following selected design basis events in light water reactors' and ANSI/ANS 58.9 'Single failure criteria for light water reactor safety-related fluid systems'. The suggested design fulfills the required functions and design criteria standards. (author)

  11. Foreign Body Esophagus: When Endoscopic Removal Fails…

    OpenAIRE

    Shreshtha, Diva; Sikka, Kapil; Singh, Chirom Amit; Thakar, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Aspiration or ingestion of a foreign body has frequently been reported in the pediatric and in the adult population. Among many foreign bodies to be ingested, artificial denture is one to be impacted in the esophagus, especially among the elderly. Radiolucency of dental prosthesis complicates early diagnosis of an impacted or ingested dental prosthesis. Rigid and flexible esophagoscopes have been used to retrieve the foreign body from the esophagus but the need for open surgery to remove the ...

  12. Coherent noise remover for optical projection tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liangliang; Dong, Di; Yang, Yujie; Wang, Jun; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) is a 3-Dimentional (3D) imaging technique for small specimens between 1mm and 10mm in size. Due to its high resolution and whole-body imaging ability, OPT has been widely used for imaging of small specimens such as murine embryos, murine organs, zebra fish, and plant sections. During an OPT imaging experiment, the ring artifacts are very common which severely impact the image quality of OPT. A ring artifact is caused by a bad pixel on the camera, or impurities on surface of lens and index matching vessel. Here we term these noises as coherent noise because they stay in the same image region during an OPT experiment. Currently, there is still no effective method to remove coherent noises. To address this problem, we propose a novel method to suppress the coherent noises before 3D OPT reconstruction. Our method consists of two steps: 1) find bad pixel positions on a blank image without specimen by using threshold segmentation, then fix the bad pixels on the projection image by using average of their neighbor pixels, 2) remove remained coherent noises on the sinogram by using Variational Coherent noise Remover (VSNR) method. After the two steps, lots of method can be used to generate the tomographic slices from the modified sinograms. We apply our method to a mouse heart imaging with our home-made OPT system. The experimental results show that our method has a good suppression on coherent noise and greatly improves the image quality. The innovation of our method is that we remove coherent noise automatically from both projection image and sinogram and they complement each other.

  13. Formaldehyde removal from wastewater applying natural zeolite

    OpenAIRE

    Dovilė Kulikauskaitė; Dainius Paliulis

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is one of the most chemically active compounds which is discharged with untreated or just partially treated industrial wastewater. It is hazardous for environment and humans. Formaldehyde vapors can strongly irritate skin, can cause damage to eyes and harm respiratory tract. As long as formaldehyde causes a toxic effect on environment and living organisms, it is necessary to remove it from wastewater which is directed to natural water. There are many methods used for formaldehyde...

  14. REMOVAL OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FROM SWEDEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Kerry A. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Bellamy, J. Steve [Savannah River National Laboratory; Chandler, Greg T. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Iyer, Natraj C. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of; Koenig, Rich E.; Leduc, D. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Hackney, B. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Leduc, Dan R. [Savannah River National Laboratory

    2013-08-18

    U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Global Threat Reduction (GTRI) recently removed legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in collaboration with AB SVAFO, Sweden. This paper details the activities undertaken through the U.S. receiving site (Savannah River Site (SRS)) to support the characterization, stabilization, packaging and removal of legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in 2012. This effort was undertaken as part of GTRI’s Gap Materials Program and culminated with the successful removal of plutonium from Sweden as announced at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. The removal and shipment of plutonium materials to the United States was the first of its kind under NNSA’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The Environmental Assessment for the U.S. receipt of gap plutonium material was approved in May 2010. Since then, the multi-year process yielded many first time accomplishments associated with plutonium packaging and transport activities including the application of the of DOE-STD-3013 stabilization requirements to treat plutonium materials outside the U.S., the development of an acceptance criteria for receipt of plutonium from a foreign country, the development and application of a versatile process flow sheet for the packaging of legacy plutonium materials, the identification of a plutonium container configuration, the first international certificate validation of the 9975 shipping package and the first intercontinental shipment using the 9975 shipping package. This paper will detail the technical considerations in developing the packaging process flow sheet, defining the key elements of the flow sheet and its implementation, determining the criteria used in the selection of the transport package, developing the technical basis for the package certificate amendment and the reviews with multiple licensing authorities and most importantly integrating the technical activities with the Swedish partners.

  15. Plutonium removal from nitric acid waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purifications operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1.4 (50-100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO (tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer

  16. Automated FingerPrint Background removal: FPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgante Michele

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of a whole-genome physical map has been an essential component of numerous genome projects initiated since the inception of the Human Genome Project. Its usefulness has been proved for whole-genome shotgun projects as a post-assembly validation and recently it has also been used in the assembly step to constrain on BACs positions. Fingerprinting is usually the method of choice for construction of physical maps. A clone fingerprint is composed of true peaks representing real fragments and background peaks, mainly composed of E. coli genomic DNA, partial digestions, star activity by-products, and machine background. High-throughput fingerprinting leads to the production of thousands of BAC clone fingerprints per day. That is why background peaks removal has become an important issue and needs to be automatized, especially in capillary electrophoresis based fingerprints. Results At the moment, the only tools available for such a task are GenoProfiler and its descendant FPMiner. The large variation in the quality of fingerprints that is usually present in large fingerprinting projects represents a major difficulty in the correct removal of background peaks that has only been partially addressed by the methods so far adopted that all require a long manual optimization of parameters. Thus, we implemented a new data-independent tool, FPB (FingerPrint Background removal, suitable for large scale projects as well as mapping of few clones. Conclusion FPB is freely available at http://www.appliedgenomics.org/tools.php. FPB was used to remove the background from all fingerprints of three grapevine physical map projects. The first project consists of about 50,000 fingerprints, the second one consists of about 70,000 fingerprints, and the third one consists of about 45,000 fingerprints. In all cases a successful assembly was built.

  17. Histopathology of submandibular glands removed for sialolithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Marchal, Francis; Kurt, Anne-Marie; Dulguerov, Pavel; Becker, Minerva; Oedman, Micaela Louise; Lehmann, Willy

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical history of 48 consecutive patients who underwent submandibular gland removal for radiologically proven sialolithiasis. The specimens were examined by a pathologist blinded to the clinical data. A histopathologic classification into I of 3 grades was established by evaluating the degrees of atrophy, fibrosis, and inflammation. A correlation between the clinical and pathological variables was sought in order to define clinical variables that would predict abnormal subma...

  18. Endotoxin removal by end-line filters.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhaecke, E; De Muynck, C; Remon, J P; Colardyn, F

    1989-01-01

    Four commonly used end-line filters, one with a charge-modified hydrophilic nylon filter (ELD96; Pall Biomedical Ltd., Portsmouth, United Kingdom), one with an unmodified nylon filter (FAE020; Pall Biomedical), and two with hydrophilic cellulose ester filters (Ivex-HP, Millipore Corp., Bedford, Mass.; Sterifix, Braun-Gelman, Brussels, Belgium), were evaluated for their endotoxin-removing capacity in saline and 5% glucose. Natural endotoxins derived from Escherichia coli 8739 and the lipopolys...

  19. Magnetic chitosan for removal of uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chitosan, an aminopolysaccharide formed for repeated units of D-glucosamine, is a deacetylation product of chitin. It presents favorable ionic properties acting as chelant, being considered a removing ionic of contaminants from water effluents. It has ample bioactivity, that is, is biocompatible, biodegradable, bioadhesive and biosorbent. The chitosan interacts for crosslinked by means of its active groups with other substances, can still coat superparamagnetic materials as magnetite nanoparticles producing one conjugated polymer-magnetite. Superparamagnetic materials are susceptible for the magnetic field, thus these particles can be attracted and grouped by a magnetic field and as they do not hold back the magnetization, they can be disagrouped and reused in processes for removal of contaminants from industrial effluents and waste water. The present work consisted of preparing coated magnetic magnetite particles with chitosan (PMQ). The PMQ powder has showed a magnetic response of intense attraction in the presence of a magnetic field without however becoming magnetic, a typical behavior of superparamagnetic material. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and measurements of magnetization. Its performance of Uranium (VI) adsorption as uranyl species, U022+, was evaluated with regard to the influence of adsorbent dose, speed of agitation, pH, the contact time and had studied the isotherms of adsorption as well as the behavior of desorption using ions of carbonate and oxalate. The optimal pH to the best removal occurred in pH 5 and that the increase of the dose increases the removal, becoming constant above of 20 g.L-1. In the kinetic study the equilibrium was achieved after 20 minutes. The results of equilibrium isotherm agreed well with the Langmuir model, being the maximum adsorption capacity equal 41.7 mg.g-1. In the desorption studies were verified 94% of U022+ recovered with carbonate ion and 49.9% with oxalate ion. (author)

  20. Micropollutant removal by advanced oxidation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Autin, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has been associated to high concentrations found in surface waters and ultimately to the tightening of drinking water regulations. Whilst traditional granular activated carbon filtration or ozone are effective barriers for the large majority of pesticides, new polar pesticides such as clopyralid or metaldehyde are not readily removed by such technologies. The use of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is suggested as an effective alternative...

  1. Magnesium removal in the electrolytic zinc industry

    OpenAIRE

    Booster, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Electrolytic zinc plants need to take measures to control the magnesium content in their process liquors, because the natural magnesium bleed does not balance the input from concentrates. Presently used methods are environmentally unfriendly (due to the production of large amounts of waste gypsum) or expensive. Therefore, an alternative process route is explored in which magnesium is removed from zinc electrolyte by selective precipitation of magnesium fluoride (sellaite). As standard applica...

  2. Intrauterine Device Removal after 22 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Boryri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IUD T380A is one of the most effective, reversible, long term methods of contraception all over the world based on the experience of World Health Organization and our own observation of women who continued to use the IUD beyond 10 years or even longer years. In this article one case of Intrauterine device removal after 22 years is reported without complications and pregnancy.

  3. Preparation of a removable polyurethane encapsulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, B.G.

    1976-08-01

    The preparation of polyurethane encapsulants, based on polyether diol/diisocyanate prepolymers and 1,4-butanediol, which are soluble in several organic solvents, was investigated. Since these materials can be easily removed, repair of electronic circuitry found defective in potted units can be readily accomplished. Polyether diols of varying molecular weights were reacted with toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and methylene diphenylisocyanate (MDI) to produce stable prepolymers. Several properties of both the isocyanate prepolymers and 1,4-butanediol cured polyurethane encapsulants are presented.

  4. Copper removal using electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Amir; Safari, Salman; Yang, Han; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-06-01

    Removal of heavy metal ions such as copper using an efficient and low-cost method with low ecological footprint is a critical process in wastewater treatment, which can be achieved in a liquid phase using nanoadsorbents such as inorganic nanoparticles. Recently, attention has turned toward developing sustainable and environmentally friendly nanoadsorbents to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media. Electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (ENCC), which can be prepared from wood fibers through periodate/chlorite oxidation, has been shown to have a high charge content and colloidal stability. Here, we show that ENCC scavenges copper ions by different mechanisms depending on the ion concentration. When the Cu(II) concentration is low (C0≲200 ppm), agglomerates of starlike ENCC particles appear, which are broken into individual starlike entities by shear and Brownian motion, as evidenced by photometric dispersion analysis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. On the other hand, at higher copper concentrations, the aggregate morphology changes from starlike to raftlike, which is probably due to the collapse of protruding dicarboxylic cellulose (DCC) chains and ENCC charge neutralization by copper adsorption. Such raftlike structures result from head-to-head and lateral aggregation of neutralized ENCCs as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to starlike aggregates, the raftlike structures grow gradually and are prone to sedimentation at copper concentrations C0≳500 ppm, which eliminates a costly separation step in wastewater treatment processes. Moreover, a copper removal capacity of ∼185 mg g(-1) was achieved thanks to the highly charged DCC polyanions protruding from ENCC. These properties along with the biorenewability make ENCC a promising candidate for wastewater treatment, in which fast, facile, and low-cost removal of heavy metal ions is desired most. PMID:25950624

  5. Modeling binder removal in ceramic compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incledon, Matthew L.

    Binder is often added to ceramic systems to provide mechanical strength to the green bodies during processing. The binder removal sequence for an individual system is difficult to predict due to the thermal reaction and mass transport of the volatile products. The objective of this work is to use computational methods to predict the kinetics of binder removal as a function of composition, particle size, pore size and tortuosity, temperature, body size and shape, etc.. The model will be used to predict the composition, temperature, and pore pressure as a function of time, position within the body, and heating sequence parameters. This will provide the ability to predict optimum heating sequences that minimize processing time and energy input while avoiding harmful high internal pressures and temperatures. Since there are many binder systems in use, a few specific cases will be considered. TGA (thermogravimetric analysis) of binders will be used to measure kinetics parameters that are inputs for the computational model. A framework will be developed to assess the binder removal sequence for a binder and ceramic system. The input for the model, computed in COMSOL Multiphysics, will be determined through analysis of TGA weight loss data and green body characterization. A set of tools will be presented that assist in the fitting of the TGA data, including the binder degrading into multiple species, higher order reactions, parallel and series reactions, etc.. The use of these ideas and tools will allow the modeler to better predict the heating sequence required for a ceramic and binder system to successfully remove all binder material.

  6. SMBH accretion and mergers: removing the symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review recent progress in studying accretion flows on to supermassive black holes (SMBH). Much of this removes earlier assumptions of symmetry and regularity, such as aligned and prograde disc rotation. This allows a much richer variety of effects, often because cancellation of angular momentum allows rapid infall. Potential applications include lower SMBH spins allowing faster mass growth and suppressing gravitational-wave reaction recoil in mergers, gas-assisted SMBH mergers, and near-dynamical accretion in galaxy centres. (paper)

  7. Localized coating removal using plastic media blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Howard L.; Wyckoff, Michael G.; Zook, Lee M.

    1988-01-01

    Steps taken to qualify the use of plastic media blasting for safely and effectively removing paint and other coatings from solid rocket booster aluminum structures are described. As a result of the effort, an improvement was made in the design of surface finishing equipment for processing flight hardware, in addition to a potentially patentable idea on improved plastic media composition. The general arrangement of the blast equipment and the nozzle configuration are presented.

  8. Removal and Recovery of Phosphonate Antiscalants

    OpenAIRE

    Boels, L.

    2012-01-01

    In reverse osmosis (RO) desalination processes, the use of phosphonates prevents scaling, thus allowing for a higher product water recovery, which increases the efficiency of the process. However, a major concern associated with their use in RO desalination is the high cost and environmental impacts associated with the discharge of the waste brine or membrane concentrate containing phosphonates. Therefore, technologies are needed that can remove and recover phosphonate antiscalants from membr...

  9. Biological Nutrient Removal in Compact Biofilm Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bassin, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The removal of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus from both domestic and industrial wastewaters is imperative since they potentially harm the environment. One of the main consequences of excessive availability of nitrogen and phosphorus in aquatic ecosystems (freshwater, marine and estuarine) is the overgrowth of algae and other aquatic plants, a phenomenon designated as eutrophication. Algae and aquatic plants induce depletion of oxygen in water basins, resulting in massive death of e...

  10. An adaptive strategy for active debris removal

    OpenAIRE

    White, Adam E.; Lewis, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Many parameters influence the evolution of the near-Earth debris population, including launch, solar, explosion and mitigation activities, as well as other future uncertainties such as advances in space technology or changes in social and economic drivers that effect the utilisation of space activities. These factors lead to uncertainty in the long-term debris population. This uncertainty makes it difficult to identify potential remediation strategies, involving active debris removal (ADR), t...

  11. Research on a Space Debris Removal System

    OpenAIRE

    河本, 聡美; Kawamoto, Satomi; 西田, 信一郎; Shin'ichiro NISHIDA; 木部, 勢至朗; KIBE, SEISHIRO

    2003-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Center has been pursuing a high-priority research program on space environment preservation and utilization technologies since 1998, and is concentrating its efforts on (1) "observation/modeling" to understand the actual debris environment, (2) "protection" to protect space systems from debris impacts, and (3) "mitigation" to suppress the generation of new debris. This paper describes the status of research on a space debris removal system for the mitigation of s...

  12. Radon removal system for indoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removal of radon gas using dynamic adsorption onto charcoal has received attention previously, but the method has not been used in houses because of practical considerations: (1) If the radon were retained long enough to decay away, excessive quantities of charcoal would be required. In addition, the gamma radiation from the decay products of radon would require shielding. (2) If the charcoal were regenerated using current technology, heated air would be required to strip off the radon. This regeneration method would be costly due to the energy requirements; the use of heated indoor air for regeneration followed by exhausting this air to the outdoors, would also depressurize the basement, tending to increase the influx of radon gas. In the work described here, the radon gas in a house's basement airspace is adsorbed onto charcoal; the removal efficiency is independent of the radon concentration at levels found indoors. The charcoal is regenerated by stripping off the radon with unheated outdoor air. If two adsorbent beds are used, one adsorbs radon while the other regenerates. Thus, the device can operate continuously, approaching a pseudo steady-state. A laboratory-scale prototype of this adsorption/stripping system was tested in the laboratory using various charcoals and operating conditions, including extremes of seasonal temperatures and relative humidities. Neither temperature nor relative humidity had a detrimental effect on removal efficiency. Once-through removal efficiencies were as high as 98% after multiple adsorption and stripping cycles. The efficacy of a full-scale system was evaluated in a high-radon house. The radon concentration was reduced by as much as 90%; further field tests will be done soon

  13. Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-18

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation” to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (α-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

  14. Passive decay heat removal during shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During shutdown the decay heat in commercial Boiling Water Reactors is removed from the core region by active and redundant pump/heat exchanger-systems which are, in addition, supported by emergency power. To study the capability of the newly developed emergency condensers to remove energy produced within the core region to a large water pool outside the Reactor Pressure Vessel by natural convection, a related test in the NOKO facility as performed. The pressure vessel in the NOKO facility has been flooded above the inlet line to the emergency condenser and heated up to about 100 deg. C. The natural circulation resulted in a cool down of the water within the pressure vessel. With two specially designed grids equipped with up to 12 thermocouples the temperature fields in two cross sections were measured: no plume-effect was identified. The vertical temperature profile was measured with thermocouples. The test showed that decay heat could be removed some time after scram to an outside pool by natural convection processes: the time after scram depends on the emergency condenser heat exchange area. (author)

  15. Some techniques for sodium removal in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the experiment and application on sodium removal and sodium disposal are presented. Steam-nitrogen process was used in CIAE for cleaning cold traps, sodium vapor traps, a sodium tank. Atomized water-nitrogen process was used for cleaning dummy fuel assembly for CEFR and a sintered stainless steel filter. Sprinkle process was used for cleaning some tubes. Bultylcellosolve was used for cleaning sintered stainless steel filter and sodium flow measurement device. Ethanol alcohol was used for cleaning electromagnetic pump. Paraffin, transformer-oil or their mixture was used for cleaning sodium valves, a sodium vapor trap and sodium-potassium alloy absorber. A small sintered stainless steel filter was distillated in vacuum. A simple sodium disposal device has been served for several years in CIA.E. It can dispose about 10 Kg sodium each time and the disposal process is no-aerosol. It operates in open air for non-radioactive sodium. In recent years a small sodium cleaning plant has been built. It can use atomized water, steam or organic alcohol to removal of sodium. The LAVEL cleaning plant and SLAPSO cleaning plant were introduced from Italy. And CEFR preliminary design on sodium cleaning for spent fuel assembly and on sodium removal-decontamination for large reactor components is introduced. Vapour-nitrogen process is planned to use in them. (author)

  16. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Elena Pascu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering bothlocal economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption methods have been applied to determine metals content in accordance to reports of National Water Agency from Romania (ANAR. Every water source contains dissolved or particulate compounds. The concentrations of these compounds can affect health, productivity, compliance requirements, or serviceability and cannot be economically removed by conventional filtration means. In this study, we made a comparison between the electrochemical and adsorption methods (using membranes. Both methods have been used to evaluate the efficiency of iron and manganese removal at various times and temperatures. We used two membrane types: composite and cellulose, respectively. Different approaches, including lowering the initial current density and increasing the initial pH were applied. Reaction kinetics was achieved using mathematical models: Jura and Temkin.

  17. Removal of aluminium from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminium in drinking water comes from natural sources and the alum used as coagulant in the water treatment process. Exposure to aluminium has been implicated in dialysis dementia, Parkinson and Alzheimer's disease. Drinking water containing aluminium was considered to be one of the main sources of Al intake into human body. For this reason, the removal of aluminium from drinking water is vital to our health. In this study, removal of aluminium was carried out by using a chelating resin. To achieve the purpose, two chelating resin iontosorb oxin (IO) and poly hydroxamic acid (PHA) were used. The effects of concentration, pH, stirring time and resin amount was investigated. The concentration range varied between 10 and 500 ppb, pH range was between 2 and 12, stirring time between 5 and 60 minutes, and resin amount between 100 and 1500 mg. The optimum conditions of these resins were determined in a batch system. The results obtained showed that the optimum condition to remove aluminium for poly hydroxamic acid and iontosorb was pH 5-8 and pH 4-9; concentration range between 50-500 ppb, and 150-500 ppb, resin amount 200 mg and the stirring time was 20 minutes, respectively. (author)

  18. Vanadium removal from petroleum refinery wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurdogan, Y. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Meyer, C.L. [Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Although a numerical effluent limit has not been proposed for vanadium, San Francisco Bay Area refineries have been investigating reasonable source control and treatment measures to limit the discharge of vanadium as part of their National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements because vanadium may contribute to aquatic toxicity. The NPDES permit issued for the Shell Martinez Manufacturing Complex (MMC) by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (CRWQCB) required that in the investigation of control strategies for vanadium, consideration must be given to source control measures that would reduce the discharge to the extent practicable. This paper summarizes the results of bench- and pilot-scale studies to remove vanadium from process effluent of the Shell MMC. This study has resulted in the following conclusions: vanadium in the Shell MMC refinery wastewater is generated by two major sources--the Flexicoker and Stretford processes; ferric and ferrous salts are both effective in removing vanadium from wastewaters; there are tradeoffs between the initial vanadium concentration, the final pH, and the final dissolved vanadium concentration, for both ferrous and ferric reagents; recycle of iron hydroxide sludge can reduce the amount of reagent needed to attain a given vanadium concentration; other things being equal, less ferric than ferrous reagent is required to produce the same removal of vanadium; the dewatered sludge from the pilot plant was tested for its hazardous waste characteristics; a high pH sludge regeneration and reuse process appears to be a promising method of cleaning up the hazardous iron sludge.

  19. How to remove an endotracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credland, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Rationale and key points The decision to remove an endotracheal tube (extubation) is taken when the patient achieves adequate airway control. This requires an effective cough and an acceptable level of consciousness. Practitioners should be able to identify when a patient is ready for endotracheal tube removal and to recognise contraindications and potential complications. ▶ The Glasgow Coma Scale should be used to assess the patient's level of consciousness. Extubation should not be performed on patients with a score of 8 or less. ▶ The patient is suitable for endotracheal tube removal if their peak expiratory flow rate is more than 60L/minute. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How you think this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an endotracheal tube. 2. How this article could be used to educate your colleagues. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:27154118

  20. Adherent Raindrop Modeling, Detectionand Removal in Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shaodi; Tan, Robby T; Kawakami, Rei; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    Raindrops adhered to a windscreen or window glass can significantly degrade the visibility of a scene. Modeling, detecting and removing raindrops will, therefore, benefit many computer vision applications, particularly outdoor surveillance systems and intelligent vehicle systems. In this paper, a method that automatically detects and removes adherent raindrops is introduced. The core idea is to exploit the local spatio-temporal derivatives of raindrops. To accomplish the idea, we first model adherent raindrops using law of physics, and detect raindrops based on these models in combination with motion and intensity temporal derivatives of the input video. Having detected the raindrops, we remove them and restore the images based on an analysis that some areas of raindrops completely occludes the scene, and some other areas occlude only partially. For partially occluding areas, we restore them by retrieving as much as possible information of the scene, namely, by solving a blending function on the detected partially occluding areas using the temporal intensity derivative. For completely occluding areas, we recover them by using a video completion technique. Experimental results using various real videos show the effectiveness of our method. PMID:26485475

  1. Candidal Leukoplakia on Patient with Removable Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiril Paskalis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida infection is a common problem in patients using removable dentures, with the most frequent type is denture stomatitis. But other type of candidal infection could also happen in these patients, such as candidal leukoplakia. We reported a 61 years old female patient who complained a painful lesion under her lower removable denture. Oral examination revealed white plaque that could not be rubbed over an ulcer on the lingual part of alveolar processes under the lower removable denture plate, and also an erythematous area on palatum durum above the upper full denture. The patient was suspected to have candidal leukoplakia on the lingual part of the mandible and denture stomatitis on the palate area. The treatment consisted of nystatin oral suspension, chlorhexidine solution, multivitamins, along with denture replacement and oral health education. The entire lesion resolved within 2 months therapy. Candidal infection treatment on denture patient needs not only medication or denture replacement, but also patient compliance to achieve maximal result.

  2. Removal of haloacetic acids by nanofiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHALATIP Ratasuk; CHAWALIT Ratanatamskul; NOPAWAN Ratasuk

    2009-01-01

    Haloacetic acids, disinfection byproducts (DBP) formed during drinking water chlorination process are carcinogens. The efficacy of nanofiltration (NF) was examined for the removal of five regulated haloacetic acids (HAA5): chloro-, dichloro-, and trichloroacetic acid (CAA, DCAA, and TCAA); bromo-, and dibromoacetic acid (BAA, and DBAA) in synthetic water. NF with the dense negatively charged membrane (ES 10), is the most efficient in removing HAA5 than the loose negatively charged membrane (NTR 7410) and neutral surface membrane (NTR 729HF), due to the greater electrostatic repulsion (Donan exclusion) and sieve effect. Excellent HAA5 removal efficiency of 90%--100% could be obtained even at a low pressure of 1×105 Pa with ES 10. Changes in cross-flow velocity did not effect the performance of membranes with a small pore size such as ES 10 and NTR 729HF. The increase in HAA5 concentration exhibited the adverse effect on the performance of three membranes by strengthening the concentration polarization, which was the driving force for the diffusion of HAA anions across the membrane.

  3. Removing the remaining ridges in fingerprint segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU En; ZHANG Jian-ming; YIN Jian-ping; ZHANG Guo-min; HU Chun-feng

    2006-01-01

    Fingerprint segmentation is an important step in fingerprint recognition and is usually aimed to identify non-ridge regions and unrecoverable low quality ridge regions and exclude them as background so as to reduce the time expenditure of image processing and avoid detecting false features. In high and in low quality ridge regions, often are some remaining ridges which are the afterimages of the previously scanned finger and are expected to be excluded from the foreground. However, existing segmentation methods generally do not take the case into consideration, and often, the remaining ridge regions are falsely classified as foreground by segmentation algorithm with spurious features produced erroneously including unrecoverable regions as foreground. This paper proposes two steps for fingerprint segmentation aimed at removing the remaining ridge region from the foreground. The non-ridge regions and unrecoverable low quality ridge regions are removed as background in the first step, and then the foreground produced by the first step is further analyzed for possible remove of the remaining ridge region. The proposed method proved effective in avoiding detecting false ridges and in improving minutiae detection.

  4. Resist residue removal using UV ozone treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Fang; Chang, Ching-Yu; Ku, Yao-Ching

    2010-04-01

    In a conventional lithography process, the resist pattern is removed by dry strip or wet chemical etch. The wet chemical etch includes sulfuric peroxide etch and solvent etch. The wet chemical etch process is always combined with the dry strip process to meet the residue process spec. However, in some applications, only the wet-etch process can be used to avoid substrate damage during the plasma step. However, organic residue can be found from particle surface scan and TGA/DSC after normal solvent strip. In this paper, we investigate polymer residue stripping using only solvent as well as solvent in combination with UV treatment. For solvents only, some solvents different from the conventional PGMEA/PGME mixture in polarity, also exhibited stripping ability but the efficiency is not as good as PGME/PGMEA mixture. When supplemented with UV treatment, the organic residue can be further decomposed and removed completely. The UV we used contains 185nm and 254nm wavelengths. Ozone is generated during UV exposure and acts as oxidant. The organic residue is thus decomposed and removed. It has been proven as an effective method to cleave the C-C bond without damaging the wafer substrate. The organic residue on the wafer surface can be easily stripped away under UV-ozone exposure. Its defect performance is also discussed in this paper.

  5. Removal of mercury from water using pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous study, the sorption of radiocobalt by powdered pottery materials was investigated. The use of these materials as immobilization matrix for liquid radioactive waste requires the employment of pottery vessels. Therefore, the present study aims to give detailed investigations of the decontamination of radionuclides and toxic elements using pottery containers. These investigations are equally useful to elucidate how far these vessels can be utilized for water purification through decontamination of toxic and heavy metals. The radionuclide or heavy metal removal capability using pottery pots, as low cost sorbents, has been investigated for both radioactive (203Hg) and stable mercury. The results indicated that Hg2+ is better removed by pottery from neutral to alkaline solutions. The capacity of the used pottery container (100 ml in volume) for complete removal of mercury was found to reach 3 x 10-4 mol/l, and the time needed was 8 hours. The sorption process was suggested to occur via adsorption and ion exchange. The effect of presence of humic or fulvic acid, as ligands abundant in water, is also investigated. The results imply that, in absence of humic or fulvic acid the sorption follows the expected behaviour, i.e. sorption sites with similar affinity for mercury. In presence of humic or fulvic acid, additional sorption sites are available by the organic molecule when it is associated to the pottery. (orig.)

  6. Tattoo removal in the typical adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzoleni Francesco F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although popular tattoos are often regretted later on for different reasons. Nevertheless, tattoo removal is a complicated and costly procedure seldom providing satisfactory results. The aim of this study was to investigate the awareness of the implications of tattoo removal among a substantial sample of Italian secondary school adolescents. Findings Students were recruited by a stratified convenience sample and surveyed by a self administered questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was performed, reporting adjusted Odds Ratios (OR, with 95% Confidence Interval (CI. 4,277 pupils returned a usable questionnaire. Piercings were more frequently undertaken than tattoos. Only 40% of the respondents were aware of the issues related to tattoo removal. Males and pupils with younger fathers were less likely to be aware, whereas students satisfied with their physical appearance and those with a positive attitude towards body art were more likely to be aware. Conclusions Male adolescents with younger fathers can be regarded as the ideal target of corporate health education programs driven by school counsellors and primary care physicians.

  7. Comparative evaluation of nitrate removal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the extensive application of artificial nitrogen-based fertilizers and animal manure on land, many water agencies face problems of increasing concentrations of nitrate in groundwater. The contamination of groundwater by nitrate may pose a significant public health problem. The threat of methemoglobinemia is well documented and reflected in the U.S. drinking water standard of 10 mg/L as nitrate-nitrogen. Approximately 45% of Saskatchewan's population use groundwater for drinking purposes, out of which, approximately 23% (230,000) are rural residents. The water used is made available from over 48,000 privately owned wells in regions where there is an extensive application of chemical fertilizers. Biological denitrification, ion exchange and reveres osmosis (RO) processes were selected for further study. Field studies were conducted on these processes. The sulfur/limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) process was selected to achieve biological removal of nitrate from groundwater. The feasibility of the system was evaluated under anaerobic conditions. An ion exchange study was conducted using Ionac A554 which is strong anion exchange resins. In the case of groundwater containing low sulfate concentrations, A554 offered high nitrate removal. However, the disposal of regenerant brine can be a problem. A reverse osmosis unit with Filmtec membrane elements (FT30-Element Family) was used in the study on nitrate removal. The unit effluent average nitrate concentration was less than the maximum allowable concentration. (author)

  8. Removal of lactobionic acid by electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Severo Júnior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactobionic acid has a number of applications, such as in cosmetic formulations and detergents, as well as in the medical field, where it is used for the preservation of organs destined for transplantation. Previous studies have reported that a promising alternative procedure for the production of lactobionic acid is the biotechnological route, using permeabilized cells of Zymomonas mobilis to produce sorbitol and lactobionic acid from fructose and lactose. However, the acid produced during the process accumulates in the reaction medium, causing enzyme deactivation. It was found that this problem can be avoided by coupling an electrodialysis unit to the reaction vessel, resulting in efficient removal of the acid from the reaction medium and improved the stability of the enzyme. These tests employed a synthetic mixture containing lactobionic acid, sorbitol, lactose, and fructose, and a factorial design was performed to identify the most influential variables. The NaCl concentration in the concentrate stream, together with the potential difference, exerted the greatest effects on the rate of removal of lactobionic acid. In all experiments, the removal efficiency exceeded 95%. The best conditions for the system investigated were a potential of 60 V, and NaCl concentrations of 3 and 25 g L-1 in the concentrate stream and the electrode compartment, respectively.

  9. Tritium removing method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A part of cleaned gases introduced from the exit of an adsorber is used for regeneration of the adsorbent which removes tritium water by processing gases to be cleaned, and off-gases are dehydrated and joined with the gases to be cleaned before compression. Further, the exits of a plurality of adsorbers for the cleaned gases are in communication with each other by a regenerated gas supply channel having a heater, and a circulation channel is disposed for circulating the regenerated gases on the suction side of the compressor by way of a cooling dehydration device. Then, it is not necessary to prepare exclusive gases for regeneration, and in the regeneration system, only heating to the temperature for regeneration is sufficient for cleaned gases. Further, regenerated gases can be introduced only by switching of adsorption and removing steps and by operating valves for regeneration and, in addition, gases after regeneration are circulated after joining to the gases to be cleaned. Accordingly, it is not necessary to completely remove tritium water upon dehydration treatment and cold trap is also unnecessary. (N.H.)

  10. Nutrient release, recovery and removal from waste sludge of a biological nutrient removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Pei, Li-Ying; Ke, Li; Peng, Dang-Cong; Xia, Si-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of nutrients from waste sludge results in nitrogen and phosphorus overloading in wastewater treatment plants when supernatant is returned to the inlet. A controlled release, recovery and removal of nutrient from the waste sludge of a Biological Nutrient Removal system (BNR) are investigated. Results showed that the supernatant was of high mineral salt, high electrical conductivity and poor biodegradability, in addition to high nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations after the waste sludge was hydrolysed through sodium dodecyl sulphate addition. Subsequently, over 91.8% of phosphorus and 10.5% of nitrogen in the supernatants were extracted by the crystallization method under the conditions of 9.5 pH and 400 rpm. The precipitate was mainly struvite according to X-ray diffraction and morphological examination. A multistage anoxic-oxic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) was then adopted to remove the residual carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the supernatant. The MBBR exhibited good performance in simultaneously removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus under a short aeration time, which accounted for 31.25% of a cycle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that nitrifiers presented mainly in floc, although higher extracellular polymeric substance content, especially DNA, appeared in the biofilm. Thus, a combination of hydrolysis and precipitation, followed by the MBBR, can complete the nutrient release from the waste sludge of a BNR system, recovers nutrients from the hydrolysed liquor and removes nutrients from leftovers effectively. PMID:25176308

  11. New underground treatment installation for radium removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For removal of radium from saline waters a method of purification has been developed and implemented in full technical scale in one of Polish coal mines several years ago. The purification station in Piast Colliery was unique, the first underground installation for the removal of radium isotopes from saline waters. Very good results have been achieved - approximately 6 m3/min of radium-bearing waters were treated there, more than 100 MBq of 226Ra and 228Ra remained underground each day. Purification has been started in 1999, therefore a lot of experiences have been gathered during this period. Since year 2002, a new purification station has been under the construction in another colliery - Ziemowit. The preparation of water galleries, feeding station, pumping station etc. has been finished at the end of 2005. In February 2006, the purification of mine waters was started in this mine, at the level -650 meters. Barium chloride is used as a cleaning agent, and amount of water to be purified is larger as in the Piast mine - reaching 9 m3/min., although concentration of radium isotopes is lower. After several months from the start-up of the installation, results of purification are excellent. The removal efficiency is higher than 95%, enabling decrease of radium concentration below 0.5 kBq/m3, while before purification the summary concentration of 226Ra and 228Ra exceeded 9 kBq/m3. Sediments with enhanced radioactivity are settled in the sedimentation galleries, without any contact with the crew or ventilation air. Only an increase of gamma dose rate near the installation is observed due to scaling of radium-barium sulphates in the canal, leading from the installation to the sedimentation galleries. In the paper short description of the installation, results of purification in the start-up period and effects for the environment are presented. (author)

  12. Mobile Tritium Removal Facility - an affordable option?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium removal facilities are only likely to be an issue when CANDU plants have matured and the increasing tritium levels in the water have become intolerable from a personnel health physics perspective. Even then some station owners claim that a Tritium removal facility is unnecessary, because improved health physics performance and practices is all that is required to protect against possible personnel exposure. To support this argument it is also true to say that the tritium accumulation does stabilize, and will reach a stage where the tritium content will no longer increase. However for station owners that support the view that they follow an ALARA principle in which only the lowest level achievable is acceptable, a tritium extraction plant when the plant is new or one built later when the plant is operating and in mid life, both have arguments to support the expense. For a CANDU reactor in mid-life, there are two options for siting the Tritium Removal Facility (TRF): Stationary Option which will require permanent structures for each station; and, Mobile Option which considers a complete TRF that can be moved from station to station. In most existing CANDU-6 stations, no provisions have been made to construct and operate a TRF. This would make the Stationary Option costly because space would have to be provided and newly added infrastructure would have to be installed. With appropriate seismic qualification and following the necessary codes and standards, a Mobile TRF unit could be more cost effective, particularly if there were a possibility to share the unit with other stations in like position. (author)

  13. Seawater bicarbonate removal during hydrothermal circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskurowski, G. K.; Seewald, J.; Sylva, S. P.; Reeves, E.; Lilley, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    High temperature fluids sampled at hydrothermal vents represent a complex alteration product of water-rock reactions on a multi-component mixture of source fluids. Sources to high-temperature hydrothermal samples include the 'original' seawater present in the recharge limb of circulation, magmatically influenced fluids added at depth as well as any seawater entrained during sampling. High-temperature hydrothermal fluids are typically enriched in magmatic volatiles, with CO2 the dominant species, characterized by concentrations of 10's-100's of mmol/kg (1, 2). Typically, the high concentration of CO2 relative to background seawater bicarbonate concentrations (~2.3 mmol/kg) obscures a full analysis of the fate of seawater bicarbonate during high-temperature hydrothermal circulation. Here we present data from a suite of samples collected over the past 15 years from high-temperature hydrothermal vents at 9N, Endeavour, Lau Basin, and the MAR that have endmember CO2 concentrations less than 10 mmol/kg. Using stable and radiocarbon isotope measurements these samples provide a unique opportunity to examine the balance between 'original' seawater bicarbonate and CO2 added from magmatic sources. Multiple lines of evidence from multiple hydrothermal settings consistently points to the removal of ~80% of the 'original' 2.3 mmol/kg seawater bicarbonate. Assuming that this removal occurs in the low-temperature, 'recharge' limb of hydrothermal circulation, this removal process is widely occurring and has important contributions to the global carbon cycle over geologic time. 1. Lilley MD, Butterfield DA, Lupton JE, & Olson EJ (2003) Magmatic events can produce rapid changes in hydrothermal vent chemistry. Nature 422(6934):878-881. 2. Seewald J, Cruse A, & Saccocia P (2003) Aqueous volatiles in hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: temporal variability following earthquake activity. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 216(4):575-590.

  14. Platform Removal Observer Program Databases from 1987-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Platform Removal Observer Program Data Underwater explosives are frequently used in the removal of oil and gas platforms. Since 1987, federal regulations required...

  15. Study on diverse passive decay heat removal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important principles for nuclear safety is the decay heat removal in accidents. Passive decay heat removal systems are extremely helpful to enhance the safety. In currently design of many advanced nuclear reactors, kinds of passive systems are proposed or developed, such as the passive residual heat removal system, passive injection system, passive containment cooling system. These systems provide entire passive heat removal paths from core to ultimate heat sink. Various kinds of passive systems for decay heat removal are summarized; their common features or differences on heat removal paths and design principle are analyzed. It is found that, these passive decay heat removal paths are similarly common on and connected by several basic heat transfer modes and steps. By the combinations or connections of basic modes and steps, new passive decay heat removal approach or diverse system can be proposed. (authors)

  16. Is Ovary Removal Tied to Colon Cancer Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. Often, an oophorectomy is done to treat ovarian cysts, Gaudet explained. But some women have them removed to lower their risk of ovarian cancer -- including women who carry the BRCA gene ...

  17. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  18. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal employing EDTA disodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinova, D.; Velkova, R. [Higher Inst. of Chemical Technology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    The biological phosphorus removal is a promising alternative to the conventional chemical technologies for processing of phosphate raw materials. The object of this study was the effect of EDTA disodium on the biotreatment of tunisian phosphorite with the strain of Aspergillus niger. The incubation was carried out in two nutritive mediums, with different phosphate content. The experimental results showed that the additives of EDTA disodium in the nutritive medium increased the rate of extraction of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and shortened significantly the time for biological leaching. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. ADHMN boundary conditions from removing monopoles

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xingang; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2002-01-01

    Boundary conditions play an important role in the ADHMN construction of BPS monopole solutions. In this paper we show how different types of boundary conditions can be related to each other by removing monopoles to spatial infinity. In particular, we use this method to show how the jumping data naturally emerge. The results can be interpreted in the D-brane picture and provide a better understanding of the derivation of the ADHMN construction from D-branes. We comment briefly on the cases wit...

  20. MICROBIAL REMOVAL OF HEAVY METALS FROM WASTEWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Koc-Jurczyk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization and urbanization result in increase of heavy metals released into the environment (soil, lakes, rivers, seas, oceans, groundwater. Studies on biosorption of heavy metals are aimed to specify types of microorganisms which could efficiently bind metals. This approach has a very important significance for both slowing down metals exploitation by recovery, and also reduction of environmental pollution by decrease of their excessive concentration. Recent studies have reported about the capabilities of fungi, algae, yeasts, bacteria, waste and agricultural residues or materials containing chitosan derived from crustacean shells as a biosorbents. Biohydrometallurgy could be considered as a new “green” technology of heavy metals removal from wastewater.

  1. Removal of phosphorus from livestock effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szogi, Ariel A; Vanotti, Matias B

    2009-01-01

    For removal of phosphorus (P) from swine liquid manure before land application, we developed a treatment process that produces low P effluents and a valuable P by-product with minimal chemical addition and ammonia losses. The new wastewater process included two sequential steps: (i) biological nitrification and (ii) increasing the pH of the nitrified wastewater to precipitate P. We hypothesized that by reduction of inorganic buffers (NH(4)(+) and carbonate alkalinity) via nitrification, P could be selectively removed by subsequent hydrated lime [Ca(OH)(2)] addition. The objective of the study was to assess if this new treatment could consistently reduce inorganic buffer capacity with varied initial concentrations of N (100-723 mg NH(4)(+) L(-1)), P (26-85 mg TP L(-1)), and alkalinity (953-3063 mg CaCO(3) L(-1)), and then efficiently remove P from swine lagoon liquid. The process was tested with surface lagoon liquids from 10 typical swine farms in North Carolina. Each lagoon liquid received treatment in a nitrification bioreactor, followed by chemical treatment with Ca(OH)(2) at Ca rates of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 mmol L(-1) to precipitate P. This configuration was compared with a control that received the same Ca rates but without the nitrification pretreatment. The new process significantly reduced >90% the inorganic buffers concentrations compared with the control and prevented ammonia losses. Subsequent lime addition resulted in efficient pH increase to > or = 9.5 for optimum P precipitation in the nitrified liquid and significant reduction of effluent total P concentration versus the control. With this new process, the total P concentration in treated liquid effluent can be adjusted for on-farm use with up to >90% of P removal. The recovered solid Ca phosphate material can be easily exported from the farm and reused as P fertilizer. Therefore, the new process can be used to reduce the P content in livestock effluents to levels that would diminish problems of

  2. System to remove particles from a gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described to remove particles from a fast flowing gas in which deep-bed filter elements are used (fibre mats in which particles are deposited). It works well with flow rates between 50.8 cm/s and 76.2 cm/s even at temperatures over 2600C and in corrosive surroundings. The filter is cleaned by passing a gas flow in reverse direction whilst simultaneously vibrating the filter. The temperature- and corrosion-resistant fibre mass preferably has a graded packing density. The equipment described in detail is relatively small and is suitable for small, compact filtration units. (HP)

  3. Boron Removal in Seawater Reverse Osmosis System

    KAUST Repository

    Rahmawati, Karina

    2011-07-01

    Reverse osmosis successfully proves to remove more than 99% of solute in seawater, providing fresh water supply with satisfied quality. Due to some operational constraints, however, some trace contaminants removal, such as boron, cannot be achieved in one pass system. The stringent criterion for boron from World Health Organization (WHO) and Saudi Arabia local standard (0.5 mg/l) is hardly fulfilled by single pass sea water reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants. Some design processes have been proposed to deal with boron removal, but they are not economically efficient due to high energy and chemical consumption. The objective of this study was to study boron removal by different reverse osmosis membranes in two pH conditions, with and without antiscalant addition. Thus, it was expected to observe the possibility of operating single pass system and necessity to operate two pass system using low energy membrane. Five membrane samples were obtained from two different manufacturers. Three types of feed water pH were used, pH 8, pH 10, and pH 10 with antiscalant addition. Experiment was conducted in parallel to compare membrane performance from two manufacturers. Filtration was run with fully recycle mode for three days. Sample of permeate and feed were taken every 12 hours, and analyzed for their boron and TDS concentration. Membrane samples were also tested for their surface charge. The results showed that boron rejection increases as the feed pH increases. This was caused by dissociation of boric acid to negatively charged borate ion and more negatively charged membrane surface at elevated pH which enhance boron rejection. This study found that single pass reverse osmosis system, with and without elevating the pH, may not be possible to be applied because of two reasons. First, permeate quality in term of boron, does not fulfill WHO and local Saudi Arabia regulations. Second, severe scaling occurs due to operation in alkaline condition, since Ca and Mg concentration are

  4. Site development interim removable dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquinelli, Kirk L; Sze, Alexander J; Matosian, Alex J

    2016-07-01

    Transitioning a patient with partial edentulism through hard and soft tissue grafting to an implant restoration with an interim removable dental prosthesis (IRDP) presents a challenge to the restorative dentist. The management of grafted sites requires care, and without the appropriate design, an IRDP may impede surgical outcomes and place the graft at risk for displacement or necrosis. A site development IRDP (SDIRDP) for a grafted site must fulfill restorative goals and promote the surgical objectives for site development. A technique is described for fabricating an SDIRDP that facilitates surgical procedures and maintains prosthetic goals. PMID:26831920

  5. BOA: Pipe asbestos insulation removal robot system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee

  6. Profound bradycardia associated with NIV removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, C.; Bourke, S.C.; Gibson, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    A patient with lower-limb onset ALS presented with a one-month history of vasovagal episodes and a one-week history of cough productive of green sputum and lethargy. She was drowsy and in acute on chronic type-two respiratory failure. She responded to non-invasive ventilation, however she suffered recurrent episodes of profound bradycardia on removal of the mask, which gradually resolved over ten days. We have reviewed the literature and offer a potential explanation for these events. PMID:26057781

  7. Research on removal of radioiodine by charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major R and D work carried out in the CIRP laboratory on removal of radioiodine is introduced, which involves the adsorption performances of various kinds of fruit shell base and coal base charcoal impregnated with chemicals, the influence of various parameters, the technique of non-destructive test for commercial scale iodine adsorber, and the iodine samplers for both gross iodine and iodine in different forms. The experimental results have been applied to the design and test of iodine adsorber and the monitoring of airborne radioiodine

  8. Removal of Duodenum Elicits GLP-1 Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Mezza, Teresa; Prioletta, Annamaria; Sorice, Gian Pio; Clemente, Gennaro; Sarno, Gerardo; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Holst, Jens J; Giaccari, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of removal of the duodenum on the complex interplay between incretins, insulin, and glucagon in nondiabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS For evaluation of hormonal secretion and insulin sensitivity, 10 overweight patients without type 2 diabetes (age 61 ± 19.3 years and BMI 27.9 ± 5.3 kg/m2) underwent a mixed-meal test and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp before and after pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for ampulloma. RESULTS All patients ...

  9. Removal Water Turbidity by Crumb Rubber Media

    OpenAIRE

    Abeer I. Alwared; Muna Yousif Abdul-Ahad; Abbas H. Sulaymon

    2014-01-01

    The removal of water turbidity by using crumb rubber filter was investigated .The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of variation of influent water turbidity (10, 25 and 50 NTU), media size (0.6and 1.14mm), filtration rate (25, 45 and 65 l/hr) and bed depth (30 and 60 cm) on the performance of mono crumb rubber filter in response to the effluent filtered water turbidity and head loss development, and compare it with that of conventional sand filter. Results revealed that 25 l/...

  10. Innovative techniques for removing concrete surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report centers on the use of heat to decompose contaminated concrete to facilitate its removal. It discusses the use of electrical resistance heating and induction heating to cause differential expansion between the reinforcing steel and the concrete in order to spall the concrete. It introduces the concept of using induction heating to both decompose and spall steel impregnated concrete, acknowledging the work of Charles H. Henager in this field. The techniques are offered as theoretical and untested possibilities. Their practical application depends upon the effectiveness of alternatives and upon further development of these concepts

  11. Compositions and methods for removal of toxic metals and radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuero, Raul G. (Inventor); McKay, David S. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for the removal of toxic metals or radionuclides from source materials. Toxic metals may be removed from source materials using a clay, such as attapulgite or highly cationic bentonite, and chitin or chitosan. Toxic metals may also be removed using volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitin or chitosan. Radionuclides may be removed using volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitin or chitosan.

  12. Rapid and Effective Removal of Perfluorooctanoic Acid from Proteomics Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Kadiyala, Chandra Sekhar Rao; Mullangi, Vennela; Zhou, Xiang; Vukoti, Krishna M.; Miyagi, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a volatile surfactant, is as effective as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at solubilizing membrane proteins. PFOA can be removed by repeated evaporation prior to mass spectrometry analysis. However, removal of PFOA by evaporation is a lengthy process that takes approximately 6 hrs. Toward the goal of decreasing the length of time required to remove PFOA from protein digests, we tested the efficiency of PFOA removal and subsequent pepti...

  13. In vitro evaluation of a novel biofilm remover

    OpenAIRE

    Hofer, D.; Meier, A; Sener, B.; Guggenheim, B; Attin, T.; Schmidlin, P.R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a novel device for its efficacy in removing experimental biofilm from root surfaces and its potential for concomitantly removing/roughening the surface substance. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A novel acrylic rotary device (biofilm remover, BR) was tested in vitro in three experiments: surface loss, surface roughness [positive controls: Perioset (PS) and Proxoshape (PR)] and biofilm removal [positive controls: ultrasonic (US) and PS]. Surface loss/surface roughness was eval...

  14. Asbestos removal: Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project: Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This topical report is a synopsis of the asbestos insulation removal performed at the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP). The information is provided, as a part of the Technology Transfer Program, to document the removal of asbestos insulation at a nuclear power station decommissioning project. The report covers the scope of work, regulations, engineering decisions, removal methods, lessons learned, and summaries from the detailed data base including manhours, asbestos removal volumes, radiation exposures, and asbestos airborne concentrations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  15. 5 CFR 359.405 - Removal: Reduction in force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removal: Reduction in force. 359.405... Appointees During Probation § 359.405 Removal: Reduction in force. (a) Coverage. This section covers the removal of a career appointee from the SES during the probationary period under a reduction in force....

  16. Removal of radionuclides by analcime-bearing rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the removal of radionuclides (uranium, radium and thorium) in static conditions from aqueous solutions by analcime-bearing rocks and pure analcime was carried out. The high removal efficiency of all studied radionuclides by analcime-bearing rocks was determined. Analcime was efficient in removing of thorium only

  17. Activated biochar removes 100% dibromochloropropane from field well water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activated biochar was produced from almond shells and used in the field to remove dibromochloropropane from a municipal water well. The activated biochar removed 100% of the contaminant for approximately three months and continued to remove it to below treatment standards for an additional three mon...

  18. Benchmarking Biological Nutrient Removal in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of different model assumptions when describing biological nutrient removal (BNR) by the activated sludge models (ASM) 1, 2d & 3. The performance of a nitrogen removal (WWTP1) and a combined nitrogen and phosphorus removal (WWTP2) benchmark wastewater treatment plant...

  19. 22 CFR 40.91 - Certain aliens previously removed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain aliens previously removed. 40.91... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Aliens Previously Removed § 40.91 Certain aliens previously removed. (a) 5-year bar. An alien who has been found inadmissible, whether as a...

  20. 30 CFR 57.12036 - Fuse removal or replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuse removal or replacement. 57.12036 Section 57.12036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12036 Fuse removal or replacement. Fuses shall not be removed...

  1. 30 CFR 56.12036 - Fuse removal or replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuse removal or replacement. 56.12036 Section 56.12036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... § 56.12036 Fuse removal or replacement. Fuses shall not be removed or replaced by hand in an...

  2. 27 CFR 19.381 - Removals from processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Manufacture of Articles Bottling, Packaging, and Removal of Products § 19.381 Removals from processing... transfer in bond to a bonded wine cellar or to another distilled spirits plant. However, wine may not be removed from the bonded premises of a distilled spirits plant for consumption or sale as wine. Spirits...

  3. 36 CFR 262.13 - Removal of obstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Removal of obstructions. 262.13 Section 262.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT ACTIVITIES Impoundments and Removals § 262.13 Removal of obstructions. A Forest...

  4. 27 CFR 28.225 - Removals of beer by brewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removals of beer by brewer..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Exportation of Beer With Benefit of Drawback Execution of Claims § 28.225 Removals of beer by brewer. Where a brewer removes taxpaid beer from...

  5. Reliability growth by failure mode removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern systems, civilian (e.g. automotive), and military (manned and unmanned aircraft, surface vehicles, submerged vessels), suffer initial design faults or failure modes (FMs), including software bugs, which detrimentally affect the system's reliability and availability. FMs must be removed or mitigated in impact during initial testing, including accelerated testing, in order for the system to meet its reliability requirements and operate satisfactorily in the field. This paper concerns models for reliability growth in which the behaviors of FMs are assumed independent, but of different types. Test effort is guided by prior information, expressed probabilistically, on the random number and tenacities of such FMs that are of various origins in the designs. Estimation of the numbers of FMs that will ultimately activate while in the field is considered here. - Highlights: • Failure mode discovery by testing and removal is a dynamic and uncertain process. • The evolution of a failure mode subject to discovery by testing is a stochastic process. • Different test types discover different types of failure modes. • More than one statistical model can well summarize failure mode activation times

  6. Formaldehyde removal from wastewater applying natural zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovilė Kulikauskaitė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is one of the most chemically active compounds which is discharged with untreated or just partially treated industrial wastewater. It is hazardous for environment and humans. Formaldehyde vapors can strongly irritate skin, can cause damage to eyes and harm respiratory tract. As long as formaldehyde causes a toxic effect on environment and living organisms, it is necessary to remove it from wastewater which is directed to natural water. There are many methods used for formaldehyde removal from wastewater: biological method, evaporation, membrane separation method. Most of them have disadvantages. Adsorption method has many advantages: it is fast, cheap, and universal, and can be widely used, therefore it was chosen for this research. Experiment was carried out with natural zeolite in different contact time with different concentration formaldehyde solutions. Concentration of formaldehyde was determined applying the Photocolorimetric Method. Method is based on reaction of formaldehyde with chromotropic acid and determination of formaldehyde concentration. Determined average sorption efficiency was highest when formaldehyde concentration was lowest, e. g. 2 mg/l (45.94% after eight hours of contact time with adsorbent. Sorption efficiency was increasing when the contact time increased, but when the contact time increased to 12 hours, sorption efficiency stayed the same because of the saturation of zeolite.

  7. Catalyst Substrates Remove Contaminants, Produce Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A spacecraft is the ultimate tight building. We don t want any leaks, and there is very little fresh air coming in, says Jay Perry, an aerospace engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center. As a result, there is a huge potential for a buildup of contaminants from a host of sources. Inside a spacecraft, contaminants can be introduced from the materials that make spacecraft components, electronics boxes, or activities by the crew such as food preparation or cleaning. Humans also generate contaminants by breathing and through the body s natural metabolic processes. As part of the sophisticated Environmental Control and Life Support System on the International Space Station (ISS), a trace contaminant control system removes carbon dioxide and other impurities from the cabin atmosphere. To maintain healthy levels, the system uses adsorbent media to filter chemical contaminant molecules and a high-temperature catalytic oxidizer to change the chemical structure of the contaminants to something more benign, usually carbon dioxide and water. In the 1990s, while researching air quality control technology for extended spaceflight travel, Perry and others at Marshall were looking for a regenerable process for the continuous removal of carbon dioxide and trace chemical contaminants on long-duration manned space flights. At the time, the existing technology used on U.S. spacecraft could only be used once, which meant that a spacecraft had to carry additional spare parts for use in case the first one was depleted, or the spacecraft would have to return to Earth to exchange the components.

  8. K basins sludge removal sludge pretreatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuels Program is in the process of planning activities to remove spent nuclear fuel and other materials from the 100-K Basins as a remediation effort for clean closure. The 105 K- East and K-West Basins store spent fuel, sludge, and debris. Sludge has accumulated in the 1 00 K Basins as a result of fuel oxidation and a slight amount of general debris being deposited, by settling, in the basin water. The ultimate intent in removing the sludge and fuel is to eliminate the environmental risk posed by storing fuel at the K Basins. The task for this project is to disposition specific constituents of sludge (metallic fuel) to produce a product stream through a pretreatment process that will meet the requirements, including a final particle size acceptable to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The purpose of this task is to develop a preconceptual design package for the K Basin sludge pretreatment system. The process equipment/system is at a preconceptual stage, as shown in sketch ES-SNF-01 , while a more refined process system and material/energy balances are ongoing (all sketches are shown in Appendix C). Thus, the overall process and 0535 associated equipment have been conservatively selected and sized, respectively, to establish the cost basis and equipment layout as shown in sketches ES- SNF-02 through 08

  9. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ishaq Ahmad; Ernst-Ulrich Hartge; Joachim Werther; and Reiner Wischnewski

    2014-01-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  10. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  11. Removal of radionuclides at a waterworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A waterworks, providing several large cities in the province of Scania with drinking-water, with an average production rate of 1.3 m3.s-1 has been studied regarding its removal capacity for several natural and anthropogenic radionuclides. The raw water is surface water from lake Bolmen which is transported through an 80 km long tunnel in the bedrock before it enters the waterworks. The method used for purification is a combination of precipitation and filtration in sand filters. Two different purification lines are at the moment in use, one using A12(SO4)3 as a coagulant and one using FeC13. After coagulation and flocculation the precipitation is removed and the water is passed through two different sand filters (rapid-filtration and slow-filtration). Water samples have been collected at the lake, the inlet at the waterworks, after each of the flocculation basins (A12(SO4)3 and FeC13), after rapid-filtration and from the municipal distribution net. The samples have been analysed with respect to its content of uranium, thorium, polonium, radium, plutonium and caesium. (au)

  12. Carbon Dioxide Removal via Passive Thermal Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael; Hanford, Anthony; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes a regenerable approach to separate carbon dioxide from other cabin gases by means of cooling until the carbon dioxide forms carbon dioxide ice on the walls of the physical device. Currently, NASA space vehicles remove carbon dioxide by reaction with lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or by adsorption to an amine, a zeolite, or other sorbent. Use of lithium hydroxide, though reliable and well-understood, requires significant mass for all but the shortest missions in the form of lithium hydroxide pellets, because the reaction of carbon dioxide with lithium hydroxide is essentially irreversible. This approach is regenerable, uses less power than other historical approaches, and it is almost entirely passive, so it is more economical to operate and potentially maintenance- free for long-duration missions. In carbon dioxide removal mode, this approach passes a bone-dry stream of crew cabin atmospheric gas through a metal channel in thermal contact with a radiator. The radiator is pointed to reject thermal loads only to space. Within the channel, the working stream is cooled to the sublimation temperature of carbon dioxide at the prevailing cabin pressure, leading to formation of carbon dioxide ice on the channel walls. After a prescribed time or accumulation of carbon dioxide ice, for regeneration of the device, the channel is closed off from the crew cabin and the carbon dioxide ice is sublimed and either vented to the environment or accumulated for recovery of oxygen in a fully regenerative life support system.

  13. Removal of soluble toxic metals from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of selected, soluble toxic metals from aqueous solutions has been accomplished using a combination of chemical treatment and ultrafiltration. The process has been evaluated at the bench-scale and is undergoing pilot-scale testing. Removal efficiencies in excess of 95-99% have been realized. The test program at the bench-scale investigated the limitations and established the optimum range of operating parameters for the process, while the tests conducted with the pilot-scale process equipment are providing information on longer-term process efficiencies, effective processing rates, and fouling potential of the membranes. With the typically found average concentrations of the toxic metals in groundwaters at Superfund sites used as the feed solution, the process has decreased levels up to 100-fold or more. Experiments were also conducted with concentrated solutions to determine their release from silica-based matrices. The solidified wastes were subjected to EP Toxicity test procedures and met the criteria successfully. The final phase of the program involving a field demonstration at a uranium tailings site will be outlined

  14. Forehead Mass Removal by Endoscopic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soyeon; Jung, Sung Won; Koh, Sung Hoon; Lim, Hyoseob

    2016-03-01

    Patients with forehead mass have a cosmetic problem because the forehead is an important first impression. Conventional skin approach results in visible scar even though surgeons designed the incision along the relaxed skin tension line1. Since Onishi introduced the technique for endoscopic approach in 1995, endoscopic surgery has become rapidly popular in the field of plastic surgery. Endoscopic approach to the forehead mass by small incision on the scalp behind hair line is big advantageous for leaving less ugly scar on the forehead. All procedures need to be identified under the endoscopic visualization. When it was completed, the mass was pulled out. The authors also used the osteotome or rasp when it was the osteoma. The forehead and scalp were applied compressive dressing to prevent hematoma and swelling for 2 days. The cosmesis was excellent because they have no visible scar on the forehead. Endoscopic approaching technique is getting popular and commonly used during the cosmetic surgery because it has many advantages. This method also, however, has difficulties to remove large-sized mass and to perform caudal dissection, and for increased operative times. Furthermore, there are complication of incomplete removal, hematoma, and swelling. The proper candidate is the patient with smooth forehead, with a mobile and soft mass, with a propensity for keloid formation, or hypertrophic scarring. Endoscopic technique is not only advantageous but also disadvantageous. That is why surgeon's selection is more important. PMID:26967101

  15. Reaction mechanism of dicofol removal by cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyuan; Yang, Ting; Zhai, Zihan; Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear whether dicofol should be defined as a persistent organic pollutant. Its environmental persistence has gained attention. This study focused on its degradation by cellulase. Cellulase was separated using a gel chromatogram, and its degradation activity towards dicofol involved its endoglucanase activity. By analyzing the kinetic parameters of cellulase reacting with mixed substrates, it was shown that cellulase reacted on dicofol and carboxyl methyl cellulose through two different active centers. Thus, the degradation of dicofol was shown to be an oxidative process by cellulase. Next, by comparing the impacts of tert-butyl alcohol (a typical OH free-radical inhibitor) on the removal efficiencies of dicofol under both cellulase and Fenton reagent systems, it was shown that the removal of dicofol was initiated by OH free radicals produced by cellulase. Finally, 4,4'-dichloro-dibenzophenone and chloride were detected using gas chromatography mass spectrometry and ion chromatography analysis, which supported our hypothesis. The reaction mechanism was analyzed and involved an attack by OH free radicals at the orthocarbon of dicofol, resulting in the degradation product 4,4'-dichloro-dibenzophenone. PMID:26456602

  16. Removal of heavy metals from biowaste: modelling of heavy metal behaviour and development of removal technologies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, A.

    1998-01-01

    In the Netherlands, recycling of solid organic waste streams as compost only becomes possible if the compost complies with the heavy metals standards of the BOOM decree. This dissertation focuses on the removal of heavy metals from biowaste, i.e. the source separated organic fraction of municipal so

  17. Wastewater centrate ammonia removal by chemisorption processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' This presentation will describe the nature, scope, and findings of a third-party evaluation of a patent-protected wastewater treatment technology identified as the ThermoEnergy Ammonia Recovery Process TM (ARP). The ARP is a reversible chemisorption process using a zinc-impregnated ion exchange resin, and it is unique in that it removes/reduces the ammonia-nitrogen load in the solids processing liquor of municipal sewage treatment plants and recycles the recovered product into a pelletized ammonium salt that can be used as an agricultural fertilizer. The primary objective of the ARP evaluation was to perform well-defined field and laboratory tests to provide data on process performance. The evaluation process was overseen and coordinated by the Environmental Technology Evaluation Center (EvTEC), a program of the Civil Engineering Research Foundation (CERF), the research and technology transfer arm of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). EvTEC is a pilot program evaluating innovative environmental technologies under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. A pilot scale ARP treatment facility was constructed and tested at the Oakwood Beach Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) in Staten Island, New York, from September through December of 1998. While operating during the 3 month period using the anaerobically digested centrate normally produced at the WPCP, the pilot study demonstrated that the ARP process was capable of removing/recovering ammonia with efficiencies ranging from 75-99+ % at influent concentrations exceeding 400 mg/L. During the pilot plant operations, forty-eight (48) complete validated runs of centrate processing were performed. The plant processed the centrate under normal day-to-day conditions at the WPCP, and no special operational considerations were given to the centrifuge operation to accommodate the ARP pilot plant. The Oakwood WPCP operated exactly the way

  18. Phenomena during thermal removal of binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdina, Kenneth Edward

    The research presented herein has focused on debinding of an ethylene copolymer from a SiC based molded ceramic green body. Examination of the binder burnout process was carried out by breaking down the process into two distinct regions: those events which occur before any weight loss begins, and those events occurring during binder removal. Below the temperature of observed binder loss (175sp°C), both reversible and irreversible displacement was observed to occur. The displacement was accounted for by relaxation of molding stresses, thermal expansion of the system, and melting of the semicrystalline copolymer occurring during heating. Upon further heating the binder undergoes a two stage thermal degradation process. In the first stage, acetic acid is the only degradation product formed, as determined by GC/MS analysis. In this stage, component shrinkage persisted and it was found that one unit volume of shrinkage corresponded with one unit volume of binder removed, indicating that no porosity developed. The escaping acetic acid effluents must diffuse through liquid polymer filled porous regions to escape. The gas pressure of the acetic acid species produced in the first stage of the thermal degradation may exceed the ambient pressure promoting bubble formation. Controlling the heating rate of the specimen maintains the gas pressure below the bubbling threshold and minimizes the degradation time. Experiments have determined the kinetics of the reaction in the presence of the high surface area (10-15msp2/g) ceramic powder and then verified that acetic acid was diffusing through the polymer phase to the specimen surface where evaporation is taking place. The sorption method measured the diffusivity and activity of acetic acid within the filled ceramic system within a TGA. These data were incorporated into a Fickian type model which included the rate of generation of the diffusing species. The modeling process involved prediction of the bloating temperature as a

  19. COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Exoelectrogenic microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) compete with other microorganisms for substrate. In order to understand how this affects removal rates, current generation, and coulombic efficiencies (CEs), substrate removal rates were compared in MFCs fed a single, readily biodegradable compound (acetate) or domestic wastewater (WW). Removal rates based on initial test conditions fit first-order kinetics, but rate constants varied with circuit resistance. With filtered WW (100Ω), the rate constant was 0.18h- 1, which was higher than acetate or filtered WW with an open circuit (0.10h- 1), but CEs were much lower (15-24%) than acetate. With raw WW (100Ω), COD removal proceeded in two stages: a fast removal stage with high current production, followed by a slower removal with little current. While using MFCs increased COD removal rate due to current generation, secondary processes will be needed to reduce COD to levels suitable for discharge.

  20. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  1. Laser scattering measurement for laser removal of graffiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tearasongsawat, Watcharawee; Kittiboonanan, Phumipat; Luengviriya, Chaiya; Ratanavis, Amarin

    2015-07-01

    In this contribution, a technical development of the laser scattering measurement for laser removal of graffiti is reported. This study concentrates on the removal of graffiti from metal surfaces. Four colored graffiti paints were applied to stainless steel samples. Cleaning efficiency was evaluated by the laser scattering system. In this study, an angular laser removal of graffiti was attempted to examine the removal process under practical conditions. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.06 microns with the repetition rate of 1 Hz was used to remove graffiti from stainless steel samples. The laser fluence was investigated from 0.1 J/cm2 to 7 J/cm2. The laser parameters to achieve the removal effectiveness were determined by using the laser scattering system. This study strongly leads to further development of the potential online surface inspection for the removal of graffiti.

  2. Organics and Suspended Solids Removal from Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhri Y. Hmood

    2013-01-01

    The Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) method is used for treating samples of waste water taken from hospitals in Mosul. Many run periods are used (6-24) hours for             6 months. It is found that the organics and suspended solids removal increase with increasing the period of run, it is in the range ( 96-82 )% and ( 100-95 )% respectively, while the pH values are nearly neutral (7.05 to 7.5).     BOD5 and SS concentrations of the effluent are within the limits of Iraqi standards,  40:30 mg...

  3. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chuan [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); Harbin Inst. of Technology (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); Liu, Lihong [Harbin Inst. of Technology (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Lee, Duu-Jong [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2010-03-15

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -6} dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10{sup -2} dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10{sup -4} dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10{sup -6} dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach. (orig.)

  4. Biomedical monitoring of phosphate removal by hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalec, Michał; Fiedoruk-Pogrebniak, Marta; Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Tymecki, Łukasz; Koncki, Robert

    2016-07-15

    A compact flow analysis system for non-invasive, dialysate-side monitoring of phosphate removal in the course of clinical hemodialysis treatment is presented. The monitor is based on solenoid operated micro-pumps and extremely cheap optoelectronic flow-through detector allowing photometric determination of phosphate in spent dialysate using a molybdenum blue method. The monitor can operate in both, discrete and continuous modes of measurement. The analytical utility of monitor has been tested with samples of spent dialysate produced by artificial kidney in the course of real hemodialysis sessions. The results of monitoring are comparable with those obtained using reference off-line method recommended for clinical analysis. Additionally, the possibility of two-side (dialysate and blood) monitoring of hemodialysis treatments with optoelectronic flow-through detectors has been announced. PMID:27136282

  5. Cotton for removal of aquatic oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raw cotton has considerable potential for selective removal of spilled oil and oil products from surface waters, since the natural waxes on the raw cotton make it preferentially oil wet. This potential was recognized in the early seventies at Texas Tech University. More recently other research workers have considered cotton as an adsorbent for spilled oil. The adsorbent market is now dominated by synthetic materials, such as air-blown polypropylene fiber, inorganic clays, and recycled paper and paper products. This paper further examines the potential of cotton in relation to these other adsorbents. Emphasis is placed on the potential for complete biodegradation of oil-soaked cotton adsorbents as a means avoiding the expense for incineration and/or the long-term environmental risk associated with placing the used adsorbents in landfills

  6. Histopathology of submandibular glands removed for sialolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, F; Kurt, A M; Dulguerov, P; Becker, M; Oedman, M; Lehmann, W

    2001-05-01

    We reviewed the clinical history of 48 consecutive patients who underwent submandibular gland removal for radiologically proven sialolithiasis. The specimens were examined by a pathologist blinded to the clinical data. A histopathologic classification into I of 3 grades was established by evaluating the degrees of atrophy, fibrosis, and inflammation. A correlation between the clinical and pathological variables was sought in order to define clinical variables that would predict abnormal submandibular glands that required extirpation. A significant percentage of the submandibular glands exhibited normal histologic findings. The patients with normal submandibular glands had a clinical evolution similar to that of other patients with severely damaged glands. The only clinical variable that correlated with increased histopathologic alteration was the patient's age. In view of the newly available diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for sialolithiasis, a conservative attitude to submandibular gland resection appears justified. PMID:11372932

  7. Organics and Suspended Solids Removal from Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Y. Hmood

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR method is used for treating samples of waste water taken from hospitals in Mosul. Many run periods are used (6-24 hours for             6 months. It is found that the organics and suspended solids removal increase with increasing the period of run, it is in the range ( 96-82 % and ( 100-95 % respectively, while the pH values are nearly neutral (7.05 to 7.5.     BOD5 and SS concentrations of the effluent are within the limits of Iraqi standards,  40:30 mg/l respectively. Hence, SBR method could be used for treating hospitals, small factories and some  residential sectors waste waters.  

  8. Removal of plutonium from the neonatal rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium bound to neonatal rat gut was readily mobilized by Ca-DTPA. A single dose of Ca-DTPA, 7-10X the usual human intravenous dose level (HID = 28.7 μmol/kg), given by gavage 2 hr after 2-day-old rats received 1.46 μCi 238Pu(NO3)2 by gavage, lowered Pu bound to the gut by 82% as compared to untreated animals. Rats similarly treated 5 days after gavage with 1.89 μCi 238Pu lost a similar amount (85%). Prompt treatment with Ca-DTPA reduced Pu in most tissues to one-third and delayed treatment reduced Pu to one-half, compared to control tissue content. The two treatment routes (gavage and intraperitoneal) were comparably effective except that removal of Pu from the skeleton, as represented by femur levels, was greater by the parenteral route

  9. Electrochemical removal of material from metallic work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deburring, polishing, surface forming and the like are carried out by electrochemical machining with conformable electrode means including an electrically conducting and an insulating web. The surface of the work to be processed is covered by a deformable electrically insulating web or cloth which is perforated and conforms with the work. The web is covered by a deformable perforated electrically conducting screen electrode which also conforms with, and is insulated from, the work by the insulating web. An electrolyte is conducted through the electrode and insulating web and along the work through a perforated elastic member which engages the electrode under pressure pressing the electrode and web against the work. High current under low voltage is conducted between the electrode and work through the insulator, removing material from the work. Under the pressure of the elastic member, the electrode and insulator continue to conform with the work and the spacing betwen the electrode and work is maintained constant

  10. Alpha Removal Process Filter Cleaning Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is developing a process to treat radioactive waste that is low in cesium-137, but high in strontium-90, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) personnel asked Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) personnel to provide recommendations for chemically cleaning the Alpha Removal Process filters. The authors reviewed previous SRTC filter cleaning experience with bench-scale radioactive filters and pilot-scale simulant filters from tests with simulated and actual waste. From reviewing the previous filter cleaning data and assuming the heel in the 512-S filtration system is 85 gallons or less, the authors recommendations and approach to the inquiry are contained in this report

  11. Intracorneal blood removal six weeks after canaloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Rossetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a 71-year-old patient with bilateral open-angle glaucoma, intracorneal blood was found after a canaloplasty procedure in the right eye. Six weeks after surgery on ultrasound biomicroscopy examination, liquified blood and blood clots could be observed nasally in the deep corneal stroma close to the Descemet′s membrane. The intracorneal blood was washed out with balanced saline solution following deep corneal incision and lamellar dissection. Descemet′s membrane was reattached with air injection into the anterior chamber. Two months later, visual acuity improved to 20/50, intraocular pressure was 16 mm Hg without medication and confocal microscopy showed deep stromal folds and limited endothelial cell loss. Viscoelastic entering the cornea at Schwalbe′s line and reflux of blood from the collector channels to Schlemm′s canal can account for corneal hematoma. Even six weeks after canaloplasty, successful blood removal could be fulfilled without rupturing the Descemet′s membrane.

  12. Pipe crawler development for duct elbow removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of equipment for removing an elbow in a 36 inch diameter ventilation line by cutting from the inside. Radiation levels, high air flow and physical constraints preclude any manual rework of the ventilation system. A remotely operated pipe crawler was developed. Testing has been performed in a full-scale mockup which models the ventilation duct configuration with the exception of radiation levels. The results gathered from the testing are discussed, and illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the crawler and plasma arc torch system. To date, the equipment has successfully completed the tasks of maneuvering through the duct geometry, performing the two required cuts, and backing out of the duct mockup. The elbow successfully fell away from the main duct, showing that the line would be clear of obstructions

  13. Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the status of process development for pretreating Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge, of which ∼ 3.3 x 106 L is stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW at the Hanford Site. The initial baseline process chosen for pretreating NCRW sludge is to dissolve the sludge in nitric acid and extract the -transuranic (MU) elements from the dissolved sludge solution with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (CNWO). This process converts the NCRW sludge into a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW) to be disposed of as grout, leaving only a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) requiring vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP)

  14. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  15. Removal of biofilms by impinging water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cense, A. W.; van Dongen, M. E. H.; Gottenbos, B.; Nuijs, A. M.; Shulepov, S. Y.

    2006-12-01

    The process of impinging water droplets on Streptococcus mutans biofilms was studied experimentally and numerically. Droplets were experimentally produced by natural breakup of a cylindrical liquid jet. Droplet diameter and velocity were varied between 20 and 200 μm and between 20 and 100 m/s, respectively. The resulting erosion process of the biofilm was determined experimentally with high-speed recording techniques and a quantitative relationship between the removal rate, droplet size, and velocity was determined. The shear stress and the pressure on the surface during droplet impact were determined by numerical simulations, and a qualitative agreement between the experiment and the simulation was obtained. Furthermore, it was shown that the stresses on the surface are strongly reduced when a water film is present.

  16. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft3 of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms

  17. An Efficient Gait Recognition with Backpack Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heesung; Hong, Sungjun; Kim, Euntai

    2009-12-01

    Gait-based human identification is a paradigm to recognize individuals using visual cues that characterize their walking motion. An important requirement for successful gait recognition is robustness to variations including different lighting conditions, poses, and walking speed. Deformation of the gait silhouette caused by objects carried by subjects also has a significant effect on the performance of gait recognition systems; a backpack is the most common of these objects. This paper proposes methods for eliminating the effect of a carried backpack for efficient gait recognition. We apply simple, recursive principal component analysis (PCA) reconstructions and error compensation to remove the backpack from the gait representation and then conduct gait recognition. Experiments performed with the CASIA database illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  18. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  19. Ionic liquid incorporating thiosalicylate for metal removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfred, Cecilia Devi; Mustafa, Fadwa Babiker; Romeli, Fatimah Julia

    2012-09-01

    Ionic liquids are a class of organic molten salts "designer solvents" that are composed totally of anions (inorganic and organic polyatomic) and organic cations. The replacement of volatile organic solvents from a separation process is of utmost importance since the use of a large excess of these solvents is hazardous and creates ecological problem. The new method for metal ion extraction is by using task-specific ionic liquids such as ionic liquids which incorporate thiosalicylate functionality. This paper looks at producing a new cluster of ionic liquids which incorporates thiosalicylate with pyridinium cation. Its thermophysical properties such as density and viscosity in single and binary mixtures are studied. The ionic liquids' capability in metal removal processes is evaluated.

  20. Removal of radium from aqueous sulphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium is often present in ores and an aqueous solution associated with the ore may consequently contain dissolved radium. It is frequently necessary to remove radium from such solutions to reduce the total radium content to a prescribed low level before the solution can be returned to the environment. The present invention is based on the discovery that the total radium content can be reduced to a satisfactory level within a reasonable time by adding a soluble barium salt to a radium-containing sulphate solution which also contains dissolved magnesium at a pH not greater than about 0 to precipitate radium as barium radium sulphate, raising the pH to at least 11 to precipitate an insoluble magnesium compound which collects the barium radium sulphate precipitate, and separating substantially all of the precipitates from the solution

  1. NDT and inspection of tritium removal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU heavy water reactors produce tritium in the moderator and coolant circuits through neutron absorption by the deuterium atoms in heavy water. The concentration of tritium, in the form of DTO molecules builds up slowly with time of reactor operation. A typical yearly production rate of tritium is 2400 curie for each megawatt of electricity produced and as a consequence, a 600 megawatt Candu reactor produces 1.4 million curie of tritium per year. Tritium decays to 3He, a non radioactive species, and has a half life of approximately 12 years. Both Ontario Hydro and AECL are constructing plants to remove tritium from heavy water to maintain the tritium concentration below the equilibrium value. This will result in lower radiation doses to operating personnel and reduce the level of radiation in any releases of heavy water to the environment

  2. The development of tritium removal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE)- Cryogenic Distillation(CD) process was studied which could be available for an optimal tritium removal process of pressurized heavy water reactor system at Wolsung nuclear power plant in the near future. Based upon analysis of reaction mechanism of hydrogen isotope exchange, process simulation by computer with process variables for tritium separation were carried out. And a fundamental research about hydrogen isotope exchange catalyst and a basic study on ortho-para hydrogen conversion catalyst were carried out. Also, system simulation for heat recovery of distillation process was studied for energy cost safety. Mainly, hydrophobic Pt-C catalyst system as a core material of LPCE was investigated, and an absorber model of heat pump was set-up. (Author)

  3. Floor tile and mastic removal project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    A test program was developed and coordinated with State and Federal Regulators and carried out at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. This program was carefully designed to create the worst conditions in order to evaluate whether asbestos fibers are released when asbestos containing floor tile and mastic are removed. There were over 1,000 samples taken and analyzed during the execution of the program. The conclusions reached were based upon analysis of the critical samples using the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) technology. Additionally, the TEM procedures were used to evaluate personnel samples to determine whether those fibers found were asbestos or other materials. Most of the (TEM) samples were analyzed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio.

  4. Residual heat removal system diagnostic advisor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) Diagnostic Advisor which is an expert system designed to alert the operators to abnormal conditions that exits in the RHRS and offer advice about the cause of the abnormal conditions. The Advisor uses a combination of rule-based and model-based diagnostic techniques to perform its functions. This diagnostic approach leads to a deeper understanding of the RHRS by the Advisor and consequently makes it more robust to unexpected conditions. The main window of the interactive graphic display is a schematic diagram of the RHRS piping system. When a conclusion about a failed component can be reached, the operator can bring up windows that describe the failure mode of the component and a brief explanation about how the Advisor arrived at its conclusion

  5. CT guided percutaneous removal of osteoid osteoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyse authors' initial clinical application with CT-guided percutaneous removal of osteoid osteoma. Methods: Among the 3 cases with final diagnosis of osteoid osteoma, 2 patients were female and 1 was male. Their ages were 13, 15, and 35 years respectively. The lesions were located in the femur (n = 1), tibia (n = 1) and humerus (n = 1). The procedure was performed under epidural anesthesia. The patient was in supine position and trephine needle was used for all patients. Results: The accuracy of needle puncture was 100%. The curative effect was 100%. No severe complications occurred in this series. Conclusions: CT-guided percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteoma is minimally invasive, safe, simple, and cost-effective

  6. Alternative modes for cryogenic krypton removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, oxygen elimination was considered as a necessary pretreatment before cryogenic krypton removal from reprocessing off-gases. In this view, the catalytic reduction of oxygen with hydrogen was investigated in the DEOXO unit, in which a Pd and a Ru catalyst were used. At a gas flow rate of 30 Nm3.h-1 and an oxygen feed concentration up to 15% volume, the oxygen content in the feed gas of the cryogenic unit could be reduced to 0.5 ppm volume. For the following experiments, the DEOXO unit was connected in series with an adsorption drier and the cryogenic distillation unit. No technical problems arose during the 80 hours run. Furthermore, no significant build-up of an oxygen-rich layer in the cryogenic rectification column was observed. At present, increased attention has been devoted to krypton removal in the presence of air. In that perspective, the study of the selective catalytic reduction of NO/sub x/ with ammonia in the DENITRO unit becomes part of the flowsheet. With the use of a H-mordenite catalyst and an ammonia excess of 30%, the NO/sub x/ concentration in a 25 Nm3.h-1 gas stream could be reduced from more than 1% volume to lower than 1 ppm volume. The oxygen behavior in the cryogenic distillation unit was also investigated. Oxygen analyses were performed to gain information on the oxygen distribution in the column. Although an oxygen rich layer was built up in the column, the krypton-xenon bottom product contained less than 0.1 ppm volume oxygen, so that no oxygen was transferred to the second column. This favorable oxygen behavior, combined with the feasibility of the selective catalytic NO/sub x/ reduction is promising for the cryogenic krypton retention in the presence of oxygen

  7. PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-10-09

    In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

  8. Radiolytic removal of trihalomethane in chlorinated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling is one of the major operational problems in seawater cooling systems. It is controlled by application of chlorine based biocides in the range of 0.5-2.0 mg L-1. The bromide in seawater reacts with the added chlorine and forms hypobromous acid. The brominated residual biocides react with natural organic matter present in the seawater, resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) such as bromoform (CHBr3), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2). Though THMs represent a small fraction of the added chlorine, they are relatively more persistent than residual chlorine, and hence pose a potential hazard to marine life because of their reported mutagenicity. There have been few reports on removal of THMs from chlorinated seawater. In this work, the efficacy of gamma irradiation technique for the removal of THMs from chlorine-dosed seawater was investigated. Experiments were carried out using seawater collected from Kalpakkam. Irradiation study was conducted in chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg L-1 of Cl2) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation using a 60Co Gamma Chamber 5000. Bromoform showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons like bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane. This shows the change in total THM concentration with variation in the radiation dose and initial Cl2 dosing. When the percentage degradation of all the three trihalomethane species was compared with applied doses, it was found that the maximum reduction occurred at a dose of 2.5 kGy. The reduction was almost similar for all the three doses (1, 3, 5 ppm of Cl2) used for chlorination. With a further increase in radiation dose to 5.0 kGy, a slight increase in reduction was observed

  9. Terpenes removal from biogas; Terpenenverwijdering uit biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, P.; Holstein, J.; De Haan, HR.; Vlap, H. [DNV KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Biogas may contain unwanted and harmful components, including aromatic hydrocarbons such as terpenes. These terpenes (organic oils) are mainly present in citrus peel and plant residues; that is why especially raw biogas from organic waste digestion plants contains high concentrations of terpenes. If terpenes end up in the gas grid (with the injected biomethane) there is a risk that plastics (PE pipes) lose their mechanical properties by absorbing liquids or extracting ethereal plasticizers. This can lead to embrittlement greatly lowering the reliability of the piping. In addition, soft components are als o affected (gaskets and rubber O-rings). Besides the impact on the integrity of the gas grid, terpenes also mask the odor of natural gas odorants such as THT. This impedes the detection of gas leaks which is a significant security risk. Furthermore, the presence of terpenes in biogas leads to fouling of equipment used for the drying of biomethane, as well as contamination of adsorption liquids and membranes used in the upgrading process. Currently, terpenes are removed by activated carbon filters. The tool life of such a filter can be relatively short if terpene concentrations are high in the biogas; this results in a significant increase of the operational costs, due to the replacement of the carbon. This study looked at alternative techniques for removing much of the terpenes from biogas in a simple, efficient and cheap way. In a workshop with stakeholders two techniques were chosen to be tested on laboratory scale in order to demonstrate the proof of principle. These techniques are photo-oxydation and a gas scrubbing. Of all investigated techniques for the removal of limonene the application of UV radiation seems to be the most promising option because of the simplicity of the process, the high efficiency (up to 94%), the comparable operational costs with activated carbon (6.7 to 9.5 euro/kg limonene removed, compared to 10 euro/kg limonene removed for activated

  10. Assessment of the removal of estrogenicity in biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of estrogenicity in a University of Cape Town-biological nutrient removal (UCT-BNR) wastewater treatment process was investigated using pilot and bench scale systems, batch experiments and mathematical modeling. In the pilot BNR process, 96 ± 5% of the estrogenicity exerted by the influent wastewater was removed by the treatment process. The degradation efficiencies in the anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic zones of the pilot BNR bioreactor were 11 ± 9%, 18 ± 2% and 93 ± 10%, respectively. In order to further understand the performance of the BNR process in the removal of estrogenicity from wastewater, a bench scale BNR process was operated with synthetic wastewater dosed with E1 and E2. The removal of estrogenicity in the bench scale system (95 ± 5%) was comparable to the pilot BNR process and the degradation efficiencies were estimated to be 8 ± 0.8%, 38 ± 4% and 85 ± 22% in the anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic zones, respectively. A biotransformation model developed to predict the fate of E1 and E2 in batch tests using the sludge from the BNR process was calibrated using the data from the experiments. The biotransformation rate constants for the transformation of E2 to E1 were estimated as 71 ± 1.5, 31 ± 3.3 and 1 ± 0.9 L g COD−1 d−1 for the aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic batch tests, respectively, while the corresponding biotransformation rate constants for the transformation of E1 were estimated to be 7.3 ± 1.0, 3 ± 2.0, and 0.85 ± 0.6 L·g COD−1 d−1. A steady state mass balance model formulated to describe the interactions between E2 and E1 in BNR activated sludge reasonably described the fate of E1 and E2 in the BNR process. - Highlights: • Comparable estrogenicity removal was observed from two BNR processes. • Pseudo first order model described the transformation of E2 and E1 in BNR process. • Biotransformation of E1 in BNR activated sludge controls the degradation of E2

  11. Assessment of the removal of estrogenicity in biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunlaja, O.O., E-mail: oogunlaj@uwaterloo.ca; Parker, W.J., E-mail: wjparker@uwaterloo.ca

    2015-05-01

    The removal of estrogenicity in a University of Cape Town-biological nutrient removal (UCT-BNR) wastewater treatment process was investigated using pilot and bench scale systems, batch experiments and mathematical modeling. In the pilot BNR process, 96 ± 5% of the estrogenicity exerted by the influent wastewater was removed by the treatment process. The degradation efficiencies in the anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic zones of the pilot BNR bioreactor were 11 ± 9%, 18 ± 2% and 93 ± 10%, respectively. In order to further understand the performance of the BNR process in the removal of estrogenicity from wastewater, a bench scale BNR process was operated with synthetic wastewater dosed with E1 and E2. The removal of estrogenicity in the bench scale system (95 ± 5%) was comparable to the pilot BNR process and the degradation efficiencies were estimated to be 8 ± 0.8%, 38 ± 4% and 85 ± 22% in the anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic zones, respectively. A biotransformation model developed to predict the fate of E1 and E2 in batch tests using the sludge from the BNR process was calibrated using the data from the experiments. The biotransformation rate constants for the transformation of E2 to E1 were estimated as 71 ± 1.5, 31 ± 3.3 and 1 ± 0.9 L g COD{sup −1} d{sup −1} for the aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic batch tests, respectively, while the corresponding biotransformation rate constants for the transformation of E1 were estimated to be 7.3 ± 1.0, 3 ± 2.0, and 0.85 ± 0.6 L·g COD{sup −1} d{sup −1}. A steady state mass balance model formulated to describe the interactions between E2 and E1 in BNR activated sludge reasonably described the fate of E1 and E2 in the BNR process. - Highlights: • Comparable estrogenicity removal was observed from two BNR processes. • Pseudo first order model described the transformation of E2 and E1 in BNR process. • Biotransformation of E1 in BNR activated sludge controls the degradation of E2.

  12. Individual and competitive removal of heavy metals using capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhe; Lu, Lu; Cai, Zhenxiao; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-01-25

    This study presents the viability and preference of capacitive deionization (CDI) for removing different heavy metal ions in various conditions. The removal performance and mechanisms of three ions, cadmium (Cd(2+)), lead (Pb(2+)) and chromium (Cr(3+)) were investigated individually and as a mixture under different applied voltages and ion concentrations. It was found that CDI could effectively remove these metals, and the performance was positively correlated with the applied voltage. When 1.2 V was applied into solution containing 0.5mM individual ions, the Cd(2+), Pb(2+), and Cr(3+) removal was 32%, 43%, and 52%, respectively, and the electrosorption played a bigger role in Cd(2+) removal than for the other two ions. Interestingly, while the removal of Pb(2+) and Cr(3+) remained at a similar level of 46% in the mixture of three ions, the Cd(2+) removal significantly decreased to 14%. Similar patterns were observed when 0.05 mM was used to simulate natural contaminated water condition, but the removal efficiencies were much higher, with the removal of Pb(2+), Cr(3+), and Cd(2+) increased to 81%, 78%, and 42%, respectively. The low valence charge and lack of physical sorption of Cd(2+) were believed to be the reason for the removal behavior, and advanced microscopic analysis showed clear deposits of metal ions on the cathode surface after operation. PMID:26476320

  13. [Investigation of nitrobenzene removal by iron sulfide (FeS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia-Lin; Li, Rui-Hua

    2012-12-01

    The nitrobenzene removal performance by iron sulfide was investigated in batch experiments. The effects of different factors were studied. The results showed that the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was 90% as initial nitrobenzene concentration was 0.96 mmol x L(-1), dosage of FeS was 1.2 g and the reaction time was 180 minutes. Initial nitrobenzene concentration, dosage of FeS, temperature and reused times of FeS had a significant influence on the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene. As the initial nitrobenzene concentration was in range of 0.74 to 1.74 mmol x L(-1), the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene decreased by 4.7% with every 0.1 mmol x L(-1) increasing of initial nitrobenzene concentration. As the dosage of FeS was in the range of 0.3 to 1.5 g, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene increased by 20% with every 0.3 g increasing of FeS. As the dosage of FeS was 1.8 g, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was 100%. In the temperature range of 10 to 25 degrees C, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene increased by 1.6% with 1 degrees C increasing. As the temperature was 30 degrees C, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was 100%. The removal efficiency of nitrobenzene decreased as the reused times of FeS increased. Rotational speed hardly had any influence on the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene. As the rotational speed was in the range of 10 to 80 r x min(-1), the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was around 75%. The nitrobenzene removal performance by iron sulfide was satisfied in the treatment of simulated chemical industrial wastewater, and after 60 min, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was 100%. PMID:23379163

  14. ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

    2012-01-30

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  15. Removal of Hydrogen Sulphide from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Edwards

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The concentration of H2S in groundwater is a significant problem in various areas across Canada. Hydrogen sulphide dissolves in ground water imparting undesirable taste and irritating rotten egg smell which makes it unpalatable. Ingestion of sulphides through drinking water can result in stomach discomfort, nausea and vomiting. Humans exposed to high concentrations of H2S for prolonged periods show symptoms of gastro-intestinal upset, anorexia, nausea, somnolence, amnesia, loss of consciousness, delirium, hallucinations, difficulty in swallowing, low blood pressure, slowing of heart rate, double vision and epileptiform convulsions. Hydrogen sulphide in blood is rapidly oxidized by molecular oxygen and thus reduces the oxidation power of haemoglobin. Unoxidized hydrogen sulphide can act upon the central nervous system and cause either paralysis or respiratory failure. It is therefore, necessary to have a very low concentration of H2S in the water. Approach: An automatic system for the addition of KMnO4 and removal of hydrogen sulphide from ground water was developed and tested. The system consisted of a freshwater tank, a pump, a chemical storage tank, a solenoid valve, a photocell and electronic circuit, a drainage tank, a filter and a set of valves. It was possible to use a photocell to detect the presence of excess KMnO4 in the system and to control the addition of KMnO4 into the system. Results: The system accomplished complete removal of hydrogen sulphide in the range of 1-30 ppm. The present system utilizes on/off control for the addition of the chemical. The amount of KMnO4 needed as a percentage of the amount used was in the range of 5-28%. Conclusion: The photocell and circuit could be used to add an amount of chemical that is constantly proportional to the amount of hydrogen sulphide in the water. The control of a positive displacement chemical feed pump would be an ideal application for this system. The speed of the

  16. Bed filters for phosphorus removal in on-site wastewater treatment : Removal mechanisms and sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Eveborn, David

    2010-01-01

    For many surface waters, phosphorus (P) leaching is a serious problem that should be minimized to prevent eutrophication. In Sweden there is a demand for physical and technical development of high-performance P removal techniques to reduce phosphorus leaching from on-site wastewater treatment systems to the Baltic Sea. However, although these systems are designed to reduce eutrophication there are also other environmental impacts to be considered when implementing them in on-site systems; ene...

  17. Microbial Phosphorus Removal in Waste Stabilisation Pond Wastewater Treatment Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mbwele, Lydia Ambakisye

    2006-01-01

    Waste Stabilisation Ponds (WSPs) are characterised by low phosphorus (P) removal capacity. Heterotrophic bacteria are principal microbial agents in WSPs in addition to algae. As treatment proceeds in WSPs, algal growth increases and pH rises, this has lead to believe that P removal is mainly through sedimentation as organic P algal biomass and precipitation as inorganic P. In activated sludge treatment plants (AS), microbial P removal has been improved and is termed as enhanced biological pho...

  18. Nitrogen Removal From Dairy Manure Wastewater Using Sequencing Batch Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Whichard, David P

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to characterize a flushed dairy manure wastewater and to develop the kinetic and stoichiometric parameters associated with nitrogen removal from the wastewater, as well as to demonstrate experimental and simulated nitrogen removal from the wastewater. The characterization showed that all the wastewaters had carbon to nitrogen ratios large enough for biological nitrogen removal. Analysis of carbon to phosphorus ratios showed that enough carbon is available fo...

  19. Same River Twice: Restoration Politics, Water Policy, and Dam Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Brewitt, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Dam removal is a new and rapidly growing phenomenon that is reshaping watersheds across the United States; nearly 600 dams were removed from American rivers 1999-2012. Dam removal restores natural flows of water, material, and wildlife upstream, downstream, and out across the floodplain. Despite this massive restorative impact, it is politically controversial, reshaping familiar landscapes and challenging traditional economies and the communities that depended upon them. American dams are agi...

  20. A Study of Sugarcane Leaf-Removal Machinery during Harvest

    OpenAIRE

    Sopa Cansee1,

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Sugarcane leaf-removing tools could help speed up sugarcane harvest and reduce contamination. Moreover, leaf-removal machinery can solve the problems of sugarcane burning and workers can increase sugarcane harvest production too. The purpose of this research was to study the use of leaf-removal machinery in the post-harvest production of sugarcane to reduce harvest production time and contaminant. Approach: This study focused on the LK92-11 variety of sugarcane having a har...

  1. Removable Partial Denture on Osseointegrated Implants and Natural Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Chi-Cheng Tasi; Jen-Chyan Wang; Li-Ching Chang

    2007-01-01

    Implants have been designed to provide edentulous patients with fixed prostheses oroverdentures. Recently, implant-supported fixed partial prostheses and single crowns havebecome successful treatment alternatives to removable and fixed partial dentures. However,few researchers have examined “removable partial dentures on implants and natural teeth”.In this article, we report two patients fitted with “removable partial dentures on implants andnatural teeth”. The patients were satisfied with th...

  2. Clinical evaluation of isolated abutment teeth in removable partial dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Zarrati S; Baheri Mghadam T; Nematollahi F

    2011-01-01

    "nBackground and Aims: Nowadays, removable partial dentures are applied to patients who are not able to use dental implants or fixed prosthesis. Although based on the studies the users of removable partial dentures are in the risk of plaque accumulation and unacceptable changes such as gingivitis, periodontitis and mobility in abutment tooth. It is not clear whether the negative effects of removable partial dentures are more on the isolated teeth which are a kind of abutment adjacent to ...

  3. Removal of Ammonia from Air, using Three Iranian Natural Zeolites

    OpenAIRE

    H. Asilian; SB Mortazavi; Kazemian, H; S Phaghiehzadeh; Sj Shahtaheri; Salem, M.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia in air can be hazardous to human and animal life and should be removed from the environment. Recently the removal of environmental pollutants such as ammonia by means of natural and modified zeolites has attracted a lot of attention and interests. In this study the capability of three Iranian natural zeolites (Clinoptilolite) in point of view of removal of ammonia from air was investigated. Through this research, different zeolites from various regions of Iran including Semnan, Meyane...

  4. Application of zeolites for radium removal from mine water

    OpenAIRE

    Chałupnik, Stanisław; Franus, Wojciech; Wysocka, Małgorzata; Gzyl, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    For removal of radium from saline waters in Upper Silesian mines, several methods of purification have been developed. The most efficient one is based on application of barium chloride, which was implemented in full technical scale in two Polish coal mines several years ago. Very good results of purification have been achieved—the removal efficiency exceeding 95 % of the initial activity. Another possibility for the removal of different ions from salty waters and brines is the application of ...

  5. Electrokinetic treatment of environmental matrices. Contaminants removal and phosphorus recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes, Paula Alexandra Rodrigues e Araújo

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to develop viable techniques for removal and recovery organic and inorganic compounds from environmental matrices, due to their ecotoxicity, regulatory obligations or potential supplies as secondary materials. In this dissertation, electro –removal and –recovery techniques were applied to five different contaminated environmental matrices aiming phosphorus (P) recovery and/or contaminants removal. In a first phase, the electrokinetic process (EK) was carried out in soils fo...

  6. Removal of polar organic micropollutants in constructed wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Carranza-Diaz, O.; Keil, P.; Möder, M.; Schultze-Nobre, L.; Kuschk, P; Nivala, J.; Köser, H.

    2013-01-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) are wastewater treatment facilities capable to remove organic micropollutants (OMs) such as residues of drugs (e.g. pharmaceuticals). Nevertheless, still there is an uncomplete understanding of the main removal mechanisms. To further understand the role of plants on the removal of OMs, investigations in a planted and unplanted horizontal flow constructed wetlands (HFCWs) were conducted. The aim was to evaluate the spatio-temporal redox condition dynam...

  7. Current Progress of Capacitive Deionization for Removal of Pollutant Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Mahendra S.; Balomajumder, Chandrajit

    2016-08-01

    A mini review of a recently developing water purification technology capacitive deionization (CDI) applied for removal of pollutant ions is provided. The current progress of CDI for removal of different pollutant ions such as arsenic, fluoride, boron, phosphate, lithium, copper, cadmium, ferric, and nitrate ions is presented. This paper aims at motivating new research opportunities in capacitive deionization technology for removal of pollutant ions from polluted water.

  8. Expert systems guide biological phosphorus removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichten, D.J.; Wilson, K.D.; Tracy, K.D. (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States))

    1991-10-01

    There is a large body of knowledge regarding optimum control strategies for new secondary wastewater treatment technology using an anaerobic selector to provide biological phosphorus removal. However, because the selector technology is new and the concepts differ somewhat from those used in conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment, a method of communicating this knowledge to plant operators is needed. Traditional methods such as classroom training and operating manuals are of limited effectiveness. The commonplace availability and low cost of the personal computer (PC) makes it practical to use a computer program to communicate the type of information required to control a wastewater treatment plant. Knowledge-based systems technology, commonly referred to as expert systems (ES) technology, is easy to use, provides useful information regarding a consistent control strategy, relieves the anxiety associated with learning a new process,' and provides instruction for inexperienced personnel. ES technology does not require special formatted input and is therefore easily accessible. All information required by the program is readily available through routine laboratory analysis, common plant instrumentation, or direct user observation. The program was designed for all levels of computer users and will run on all IBM-compatible or Apple MacIntosh systems.

  9. Possibility in optimization of biological phosphorus removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberger, R.

    1989-02-01

    The elimination-efficiency of wastewater treatment plants with biological phosphorus removal is often limited by the following aspects: Low concentrations of organic acids in influent wastewater, hydraulic- and load fluctuations, low anaerobic sludge detention time, transfer of nitrate into the anaerobic zone, phosphorus release in the final clarifier and in sludge treatment units, high effluent suspended solids content. In this context, the following optimization measures seem to be advantageous: 'Activated primary tanks' and 'activated sludge thickeners' are adequate techniques to raise the concentration of organic acids in the wastewater by pre-acidification. Simultaneous acidification takes place in an anaerobic sedimentation basin as realized in the EASC-process (extended anaerobic sludge contact). Below the sludge blanket of an EASC-sedimentation tank, anaerobic conditions can be maintained even in the case of nitrate input. Furthermore, this process is suitable to compensate load- and hydraulic fluctuations of wastewater. To avoid phosphorus release in the final clarifier, it is important to improve sludge settleability. If a low sludge blanket and/or high oxygen concentrations are maintained, phosphorus release in the final clarifier can be limited. Further reduction of total phosphorus is possible with filtration only. Measures against high return flow phosphorus loads are mechanical dewatering of excess sludge and chemical precipitation of digester supernatant.

  10. HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO(sub 2)) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor

  11. Bounds for graph regularity and removal lemmas

    CERN Document Server

    Conlon, David

    2011-01-01

    We show, for any positive integer k, that there exists a graph in which any equitable partition of its vertices into k parts has at least ck^2/\\log^* k pairs of parts which are not \\epsilon-regular, where c,\\epsilon>0 are absolute constants. This bound is tight up to the constant c and addresses a question of Gowers on the number of irregular pairs in Szemer\\'edi's regularity lemma. In order to gain some control over irregular pairs, another regularity lemma, known as the strong regularity lemma, was developed by Alon, Fischer, Krivelevich, and Szegedy. For this lemma, we prove a lower bound of wowzer-type, which is one level higher in the Ackermann hierarchy than the tower function, on the number of parts in the strong regularity lemma, essentially matching the upper bound. On the other hand, for the induced graph removal lemma, the standard application of the strong regularity lemma, we find a different proof which yields a tower-type bound. We also discuss bounds on several related regularity lemmas, inclu...

  12. Carbon dioxide removal in gas treating processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidal, H.

    1992-06-01

    The main contribution of this work is the development of a simple and reliable modelling technique on carbon dioxide removal describing the vapor-liquid equilibria of CO{sub 2} in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. By making use of measured pH data, the author has circumvented the problem of estimating interaction parameters, activity coefficients, and equilibrium constants in the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The applicability of the model is best demonstrated on the tertiary amine system using MDEA. For this system, the VLE is accurately represented for temperatures in the range 25 to 140{sup o}C, for CO{sub 2} loadings from 0.001 to 1 mol/mol, and for amine molarities usually encountered in acid gas treating processes. The absorption of CO{sub 2} into solutions containing the sterically hindered amine AMP, is also well described by the model. The equilibrium of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents containing a glycol (TEG,DEG) and an alkonolamine (MEA,DEA) has been measured at temperatures encountered in the absorption units. An equilibrium model has been developed for the CO{sub 2}/TEG/MEA system for estimation of CO{sub 2} partial pressures, covering loadings and temperatures for both absorption and desorption conditions. An important spin-off of the work described is that two new experimental set-ups have been designed and built. 154 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs.

  13. Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-02-01

    Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

  14. Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

    2005-12-09

    In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

  15. Removal of cesium from red deer meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect was studied of marinading on the reduction of cesium radionuclide activity in red deer meat contaminated by ingestion of feed containing 134Cs+137Cs from radioactive fallout following the Chernobyl accident. Two types of marinade were studied, viz., a vinegar infusion and a vinegar infusion with an addition of vegetables and spices. The meat was chopped to cubes of about 1.5 cm in size and the marinading process took place at temperatures of 5 and 11 degC. The drop of cesium content in the meat was determined by gamma spectrometry at given time intervals. The replacement of the marinade and the duration of the process were found to maximally affect efficiency. If the solution was not replaced, about 80% of cesium radionuclides were removed after seven hours of marinading. With one replacement of the infusion the drop in 134Cs+137Cs radioactivity amounted to up to 90% after seven hours of marinading. No effects were shown of vegetable additions to the vinegar infusion and of the change in temperature from 5 to 11 degC on the efficiency of the process. (author). 3 tabs., 6 refs

  16. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding

  17. Carbon dioxide removal in gas treating processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main contribution of this work is the development of a simple and reliable modelling technique on carbon dioxide removal describing the vapor-liquid equilibria of CO2 in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. By making use of measured pH data, the author has circumvented the problem of estimating interaction parameters, activity coefficients, and equilibrium constants in the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The applicability of the model is best demonstrated on the tertiary amine system using MDEA. For this system, the VLE is accurately represented for temperatures in the range 25 to 140oC, for CO2 loadings from 0.001 to 1 mol/mol, and for amine molarities usually encountered in acid gas treating processes. The absorption of CO2 into solutions containing the sterically hindered amine AMP, is also well described by the model. The equilibrium of CO2 in mixed solvents containing a glycol (TEG,DEG) and an alkonolamine (MEA,DEA) has been measured at temperatures encountered in the absorption units. An equilibrium model has been developed for the CO2/TEG/MEA system for estimation of CO2 partial pressures, covering loadings and temperatures for both absorption and desorption conditions. An important spin-off of the work described is that two new experimental set-ups have been designed and built. 154 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs

  18. Removal of lead oxide dust from air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, M.O.; Sulaymon, A.H.; Sameh, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    This work concerns the removal of lead oxide dust from air using granular beds. Theoretical and experimental aspects of the problem have been studied. It has been found that the order of efficiencies of the different packing types used for capturing lead oxide aerosol at velocity range 17-26 cm/sec, and column height range 5-20 cm is as follows: rashing rings, glass wool, plastic wire mesh and glass beads. The penetration is decreased exponentially as the bed height increases for all types of packing investigated. The overall and individual maximum penetration velocities (at a given packing height) exist for all types of packing studied. The algebraic change of the magnitudes of diffusion, gravitational and impaction mechanisms equals zero at the maximum penetration velocity. At a given air velocity and packing height, a definite particle aerosol diameter appears with maximum penetration for all types of packing considered. The constants in the mathematical model representing the penetration of lead oxide in different types of packing have been determined. 25 references, 10 figures. 1 table.

  19. Modified TEDA impregnants for methyl iodine removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the more successful impregnants for methyl iodide removal has been TEDA (Triethylene Diamine). The high activity of this compound owes as much to its rigid structure as to its basicity. Drawbacks to the use of TEDA as an impregnant have been (1) its vapor pressure and (2) that it is a solid and must be dissolved in water before applying to the charcoal. It is reported that the addition of C-Alkyl groups to the TEDA molecule can serve the purpose of decreasing the vapor pressure of the TEDA molecule. Thus improved performance at higher temperatures is expected when such modified TEDA compounds are used. Charcoals impregnated with C-Alkyl derivatives of TEDA are capable of retentions of more than 99% of the input methyl iodide under standard test conditions at 1300C, 95% R.H. Repeated tests of such charcoals have shown their ability, under standard test conditions, to retain greater than 99% methyl iodide at 250C, 95% R.H

  20. Simulation tools for hazardous waste removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bills, K.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The primary mission of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during World War 2 was the processing of pure plutonium metal in support of the Manhattan Project. By-products of this process include radioactive cesium-137 and strontium-90. Between 1943 and 1951, the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) at ORNL were built to collect, neutralize, and storage these by-products. Currently, twelve gunite tanks and four stainless steel tanks are located on the ORNL complex. Characterization studies of these tanks in 1994 indicated that the structural integrity of some of the tanks is questionable. These risks provided the motivation for remediation and relocation of waste stored in the ORNL tanks. A number of factors complicate the remediation process. The material stored in these tanks ranges from liquid to sludge and solid and is composed of organic materials, heavy metals, and radionuclides. Furthermore, the tanks, which range from 12 to 50 ft in diameter, are located below ground and in the middle of the ORNL complex. The only access to these tanks is through one of three access ports that are either 12 or 24 in. in diameter. These characteristics provide a daunting challenge: how can material be safely removed from such a confined structure? This paper describes the existing strategy and hardware projected for use in the remediation process. This is followed by a description of an integrated hardware system model. This investigation has isolated a few key areas where further work may be needed.

  1. REMOVAL OF CONTAMINANTS USING PLANTS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.K. Sharma, S.K. Bhasin, Pernita Dogra, Shilpi Khatri, Sunita Ahuja

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This review lists the environmental benefits from the presence of various plants regarding their application in removing contamination. From the review we concluded that Phytoremediation which is sustainable and inexpensive process, is fast emerging as a viable alternative to conventional remediation methods, and will be most suitable for a developing country like India. Most of the studies have been done in developed countries and knowledge of suitable plants is particularly limited. It is clear from the review that fast growing plants with high biomass and good metal uptake ability are needed. In most of the contaminated sites hardy, tolerant, weed species exist and phytoremediation through these and other nonedible species can restrict the contaminant from being introduced into the food web. Much more work needs to be performed to further confirm: (1 the correlation between transpiration gas and condensate water; (2 soil community contaminant degradation rate; (3 soil flux rate of VOCs; (4 contaminant exposure to the root zone versus sap and condensate water; (5 leaf litter exposure pathway; and (6 microwells to determine the zone of contamination.

  2. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  3. NaK handling and removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium-potassium alloy is used in specific application in French Fast Breeder Reactors as: cold traps, NaK bubbler for argon purification, valves and also in experimental irradiation devices. lt has been preferred to sodium because it is liquid from + 7 deg. C for the most common peritectic alloy. After its use, NaK is considered as a hazardous waste (nuclear or not) due to its high reactivity with air and water. The most important risk remains in handling NaK systems which have not been operated for some time. The NaK will be covered with a crust of the superoxide K02 which is a strong oxidising agent. Thermodynamically, K02 will react with most organic material or metallic dust or swarfs and can also react with additional NaK to give sufficient heat to boil part of the NaK, resulting in a sudden increase in pressure and small explosions. We describe the formation given to experimenters in our Sodium School and the CEA's experience in treating specific devices for transportation, decanting of tanks, tank opening and NaK removal. (author)

  4. Boron removal from molten silicon using sodium-based slags

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Changhao; Hu Bingfeng; Huang Xinming

    2011-01-01

    Slag refining,as an important option for boron removal to produce solar grade silicon (SOG-Si) from metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si),has attracted increasing attention.In this paper,Na2CO3-SiO2 systems were chosen as the sodium-based refining slag materials for boron removal from molten silicon.Furthermore,the effect of Al2O3 addition for boron removal was studied in detail,which showed that an appropriate amount of Al2O3 can help retention of the basicity of the slags,hence improving the boron removal rate.

  5. Removal of Phosphate from Aqueous Solution with Modified Bentonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐艳葵; 童张法; 魏光涛; 李仲民; 梁达文

    2006-01-01

    Bentonite combined with sawdust and other metallic compounds was used to remove phosphate from aqueous solutions in this study. The adsorption characteristics of phosphate on the modified bentonite were investigated, including the effects of temperature, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration of phosphate and pH on removal of phosphate by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The results showed that 98% of phosphate removal rate was obtained since sawdust and bentonite used in this investigation were abundantly and locally available. It is concluded that modified bentonite is a relatively efficient, low cost and easily available adsorbent for the removal of phosphate from aqueous solutions.

  6. Percutaneous lithotripsy for removing difficult bile duct stones using endoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, See Hyung; Sohn, Chul Ho; Kim, Young Hwan [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    To describe efficacy of percutaneous lithotripsy for removing difficult bile duct stones using endoscopy. A total of 88 patients with difficulties for the removal of bile duct stones using endoscopy (an impacted stone, stone size > 15 mm, intrahepatic duct (IHD) stone, stone size to bile duct diameter ratio > 1.0), were enrolled in this study. A 12 Fr sheath was inserted through the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tract, and then nitrol stone baskets and a 0.035' snare wire were used to capture, fragment and remove the stones. The technical and clinical success rates were analyzed, together with an analysis of any complications. The overall technical success rate of stone removal was achieved in 79 of 88 patients (89.8%). In five of nine patients with failed stone removal, small residual IHD stones were noted on a cholangiogram. Even if stone removal failed in these cases, cholangitic symptoms were improved and the drainage catheter was successfully removed. Therefore, clinical success was achieved in 84 of 88 patients (95.5%). There were no significant procedure-related complications, except for sepsis in one case. Billiary stone removal using the stone basket and guide-wire snare technique through the PTBD tract is a safe and effective procedure that can be used as a primary method in patients with difficulties for the removal of bile duct stones using endoscopy.

  7. Removal of bromide and natural organic matter by anion exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Susan; Singer, Philip C

    2010-04-01

    Bromide removal by anion exchange was explored for various water qualities, process configurations, and resin characteristics. Simulated natural waters containing different amounts of natural organic matter (NOM), bicarbonate, chloride, and bromide were treated with a polyacrylate-based magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin on a batch basis to evaluate the effectiveness of the resin for removal of bromide. While bromide removal was achieved to some degree, alkalinity (bicarbonate), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and chloride were shown to inhibit bromide removal in waters with bromide concentrations of 100 and 300 microg/L. Water was also treated using a two-stage batch MIEX process. Two-stage treatment resulted in only a slight improvement in bromide removal compared to single-stage treatment, presumably due to competition with the high concentration of chloride which is present along with bromide in natural waters. In view of the relatively poor bromide removal results for the MIEX resin, a limited set of experiments was performed using polystyrene resins. DOC and bromide removal were compared by treating model waters with MIEX and two polystyrene resins, Ionac A-641 and Amberlite IRA910. The two polystyrene resins were seen to be more effective for bromide removal, while the MIEX resin was more effective at removing DOC. PMID:20045170

  8. Materials removal by water jets with high relative velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By way of introduction approaches to the systematic apprehension of the material removal by water jets up to 1000 bar are made. In drilling experiments the effects of jet dynamic are studied, using the controlled disintegration of the jet. Using model-layer-systems the removal of layers by the 'natural' disintegrating fluid-jet is examined. The mechanisms of material removal and the consequences on the praxis of cleaning are discussed. A concept to measure specially the effects of the dynamic jet components is developed. In conclusion aspects of progress in this methods of material removal are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Experimental research on performance of gaseous methyl iodide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the circumstance of gaseous methyl iodide removal process in containment venting system, taking the deionized water and alkalescent sodium thiosulphate as absorber, the experimental researches on the performance of gaseous methyl iodide removal were carried out at different solution temperatures and concentrations. And the effects of two types of mechanisms, namely mass transfer and chemical reaction, on gaseous methyl iodide removal process were analyzed based on the experimental results. The research results show that at room temperature, the mass transfer mechanism plays a dominant role in gaseous methyl iodide removal process through the absorption of alkalescent sodium thiosulphate solution. Thus, the slow chemical reaction rate is the major factor that limits gaseous methyl iodide removal efficiency. With temperature increasing, the effect of chemical reaction is constantly enhanced in the methyl iodide removal process. However, the gas absorption process will get into an insensitive region when the reaction rate reaches to a certain point and the continuously enhancing chemical reaction rate will not greatly influence the removal efficiency. At that point, mass transfer performance becomes the major factor that limits gaseous methyl iodide removal process. The efficiency of gaseous methyl iodide removal can be further improved by necessary means of enhancing mass transfer process through increasing contact surface and so on. (authors)

  10. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  11. Performance evaluation of organic emulsion liquid membrane on phenol removal

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Y S; Hashim, M A

    2014-01-01

    The percentage removal of phenol from aqueous solution by emulsion liquid membrane and emulsion leakage was investigated experimentally for various parameters such as membrane:internal phase ratio, membrane:external phase ratio, emulsification speed, emulsification time, carrier concentration, surfactant concentration and internal agent concentration. These parameters strongly influence the percentage removal of phenol and emulsion leakage. Under optimum membrane properties, the percentage removal of phenol was as high as 98.33%, with emulsion leakage of 1.25%. It was also found that the necessity of carrier for enhancing phenol removal was strongly dependent on the internal agent concentration.

  12. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  13. Turbidity and microbes removal from water using an electrochemical filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in-house designed and fabricated Electrochemical fibrous graphite filter (ECF) was used to remove turbidity and microbes. The filter was found to be effective in removing sub micron size indium turbidity from RAPS-1 moderator water, iron turbidity from Active Process Cooling Water (APCW) of Kaiga Generating Station and microbial reduction from process cooling water RAPS-2. Unlike conventional turbidity removal by addition of coagulants and biocide chemical additions for purification, ECF is a clean way to remove the turbidity without contaminating the system and is best suited for close loop systems

  14. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitek Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR.The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  15. Effects of topsoil removal on seedling emergence and species diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

    1994-02-01

    Approximately 800 hectares on the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site and vicinity are contaminated with Plutonium. As part of a cleanup effort, both the vegetation and the top 5--10 cm of soil may be removed. A study was developed to determine the effects of topsoil removal on seedling emergence and plant species diversity. Trial plots were prepared by removing 5, 10, or 20 cm of topsoil, seeding a mix of nine native species, mulching with straw, and then anchoring the straw with erosion netting. Additional plots (0 topsoil removal treatment) were lightly bladed to remove existing vegetation and then treated as above. Approximately 85 mm of supplemental irrigation was applied to help initiate germination during early spring. Seedling density data of seeded and nonseeded species was collected following emergence, and species diversity was calculated with the Shannon diversity index for the nonseeded species. Densities of seeded species either were unaffected by or increased with increased depth of topsoil removal. In general, densities of nonseeded species decreased with increased depth of topsoil removal. The number of species, species diversity and evenness also decreased with increased depth of topsoil removal. Initial emergence of seeded species is apparently unaffected by topsoil removal at this site.

  16. ADSORPTION POTENTIAL OF UNMODIFIED RICE HUSK FOR BORON REMOVAL

    OpenAIRE

    Hasfalina Che Man,; Wei Hong Chin,; Maryam Rahmati Zadeh,; Mohd Rashid Mohd Yusof

    2012-01-01

    A batch study of boron removal from aqueous solutions by adsorption using rice husk was carried out. The effect of selected parameters such as particle size, pH, adsorbent dosage, and initial concentration of adsorbate on boron removal was investigated in the study. Results showed that the maximum boron removal was obtained with the rice husk particle size between 0.425 mm and 1.0 mm at pH 5. Boron removal was increased with an increasing amount of adsorbent dosage but decreased as the initia...

  17. Use of a subsurface flow constructed wetland to remove fish water macronutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Serra

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a subsurface flow constructed wetland onthe removal of fish water macronutrients, a experiment was carried out at cimento-amianto box cultivated with Thypha spp on monocultive system. The parameters evaluated were: Nitrogen removal, Phosphors removal, Sulfur removal, Calcium removal, Potassium removal and Magnesium removal. The results showed 36,15% of Nitrogen removal, 43,30% of Phosphors removal, 28,20% of Sulfur removal, 26,30% of Calcium removal, 31,61% of Potassium removal and 16,20% of Magnesium removal. As conclusions, the performance of the system on Nitrogen total removal was smaller whem comparated with other autors; the phosphorous removal was considered satisfactory and the performance of the system on Sulfur, Calcium, Magnesium and Potassium removal was low.

  18. Coagulation Enhancement for Removal of Trihalomethane Precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trihalomethanes can be formed as a result of chemical reactions between the organic matter present in water and chlorine added for disinfection purposes. Trihalomethanes have serious health effects and are found in treated water effluent of Zai Water Treatment plant, and some components are more predominant than others. This study aims to minimize THM level by enhancing the coagulation process through the addition of treatment chemicals. The parameters used in the determination of the optimum chemical additions in the different steps of coagulation enhancement include turbidity removal, percent reduction of bromide, heavy metal residuals, percent reduction of total organic carbon, and the concentration of trihalomethanes formed. The treatment chemicals used in the study were potassium permanganate, cationic polymer, powdered activated carbon, and chlorine. The doses of these treatment chemical were 1.2 ppm, 0.5ppm, 1.4ppm, and 2.65ppm; respectively. The coagulants tested were alum, ferric chloride, and ferrous sulfate. The optimum doses of individual coagulants were 20 ppm for alum, 10ppm for ferrous sulfate, and 10 ppm ferric chloride. Ferrous sulfate was found to be the best single coagulant resulting in 51% reduction in total organic carbon and 34.24 ppb of trihalomethane concentration. The best combination of coagulants was 18 ppm of alum and 2 ppm of ferric chloride. Increasing dose of powder activated carbon has no impact on the turbidity, total organic carbon, or trihalomethanes. This could mean that the chemical addition has been optimized so that no further reductions in trihalomethanes and total organic carbon are possible. (authors) 18 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Environmental Remediation: Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah

    2012-11-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous persistent semi-volatile organic compounds. They are contaminants that are resistant to degradation and can remain in the environment for long periods due to their high degree of conjugation, and aromaticity. PAHs are present in industrial effluents as products of incomplete combustion processes of organic compounds. Petroleum, coal and shale oil contain extremely complex mixtures of these PAHs, and their transport and refining process can also result in the release of PAHs. It is therefore prudent that such effluents are treated before discharge into the environment. In this project, different approaches to the treatment of PAHs have been investigated. Hydrous pyrolysis has been explored as a potential technique for degrading PAHs in water using anthracene as a model compound. The experiments were performed under different conditions of temperature, substrate, redox systems and durations. The conditions include oxidising systems comprising pure water, hydrogen peroxide and Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts to assess a range of reactivities. Products observed in GCMS analysis of the extract from the water phase include anthrone, anthraquinone, xanthone and multiple hydro-anthracene derivatives (Paper I). In addition a modified version of the Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water oxidising system was tested; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts were adopted for the conversion of a mixture of anthracene, fluorene and fluoranthene. The rate of conversion in the mixture was high as compared to that of only anthracene (Paper II). Also the use of LECA (Lightweight expanded clay aggregates) as an adsorbent (Paper III) for PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) removal from water has been.(Author)

  20. Fluoride removal from water by nano filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As any oligo element, fluoride is necessary and beneficial for human health to low concentrations, but an excess amount of fluoride ions in drinking water has been known to cause undesirable effects, especially tooth and bones fluoro sis. The maximum acceptable concentration of fluoride in drinking water was fixed by the World Health Organization according to the climate in the range of 1 mg.L-1 to 1,2 mg.L-1. Many methods have been used to remove fluoride from water such as precipitation, adsorption, electrocoagulation and membrane processes. Technologies using membrane processes are being used in many applications, particularly for brackish water desalination. Nano filtration seems to be the best process for a good selective defluorination of fluorinated waters. The main objective of this work was to investigate the retention of fluoride anions by nano filtration. The first part of this study deals with the characterisation of the NF HL2514TF membrane. The influence of various experimental parameters such as initial fluoride content, feed pressure, permeate flux, ionic strength, type of cation associated to fluoride and pH were studied in the second part. Results show that the retention order for the salts tested was TR(Na2SO4) > TR(CaCl2) > TR(NaCl), showing a retention sequence inversely proportional to the salt diffusion coefficients in water. It was also shown that charge effects could not be neglected, and a titration experiments confirmed that the NF membrane carry a surplus of negatively charged groups. Fluoride retention exceeds 60 pour cent, and increases with increasing concentration, where the rejection mechanism is related to the dielectric effects. Speigler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parametersσand Ps respectively, the reflexion coefficient of the membrane and the solute permeability of ions. The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with predominance of the

  1. Removal of carbonaceous contaminants from silica aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Ping; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Capture of micrometeorite material from low Earth orbit or dust grains around active comets for return to terrestrial laboratories, capable of practicing the most up to date techniques of chemical isotopic and mineralogical analysis, will greatly enhance our knowledge of primitive material in the solar system. The next generation of space launched cosmic dust collectors will undoubtedly include extremely low density target materials such as silica aerogel as the decelerating and arresting medium. This material has been found to be clean from the point of view of inorganic elements and is thus acceptable for the purpose of harvesting grains to be studied by, for example PIXE, INAA, or SXRF. However, the process used in making aerogel leaves substantial carbon and hydrogen containing residues which would negate their suitability for collection and subsequent investigation of the very important CHON particles. Attempts to precondition aerogel by solvent extraction or heating at 500 C and 750 C in air for 24 hours or under a vacuum of 2(7)(exp -7) torr at 260 C were largely ineffective except that pyrolysis did reduce volatile species. In this investigation we have examined the use of supercritical fluids for the purpose of extracting organic residues. The logic of the new approach is that beyond the supercritical point a substance has the solvating properties of a liquid but the viscosity characteristics of a gas. For example carbon dioxide becomes supercritical at a pressure of 73 atmospheres and a temperature of 31 C; in consequence it can transform to a very powerful and ultraclean solvent. It can dissolve organic matter from low molecular weight up to molecules containing 90 carbon atoms. On release of pressure the fluid reverts to a gas which can easily be pumped away and removed from the substrate being extracted.

  2. Evaluation of Heat Removal Performance of Passive Decay Heat Removal system for S-CO2 Cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modular systems is able to be transported by large trailer. Moreover, dry cooling system is applied for waste heat removal. The characteristics of MMR takes wide range of construction area from coast to desert, isolated area and disaster area. In MMR, Passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS) is necessary for taking the advantage on selection of construction area where external support cannot be offered. The PDHRS guarantees to protect MMR without external support. In this research, PDHRS of MMR is introduced and decay heat removal performance is analyzed. The PDHRS guarantees integrity of reactor coolant system. The high level of decay heat (2 MW) can be removed by PDHRS without offsite power

  3. Electrochemical antimony removal from accumulator acid: Results from removal trials in laboratory cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► In non-divided cells, antimony did not deposit at cathode due to oxidation of Sb(III) at anode. ► Copper and graphite were found to be the most suitable electrode materials for antimony deposition. ► Sb species covering electrode lowers deposition efficiency with time. ► Thus, periodical renewal of cathode material is necessary. ► Calculated specific electroenergy consumption was relatively high. ► In contrast, absolute energy consumption was low due to small quantities of antimony removed. - Abstract: Regeneration of spent accumulator acid could be an alternative process for crystallization, neutralisation and disposal. Therefore, for the first time in a study of the possibilities of electrochemical removal of antimony and accumulator acid regeneration on a laboratory scale, two synthetic and several real systems containing sulfuric acid of concentrations ranging between 28% and 36%, and antimony species were tested. Discontinuous electrochemical reactors with anion exchange membranes were successfully used in these experiments, which were conducted at a temperature of 35 °C. Removal of antimony using cells that were not divided by a separator, however, was not possible. In selected experiments, by varying the electrode material, type of electrolyte, and cell current, the concentration of antimony could be reduced from the range of 5 ppm to 0.15 ppm. This resulted in current efficiencies between 0.00002% and 0.001%, and in specific electroenergy demands between 100 Wh L−1 and 2000 Wh L−1. In other experiments on substances with antimony contents up to 3500 mg L−1, the current efficiencies obtained were more than a thousandfold higher. In contrast to the formally high relative energy consumption parameters absolute demand parameters are relatively small and favour the electrochemical method in small scale application. Besides plate electrodes, 3D-cathodes were used. Copper- and graphite cathodes produced the best results.

  4. Removal of heavy metals from biowaste: modelling of heavy metal behaviour and development of removal technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Veeken, A.

    1998-01-01

    In the Netherlands, recycling of solid organic waste streams as compost only becomes possible if the compost complies with the heavy metals standards of the BOOM decree. This dissertation focuses on the removal of heavy metals from biowaste, i.e. the source separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Biowaste is referred to as an organic waste stream but surprisingly it was found that a large part of biowaste is composed of inorganic material, i.e. sand, silt and clay minerals. The i...

  5. 76 FR 60357 - Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 301 Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas.... SUMMARY: We are amending the golden nematode regulations by removing the townships of Elba and Byron in... two townships are free of golden nematode, and we have determined that regulation of these areas is...

  6. 49 CFR 192.165 - Compressor stations: Liquid removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Liquid removal. 192.165... Components § 192.165 Compressor stations: Liquid removal. (a) Where entrained vapors in gas may liquefy under the anticipated pressure and temperature conditions, the compressor must be protected against...

  7. Influence of biofilm thickness on micropollutants removal in nitrifying MBBRs

    OpenAIRE

    Torresi, Elena; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Smets, Barth F.; Plósz, Benedek G.; Christensson, M.

    2015-01-01

    The removal of pharmaceuticals was investigated in nitrifying Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBRs) containing carriers with different biofilm thicknesses. The biofilm with the thinnest thickness was found to have the highest nitrification and biotransformation rate for some key pharmaceuticals. Microbial analysis revealed a different relative abundance of nitrifying guilds in the different carriers, suggesting the importance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria in removal of micropollutants.

  8. 30 CFR 785.14 - Mountaintop removal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hill, except as provided for in 30 CFR 824.11(a)(6), by removing substantially all of the overburden.... (3) The requirements of 30 CFR 824 are made a specific condition of the permit. (4) All other... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mountaintop removal mining. 785.14 Section...

  9. Nitrogen Removal from Molten Steel under Argon DC Glow Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ming-shan; DING Wei-zhong; LU Xiong-gang

    2005-01-01

    Under argon DC glow plasma, the nitrogen removal from molten steel was studied. The experimental result showed that nitrogen mass percent could be reduced to 0.000 8%. The change of polarity had no impact on nitrogen removal when the nitrogen mass percent was low. The mechanism of denitrogenation of molten steel under argon DC glow plasma was discussed.

  10. Method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder involves the direct chemical treatment of TiB2 powders with a gaseous boron halide, such as BCl3, at temperatures in the range of 5000-8000C. The BCl3 reacts with the oxides to form volatile species which are removed by the BCl3 exit stream

  11. Removal of COD from laundry wastewater by electrocoagulation/electroflotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal efficiency of COD in the treatment of simulated laundry wastewater using electrocoagulation/electroflotation technology is described. The experimental results showed that the removal efficiency was better, reaching to about 62%, when applying ultrasound to the electrocoagulation cell. The solution pH approached neutrality in all experimental runs. The optimal removal efficiency of COD was obtained by using the applied voltage of 5 V when considering the energy efficiency and the acceptable removal efficiency simultaneously. The Cl- concentration of less than 2500 ppm had a positive effect on the removal efficiency. The performance of the monopolar connection of electrodes was better than that of the bipolar connection in this work. In addition, the removal efficiency of using Al electrodes was higher in comparison with using Fe electrodes in the study. The highest COD removal amount per joule was found to be 999 mg dm-3 kW h-1 while using two Al electrodes, although the removal efficiency increased with the number of Al plates

  12. The investigation of parameters affecting boron removal by electrocoagulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron removal from wastewaters by electrocoagulation using aluminum electrode material was investigated in this paper. Several working parameters, such as pH, current density, boron concentration and type and concentration of supporting electrolyte were studied in an attempt to achieve a higher removal capacity. The experiments were carried out by keeping the pH of solution constant and optimum pH of solution was determined 8.0 for the aluminum electrode. Although energy consumption increased with decreasing boron concentration, which conductivity of these solutions were low, boron removal efficiency was higher at 100 mg/L than that of 1000 mg/L. Current density was an important parameter affecting removal efficiency. Boron removal efficiency and energy consumption increased with increasing current density from 1.2 to 6.0 mA/cm2. The types of different supporting electrolyte were experimented in order to investigate to this parameter effect on boron removal. The highest boron removal efficiency, 97%, was found by CaCl2. Added CaCl2 increased more the conductivity of solution according to other supporting electrolytes, but decreased energy consumption. The results showed to have a high effectiveness of the electrocoagulation method in removing boron from aqueous solutions

  13. 40 CFR 156.144 - Residue removal instructions-general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the heading “Storage and Disposal.” (c) Exemption for residential/household use products. Residential/household use pesticide products are exempt from the residue removal instruction requirements in this... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Residue removal...

  14. 40 CFR 35.6200 - Eligibility for removal Cooperative Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligibility for removal Cooperative Agreements. 35.6200 Section 35.6200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND..., political subdivisions and Indian Tribes may apply for removal Cooperative Agreements....

  15. Native plant community response to alien plant invasion and removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jara ANDREU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the potential ecological impacts of invasive species, removal of alien plants has become an important management challenge and a high priority for environmental managers. To consider that a removal effort has been successful requires both, the effective elimination of alien plants and the restoration of the native plant community back to its historical composition and function. We present a conceptual framework based on observational and experimental data that compares invaded, non-invaded and removal sites to quantify invaders’ impacts and native plant recover after their removal. We also conduct a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the impacts of plant invaders and the consequences of their removal on the native plant community, across a variety of ecosystems around the world. Our results that invasion by alien plants is responsible for a local decline in native species richness and abundance. Our analysis also provides evidence that after removal, the native vegetation has the potential to recover to a pre-invasion target state. Our review reveal that observational and experimental approaches are rarely used in concert, and that reference sites are scarcely employed to assess native species recovery after removal. However, we believe that comparing invaded, non-invaded and removal sites offer the opportunity to obtain scientific information with relevance for management.

  16. 49 CFR 230.31 - Flues to be removed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... inspecting the entire interior of the boiler and its bracing. After removing the flues, the steam locomotive..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.31 Flues to be removed. (a) Inspection of the boiler interior. During the...

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) removal by sorption: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Shanti; Bal Krishna, K C; Sarukkalige, Ranjan

    2016-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic micro pollutants which are persistent compounds in the environment due to their hydrophobic nature. Concerns over their adverse effects in human health and environment have resulted in extensive studies on various types of PAHs removal methods. Sorption is one of the widely used methods as PAHs possess a great sorptive ability into the solid media and their low aqueous solubility property. Several adsorbent media such as activated carbon, biochar, modified clay minerals have been largely used to remove PAHs from aqueous solution and to immobilise PAHs in the contaminated soils. According to the past studies, very high removal efficiency could be achieved using the adsorbents such as removal efficiency of activated carbon, biochar and modified clay mineral were 100%, 98.6% and >99%, respectively. PAHs removal efficiency or adsorption/absorption capacity largely depends on several parameters such as particle size of the adsorbent, pH, temperature, solubility, salinity including the production process of adsorbents. Although many studies have been carried out to remove PAHs using the sorption process, the findings have not been consolidated which potentially hinder to get the correct information for future study and to design the sorption method to remove PAHs. Therefore, this paper summarized the adsorbent media which have been used to remove PAHs especially from aqueous solutions including the factor affecting the sorption process reported in 142 literature published between 1934 and 2015. PMID:26820781

  18. REMOVAL OF SOLUBLE BOD(5) IN PRIMARY CLARIFIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project was directed to evaluating means for increasing BOD removal from primary treatment systems treating pulp and paper wastes. An improved understanding of the optimal conditions for soluble and colloidal BOD removal should permit increasing efficiency in total organic r...

  19. Modified technique of Wolbachia removal from Malaysian Aedes albopictus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sylvia; Joanne; Indra; Vythilingam; Nava; Yugavathy; Jonathan; Inbaraj; Doss

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To develop an artificial and modified Wolbaehia removal technique using tetracycline from naturally Wolbachia infected Aedes albopictus(Ae.albopictus)so as to be able to produce generations of Wolbaehia free offsprings.Methods:In this study,seven different tetracycline treatment methods were conducted to obtain the best removal method.Four methods focused on larvae tetracycline treatment,one method on both larvae and adult tetracycline treatment and the last two methods on adult mosquito sucrose treatment.Results:All larval tetracycline treatments resulted in either high larvae mortality,sterile F_o adult mosquitoes or unsuccessful Wolbaehia removal.Treatment of both larvae and adults resulted in reduced larvae mortality,successful Wolbachia removal but slow mosquito fecundity.As for the adult treatment,1.0 mg/mL as previously published was not aisle to completely remove Wolbaehia in F,generation whereas 1.25 mg/mL successfully removed Wolbachia from F,and F,mosquitoes in 2 weeks.Conclusions:This method is different from the previously published methods as it provides an improved Watbachia removal technique from Ae.albopictus with high egg hatchability.low larvae mortality,increased fecundity and better Wolbaehia removal rate.

  20. Modified technique of Wolbachia removal from Malaysian Aedes albopictus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sylvia Joanne; Indra Vythilingam; Nava Yugavathy; Jonathan Inbaraj Doss

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop an artificial and modified Wolbachia removal technique using tetracycline from naturally Wolbachia infected Aedes albopictus (Ae. albopictus) so as to be able to produce generations of Wolbachia free offsprings.Methods:In this study, seven different tetracycline treatment methods were conducted to obtain the best removal method. Four methods focused on larvae tetracycline treatment, one method on both larvae and adult tetracycline treatment and the last two methods on adult mosquito sucrose treatment.Results:All larval tetracycline treatments resulted in either high larvae mortality, sterile F0 adult mosquitoes or unsuccessful Wolbachia removal. Treatment of both larvae and adults resulted in reduced larvae mortality, successful Wolbachia removal but slow mosquito fecundity. As for the adult treatment, 1.0 mg/mL as previously published was not able to completely remove Wolbachia in F1 generation whereas 1.25 mg/mL successfully removed Wolbachia from F1 and F2 mosquitoes in 2 weeks. Conclusions: This method is different from the previously published methods as it provides an improved Wolbachia removal technique from Ae. albopictus with high egg hatchability, low larvae mortality, increased fecundity and better Wolbachia removal rate.