WorldWideScience

Sample records for africa linking availability

  1. Advancing drug availability-experiences from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Richard A; Kaye, Richard Mugula; Ddungu, Henry; Mwangi-Powell, Faith

    2010-07-01

    International health and drug regulatory authorities acknowledge that analgesics (especially opioids) are insufficiently available for pain management in many countries. In Africa, reported morphine consumption is far below the global mean, with multiple factors hampering opioid supply. Since 2006, the African Palliative Care Association has hosted three regional drug availability workshops across the continent to address this issue. Using an interactive format, the workshops have identified country-specific barriers to opioid and other essential medication accessibility before supporting participants to develop action plans to address recognized impediments. Despite multiple challenges, a number of successes have arisen from the implementation of the plans. However, key issues remain, including the introduction of supportive policy environments, effective educational initiatives, and measures to address supply-chain obstacles impeding drug availability. Copyright 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stronger links between CERN and South Africa

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    iThemba LABS in South Africa is a research facility that, about twenty years ago, started to treat oncological patients with particle beams. Its collaboration with CERN has steadily grown over the years. After becoming a member of the ALICE and ATLAS Collaborations, today iThemba LABS is planning to buy a new medical-use cyclotron proton facility, and is seeking to strengthen its links with CERN and Europe also in this field by collaborating with ENLIGHT. The cyclotron will be dedicated to proton therapy – the only one of its kind in the southern hemisphere.   iThemba LABS (Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences) was established near Cape Town, South Africa almost 50 years ago as the continent's base for the Southern Universities Nuclear Institute that is now used mainly for material science research. In the 1980s, iThemba built a 200MeV cyclotron and, following its construction, in the early 1990s branched into a new scientific field: radiation and nuclear medicine. ...

  3. BER and Availability Measured on FSO Link

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvíčala, R.; Kvičera, V.; Grábner, M.; Fišer, Ondřej

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2007), s. 7-12 ISSN 1210-2512 Grant - others:Ministry of research and technology(DE) 17050531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : free space optical links * quality of service * meteorological optical range * link unavailability * bit error rate Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  4. Africa's energy sector: energy availability and the underlying financial challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesa, Motselisi; Ndyeshobola, Ahmed.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a brief overview of energy availability in Africa and the attendant financing concerns in the African energy sector. The paper departs from three key premises: firstly that energy resources in Africa are abundant, but current trends in its consumption and inherent externalities are unsustainable. This abundance is also affected by social and political stability. Secondly, that the majority of Africa's population lacks access to adequate energy services. Poverty issues and effects undermine the urgency of energy and environmental concerns. Thirdly, that Africa's sustainable development calls for more energy supply not less. Future energy requirements and related supply and financing issues are discussed with the time horizon of the year 2020. (author)

  5. Availability and Reliability of FSO Links Estimated from Visibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tatarko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on estimation availability and reliability of FSO systems. Shortcut FSO means Free Space Optics. It is a system which allows optical transmission between two steady points. We can say that it is a last mile communication system. It is an optical communication system, but the propagation media is air. This solution of last mile does not require expensive optical fiber and establishing of connection is very simple. But there are some drawbacks which have a bad influence of quality of services and availability of the link. Number of phenomena in the atmosphere such as scattering, absorption and turbulence cause a large variation of receiving optical power and laser beam attenuation. The influence of absorption and turbulence can be significantly reduced by an appropriate design of FSO link. But the visibility has the main influence on quality of the optical transmission channel. Thus, in typical continental area where rain, snow or fog occurs is important to know their values. This article gives a description of device for measuring weather conditions and information about estimation of availability and reliability of FSO links in Slovakia.

  6. Limits to the availability of groundwater in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, W. Mike

    2012-06-01

    The recent paper on Africa's groundwater by MacDonald et al (2012) has attracted much attention. This is good news, especially since groundwater has been widely ignored, misunderstood or abused, as a fundamental global resource. This important paper goes a long way to raising the profile of groundwater in Africa by providing first-order estimates of the available storage (taking account of saturated aquifer thickness and porosity) as well as mapping expected water yields (aquifer productivity) in that continent. Reliable estimates of groundwater resources can now be set against the far more widely reported surface water availability. The constraints of the methodology used to compile these maps are duly acknowledged, and are well within the hydrogeological state-of-the-art. The paper is backed by carefully reviewed sources of data and a considerable effort has been made to incorporate the extensive grey literature. It is important that this benchmark study is received with the acclaim it deserves. However, the headline—that groundwater storage is some 100 times the annual renewable surface waters—could be misconstrued as implying that groundwater is an abundant new resource, which it is not. Whilst groundwater is key to sustainable development, renewability and accessibility issues need to be addressed. The paper may therefore be seized upon to justify unsustainable groundwater exploitation, or to provide an argument against funding to NGOs and others, for water provision for needy communities. Some constraints that must be taken into account are elaborated here. The conclusions of the paper (MacDonald et al 2012) demonstrate that modest yields of groundwater are quite widely available at accessible depths and sufficient to sustain small communities and their development, but larger yields (>5 l s-1) suitable for urban development or major agricultural schemes are unlikely outside of the sedimentary terrain. The availability and accessibility of groundwater

  7. The Policy Paradox in Africa: Strengthening Links between ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    term political expediencies, they must also tap the broad knowledge base that is furnished by policy research in Africa, particularly economic research on a continent confronting chronic and crushing poverty. What role does ...

  8. Stress hormones link food availability and population processes in seabirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Piatt, John F.; Wingfield, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Catastrophic population declines in marine top predators in the northern Pacific have been hypothesized to result from nutritional stress affecting reproduction and survival of individuals. However, empirical evidence for food-related stress in wild animals is frequently lacking or inconclusive. We used a field endocrinology approach to measure stress, identify its causes, and examine a link between stress and population processes in the common murre Uria aalge. We tested the empirical relationship between variations in the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) and food abundance, reproduction, and persistence of individuals at declining and increasing colonies in Cook Inlet, Alaska, from 1996 to 2001. We found that CORT secretion in murres is independent of colony, reproductive stage effects, and gender of individuals, but is directly negatively correlated with abundance of their food. Baseline CORT reflected current food abundance, whereas acute stress-induced CORT reflected food abundance in the previous month. As food supply diminished, increased CORT secretion predicted a decrease in reproductive performance. At a declining colony, increased baseline levels of CORT during reproduction predicted disappearance of individuals from the population. Persistence of individuals in a growing colony was independent of CORT during reproduction. The obtained results support the hypothesis that nutritional stress during reproduction affects reproduction and survival in seabirds. This study provides the first unequivocal evidence for CORT secretion as a mechanistic link between fluctuations in food abundance and population processes in seabirds. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  9. Linking research to policy: West Africa workshop highlights use of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    9 mars 2016 ... Eighty people—researchers, policymakers, donors, and experts—attended a workshop to discuss the current situation and emerging evidence on maternal and child health in West Africa. Held in Dakar, Senegal from February 18-20, 2016, the workshop provided a unique platform for researchers working ...

  10. Disentangling the relative effects of bushmeat availability on human nutrition in central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, John E.; Olivero, Jesús; Real, Raimundo; Farfán, Miguel A.; Márquez, Ana L.; Vargas, J. Mario; Ziegler, Stefan; Wegmann, Martin; Brown, David; Margetts, Barrie; Nasi, Robert

    2015-02-01

    We studied links between human malnutrition and wild meat availability within the Rainforest Biotic Zone in central Africa. We distinguished two distinct hunted mammalian diversity distributions, one in the rainforest areas (Deep Rainforest Diversity, DRD) containing taxa of lower hunting sustainability, the other in the northern rainforest-savanna mosaic, with species of greater hunting potential (Marginal Rainforest Diversity, MRD). Wild meat availability, assessed by standing crop mammalian biomass, was greater in MRD than in DRD areas. Predicted bushmeat extraction was also higher in MRD areas. Despite this, stunting of children, a measure of human malnutrition, was greater in MRD areas. Structural equation modeling identified that, in MRD areas, mammal diversity fell away from urban areas, but proximity to these positively influenced higher stunting incidence. In DRD areas, remoteness and distance from dense human settlements and infrastructures explained lower stunting levels. Moreover, stunting was higher away from protected areas. Our results suggest that in MRD areas, forest wildlife rational use for better human nutrition is possible. By contrast, the relatively low human populations in DRD areas currently offer abundant opportunities for the continued protection of more vulnerable mammals and allow dietary needs of local populations to be met.

  11. 77 FR 23630 - Lifeline and Link Up Reform and Modernization; Advancing Broadband Availability Through Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    .... 2948] Lifeline and Link Up Reform and Modernization; Advancing Broadband Availability Through Digital... Commission's Rulemaking proceeding concerning rules that comprehensively reform and modernize the Lifeline... applicability. Subject: Lifeline and Link Up Reform and Modernization; Advancing Broadband Availability through...

  12. Linking African Farmers to Markets (eARN Africa) | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Studies suggest that information and communication technologies (ICTs) are of some benefit to farmers, but how effective they are in linking small farmers to wider markets remains unknown. There are knowledge gaps concerning the factors conditioning farmers' adoption of ICTs, farmers' benefits from ICTs, drivers of ...

  13. 77 FR 19125 - Lifeline and Link Up Reform and Modernization, Advancing Broadband Availability Through Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... and Link Up Reform and Modernization, Advancing Broadband Availability Through Digital Literacy... Universal Service Fund's Lifeline program. The reforms adopted will substantially strengthen protections...

  14. Linking erosion history and mantle processes in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J. R.; Braun, J.; Flowers, R. M.; Baby, G.; Wildman, M.; Guillocheau, F.; Robin, C.; Beucher, R.; Brown, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    The large, low relief, high elevation plateau of southern Africa has been the focus of many studies, but there is still considerable debate about how it formed. Lack of tectonic convergence and crustal thickening suggests mantle dynamics play an important role in the evolution of topography there, but the time and specific mechanisms of topographic development are still contested. Many mantle mechanisms of topographic support have been suggested including dynamic topography associated with either deep or shallow mantle thermal anomalies, thermochemical modification of the lithosphere, and plume tails related to Mesozoic magmatic activity. These mechanisms predict different timing and patterns of surface uplift such that better constraints on the uplift history have the potential to constrain the nature of the source of topographic support. Here we test several of these geodynamic hypotheses using a landscape evolution model that is used to predict the erosional response to surface uplift. Several recent studies have provided a clearer picture of the erosion history of the plateau surface and margins using low temperature thermochronology and the geometries of the surrounding offshore depositional systems. Model results are directly compared with these data. We use an inversion method (the Neighborhood Algorithm) to constrain the range in erosional and uplift parameters that can best reproduce the observed data. The combination of different types of geologic information including sedimentary flux, landscape shape, and thermochronolology is valuable for constraining many of these parameters. We show that both the characteristics of the geodynamic forcing as well as the physical characteristics of the eroding plateau have significant control on the plateau erosion patterns. Models that match the erosion history data well suggest uplift of the eastern margin in the Cretaceous ( 100 Ma) followed by uplift of the western margin 20 Myr later. The amplitude of this uplift

  15. Hydrologic modeling for monitoring water availability in Eastern and Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, A.; Harrison, L.; Shukla, S.; Pricope, N. G.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    Severe droughts in 2015, 2016 and 2017 in Ethiopia, Southern Africa, and Somalia have negatively impacted agriculture and municipal water supplies resulting in food and water insecurity. Information from remotely sensed data and field reports indicated that the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) Land Data Assimilation (FLDAS) accurately tracked both the anomalously low soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff conditions. This work presents efforts to more precisely monitor how the water balance responds to water availability deficits (i.e. drought) as estimated by the FLDAS with CHIRPS precipitation, MERRA-2 meteorological forcing and the Noah33 land surface model.Preliminary results indicate that FLDAS streamflow estimates are well correlated with observed streamflow where irrigation and other channel modifications are not present; FLDAS evapotranspiration (ET) is well correlated with ET from the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance model (SSEBop) in Eastern and Southern Africa. We then use these results to monitor availability, and explore trends in water supply and demand.

  16. 77 FR 71712 - Lifeline and Link Up Reform and Modernization, Advancing Broadband Availability Through Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... and Link Up Reform and Modernization, Advancing Broadband Availability Through Digital Literacy... Lifeline and Link Up Reform and Modernization Report and Order (Order). The Commission submitted revisions... and Uses: In the 2012 Lifeline Reform Order, 77 FR 12952, March 2, 2012, we take actions necessary to...

  17. Rationalizing historical successes of malaria control in Africa in terms of mosquito resource availability management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Gerry F; Seyoum, Aklilu; Knols, Bart G J

    2004-08-01

    Environmental management of mosquito resources is a promising approach with which to control malaria, but it has seen little application in Africa for more than half a century. Here we present a kinetic model of mosquito foraging for aquatic habitats and vertebrate hosts that allows estimation of malaria transmission intensity by defining the availability of these resources as the rate at which individual mosquitoes encounter and use them. The model captures historically observed responses of malaria transmission to environmental change, highlights important gaps in current understanding of vector ecology, and suggests convenient solutions. Resource availability is an intuitive concept that provides an adaptable framework for models of mosquito population dynamics, gene flow, and pathogen transmission that can be conveniently parameterized with direct field measurements. Furthermore, the model presented predicts that drastic reductions of malaria transmission are possible with environmental management and elucidates an ecologic basis for previous successes of integrated malaria control in Africa before the advent of DDT or chloroquine. Environmental management for malaria control requires specialist skills that are currently lacking in sub-Saharan Africa where they are needed most. Infrastructure and human capacity building in clinical, public health, and environmental disciplines should therefore be prioritized so that growing financial support for tackling malaria can be translated into truly integrated control programs. Copyright 2004 The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

  18. Precipitation variability in the winter rainfall zone of South Africa during the last 1400 yr linked to the austral westerlies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Stager

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The austral westerlies strongly influence precipitation and ocean circulation in the southern temperate zone, with important consequences for cultures and ecosystems. Global climate models anticipate poleward retreat of the austral westerlies with future warming, but the available paleoclimate records that might test these models have been limited to South America and New Zealand, are not fully consistent with each other and may be complicated by influences from other climatic factors. Here we present the first high-resolution diatom and sedimentological records from the winter rainfall region of South Africa, representing precipitation in the equatorward margin of the westerly wind belt during the last 1400 yr. Inferred rainfall was relatively high ∼1400–1200 cal yr BP, decreased until ∼950 cal yr BP, and rose notably through the Little Ice Age with pulses centred on ∼600, 530, 470, 330, 200, 90, and 20 cal yr BP. Synchronous fluctuations in Antarctic ice core chemistry strongly suggest that these variations were linked to changes in the westerlies. Equatorward drift of the westerlies during the wet periods may have influenced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation by restricting marine flow around the tip of Africa. Apparent inconsistencies among some aspects of records from South America, New Zealand and South Africa warn against the simplistic application of single records to the Southern Hemisphere as a whole. Nonetheless, these findings in general do support model projections of increasing aridity in the austral winter rainfall zones with future warming.

  19. Access to Schooling in a Post-Apartheid South Africa: Linking Concepts to Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fataar, Aslam

    1997-07-01

    This paper focuses on the policy issue of expanding schooling in a post-apartheid South Africa. The Project of placing about two million children of school-going age in school is viewed as central to the rebuilding of South Africa. The paper argues that this project should be located within the peculiar history of this country's educational underdevelopment. Challenging the constraining influence of the New Right context should be central in conceptualising the provision of expanded school access. Access policy should be based on a notion of educational development that is linked to the overall socioeconomic development of this society. The view is promoted in this paper that a policy of quantitative expansion of schooling should not ignore the quality of such schooling.

  20. Community-based carbon sequestration in East Africa: Linking science and sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, N. E.

    2004-12-01

    International agreements on climate change have set the stage for an expanding market for greenhouse gas emissions reduction credits. Projects that can generate credits for trading are diverse, but one of the more controversial types involve biological carbon sequestration. For several reasons, most of the activity on these "sinks" projects has been in Latin America and Southeast Asia. Yet people in sub-saharan Africa could benefit from properly implemented projects. This poster will discuss estimates of the potential and risks of such projects in East Africa, and will describe in detail a case study located in central Tanzania and now part of the World Bank's BioCarbon Fund portfolio. Understanding climate variability and risk can effectively link international agreements on climate change, local realities of individual projects, and the characteristics of targeted ecosystems.

  1. Precipitation variability in the winter rainfall zone of South Africa during the last 1400 yr linked to the austral westerlies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stager, J. C.; Mayewski, P. A.; White, J.; Chase, B. M.; Neumann, F. H.; Meadows, M. E.; King, C. D.; Dixon, D. A.

    2012-05-01

    The austral westerlies strongly influence precipitation and ocean circulation in the southern temperate zone, with important consequences for cultures and ecosystems. Global climate models anticipate poleward retreat of the austral westerlies with future warming, but the available paleoclimate records that might test these models have been limited to South America and New Zealand, are not fully consistent with each other and may be complicated by influences from other climatic factors. Here we present the first high-resolution diatom and sedimentological records from the winter rainfall region of South Africa, representing precipitation in the equatorward margin of the westerly wind belt during the last 1400 yr. Inferred rainfall was relatively high ∼1400-1200 cal yr BP, decreased until ∼950 cal yr BP, and rose notably through the Little Ice Age with pulses centred on ∼600, 530, 470, 330, 200, 90, and 20 cal yr BP. Synchronous fluctuations in Antarctic ice core chemistry strongly suggest that these variations were linked to changes in the westerlies. Equatorward drift of the westerlies during the wet periods may have influenced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation by restricting marine flow around the tip of Africa. Apparent inconsistencies among some aspects of records from South America, New Zealand and South Africa warn against the simplistic application of single records to the Southern Hemisphere as a whole. Nonetheless, these findings in general do support model projections of increasing aridity in the austral winter rainfall zones with future warming.

  2. Cases of human brucellosis in Sweden linked to Middle East and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofolo, Giuliano; Fasanella, Antonio; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Platone, Ilenia; Sacchini, Lorena; Persiani, Tiziana; Boskani, Talar; Rizzardi, Kristina; Wahab, Tara

    2016-05-17

    Human brucellosis cases are still reported each year in Sweden despite eradication of the disease in animals. Epidemiological investigation has never been conducted to trace back the source of human infection in the country. The purpose of the study was to identify the source of infection for 16 human brucellosis cases that occurred in Sweden, during the period 2008-2012. The isolates were identified as Brucella melitensis and MLVA-16 genotyping revealed 14 different genotypes of East Mediterranean and Africa lineages. We also reported one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis (LAB) that was shown to be epidemiological linked to one of the cases in the current study. Brucella melitensis was the only species diagnosed, confirming its highest zoonotic potential in the genus Brucella, and MLVA-16 results demonstrated that the cases of brucellosis in Sweden herein investigated, are imported and linked to travel in the Middle East and Africa. Due to its zoonotic concerns, any acute febrile illness linked to recent travel within those regions should be investigated for brucellosis and samples should be processed according to biosafety level 3 regulations.

  3. Linking-In through Education? Exploring the Educational Question in Africa from the Perspective of Flows and (dis Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayke Kaag

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Education is the fourth Sustainable Development Goal (SDG and considered an important gateway to many other SDGs being achieved. Education is, however, frequently interpreted in terms of its technical aspects, i.e., furthering skills and knowledge and strengthening human capital for promoting development. By contrast, this paper focuses less on this technical aspect and instead analyses the current educational landscape in Africa as a field in which flows of investment, ideas, and people influence connections between Africans and the rest of the world. As an effect of the structural adjustment programs in the 1980s, public spending on education in many African countries went down, allowing private education initiatives to spring up. These were, for a large part, financed by Western and Arab countries. Over the last fifteen years, investment flows in education from emerging global powers like China, Brazil, Malaysia, and Turkey have contributed to an increasingly diversified educational landscape in Africa. This paper argues that these investments not only allow Africans to improve their educational levels but that these diverse forms of education also have an influence on connections and social orientations in African societies. Educational programs go together with specific worldviews. In addition, people develop their social networks through educational trajectories. Both orientations and connections influence people’s choices and opportunities in their further lives, and thus individual and societal development. Interestingly, often investments in education by external parties are not isolated endeavors, but also used as a means to get linked-in in local societies for such diverse purposes as religion or business interests. Illustrating my argument with examples taken from my research on Gulf charities and on Turkish schools in Africa, I will explore how the new connectivities that come with the changing educational landscape in Africa

  4. Price and availability of healthy food: a study in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Norman J; Steyn, Nelia P; Fourie, Jean; De Villiers, Anniza

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the availability of healthier food choices and whether a healthier diet costs more than a diet commonly eaten by low-income families in South Africa. We visited 21 food stores in 14 rural towns of the Western Cape province of South Africa. We recorded the price and availability of 66 food items, including both commonly consumed foods as well as healthy options. Healthier food choices are available in supermarkets. However, many towns only have small food stores with a limited selection of healthy foods. We compared the prices of six commonly consumed foods with healthier versions of those foods (e.g., whole-wheat bread in place of white bread). Healthier foods typically cost between 10% and 60% more when compared on a weight basis (Rand per 100 g), and between 30% and 110% more when compared based on the cost of food energy (Rand per 100 kJ). Next, we compared the extra cost of a healthier diet compared to a typical South African menu. On average, for an adult male, the healthier diet costs Rand 10.2 (US$1.22) per day more (69% more). For a household with five occupants, the increased expenditure on food by eating a healthier diet is approximately Rand 1090 per month (US$140); this represents a high proportion (>30%) of the total household income for most of the population. Healthier food choices are, in general, considerably more expensive than commonly consumed foods. As a result, a healthy diet is unaffordable for the large majority of the population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 77 FR 25609 - Lifeline and Link Up Reform and Modernization, Advancing Broadband Availability Through Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... and Link Up Reform and Modernization, Advancing Broadband Availability Through Digital Literacy... Up Reform and Modernization Report and Order (Order). The Commission submitted revisions to those... inspection under 47 CFR 0.459 of the Commission's rules. Needs and Uses: In the 2012 Lifeline Reform Order...

  6. Improving public health training and research capacity in Africa: a replicable model for linking training to health and socio-demographic surveillance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill R. Williams

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research training for public health professionals is key to the future of public health and policy in Africa. A growing number of schools of public health are connected to health and socio-demographic surveillance system field sites in developing countries, in Africa and Asia in particular. Linking training programs with these sites provides important opportunities to improve training, build local research capacity, foreground local health priorities, and increase the relevance of research to local health policy. Objective: To increase research training capacity in public health programs by providing targeted training to students and increasing the accessibility of existing data. Design: This report is a case study of an approach to linking public health research and training at the University of the Witwatersrand. We discuss the development of a sample training database from the Agincourt Health and Socio-demographic Surveillance System in South Africa and outline a concordant transnational intensive short course on longitudinal data analysis offered by the University of the Witwatersrand and the University of Colorado-Boulder. This case study highlights ways common barriers to linking research and training can be overcome. Results and Conclusions: This collaborative effort demonstrates that linking training to ongoing data collection can improve student research, accelerate student training, and connect students to an international network of scholars. Importantly, the approach can be adapted to other partnerships between schools of public health and longitudinal research sites.

  7. Links between Climate Change Mitigation, Adaptation and Development in Land Policy and Ecosystem Restoration Projects: Lessons from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Favretto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Links between climate change adaptation, mitigation and development co-benefits in land policy and ecosystem restoration projects are hampered by limited understanding of how multi-faceted policy, institutions and projects interact. This paper explores perceptions of co-benefits produced by two community-level projects that pursue ecosystem restoration in South Africa. It develops a new analytical framework to assess the enabling and constraining factors in delivering triple wins for adaptation, mitigation and development. The aim is to investigate the potential for integrating community perspectives into policy and project development and implementation. Data collected through mixed-methods (policy analysis, semi-structured interviews, participatory site visits and focus groups are analysed using thematic analysis. We find that while the projects investigated have potential to deliver triple wins, siloed approaches presently hinder effective implementation. In particular, project focus on job creation hampers the achievement of longer-term mitigation and adaptation benefits. Operational flexibility, long-term goals, multi-sectoral cooperation and enabling frameworks are imperative to the achievement of triple wins. Findings provide valuable lessons that can be applied across sub-Saharan Africa towards achieving triple wins in climate and development policy and practice, especially those developed with job creation and ecological restoration aims.

  8. A Criminological Perspective on the Prenatal Abuse of Substances during Pregnancy and the Link to Child Abuse in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovens, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The increase in drug abuse in South Africa has had major social implications in the country. Problems associated with drug dependency are poverty, unemployment, a heavier burden on the health care system, the disintegration of family systems and drug-related crimes. Another area of concern is the link between drug abuse and child abuse. While…

  9. The Availability of Space Service for Inter-Satellite Links in Navigation Constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yinyin; Wang, Yueke; Chen, Jianyun

    2016-08-19

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are widely used in low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite navigation; however, their availability is poor for users in medium Earth orbits (MEO), and high Earth orbits (HEO). With the increasing demand for navigation from MEO and HEO users, the inadequate coverage of GNSS has emerged. Inter-satellite links (ISLs) are used for ranging and communication between navigation satellites and can also serve space users that are outside the navigation constellation. This paper aims to summarize their application method and analyze their service performance. The mathematical model of visibility is proposed and then the availability of time division ISLs is analyzed based on global grid points. The BeiDou navigation constellation is used as an example for numerical simulation. Simulation results show that the availability can be enhanced by scheduling more satellites and larger beams, while the presence of more users lowers the availability. The availability of navigation signals will be strengthened when combined with the signals from the ISLs. ISLs can improve the space service volume (SSV) of navigation constellations, and are therefore a promising method for navigation in MEO/HEO spacecraft.

  10. HIV incidence in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of available data with implications for surveillance and prevention planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunstein, Sarah L.; van de Wijgert, Janneke H. H. M.; Nash, Denis

    2009-01-01

    HIV incidence estimation is increasingly being incorporated into HIV/AIDS surveillance activities in both resource-rich and developing countries. We conducted a systematic review to assess the availability of HIV incidence data from sub-Saharan Africa. We examined peer-reviewed articles, conference

  11. Mapping rootable depth and root zone plant-available water holding capacity of the soil of sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, Johan G.B.; Claessens, Lieven; Heuvelink, Gerard B.M.; Hengl, Tom; Ruiperez González, Maria; Bussel, van Lenny G.J.; Guilpart, Nicolas; Yang, Haishun; Cassman, Kenneth G.

    2018-01-01

    In rainfed crop production, root zone plant-available water holding capacity (RZ-PAWHC) of the soil has a large influence on crop growth and the yield response to management inputs such as improved seeds and fertilisers. However, data are lacking for this parameter in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This

  12. Available data sources for monitoring non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandai, M.; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens; Day, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Health information systems for monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa (SA) are relatively less advanced than those for infectious diseases (particularly tuberculosis and HIV) and for maternal and child health. NCDs are now the largest cause of premature...

  13. Drought-adaptation potential in Fagus sylvatica: linking moisture availability with genetic diversity and dendrochronology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R Pluess

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microevolution is essential for species persistence especially under anticipated climate change scenarios. Species distribution projection models suggested that the dominant tree species of lowland forests in Switzerland, European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., might disappear from most areas due to expected longer dry periods. However, if genotypes at the moisture boundary of the species climatic envelope are adapted to lower moisture availability, they can serve as seed source for the continuation of beech forests under changing climates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With an AFLP genome scan approach, we studied neutral and potentially adaptive genetic variation in Fagus sylvatica in three regions containing a dry and a mesic site each (n(ind. = 241, n(markers = 517. We linked this dataset with dendrochronological growth measures and local moisture availabilities based on precipitation and soil characteristics. Genetic diversity decreased slightly at dry sites. Overall genetic differentiation was low (F(st = 0.028 and Bayesian cluster analysis grouped all populations together suggesting high (historical gene flow. The Bayesian outlier analyses indicated 13 markers with three markers differing between all dry and mesic sites and the others between the contrasting sites within individual regions. A total of 41 markers, including seven outlier loci, changed their frequency with local moisture availability. Tree height and median basal growth increments were reduced at dry sites, but marker presence/absence was not related to dendrochronological characteristics. CONCLUSION AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE: The outlier alleles and the makers with changing frequencies in relation to moisture availability indicate microevolutionary processes occurring within short geographic distances. The general genetic similarity among sites suggests that 'preadaptive' genes can easily spread across the landscape. Yet, due to the long live span of

  14. Availability and quality of routine morbidity data: review of studies in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roomaney, Rifqah A; Pillay-van Wyk, Victoria; Awotiwon, Oluwatoyin F; Nicol, Edward; Joubert, Jané D; Bradshaw, Debbie; Hanmer, Lyn A

    2017-04-01

    Routine health information systems (RHISs) provide data that are vital for planning and monitoring individual health. Data from RHISs could also be used for purposes for which they were not originally intended, provided that the data are of sufficient quality. For example, morbidity data could be used to inform burden of disease estimations, which serve as important evidence to prioritize interventions and promote health. The objective of this study was to identify and assess published quantitative assessments of data quality related to patient morbidity in RHISs in use in South Africa. We conducted a review of literature published between 1994 and 2014 that assessed the quality of data in RHISs in South Africa. World Health Organization (WHO) data quality components were used as the assessment criteria. Of 420 references identified, 11 studies met the inclusion criteria. The studies were limited to tuberculosis and HIV. No study reported more than 3 WHO data quality components or provided a quantitative assessment of quality that could be used for burden of disease estimation. The included studies had limited geographical focus and evaluated different source data at different levels of the information system. All studies reported poor data quality. This review confirmed concerns about the quality of data in RHISs, and highlighted the need for a comprehensive evaluation of the quality of patient-level morbidity data in RHISs in South Africa.

  15. The use of GRACE data to monitor natural and anthropogenic induced variations in water availability across Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Sultan, Mohamed; Wahr, John; Yan, Eugene

    2014-05-27

    Inter-annual trends in terrestrial water storage (TWS) were extracted from monthly (01/2003–09/2012) Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data acquired over Africa and correlated (in a geographic information system [GIS] environment) with relevant temporal remote sensing, geologic, and hydrologic datasets. Findings include the following: (1) large sectors of Africa are undergoing statistically significant TWS variations (+ 44 mm/yr to -15 mm/yr) due to natural and anthropogenic causes; (2) warming of the tropical Atlantic Ocean apparently intensified Atlantic monsoons and increased precipitation and TWS over western and central Africa; (3) warming in the central Indian Ocean decreased precipitation and TWS over eastern Africa; (4) the high frequency of flooding events increased TWS over the Zambezi and Okavango basins; (5) extraction of fossil groundwater decreased TWS over the Saharan aquifers; (6) deforestation decreased TWS in three subbasins (Ubangi, Congo, and Sangha) of the Congo River Basin; and (7) the construction of dams increased TWS in the Blue Nile and Atbara subbasins. Given the 10 years of monthly GRACE data acquired on the subbasin scale across the globe, as well as the plans underway for deployment of a GRACE-FO and GRACE-II, using GRACE-derived TWS data should be considered an alternative, viable index for measuring temporal and spatial variations in water availability.

  16. Dynamic root growth and architecture responses to limiting nutrient availability: linking physiological models and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Johannes A; Schurr, Ulrich; Fiorani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the study of root phenotypic plasticity in response to sub-optimal environmental factors and the genetic control of these responses have received renewed attention. As a path to increased productivity, in particular for low fertility soils, several applied research projects worldwide target the improvement of crop root traits both in plant breeding and biotechnology contexts. To assist these tasks and address the challenge of optimizing root growth and architecture for enhanced mineral resource use, the development of realistic simulation models is of great importance. We review this research field from a modeling perspective focusing particularly on nutrient acquisition strategies for crop production on low nitrogen and low phosphorous soils. Soil heterogeneity and the dynamics of nutrient availability in the soil pose a challenging environment in which plants have to forage efficiently for nutrients in order to maintain their internal nutrient homeostasis throughout their life cycle. Mathematical models assist in understanding plant growth strategies and associated root phenes that have potential to be tested and introduced in physiological breeding programs. At the same time, we stress that it is necessary to carefully consider model assumptions and development from a whole plant-resource allocation perspective and to introduce or refine modules simulating explicitly root growth and architecture dynamics through ontogeny with reference to key factors that constrain root growth. In this view it is important to understand negative feedbacks such as plant-plant competition. We conclude by briefly touching on available and developing technologies for quantitative root phenotyping from lab to field, from quantification of partial root profiles in the field to 3D reconstruction of whole root systems. Finally, we discuss how these approaches can and should be tightly linked to modeling to explore the root phenome. © 2013.

  17. Revealing the link between licensed outlets and violence: counting venues versus measuring alcohol availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenbin; Chikritzhs, Tanya

    2011-09-01

    Associations between alcohol-related harms and numbers of outlets at the neighbourhood level have been demonstrated; however, the degree to which alcohol consumption or sales plays a part in levels of violence is not clear. This has contributed to uncertainty regarding the actual mechanisms by which outlet density may influence levels of violence. This ecological cross-sectional study investigated the effect of outlet numbers and alcohol sales on the risk of assault in Western Australia. For 2000/2001, information on type, number and wholesale alcohol purchases of all licensed outlets in operation, police-reported assault offences, socioeconomic/demographic data were obtained from official sources. Multivariate negative binomial regression was applied to at local government area level in order to assess associations between outlet density, alcohol sales and violence occurring in both licensed and domestic settings. Average alcohol sales volume per off-site outlet was significantly associated with all measures of assault. Numbers of on-site outlets significantly predicted violence with the exception of assaults occurring at residential premises. Alcohol sales from off-site outlets predicted violence occurring at on-site outlets. The link between on-site outlets and violence may be primarily underpinned by negative amenity effects while off-site outlet effects occur via increased availability. Alcohol sales volumes from off-site outlets influence levels of violence, which occur at both licensed and residential settings. The substantial and wide-ranging effects of liquor stores on alcohol-related harms may have been underestimated in the literature and by policy makers. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  18. The fate of nitrogen is linked to iron(II) availability in a freshwater lake sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Elizabeth K.; Thamdrup, Bo

    2017-05-01

    The fate of nitrogen in natural environments is controlled by anaerobic nitrate-reducing processes by which nitrogen is removed as N2 or retained as NH4+. These processes can potentially be driven by oxidation of reduced inorganic compounds at oxic-anoxic interfaces. Several studies have investigated the use of Fe2+ as an electron donor in nitrate reduction in bacterial cultures, however current information on this process in the environment is sparse. We aimed to determine whether nitrate-reducing processes in the freshwater Lake Almind (Silkeborg, Denmark) were linked to Fe2+ oxidation. Anaerobic sediment slurries were supplemented with 15N-substrates and electron donors (Fe2+ and/or acetate) to characterize nitrate-reducing processes under environmentally relevant substrate concentrations and at higher concentrations traditionally used in microbial enrichment studies. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, DNRA, was stimulated by Fe2+ addition in 7 of 10 slurry experiments and in some cases, denitrification was concomitantly reduced. The determined kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) for Fe2+-driven DNRA were 4.7 μmol N L-1 d-1 and 33.8 μmol Fe2+ L-1, respectively and reaction stoichiometry for Fe2+:NH4+ (8.2:1) was consistent with that of predicted stoichiometry (8:1). Conversely, under enrichment conditions, denitrification was greatly increased while DNRA rates remained unchanged. Increased Fe2+ concentrations may be exploited by DNRA organisms and have an inhibitory effect on denitrification, thus Fe2+ may play a role in regulating N transformations in Lake Almind. Furthermore, we suggest enrichment conditions may promote the adaptation or change of microbial communities to optimally utilize the available high substrate concentrations; misrepresenting metabolisms occurring in situ.

  19. Drivers of household food availability in sub-Saharan Africa based on big data from small farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelat, Romain; Lopez-Ridaura, Santiago; Giller, Ken E; Herrero, Mario; Douxchamps, Sabine; Andersson Djurfeldt, Agnes; Erenstein, Olaf; Henderson, Ben; Kassie, Menale; Paul, Birthe K; Rigolot, Cyrille; Ritzema, Randall S; Rodriguez, Daniel; van Asten, Piet J A; van Wijk, Mark T

    2016-01-12

    We calculated a simple indicator of food availability using data from 93 sites in 17 countries across contrasted agroecologies in sub-Saharan Africa (>13,000 farm households) and analyzed the drivers of variations in food availability. Crop production was the major source of energy, contributing 60% of food availability. The off-farm income contribution to food availability ranged from 12% for households without enough food available (18% of the total sample) to 27% for the 58% of households with sufficient food available. Using only three explanatory variables (household size, number of livestock, and land area), we were able to predict correctly the agricultural determined status of food availability for 72% of the households, but the relationships were strongly influenced by the degree of market access. Our analyses suggest that targeting poverty through improving market access and off-farm opportunities is a better strategy to increase food security than focusing on agricultural production and closing yield gaps. This calls for multisectoral policy harmonization, incentives, and diversification of employment sources rather than a singular focus on agricultural development. Recognizing and understanding diversity among smallholder farm households in sub-Saharan Africa is key for the design of policies that aim to improve food security.

  20. Drivers of household food availability in sub-Saharan Africa based on big data from small farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelat, Romain; Lopez-Ridaura, Santiago; Herrero, Mario; Douxchamps, Sabine; Djurfeldt, Agnes Andersson; Erenstein, Olaf; Henderson, Ben; Kassie, Menale; Paul, Birthe K.; Rigolot, Cyrille; Ritzema, Randall S.; Rodriguez, Daniel; van Asten, Piet J. A.; van Wijk, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    We calculated a simple indicator of food availability using data from 93 sites in 17 countries across contrasted agroecologies in sub-Saharan Africa (>13,000 farm households) and analyzed the drivers of variations in food availability. Crop production was the major source of energy, contributing 60% of food availability. The off-farm income contribution to food availability ranged from 12% for households without enough food available (18% of the total sample) to 27% for the 58% of households with sufficient food available. Using only three explanatory variables (household size, number of livestock, and land area), we were able to predict correctly the agricultural determined status of food availability for 72% of the households, but the relationships were strongly influenced by the degree of market access. Our analyses suggest that targeting poverty through improving market access and off-farm opportunities is a better strategy to increase food security than focusing on agricultural production and closing yield gaps. This calls for multisectoral policy harmonization, incentives, and diversification of employment sources rather than a singular focus on agricultural development. Recognizing and understanding diversity among smallholder farm households in sub-Saharan Africa is key for the design of policies that aim to improve food security. PMID:26712016

  1. Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mol, Michael J.; Stadler, Christian; Ariño, Africa

    2017-01-01

    Context matters in the global strategy literature. We discuss how Africa, as a setting that received limited attention in the past, offers opportunity to challenge existing theory and develop new insights. The overall goal is to ask: What will the field of global strategic management look like on...... we have engaged with Africa in a similar manner as we have done with other emerging economies? We also introduce the papers published in this special issue and highlight directions for future research.......Context matters in the global strategy literature. We discuss how Africa, as a setting that received limited attention in the past, offers opportunity to challenge existing theory and develop new insights. The overall goal is to ask: What will the field of global strategic management look like once...

  2. Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Laurent Fourchard & Aurelia Segatti, eds, Africa, 2015, 85 (1) : The Politics of Exclusion and Inclusion in Africa, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2015, 151 p. La vie en commun dans les villes africaines a été étudiée aussi bien par le prisme des conflits opposant des groupes définis par une appartenance revendiquée ou attribuée, que par celui des multiples formes d’échange et de coopération qui, à l’inverse, voient des individus d’origines diverses dépasser les assignations identitai...

  3. Interannual rainfall variability over the Cape south coast of South Africa linked to cut-off low associated rainfall

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, CJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of cut-off low (COL) associated rainfall on interannual rainfall variability over the Cape south coast region of South Africa for the period 1979-2011 is investigated. COLs are objectively identified and tracked on daily average 500 h...

  4. Climate change and human health: Spatial modeling of water availability, malnutrition, and livelihoods in Mali, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Marta M.; Lopez-Carr, David; Funk, Chris; Husak, Gregory J.; Chafe, Z.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops a novel approach for projecting climate trends in the Sahel in relation to shifting livelihood zones and health outcomes. Focusing on Mali, we explore baseline relationships between temperature, precipitation, livelihood, and malnutrition in 407 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) clusters with a total of 14,238 children, resulting in a thorough spatial analysis of coupled climate-health dynamics. Results suggest links between livelihoods and each measure of malnutrition, as well as a link between climate and stunting. A ‘front-line’ of vulnerability, related to the transition between agricultural and pastoral livelihoods, is identified as an area where mitigation efforts might be usefully targeted. Additionally, climate is projected to 2025 for the Sahel, and demographic trends are introduced to explore how the intersection of climate and demographics may shift the vulnerability ‘front-line’, potentially exposing an additional 6 million people in Mali, up to a million of them children, to heightened risk of malnutrition from climate and livelihood changes. Results indicate that, holding constant morbidity levels, approximately one quarter of a million children will suffer stunting, nearly two hundred thousand will be malnourished, and over one hundred thousand will become anemic in this expanding arid zone by 2025. Climate and health research conducted at finer spatial scales and within shorter projected time lines can identify vulnerability hot spots that are of the highest priority for adaptation interventions; such an analysis can also identify areas with similar characteristics that may be at heightened risk. Such meso-scale coupled human-environment research may facilitate appropriate policy interventions strategically located beyond today’s vulnerability front-line.

  5. Linking Life Skills and Norms with Adolescent Substance Use and Delinquency in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Mary H.; Graham, John W.; Caldwell, Linda L.; Smith, Edward A.; Bradley, Stephanie A.; Vergnani, Tania; Mathews, Cathy; Wegner, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    We examined factors targeted in two popular prevention approaches with adolescent drug use and delinquency in South Africa. We hypothesized adolescent life skills to be inversely related and perceived norms to be directly related to later drug use and delinquency. Multiple regression and a relative weights approach were conducted for each outcome…

  6. Population growth and the environment in Africa : local informal institutions, the missing link

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzucato, V.; Niemeijer, D.

    2002-01-01

    Population and environment debates regarding Africa, whether Malthusian or Boserupian in nature, focus on population levels as the driving force behind the relationship between environment and society. This article argues, instead, that how people adjust to their rise in numbers is more important

  7. Characteristics, availability and uses of vital registration and other mortality data sources in post-democracy South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Jané; Rao, Chalapati; Bradshaw, Debbie; Dorrington, Rob E.; Vos, Theo; Lopez, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    The value of good-quality mortality data for public health is widely acknowledged. While effective civil registration systems remains the ‘gold standard’ source for continuous mortality measurement, less than 25% of deaths are registered in most African countries. Alternative data collection systems can provide mortality data to complement those from civil registration, given an understanding of data source characteristics and data quality. We aim to document mortality data sources in post-democracy South Africa; to report on availability, limitations, strengths, and possible complementary uses of the data; and to make recommendations for improved data for mortality measurement. Civil registration and alternative mortality data collection systems, data availability, and complementary uses were assessed by reviewing blank questionnaires, death notification forms, death data capture sheets, and patient cards; legislation; electronic data archives and databases; and related information in scientific journals, research reports, statistical releases, government reports and books. Recent transformation has enhanced civil registration and official mortality data availability. Additionally, a range of mortality data items are available in three population censuses, three demographic surveillance systems, and a number of national surveys, mortality audits, and disease notification programmes. Child and adult mortality items were found in all national data sources, and maternal mortality items in most. Detailed cause-of-death data are available from civil registration and demographic surveillance. In a continent often reported as lacking the basic data to infer levels, patterns and trends of mortality, there is evidence of substantial improvement in South Africa in the availability of data for mortality assessment. Mortality data sources are many and varied, providing opportunity for comparing results and improved public health planning. However, more can and must be

  8. An evaluation of nine probiotics available in South Africa, August 2003

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objective. Although probiotics are not new, 5 new commercially available products have been launched onto the South African market in the last 2 years. Evaluations of products in the USA and Europe have shown poor correlation between label claims and actual contents. We undertook an evaluation of 9 ...

  9. FSL based estimation of white space availability in UHF TV bands in Bergvliet, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, AA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available in the UHF TV frequency bands. The free space loss (FSL) formula, together with a line of sight condition, are applied to the information about the location and power of TV transmitters around this area. The predictions show 61% correlation between...

  10. Linking Climate to Incidence of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (L. major) in Pre-Saharan North Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bounoua, Lahouari; Kahime, Kholoud; Houti, Leila; Blakey, Tara; Ebi, Kristie L.; Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thome, Kurtis; Dudek, Claire; Sahabi, Salah A.; Messouli, Mohammed; Makhlouf, Baghdad; EI Laamrani, Abderahmane; Boumezzough, Ali

    2013-08-20

    Shifts in surface climate may have changed the dynamic of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the pre-Saharan zones of North Africa. Caused by Leishmania major, this form multiplies in the body of rodents serving as reservoirs of the disease. The parasite is then transmitted to human hosts by the bite of a Phlebotomine sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) that was previously fed by biting an infected reservoir. We examine the seasonal and interannual dynamics of the incidence of this ZCL as a function of surface climate indicators in two regions covering a large area of the semi-arid Pre-Saharan North Africa. Results suggest that in this area, changes in climate may have initiated a trophic cascade that resulted in an increase in ZCL incidence.

  11. Geophysical Evidence to Link Terrestrial Insect Diversity and Groundwater Availability in Non-Riparian Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehringer, M.; Carr, G.; Long, H.; Parsekian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Wyoming, the third driest state in the United States, is home to a high level of biodiversity. In many cases, ecosystems are dependent on the vast systems of water resting just below the surface. This groundwater supports a variety of organisms that live far from surface water and its surrounding riparian zone, where more than 70% of species reside. In order to observe the correlation of groundwater presence and biodiversity in non-riparian ecosystems, a study was conducted to look specifically at terrestrial insect species linked to groundwater in Bighorn National Forest, WY. It was hypothesized that the more groundwater present, the greater the diversity of insects would be. Sample areas were randomly selected in non-riparian zones and groundwater was evaluated using a transient electromagnetic (TEM) geophysical instrument. Electrical pulses were transmitted through a 40m by 40m square of wire to measure levels of resistivity from near the surface to several hundred meters below ground. Pulses are echoed back to the surface and received by a smaller 10m by 10m square of wire, and an even smaller 1m by 1m square of wire set inside the larger transmitting wire. An insect population and species count was then conducted within the perimeter set by the outer transmitting wire. The results were not as hypothesized. More inferred groundwater below the surface resulted in a smaller diversity of species. Inversely, the areas with a smaller diversity held a larger total population of terrestrial insects.

  12. Water availability and demand in West Africa in the 21st century: impacts of climate change and population growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, Dominik; Oyerinde, Ganiyu; Ibrahim, Moussa; Ibrahim, Boubacar

    2014-05-01

    The countries in West Africa are highly dependent on rainfed agriculture. Changes in the magnitude and timing of precipitation will affect the agricultural output and the economies as a whole. Irrigation is increasingly being considered an important adaptation option to help improve food security of the population that is expected to double in less than 50 years. West Africa is one of the regions where general circulation models (GCM) show the highest disagreements in the direction of future trends of precipitation, making assessments of water availability and the potential for irrigation a difficult task. We use output from a set of dynamically downscaled climate data sets from regional climate modes (RCM) from the CORDEX CMIP5 collection to drive WBMplus, a macroscale hydrological model and simultaneously calculate water demand (livestock, domestic, and irrigation) and availability for a set of land use, and socio economic scenarios around the 2050's for river basins in the ten countries participating in the West African Science Service Center on Climate Change and Adapted Land Use (WASCAL) project. Contrary to earlier results from GCMs, the set of RCMs suggest a consistent increase (~5-10%) in annual precipitation for a majority of the land area in West Africa that translates to slight increases in river flow under natural conditions for most river basins and a opportunities for increasing irrigation during the dry season. However, water demand is projected to more than double for livestock and domestic needs as a result of population growth. Demand for irrigation will rise sharply if irrigation is expanded from the current area (representing less than 3% of all croplands in the region), closer to its potential which is multiple times higher than the existing area. The pressures on water resources in the region will therefore be dominated by pressures arising from increased demand rather than changes in the availability of water and can potentially lead to

  13. Fuelwood availability and use in the Richtersveld National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Shackleton

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been voiced about the possible over-use of fuelwood from the riparian fringe by pastoralist herders in the Richtersveld National Park (RNP. This coincided with the current examination and modelling of the supply and use of ecosystem goods and services in the Gariep Basin as part of the Southern African Millennium Assessment (SAfMA. This paper reports on a study to index the current availability of deadwood within the riparian zone of RNP, its relationship with proximity to human habitation, and species preferences of the local herders. Deadwood availability was assessed per woody species and on the ground in 12 transects within the riparian fringe. Herders were interviewed regarding their species preferences, and the composition of woodpiles was examined. There was no relationship between the percentage of attached deadwood on the tree, or the percentage deadwood ground cover, and the distance from herder stockposts. Euclea pseudobenus and Tamarix usneoides were the dominant species in the riparian fringe. There was strong selection for Ziziphus mucronata as a fuelwood species and only marginal or random selection for E. pseudobenus. Tamarix usneoides and Prosopis sp. were abundant in the riparian zone, but were not used for fuelwood. There was a significant difference between species with respect to the mean proportion of the stem that was dead, the highest being Z. mucronata (± 28 % deadwood, followed by T. usneoides (± 12 %. Most of the Prosopis trees had no deadwood. Across all species, the mean percentage dead per tree was approximately 15 %. Additionally, detached deadwood covered just less than 9 % of ground area, averaged across all plots and transects. All the variables measured indicated that there seems to be little need for concern over the current fuelwood extraction activities of pastoralists within the RNP. There was no clear evidence of cutting of branches or deadwood. The abundance of both attached and detached

  14. Linking the SASSCAL WeatherNet and data management/rescue activities to provide consistent information for climate change assessments in Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmschrot, J.; Kaspar, F.; Muche, G.; Hillmann, T.; Kanyanga, J.; Butale, M.; Nascimento, D.; Josenhans, K.; Falanga, E.; Neto, F. O. S.; Kruger, S.; Juergens, N.

    2014-12-01

    Many countries of Southern Africa face inadequate weather monitoring networks to provide reliable and consistent information for the development of efficient management strategies for sustainable water and land resources management, drought and flood risk analysis and forecasts as well as climate change impacts assessments. In addition, some existing networks are characterized by station data showing notable gaps in long-term observations. On the other hand, useful climate information is saved in historical documents and archives, but only barely explored up to now. Such documents are also available in archives of European meteorological services, partly also not yet in digital format. A main aim of the SASSCAL Initiative (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management; www.sasscal.org) is to improve the availability of reliable meteorological baseline data along with a set of analytical methods to strengthen the research capacities in the SASSCAL region including Angola, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia, and therewith to support and integrate information of existing national monitoring networks of the Southern African region. In close cooperation with the national weather authorities and various research institutions of the SASSCAL region, the above mentioned deficits are specifically addressed by i) extending the existing national monitoring networks through additional automatic weather stations and their integration in the SASSCAL WeatherNet which in near future hosts about 130 stations, ii) contributing to the development of Climate Data Management Systems (CDMS) at the national weather authorities in Angola, Botswana and Zambia and iii) the provision of additional time series of climate data based on the historic documents from various archives in all countries. The paper presents first results and shows how these efforts are linked to provide consistent climate information for Southern Africa in order to

  15. Link and route availability for Inter-working multi-hop wireless networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salami, O

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In inter-working multi-hop wireless networks, establishing resilient connectivity between source-destination node pairs is a major issue. The issue of connectivity in multi-hop wireless networks have been studied. However, these analyses focused...

  16. Linking food availability, body growth and survival in the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Simone; Mangel, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Population dynamics of black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla in Bering Sea colonies are likely to increasingly experience climate-induced changes in the physical environment. Since adult kittiwakes are central place foragers with high energy requirements, increased variability of forage patch dynamics, as predicted for polar regions, may influence both quantity and quality of food available and consequently alter the population dynamics of kittiwake colonies. Here, we describe, conceptualize, and model the effects of environment and energy resources on kittiwake growth, fledging age (from 35 to 50 days) and survival from hatching up to first breeding (post-hatching productivity). For our life-history model, we use a von Bertalanffy growth function for body growth in mass. We model nestling mortality as a function of somatic growth, in order to account for oxidative damage and trade-offs in the allocation of resources, and energy available, since low food availability increases the risk of chicks' starvation and predation risk. In the case of a good environment (i.e., high food availability), the best strategy (i.e., highest post-hatching productivity) is to grow fast (about 18.6 g d-1) and to spend a moderately long time in the nest (up to 45 days), while in the case of a poor environment the best strategy is to grow fast (about 18 g d-1) and leave the nest soon (35-40 days). Different ages at first breeding do not change the optimal strategies. We discuss the implications of optimal growth strategy in terms of evolution of life histories in kittiwakes and how our work, coupled with models of post-breeding survival and reproductive dynamics, could lead to the development of a full life-history model and the exploration of future evolutionary trajectories for traits like body growth and age at first breeding.

  17. Economic growth and poverty alleviation in Africa - linking hard and soft economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2014-01-01

    soft and hard economics, arguing that economic growth must be converted into social change that benefits poor for it to be described as development-oriented. It provides a direction for future research into issues of economic growth and poverty alleviation in Sub-Sahara Africa......This paper provides a quick glance at the dominant issues that have characterized the development economics debate during the past five decades. It is based on a review of a selection of literature that highlights the dominant perspectives in development economics. It draws a distinction between...

  18. Linking Climate to Incidence of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (L. major) in Pre-Saharan North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounoua, Lahouari; Kahime, Kholoud; Houti, Leila; Blakey, Tara; Ebi, Kristie L.; Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Dudek, Claire; Sahabi, Salah A.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Shifts in surface climate may have changed the dynamic of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the pre-Saharan zones of North Africa. Caused by Leishmania major, this form multiplies in the body of rodents serving as reservoirs of the disease. The parasite is then transmitted to human hosts by the bite of a Phlebotomine sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) that was previously fed by biting an infected reservoir. We examine the seasonal and interannual dynamics of the incidence of this ZCL as a function of surface climate indicators in two regions covering a large area of the semi-arid Pre-Saharan North Africa. Results suggest that in this area, changes in climate may have initiated a trophic cascade that resulted in an increase in ZCL incidence. We find the correlation between the rainy season precipitation and the same year Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to be strong for both regions while the number of cases of ZCL incidence lags the precipitation and NDVI by 2 years. The zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis seasonal dynamic appears to be controlled by minimum temperatures and presents a 2-month lag between the reported infection date and the presumed date when the infection actually occurred. The decadal increase in the number of ZCL occurrence in the region suggests that changes in climate increased minimum temperatures sufficiently and created conditions suitable for endemicity that did not previously exist. We also find that temperatures above a critical range suppress ZCL incidence by limiting the vector's reproductive activity.

  19. Linking Remote Sensing Data and Energy Balance Models for a Scalable Agriculture Insurance System for sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. E.; Osgood, D. E.; McCarty, J. L.; Husak, G. J.; Hain, C.; Neigh, C. S. R.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most immediate and obvious impacts of climate change is on the weather-sensitive agriculture sector. Both local and global impacts on production of food will have a negative effect on the ability of humanity to meet its growing food demands. Agriculture has become more risky, particularly for farmers in the most vulnerable and food insecure regions of the world such as East Africa. Smallholders and low-income farmers need better financial tools to reduce the risk to food security while enabling productivity increases to meet the needs of a growing population. This paper will describe a recently funded project that brings together climate science, economics, and remote sensing expertise to focus on providing a scalable and sensor-independent remote sensing based product that can be used in developing regional rainfed agriculture insurance programs around the world. We will focus our efforts in Ethiopia and Kenya in East Africa and in Senegal and Burkina Faso in West Africa, where there are active index insurance pilots that can test the effectiveness of our remote sensing-based approach for use in the agriculture insurance industry. The paper will present the overall program, explain links to the insurance industry, and present comparisons of the four remote sensing datasets used to identify drought: the CHIRPS 30-year rainfall data product, the GIMMS 30-year vegetation data product from AVHRR, the ESA soil moisture ECV-30 year soil moisture data product, and a MODIS Evapotranspiration (ET) 15-year dataset. A summary of next year's plans for this project will be presented at the close of the presentation.

  20. Linking extreme interannual changes in prey availability to foraging behaviour and breeding investment in a marine predator, the macaroni penguin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cat Horswill

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that link prey availability to predator behaviour and population change is central to projecting how a species may respond to future environmental pressures. We documented the behavioural responses and breeding investment of macaroni penguins Eudyptes chrysolophus across five breeding seasons where local prey density changed by five-fold; from very low to highly abundant. When prey availability was low, foraging trips were significantly longer and extended overnight. Birds also foraged farther from the colony, potentially in order to reach more distant foraging grounds and allow for increased search times. These extended foraging trips were also linked to a marked decrease in fledgling weights, most likely associated with reduced rates of provisioning. Furthermore, by comparing our results with previous work on this population, it appears that lowered first-year survival rates associated, at least partially, with fledging masses were also evident for this cohort. This study integrates a unique set of prey density, predator behaviour and predator breeding investment data to highlight a possible behavioural mechanism linking perturbations in prey availability to population demography.

  1. Reactivity of the Bacteria-Water Interface: Linking Nutrient Availability to Bacteria-Metal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowle, D. A.; Daughney, C. J.; Riley, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Identifying and quantifying the controls on metal mobilities in geologic systems is critical in order to understand processes such as global element cycling, metal transport in near-surface water-rock systems, sedimentary diagenesis, and mineral formation. Bacteria are ubiquitous in near-surface water-rock systems, and numerous laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that bacteria can facilitate the formation and dissolution of minerals, and enhance or inhibit contaminant transport. However, despite the growing evidence that bacteria play a key role in many geologic processes in low temperature systems, our understanding of the influence of the local nutrient dynamics of the system of interest on bacteria-metal interactions is limited. Here we present data demonstrating the effectiveness of coupling laboratory experiments with geochemical modeling to isolate the effect of nutrient availability on bacterially mediated proton and metal adsorption reactions. Experimental studies of metal-bacteria interactions were conducted in batch reactors as a function of pH, and solid-solute interactions after growth in a variety of defined and undefined media. Media nutrient composition (C,N,P) was quantified before and after harvesting the cells. Surface complexation models (SCM) for the adsorption reactions were developed by combining sorption data with the results of acid-base titrations, and in some cases zeta potential titrations of the bacterial surface. Our results indicate a clear change in both buffering potential and metal binding capacity of the cell walls of Bacillus subtilis as a function of initial media conditions. Combining current studies with our past studies on the effects of growth phase and others work on temperature dependence on metal adsorption we hope to develop a holistic surface complexation model for quantifying bacterial effects on metal mass transfer in many geologic systems.

  2. Menstrual Disruption with Exercise Is Not Linked to an Energy Availability Threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Jay L; DE Souza, Mary Jane; Wagstaff, David A; Williams, Nancy I

    2018-03-01

    Chronic reductions in energy availability (EA) suppress reproductive function. A particular calculation of EA quantifies the dietary energy remaining after exercise for all physiological functions. Reductions in luteinizing hormone pulse frequency have been demonstrated when EA using this calculation is <30 kcal·kg·fat-free mass (ffm)·d. We determined whether menstrual disturbances (MD) are induced when EA is <30 kcal·kg ffm·d. Thirty-five sedentary, ovulatory women age 18 to 24 yr (weight, 59.0 ± 0.8 kg; body mass index, 21.8 ± 0.4 kg·m) completed a diet and exercise intervention over three menstrual cycles. Participants were randomized to groups that varied in the magnitude of negative energy balance created by the combination of exercise and energy restriction. Menstrual disturbances were determined using daily urinary estrone-1-glucuronide and pregnanediol glucuronide, midcycle luteinizing hormone, and menstrual calendars. In a secondary analysis, we calculated EA from energy balance data and tested the association of EA with MD. A generalized linear mixed-effects model showed that the likelihood of a MD decreased by 9% for each unit increase in EA (odds ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.98; P = 0.010). No specific value of EA emerged as a threshold below which MD were induced. When participants were partitioned into EA tertile groups (low EA, 23.4-34.1; n = 11; moderate EA, 34.9-40.7; n = 12, and high EA, 41.2-50.1; n = 12 [kcal·kg ffm·d]), estrone-1-glucuronide (P < 0.001), pregnanediol glucuronide (P < 0.001), and luteal phase length (P = 0.031) decreased significantly, independent of tertile. These findings do not support that a threshold of EA exists below which MD are induced but do suggest that MD increase linearly as EA decreases. Menstrual disturbances can likely be prevented by monitoring EA using a simplified assessment of metabolic status.

  3. Linking organic pollutant (bio)availability with geosorbent properties and biomimetic methodology: a review of geosorbent characterisation and (bio)availability prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, George A C; Loibner, Andreas P

    2006-06-01

    The interdependent link between structure and physico-chemical properties of geosorbents and sorption activity of hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOC) upon interaction with solid matrices has been established. The conclusions derived from these investigations have not been actively incorporated into risk assessment and remediation protocols since legislators prefer to adopt a conservative approach when the potential of contaminants to be released from soil matrices are evaluated. With the advent of spectroscopic techniques, it is possible to determine the molecular properties of the geosorbent organic matter which play a pivotal role in HOC retention. Physical-chemical and biological methods are employed to predict the potential for HOC release from sorbent matrices. This article serves as a review discussing the literature and reports the progress that has been made in these particular areas. The implication of employing molecular descriptor factors correlated with a biomimetic method to assess availability and risk is also considered.

  4. HIV/AIDS mitigation strategies and the State in sub-Saharan Africa – the missing link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa is widely recognised as a development disaster threatening poverty reduction, economic growth and not merely a health issue. Its mitigation includes the societal-wide adoption and implementation of specific health technologies, many of which depend on functional institutions and State. Discussion Donor and International Institutions' strategies to mitigate HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa are premised on a single optimal model of the State, one which focuses on the decentralised delivery of public goods alone (such as healthcare – the service delivery state. The empirical evidence, though sparse, of "successful" and "unsuccessful" sub-Saharan Africa states' performance in mitigating HIV/AIDS does not support this model. Rather, the evidence suggests an alternative model that takes a country context specific approach – encompassing political power, institutional structures and the level of health technology needed. This model draws on the historical experience of East Asian countries' rapid development. Summary For international public health policies to be effective, they must consider a country tailored approach, one that advocates a coordinated strategy designed and led by the State with involvement of wider society specific to each country's particular history, culture, and level of development.

  5. Linking extreme interannual changes in prey availability to foraging behaviour and breeding investment in a marine predator, the macaroni penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horswill, Cat; Trathan, Philip N; Ratcliffe, Norman

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that link prey availability to predator behaviour and population change is central to projecting how a species may respond to future environmental pressures. We documented the behavioural responses and breeding investment of macaroni penguins Eudyptes chrysolophus across five breeding seasons where local prey density changed by five-fold; from very low to highly abundant. When prey availability was low, foraging trips were significantly longer and extended overnight. Birds also foraged farther from the colony, potentially in order to reach more distant foraging grounds and allow for increased search times. These extended foraging trips were also linked to a marked decrease in fledgling weights, most likely associated with reduced rates of provisioning. Furthermore, by comparing our results with previous work on this population, it appears that lowered first-year survival rates associated, at least partially, with fledging masses were also evident for this cohort. This study integrates a unique set of prey density, predator behaviour and predator breeding investment data to highlight a possible behavioural mechanism linking perturbations in prey availability to population demography.

  6. Scrambling for access: availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of healthcare for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alex

    2017-05-30

    Sexual orientation and gender identity are social determinants of health for people identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT), and health disparities among sexual and gender minority populations are increasingly well understood. Although the South African constitution guarantees sexual and gender minority people the right to non-discrimination and the right to access to healthcare, homo- and transphobia in society abound. Little is known about LGBT people's healthcare experiences in South Africa, but anecdotal evidence suggests significant barriers to accessing care. Using the framework of the UN International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights General Comment 14, this study analyses the experiences of LGBT health service users using South African public sector healthcare, including access to HIV counselling, testing and treatment. A qualitative study comprised of 16 semi-structured interviews and two focus group discussions with LGBT health service users, and 14 individual interviews with representatives of LGBT organisations. Data were thematically analysed within the framework of the UN International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights General Comment 14, focusing on availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of care. All interviewees reported experiences of discrimination by healthcare providers based on their sexual orientation and/or gender identity. Participants recounted violations of all four elements of the UN General Comment 14: 1) Availability: Lack of public health facilities and services, both for general and LGBT-specific concerns; 2) Accessibility: Healthcare providers' refusal to provide care to LGBT patients; 3) Acceptability: Articulation of moral judgment and disapproval of LGBT patients' identity, and forced subjection of patients to religious practices; 4) Quality: Lack of knowledge about LGBT identities and health needs, leading to poor-quality care. Participants had delayed or

  7. Measurement of fog and haze extinction characteristics and availability evaluation of free space optical link under the sea surface environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Hongxing; Song, Bo

    2015-02-10

    Fog and haze can lead to changes in extinction characteristics. Therefore, the performance of the free space optical link is highly influenced by severe weather conditions. Considering the influential behavior of weather conditions, a state-of-the-art solution for the observation of fog and haze over the sea surface is presented in this paper. A Mie scattering laser radar, with a wavelength of 532 nm, is used to observe the weather conditions of the sea surface environment. The horizontal extinction coefficients and visibilities are obtained from the observation data, and the results are presented in the paper. The changes in the characteristics of extinction coefficients and visibilities are analyzed based on both the short-term (6 days) severe weather data and long-term (6 months) data. Finally, the availability performance of the free space optical communication link is evaluated under the sea surface environment.

  8. Population sexual behavior and HIV prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa: missing links?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Ryosuke; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2016-03-01

    Patterns of sexual partnering should shape HIV transmission in human populations. The objective of this study was to assess empirical associations between population casual sex behavior and HIV prevalence, and between different measures of casual sex behavior. An ecological study design was applied to nationally representative data, those of the Demographic and Health Surveys, in 25 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. Spearman rank correlation was used to assess different correlations for males and females and their statistical significance. Correlations between HIV prevalence and means and variances of the number of casual sex partners were positive, but small and statistically insignificant. The majority of correlations across means and variances of the number of casual sex partners were positive, large, and statistically significant. However, all correlations between the means, as well as variances, and the variance of unmarried females were weak and statistically insignificant. Population sexual behavior was not predictive of HIV prevalence across these countries. Nevertheless, the strong correlations across means and variances of sexual behavior suggest that self-reported sexual data are self-consistent and convey valid information content. Unmarried female behavior seemed puzzling, but could be playing an influential role in HIV transmission patterns. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Linking spatial planning, water resources management and biodiversity protection: a case study for the systematic conservation of rivers in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, GA

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available systems. An integrated perspective (including linkages with wetlands and estuaries) is needed if biodiversity strategies and plans are to be successful. Ultimately, the conservation of freshwater biodiversity resources in South Africa will require...

  10. Contemporary flowstone development links early hominin bearing cave deposits in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Robyn; Kramers, Jan D.; Hancox, Philip John; de Ruiter, Darryl J.; Woodhead, Jon D.

    2011-06-01

    The Cradle of Humankind cave sites in South Africa preserve fossil evidence of four early hominin taxa: Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus sediba, Paranthropus robustus and early Homo. In order to integrate this record into a pan-African scenario of human evolutionary history it is critical to have reliable dates and temporal ranges for the southern African hominins. In the past a lack of precise and accurate chronological data has prevented the evaluation of the temporal relationships between the various sites. Here we report new uranium-lead (U-Pb) radiometric ages obtained from sheets of calcium carbonate flowstone inter-bedded between clastic cave sediments at the site of Swartkrans, providing bracketing ages for the fossiliferous deposits. The fossil bearing units of Swartkrans, specifically the Hanging Remnant and Lower Bank of Member 1, are underlain by flowstone layers dated to 2.25 ± 0.05 Ma and 2.25 ± 0.08 Ma and capped by layers of 1.8 ± 0.01 Ma and 1.7 ± 0.07 Ma. The age bracket of the Member 1 deposits is therefore between 2.31 and 1.64 Ma. However, by combining the U-Pb with biostratigraphic data we suggest that this can be narrowed down to between 1.9 and 1.8 Ma. These data can be compared with other recently dated sites and a radiometrically dated U-Pb age sequence formed: Sterkfontein Member 4, Swartkrans Member 1, Malapa, and Cooper's D. From this new U-Pb dataset, a pattern of contemporary flowstone development emerges, with different caves recording the same flowstone-forming event. Specifically overlapping flowstone formation takes place at Swartkrans and Sterkfontein at ~ 2.29 Ma and ~ 1.77 Ma, and at Sterkfontein and Malapa at ˜ 2.02 Ma. This suggests a regional control over the nature and timing of speleothem development in cave deposits and these flowstone layers could assist in future correlation, both internal to specific deposits and regionally between sites.

  11. Improvement of Ka-band satellite link availability for real-time IP-based video contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Berretta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available New High Throughput Satellite (HTS systems allow high throughput IP uplinks/contribution at Ka-band frequencies for relatively lower costs when compared to broadcasting satellite uplinks at Ku band. This technology offers an advantage for live video contribution from remote areas, where the terrestrial infrastructure may not be adequate. On the other hand, the Ka-band is more subject to impairments due to rain or bad weather. This paper addresses the target system specification and provides an optimized approach for the transmission of IP-based video flows through HTS commercial services operating at Ka-band frequencies. In particular, the focus of this study is on the service requirements and the propagation analysis that provide a reference architecture to improve the overall link availability. The approach proposed herein leads to the introduction of a new concept of live service contribution using pairs of small satellite antennas and cheap satellite terminals.

  12. Water-Food-Nutrition-Health Nexus: Linking Water to Improving Food, Nutrition and Health in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabhaudhi, Tafadzwanashe; Chibarabada, Tendai; Modi, Albert

    2016-01-06

    Whereas sub-Saharan Africa's (SSA) water scarcity, food, nutrition and health challenges are well-documented, efforts to address them have often been disconnected. Given that the region continues to be affected by poverty and food and nutrition insecurity at national and household levels, there is a need for a paradigm shift in order to effectively deliver on the twin challenges of food and nutrition security under conditions of water scarcity. There is a need to link water use in agriculture to achieve food and nutrition security outcomes for improved human health and well-being. Currently, there are no explicit linkages between water, agriculture, nutrition and health owing to uncoordinated efforts between agricultural and nutrition scientists. There is also a need to develop and promote the use of metrics that capture aspects of water, agriculture, food and nutrition. This review identified nutritional water productivity as a suitable index for measuring the impact of a water-food-nutrition-health nexus. Socio-economic factors are also considered as they influence food choices in rural communities. An argument for the need to utilise the region's agrobiodiversity for addressing dietary quality and diversity was established. It is concluded that a model for improving nutrition and health of poor rural communities based on the water-food-nutrition-health nexus is possible.

  13. Improving public health training and research capacity in Africa: a replicable model for linking training to health and socio-demographic surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jill R; Schatz, Enid J; Clark, Benjamin D; Collinson, Mark A; Clark, Samuel J; Menken, Jane; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen M

    2010-08-31

    Research training for public health professionals is key to the future of public health and policy in Africa. A growing number of schools of public health are connected to health and socio-demographic surveillance system field sites in developing countries, in Africa and Asia in particular. Linking training programs with these sites provides important opportunities to improve training, build local research capacity, foreground local health priorities, and increase the relevance of research to local health policy. To increase research training capacity in public health programs by providing targeted training to students and increasing the accessibility of existing data. This report is a case study of an approach to linking public health research and training at the University of the Witwatersrand. We discuss the development of a sample training database from the Agincourt Health and Socio-demographic Surveillance System in South Africa and outline a concordant transnational intensive short course on longitudinal data analysis offered by the University of the Witwatersrand and the University of Colorado-Boulder. This case study highlights ways common barriers to linking research and training can be overcome. This collaborative effort demonstrates that linking training to ongoing data collection can improve student research, accelerate student training, and connect students to an international network of scholars. Importantly, the approach can be adapted to other partnerships between schools of public health and longitudinal research sites.

  14. Changes in hydro-meteorological conditions over tropical West Africa (1980-2015) and links to global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndehedehe, Christopher E.; Awange, Joseph L.; Agutu, Nathan O.; Okwuashi, Onuwa

    2018-03-01

    The role of global sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in modulating rainfall in the African region has been widely studied and is now less debated. However, their impacts and links to terrestrial water storage (TWS) in general, have not been studied. This study presents the pioneer results of canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of TWS derived from both global reanalysis data (1980-2015) and GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) (2002-2014) with SST fields. The main issues discussed include, (i) oceanic hot spots that impact on TWS over tropical West Africa (TWA) based on CCA, (ii) long term changes in model and global reanalysis data (soil moisture, TWS, and groundwater) and the influence of climate variability on these hydrological indicators, and (iii) the hydrological characteristics of the Equatorial region of Africa (i.e., the Congo basin) based on GRACE-derived TWS, river discharge, and precipitation. Results of the CCA diagnostics show that El-Niño Southern Oscillation related equatorial Pacific SST fluctuations is a major index of climate variability identified in the main portion of the CCA procedure that indicates a significant association with long term TWS reanalysis data over TWA (r = 0.50, ρ < 0.05). Based on Mann-Kendall's statistics, the study found fairly large long term declines (ρ < 0.05) in TWS and soil moisture (1982 - 2015), mostly over the Congo basin, which coincided with warming of the land surface and the surrounding oceans. Meanwhile, some parts of the Sahel show significant wetting (rainfall, soil moisture, groundwater, and TWS) trends during the same period (1982-2015) and aligns with the ongoing narratives of rainfall recovery in the region. Results of singular spectral analysis and regression confirm that multi-annual changes in the Congo River discharge explained a considerable proportion of variability in GRACE-hydrological signal over the Congo basin (r = 0.86 and R2 = 0.70, ρ < 0.05). Finally, leading

  15. Affordability, availability and acceptability barriers to health care for the chronically ill: Longitudinal case studies from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Steven

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing burden of chronic illness in low and middle income countries, driven by TB/HIV, as well as non-communicable diseases. Few health systems are organized to meet the needs of chronically ill patients, and patients' perspectives on the difficulties of accessing care need to be better understood, particularly in poor resourced settings, to achieve this end. This paper describes the experience of poor households attempting to access chronic care in a rural area of South Africa. Methods A household survey (n = 1446 individuals was combined with qualitative longitudinal research that followed 30 case study households over 10 months. Illness narratives and diaries provided descriptive textual data of household interactions with the health system. Results In the survey 74% of reported health problems were 'chronic', 48% of which had no treatment action taken in the previous month. Amongst the case study households, of the 34 cases of chronic illness, only 21 (62% cases had an allopathic diagnosis and only 12 (35% were receiving regular treatment. Livelihoods exhausted from previous illness and death, low income, and limited social networks, prevented consultation with monthly expenditure for repeated consultations as high as 60% of income. Interrupted drug supplies, insufficient clinical services at the clinic level necessitating referral, and a lack of ambulances further hampered access to care. Poor provider-patient interaction led to inadequate understanding of illness, inappropriate treatment action, 'healer shopping', and at times a break down in cooperation, with the patient 'giving up' on the public health system. However, productive patient-provider interactions not only facilitated appropriate treatment action but enabled patients to justify their need for financial assistance to family and neighbours, and so access care. In addition, patients and their families with understanding of a disease became a

  16. Using Giovanni in Investigating the Links between Environmental Processes and Drought in Northern sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles; Gatebe, Charles; Lee, Jejung; Wang, Jun; Bolten, John; Policelli, Fritz; Wilcox, Eric; Adegoke, Jimmy; Habib, Shahid; Babamaaji, Rakiya; hide

    2013-01-01

    The northern sub-Saharan African (NSSA) region, bounded on the north and south by the Sahara and the Equator, respectively, and stretching East-West across Africa, is very vulnerable because of the highly active environmental and meteorological processes associated with its unique location and human activities that adversely impact the regional water cycle. Over the years, this region has suffered frequent severe droughts that have caused tremendous hardship and loss of life to millions of its inhabitants due to the rapid depletion of the regional water resources, as exemplified by the dramatic drying of Lake Chad. On the other hand, the NSSA region shows one of the highest biomass-burning rates per unit land area among all regions of the world. Because of the high concentration and frequency of fires in this region, with the associated abundance of heat release and gaseous and particulate smoke emissions, biomass-burning activity is believed to be one of the drivers of the regional carbon and energy cycles, with serious implications for the water cycle. An interdisciplinary research effort funded by NASA is presently being focused on the NSSA region, to better understand possible connections between the intense biomass burning observed from satellite year after year across the region and the water cycle, through associated changes in land-cover, surface albedo, emissions, atmospheric processes, precipitation, soil moisture, surface evaporation and runoff, and groundwater recharge. A combination of remote sensing and modeling approaches is being utilized to investigate these multiple processes to clarify possible links between them. However, by using Giovanni, we are able to extract and jointly analyze some of the important relevant parameters to obtain a first insight into their relationships. In this presentation, we will discuss these preliminary results as well as the path toward improved understanding of the interrelationships and feedbacks between the water

  17. Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Russo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La lista de enlaces ofrecida a continuación tiene como objetivo la creación de una base de datos sobre los principales sitios de interés para el estudio de la imagen (en America Latina y más allá. Se ha tratado de incluir una vasta gama de instituciones (museos, colecciones, institutos, representando sin embargo también a revistas, proyectos de investigación, y catálogos en línea. Sin tener la pretensión de ser exhaustiva, esta selección es evolutiva y se pone al día continuamente. MuseosI...

  18. Availability of critical care resources to treat patients with severe sepsis or septic shock in Africa: a self-reported, continent-wide survey of anaesthesia providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baelani, Inipavudu; Jochberger, Stefan; Laimer, Thomas; Otieno, Dave; Kabutu, Jane; Wilson, Iain; Baker, Tim; Dünser, Martin W

    2011-01-01

    It is unknown whether resources necessary to implement the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines and sepsis bundles are available in Africa. This self-reported, continent-wide survey compared the availability of these resources between African and high-income countries, and between two African regions (Sub-Sahara Africa vs. South Africa, Mauritius and the Northern African countries). The study was conducted as an anonymous questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey among anaesthesia providers attending a transcontinental congress. Based on the respondents' country of practice, returned questionnaires were grouped into African and high-income countries. The questionnaire contained 74 items and evaluated all material resources required to implement the most recent Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. Group comparisons were performed with the Chi2, Fisher's Exact or Mann Whitney U test, as appropriate. The overall response rate was 74.3% (318/428). Three-hundred-seven questionnaires were analysed (African countries, n = 263; high-income countries, n = 44). Respondents from African hospitals were less likely to have an emergency room (85.5 vs. 97.7%, P = 0.03) or intensive care unit (73.8 vs. 100%, P resources available to implement the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines in entirety. The percentage of implementable recommendations was lower in African than in high-income countries (72.6 (57.7 to 87.7)% vs. 100 (100 to 100)%, P resources to implement the majority of strong Surviving Sepsis Campaign recommendations and the sepsis bundles may allow modification of current sepsis guidelines based on available resources and implementation of a substantial number of life-saving interventions into sepsis care in Africa.

  19. Leaf hydraulic vulnerability to drought is linked to site water availability across a broad range of species and climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Chris J; Gleason, Sean M; Chang, Yvonne; Cook, Alicia M; Laws, Claire; Westoby, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Vulnerability of the leaf hydraulic pathway to water-stress-induced dysfunction is a key component of drought tolerance in plants and may be important in defining species' climatic range. However, the generality of the association between leaf hydraulic vulnerability and climate across species and sites remains to be tested. Leaf hydraulic vulnerability to drought (P50leaf, the water potential inducing 50 % loss in hydraulic function) was measured in a diverse group of 92 woody, mostly evergreen angiosperms from sites across a wide range of habitats. These new data together with some previously published were tested against key climate indices related to water availability. Differences in within-site variability in P50leaf between sites were also examined. Values of hydraulic vulnerability to drought in leaves decreased strongly (i.e. became more negative) with decreasing annual rainfall and increasing aridity across sites. The standard deviation in P50leaf values recorded within each site was positively correlated with increasing aridity. P50leaf was also a good indicator of the climatic envelope across each species' distributional range as well as their dry-end distributional limits within Australia, although this relationship was not consistently detectable within sites. The findings indicate that species sorting processes have influenced distributional patterns of P50leaf across the rainfall spectrum, but alternative strategies for dealing with water deficit exist within sites. The strong link to aridity suggests leaf hydraulic vulnerability may influence plant distributions under future climates. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Hospital management practices and availability of surgery in sub-Saharan Africa: a pilot study of three hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Luke M; Conley, Dante M; Berry, William R; Gawande, Atul A

    2013-11-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has a high surgical burden of disease but performs a disproportionately low volume of surgery. Closing this surgical gap will require increased surgical productivity of existing systems. We examined specific hospital management practices in three sub-Saharan African hospitals that are associated with surgical productivity and quality. We conducted 54 face-to-face, structured interviews with administrators, clinicians, and technicians at a teaching hospital, district hospital, and religious mission hospital across two countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Questions focused on recommended general management practices within five domains: goal setting, operations management, talent management, quality monitoring, and financial oversight. Records from each interview were analyzed in a qualitative fashion. Each hospital's management practices were scored according to the degree of implementation of the management practices (1 = none; 3 = some; 5 = systematic). The mission hospital had the highest number of employees per 100 beds (226), surgeons per operating room (3), and annual number of operations per operating room (1,800). None of the three hospitals had achieved systematic implementation of management practices in all 14 measures. The mission hospital had the highest total management score (44/70 points; average = 3.1 for each of the 14 measures). The teaching and district hospitals had statistically significantly lower management scores (average 1.3 and 1.1, respectively; p hospital management practices in low resource settings. We observed substantial variation in implementation of basic management practices at the three hospitals. Future research should focus on whether enhancing management practices can improve surgical capacity and outcomes.

  1. Assessing changes in availability of land and water for food (1960-2050) : An analysis linking food demand and available resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibarrola Rivas, M. J.; Nonhebel, S.

    Future global food demand will require more land and water. We group the global population into six Gross Domestic Product groups and study changes in the availability of land and water for food in relation to demographic and nutrition transition theories. We show large differences in land and water

  2. Evaluation of problems and possible solutions linked to the surveillance and control of bovine brucellosis in sub-Saharan Africa, with special emphasis on Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folorunso O. Fasina

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine brucellosis is disease of economic and public health significance in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is distributed worldwide but some countries have been able to eradicate brucellosis from their territories using elaborate brucellosis control and eradication programmes that have been targeted primarily at livestock (the main reservoir host for the disease. This has been achieved mainly by vaccination, test and slaughter, as well as by regular surveillance for early detection of the disease. Despite the level of knowledge on the epidemiology of bovine brucellosis, there has been limited success in controlling bovine brucellosis in sub-Saharan Africa. Some of the problems associated with the surveillance and control of bovine brucellosis in sub-Saharan Africa include poor disease reporting, insufficient financial resources of governments (poor economic status of most countries in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as competing national health priorities, inadequate infrastructures and personnel, the commonly practised seasonal grazing or transhumant husbandry systems and communal grazing, inadequate monitoring of the disease in wildlife and poor communication and education of stakeholders. Since previous attempts at the control of bovine brucellosis have failed in Africa, it was considered important to address this aspect, using an approach that differed from the classic veterinary regulatory approach. Possible ways of dealing with this problem using complementary measures to the conventional approaches are also proposed.

  3. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from drinking well water available in Guinea-Bissau (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, A; Bordalo, A A

    2014-08-01

    The dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes are a major public health concern worldwide, being even proposed as emerging contaminants. The aquatic environment is a recognized reservoir of antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes have been recently detected in drinking water. In this study, the water quality and the prevalence of antibiotic resistance of heterotrophic culturable bacteria were characterized seasonally in wells that serve the population of Guinea-Bissau (West Africa) as the sole source of water for drinking and other domestic proposes. The results revealed that well water was unfit for human consumption independently of the season, owing to high acidity and heavy fecal contamination. Moreover, potentially pathogenic bacteria, which showed resistance to the most prescribed antibiotics in Guinea-Bissau, were isolated from well water, posing an additional health risk. Our results suggest that well water not only fosters the transmission of potential pathogenic bacteria, but also represents an important reservoir for the proliferation of antibiotic resistant bacteria, that can aggravate the potential to cause disease in a very vulnerable population that has no other alternative but to consume such water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Macro-Micro Feedback Links of Water Management in South Africa : CGE Analyses of Selected Policy Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, R.; Thurlow, J.; Roe, T.; Diao, X.; Chumi., S.; Tsur, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The pressure on an already stressed water situation in South Africa is predicted to increase significantly under climate change, plans for large industrial expansion, observed rapid urbanization, and government programs to provide access to water to millions of previously excluded people. The present study employed a general equilibrium approach to examine the economy-wide impacts of selec...

  5. Formulary availability and regulatory barriers to accessibility of opioids for cancer pain in Africa: a report from the Global Opioid Policy Initiative (GOPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, J; Powell, R A; Munene, G; Mwangi-Powell, F N; Luyirika, E; Kiyange, F; Merriman, A; Scholten, W; Radbruch, L; Torode, J; Cherny, N I

    2013-12-01

    With nearly 1.1 billion inhabitants living in more than 50 countries, Africa is the world's poorest and most socioeconomically underdeveloped continent. Despite some advances for individual states, many African countries have very low opioid consumption and, overall, the continent has the lowest consumption per capita of any in the world. This article presents the findings of the first systematic study of the availability and accessibility of opioids for the management of cancer pain across the continent. Data are reported on the availability and accessibility of opioids for the management of cancer pain in 25 of 52 countries, with 744 million of the region's 1127 million people (66%) covered by the survey. Many countries had severely restricted formularies of opioids and only 15 of 25 had morphine available in oral IR, CR and injectable formulations. Even when opioids are on formulary they are often unavailable, and access is significantly impaired by widespread over-regulation that is pervasive across the region.

  6. HIV/AIDS mitigation strategies and the State in sub-Saharan Africa--the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiddin, Abdu; Johnston, Deborah

    2006-01-17

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa is widely recognised as a development disaster threatening poverty reduction, economic growth and not merely a health issue. Its mitigation includes the societal-wide adoption and implementation of specific health technologies, many of which depend on functional institutions and State. Donor and International Institutions' strategies to mitigate HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa are premised on a single optimal model of the State, one which focuses on the decentralised delivery of public goods alone (such as healthcare) - the service delivery state. The empirical evidence, though sparse, of "successful" and "unsuccessful" sub-Saharan Africa states' performance in mitigating HIV/AIDS does not support this model. Rather, the evidence suggests an alternative model that takes a country context specific approach - encompassing political power, institutional structures and the level of health technology needed. This model draws on the historical experience of East Asian countries' rapid development. For international public health policies to be effective, they must consider a country tailored approach, one that advocates a coordinated strategy designed and led by the State with involvement of wider society specific to each country's particular history, culture, and level of development.

  7. Assessing the link between Atlantic Niño 1 and drought over West Africa using CORDEX regional climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Mojisola Oluwayemisi; Dilau, Kabiru Alabi

    2018-02-01

    The skill of Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) models (ARPEGE, CCLM, HIRHAM, RACMO, REMO, PRECIS, RegCM3, RCA, WRF and CRCM) in simulating the climate (precipitation, temperature and drought) of West Africa is determined using a process-based metric. This is done by comparing the CORDEX models' simulated and observed correlation coefficients between Atlantic Niño Index 1 (ATLN1) and the climate over West Africa. Strong positive correlation is observed between ATLN1 and the climate parameters at the Guinea Coast (GC). The Atlantic Ocean has Niño behaviours through the ATLN indices which influence the climate of the tropics. Drought has distinct dipole structure of correlation with ATLN1 (negative at the Sahel); precipitation does not have distinct dipole structure of correlation, while temperature has almost a monopole correlation structure with ATLN1 over West Africa. The magnitude of the correlation increases with closeness to the equatorial eastern Atlantic. Correlations between ATLN1 and temperature are mostly stronger than those between ATLN1 and precipitation over the region. Most models have good performance over the GC, but ARPEGE has the highest skill at GC. The PRECIS is the most skilful over Savannah and RCA over Sahel. These models can be used to downscale the projected climate at the region of their highest skill.

  8. Water-Food-Nutrition-Health Nexus: Linking Water to Improving Food, Nutrition and Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tafadzwanashe Mabhaudhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas sub-Saharan Africa’s (SSA water scarcity, food, nutrition and health challenges are well-documented, efforts to address them have often been disconnected. Given that the region continues to be affected by poverty and food and nutrition insecurity at national and household levels, there is a need for a paradigm shift in order to effectively deliver on the twin challenges of food and nutrition security under conditions of water scarcity. There is a need to link water use in agriculture to achieve food and nutrition security outcomes for improved human health and well-being. Currently, there are no explicit linkages between water, agriculture, nutrition and health owing to uncoordinated efforts between agricultural and nutrition scientists. There is also a need to develop and promote the use of metrics that capture aspects of water, agriculture, food and nutrition. This review identified nutritional water productivity as a suitable index for measuring the impact of a water-food-nutrition-health nexus. Socio-economic factors are also considered as they influence food choices in rural communities. An argument for the need to utilise the region’s agrobiodiversity for addressing dietary quality and diversity was established. It is concluded that a model for improving nutrition and health of poor rural communities based on the water-food-nutrition-health nexus is possible.

  9. Availability of tuberculosis infection control plans at rural hospitals of Vhembe district, Limpopo Province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takalani G. Tshitangano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Limpopo province the rate of new tuberculosis (TB cases increase daily.The Infection Control (IC plan is one of the essential actions for TB IC. This study aimed to establish the availability of these plans at health care facilities.Objectives: The objectives were to explore and describe the awareness and knowledge of health care workers (HCWs of the availability and content of TB IC plan; and to identity the role of infection control committees from the perspective of HCWs.Method: A qualitative approach using a cross-sectional descriptive design was adopted. The target population was all HCWs from the seven hospitals of Vhembe district. A purposive sampling approach was used to select 57 participants. The approval to conduct this study was obtained from the relevant authorities and participants. Data was collected through seven focus group discussions comprising five to 10 members. An unstructured discussion guide was used to collect data, and an open-coding method was used to analyse the data. Lincoln and Guba’s criteria ensured trustworthiness of the study findings.Results: Findings revealed that HCWs were not aware of the availability and the information contained in the TB IC plans. No person was designated as TB IC officer at hospital level. There was lack of a TB IC Committee and teams as well as ineffective utilisation of those that did exist.Conclusions: It was concluded that if the TB IC plans are not available at health care facilities,then the TB IC practices implemented by HCWs vary, resulting in TB nosocomial infection transmission. It was recommended that the World Health Organisation’s TB IC plans be adopted and implemented in Vhembe district.

  10. Not the time or the place: the missing spatio-temporal link in publicly available genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Lisa C; Liggins, Libby; Keyse, Jude; Carvalho, Silvia B; Riginos, Cynthia

    2015-08-01

    Genetic data are being generated at unprecedented rates. Policies of many journals, institutions and funding bodies aim to ensure that these data are publicly archived so that published results are reproducible. Additionally, publicly archived data can be 'repurposed' to address new questions in the future. In 2011, along with other leading journals in ecology and evolution, Molecular Ecology implemented mandatory public data archiving (the Joint Data Archiving Policy). To evaluate the effect of this policy, we assessed the genetic, spatial and temporal data archived for 419 data sets from 289 articles in Molecular Ecology from 2009 to 2013. We then determined whether archived data could be used to reproduce analyses as presented in the manuscript. We found that the journal's mandatory archiving policy has had a substantial positive impact, increasing genetic data archiving from 49 (pre-2011) to 98% (2011-present). However, 31% of publicly archived genetic data sets could not be recreated based on information supplied in either the manuscript or public archives, with incomplete data or inconsistent codes linking genetic data and metadata as the primary reasons. While the majority of articles did provide some geographic information, 40% did not provide this information as geographic coordinates. Furthermore, a large proportion of articles did not contain any information regarding date of sampling (40%). Although the inclusion of spatio-temporal data does require an increase in effort, we argue that the enduring value of publicly accessible genetic data to the molecular ecology field is greatly compromised when such metadata are not archived alongside genetic data. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Has the increase in the availability of generic drugs lowered the price of cardiovascular drugs in South Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Bangalee

    2016-10-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between originator drug prices and the number of generic brands within the cardiovascular class of drugs and to compare South African prices with international reference prices. Method: Data on private sector drug prices was sourced from the South African Medicine Price Registry. The relationship between the median proportional price and the number of brands in the therapeutic class was analysed using correlation analysis. International reference prices were obtained from the Management Sciences for Health International Drug Price Indicator Guide (2012 edition. Results: A weak correlation between originator and generic drug prices and the number of available brands was observed, the exception being diuretic drugs. The median prices per strength of the originator generic were still higher than the most expensive generic version manufactured by any other company, the exception being telmisartan. Comparison of price ratios between the originator drug, lowest priced generic and international reference price values revealed that the originator drug prices had a median price ratio of 20.99 (interquartile range 7.31—53.46 and the lowest priced generics had a median price ratio of 4.28 (interquartile range 2.10—8.47. Conclusion: Increased generic competition is not a predictor of lower drug prices. The study also concludes that the current South African pharmaceutical policies have not yet achieved the lowest prices for drugs when compared internationally.

  12. Current and future availability of and need for human resources for sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn health in 41 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Arias, Maria; Nove, Andrea; Michel-Schuldt, Michaela; de Bernis, Luc

    2017-05-03

    The WHO African region, covering the majority of Sub-Saharan Africa, faces the highest rates of maternal and neonatal mortality in the world. This study uses data from the State of the World's Midwifery 2014 survey to cast a spotlight on the WHO African region, highlight the specific characteristics of its sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn health (SRMNH) workforce and describe and compare countries' different trajectories in terms of meeting the population need for services. Using data from 41 African countries, this study used a mathematical model to estimate potential met need for SRMNH services, defined as "the percentage of a universal SRMNH package that could potentially be obtained by women and newborns given the composition, competencies and available working time of the SRMNH workforce." The model defined the 46 key interventions included in this universal SRMNH package and allocated them to the available health worker time and skill set in each country to estimate the potential met need. Based on the current and projected potential met need in the future, the countries were grouped into three categories: (1) 'making or maintaining progress' (expected to meet more, or the same level, of the need in the future than currently): 14 countries including Ghana, Senegal and South Africa, (2) 'at risk' (currently performing relatively well but expected to deteriorate due to the health workforce not keeping pace with population growth): 6 countries including Gabon, Rwanda and Zambia, and (3) 'low performing' (not performing well and not expected to improve): 21 countries including Burkina Faso, Eritrea and Sierra Leone. The three groups face different challenges, and policy solutions to increasing met need should be tailored to the specific context of the country. National health workforce accounts should be strengthened so that workforce planning can be evidence-informed.

  13. Linking the open source, spatial electrification tool (ONSSET) and the open source energy modelling system (OSeMOSYS), with a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, Dimitrios; Howells, Mark; Rogner, Holger; Korkovelos, Alexandros; Arderne, Christopher; Siyal, Shahid; Zepeda, Eduardo; Taliotis, Constantinos; Bazilian, Morgan; de Roo, Ad; Tanvez, Yann; Oudalov, Alexandre; Scholtz, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    In September 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Agenda 2030, which comprises a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) defined by 169 targets. "Ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030" is the seventh goal (SDG7). While access to energy refers to more than electricity, the latter is the central focus of this work. According to the World Bank's 2015 Global Tracking Framework, roughly 15% of world population (or 1.1 billion people) lack access to electricity, and many more rely on poor quality electricity services. The majority of those without access (87%) reside in rural areas. This paper presents results of a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach coupled with open access data and linked to the Electricity Model Base for Africa (TEMBA), a model that represents each continental African country's electricity supply system. We present least-cost electrification strategies on a country-by-country basis for Sub-Saharan Africa. The electrification options include grid extension, mini-grid and stand-alone systems for rural, peri-urban, and urban contexts across the economy. At low levels of electricity demand there is a strong penetration of standalone technologies. However, higher electricity demand levels move the favourable electrification option from stand-alone systems to mini grid and to grid extensions.

  14. How do Gradients in Mineralogy and Nutrient Availability Alter Links between Microbial Growth Efficiency and Soil Carbon Storage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, D. F.; Reed, S.; Wieder, W. R.; Taylor, P.; Cleveland, C. C.; Chadwick, O.; Vitousek, P.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the terrestrial carbon (C) balance depends on understanding how C is (1) partitioned by heterotrophic microbes to biomass vs. respiration (i.e. growth efficiency), and (2) stabilized and stored in soils. Microbial growth efficiency may also strongly influence soil C stabilization if microbial biomass is a dominant source of C to organo-mineral associations. We hypothesized that natural variation in nutrient availability, as well as addition of scarce nutrients, may alter growth efficiency such that soil C storage on mineral surfaces increases without increasing C losses via heterotrophic respiration. We predicted that nutrient poor sites with relatively high reactive mineral availability (i.e. not C-saturated) have the largest potential to store new microbial biomass C. To test our hypothesis we used a microbial radionuclide-labeling technique combined with long- and short-term nutrient additions to follow C through soils that vary in mineral composition and background nutrient availability. We collected mineral soils (0-10 cm depth) from 8 Hawaiian sites that provided maximum variation in nutrient availability, reactive mineral content, and background soil C. Soils were sieved, pooled by site, and homogenized prior to a laboratory addition of radio (14C)-labeled sucrose, including nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) additions in full factorial design. We followed the 14C into microbial biomass growth, into soil mineral fractions, and into 14C-respiration (CO2) over 24 hours. We say effects of laboratory fertilization and ecosystem conditions on microbial growth efficiency and C losses via CO2. Across the 8 diverse soils, the full addition of 14C-sucrose+NP increased cumulative loss of 14C-CO2 relative to addition of 14C-sucrose alone (pP) did not increase 14C-CO2 across the 8 soils relative to 14C-sucrose alone, although there were effects at individual sites. By 24 hours, 14C-CO2 losses for 14C-sucrose+NP were 26 × 3 μg-14C/g-soil/hr, versus

  15. Scanning the available Dictyostelium discoideum proteome for O-linked GlcNAc glycosylation sitesusing neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Ramneek; Jung, Eva; Gooley, Andrew A

    1999-01-01

    context and protein surface accessibility in 39 experimentally determined O-alpha-GlcNAc sites found in D. discoideum glycoproteins expressed in vivo. Cross-validation of the data revealed a correlation in which 97% of the glycosylated and nonglycosylated sites were correctly identified. Based...... on the currently limited data set, an abundant periodicity of two (positions-3, -1, +1, +3, etc.) in Proline residues alternating with hydroxyl amino acids was observed upstream and downstream of the acceptor site. This was a consequence of the spacing of the glycosylated residues themselves which were peculiarly...... found to be situated only at even positions with respect to each other, indicating that these may be located within beta-strands. The method has been used for a rapid and ranked scan of the fraction of the Dictyostelium proteome available in public databases, remarkably 25-30% of which were predicted...

  16. Early nutrition transition in Haiti: linking food purchasing and availability to overweight status in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Alexandra B; Becker, Haley V; Delnatus, Jacques Raymond; Wolff, Patricia B; Iannotti, Lora L

    2016-12-01

    The primary aim was to examine the association of socio-economic factors and diet with overweight (including obesity) among school-aged children in Haiti. The secondary aim was to describe food availability and the physical activity built environment in participating schools. This cross-sectional study examined baseline data from the intervention Mamba study assessing the effectiveness of a fortified peanut butter paste in school-aged children. Logistic regression modelling was used to test hypothesized factors in association with overweight status. Six primary schools in Cap-Haitien, the second largest city in Haiti. Children (n 968) aged 3-13 years, in good health and enrolled in a participating school for the 2012/13 school year. Child age (adjusted OR (AOR); 95 % CI=0·25; 0·12, 0·56), child age squared (1·08; 1·03, 1·13), always purchasing food at school (3·52; 1·12, 11·08), mother's BMI (1·10; 1·04, 1·16) and household ownership of a bicycle (0·28; 0·11, 0·71) were significantly associated with overweight (likelihood ratio=36, Poverweight children in the binary analysis (P=0·033) and improved the fit of the model. Schools had limited time and space for physical activity and foods sold by vendors were predominantly high in sugar or fat. To our knowledge the present study is the first to examine the covariates of childhood overweight or describe school food availability and physical activity built environments in Haiti. Further research is necessary to identify intervention targets and feasible, cost-effective approaches for prevention of obesity in Haiti children.

  17. The medical threat of mamba envenoming in sub-Saharan Africa revealed by genus-wide analysis of venom composition, toxicity and antivenomics profiling of available antivenoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Petras, Daniel; Engmark, Mikael; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Whiteley, Gareth; Albulescu, Laura-Oana; Kazandjian, Taline D; Wagstaff, Simon C; Rowley, Paul; Wüster, Wolfgang; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Arias, Ana Silvia; Gutiérrez, José M; Harrison, Robert A; Casewell, Nicholas R; Calvete, Juan J

    2018-02-10

    Mambas (genus Dendroaspis) are among the most feared of the medically important elapid snakes found in sub-Saharan Africa, but many facets of their biology, including the diversity of venom composition, remain relatively understudied. Here, we present a reconstruction of mamba phylogeny, alongside genus-wide venom gland transcriptomic and high-resolution top-down venomic analyses. Whereas the green mambas, D. viridis, D. angusticeps, D. j. jamesoni and D. j. kaimosae, express 3FTx-predominant venoms, black mamba (D. polylepis) venom is dominated by dendrotoxins I and K. The divergent terrestrial ecology of D. polylepis compared to the arboreal niche occupied by all other mambas makes it plausible that this major difference in venom composition is due to dietary variation. The pattern of intrageneric venom variability across Dendroaspis represented a valuable opportunity to investigate, in a genus-wide context, the variant toxicity of the venom, and the degree of paraspecific cross-reactivity between antivenoms and mamba venoms. To this end, the immunological profiles of the five mamba venoms were assessed against a panel of commercial antivenoms generated for the sub-Saharan Africa market. This study provides a genus-wide overview of which available antivenoms may be more efficacious in neutralising human envenomings caused by mambas, irrespective of the species responsible. The information gathered in this study lays the foundations for rationalising the notably different potency and pharmacological profiles of Dendroaspis venoms at locus resolution. This understanding will allow selection and design of toxin immunogens with a view to generating a safer and more efficacious pan-specific antivenom against any mamba envenomation. The mambas (genus Dendroaspis) comprise five especially notorious medically important venomous snakes endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Their highly potent venoms comprise a high diversity of pharmacologically active peptides, including

  18. The Impact of Climate Change on Water Resource Availability in a Trans-Boundary Basin in West Africa: The Case of Sassandra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naga Coulibaly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of climate change in West Africa characterized by a reduction of precipitation, this study was conducted to evaluate the impact of climate change on water resources from now to the end of the 21st century in the transboundary watershed of the Sassandra River shared by Guinea and Côte d’Ivoire. Historical and future climate data of Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs 4.5 and 8.5 were projected with the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP Regional Climate Model (RegCM4. The hydrological modeling of the river basin was carried out with the conceptual hydrological model, GR2M, a monthly time steps model that allows for the assessment of the discharge of the Sassandra River for each climate scenario according to the time periods 2021–2040 (Horizon 2030, 2041–2060 (Horizon 2050, 2061–2080 (Horizon 2050, and 2061–2080 (Horizon 2090. The results show a reduction in annual discharge when compared to the baseline (1961–1980. For RCP 4.5, the observed values go from −1.2% in 2030 to −2.3% in 2070 and rise to −2.1% in 2090. Concerning RCP 8.5, we saw a variation from −4.2 to −7.9% in Horizons 2030 and 2090, respectively. With the general decrease in rainfall in West Africa, it is appropriate to assess the impact on water resources of the largest rivers (Niger, Gambia, and Senegal that irrigate the Sahelo–Saharian zone.

  19. Food and Nutrition Insecurity in Selected Rural Communities of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa-Linking Human Nutrition and Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Laurencia; Pillay, Kirthee; Siwela, Muthulisi; Modi, Albert; Mabhaudhi, Tafadzwanashe

    2016-12-27

    Lack of access to nutritious and balanced diets remains a major impediment to the health and well-being of people living in rural areas. The study utilizes a qualitative systematic approach to conduct an environmental scan and review of scientific literature of studies conducted in South Africa, specifically KwaZulu-Natal (KZN). Availability and access to nutritious, diverse and balanced diets were identified as key constraints for achieving food and nutrition security as well as for human health and well-being. This has led to both under- and over-nutrition, with the former, in particular stunting, affecting children under 5 years. A high incidence of over-nutrition, both overweight and obesity, was observed among black African females. In South Africa, poor people rely mostly on social grants and cannot afford a balanced diet. Under these circumstances, agriculture could be used to increase availability and access to diverse and nutritious foods for the attainment of a balanced diet. The wider use of traditional vegetable crops and pulses could improve availability and access to healthy and locally available alternatives. The promotion of household and community food gardens, and the use of nutrient dense crops with low levels of water use, i.e., high nutritional water productivity, offers prospects for addressing malnutrition in poor rural areas.

  20. Faith and Marital Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa: Exploring the Links Between Religious Affiliation and Intimate Partner Violence Among Women in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takyi, Baffour K; Lamptey, Enoch

    2016-11-01

    Research shows that intimate partner violence is quite widespread throughout the world. In the case of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), studies have concluded that cultural and economic factors help to sustain the spread and maintenance of intimate partner violence in the region. Although the cultural interpretations predominate in current research, few have examined the links between religion, an important cultural variable, and intimate partner violence in SSA. Given the growth and importance of religion in African cultures, we used data from the 2008 Ghana Demographic Health Survey ( n = 1,831) and ordinary least squares regression method to investigate the links between religious affiliation and intimate partner violence. Findings from our study point to some variations in intimate partner violence by affiliation. This is especially true with regard to women's experience with sexual violence and emotional violence. Besides religion, we also found ideologies that support wife abuse, the nature of decision-making process at the household level, and husband's use of alcohol to be important determinants of intimate partner violence in Ghana. We examined the implications of these findings.

  1. Multiple stressors in Southern Africa: the link between HIV/AIDS, food insecurity, poverty and children's vulnerability now and in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drimie, Scott; Casale, Marisa

    2009-01-01

    Several countries in Southern Africa now see large numbers of their population barely subsisting at poverty levels in years without shocks, and highly vulnerable to the vagaries of the weather, the economy and government policy. The combination of HIV/AIDS, food insecurity and a weakened capacity for governments to deliver basic social services has led to the region experiencing an acute phase of a long-term emergency. "Vulnerability" is a term commonly used by scientists and practitioners to describe these deteriorating conditions. There is particular concern about the "vulnerability" of children in this context and implications for children's future security. Through a review of literature and recent case studies, and using a widely accepted conceptualisation of vulnerability as a lens, we reflect on what the regional livelihoods crisis could mean for children's future wellbeing. We argue that an increase in factors determining the vulnerability of households - both through greater intensity and frequency of shocks and stresses ("external" vulnerability) and undermined resilience or ability to cope ("internal" vulnerability) - are threatening not only current welfare of children, but also their longer-term security. The two specific pathways we explore are (1) erosive coping strategies employed by families and individuals; and (2) their inability to plan for the future. We conclude that understanding and responding to this crisis requires looking at the complexity of these multiple stressors, to try to comprehend their interconnections and causal links. Policy and programme responses have, to date, largely failed to take into account the complex and multi-dimensional nature of this crisis. There is a misfit between the problem and the institutional response, as responses from national and international players have remained relatively static. Decisive, well-informed and holistic interventions are needed to break the potential negative cycle that threatens the

  2. Water harvesting experience in sub-Saharan Africa - lessons for sustainable intensification of rainfed agriculture and the influence of available soils and rainfall data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, John; Bunclark, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    Africa is seen by many as the continent with the greatest potential for agricultural growth, but land degradation and environmental change threaten the African soil resource more severely than in many other regions of the planet. Achieving future food security will depend mainly on increasing production from rainfed agriculture. The challenge of delivering the required sustainable intensification in rainfed agriculture is most acute in the drylands - the semi-arid and dry sub-humid climatic regions. There are two broad strategies for increasing yields under these circumstances: (1) capturing more rainwater and storing it (increasing water availability), and (2) using the available water more effectively by increasing the plant growth and/or reducing non-productive soil evaporation (increasing water productivity). We focus on the first of these options - water harvesting, which is defined as, "the collection and concentration of rainfall runoff, or floodwaters, for plant production". The benefits of water harvesting have been documented from small scale experimental plot studies, but evidence of successful adoption and impact is weak. As a contribution to improving the evidence base, we present results from an investigation conducted in SSA to gather information on progress with efforts to promote adoption of water harvesting. The intention was to investigate in detail the processes and outcomes on a large enough sample area to draw some common conclusions. This was not a comprehensive analysis of all that is happening in each country, nor was it a random sample; this was a purposive sample guided by available baseline information to permit comparative analysis. Water harvesting seems to have made the most progress where techniques can be adopted by individual farmers: in Burkina Faso and Niger micro- scale zaï /tassa and demi-lune systems; in Sudan and Tanzania meso-scale majaruba and teras systems. Macro-scale systems requiring social organisation may offer

  3. Parents' and guardians' perceptions on availability and pricing of medicines and healthcare for children in eThekwini, South Africa - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal-Pillay, Velisha Ann; Suleman, Fatima

    2017-06-19

    Inadequate access to affordable essential medicines poses a challenge to achieving Universal Health Coverage. Access to essential medicines for children has been in the spotlight in recent research. However, information from the end users of medicines, i.e. patients is scarce. Obtaining information at a household level is integral to understanding how people access, obtain and use medicines. This study aimed to gather opinions and perceptions from parents/guardians on availability, affordability and quality of medicines and healthcare for children in SA. Eight Focus group discussions were held with 41 individuals in eThekwini, South Africa (SA), from September-November 2016. Participants were parents/guardians of children up to 12 years from different ethnicities, ages, gender, and socio-economic backgrounds. Key informants identified by the principal researcher recruited participants using snowball sampling. Focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded by the first author, verified by the second author, reconciled for consensus and imported into NVIVO for data analysis. Medicines and healthcare facilities are accessible in urban and peri-urban areas in eThekwini. Medicines may not always be available in public sector facilities due to medicine shortages, compelling parents to purchase medicines from private sector pharmacies. Common medicines were perceived as affordable for most socio-economic groups except the 'Poor' group. Quality of medicines was perceived as 'good' especially if obtained from the private sector but sometimes perceived as 'poor' and viewed with suspicion when received from public sector clinics. Quality of healthcare was perceived as 'good' but requires improvement for both sectors. This is the first study in SA to report on parent/guardian perceptions on availability, affordability and quality of medicines and healthcare for children. It has the potential to be up-scaled to a country-wide investigation to paint a

  4. Linking climate change and progressive eutrophication to incidents of clustered animal mortalities in different geographical regions of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholster, Paul J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available of cyanobacteria species that have previously been hampered to form blooms due to low temperature and nutrient concentrations, may form mix blooms with existing species which potentially can lead to the simultaneous occurrence of both neuro and hepatic biotoxins...

  5. On the potential vegetation feedbacks that enhance phosphorus availability – insights from a process-based model linking geological and ecological timescales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Buendía

    2014-07-01

    We find that active P uptake is an essential mechanism for sustaining P availability on long timescales, whereas biotic de-occlusion might serve as a buffer on timescales shorter than 10 000 yr. Although active P uptake is essential for reducing P losses by leaching, humid lowland soils reach P limitation after around 100 000 yr of soil evolution. Given the generalized modelling framework, our model results compare reasonably with observed or independently estimated patterns and ranges of P concentrations in soils and vegetation. Furthermore, our simulations suggest that P limitation might be an important driver of biomass production efficiency (the fraction of the gross primary productivity used for biomass growth, and that vegetation on old soils has a smaller biomass production rate when P becomes limiting. With this study, we provide a theoretical basis for investigating the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to P availability linking geological and ecological timescales under different environmental settings.

  6. Availability of, access to and consumption of fruits and vegetables in a peri-urban area in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Mieke; Laubscher, Ria; Laurie, Sunette

    2013-07-01

    Availability and consumption of fruits and vegetables were assessed in peri-urban households in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. Caregivers of 400 randomly selected grade 6 and 7 learners were interviewed using a questionnaire that included unquantified food frequency questions. Using a repeated 24-h dietary recall, dietary intake was quantified for learners, caregivers and 2- to 5-year-old children in the household. Usual household fruit and vegetable consumption was expressed over three Living Standard Measure (LSM) categories. Average per capita intake of fruit and/or vegetables was 99 g for 2- to 5-year-old children and 124 g for caregivers. For consumers, fruits and/or vegetables contributed towards total dietary intake of fibre (16-21%), calcium (13-21%), vitamin A (27-31%) and vitamin C (47-62%). For households not consuming fruits (n = 297) and vegetables (n = 178) daily, cost was the major constraint (≥75%). Of all households, 52% had fruit trees and 25% had a vegetable garden. Animals destroying vegetables was the major constraint to 59% of vegetable growers. Household consumption of fruits and vegetables increased over the LSM categories. Caregivers in the higher LSM group more likely used printed material for information on healthy eating, had fruit trees, were confident about vegetable gardening and sold some of their produce. To enable peri-urban populations of low socio-economic status to consume more frequently a bigger variety of fruits and vegetables, the cost of purchasing these food items needs to be addressed by government and business sector. Households should further receive support to overcome constraints which hamper the success of home gardens. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Why increasing availability of ART is not enough: a rapid, community-based study on how HIV-related stigma impacts engagement to care in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves-Kagan, Sarah; Steward, Wayne T; Ntswane, Lebogang; Haller, Robin; Gilvydis, Jennifer M; Gulati, Harnik; Barnhart, Scott; Lippman, Sheri A

    2016-01-28

    Stigma is a known barrier to HIV testing and care. Because access to antiretroviral therapy reduces overt illness and mortality, some scholars theorized that HIV-related stigma would decrease as treatment availability increased. However, the association between ART accessibility and stigma has not been as straightforward as originally predicted. We conducted a "situational analysis"--a rapid, community-based qualitative assessment to inform a combination HIV prevention program in high prevalence communities. In the context of this community-based research, we conducted semi-structured interviews and focus groups with 684 individuals in four low-resource sub-districts in North West Province, South Africa. In addition to using this data to inform programming, we examined the impact of stigma on the uptake of services. Findings suggested that anticipated stigma remains a barrier to care. Although participants reported less enacted stigma, or hostility toward people living with HIV, they also felt that HIV remains synonymous with promiscuity and infidelity. Participants described community members taking steps to avoid being identified as HIV-positive, including avoiding healthcare facilities entirely, using traditional healers, or paying for private doctors. Such behaviors led to delays in testing and accessing care, and problems adhering to medications, especially for men and youth with no other health condition that could plausibly account for their utilization of medical services. We conclude that providing access to ART alone will not end HIV-related stigma. Instead, individuals will remain hesitant to seek care as long as they fear that doing so will lead to prejudice and discrimination. It is critical to combat this trend by increasing cultural acceptance of being seropositive, integrating HIV care into general primary care and normalizing men and youths' accessing health care.

  8. The medical threat of mamba envenoming in sub-Saharan Africa revealed by genus-wide analysis of venom composition, toxicity and antivenomics profiling of available antivenoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Petras, Daniel; Engmark, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    Mambas (genus Dendroaspis) are among the most feared of the medically important elapid snakes found in sub-Saharan Africa, but many facets of their biology, including the diversity of venom composition, remain relatively understudied. Here, we present a reconstruction of mamba phylogeny, alongside......-wide context, the variant toxicity of the venom, and the degree of paraspecific cross-reactivity between antivenoms and mamba venoms. To this end, the immunological profiles of the five mamba venoms were assessed against a panel of commercial antivenoms generated for the sub-Saharan Africa market. This study...

  9. Limited Service Availability, Readiness, and Use of Facility-Based Delivery Care in Haiti: A Study Linking Health Facility Data and Population Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjuan; Winner, Michelle; Burgert-Brucker, Clara R

    2017-06-27

    Understanding the barriers that women in Haiti face to giving birth at a health facility is important for improving coverage of facility delivery and reducing persistently high maternal mortality. We linked health facility survey data and population survey data to assess the role of the obstetric service environment in affecting women's use of facility delivery care. Data came from the 2012 Haiti Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and the 2013 Haiti Service Provision Assessment (SPA) survey. DHS clusters and SPA facilities were linked with their geographic coordinate information. The final analysis sample from the DHS comprised 4,921 women who had a live birth in the 5 years preceding the survey. Service availability was measured with the number of facilities providing delivery services within a specified distance from the cluster (within 5 kilometers for urban areas and 10 kilometers for rural areas). We measured facility readiness to provide obstetric care using 37 indicators defined by the World Health Organization. Random-intercept logistic regressions were used to model the variation in individual use of facility-based delivery care and cluster-level service availability and readiness, adjusting for other factors. Overall, 39% of women delivered their most recent birth at a health facility and 61% delivered at home, with disparities by residence (about 60% delivered at a health facility in urban areas vs. 24% in rural areas). About one-fifth (18%) of women in rural areas and one-tenth (12%) of women in nonmetropolitan urban areas lived in clusters where no facility offered delivery care within the specified distances, while nearly all women (99%) in the metropolitan area lived in clusters that had at least 2 such facilities. Urban clusters had better service readiness compared with rural clusters, with a wide range of variation in both areas. Regression models indicated that in both rural and nonmetropolitan urban areas availability of delivery services was

  10. Visceral leishmaniasis relapse hazard is linked to reduced miltefosine exposure in patients from Eastern Africa: a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorlo, Thomas P C; Kip, Anke E; Younis, Brima M; Ellis, Sally J; Alves, Fabiana; Beijnen, Jos H; Njenga, Simon; Kirigi, George; Hailu, Asrat; Olobo, Joseph; Musa, Ahmed M; Balasegaram, Manica; Wasunna, Monique; Karlsson, Mats O; Khalil, Eltahir A G

    2017-11-01

    Low efficacy of miltefosine in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis was recently observed in Eastern Africa. To describe the pharmacokinetics and establish a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship for miltefosine in Eastern African patients with visceral leishmaniasis, using a time-to-event approach to model relapse of disease. Miltefosine plasma concentrations from 95 patients (48 monotherapy versus 47 combination therapy) were included in the population pharmacokinetic model using non-linear mixed effects modelling. Subsequently a time-to-event model was developed to model the time of clinical relapse. Various summary pharmacokinetic parameters (various AUCs, Time > EC50, Time > EC90), normalized within each treatment arm to allow simultaneous analysis, were evaluated as relapse hazard-changing covariates. A two-compartment population model with first-order absorption fitted the miltefosine pharmacokinetic data adequately. Relative bioavailability was reduced (-74%, relative standard error 4.7%) during the first week of treatment of the monotherapy arm but only the first day of the shorter combination regimen. Time to the relapse of infection could be described using a constant baseline hazard (baseline 1.8 relapses/year, relative standard error 72.7%). Miltefosine Time > EC90 improved the model significantly when added in a maximum effect function on the baseline hazard (half maximal effect with Time > EC90 6.97 days for monotherapy). Miltefosine drug exposure was found to be decreased in Eastern African patients with visceral leishmaniasis, due to a (transient) initial lower bioavailability. Relapse hazard was inversely linked to miltefosine exposure. Significantly lower miltefosine exposure was observed in children compared with adults, further urging the need for implementation of dose adaptations for children. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  11. Linking hard and soft traits: Physiology, morphology and anatomy interact to determine habitat affinities to soil water availability in herbaceous dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belluau, Michaël; Shipley, Bill

    2018-01-01

    Species' habitat affinities along environmental gradients should be determined by a combination of physiological (hard) and morpho-anatomical (soft) traits. Using a gradient of soil water availability, we address three questions: How well can we predict habitat affinities from hard traits, from soft traits, and from a combination of the two? How well can we predict species' physiological responses to drought (hard traits) from their soft traits? Can we model a causal sequence as soft traits → hard traits → species distributions? We chose 25 species of herbaceous dicots whose affinities for soil moisture have already been linked to 5 physiological traits (stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis measured at soil field capacity, water use efficiency, stomatal conductance and soil water potential measured when leaves begin to wilt). Under controlled conditions in soils at field capacity, we measured five soft traits (leaf dry matter content, specific leaf area, leaf nitrogen content, stomatal area, specific root length). Soft traits alone were poor predictors (R2 = 0.129) while hard traits explained 48% of species habitat affinities. Moreover, hard traits were significantly related to combinations of soft traits. From a priori biological knowledge and hypothesized ecological links we built a path model showing a sequential pattern soft traits → hard traits → species distributions and accounting for 59.6% (p = 0.782) of habitat wetness. Both direct and indirect causal relationships existed between soft traits, hard traits and species' habitat preferences. The poor predictive abilities of soft traits alone were due to the existence of antagonistic and synergistic direct and indirect effects of soft traits on habitat preferences mediated by the hard traits. To obtain a more realistic model applicable to a population level, it has to be tested in an experiment including species competition for water supply.

  12. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay gliadin assessment in processed food products available for persons with celiac disease: a feasibility study for developing a gluten-free food database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakidis, Charalampos; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Kalaitsidou, Marina; Papadopoulos, Theodoros; Savvidou, Afroditi; Daskalou, Efstratia; Dimitrios, Triantafyllou

    2011-12-01

    Inappropriate food labeling and unwillingness of food companies to officially register their own gluten-free products in the Greek National Food Intolerance Database (NFID) result in a limited range of processed food products available for persons with celiac disease (CDP). The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of developing a gluten-free food product database based on the assessment of the gluten content in processed foods available for CDP. Gluten was assessed in 41 processed food products available for CDP. Group A consisted of 26 products for CDP included in the NFID, and group B contained 15 food products for CDP not registered in the NFID but listed in the safe lists of the local Celiac Association (CA). High-sensitivity ω-gliadin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for analysis. Gluten was lower than 20 ppm in 37 of 41 analyzed products (90.2%): in 24 of 26 (92.3%) products in group A and in 13 of 15 (86.7%) products in group B (P = .61). No significant difference was found between the 2 groups regarding gluten content. No product in either group contained gluten in excess of 100 ppm. Most of the analyzed products included in the Greek NFID or listed in the lists of the local CA, even those not officially labeled "gluten free," can be safely consumed by CDP. The use of commercially available ω-gliadin ELISA is able to identify those products that contain inappropriate levels of gluten, making feasible it to develop an integrated gluten-free processed food database.

  13. of cassava in africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. This review summarises the available information on the viruses and virus diseases of cassava in Africa. .... Nevertheless, serological tests have been made on more than 150 isolates from mosaic- affected cassava in 22 countries of Africa or the. Indian sub-continent. ...... of Crop Pests in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  14. Interannual variability of seasonal rainfall over the Cape south coast of South Africa and synoptic type association

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, CJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The link between interannual variability of seasonal rainfall over the Cape south coast of South Africa and different synoptic types as well as selected teleconnections is explored. Synoptic circulation over the region is classified into different...

  15. Greenhouse gas emissions from natural ecosystems and agricultural lands in sub-Saharan Africa: synthesis of available data and suggestions for further research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Gill; Thomas, Andrew D.; Pelster, David; Rosenstock, Todd S.; Sanz-Cobena, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    This paper summarizes currently available data on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from African natural ecosystems and agricultural lands. The available data are used to synthesize current understanding of the drivers of change in GHG emissions, outline the knowledge gaps, and suggest future directions and strategies for GHG emission research. GHG emission data were collected from 75 studies conducted in 22 countries (n = 244) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions were by far the largest contributor to GHG emissions and global warming potential (GWP) in SSA natural terrestrial systems. CO2 emissions ranged from 3.3 to 57.0 Mg CO2 ha-1 yr-1, methane (CH4) emissions ranged from -4.8 to 3.5 kg ha-1 yr-1 (-0.16 to 0.12 Mg CO2 equivalent (eq.) ha-1 yr-1), and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions ranged from -0.1 to 13.7 kg ha-1 yr-1 (-0.03 to 4.1 Mg CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1). Soil physical and chemical properties, rewetting, vegetation type, forest management, and land-use changes were all found to be important factors affecting soil GHG emissions from natural terrestrial systems. In aquatic systems, CO2 was the largest contributor to total GHG emissions, ranging from 5.7 to 232.0 Mg CO2 ha-1 yr-1, followed by -26.3 to 2741.9 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 (-0.89 to 93.2 Mg CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1) and 0.2 to 3.5 kg N2O ha-1 yr-1 (0.06 to 1.0 Mg CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1). Rates of all GHG emissions from aquatic systems were affected by type, location, hydrological characteristics, and water quality. In croplands, soil GHG emissions were also dominated by CO2, ranging from 1.7 to 141.2 Mg CO2 ha-1 yr-1, with -1.3 to 66.7 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 (-0.04 to 2.3 Mg CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1) and 0.05 to 112.0 kg N2O ha-1 yr-1 (0.015 to 33.4 Mg CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1). N2O emission factors (EFs) ranged from 0.01 to 4.1 %. Incorporation of crop residues or manure with inorganic fertilizers invariably resulted in significant changes in GHG emissions, but results were inconsistent as the magnitude and direction of

  16. Evaluation of problems and possible solutions linked to the surveillance and control of bovine brucellosis in sub-Saharan Africa, with special emphasis on Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibironke, Ademola A; McCrindle, Cheryl M E; Fasina, Folorunso O; Godfroid, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is disease of economic and public health significance in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is distributed worldwide but some countries have been able to eradicate brucellosis from their territories using elaborate brucellosis control and eradication programmes that have been targeted primarily at livestock (the main reservoir host for the disease). This has been achieved mainly by vaccination, test and slaughter, as well as by regular surveillance for early detection of the disease. Despite the level of knowledge on the epidemiology of bovine brucellosis, there has been limited success in controlling bovine brucellosis in sub-Saharan Africa. Some of the problems associated with the surveillance and control of bovine brucellosis in sub-Saharan Africa include poor disease reporting, insufficient financial resources of governments (poor economic status of most countries in sub-Saharan Africa), as well as competing national health priorities, inadequate infrastructures and personnel, the commonly practised seasonal grazing or transhumant husbandry systems and communal grazing, inadequate monitoring of the disease in wildlife and poor communication and education of stakeholders. Since previous attempts at the control of bovine brucellosis have failed in Africa, it was considered important to address this aspect, using an approach that differed from the classic veterinary regulatory approach. Possible ways of dealing with this problem using complementary measures to the conventional approaches are also proposed.

  17. Developing energy in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favennec, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Energy and economic growth are connected and the wealth of Western countries is based on a high availability of energy. Africa is a continent vast by its size, well populated and well supplied with fossil energy (oil, gas, coal) and renewable energy (hydroelectric, biomass, solar). But consumption is limited, without distribution infrastructures and initially, without capitals for necessary investments. The situation is particularly critical in Sub-Sahara Africa since the African energy consumption is mainly concentrated in South Africa and North Africa. An annual conference, the Energy Summit in Africa, brings together all players in the sector, from all the continent's countries, from Europe and America, in an attempt to establish recommendations for more availability and a better use of energy in Africa. The next summit is scheduled for November 23 to 25, 2004 in Dakar. The program relies on the Association for the Development of Energy in Africa, which will be created shortly. (author)

  18. Redox engineering by ectopic expression of glutamate dehydrogenase genes links NADPH availability and NADH oxidation with cold growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester-Tomás, Lidia; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Prieto, Jose Antonio

    2015-07-09

    Cold stress reduces microbial growth and metabolism being relevant in industrial processes like wine making and brewing. Knowledge on the cold transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests the need of a proper redox balance. Nevertheless, there are no direct evidence of the links between NAD(P) levels and cold growth and how engineering of enzymatic reactions requiring NAD(P) may be used to modify the performance of industrial strains at low temperature. Recombinant strains of S. cerevisiae modified for increased NADPH- and NADH-dependent Gdh1 and Gdh2 activity were tested for growth at low temperature. A high-copy number of the GDH2-encoded glutamate dehydrogenase gene stimulated growth at 15°C, while overexpression of GDH1 had detrimental effects, a difference likely caused by cofactor preferences. Indeed, neither the Trp(-) character of the tested strains, which could affect the synthesis of NAD(P), nor changes in oxidative stress susceptibility by overexpression of GDH1 and GDH2 account for the observed phenotypes. However, increased or reduced NADPH availability by knock-out or overexpression of GRE3, the NADPH-dependent aldose reductase gene, eliminated or exacerbated the cold-growth defect observed in YEpGDH1 cells. We also demonstrated that decreased capacity of glycerol production impairs growth at 15 but not at 30°C and that 15°C-grown baker's yeast cells display higher fermentative capacity than those cultivated at 30°C. Thus, increasing NADH oxidation by overexpression of GDH2 would help to avoid perturbations in the redox metabolism induced by a higher fermentative/oxidative balance at low temperature. Finally, it is shown that overexpression of GDH2 increases notably the cold growth in the wine yeast strain QA23 in both standard growth medium and synthetic grape must. Redox constraints limit the growth of S. cerevisiae at temperatures below the optimal. An adequate supply of NAD(P) precursors as well as a proper level of reducing

  19. Inventory on the dietary assessment tools available and needed in africa: a prerequisite for setting up a common methodological research infrastructure for nutritional surveillance, research, and prevention of diet-related non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisa, Pedro T; Landais, Edwige; Margetts, Barrie; Vorster, Hester H; Friedenreich, Christine M; Huybrechts, Inge; Martin-Prevel, Yves; Branca, Francesco; Lee, Warren T K; Leclercq, Catherine; Jerling, Johann; Zotor, Francis; Amuna, Paul; Al Jawaldeh, Ayoub; Aderibigbe, Olaide Ruth; Amoussa, Waliou Hounkpatin; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer; Atek, Madjid; Benhura, Chakare; Chifamba, Jephat; Covic, Namukolo; Dary, Omar; Delisle, Hélène; El Ati, Jalila; El Hamdouchi, Asmaa; El Rhazi, Karima; Faber, Mieke; Kalimbira, Alexander; Korkalo, Liisa; Kruger, Annamarie; Ledo, James; Machiweni, Tatenda; Mahachi, Carol; Mathe, Nonsikelelo; Mokori, Alex; Mouquet-Rivier, Claire; Mutie, Catherine; Nashandi, Hilde Liisa; Norris, Shane A; Onabanjo, Oluseye Olusegun; Rambeloson, Zo; Saha, Foudjo Brice U; Ubaoji, Kingsley Ikechukwu; Zaghloul, Sahar; Slimani, Nadia

    2018-01-02

    To carry out an inventory on the availability, challenges, and needs of dietary assessment (DA) methods in Africa as a pre-requisite to provide evidence, and set directions (strategies) for implementing common dietary methods and support web-research infrastructure across countries. The inventory was performed within the framework of the "Africa's Study on Physical Activity and Dietary Assessment Methods" (AS-PADAM) project. It involves international institutional and African networks. An inventory questionnaire was developed and disseminated through the networks. Eighteen countries responded to the dietary inventory questionnaire. Various DA tools were reported in Africa; 24-Hour Dietary Recall and Food Frequency Questionnaire were the most commonly used tools. Few tools were validated and tested for reliability. Face-to-face interview was the common method of administration. No computerized software or other new (web) technologies were reported. No tools were standardized across countries. The lack of comparable DA methods across represented countries is a major obstacle to implement comprehensive and joint nutrition-related programmes for surveillance, programme evaluation, research, and prevention. There is a need to develop new or adapt existing DA methods across countries by employing related research infrastructure that has been validated and standardized in other settings, with the view to standardizing methods for wider use.

  20. Evaluation of problems and possible solutions linked to the surveillance and control of bovine brucellosis in sub-Saharan Africa, with special emphasis on Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Folorunso O. Fasina; Cheryl M.E. McCrindle; Ademola A. Ibironke; Jacques Godfroid

    2008-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is disease of economic and public health significance in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is distributed worldwide but some countries have been able to eradicate brucellosis from their territories using elaborate brucellosis control and eradication programmes that have been targeted primarily at livestock (the main reservoir host for the disease). This has been achieved mainly by vaccination, test and slaughter, as well as by regular surveillance for early detection of the d...

  1. Bond markets in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Mu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available African bond markets have been steadily growing in recent years, but nonetheless remain undeveloped. African countries would benefit from greater access to financing and deeper financial markets. This paper compiles a unique set of data on government securities and corporate bond markets in Africa. It then applies an econometric model to analyze the key determinants of African government securities market and corporate bond market capitalization. Government securities market capitalization is directly related to better institutions and interest rate volatility, and inversely related to smaller fiscal deficits, higher interest rate spreads, exchange rate volatility, and current and capital account openness. Corporate bond market capitalization is directly linked to economic size, the level of development of the economy and financial markets, better institutions, and interest rate volatility, and inversely related to higher interest rate spreads and current account openness. Policy implications follow.

  2. Projecting regional climate and cropland changes using a linked biogeophysical-socioeconomic modeling framework: 1. Model description and an equilibrium application over West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiling; Ahmed, Kazi Farzan; You, Liangzhi; Yu, Miao; Pal, Jeremy; Ji, Zhenming

    2017-03-01

    Agricultural land use alters regional climate through modifying the surface mass, energy, and momentum fluxes; climate influences agricultural land use through their impact on crop yields. These interactions are not well understood and have not been adequately considered in climate projections. This study tackles the critical linkages within the coupled natural-human system of West Africa in a changing climate based on an equilibrium application of a modeling framework that asynchronously couples models of regional climate, crop yield, multimarket agricultural economics, and cropland expansion. Using this regional modeling framework driven with two global climate models, we assess the contributions of land use change (LUC) and greenhouse gas (GHGs) concentration changes to regional climate changes and assess the contribution of climate change and socioeconomic factors to agricultural land use changes. For future cropland expansion in West Africa, our results suggest that socioeconomic development would be the dominant driver in the east (where current cropland coverage is already high) and climate changes would be the primary driver in the west (where future yield drop is severe). For future climate, it is found that agricultural expansion would cause a dry signal in the west and a wet signal in the east downwind, with an east-west contrast similar to the GHG-induced changes. Over a substantial portion of West Africa, the strength of the LUC-induced climate signals is comparable to the GHG-induced changes. Uncertainties originating from the driving global models are small; human decision making related to land use and international trade is a major source of uncertainty.

  3. Effect of moisture availability on wood density and vessel characteristics of Eucalyptus grandis in the warm temperate region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Sasha

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available the density of wood (Malan and Marais, 1991). Statistical analyses Results were analysed using univariate analysis of variance using the General Linear Models procedure, and Bivariate Correlations procedure conducted in SPSS, version 9.01 (SPSS Inc...., Chicago, USA). Fisher’s least significant difference (LSD) procedures, using SPSS, were conducted on main effects and interactions between MAP and SWS. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess linear relationships, if any...

  4. Africa and the global carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denning A Scott

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The African continent has a large and growing role in the global carbon cycle, with potentially important climate change implications. However, the sparse observation network in and around the African continent means that Africa is one of the weakest links in our understanding of the global carbon cycle. Here, we combine data from regional and global inventories as well as forward and inverse model analyses to appraise what is known about Africa's continental-scale carbon dynamics. With low fossil emissions and productivity that largely compensates respiration, land conversion is Africa's primary net carbon release, much of it through burning of forests. Savanna fire emissions, though large, represent a short-term source that is offset by ensuing regrowth. While current data suggest a near zero decadal-scale carbon balance, interannual climate fluctuations (especially drought induce sizeable variability in net ecosystem productivity and savanna fire emissions such that Africa is a major source of interannual variability in global atmospheric CO2. Considering the continent's sizeable carbon stocks, their seemingly high vulnerability to anticipated climate and land use change, as well as growing populations and industrialization, Africa's carbon emissions and their interannual variability are likely to undergo substantial increases through the 21st century.

  5. Comparison of IgM Capture Enzyme- Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) using Inhouse method and commercially available MRL kit for serological confirmation of dengue infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hapugoda, D.M.; De Silva R, Nilanthi; Abeywickreme, W.; Gunasena, Sunethra; Prithimala, L.D.; Jayawardene, S.L.G.J.; Kumari, Thamara

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of dengue infection is important for the management of the patients. In this study igM capture ELISA using an inhouse method and commercially available kit (MRL diagnostics,USA) was compared to detect diagnostic capability of Inhouse IgM ELISA for provision of diagnostic facilities to the public at an affordable cost. Eighty acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from serologically confirmed dengue patients. Serological confirmation of patients were performed by Haemagglutination Inhibition (HI) assay, gold standard assay for dengue on paired serum samples. All collected acute and convalescent sera were tested by IgM ELISA using the inhouse method and MRL kit. Antigen and conjugate for the inhouse IgM method were prepared in the laboratory. A cocktail of four dengue antigens containing 25 Antigen ELISA units of each type was prepared and used as the assay antigen. Conjugate was prepared using a serum sample with high dengue Anti flavi IgG antibody titre conjugated with Horseradish peroxidase. A prospective study of both IgM ELISA assays were performed using 113 acute sera collected from dengue suspected cases. Overall results showed that 46% and 52% acute sera collected from dengue confirmed patients were positive by inhouse ELISA assay and MRL kits respectively. In the prospective study done using acute sera collected from dengue suspected patients showed that 44% and 52% were positive by inhouse ELISA assay and MRL kits. There was no significant difference in positivity between these two assays. (P=0.18). Inhouse IgM ELISA can be used for provision of laboratory diagnosis of dengue virus infection more than 5 days. The assay is 10 times less costly than using MRL kits as assay antigen and conjugate can be prepared easily in the laboratory

  6. Navigating Multiple Sources of Healing in the Context of HIV/AIDS and Wide Availability of Antiretroviral Treatment: A Qualitative Study of Community Participants' Perceptions and Experiences in Rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuma, Thembelihle; Wight, Daniel; Rochat, Tamsen; Moshabela, Mosa

    2018-01-01

    South Africa introduced the world's largest antiretroviral treatment (ART) program in 2004 and since 2016 the Department of Health implemented a universal Treatment as Prevention (TasP) strategy. However, some studies have shown that increasing the availability of ART is insufficient for the comprehensive treatment of HIV, since many people still use traditional health practitioners (THPs) to avoid being identified as HIV positive, and for reasons unrelated to HIV/AIDS. This qualitative study explored the factors influencing how both HIV-negative and HIV-positive people choose amongst multiple sources of healing and how they engage with them, in the context of HIV/AIDS and wide availability of ART. Data were collected as part of a larger TasP trial at the Africa Health Research Institute, KwaZulu-Natal. Repeat in-depth individual interviews were conducted with 10 participants. Repeat group discussions were conducted with 42 participants. Group discussion data were triangulated using community walks and photo-voice techniques to give more insight into the perceptions of community members. All data were collected over 18 months. Thematic analysis was used to analyze participants' narratives from both individual interviews and group discussions. In the context of HIV/AIDS and wide availability of ART, use of biomedical and traditional healing systems seemed to be common in this locality. People used THPs to meet family expectations, particularly those of authoritative heads of households such as parents or grandparents. Most participants believed that THPs could address specific types of illnesses, especially those understood to be spiritually caused and which could not be addressed or cured by biomedical practitioners. However, it was not easy for participants to separate some spiritually caused illnesses from biological illnesses in the context of HIV/AIDS. These data demonstrate that in this context, the use of THPs continues regardless of the wide availability

  7. The Global Opioid Policy Initiative (GOPI) project to evaluate the availability and accessibility of opioids for the management of cancer pain in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East: introduction and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherny, N I; Cleary, J; Scholten, W; Radbruch, L; Torode, J

    2013-12-01

    Opioid analgesics are critical to the effective relief of cancer pain. Effective treatment is predicated on sound assessments, individually tailored analgesic therapy, and the availability and accessibility of the required medications. In some countries, pain relief is hampered by the lack of availability or barriers to the accessibility of opioid analgesics. As the follow-up to a successful project to evaluate the availability and accessibility of opioids and regulatory barriers in Europe, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) undertook to expand their research to those parts of the world where data were lacking regarding these aspects of care, in particular Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the states of India. This project has been undertaken in collaboration with the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), the Pain and Policy Studies Group (PPSG) of the University of Wisconsin, and the World Health Organization (WHO), together with a consortium of 17 international oncology and palliative care societies. This article describes the study methodology.

  8. Occurrences and Effects of Drought across Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, M. N.

    2009-12-01

    Drought is a common occurrence in Africa and its effects vary temporally and spatially across the continent. The objective of this paper is to synthesize available information on droughts in Africa in order to discern emerging trends vis-à-vis spatiotemporal occurrences, impacts and adaptation. Drought forcings in the Sahelian region and southern Africa are predominately related to the passage of mid-latitude air masses while in locations near the equator is strongly linked to the position of ITCZ, except perhaps in the deserts where albedo may predominate. The review shows that drought occurrences have increased both temporally and spatially; its effects on the society vary across scales, and are influenced by political, economic, social, cultural, and ecological factors. The drought occurrence and its impacts varied spatially and temporally. The effect of drought also varied with socioeconomic sector; agriculture and pastoralism were the widely reported. The greater horn of Africa, specifically Kenya, has the most continuous record of droughts. The synthesis also reveals that a suite of drought adaptation strategies exists at the local scale; in contrasts, at the aggregate scale, coping strategies are scarce. Drought management tailored for specific livelihood system or societies are non-existent. The study found that occurrence of drought alongside issues related to the multiscale political economy affect the viability of most adaptation strategies used by societies across Africa. Drought management has been silent on the social, political, and economic dimensions that reasonably aggravate the vulnerability of lives and livelihood systems to this climatic hazard. The effect of drought and social pressures is relational and simultaneous to such a degree that differential vulnerability among communities across Africa is to be expected. Although scenarios about rainfall and drought vis-à-vis Africa are largely contested there is a general indication that most

  9. Military Psychology for Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, Adelaide

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available African Military Psychology community. Twenty-two years into democracy, this book Military psychology for Africa brings ‘wholeness’ for African soldiers, their families, psychological scientists, university scholars and practitioners. The scope...

  10. Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa Insight is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal of the Africa Institute of South Africa. It is accredited by the South African National Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and is indexed in the International Bibliography of Social Science (IBSS). It is a multi-disciplinary journal primarily focusing on African ...

  11. Feasibility, yield, and cost of active tuberculosis case finding linked to a mobile HIV service in Cape Town, South Africa: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzer, Katharina; Lawn, Stephen D; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Vassall, Anna; Raditlhalo, Eudoxia; Govindasamy, Darshini; van Schaik, Nienke; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization is currently developing guidelines on screening for tuberculosis disease to inform national screening strategies. This process is complicated by significant gaps in knowledge regarding mass screening. This study aimed to assess feasibility, uptake, yield, treatment outcomes, and costs of adding an active tuberculosis case-finding program to an existing mobile HIV testing service. The study was conducted at a mobile HIV testing service operating in deprived communities in Cape Town, South Africa. All HIV-negative individuals with symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis, and all HIV-positive individuals regardless of symptoms were eligible for participation and referred for sputum induction. Samples were examined by microscopy and culture. Active tuberculosis case finding was conducted on 181 days at 58 different sites. Of the 6,309 adults who accessed the mobile clinic, 1,385 were eligible and 1,130 (81.6%) were enrolled. The prevalence of smear-positive tuberculosis was 2.2% (95% CI 1.1-4.0), 3.3% (95% CI 1.4-6.4), and 0.4% (95% CI 1.4 015-6.4) in HIV-negative individuals, individuals newly diagnosed with HIV, and known HIV, respectively. The corresponding prevalence of culture-positive tuberculosis was 5.3% (95% CI 3.5-7.7), 7.4% (95% CI 4.5-11.5), 4.3% (95% CI 2.3-7.4), respectively. Of the 56 new tuberculosis cases detected, 42 started tuberculosis treatment and 34 (81.0%) completed treatment. The cost of the intervention was US$1,117 per tuberculosis case detected and US$2,458 per tuberculosis case cured. The generalisability of the study is limited to similar settings with comparable levels of deprivation and TB and HIV prevalence. Mobile active tuberculosis case finding in deprived populations with a high burden of HIV and tuberculosis is feasible, has a high uptake, yield, and treatment success. Further work is now required to examine cost-effectiveness and affordability and whether and how the same results may be achieved at scale.

  12. Causality links among renewable energy consumption, CO2 emissions, and economic growth in Africa: evidence from a panel ARDL-PMG approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attiaoui, Imed; Toumi, Hassen; Ammouri, Bilel; Gargouri, Ilhem

    2017-05-01

    This research examines the causality (For the remainder of the paper, the notion of causality refers to Granger causality.) links among renewable energy consumption (REC), CO 2 emissions (CE), non-renewable energy consumption (NREC), and economic growth (GDP) using an autoregressive distributed lag model based on the pooled mean group estimation (ARDL-PMG) and applying Granger causality tests for a panel consisting of 22 African countries for the period between 1990 and 2011. There is unidirectional and irreversible short-run causality from CE to GDP. The causal direction between CE and REC is unobservable over the short-term. Moreover, we find unidirectional, short-run causality from REC to GDP. When testing per pair of variables, there are short-run bidirectional causalities among REC, CE, and GDP. However, if we add CE to the variables REC and NREC, the causality to GDP is observable, and causality from the pair REC and NREC to economic growth is neutral. Likewise, if we add NREC to the variables GDP and REC, there is causality. There are bidirectional long-run causalities among REC, CE, and GDP, which supports the feedback assumption. Causality from GDP to REC is not strong for the panel. If we test per pair of variables, the strong causality from GDP and CE to REC is neutral. The long-run PMG estimates show that NREC and gross domestic product increase CE, whereas REC decreases CE.

  13. The Impacts of Water Quality and Food Availability on Children's Health in West Africa: A Spatial Analysis Using Remotely Sensed Data and Small-Scale Water Quality Data and Country-level Health Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, L.; Grace, K.; Lloyd, B.

    2015-12-01

    As the global climate changes and the populations of many African countries grow, ensuring clean drinking water and food has become a pressing concern. Because of their vulnerability to malnutrition and food insecurity, children face the greatest risk for adverse health outcomes related to climate change. Vulnerability, however, is highly variable, with some children in food insecure communities showing healthy growth, while some children in food secure communities show signs of malnutrition. In West Africa, Burkina Faso faces high levels of child malnutrition, loses to farmland and a large share of the population have no access to clean water. Because the overwhelming majority of children rely on locally grown, rainfed agriculture and well/surface water, the combined impact of climate change and population growth decreases water availability and farmland per person. However, there is notable community and individual variation in malnutrition levels suggesting that there are important coping strategies that vulnerable families may use to secure their children's health. No spatially relevant analysis of water and food insecurity and children's health exists for Burkina Faso. The goal of this research is to identify and quantify the combined and inter-related impact of unsafe drinking water and community-level food availability on the physical health outcomes of Burkinabe children under five years of age. To accomplish this goal we rely on a publically available highly detailed, geo-referenced data set (Demographic and Health Survey (DHS)) to provide information on measures of childhood malnutrition and details on parental characteristics related to children's health. Information on water source (covered/uncovered well, piped water, etc.) and water quality (measures of arsenic and pollution) comes from DHS along with a recently collected geo-referenced US Agency for International Development (USAID) data set. Critical information on food production, environmental

  14. A link of full-scale accelerated pavement testing to long-term pavement performance study in the Western Cape Province of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph K

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ) will heavily rely on Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) and Accelerated Pavement Testing (APT) data to calibrate performance models for cracking and rutting. This paper discusses more than 10 years APT and LTPP data established from LTPP sections...

  15. Food and environmental policies in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, M R; Biswas, A K

    1986-08-01

    Not only is Africa experiencing severe food production and nutrition problems, but environmental conditions, on which agricultural production ultimately depends, are deteriorating. A meeting of the African Ministers of Environment was held in Cairo last December, and an African solution to an African problem was put forth. The proposed program is examined in this paper. The usable extent of the pastoral area in the arid and semi-arid regions of Africa nas been reduced by 25% since 1968. At present only about 35% of the former area of slightly productive savannah is left. Africa's rich fishing grounds are being overfished and coastal regions are threatened by pollution. Africa's problems are linked with very high rates of population growth, rapid rates of urbanization, inappropriate development policies that have neglected the agricultural sector, and nonavailability of skilled manpower. The Cairo Program of African Cooperation included the following proposals: 8 continent-wide networks of institutions are to be established or strenghened in the fields of climatology, soils and fertilizers, water resources, energy, genetic resources, environmental monitoring, science and technology, and education and training; all available African skills and experience are to be applied to seek economically feasible, environmentally sound and socially acceptable solutions in certain regions; subregional cooperation is to be strenghened in terms of implementation of priority activities; 4 committees were established in areas of priority concerns; and a formula to provide US$32.5 million to finance the follow-up activities was approved.

  16. 50 Years of Urbanization in Africa : Examining the Role of Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, J. Vernon; Storeygard, Adam; Deichmann, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This paper documents a significant impact of climate variation on urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa, primarily in more arid countries. By lowering farm incomes, reduced moisture availability encourages migration to nearby cities, while wetter conditions slow migration. The paper also provides evidence for rural-urban income links. In countries with a larger industrial base, reduced moistu...

  17. LIDAR for atmosphere research over Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the LIDAR for atmosphere research over Africa and current initiatives being undertaken in South Africa. A mobile LIDAR system is being developed at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) National Laser Centre...

  18. Reasons for missed appointments linked to a public-sector intervention targeting patients with stable chronic conditions in South Africa: results from in-depth interviews and a retrospective review of medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadzire, Bvudzai P; Mathole, Thubelihle; Ward, Kim

    2017-08-24

    Missed appointments serve as a key indicator for adherence to therapy and as such, identifying patient reasons for this inconsistency could assist in developing programmes to improve health outcomes. In this article, we explore the reasons for missed appointments linked to a centralised dispensing system in South Africa. This system dispenses pre-packed, patient-specific medication parcels for clinically stable patients to health facilities. However, at least 8%-12% of about 300,000 parcels are not collected each month. This article aims to establish whether missed appointments for collection of medicine parcels are indicative of loss-to-follow-up and also to characterise the patient and health system factors linked to missed appointments. We applied an exploratory mixed-methods design in two overlapping research phases. This involved in-depth interviews to yield healthcare practitioners' and patients' experiences and medical record reviews. Data collection was conducted during the period 2014-2015. Qualitative data were analysed through a hybrid process of inductive and deductive thematic analysis which integrated data-driven and theory-driven codes. Data from medical records (N = 89) were analysed in MS excel using both descriptive statistics and textual descriptions. Review of medical records suggests that the majority of patients (67%) who missed original appointments later presented voluntarily to obtain medicines. This could indicate a temporal effect of some barriers. The remaining 33% revealed a range of CDU implementation issues resulting from, among others, erroneous classification of patients as defaulters. Interviews with patients revealed the following reasons for missed appointments: temporary migration, forgetting appointments, work commitments and temporary switch to private care. Most healthcare practitioners confirmed these barriers to collection but perceived that some were beyond the scope of health services. In addition, healthcare

  19. Linked data management

    CERN Document Server

    Hose, Katja; Schenkel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Linked Data Management presents techniques for querying and managing Linked Data that is available on today’s Web. The book shows how the abundance of Linked Data can serve as fertile ground for research and commercial applications. The text focuses on aspects of managing large-scale collections of Linked Data. It offers a detailed introduction to Linked Data and related standards, including the main principles distinguishing Linked Data from standard database technology. Chapters also describe how to generate links between datasets and explain the overall architecture of data integration systems based on Linked Data. A large part of the text is devoted to query processing in different setups. After presenting methods to publish relational data as Linked Data and efficient centralized processing, the book explores lookup-based, distributed, and parallel solutions. It then addresses advanced topics, such as reasoning, and discusses work related to read-write Linked Data for system interoperation. Desp...

  20. Higher Education Transformation: A Paradigm Shift in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa\\'s higher education system is struggling to become a socially relevant ivory tower: that is, a university system that pays close attention to its calling of research while staying linked to the existential and political struggles of the people, the primary stakeholders in the system. Africa Insight Vol.34(2/3) 2004: 65-72 ...

  1. Scandinavian links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    centres, one joins more thinly populated regions, and the last one links peripheral areas. Two of them (The Great Belt Link and the Oresund Link) have been constructed and are in full operation. The third (the Fehmarnbelt Link) has been decided 2008 on bilateral government level. The three links...

  2. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J J; Paumard, J L; Milin, D; Levoir, P; Fontaine, J C

    1988-11-01

    A low-cost digital acquisition unit for a CARY-210 spectrophotometer has been designed and constructed. The data-flow is controlled by a 6809 microprocessor driving four parallel interface adapters. Two RS232-C serial links are provided for communication with a terminal and a mass storage unit. The acquired data are processed by a personal computer. Included are several software modules, based on powerful signal-processing algorithms, which are highly useful in kinetic studies.

  3. Innovative financing for health: what are the options for South Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Fryatt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper assesses the options for additional innovative financing that could be considered in South Africa, covering both raising new funds and linking funds to results. New funds could come from: i the private sector, including the mining and mobile phone industry; ii from voluntary sources, through charities and foundations; iii and through further expanding health (sin levies on products such as tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy food and drinks. As in other countries, South Africa could earmark some of these additional sources for investment in interventions and research to reduce unhealthy behaviors and influence the determinants of health. South Africa could also expand innovative linking of funds to improve overall performance of the health sector, including mitigating the risks for non-state investment and exploring different forms of financial incentives for providers and patients. All such innovations would require rigorous monitoring and evaluation to assess whether intended benefits are achieved and to look for unintended consequences.

  4. Citrus water use in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vahrmeijer, JT

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available International Citrus Congress, Spain, Valencia, 18-23 September 2012 Citrus water use in South Africa J. Teunis Vahrmeijer1,2,*, John G. Annandale2, Mark B. Gush3 and Nicolette J. Taylor2 1Citrus Research International (CRI), Nelspruit, South Africa 2...Department of Plant Production and Soil Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa 3Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Natural Resources and the Environment, Stellenbosch, South Africa *Corresponding author: jtv...

  5. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsin, F

    1979-01-01

    Malthusianism in France in the years before the 1st world war was quickly transformed by the socialist ideology and presented to the working class as a revolutionary theory which might help the masses toward the goal of social revolution. However, the original appeal to moral restraint only (late marriage, sexual abstinence) in avoiding unwanted pregnancies was refused, and contraception was advertised vigorously. The 1st militant neomalthusian organization, The Malthusian League, was created in 1877, and was ideologically linked to anglo-saxon social reformism. At the beginning ot the 20th century Malthusianism in France began to assume a different character under the influence of a leading militant revolutionary, Paul Robin, who emphasized the Malthusian doctrine as an indispensable strategic tool of the proletariat's success, when coupled with better education. The Malthusian League published 2 magazines, Regeneration, and, later, Le Malthusien. Most French Neomalthusians belonged to the anarchist movement and gathered around its publication, Libertaire. However, the so called pure anarchists and the communists were against it, and strong opposition also came from the labor unions and from at least some of the socialist press. In 1911 the Federation of Neomalthusian Working Groups was founded; within it socialist groups with different ideologies debated the Malthusian theory. Notwithstanding the Federation's efforts to link Neomalthusianism with the workers' movement, this link was never really established. The Federation had to fight against the dominant bourgeois ideology, against other revolutionary groups, and against those who wanted to save France from the danger of underpopulation and the immigration of increasing numbers of workers from less civilized countries. Birthrate began declining in France at the end of the 18th century, but the greatest decline began between 1890-1900. It is very difficult to determine whether Neomalthusianism affected the

  6. South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that South Africa's main reason for entering the international nuclear market is, and always has been, to sell its uranium abroad. From 1939-45 South Africa took part in the war against Nazi Germany, and the South African government of the time sought to help the Allied war effort in all ways that were practical. Later, during the Cold War, it tried to help build up the West's nuclear arsenal. In 1944, the British government secretly asked General Smuts---prime minister of South Africa since 1939 and a member of Churchill's War Cabinet---to survey South Africa's deposits of uranium. The survey, carried out with U.S. and British help, showed that the deposits were large, generally low-grade, but, in most cases, associated with gold and therefore could be profitably mined. In 1951, South Africa became a significant producer, with lucrative contracts for the sale of all its output to the U.S.-U.K.-Canada Joint Development Agency and one of the three main suppliers to the U.S. nuclear weapons program. In time, government controls eased and uranium production and marketing became a purely commercial operation

  7. Small hydro in Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonker Klunne, W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available the gold mines at Pilgrim?s Rest in South Africa were powered by two 6kW hydro turbines as early as 1892, complemented by a 45kW turbine in 1894 to power the first electrical railway. In several African countries church missions built small hydro... that feed in to the national grid as this ensures a steady income stream for the enterprise. Several African countries have established renewable energy feed-in tariffs (Kenya, South Africa and Uganda) that do support the establishment of small scale...

  8. Pleistocene Palaeoart of Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This comprehensive review of all currently known Pleistocene rock art of Africa shows that the majority of sites are located in the continent’s south, but that the petroglyphs at some of them are of exceptionally great antiquity. Much the same applies to portable palaeoart of Africa. The current record is clearly one of paucity of evidence, in contrast to some other continents. Nevertheless, an initial synthesis is attempted, and some preliminary comparisons with the other continents are attempted. Certain parallels with the existing record of southern Asia are defined.

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter ... research findings and news updates. Read on to Learn the Link between drug use and HIV and ...

  10. Terrestrial teleconnections link global rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, F.; Howden, N. J.; Woods, R. A.; Bates, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    We present analyses of river discharge data from across the world, which we used to identify links between annual river flow regimes across different continents. Our hypothesis was that, as atmospheric processes are subject to large-scale teleconnection patterns, and because these atmospheric processes are inherently linked to precipitation regimes across the world, there should be identifiable links between river flow regimes driven by these atmospheric processes. We used discharge data from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) to identify cross-correlations (and accounted for serial dependence) between 23 of the world's largest river basins where overlapping data were available over a period of 12 years or more: two in South America; five in Africa; one in Australasia; five in North America and ten in Eurasia. The selected river basins drain approximately a third of the Earth's landmass at their furthest downstream gauging station. Where significant cross-correlations were found, we compared these to known patterns associated with the ENSO and NAO teleconnections. In total, 85 of the 253 possible correlations were deemed significant at p0). We compared these significant cross-correlations with known atmospheric teleconnection patterns, and while these were consistent for the majority of cases, we found a number of significant correlations that are inconsistent with the anticipated effects of known atmospheric teleconnections. Our results provide new insight into the inter-continental links between global river systems and the way in which these are controlled by large-scale atmospheric processes. We suggest this may be useful for global industries, such as insurers or aid agencies, who seek to understand correlations between the magnitudes of extreme events across different regions of the world. For the former, this may enable more efficient management of global liabilities, for the latter it may enable better logistical planning of disaster relief requirements

  11. Data content standards in Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Data content standards tend to be more accessible. Easier to understand. Used directly by many end users. Immediately applicable to Africa. More susceptible to culture and language – Hence, more important to have local standards...

  12. FLOSS World Africa regional workshop

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tucker, KC

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Education is fundamental to development and the foundation for addressing and improving some of the key development challenges facing Africa. The focus groups recommend that FOSSFA convene a working group to address these important, pivotal issues...

  13. South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-22

    Dec 22, 2008 ... South Africa has committed to address freshwater conservation at the catchment scale, using a combination of landscape- level and species-level .... recursive partitioning, a non-parametric technique, in the R software (version ... non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS), using log(n+1) transformed fish ...

  14. Africa Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa Development is the quarterly bilingual journal of CODESRIA. It is a social science journal whose major focus is on issues which are central to the development of society. Its principal objective is to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas among African scholars from a variety of intellectual persuasions and various ...

  15. Saharan Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    African Journal of Reproductive Health December 2014; 18(4):26. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Perceived Risk and Condom Use among Adolescents in Sub-. Saharan Africa: A Latent Class Analysis. Julie A. Cederbaum. 1*. , Tamika D. Gilreath. 1 and Anamika Barman-Adhikari. 2. 1University of Southern California ...

  16. Epidemiology of Leptospirosis in Africa: A Systematic Review of a Neglected Zoonosis and a Paradigm for 'One Health' in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J Allan

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is an important but neglected bacterial zoonosis that has been largely overlooked in Africa. In this systematic review, we aimed to summarise and compare current knowledge of: (1 the geographic distribution, prevalence, incidence and diversity of acute human leptospirosis in Africa; and (2 the geographic distribution, host range, prevalence and diversity of Leptospira spp. infection in animal hosts in Africa.Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA guidelines, we searched for studies that described (1 acute human leptospirosis and (2 pathogenic Leptospira spp. infection in animals. We performed a literature search using eight international and regional databases for English and non-English articles published between January 1930 to October 2014 that met out pre-defined inclusion criteria and strict case definitions.We identified 97 studies that described acute human leptospirosis (n = 46 or animal Leptospira infection (n = 51 in 26 African countries. The prevalence of acute human leptospirosis ranged from 2 3% to 19 8% (n = 11 in hospital patients with febrile illness. Incidence estimates were largely restricted to the Indian Ocean islands (3 to 101 cases per 100,000 per year (n = 6. Data from Tanzania indicate that human disease incidence is also high in mainland Africa (75 to 102 cases per 100,000 per year. Three major species (Leptospira borgpetersenii, L. interrogans and L. kirschneri are predominant in reports from Africa and isolates from a diverse range of serogroups have been reported in human and animal infections. Cattle appear to be important hosts of a large number of Leptospira serogroups in Africa, but few data are available to allow comparison of Leptospira infection in linked human and animal populations. We advocate a 'One Health' approach to promote multidisciplinary research efforts to improve understanding of the animal to human transmission of leptospirosis on the

  17. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 17 – 21.11.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium – niveau 2 : 18 – 21.11.03 (4 jours) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition – Part 1 : WEB Applications : 20 & ...

  18. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Mariana Soares; Possuelo, Lia Gonçalves; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida da

    2016-06-01

    The scope of this study was to organize the knowledge produced on tuberculosis in Brazilian prisons in a systematic manner. A comprehensive review was conducted in the Medline and Lilacs databases and the SciELO electronic library using the key words: "Tuberculosis," "Prisons" and "Brazil." Of the 61 records found, 33 were evaluated (28 duplicated records) and 21 included in the review (12 excluded according to the criteria adopted). These studies contribute effectively to improve the knowledge regarding the scale of the disease among inmates, as well as to the choice of screening and diagnostic methods most appropriate to the prison setting. The incidence rates and prevalence of active and latent tuberculosis are presented, in addition to data on the profile of drug and genotype susceptibility of the clinical results. Awareness of the data presented highlights the need to adopt measures aimed at case detection, treatment and follow-up. It is suggested that the new challenges for scientific research should be linked to the development of specific knowledge about dealing with the problem in an environment full of specificities such as a prison.

  19. Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Places available The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses : Introduction à Outlook : 19.8.2004 (1 journée) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (short course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction ...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Nouveautés de FileMaker : 20 - 23.03.01 (4 matins) Contract Follow-up : 9.4.01 (3 heures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  1. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses : EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) The EDMS-MTF in practice (free of charge) :  28 -  30.10.03 (6 half-day sessions) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) LabVIEW TestStand ver. 3 : 4 & 5.11.03 (2 days) Introduction to Pspice : 4.11.03 p.m. (half-day) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programm...

  2. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques (ML01) :2 & 3.12.03 (2 days) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) The EDMS MTF in practice : 5.12.03 (afternoon, free of charge) Modeling Dynamic Systems with Simulink (SL01) : 8 & 9.12.03 (2 days) Signal Processing with MATLAB (SG01) : 11 & ...

  3. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2 : 11 to 13.1.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 22 - 24.3.20...

  4. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 :9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2 : 11 to 13.1.2004 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 16 - 18.2.2004 (3 days - free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004...

  5. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques (ML01) : 2 & 3.12.03 (2 days) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) The EDMS MTF in practice : 5.12.03 (afternoon, free of charge) Modeling Dynamic Systems with Simulink (SL01) : 8 & 9.12.03 (2 days) Signal Processing with MATLAB (SG01) : 11 & 12.12.03 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language - l...

  6. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Project Planning with MS-Project : 15 & 22.1.2004 (2 days) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework Course : 2 sessions : 2 - 6.2.2004 and 16 - 20-2-2004 (5 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 16 - 18.2.2004 (3 days - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions)

  7. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1 : WEB Applications : 20 & 21.11.03(2 days) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.11.03 (2 jours) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) Oracle 8i : Programming with PL/SQL : 8 - 10.12.03 (3 days) The JAVA Programming Language - leve...

  8. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiero, Fabiano; Giangreco, Manuela; Pisa, Federica Edith; Negro, Corrado; Bovenzi, Massimo; Rosolen, Valentina; Barbone, Fabio

    2016-07-26

    The incidence of mesothelioma in Italy shows wide geographical variation, with the highest incidence rates in Genoa and Friuli Venezia Giulia (FVG). For mesothelioma, national standard incidence rates are not available prior to the calendar year 2006. To estimate the Standardized Incidence rate Ratio (SIR) of mesothelioma in a cohort of former workers undergoing health surveillance because of previous asbestos exposure, when sex-, age-, and calendar year-specific rates of the national standard are not available and the number of expected cases calculated from the regional rates is biased by the size of the study cohort. We conducted a sensitivity analysis in a cohort of 2,488 men. We considered every Italian cancer registry available with complete data in the period 1995-2007 (N=14). We calculated, for each year and age group, the corresponding weighted mean rate of 10 registries of North-Italy (Mean W10), the weighted mean rate of all 14 registries available (Mean W14) and considered FVG standard rate. During the period 1995-2007, we observed 25 incident cases of mesothelioma with expected cases that varied between 2.00 (Mean W14) and 2.56 (FVG standard rate), with a SIR of 12.49 (CI95% 8.08-18.48) and 9.76 (CI95% 6.32-14.45) respectively. Our results show that the use of FVG rates as standard does not lead to significant distortions in the calculation of the expected cases. However, distortion is remarkable in the SIRs estimation. Using a weighted mean standard incidence rate may be a valid alternative for SIR estimate when national standard rates are not available.

  9. Ebola in West Africa ? ICAN meeting November 2014 - ICPIC Outstanding seminar series

    OpenAIRE

    Pittet, Didier; Voss, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the 2014 Infection Control Africa Network (ICAN) meeting in Harare, videos were recorded for this seminar series on Ebola in West Africa. This summary is an introduction into the topic and includes the links to the produced video clips.

  10. BRICS Regional Policy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Deych

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an analysis of the BRICS as a whole and an analysis of each member’s policies in Africa. It exploresthe countries’ political and economic interests in Africa, the various patterns and strategies of each country’s cooperationwith Africa, and estimates the impact of BRICS aid and investment on the African economy and Africa’s development. TheBRICS countries have emerged as the new effective actors in the world arena. Their global economic weight and politicalinfluence continue to grow. Not only is the group focusing its attention on strengthening the internal ties of its members, but itis also focusing on assistance to Africa, as a way to implement the emerging powers efforts to change the existing world order.The BRICS is deepening its engagement with African countries, which gained great success in their development in recentyears. Its focus on Africa is determined by the important role of African resources and by the continent’s growing influencein the world economy and contemporary international relations. BRICS countries are major trade partners of Africa, andAfrica’s trade with BRICS members is growing faster than its trade with the traditional partners. Africa has become themain destination for BRICS development aid and investment. The BRICS is also focusing on African infrastructure. BRICScountries use soft power widely, through developing humanitarian ties with Africa, particularly in health care and education.The BRICS is also an active participant in peacekeeping and conflict resolution in Africa. Members currently tend tocompete in Africa, but they are taking steps toward collaboration. The BRICS contributes much to the African economy. Itspresence has become important for the continent and receives a positive response there.

  11. FLOSSWorld Africa regional workshop agenda

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tucker, KC

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Tucker1_2006.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8692 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Tucker1_2006.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 FLOSSWorld Africa Regional Workshop... MIMOS Malaysia: MIMOS Bhd 12 CSIR South Africa: Council for Scientific and Industrial Research 13 UWC South Africa: University of the Western Cape 14 MI2 Croatia: Multimedia Institute MI2 15 CARNET Croatia: Croatian Academic Research Network 16 ITI...

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Utilisation du simulateur Simplorer : 30.5 - 1.6.01 (3 jours) Contract Follow-up : 11.6.01 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 11.6.01 F ou E (1/2 journée) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.6.01 (3 jours) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs: 2 sessions d'une demi-journée les 12 et 19.6.01 If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  13. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    TECHNICAL TRAINING; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA programming language level 1: 8 - 9.2.01 (2 days) AutoCAD 2D niveau 1 : 12 - 16.2.01 (5 jours) The JAVA programming language level 2: 19 - 21.2.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists: 5 - 9.3.01 (20 hrs on 5 days) Contract Follow-up : 12.3.01 (3 heures) The JAVA programming language level 2: 12 - 14.3.01 (3 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  14. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: December 2002   PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) Introduction à la CAO Cadence (cours gratuit) :  10 & 11.12.02  (2 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (cours gratuit) : 13.08.2002 (matin) Introduction to the CERN Enginnering Data Management System :  27.8.02  (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced Users :  28.8.02  (1 day) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch    

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps & Pitfalls:  16 - 19.7.02 (4 days) Frontpage 2000 - level 1 :  22 - 23.7.02  (2 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 24.7.02 (après-midi) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (cours gratuit) : 13.08.2002 (matin) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Perl 5 : 2 - 3.7.01 (2 days) Introduction to Databases :  3 - 4.7.01 (2 days) JAVA programming language Level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) Enterprise JavaBeans :  9 - 11.7.01 (3 days) Design Patterns :  10 - 12.7.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  23 - 27.7.01 (6 3-hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  18. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Databases :  3 - 4.7.01 (2 days) The JAVA programming language Level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) Enterprise JavaBeans :  9 - 11.7.01 (3 days) Design Patterns :  10 - 12.7.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  23 - 27.7.01 (6 3-hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  19. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS : 16.6.03 (p.m.) Basic PVSS : 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 20.6.03 (1 day) Programmation automate Schneider : Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - 2ème niveau : 24 - 27.6.03 (4 jours) - audience : toute personne qui veux maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation des fonctions spécialisées d'un automate TSX Premium - objectifs : maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation des fonctions spécialisées d'un automate TSX Premium Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (session de 3 jours) ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. If you wish to participate in one of these courses, pl...

  20. Epidemiology of Leptospirosis in Africa: A Systematic Review of a Neglected Zoonosis and a Paradigm for 'One Health' in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Kathryn J; Biggs, Holly M; Halliday, Jo E B; Kazwala, Rudovick R; Maro, Venance P; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an important but neglected bacterial zoonosis that has been largely overlooked in Africa. In this systematic review, we aimed to summarise and compare current knowledge of: (1) the geographic distribution, prevalence, incidence and diversity of acute human leptospirosis in Africa; and (2) the geographic distribution, host range, prevalence and diversity of Leptospira spp. infection in animal hosts in Africa. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we searched for studies that described (1) acute human leptospirosis and (2) pathogenic Leptospira spp. infection in animals. We performed a literature search using eight international and regional databases for English and non-English articles published between January 1930 to October 2014 that met out pre-defined inclusion criteria and strict case definitions. We identified 97 studies that described acute human leptospirosis (n = 46) or animal Leptospira infection (n = 51) in 26 African countries. The prevalence of acute human leptospirosis ranged from 2 3% to 19 8% (n = 11) in hospital patients with febrile illness. Incidence estimates were largely restricted to the Indian Ocean islands (3 to 101 cases per 100,000 per year (n = 6)). Data from Tanzania indicate that human disease incidence is also high in mainland Africa (75 to 102 cases per 100,000 per year). Three major species (Leptospira borgpetersenii, L. interrogans and L. kirschneri) are predominant in reports from Africa and isolates from a diverse range of serogroups have been reported in human and animal infections. Cattle appear to be important hosts of a large number of Leptospira serogroups in Africa, but few data are available to allow comparison of Leptospira infection in linked human and animal populations. We advocate a 'One Health' approach to promote multidisciplinary research efforts to improve understanding of the animal to human transmission of leptospirosis on the African

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Habilitation électrique : recyclage HT/BT : 11 - 15.3.2002  (2 * 2 heures) PVSS Basics :  8 - 12.4.02  (5 days) ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applica...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS basics :  18 - 22.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 20 & 21.2.02 (2 jours) LabView Basics 1 :  4 - 6.3.02  (3 days) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur de CADENCE : 6 & 7.3.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 2 : 11 & 12.3.02 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) LabView Advanced :  13 - 15.3.02 (3 days) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 20 & 21.2.02 (2 jours) LabView Basics 1 :  4 - 6.3.02  (3 days) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur de CADENCE : 6 & 7.3.02 (2 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Clean Room :  7.3.2002  (1 day) LabView Base 2 : 11 & 12.3.02 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) LabView Advanced :  13 - 15.3.02 (3 days) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisiona...

  4. PLACES AVAILABLES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses:   C++ for Particle Physicists 20 - 24.11.00 6 lectures CANbus 20.11.00 1 journée CANopen 21 et 22.11.00 2 jours Sécutiré dans les installations cryogéniques 21 et 22.11.00 2 demi-journées The JAVA programming language level 2 27 ­ 29.11.00 3 days Contract Follow-up 27.11.00 3 heures 1/2 Cryogénie (introduction) 4 ­ 8.12.00 ANSYS Introduction : langue a décider suivant majorité 5 ­ 7.12.00 3 jours EXCEL 7, 8, 13 et 14.12.00 4 jours Contract Follow-up 15.12.00 3 heures 1/2 If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an “application for training” form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer)....

  5. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Base 1 : 27-29.3.01 (3 jours) Contract Follow-up : 9.4.01 (3 heures) Introduction à PowerPoint : 24.4.01 (1 journée) Publier sur le Web : 25-27.4.01 (3 demi-journées) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 15-16.5.01 (5 jours) LabView Base 2 : 27-29.3.01 (2 jours) Hands-on Object-oriented Analysis, Design & Programming with C++ :  23-27.4.01 (5 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA programming language level 1 : 22 - 23.1.01 (2 days) Introduction to Databases : 23 - 24.1.01 (2 days) EXCEL : 24 - 25.1.01  et 1 - 2.2.01 (4 jours) Advanced and Modern Databases : 25 - 26.01.01 (2 days) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 31.1 - 2.2.01 (3 jours) JAVA for non-programmers : 5 - 7.2.01 (3 days) Publier sur le Web :  6 - 8.2.01 (3 demi-journées) Contract Follow-up : 12.2.01 (3 heures) Introduction to Oracle SQL and PL/SQL : 12 - 16.2.01 (5 days) The JAVA programming language level 2 : 19 - 21.2.01 (3 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order...

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    TECHNICAL TRAINING; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Databases : 23 - 24.1.01 (2 days) Advanced and Modern Databases : 25 - 26.01.01 (2 days) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 31.1 - 2.2.01 (3 jours) JAVA for non-programmers : 5 - 7.2.01 (3 days) Contract Follow-up : 12.2.01 (3 heures) Introduction to Oracle SQL and PL/SQL : 12 - 16.2.01 (5 days) AutoCAD 2D niveau I : 12 - 16.2.02 (5 jours) The JAVA programming language level 2 : 19 - 21.2.2001 (3 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Utilisation du simulateur Simplorer : 30.5 - 1.6.01 (3 jours) JAVA programming language level 1: 11-12.6.01 (2 days) LabView hands-on F ou E : 11.6.01 (1/2 journée) Comprehensive VHDL for EPLD/FPGA Design : 11 - 15.6.01 (5 days) Introduction au Langage C : 13 - 15.6.01 (3 jours) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.6.01 (3 jours) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 2 sessions d'une demi-journée les 12 et 19.6.01 Migration de LabVIEW 5 vers LabVIEW 6i Migration from LabVIEW 5 to LabVIEW 6I :  15.6.01 (1/2 journée/half-day) Introduction to Perl 5 : 2 - 3.7.01 (2 days) JAVA programming language level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from ...

  9. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Java Programming Language level 1 :  28 & 29.11.02  (2 days) December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training M...

  10. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual - gratuit/free of charge) : 13.9.02 (a.m.) LabView DAQ Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual - gratuit/free of charge) : 13.9.02 (p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20, 26, 27.9.02 (4 jours) LabView Base 1 : 23 - 25.9.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ (E) : 26 - 27.9.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 30.9, 1, 2, 9, 10, 11.10.02 (6 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 10.10.02 (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 14 - 15.10.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 17, 18, 24, 25.10.02 (4 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Of...

  11. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++:  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  2 & 3.12.02  (2 jours) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisiona...

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à PowerPoint : 26.2.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 26.2 - 2.3.01 (5 jours) Premiers pas avec votre PC : 27.2 - 2.3.01 (4 matins) C++ for Particle Physicists :  5 - 9.3.01 (6*3 hour lectures) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronic Design : 6.3.01 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronic Design : 7.3.01 (1 day) EXCEL : 6, 7 et 13, 14.3.01 (4 jours) The JAVA programming language level 2 : 12 - 14.3.01 (3 days) Nouveautés de FileMaker : 20 - 23.03.01 (4 matins) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be acc...

  13. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    TECHNICAL TRAINING; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 1er niveau : 20 - 23.2.01 (4 matins) Architecture d'automatisme : 20 - 21.2.01 (2 jours) Introduction à PowerPoint : 26.2.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 (Schneider) : 26.2 - 2.3.01 (5 jours) Premiers pas avec votre PC : 27.2 - 2.3.01 (4 matins) C++ for Particle Physicists : 5 - 9.3.01 (6*3 hour lectures) EXCEL : 6, 7 et 13, 14.3.01 (4 jours) The JAVA programming language level 2 :  12 - 14.3.01 (3 days) Nouveautés de FileMaker :  20 - 23.03.01 (4 matins) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  14. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel 74924

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 24 & 25.01.02 (2 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ (E) : 7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java : 11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists : 11 - 15.3.2002 (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO ...

  15. Combating cyberspace fraud in Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available in Africa Marthie Grobler, Joey Jansen van Vuuren Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Defence, Peace, Safety & Security © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za Combating cyber crime in Africa is a reality • Computer crime... throughout the African community, especially not to those areas with limited connectivity © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za Primary cyberspace threats and trends: Shortage of IT education • Building on the digital divide...

  16. Public expenditures and health care in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbu, O; Gallagher, M

    1992-03-01

    Unfavorable economic conditions in most of Africa (in this paper Africa refers to Sub-Saharan Africa only) have meant public austerity and a deceleration in government health spending. Given the dominant role of government in providing health services in Africa there is a need to investigate the links between public spending and the provision of health care. Analyzing information from five Sub-Saharan African countries, namely Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ethiopia and Senegal, we investigate the impacts of shifting expenditure patterns and levels on the process of providing health services as well as on delivery of health care. The country analyses indicate that in addition to the level of public spending, the expenditure mix (i.e. salaries, drugs, supplies etc.), the composition of the health infrastructure (hospitals, clinics, health posts etc.), community efforts, and the availability of private health care all influence health care delivery. Consequently, per capita public expenditure (the most important indicator in a number of related studies) alone as a measure of the availability of health care and especially for cross-country comparisons is inadequate. Reductions in government resources for health care often result in less efficient mixing of resources and hence less health care delivery, in quality and quantity terms. With the recent trends in health care spending in Africa there should be greater effort to increase the efficient use of these increasingly scarce resources, yet the trend in resource mix has been in the opposite direction. Given the input to public health care of local communities, as well as the provision of private health care, it would seem that government spending on health care should be counter-cyclical, i.e. government health spending should accelerate during periods of economic down turns. Such counter-cyclical spending would tend to offset the difficulties facing local communities and the declining ability of individuals to

  17. Arbitration Foundation of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir O. Kramarenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author explores the history and legal framework for the creation and operation of international commercial arbitration in South Africa. Author notes that South Africa is the most economically developed country in Africa, it is among dozens of major international organizations. From the point of view of the development of the system of law, legal proceedings and arbitration, South Africa is an attractive state for study. Author emphasizes that the South African Republic throughout its existence has been influenced by two legal families: Anglo-Saxon and Romano-Germanic. Therefore, it is important to note that South Africa refers to a mixed system of law. To date, South Africa has two international commercial arbitration: the Arbitration Foundation of South Africa and the Association of Arbitrators. In the conclusion author points out that the development and establishment of the centers of the arbitration fund continues: new centers are being established, and the system of procedures for dealing with cases in already established centers is being improved.

  18. From Theory to Practice: Exploring the Organised Crime-Terror Nexus in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Hübschle

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  A growing body of scholarly literature suggests confluence or even convergence of organized crime and terrorism in various parts of the world. However, links remain somewhat nebulous at this stage and vary considerably, based on region and context. Africa has come under the spotlight due to perceived weaknesses in the criminal justice sector, limited law enforcement capacity, political and systemic corruption, poor border patrol and weak anti-terror and organized crime laws which are believed to provide an ideal environment for the terror-crime nexus to flourish. This article provides an African perspective on the links between organized crime and terror networks in Sub-Saharan Africa, with a particular focus on Southern Africa. The discussion begins with an overview of the theoretical discourse on the subject – relying on African definitions of the contested concepts of ‘terrorism’ and ‘organized crime’ – and will then narrow the analysis on the sub-Saharan case. It relies on an extensive literature review and concludes with empirical findings of a research project on organized crime in Southern Africa, which found no strong empirical links between criminal and terrorist organizations.

  19. Biofuels and biodiversity in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. O’Farrell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The South African government, as part of its efforts to mitigate the effects of the ongoing energy crisis, has proposed that biofuels should form an important part of the country’s energy supply. The contribution of liquid biofuels to the national fuel supply is expected to be at least 2% by 2013. The Biofuels Industrial Strategy of the Republic of South Africa of 2007 outlines key incentives for reaching this target and promoting the development of a sustainable biofuels industry. This paper discusses issues relating to this strategy as well as key drivers in biofuel processing with reference to potential impacts on South Africa’s rich biological heritage.

    Our understanding of many of the broader aspects of biofuels needs to be enhanced. We identify key areas where challenges exist, such as the link between technology, conversion processes and feedstock selection. The available and proposed processing technologies have important implications for land use and the use of different non-native plant species as desired feedstocks. South Africa has a long history of planting non-native plant species for commercial purposes, notably for commercial forestry. Valuable lessons can be drawn from this experience on mitigation against potential impacts by considering plausible scenarios and the appropriate management framework and policies. We conceptualise key issues embodied in the biofuels strategy, adapting a framework developed for assessing and quantifying impacts of invasive alien species. In so doing, we provide guidelines for minimising the potential impacts of biofuel projects on biodiversity.

  20. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaeyer, Ph

    2016-01-01

    Medicine owes many to Hippocrate, but pneumology traces its origin back to antiquity, from Mesopotamia to ancient Rome. Regarding prehistory: if viscera of this period have not been kept, some bones were. Since Neanderthals, it is then possible to study osteoarticular pathologies (often chronic arthrosis). But no evidence of tuberculosis was found (all thoracic kyphosis are not tuberculosis). Tuberculosis probably appears during the Neolithic age, because of high concentration of population. In ancient times, pneumology was of course not a real medical specialty. However, respiratory illness already constituted a big part of antique medical practice. The purpose of the physician in antiquity was to establish a diagnosis, a prognostic and to propose a treatment. Prognostic revealed to be of great importance in ancient times, since therapeutic efficacy was limited. Contemporary physicians often neglect this part of their practice. In ancient times, physicians also tried to gradually eliminate magic-religious aspects in taking care of the patients. This review will propose a journey from Mesopotamia to ancient Egypt (and its medical papyrus). Very few sources are available concerning medicine in pre-Columbian cultures. However, it is well known that shamans had, besides their religious competences, a great pharmacopoeia. Because of these very few sources, this topic will not be added to this article. Little is known in Europa about chinese medicine before the Jesuit mission in China during the 17th and 18th centuries. Yet, chinese medicine grew in parallel with European's one. Some relevant elements of this medicine will hereafter be shown.

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours)...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users : 16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec Micr...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Document Server

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design: 16 - 19.4.02  (4 days) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-...

  4. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : WorldFIP 2003 pour utilisateurs : 11-14.2.03 (4 jours) DISP-2003 ? Spring I Term : Introduction to Digital Signal Processing : 20, 27.2, 6, 13, 20, 27.3, 3.4.03 (7 X 2-hour lectures) AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Accelerators : 24-28.2.03 (10 X 1-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 & 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 ? 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) MAGNE-03 - Magnetism for Technical Ele...

  5. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/Language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) Langue à définir/Language to be decided DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (...

  6. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required) : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 (Langue à définir/ language to be decided) : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : 3 sessions sont programmées pour 2003 : 25...

  7. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, ) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6....

  8. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) LabView DAQ (language to be defined) : 8 & 9.5.03 AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 (sessions of 2 days) These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (session de 3 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description ...

  9. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, ) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6...

  10. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) Programmation de pilotes périphériques : 5 - 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) LabView DAQ (language to be defined) : 8 & 9.5.03 AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.0 (6 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 (F) : 17 & 18.6.03 (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 2 : 19 & 20.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (langue à décider/language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 26 & 27.6.03 ...

  11. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring I Term : Introduction to Digital Signal Processing : 20, 27.2, 6, 13, 20, 27.3, 3.4.03 (7 X 2-hour lectures) AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Accelerators : 24 - 28.2.03 (10 X 1-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 & 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, regis...

  12. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7....

  13. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) Langue à définir/language to be decided DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 11 & 12.3.03 / 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16...

  14. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half-day, afternoon) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 days) Language to be decided. DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures). AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité: Etre TSO au CERN : 3 sessions sont programmées pour 2003 : 25, 26 & 28.3.03 - 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (sessions de 3 jours) ** The number o...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Document Server

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  30.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - condensé : 4 - 6.6.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (E):  6 & 7.6.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  10 - 12 and 24 - 26.6.02  (6 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the c...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Document Server

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  30.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - condensé : 4 - 6.6.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (E):  6 & 7.6.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  10 - ...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design: 16 - 19.4.02  (4 days) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02&a...

  18. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel.74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 5.12.01 (1/2 journée) LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 : 12 & 14.12.01 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 17.12.2001 (1/2 journée) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) Frontpage...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Programming the Web for Control Applications : 11, 12, 18, 19.3.2002  (4 * 2 hour lectures) Habilitation électrique : recyclage HT/BT (Français) : 13 - 14.3.2002 (2 * 2 heures) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 19 & 20.3.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fil...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (F) : 7 & 8.2.02 (2 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :  11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) PVSS basics :  18 - 22.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 : 18.2.02 (1 demi-journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  20.2.02 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  21.2.02  (1 day) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electr...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics :  8 - 12.4.02  (5 days) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design: 16 - 19.4.02  (4 days) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02  (3 days) LabVIEW DAQ (E):  6 & 7.6.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique DUVAL

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Basics 1 :  4 - 6.3.02  (3 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Clean Room :  7.3.2002  (half day) LabView Base 2 : 11 & 12.3.02 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Programming the Web for Control Applications : 11, 12, 18, 19.3.2002  (4 * 2 hour lectures) Habilitation électrique : recyclage HT/BT (Français) : 13 - 14.3.2002 (2 * 2 heures) LabView Advanced :  13 - 15.3.02 (3 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) :  20.3.2002  (1 day) The CERN (EDMS) for Advanced Users :  21.3.2002  (1 day) LabVIEW DSC : 25 - 26.4.2002 (2 jours) LabVIEW DAQ : 15 - 16.5.2002 (2 jours) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé ...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics : 20 - 24.8.01 (5 days) PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programming TSX Premium 1: 15 - 19.10.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 13 - 14.9.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 15 - 17.10.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - Base 2 / LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 18 - 19.10.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours / 2...

  4. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Autocad Migration support courses: a detailed calendar will be published shortly for this series of sessions which will start on 15.10.2001. Registration is already open AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days)...

  5. PLACES AVAILABLES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics : 20 - 24.8.01 (5 days) PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programming TSX Premium 1: 15 - 19.10.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 13 - 14.9.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 15 - 17.10.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - Base 2 / LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 18 - 19.10.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours / 2...

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView DAQ  (F) : 7 & 8.2.02 (2 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :  11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) PVSS basics :  18 - 22.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 : 18.2.02 (1 demi-journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  20.2.02 (1 day) Introduction à la CAO CADENCE : 20 & 21.2.02 (2 jours) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  21.2.02  (1 day) LabView Basics 1 :  4 - 6.3.02  (3 days) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur de CADENCE : 6 & 7.3.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 2 : 11 & 12.3.02 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) LabView Advanced :  13 - 15.3.02 (3 days) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à...

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Habilitation électrique : électriciens network : 27 - 29.11.2001 (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  30.11.2001 (1 day) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Introduction (bilingual) :  3.12.01 (half-day) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 07.12.2001 (1 day) LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker P...

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Nouveautés d'EXCEL : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction a Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Autocad Migration support courses: a detail...

  9. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Nouveautés d'EXCEL : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction a Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Design Patterns :  7 - 8.11.01 (2 days) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 12 - 14.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to Windows 2000 at CERN :  14.11.01  (half-day) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ :  11 - 13.12.2...

  10. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) Nouveautés d'Excel 2000 : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.11.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001 (4 days) Hands...

  11. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 12 - 14.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to Windows 2000 at CERN :  14.11.01  (half-day) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques : 21 - 22.11.2001 (2 demi-journées) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  30.11.2001 (1 day) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Introduction (bilingual) :  3.12.01 (half-day) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 07.12.2001...

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Traininf; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Introduction (bilingual) :  3.12.01 (half-day) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 5.12.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 07.12.2001 (1 day) LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 : 12 & 14.12.01 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 17.12.2001 (1/2 journée) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1....

  13. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbiac, Pascale De; Lamoureux, Fabien; Pourrat, Xavier; Bretault, Lydia; Marchand, Sophie; Grassin, Jacqueline; Antier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of Bronchial Superinfections: Data Related to Stability of Antibiotics in Portable Pumps. Given many data about the stability of antibiotics in portable pump (elastomer) are lacking, this study was designed to make a point about available data and to evaluate the stability of antibiotics when exposed to temperature within 35°C (average temperature measured in real conditions of use). First, to collect information about the stability of antibiotics in portable pump and to confront them with the local antibiotics protocols dedicated to the treatment of bronchial superinfection in patients with cystic fibrosis; second, to evaluate the stability of piperacillin associated with tazobactam at 35°C. While measured concentrations in tazobactam did not show significant variation during the study, piperacillin measurements showed a major reduction of concentration (up to 33%), both time and concentration related to. Such information must be pointed out to prescribers and patients to ensure a cold accumulator is placed in the pump can'ying-bag and to limit the duration of infusion to 24h with a single pump. This experimental program will keep on going with the stability study of both ticarcillin and cefsulodin in portable pump. Copyright © 2006 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornu, Catherine; Camberlein, Clémence; Binquet, Christine; Robert, Carine; Vigouroux, Céline; Bouyssou, Caroline; Felin, Alexandra; Dupont-Mordelet, Marie-Françoise; Sailly, Annabelle; Kubiak, Christine; Poli, Géraldine; Gueguen, Sonia; Duchesne, Charlène; Ploix, Stéphanie; Thalamas, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Clinical Investigation Centres (CICs) are academic organisations for performing clinical studies. They are a part of a national network which is co-ordinated by French national institute for health and medical research (Inserm), and the head office of healthcare provision (DGOS). There are working groups and specialised networks within the overall CIC network. The Harmonisation of CIC Procedures (HPCIC) group wrote a manual of good professional practices for clinical research. This manual is described here. This manual was written by consensus. It was approved by the coordinators of all CICs, external experts, and validated by representatives of both Inserm and the General directorate of healthcare provision (DGOS). The CIC Good Professional Practices manual is a guide divided into two sections. The first section covers the general management of a CIC (common to all CICs). The second section covers the core activities of CICs, running clinical studies (clinical study coordination, clinical investigation, data management, statistical analysis, valorisation). This manual is available for all CICs and any other clinical research organisations. It will serve as a basis for CIC self-quality evaluation, audits between CICs, and external audits. This manual shows how much the CICs want to standardise practices and procedures nationwide to offer their partners the best quality in performing clinical studies. Copyright © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS : 16.6.03 (p.m.) Basic PVSS : 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 20.6.03 (1 day) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Simatic Net Network : 26 & 27.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Programmation automate Schneider : Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - 1er niveau : 10 - 13.6.03 (4 jours) - audience : toute personne qui veux maitriser la msie en uvre et la programmation d'un automate TSX Premium - objectifs : maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation d'un autom...

  16. Places available **

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PIPES-2003 - Pratique du Sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches : 26.8.03 (stage pratique) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers : 27.8.03 (1 day, free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.9.03 (une demi-journée, séminaire gratuit) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Programmation STEP7 - niveau 1 : 29 - 2.10.03 (4 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août Programmation STEP7 - niveau 2 : 13 - 17.10.03 (5 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août Réseau Simatic Net : 22 & 23.10.03 (2 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.20.03 (half day, free of charge) These courses will be given in French or Englis...

  17. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) PIPES-2003 : Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches : 21.5.03 (1 jour) Introduction à la CAO Cadence : de la saisie de schéma Concept-HDL au PCB : 20 & 22.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 5, 6, 12, 13, 26, 27.6.03 (6 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 (F) : 17 & 18.6.03 (2 jours) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 2 : 19 & 20.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (langue à décider/language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic...

  18. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following course : Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 28.1.03 (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 et 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 27 & 28.2.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3 hour lectures) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 25.3.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 11 & 12.3.03 / 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 Ces cours seront donnés en français ou anglais en fonction des demandes / These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. * Etant do...

  19. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1: 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) PIPES-2003 : Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches: 21.5.03 (1 jour) Introduction à la CAO Cadence: de la saisie de schéma Concept-HDL au PCB : 20 & 22.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E): 5, 6, 12, 13, 26, 27.6.03 (6 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1: 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence: 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1: 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS: 16.6.03 (half-day, pm) Basic PVSS: 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence: 17.6.03 (matin) LabView DSC (language to be defined): 19 & 20.6.03 PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial: 20.6.03 (1 day) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2: 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7: 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming: 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network: 26 & 27.6.03 (2 days) These courses will be given...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):  21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) HREF-2002: Techniques de la Réfri...

  1. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.10.03 (half day, free of charge) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 17, 18, 24, 25.11 & 1, 2.12.03 (6...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS 21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) LabVIEW Basics 1 (English):  21 - 23.10.02  (3 days) LabVIEW Basics 2 (English):  24 & 25.10.02  (2 days) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 days) LabVIEW - Advanced (English) :  18 - 20.11.2002  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  19, 20, 25, 26.11.02 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Designer: First Class:&...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans:  18 - 20.9.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  19, 20, 26, 27.9.02  (4 jours) LabView Base 1 :  23 - 25.9.02  (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design using UML:  25 - 27.9.02  (3 days) LabView DAQ (E):  26 - 27.9.02  (2 days) Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11....

  4. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.11.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.11.02  (3 jours) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN :  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) LabView Base 1 :  13 - 15.11.02  (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 jours) LabVIEW - Advanced:  18 - 20.11.02  (3 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ :  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  LabVIEW - Basics 2:  21 - 22.11.02 ...

  5. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (séminaire gratuit) : 4.9.03 (une demi-journée) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours)...

  6. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.10.03 (half day, free of charge) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 17, 18, 24, 25.11 & 1, 2.12.03 (6 days) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.11.03 (2 jours) MAGNE-03 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 25 - 27.11.03 (3 jours) ...

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN:  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1:  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) LabView Base 1 :  13 - 15.11.02  (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  14, 15, 21, 22.11.2002  (4 days) LabVIEW - Advanced:  18 - 20.11.02  (3 days) Auto...

  8. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PIPES-2003 - Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches :26.8.03(stage pratique) The CERN EDMS for Engineers (free of charge) : 27.8.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (séminaire gratuit) : 4.9.03(une demi-journée) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2...

  9. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20...

  10. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: October 2002   Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (free of charge):  29.10.2002  (1 day) The CERN EDMS for Advanced users (free of charge):  30.10.2002  (1 day) November 2002   LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN :  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free ...

  11. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) LabView Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual) : 10.10.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual)  10.10.02 (après-midi /afternoon) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):  21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) HREF-2002: Techniques de la...

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Introduction to PVSS (free of charge): 11.11.02  (afternoon) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++:  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 :  25 & 26.11.02  (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 :  27 & 28.11.02  (2 jours) December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  2 & 3.12.02  (2 jours) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02 ...

  13. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Base 1 :  23 - 25.9.02  (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design using UML:  25 - 27.9.02  (3 days) LabView DAQ (E):  26 - 27.9.02  (2 days) Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):...

  14. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; Technical Training; Monique Duval; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : Premiers pas avec votre PC 12 - 15.9.00 (4 demi-journées) WORD 20, 21 et 26, 27.9.2000 (4 jours) JAVA programming level 1 25 - 26.9.2000 (2 days) Gaz inflammables 1 26.9.2000 (1 journée) Advanced aspects of PERL 5 6.10.2000 (1 day) Initiation au WWW 10 - 12.10.00 (3 demi-journées) WORD : importer et manipuler des images 16.10.2000 (1 journée) FileMaker 17, 18 et 24, 25.10.00 (4 jours) Nouveautés de WORD 19 et 20.10.2000 (2 jours) ACCESS 1er niveau 30 - 31.10.00 (2 jours)Introduction à PowerPoint 6.11.00 (1 journée)Nouveautés d’EXCEL 7.11.2000(4 demi-journées)Excel 13, 14 et 20, 21.11.00 (4 jours) LabView hands-on 13.11.2000(4 hours)LabView Basics 1 14 - 16.11.2000 (3 days) MS-Project 1er niveau 14-17.11.00 (4 demi-journées) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply elec...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 ...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 2 sessions de _ journée les 24 et 25.9.01 PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 : 1 et 2.10.01 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 1 : 8 et 9.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 3-hour lectures) MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Basics 1 :  15 - 17.10.01  (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) Introduction to XML :  12 & 13.12.01 (2 days) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 : 12 & 14.12.01 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 17.12.2001 (1/2 journée) MS-Project 2000 : 10 & 11.01.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 -...

  18. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 2 sessions de _ journée les 24 et 25.9.01 PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 1 : 8 et 9.10.01 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 lectures) MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 2000 : 10 & 11.01.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 24 & 25.01.02 (2 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (E) :  7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :&nbs...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 lectures) Cadence Board Design tools : Upgrading to release 14 : 3 1-day sessions on 9, 10 & 11.10.01 MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introd...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 22, 24 & 25.01.02 (3 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (E) :  7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :  11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) PVSS basics :  11 - 15.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 : 18.2.02 (1 demi-journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  20.2.02 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  21.2.02  (1 day) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Cadence Board Design tools : Upgrading to release 14 :  3 1-day sessions on 9, 10 & 11.10.01 MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Contract Follow-up (F) :  30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (...

  3. Massive Open Online Courses for Africa by Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Oyo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Africa is known for inadequate access to all sorts of human needs including health, education, food, shelter, transport, security, and energy. Before the emergence of massive open online courses (MOOCs, open access to higher education (HE was exclusive of Africa. However, as a generally affordable method of post-secondary education delivery, MOOCs place the developing countries at the centre of universal access to HE. This paper provides the strategy for MOOC implementation in the context of limited resources in Africa. The strategy is clustered under five baseline requirements: national accredited MOOC curriculum, electronic content development, development of an online and offline eLearning platform, establishment and funding of MOOC coordination units at public HEIs, and establishment of MOOC access hubs at strategic locations. Emerging from this paper is the insight that a new era of universal access to HE in Africa is achievable through MOOCs only if initial requirements are met by the respective governments.

  4. A brief overview of the history of veterinary field services in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon K. Brückner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The historical evolution of veterinary services in South Africa is closely linked to the colonial history of the past and the eventual political formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910, as well as the establishment of a fully democratic South Africa in 1994. The majority of the early pioneering veterinarians had close links to military activities and were originally mostly of British origin. The appointment of the first colonial chief veterinary officers occurred in the late 1800s. These appointments were dictated by the need to combat devastating animal diseases, such as rinderpest and African horse sickness, mainly because they affected draught oxen (used for travel and horses (used in combat. Veterinary field services was established in 1962 as a separate functional entity within government services when M.C. Lambrechts became Director of Veterinary Services of South Africa. In the context of this article, veterinary field services refers to that sphere of veterinary service delivery conducted by government-appointed or seconded veterinarians applying disease control and prevention, as required by animal health legislation. Paging through the history of veterinary field services in South Africa confirms that the problems faced by the veterinary services of today were just as real during the times of our pioneers. The pioneers of veterinary services transformed unknown animal diseases into textbook descriptions still used today and also demonstrated the important link to, and use of, the observations made by farmers, as well as the need for continued basic and applied research on animal diseases. This article provided a brief overview of the evolution of veterinary field services and the important role played by pioneers over the last two centuries to make South Africa relatively free and safe from the most important trade-sensitive and economically important animal diseases.

  5. Openness, Inequality and Poverty in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Alemayehu Geda

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between openness, poverty and inequality in Africa. The analysis begins with a review of social development on the continent since 1980, followed by a discussion of openness and a lengthy exploration of the patterns of trade and finance that link Africa to the rest of the world. The macroeconomic policy framework that guided African policymaking over the last three decades is the lens through which poverty and inequality are further examined. The paper hi...

  6. Race, crime and criminal justice in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bosilong, KP

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This chapter begins with a brief tour of South Africa's justice and political systems, demographics and discourses of race. The brief narrative, which will also allude to situations in Apartheid South Africa, is meant to aid understanding...

  7. First supplement to the lichen checklist of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuvo Ahti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Details are given of errors and additions to the recently published checklist of lichens reported from South Africa (Fryday 2015. The overall number of taxa reported from South Africa is increased by one, to 1751.

  8. Rehabilitation design of flexible pavements in South Africa.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This report contains a set of practical course notes on the Rehabilitation Design of flexible pavements in southern Africa based on extensive research by various researchers and / or practitioners in South Africa. The course is intended...

  9. Geology and engineering geology of roads in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly summarises the geological and geomorphological history of South Africa. This history is then related to various problems affecting the construction of roads in South Africa. These problems need to be identified early...

  10. Paul and Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Loba-Mkole

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between Saint Paul and the continent of Africa has never been a significant point of discussion in the New Testament studies. The same can be observed about other continents, even if the study of the Pauline corpus touches on some countries of Europe and the Middle East. The present article was triggered by the invitation of the Catholic Church to celebrate the 3rd millennium of Paul’s birthday during the period of June 2008 – June 2009, which was declared as the Year of Paul all over the world. It raises and discusses the question of relevance of Paul to Africa and vice versa in the light of intercultural exegesis.

  11. Geomorphic and Hydrological challenges in Africa: implications for soil and water conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmaercke, Matthias; Poesen, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Expected scenarios of climate change and population growth confront Africa with various important challenges related to food, water and energy security. Many of these challenges are closely linked to the impacts of soil erosion and other geomorphic processes, such as reduced crop yields, sedimentation of reservoirs and reduced freshwater quality. Despite the urgency and extent of many of these challenges, the causes and dynamics of these processes and their impacts remain severely understudied. This becomes apparent when the availability of e.g. soil erosion and catchment sediment export measurements for Africa is compared to that of other continents. Nonetheless, a substantial amount of geomorphic research has been conducted in Africa. Many of this work dates back from several decades ago, and were often only reported in 'gray literature' (e.g. internal reports). Here we present an overview of our current state of knowledge on soil erosion and its implications in Africa. We discuss which geomorphic process rate measurements are currently available and what can be learned from these with respect to the challenged raised above. We especially focus on our current understanding about the effectiveness of soil and water conservation techniques at various spatial and temporal scales. Based on specific case-studies (e.g. in Ethiopia and Uganda) and a meta-analysis of previous work, we highlight some research gaps, research needs and research opportunities when aiming to use Africa's soil and water resources sustainably and efficiently.

  12. South Africa makes some decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1996-08-01

    The potential heritage of apartheid still affects energy availability in South Africa. This article describes a new Energy Policy White paper, to be presented to Parliament, which will start to rectify current inequalities. Most of the black citizens have no access to electricity, while the affluent white minority have cheap electricity readily available to them. The complexities of funding necessary changes are addressed. South Africa`s low-cost coal reserves, mined from opencast pits next to power stations, are likely to continue to be exploited. As yet the country`s solar potential is unlikely to be developed because of the availability of coal. The production of electricity and the future of liquid fuel industries are likely to remain in crisis, even after the White Paper`s implementation. (UK)

  13. South Africa in the BRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Harrison

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available South Africa’s membership of the BRICS has stirred controversy. A number of observers have argued that South Africa is too small in terms of economy and population to be considered an authentic member of this group. In this article, the author accepts that South Africa may have no place in the analytical construct that Jim O’Neill of Goldman Sachs invented in 2001, but also argues that South Africa is a valuable and legitimate member of the political construct that we know today as the BRIC(S. South Africa has the “soft power” needed to play a constructive role in the rebalancing of geopolitical power globally, and is a potential voice for the continent of Africa. However, South Africa’s position in the BRICS must be understood in terms of its own contested role as a leader in Africa; the ambiguous outcomes of the BRICS engagement with this continent; and the danger that the BRICS may become an exclusive self-selected grouping rather than a potent force for greater global equity.

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learn-link-drugs-hiv . 120x90 460x80 486x60 Social Media Send the message to young people and to parents, teachers, and the media about the link between drug misuse and HIV. ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Misuse and HIV Related? Drug misuse and addiction have been linked with HIV/AIDS since the beginning ... the link between drug misuse and HIV. We have produced a set of multicultural public service announcements ( ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 – ... and to help us Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human ...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November 2017. How are Drug Misuse and HIV Related? Drug misuse and addiction ...

  18. Link Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, Steve

    Link analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and links. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.

  19. Christianity in Africa: a historical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson A Fatokun

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author challenges the popular public conception that Christianity in Africa is a latecomer introduced only with the advent of colonialism. By tracing the origins of the Christian faith in both North and sub-Saharan Africa (including, North-Central and West Africa, this paper seeks to show that Christianity has been in Africa virtually since its inception and that the continent� s own adherents to this faith played an important role in the formation and advance of Christianity elsewhere. Moreover, Christianity in Africa can be found almost everywhere on the continent and indigenous varieties of the tradition developed which allowed it to become as part of Africa as African traditional religions.

  20. Oil challenges for Latin America and Africa given the Asian expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Hernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lower United States dependency on crude imports has caused shipments from Latin America and Africa to fall. Asia has also made efforts to diversify the sources of its supply to meet its energy demands and thereby reduce exposure to the Middle East. These developments have implications for the projects aiming to increase Latin American and African participation in the Asian market. In this context, this article examines the significance of the expansion of Asian funding linked to the energy sector, identifies opportunities for complementarity between regions, and explores examples linked to the development of oil projects in Venezuela and the use of African crudes as input, as well as the interest of Latin American companies in developing projects in Africa.

  1. Issues in and Challenges to Professionalism in Africa's Cultural Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsamenang, A. Bame

    2010-01-01

    This article explores critical issues linked to early child development (ECD) professionalism in African childhood contexts in the light of rights-based consideration. Against the backdrop of acculturation being a reality in Africa, it accepts professionalism as a "good thing" for ECD programmes in Africa. The article sketches a portrait…

  2. Boosting capacity for health research in Africa | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    9 mai 2013 ... Africa's progress is linked to its capacity to generate, adapt, and use scientific knowledge to meet regional health and development needs. But Africa's institutions of higher learning that are mandated to foster this capacity in fact lack adequate resources to generate and apply knowledge. This raises the ...

  3. Towards the professionalisation of editing in South Africa | Law ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards the professionalisation of editing in South Africa. Melanie Ann Law, Haidee Kruger. Abstract. In South Africa, the professional status of editors remains largely undefined. In certain industries, such as the publishing industry, editing is regarded as a professional activity, requiring well-defined, high-level skills linked ...

  4. Epilepsy: Asia versus Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Marin, Benoît; Ngoungou, Edgard Brice; Tan, Chong Tin; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-09-01

    Is epilepsy truly an "African ailment"? We aimed to determine this, since international health agencies often refer to epilepsy as an African disease and the scientific literature has spoken the same tone. Various published materials, mainly reports, articles, were used to gather Asian and African evidence on various aspects of epilepsy and many of its risk and associated factors. Our results suggest that in no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment and such characterization is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. In comparison to Africa, Asia has a 5.0% greater burden from all diseases, and is 17.0% more affected from neuropsychiatric disorders (that include epilepsy). Given that more countries in Asia are transitioning, there may be large demographic and lifestyle changes in the near future. However these changes are nowhere close to those expected in Africa. Moreover, 23 million Asians have epilepsy in comparison to 3.3 million Africans and 1.2 million sub-Saharan Africans. In comparison to Africa, Asia has more untreated patients, 55.0% more additional epilepsy cases every year, because of its larger population, with greater treatment cost and possibly higher premature mortality. Of several associated factors discussed herein, many have more importance for Asia than Africa. The current state of epilepsy in Asia is far less than ideal and there is an urgent need to recognize and accept the importance of epilepsy in Asia. In no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment. This is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Equity in development and access to health services in the Wild Coast of South Africa: the community view through four linked cross-sectional studies between 1997 and 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Steven

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After election in 1994, the South African government implemented national and regional programmes, such as the Wild Coast Spatial Development Initiative (SDI, to provoke economic growth and to decrease inequities. CIET measured development in the Wild Coast region across four linked cross-sectional surveys (1997-2007. The 2007 survey was an opportunity to look at inequities since the original 1997 baseline, and how such inequities affect access to health care. Methods The 2000, 2004 and 2007 follow-up surveys revisited the communities of the 1997 baseline. Household-level multivariate analysis looked at development indicators and access to health in the context of inequities such as household crowding, access to protected sources of water, house roof construction, main food item purchased, and perception of community empowerment. Individual multivariate models accounted for age, sex, education and income earning opportunities. Results Overall access to protected sources of water increased since the baseline (from 20% in 1997 to 50% in 2007, yet households made of mud and grass, and households who bought basics as their main food item were still less likely to have protected sources of water. The most vulnerable, such as those with less education and less water and food security, were also less likely to have worked for wages leaving them with little chance of improving their standard of living (less education OR 0.59, 95%CI 0.37-0.94; less water security OR 0.67, 95%CI 0.48-0.93; less food security OR 0.43, 95%CI 0.29-0.64. People with less income were more likely to visit government services (among men OR 0.28, 95%CI 0.13-0.59; among women OR 0.33, 95%CI 0.20-0.54, reporting decision factors of cost and distance; users of private clinics sought out better service and medication. Lower food security and poorer house construction was also associated with women visiting government rather than private health services. Women with

  6. Land availability for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ximing; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Dingbao

    2011-01-01

    Marginal agricultural land is estimated for biofuel production in Africa, China, Europe, India, South America, and the continental United States, which have major agricultural production capacities. These countries/regions can have 320-702 million hectares of land available if only abandoned and degraded cropland and mixed crop and vegetation land, which are usually of low quality, are accounted. If grassland, savanna, and shrubland with marginal productivity are considered for planting low-input high-diversity (LIHD) mixtures of native perennials as energy crops, the total land availability can increase from 1107-1411 million hectares, depending on if the pasture land is discounted. Planting the second generation of biofuel feedstocks on abandoned and degraded cropland and LIHD perennials on grassland with marginal productivity may fulfill 26-55% of the current world liquid fuel consumption, without affecting the use of land with regular productivity for conventional crops and without affecting the current pasture land. Under the various land use scenarios, Africa may have more than one-third, and Africa and Brazil, together, may have more than half of the total land available for biofuel production. These estimations are based on physical conditions such as soil productivity, land slope, and climate.

  7. Robotics and automation activities in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Utete, S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Second in the series of articles focusing on the state of robotics and automation in the BRICS countries: Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa, this article provides an overview on South Africa written by researchers from the Council...

  8. The personal value of being part of a Tropical Health Education Trust (THET) links programme to develop a palliative care degree programme in Sub Saharan Africa: a descriptive study of the views of volunteer UK health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, B A; Kirton, J A; Downing, J; Frame, K

    2015-12-14

    There is a global need to expand palliative care services to reach the increasing number requiring end of life care. In developing countries where the incidences of cancer are rising there is an urgent need to develop the palliative care workforce. This paper reports on a UK Department for international development (DFID) initiative funded through the Tropical Health Education Trust (THET) where palliative care staff, both clinical and academic, volunteered to help to develop, support and deliver a degree in palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of the study was to explore the personal impact on the health care professionals of being part of this initiative. An evaluation approach using a confidential electronic survey containing quantitative and qualitative questions was distributed to all 17 volunteers on the programme, three months after completion of the first cohort. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and content thematic analysis. Ethical review deemed the study to be service evaluation. 82 % (14) responded and several themes emerged from the data including the positive impact on teaching and educational skills; clinical practice and finally personal development. Using a score of 1-10 (1-no impact, 10 maximum impact) 'Lifestyle choices - life work balance' (rating 7.83) had the most impact. This approach to supporting the development of palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa through skill sharing in supporting the delivery of a degree programme in palliative care was successful in terms of delivery of the degree programme, material development and mentorship of local staff. Additionally, this study shows it provided a range of positive impacts on the volunteer health care professionals from the UK. Professional impacts including increased management skills, and being better prepared to undertake a senior role. However it is the personal impact including lifestyle choices which the volunteers reported as the highest impact

  9. Mapping Africa's advanced public health education capacity: the AfriHealth project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijsselmuiden, C B; Nchinda, T C; Duale, S; Tumwesigye, N M; Serwadda, D

    2007-12-01

    Literature on human resources for health in Africa has focused on personal health services. Little is known about graduate public health education. This paper maps "advanced" public health education in Africa. Public health includes all professionals needed to manage and optimize health systems and the public's health. Data were collected through questionnaires and personal visits to departments, institutes and schools of community medicine or public health. Simple descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. For more than 900 million people, there are fewer than 500 full-time staff, around two-thirds of whom are male. More men (89%) than women (72%) hold senior degrees. Over half (55%) of countries do not have any postgraduate public health programme. This shortage is most severe in lusophone and francophone Africa. The units offering public health programmes are small: 81% have less than 20 staff, and 62% less than 10. On the other hand, over 80% of Africans live in countries where at least one programme is available, and there are six larger schools with over 25 staff. Programmes are often narrowly focused on medical professionals, but "open" programmes are increasing in number. Public health education and research are not linked. Africa urgently needs a plan for developing its public health education capacity. Lack of critical mass seems a key gap to be addressed by strengthening subregional centres, each of which should provide programmes to surrounding countries. Research linked to public health education and to educational institutions needs to increase.

  10. Application of the critical loads approach in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Tienhoven, AM

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available , South Africa. Abstract. South Africa is the most industrialised country in southern Africa and stands at some risk from negative pollution i apa~ To the authors' knowledge, this paper presents the first attempt toapply the critical loads approach...

  11. Operative links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2010-01-01

    and have been the object of great expectations concerning the ability to incorporate health concerns into every welfare area through health promotion strategies. The paper draws on results and analyses of a collective research project funded by the Danish National Research Council and carried out...... as networks: second, a semantic perspective on discourses and concepts of health, and, third, a health pedagogical perspective on participation, intervention, and roles. This paper argues for the importance of 'operative links' between different levels in health strategies. It is proposed that such links...

  12. Operative Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Højlund, Holger

    2012-01-01

    and have been the object of great expectations concerning the ability to incorporate health concerns into every welfare area through health promotion strategies. The paper draws on results and analyses of a collective research project funded by the Danish National Research Council and carried out...... links' that indicate cooperative levels which facilitate a creative and innovative effort in disease prevention and health promotion targeted at children and adolescents - across traditional professional boundaries. It is proposed that such links are supported by network structures, shared semantics...

  13. Strengthening health systems through linking research evidence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    informed policies. Accordingly, a critical way of addressing these challenges facing health systems in the region is through the linking of health research findings to policy. Keywords: Evidence; Sub-Saharan Africa; Health Policy; Health Systems ...

  14. Real-world innovation in rural South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mulder, I

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Organizations and Networks Volume 10, “Special Issue on Living Labs”, August 2008 REAL-WORLD INNOVATION IN RURAL SOUTH AFRICA Ingrid Mulder1,2, Walter Bohle3, Shela Boshomane4, Chris Morris4, Hugo Tempelman5, & Daan Velthausz1,6 1Telematica Instituut... (Enschede, The Netherlands) 2Rotterdam University (Rotterdam, The Netherlands) 3Liaison Telematica Instituut & Meraka Institute (Pretoria, South Africa) 4Meraka Institute (Pretoria, South Africa) 5Ndlovu Medical Centre (Elandsdoorn, South Africa) 6In...

  15. GMOs in Africa: opportunities and challenges in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bothma, G

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available commercialised GM crops. With South Africa being an early adopter of GM technology, the economic benefits for some of the crop technologies can be readily demonstrated, particularly in commercial crop production. Seventy five percent of agricultural output comes...

  16. Africa Development - Vol 41, No 2 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regional Economic Integration and the Governance Challenge in Africa: Missing Links in the African Peer Review Mechanism · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Peace Akudo Jiboku, Ufo Okeke-Uzodike, 47–70 ...

  17. making extractive investments work for africa's development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    success in gaining access to the resources of Africa is linked to an effective strategy that combines trade inducements, increased investment flows, aid for infrastructure and construction and technology transfers. With the recent dramatic decline in the price of commodities, and China's re-balancing with greater emphasis on ...

  18. Indo-Pacific sea surface temperature influences on failed consecutive rainy seasons over eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, Andrew; Funk, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Rainfall over eastern Africa (10°S–10°N; 35°E–50°E) is bimodal, with seasonal maxima during the "long rains" of March–April–May (MAM) and the "short rains" of October–November–December (OND). Below average precipitation during consecutive long and short rains seasons over eastern Africa can have devastating long-term impacts on water availability and agriculture. Here, we examine the forcing of drought during consecutive long and short rains seasons over eastern Africa by Indo-Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The forcing of eastern Africa precipitation and circulation by SSTs is tested using ten ensemble simulations of a global weather forecast model forced by 1950–2010 observed global SSTs. Since the 1980s, Indo-Pacific SSTs have forced more frequent droughts spanning consecutive long and short rains seasons over eastern Africa. The increased frequency of dry conditions is linked to warming SSTs over the Indo-west Pacific and to a lesser degree to Pacific Decadal Variability. During MAM, long-term warming of tropical west Pacific SSTs from 1950–2010 has forced statistically significant precipitation reductions over eastern Africa. The warming west Pacific SSTs have forced changes in the regional lower tropospheric circulation by weakening the Somali Jet, which has reduced moisture and rainfall over the Horn of Africa. During OND, reductions in precipitation over recent decades are oftentimes overshadowed by strong year-to-year precipitation variability forced by the Indian Ocean Dipole and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation.

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about the link between drug misuse and HIV. Post on Facebook or Twitter ; add photos to your Flickr , Pinterest , ... about the link between drug misuse and HIV. Post on Facebook About Learn the Link Need ideas for posts? ...

  20. Sensitive and specific detection of potentially allergenic almond (Prunus dulcis) in complex food matrices by Taqman(®) real-time polymerase chain reaction in comparison to commercially available protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Martin; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2011-01-24

    Currently, causative immunotherapies are lacking in food allergy. The only option to prevent allergic reactions in susceptible individuals is to strictly avoid the offending food. Thus, reliable labelling of allergenic constituents is of major importance, but can only be achieved if appropriate specific and sensitive detection techniques for foods with allergenic potential are available. Almond is an allergenic food that requires mandatory labelling on prepackaged foods and belongs to the genus Prunus. Species of this genus are phylogenetically closely related. We observed commercially available almond specific ELISA being highly cross-reactive with other foods of the Prunoideae family, resulting in a false-positive detection of up to 500,000 mg kg(-1) almond. Previously published PCR methods were reported to be cross-reactive with false positive results >1200 mg kg(-1). We describe the development of a novel almond specific real-time PCR, based on mutated mismatch primers and sequence specific Taqman(®) probe detection, in comparison with two quantitative commercially available ELISA. PCR sensitivity was investigated with chocolate, chocolate coating and cookies spiked between 5 and 100,000 mg kg(-1) almond. In all matrices almond was reproducibly detected by real-time PCR at the lowest spike level of 5 mg kg(-1). Further, between 100 and 100,000 mg kg(-1) spiked almond, the method featured good correlation between quantified copy numbers and the amount of spiked almond. Within this range a similar relation between detectable signal and amount of almond was observed for both PCR and ELISA. In contrast to ELISA the Taqman(®) real-time PCR method was highly specific in 59 food items with negligible cross-reactivity for a very limited number of Prunoideae foods. The real-time PCR analysis of 24 retail samples was in concordance with ELISA results: 21% (n=5) contained undeclared almond. This is the first completely disclosed real-time PCR method for a specific and

  1. Sensitive and specific detection of potentially allergenic almond (Prunus dulcis) in complex food matrices by Taqman real-time polymerase chain reaction in comparison to commercially available protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, Martin; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Currently, causative immunotherapies are lacking in food allergy. The only option to prevent allergic reactions in susceptible individuals is to strictly avoid the offending food. Thus, reliable labelling of allergenic constituents is of major importance, but can only be achieved if appropriate specific and sensitive detection techniques for foods with allergenic potential are available. Almond is an allergenic food that requires mandatory labelling on prepackaged foods and belongs to the genus Prunus. Species of this genus are phylogenetically closely related. We observed commercially available almond specific ELISA being highly cross-reactive with other foods of the Prunoideae family, resulting in a false-positive detection of up to 500,000 mg kg -1 almond. Previously published PCR methods were reported to be cross-reactive with false positive results >1200 mg kg -1 . We describe the development of a novel almond specific real-time PCR, based on mutated mismatch primers and sequence specific Taqman probe detection, in comparison with two quantitative commercially available ELISA. PCR sensitivity was investigated with chocolate, chocolate coating and cookies spiked between 5 and 100,000 mg kg -1 almond. In all matrices almond was reproducibly detected by real-time PCR at the lowest spike level of 5 mg kg -1 . Further, between 100 and 100,000 mg kg -1 spiked almond, the method featured good correlation between quantified copy numbers and the amount of spiked almond. Within this range a similar relation between detectable signal and amount of almond was observed for both PCR and ELISA. In contrast to ELISA the Taqman real-time PCR method was highly specific in 59 food items with negligible cross-reactivity for a very limited number of Prunoideae foods. The real-time PCR analysis of 24 retail samples was in concordance with ELISA results: 21% (n = 5) contained undeclared almond. This is the first completely disclosed real-time PCR method for a specific and

  2. Sensitive and specific detection of potentially allergenic almond (Prunus dulcis) in complex food matrices by Taqman real-time polymerase chain reaction in comparison to commercially available protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder, Martin; Vieths, Stefan [Division of Allergology, Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Paul-Ehrlich-Strasse 51-59, 63225 Langen (Germany); Holzhauser, Thomas, E-mail: holth@pei.de [Division of Allergology, Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Paul-Ehrlich-Strasse 51-59, 63225 Langen (Germany)

    2011-01-24

    Currently, causative immunotherapies are lacking in food allergy. The only option to prevent allergic reactions in susceptible individuals is to strictly avoid the offending food. Thus, reliable labelling of allergenic constituents is of major importance, but can only be achieved if appropriate specific and sensitive detection techniques for foods with allergenic potential are available. Almond is an allergenic food that requires mandatory labelling on prepackaged foods and belongs to the genus Prunus. Species of this genus are phylogenetically closely related. We observed commercially available almond specific ELISA being highly cross-reactive with other foods of the Prunoideae family, resulting in a false-positive detection of up to 500,000 mg kg{sup -1} almond. Previously published PCR methods were reported to be cross-reactive with false positive results >1200 mg kg{sup -1}. We describe the development of a novel almond specific real-time PCR, based on mutated mismatch primers and sequence specific Taqman probe detection, in comparison with two quantitative commercially available ELISA. PCR sensitivity was investigated with chocolate, chocolate coating and cookies spiked between 5 and 100,000 mg kg{sup -1} almond. In all matrices almond was reproducibly detected by real-time PCR at the lowest spike level of 5 mg kg{sup -1}. Further, between 100 and 100,000 mg kg{sup -1} spiked almond, the method featured good correlation between quantified copy numbers and the amount of spiked almond. Within this range a similar relation between detectable signal and amount of almond was observed for both PCR and ELISA. In contrast to ELISA the Taqman real-time PCR method was highly specific in 59 food items with negligible cross-reactivity for a very limited number of Prunoideae foods. The real-time PCR analysis of 24 retail samples was in concordance with ELISA results: 21% (n = 5) contained undeclared almond. This is the first completely disclosed real-time PCR method for a

  3. Threatened plants of Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hall, AV

    1980-05-01

    Full Text Available Lists are provided of 1 915 vascular plant taxa regarded to be either extinct or variously threatened in southern Africa, the region south of (but excluding) Angola, Zimbabwe and Mozambique. These include 39 recently extinct taxa} 105 endangered...

  4. Young engineers of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Beyers, R

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The Young Engineers of South Africa Programme (YESA) also endorses the e-Education and the Science and Technology White Papers. The main focus area will be on Information Communication Technologies (ICT) in education and the way that they can impact...

  5. Cooperation: New Players in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Hugon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the context of globalisation and the current global financial crisis, new players are emerging in cooperation in Africa. These partners loosen financial constraints and conditionalities, increase the room for manoeuvre and stimulate commodity markets. On the other hand, they also increase the risks of renewed indebtedness and potentially weaken the coordination of aid policies. Do these partnerships call the new cooperation practices of OECD countries into question? Do they justify the return to a realpolitik or are they repeating the earlier mistakes of industrial powers? Can these mistakes be corrected? The question also arises as to whether the global crisis, which has a profound effect on Africa, will lead to a withdrawal or to a passing of the baton on to new, emerging powers. This article highlights the new geopolitical issues concerning Africa in a multipolar world, then discusses the new players involved in cooperation in Africa, before going on to explore the horizons that are opening up for cooperation in Africa, in particular with regard to the global crisis.

  6. Operative Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Højlund, Holger

    2012-01-01

    educational approaches. Methods: Mixed qualitative design: survey based on telephone interviews with health managers (n=72), personal and focus group interviews with health professionals (n=84) and pupils (n=108) from 18 school classes, and comparative case studies in five selected municipalities of various...... educational goals, learning content, or value clarification. Health pedagogy is often a matter of retrospective rationalization rather than the starting point of planning. Health and risk behaviour approaches override health educational approaches. Conclusions: Operational links between health education...

  7. Africa's Petroleum Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldwyn, David L

    2005-01-01

    .... Africa's importance to U.S. energy security is rising due to Africa's expanding role as an incremental supplier of oil in a tight global oil market, its relative openness to foreign investment, increasing levels of U.S...

  8. The "Brown" Environmental Agenda And The Constitutional Duties Of Local Government In South Africa: A Conceptual Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anél du Plessis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This note explores the interrelationship between ecologically sustainable development (the green environmental agenda and pro-poor urban development and environmental health (the brown environmental agenda in relation to local government in South Africa. The meaning and relevance of the brown agenda versus the green agenda in environmental governance are discussed in general. This discussion subsequently feeds into the argument that South Africa's constitutional environmental right also foresees the advancement of the brown environmental agenda, which has implications for the interpretation and enforcement of local government's service delivery mandate. This link between municipal service delivery and the environmental right further informs understanding of what is required of government to fulfill this right. This paper is thus devoted to an introductory conceptual framing of South Africa's environmental right that goes beyond the green agenda. This impacts on how the constitutional duties of municipalities are interpreted and executed.

  9. Epidemiology of Leptospirosis in Africa: A Systematic Review of a Neglected Zoonosis and a Paradigm for ‘One Health’ in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Kathryn J.; Biggs, Holly M.; Halliday, Jo E. B.; Kazwala, Rudovick R.; Maro, Venance P.; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an important but neglected bacterial zoonosis that has been largely overlooked in Africa. In this systematic review, we aimed to summarise and compare current knowledge of: (1) the geographic distribution, prevalence, incidence and diversity of acute human leptospirosis in Africa; and (2) the geographic distribution, host range, prevalence and diversity of Leptospira spp. infection in animal hosts in Africa. Methods Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we searched for studies that described (1) acute human leptospirosis and (2) pathogenic Leptospira spp. infection in animals. We performed a literature search using eight international and regional databases for English and non-English articles published between January 1930 to October 2014 that met out pre-defined inclusion criteria and strict case definitions. Results and Discussion We identified 97 studies that described acute human leptospirosis (n = 46) or animal Leptospira infection (n = 51) in 26 African countries. The prevalence of acute human leptospirosis ranged from 2 3% to 19 8% (n = 11) in hospital patients with febrile illness. Incidence estimates were largely restricted to the Indian Ocean islands (3 to 101 cases per 100,000 per year (n = 6)). Data from Tanzania indicate that human disease incidence is also high in mainland Africa (75 to 102 cases per 100,000 per year). Three major species (Leptospira borgpetersenii, L. interrogans and L. kirschneri) are predominant in reports from Africa and isolates from a diverse range of serogroups have been reported in human and animal infections. Cattle appear to be important hosts of a large number of Leptospira serogroups in Africa, but few data are available to allow comparison of Leptospira infection in linked human and animal populations. We advocate a ‘One Health’ approach to promote multidisciplinary research efforts to improve understanding of the animal to human

  10. Solid wastes research in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Noble, RG

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of solid wastes management in environmental pollution control cannot be over-emphasised. Increased socio-economic development in South Africa has brought with it increasing volumes of urban, industrial and agricultural wastes...

  11. Developing the GHG inventory for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taviv, R

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available will be used for the Second National Communication to the UNFCCC. Furthermore, the GHG inventory will be a critical source of information for air quality management and climate change mitigation in South Africa...

  12. Africa Insight: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Africa Insight is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal of the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA). It is accredited by the South African National Department of Higher Education and Training and is indexed in the International Bibliography of Social Science. AISA is a statutory research body focusing on ...

  13. Wind engineering in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisse, J.A.; Stigter, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The International Association for Wind Engineering (IAWE) has very few contacts in Africa, the second-largest continent. This paper reviews important wind-related African issues. They all require data on wind climate, which are very sparse in Africa. Wind engineering in Africa can assist in

  14. Africa Insight: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Africa Insight is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal of the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA). It is accredited by the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and is indexed in the International Bibliography of Social Science (IBSS). It is a multi-disciplinary journal primarily focusing on African ...

  15. Shakespeare in Southern Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shakespeare in Southern Africa is interested in both literary and theatrical approaches to Shakespeare. Its geographical scope is not confined to Southern Africa. Contributions discussing the legacy of Shakespeare elsewhere in Africa, with a specific focus on the Shakespearean experience in particular African countries, ...

  16. Africa's Geomosaic under Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blij, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Traces the transformation of Subsaharan Africa during the last 35 years. Contends that the domino effect hastened decolonization and increased polarization within South Africa. Argues that modernization is taking place only in South Africa's core and that the geopolitical framework appears stable but may collapse from within. (NL)

  17. Paul and Africa?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2011-06-07

    Jun 7, 2011 ... After the end of the Cold War, which divided Africa into two blocks (capitalists and communists), the most recent partition of Africa happened with the creation of the. Mediterranean .... powerful role that Africa has been playing in the expansion of the Church ministries from the early period until today (cf.

  18. SEA in Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Audouin, M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available On a continent where the livelihoods of the majority of Africans are closely linked to the health of the natural environment, and where poverty and land degradation has increased in recent decades, there is a critical need for sustainable management...

  19. Dermatology and HIV/AIDS in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS have greatly complicated dermatologic disease and the required care in most regions of Africa. Opportunistic infections, ectoparasites, Kaposi sarcoma, and skin manifestations of systemic infections are exceedingly common in patients with HIV/AIDS. Dermatologists have contributed significantly to our knowledge base about HIV/AIDS and have played an important educational role regarding the clinical manifestations historically. Because of the increased burden of skin disease in Africa due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic we must redouble our efforts to provide dermatology education to care providers in Africa. We review the burden of skin disease in Africa, how it relates to HIV/AIDS and global infectious disease, current educational strategies in Africa to address this need, and suggest potential solutions to move these efforts forward.

  20. Perspectives of wild medicine harvesters from Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Petersen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cape Town is a fast-growing cityscape in the Cape Floristic Region in South Africa with 24 formally protected conservation areas including the World Heritage Table Mountain National Park. These sites have been protected and managed as critical sites for local biodiversity, representing potentially one-third of all Cape Floristic Region flora species and 18% of South Africa's plant diversity. Cape Town is also inhabited by a rapidly growing culturally and economically diverse citizenry with distinct and potentially conflicting perspectives on access to, and management of, local natural resources. In a qualitative study of 58 locally resident traditional healers of distinct cultural groups, we examined motivations underlying the generally illicit activity of harvesting of wild resources from Cape Town protected areas. Resource harvester motivations primarily link to local economic survival, health care and cultural links to particular resources and practices, 'access for all' outlooks, and wholesale profit-seeking perspectives. We describe these motivations, contrast them with the current formal, legal and institutional perspectives for biodiversity protection in the city, and propose managerial interventions that may improve sustainability of ongoing harvest activities. Significance: The study reveals, for the first time in the Cape Floristic Region, informal economy viewpoints on terrestrial nature and how its direct use has important economic and cultural roles – specifically in wild medicine harvesting and trade. We contrast the formal and informal approaches to nature conservation in the city and propose new considerations for conservation managers.

  1. Palatibility of Opuntia varieties available in South Africa for dryland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty two Opuntia varieties were fed fresh to evaluate their palatability to dryland sheep. The experiment consisted of four Pedi sheep blocked according to weight in five camps containing three feeding troughs, where three different varieties were fed randomly on a daily basis. Each Variety was presented in a different camp ...

  2. Employment creation through public works programmes and projects in South Africa: Experiences and potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D. Thwala

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/objectives: The aim of this article is to look at the experiences, problems and the potential contribution of employment creation programmes in alleviating the unemployment problem in other African countries through the construction of public infrastructure through the use of labour-intensive methods. The article then describes the problems and experiences that have been encountered in South Africa in relation to employment creation through the construction of public infrastructure. Problem investigated: In South Africa the levels of unemployment and poverty are extremely high and unemployment is one of South Africa's most pressing problems. At the same time there is a lack of capacity and skills at institutional, community and individual levels. Labour-intensive programmes generate more direct and indirect local employment opportunities and income by using locally available inputs (materials, simple tools and local labour and thus creating a greater demand for local products and services than do high-technology programmes reliant on imported technology and equipment. Design/Methodology/Approach: Drawing on research on labour-intensive, public works programmes and projects, the paper is mainly a literature review. From a theoretical perspective supported by experience elsewhere in Africa, there are reasons for considering that properly formulated employment creation programmes based on the use of labour-intensive methods could be established to construct and maintain the required physical infrastructure, thus creating employment, skills and institutional capacities. The article closes with some recommendations for the future programmes success. Findings/Implications: The article attributes the failure of projects and programmes in South Africa to different factors which must be avoided in future in order for projects and programmes to be successful in South Africa. Investment in infrastructure has a huge potential to redress the high

  3. Visualisierung von typisierten Links in Linked Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Neubauer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Das Themengebiet der Arbeit behandelt Visualisierungen von typisierten Links in Linked Data. Die wissenschaftlichen Gebiete, die im Allgemeinen den Inhalt des Beitrags abgrenzen, sind das Semantic Web, das Web of Data und Informationsvisualisierung. Das Semantic Web, das von Tim Berners Lee 2001 erfunden wurde, stellt eine Erweiterung zum World Wide Web (Web 2.0 dar. Aktuelle Forschungen beziehen sich auf die Verknüpfbarkeit von Informationen im World Wide Web. Um es zu ermöglichen, solche Verbindungen wahrnehmen und verarbeiten zu können sind Visualisierungen die wichtigsten Anforderungen als Hauptteil der Datenverarbeitung. Im Zusammenhang mit dem Sematic Web werden Repräsentationen von zuhammenhängenden Informationen anhand von Graphen gehandhabt. Der Grund des Entstehens dieser Arbeit ist in erster Linie die Beschreibung der Gestaltung von Linked Data-Visualisierungskonzepten, deren Prinzipien im Rahmen einer theoretischen Annäherung eingeführt werden. Anhand des Kontexts führt eine schrittweise Erweiterung der Informationen mit dem Ziel, praktische Richtlinien anzubieten, zur Vernetzung dieser ausgearbeiteten Gestaltungsrichtlinien. Indem die Entwürfe zweier alternativer Visualisierungen einer standardisierten Webapplikation beschrieben werden, die Linked Data als Netzwerk visualisiert, konnte ein Test durchgeführt werden, der deren Kompatibilität zum Inhalt hatte. Der praktische Teil behandelt daher die Designphase, die Resultate, und zukünftige Anforderungen des Projektes, die durch die Testung ausgearbeitet wurden.

  4. Protected areas: mixed success in conserving East Africa's evergreen forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Pfeifer

    Full Text Available In East Africa, human population growth and demands for natural resources cause forest loss contributing to increased carbon emissions and reduced biodiversity. Protected Areas (PAs are intended to conserve habitats and species. Variability in PA effectiveness and 'leakage' (here defined as displacement of deforestation may lead to different trends in forest loss within, and adjacent to, existing PAs. Here, we quantify spatial variation in trends of evergreen forest coverage in East Africa between 2001 and 2009, and test for correlations with forest accessibility and environmental drivers. We investigate PA effectiveness at local, landscape and national scales, comparing rates of deforestation within park boundaries with those detected in park buffer zones and in unprotected land more generally. Background forest loss (BFL was estimated at -9.3% (17,167 km(2, but varied between countries (range: -0.9% to -85.7%; note: no BFL in South Sudan. We document high variability in PA effectiveness within and between PA categories. The most successful PAs were National Parks, although only 26 out of 48 parks increased or maintained their forest area (i.e. Effective parks. Forest Reserves (Ineffective parks, i.e. parks that lose forest from within boundaries: 204 out of 337, Nature Reserves (six out of 12 and Game Parks (24 out of 26 were more likely to lose forest cover. Forest loss in buffer zones around PAs exceeded background forest loss, in some areas indicating leakage driven by Effective National Parks. Human pressure, forest accessibility, protection status, distance to fires and long-term annual rainfall were highly significant drivers of forest loss in East Africa. Some of these factors can be addressed by adjusting park management. However, addressing close links between livelihoods, natural capital and poverty remains a fundamental challenge in East Africa's forest conservation efforts.

  5. Regional responses: Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wereko-Brobby, C.Y.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the author presents the theory that for Africa to work towards reduction of global warming, it must first address its environmental problems; i.e. land use, deforestation, desertification, poverty and hunger. He argues that Africa should aim for growth in the productivity and quantity of energy use. The following suggestions were made: Africa must shift from low-quantity biomass to secondary sources in the short term; developed countries must avoid pushing experimental and frontier technologies on Africa; with financial and technical help, Africa could develop its largely untapped reserves of hydropower. Nuclear power should not be an option because reliable production is not possible at present

  6. Uranium deposits in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilpolt, R.H.; Simov, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Africa is not only known for its spectacular diamond, gold, copper, chromium, platinum and phosphorus deposits but also for its uranium deposits. At least two uranium provinces can be distinguished - the southern, with the equatorial sub-province; and the south Saharan province. Uranium deposits are distributed either in cratons or in mobile belts, the first of sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate type, while those located in mobile belts are predominantly of vein and similar (disseminated) type. Uranium deposits occur within Precambrian rocks or in younger platform sediments, but close to the exposed Precambrian basement. The Proterozoic host rocks consist of sediments, metamorphics or granitoids. In contrast to Phanerozoic continental uranium-bearing sediments, those in the Precambrian are in marginal marine facies but they do contain organic material. The geology of Africa is briefly reviewed with the emphasis on those features which might control the distribution of uranium. The evolution of the African Platform is considered as a progressive reduction of its craton area which has been affected by three major Precambrian tectonic events. A short survey on the geology of known uranium deposits is made. However, some deposits and occurrences for which little published material is available are treated in more detail. (author)

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 7.2.2006 (February-May course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document 3 27.02.06 E-F JAVA: Level 2 32 28.02-3.03.06 E Manipulation des images 4 28.02.06 F ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 2-3.03.06 E-F C++ for Particle Physicists 20 6-10.03.06 E PowerPoint 2003 8 9.03.06 F JCOP: Control System Integration using JCOP Tools 24 14-16.03.06 E EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables 3 20.03.06 E-F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo....Link cells, worksheets and workbooks 3 20.03.06 E-F JCOP: Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework 24 21-23.03.06 E Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML 24 21-23.03.06 E FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 27-28.03.06 F JCOP: Joint PVSS-JCOP Fram...

  8. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 7.2.2006 (February-May course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge 3 13.03.06 E-F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables 3 20.03.06 E-F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo....Link cells, worksheets and workbooks 3 20.03.06 E-F Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML 24 21-23.03.06 E EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 16 22-23.03.06 F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 27-28.03.06 F Oracle Forms Developer 10g: Move to the Web 16 27-28.03.06 E Oracle JDeveloper 10g: Build Applications with ADF 24 29-31.03.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 3-4.03.06 E-F JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications 16 3-4.04.06 E JCOP: Control System Integration using JCOP Tools 24 4-6.04.06 E JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition...

  9. Spectrum availability and digital communication links : summary of proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-20

    ON OCTOBER 26-27, 1995, MORE THAN 200 TRANSPORTATION LEADERS AND DECISION MAKERS FROM AROUND THE NATION CONVENED IN CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS, TO PARTICIPATE IN A TWO-DAY SYMPOSIUM ON "CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL TRANSPORTATION IN THE 21ST...

  10. Examining evapotranspiration trends in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Michael; Michaelsen, Joel [University of California Santa Barbara, Department of Geography, Climate Hazards Group, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Funk, Christopher [University of California Santa Barbara, US Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, Department of Geography, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Surface temperatures are projected to increase 3-4 C over much of Africa by the end of the 21st century. Precipitation projections are less certain, but the most plausible scenario given by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is that the Sahel and East Africa will experience modest increases ({proportional_to}5%) in precipitation by the end of the 21st century. Evapotranspiration (E{sub a}) is an important component of the water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles that impact several climate properties, processes, and feedbacks. The interaction of E{sub a} with climate change drivers remains relatively unexplored in Africa. In this paper, we examine the trends in E{sub a}, precipitation (P), daily maximum temperature (T{sub max}), and daily minimum temperature (T{sub min}) on a seasonal basis using a 31 year time series of variable infiltration capacity (VIC) land surface model (LSM) E{sub a}. The VIC model captured the magnitude, variability, and structure of observed runoff better than other LSMs and a hybrid model included in the analysis. In addition, we examine the inter-correlations of E{sub a}, P, T{sub max}, and T{sub min} to determine relationships and potential feedbacks. Unlike many IPCC climate change simulations, the historical analysis reveals substantial drying over much of the Sahel and East Africa during the primary growing season. In the western Sahel, large increases in daily maximum temperature appear linked to E{sub a} declines, despite modest rainfall recovery. The decline in E{sub a} and latent heating in this region could lead to increased sensible heating and surface temperature, thus establishing a possible positive feedback between E{sub a} and surface temperature. (orig.)

  11. Teaching Mandarin as a foreign language in Higher Education institutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi, Y (Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Foreign language learning is a hallmark of the internationalisation of university education and a key to enabling graduates to participate in a globalising world. Currently, China is both a global political player and a key market and trading partner for the West and for Africa. Linked to these economic and political factors, non-Chinese speakers in higher education systems worldwide are showing a rapidly expanding interest in learning Mandarin Chinese as a foreign language. Notwithstanding the complexity of learning Chinese, the expansion of Mandarin tuition on all levels of education has exhibited a striking linguistic pattern. In line with international trends, the demand for learning Mandarin as a foreign language in higher education in South Africa is mainly driven by China’s political importance and the burgeoning trade partnership between China and South Africa. This article provides an exploratory overview of the teaching of Mandarin as a foreign language and the related study of Chinese culture in four higher education institutions in South Africa: The University of South Africa (Unisa, The University of Stellenbosch (US, Rhodes University (RU and The University of Cape Town (UCT. The article concludes with an appraisal of the small but growing interest in Mandarin study in the higher education system of this country. An argument is presented that this promotes the internationalisation of South Africa's higher education, that the inclusion of cultural studies in language courses offers a deeper engagement than language studies alone, and that a current weakness in provision is the lack of articulation with postgraduate degrees in Chinese language study and research. Finally, the role of the Confucius Institutes in the provision of Mandarin tuition is highlighted.

  12. Plasmodium vivax Transmission in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind E Howes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Malaria in sub-Saharan Africa has historically been almost exclusively attributed to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf. Current diagnostic and surveillance systems in much of sub-Saharan Africa are not designed to identify or report non-Pf human malaria infections accurately, resulting in a dearth of routine epidemiological data about their significance. The high prevalence of Duffy negativity provided a rationale for excluding the possibility of Plasmodium vivax (Pv transmission. However, review of varied evidence sources including traveller infections, community prevalence surveys, local clinical case reports, entomological and serological studies contradicts this viewpoint. Here, these data reports are weighted in a unified framework to reflect the strength of evidence of indigenous Pv transmission in terms of diagnostic specificity, size of individual reports and corroboration between evidence sources. Direct evidence was reported from 21 of the 47 malaria-endemic countries studied, while 42 countries were attributed with infections of visiting travellers. Overall, moderate to conclusive evidence of transmission was available from 18 countries, distributed across all parts of the continent. Approximately 86.6 million Duffy positive hosts were at risk of infection in Africa in 2015. Analysis of the mechanisms sustaining Pv transmission across this continent of low frequency of susceptible hosts found that reports of Pv prevalence were consistent with transmission being potentially limited to Duffy positive populations. Finally, reports of apparent Duffy-independent transmission are discussed. While Pv is evidently not a major malaria parasite across most of sub-Saharan Africa, the evidence presented here highlights its widespread low-level endemicity. An increased awareness of Pv as a potential malaria parasite, coupled with policy shifts towards species-specific diagnostics and reporting, will allow a robust assessment of the public health

  13. Africa | Afrique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available African countries’ independence dates and former colonial powersDates d’indépendance des pays africains et anciennes puissances colonialesAfrican countries’ dependence on foreign ODA, 2008Dépendance des pays africains vis-à-vis de l’APD extérieure, 2008ODA receipts as a percentage of recipients’ GNI. Among the countries less dependent on foreign ODA, there are those where the industrial structure is diversified and those which export considerable volumes of raw materials, notably oil. | Recet...

  14. Europa e Africa - Anatomia di un incontro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoppi, Marco

    Available at: - http://ebook.edizionieiffel.com/product.php?id_product=36 or on AMAZON at:  http://www.amazon.it/Europa-Africa-Anatomia-Marco-Zoppi-ebook/dp/B01DPSBE6C/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1460205243&sr=8-1&keywords=marco+zoppi The book title translates as: "Europe and Africa: anatomy of an enc......Available at: - http://ebook.edizionieiffel.com/product.php?id_product=36 or on AMAZON at:  http://www.amazon.it/Europa-Africa-Anatomia-Marco-Zoppi-ebook/dp/B01DPSBE6C/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1460205243&sr=8-1&keywords=marco+zoppi The book title translates as: "Europe and Africa: anatomy...

  15. Seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in sheep in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Abu Samraa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Serum samples from 600 sheep were collected from 5 different provinces randomly chosen in South Africa. Two sheep abattoirs (representing formal slaughter of sheep and 1 rural location (representing informal slaughter of sheep per province were also selected randomly. The serum samples were tested for anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibodies using 2 different serological tests : an indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA test and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA test available as a commercial kit. This study provides the first published data on seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in sheep in South Africa, although positive titres have been found previously in wild felids, ferrets, chinchillas and a dog. Data on seroprevalence in sheep is considered important because consumption of mutton is universally considered to be a source of zoonotic transfer to humans. Seroprevalence in humans in South Africa was previously found to be 20% and it is postulated that this may be linked to the informal slaughter and consumption of mutton. During this study, the overall national seroprevalence per province in sheep was found to be 5.6 % (IFA and 4.3 % (ELISA, respectively. This is lower than in other countries, possibly because South Africa has an arid climate. Differences in seroprevalence in different areas studied suggested an association with the climate and a significant correlation (P > 0.05 was detected between the prevalence of T. gondii and the minimum average temperature. The seroprevalence was found to be significantly higher (P < 0.01 in sheep originating from commercial farms (7.9 % than in rural sheep in the informal sector (3.4 %. Also, sheep managed extensively had a seroprevalence of 1.8 %, which was significantly lower (P < 0.05 than the seroprevalence in sheep under semi-intensive or intensive management systems (5.3 %. An incidental finding of interest was the considerable movement of sheep to abattoirs and mutton after slaughter. The

  16. The Military of the New South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    in the book is based upon two underpinning major claims and one linked question: 1) Post-apartheid SA foreign policy is characterized by efforts to change South Africa’s image from “pariah” to “soft peacemaker”. 2) The SANDF has played an important and somewhat overlooked role in this transition. Its...... the impact of this will be for South African foreign. This will indirectly also impact on the African Union’s Security Architecture and its conflict resolution tools, such as the African Standby Force (ASF) and African Capacity for the Immediate Response the Crisis (ACIRC)   Structure of the book Chapter 1....... Introduction – Setting the Scene Chapter 2. Foreign Policy and Military Power in South Africa – framing the debate on RSA foreign policy in relation to Africa, Chapter 3. South Africa and the Concept of National Security Chapter 4. The SANDF: Capacity and Capabilities Chapter 5. Sorry Mr. Chairman, can we stop...

  17. Equity in development and access to health services in the Wild Coast of South Africa: the community view through four linked cross-sectional studies between 1997 and 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background After election in 1994, the South African government implemented national and regional programmes, such as the Wild Coast Spatial Development Initiative (SDI), to provoke economic growth and to decrease inequities. CIET measured development in the Wild Coast region across four linked cross-sectional surveys (1997-2007). The 2007 survey was an opportunity to look at inequities since the original 1997 baseline, and how such inequities affect access to health care. Methods The 2000, 2004 and 2007 follow-up surveys revisited the communities of the 1997 baseline. Household-level multivariate analysis looked at development indicators and access to health in the context of inequities such as household crowding, access to protected sources of water, house roof construction, main food item purchased, and perception of community empowerment. Individual multivariate models accounted for age, sex, education and income earning opportunities. Results Overall access to protected sources of water increased since the baseline (from 20% in 1997 to 50% in 2007), yet households made of mud and grass, and households who bought basics as their main food item were still less likely to have protected sources of water. The most vulnerable, such as those with less education and less water and food security, were also less likely to have worked for wages leaving them with little chance of improving their standard of living (less education OR 0.59, 95%CI 0.37-0.94; less water security OR 0.67, 95%CI 0.48-0.93; less food security OR 0.43, 95%CI 0.29-0.64). People with less income were more likely to visit government services (among men OR 0.28, 95%CI 0.13-0.59; among women OR 0.33, 95%CI 0.20-0.54), reporting decision factors of cost and distance; users of private clinics sought out better service and medication. Lower food security and poorer house construction was also associated with women visiting government rather than private health services. Women with some formal education

  18. Equity in development and access to health services in the Wild Coast of South Africa: the community view through four linked cross-sectional studies between 1997 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Steven; Andersson, Neil

    2011-12-21

    After election in 1994, the South African government implemented national and regional programmes, such as the Wild Coast Spatial Development Initiative (SDI), to provoke economic growth and to decrease inequities. CIET measured development in the Wild Coast region across four linked cross-sectional surveys (1997-2007). The 2007 survey was an opportunity to look at inequities since the original 1997 baseline, and how such inequities affect access to health care. The 2000, 2004 and 2007 follow-up surveys revisited the communities of the 1997 baseline. Household-level multivariate analysis looked at development indicators and access to health in the context of inequities such as household crowding, access to protected sources of water, house roof construction, main food item purchased, and perception of community empowerment. Individual multivariate models accounted for age, sex, education and income earning opportunities. Overall access to protected sources of water increased since the baseline (from 20% in 1997 to 50% in 2007), yet households made of mud and grass, and households who bought basics as their main food item were still less likely to have protected sources of water. The most vulnerable, such as those with less education and less water and food security, were also less likely to have worked for wages leaving them with little chance of improving their standard of living (less education OR 0.59, 95%CI 0.37-0.94; less water security OR 0.67, 95%CI 0.48-0.93; less food security OR 0.43, 95%CI 0.29-0.64). People with less income were more likely to visit government services (among men OR 0.28, 95%CI 0.13-0.59; among women OR 0.33, 95%CI 0.20-0.54), reporting decision factors of cost and distance; users of private clinics sought out better service and medication. Lower food security and poorer house construction was also associated with women visiting government rather than private health services. Women with some formal education were nearly eight times more

  19. Trauma Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Y. Kong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available “Major Trauma. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately.” Even though I have been working at Edendale Hospital as a trauma registrar for over a year, whenever I hear this announcement over the hospital intercom system, my heart beats just a little faster than normal. When I first arrived at Edendale my colleagues told me that the adrenaline rush I would experience after being called out to attend a new emergency would decrease over time, and indeed they were right. However, it is also true to say that on some occasions more than others, it is still felt more strongly than ever.

  20. One or two nation projects? Discourse on inequalities and equality-related policies in South Africa and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Leubolt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis contribution focuses on the social production and reproduction of social inequalities in Brazil and South Africa. It aims at interlinking different theoretical perspectives and applying them to a comparative analysis of inequality-related policies. Resorting to strategic-relational institutionalism, the historical heritage of discourse formation and the institutionalization of inequality regimes in the two countries to inform the analysis of the more recent conjuncture will be analysed. While South Africa is an example of formal racist discrimination, the Brazilian inequality regime worked on more informal patterns. The different historical heritage influences current foci of equality-related policies, which tend to be dominantly anti-racist in South Africa, while focusing on poverty reduction in Brazil during the recent years. The latter experience tended more towards a discourse of a ‘common interest’ and was better able to institutionalize policies to reduce income inequalities. South Africa is still discursively divided into ‘two nations’. Social uplifting for Africans linked to the governing parties was only partially accompanied by improved living conditions for the poor majority of Africans. Both countries are significantly structured by the respective historical heritage concerning both the creation and the reduction of inequalities. The Brazilian ‘one nation’ discourse was more successful in promoting equality-related policies than its ‘two nations’ counterpart in South Africa. Despite important improvements, both countries are now in critical junctures and societal contradictions are beginning to create new crisis tendencies.

  1. Linked Ocean Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, Adam; Arko, Robert; Chandler, Cynthia; Shepherd, Adam

    2014-05-01

    "Linked Data" is a term used in Computer Science to encapsulate a methodology for publishing data and metadata in a structured format so that links may be created and exploited between objects. Berners-Lee (2006) outlines the following four design principles of a Linked Data system: Use Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) as names for things. Use HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) URIs so that people can look up those names. When someone looks up a URI, provide useful information, using the standards (Resource Description Framework [RDF] and the RDF query language [SPARQL]). Include links to other URIs so that they can discover more things. In 2010, Berners-Lee revisited his original design plan for Linked Data to encourage data owners along a path to "good Linked Data". This revision involved the creation of a five star rating system for Linked Data outlined below. One star: Available on the web (in any format). Two stars: Available as machine-readable structured data (e.g. An Excel spreadsheet instead of an image scan of a table). Three stars: As two stars plus the use of a non-proprietary format (e.g. Comma Separated Values instead of Excel). Four stars: As three stars plus the use of open standards from the World Wide Web Commission (W3C) (i.e. RDF and SPARQL) to identify things, so that people can point to your data and metadata. Five stars: All the above plus link your data to other people's data to provide context Here we present work building on the SeaDataNet common vocabularies served by the NERC Vocabulary Server, connecting projects such as the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) and the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) and other vocabularies such as the Marine Metadata Interoperability Ontology Register and Repository and the NASA Global Change Master Directory to create a Linked Ocean Data cloud. Publishing the vocabularies and metadata in standard RDF XML and exposing SPARQL endpoints renders them five-star Linked

  2. Accounting for female employment in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Anyanwu, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Women employment has become a critical development challenge globally. This is because the exclusion of women in employment has potential negative effects on both sustainable inclusive development and poverty reduction. In this paper, we examine the characteristics and the key determinants of female employment in Africa. Our empirical estimates, using available cross-sectional data over the period, 1991 and 2009 suggest that in the all-Africa estimation, quadratic levels of real per capita GD...

  3. Asia and Africa in the Colonial Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav Iakovlevich Belokrenitskii

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The section examines the colonial history of Asia and Africa, as well as key periods and directions of colonization. The authors analyze the features of the colonial political systems, processes of power distribution, the relationships between colonies and metropolis. Particular attention is paid to the strengthening of Asia and Africa in the final period of colonialism, as well as the impact of the Second World War and a new system of international relations on the process of decolonization.

  4. Rise of intercultural Biblical exegesis in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Loba-Mkole

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the rise and development of intercultural Biblical exegesis in Africa, especially with regard to New Testament interpretations. Different trends of Biblical exegesis practiced in Africa are explored, whereafter the different phases of intercultural exegesis are discussed. The focus falls on inculturation hermeneutic as an important method of interpreting the Bible in an African context. The different proponents of this method are discussed and differences in approach are noted and appraised as a healthy tension.

  5. The Nutrition Transition in Africa: Can It Be Steered into a More Positive Direction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrie M. Margetts

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this narrative review is to examine the nutrition transition and its consequences when populations in Africa modernize as a result of socio-economic development, urbanization, and acculturation. The focus is on the changes in dietary patterns and nutrient intakes during the nutrition transition, the determinants and consequences of these changes as well as possible new approaches in public health nutrition policies, interventions and research needed to steer the nutrition transition into a more positive direction in Africa. The review indicates that non-communicable, nutrition-related diseases have emerged in sub-Saharan Africa at a faster rate and at a lower economic level than in industrialized countries, before the battle against under-nutrition has been won. There is a putative epigenetic link between under- and over-nutrition, explaining the double burden of nutrition-related diseases in Africa. It is concluded that it is possible to steer the nutrition transition into a more positive direction, provided that some basic principles in planning public health promotion strategies, policies and interventions are followed. It is suggested that sub-Saharan African countries join forces to study the nutrition transition and implemented interventions on epidemiological, clinical and molecular (genetic level for better prevention of both under- and over-nutrition.

  6. Enhancing global control of alcohol to reduce unsafe sex and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rees Helen V

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sub-Saharan Africa carries a massive dual burden of HIV and alcohol disease, and these pandemics are inextricably linked. Physiological and behavioural research indicates that alcohol independently affects decision-making concerning sex, and skills for negotiating condoms and their correct use. More than 20 studies in Africa have reported higher occurrence of HIV among people with problem drinking; a finding strongly consistent across studies and similar among women and men. Conflation of HIV and alcohol disease in these setting is not surprising given patterns of heavy-episodic drinking and that drinking contexts are often coterminous with opportunities for sexual encounters. HIV and alcohol also share common ground with sexual violence. Both perpetrators and victims of sexual violence have a high likelihood of having drunk alcohol prior to the incident, as with most forms of violence and injury in sub-Saharan Africa. Reducing alcohol harms necessitates multi-level interventions and should be considered a key component of structural interventions to alleviate the burden of HIV and sexual violence. Brief interventions for people with problem drinking (an important component of primary health care, must incorporate specific discussion of links between alcohol and unsafe sex, and consequences thereof. Interventions to reduce alcohol harm among HIV-infected persons are also an important element in positive-prevention initiatives. Most importantly, implementation of known effective interventions could alleviate a large portion of the alcohol-attributable burden of disease, including its effects on unsafe sex, unintended pregnancy and HIV transmission.

  7. Equipping lay facilitators to support emotionally wounded children in Africa by means of healing communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Coetsee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many children in Africa are emotionally wounded by circumstances and experiences not supporting their overall well-being and healthy development, and are in need of effective support. It seems that the church’s educational ministry and pastoral care based on individualistic pastoral practices do not address this need effectively. Beginning with an orientation to the problem, the article then focused on the development of lay facilitators for healing communities as an alternative way of ministering to children who experience emotional suffering. With reference to an illustrative narrative of a camp with deprived children, some elements contributing to the success of the camp were highlighted and linked to the effective functioning of healing communities. Thereafter the process used to equip lay people to facilitate such healing communities was described. The article concluded with challenges to the church in Africa to develop a new ministry to serve emotionally wounded children.

  8. Migration and exile - some implications for mental health in post-apartheid South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Marchetti-Mercer

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The age of globalisation and the socio-political changes that have taken place in South Africa in the past decade have created powerful contexts within which the issues of belonging and finding a ‘home’ have become very relevant to all South Africans. This article explores the phenomena of migration and exile, which are strongly characterised by an attempt to find a place one can call ‘home’ and where one can belong, and then shows how these experiences can provide a useful framework for understanding a multicultural context such as the one in South Africa. Some of the implications of these phenomena for mental health, specifically the link between schizophrenia and migration, will also be discussed.

  9. Foreign aid and poverty reduction in sub-Saharan Africa: A cross-country investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GT Ijaiya

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increase in the rate of poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa can be linked to the inadequate management and use of international financial assistance such as foreign aid. Using a cross-country data, this paper examines the relationship between foreign aid and poverty reduction in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. The result obtained indicates that foreign aid has no significant influence on poverty reduction in SSA, because of the countries’ weak economic management evidenced by high levels of corruption, bad governance, and political and economic instability. To improve the performance of foreign aid directed at poverty reduction, the paper suggests the implementation of measures directed at good governance, macroeconomic and political stability.Incentives in Nigeria’s food manufacturing industries and their impact on output and prices

  10. Wind power potential and integration in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbetuyi, A.F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy penetration into power networks is increasing very rapidly all over the world. The great concern about global warming and continued apprehensions about nuclear power around the world should drive most countries in Africa into strong demand for wind generation because of its advantages which include the absence of harmful emissions, very clean and almost infinite availability of wind that is converted into electricity. This paper shows the power available in the wind. It also gives an overview of the wind power potential and integration in some selected Africa countries like Egypt, Morocco, South Africa and Nigeria and the challenges of wind power integration in Africa’s continent are also discussed. The Northern part of Africa is known to be Africa’s Wind pioneers having installed and connected the Wind Energy Converters (WEC to the grid. About 97% of the continent’s total wind installations are located in Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. Research work should commence on the identified sites with high wind speeds in those selected Africa countries, so that those potential sites can be connected to the grid. This is because the ability of a site to sufficiently accommodate wind generation not only depends on wind speeds but on its ability to interconnect to the existing grid. If these wind energy potentials are tapped and connected to the grid, the erratic and epileptic power supply facing most countries in Africa will be reduced; thereby reducing rural-urban migration and more jobs will be created.

  11. Sponsorship evaluation in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele D. Berndt

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Sponsorships are regarded as a marketing communications activity. This is seem as an investment made by an organisation that need to be evaluated in terms of its return and contribution. Sport sponsorships have increased in South Africa since re-admittance to the international sports arena. There are various objectives for sponsorships. The identification of these objectives is important for the evaluation of sponsorships. The articles proposes some guidelines for the evaluation of sponsorships.

  12. Environmental Aspects of Economic Development in Sub-Saharn Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Baytas, A.

    1991-01-01

    Studies on the economies of Sub-Saharan Africa have generally neglected the links between economic growth and environmental quality. In many such studies, economics and ecology have been treated as mutually exclusive rather than complementary domains. The key to Sub-Saharan Africa's future is to achieve sustainable growth. This calls for replacing the traditional concept of growth based economic output alone with a new approach that stresses development through conserv...

  13. Financing low carbon energy access in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujba, Haruna; Thorne, Steve; Mulugetta, Yacob; Rai, Kavita; Sokona, Youba

    2012-01-01

    Modern energy access in Africa is critical to meeting a wide range of developmental challenges including poverty reduction and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Despite having a huge amount and variety of energy resources, modern energy access in the continent is abysmal, especially Sub-Saharan Africa. Only about 31% of the Sub-Saharan African population have access to electricity while traditional biomass energy accounts for over 80% of energy consumption in many Sub-Saharan African countries. With energy use per capita among the lowest in the world, there is no doubt that Africa will need to increase its energy consumption to drive economic growth and human development. Africa also faces a severe threat from global climate change with vulnerabilities in several key areas or sectors in the continent including agriculture, water supply, energy, etc. Low carbon development provides opportunities for African countries to improve and expand access to modern energy services while also building low-emission and climate-resilient economies. However, access to finance from different sources will be critical in achieving these objectives. This paper sets out to explore the financial instruments available for low carbon energy access in Africa including the opportunities, markets and risks in low carbon energy investments in the continent. - Highlights: ► Access to finance will be critical to achieving low carbon energy access in Africa. ► Domestic finance will be important in leveraging private finance. ► Private sector participation in modern and clean energy in Africa is still low. ► Many financing mechanisms exist for low carbon energy access in Africa. ► The right institutional frameworks are critical to achieving low carbon energy access in Africa.

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at: http://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/public-education-projects/learn-link-drugs-hiv . 120x90 460x80 486x60 Social Media Send the message to young people and to parents, teachers, and the media about the link between drug ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plan Search Share Print Home » News & Events » Public Education Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug misuse are among the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... projects/learn-link-drugs-hiv . 120x90 460x80 486x60 Social Media Send the message to young people and to parents, teachers, and the media about the link between drug misuse and HIV. Post on Facebook or Twitter ; add photos to your Flickr , Pinterest , ...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging ... Badges Other Resources Strategic Plan Search Share Print Home » News & Events » Public Education Projects » Learn the Link - ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn the Link campaign uses TV, print, and Web public service announcements (PSAs), as well as posters, e-cards, ... to misuse drugs. The Learn the Link public service campaign is just one ... this Web site. Sincerely, Nora D. Volkow, M.D. Director ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... projects/learn-link-drugs-hiv . 120x90 460x80 486x60 Social Media Send the message to young people and ... HIV/AIDS and the discovery of promising treatment interventions for breaking the harmful links between them, we ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse ... Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug misuse are ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs ... HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug misuse ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Link Need ideas for posts? We’ve provided sample Facebook status updates that you can easily copy ... LearntheLink. Need ideas for tweets? We’ve provided sample tweets that you can easily copy and paste ...

  3. Sub-Saharan Africa Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    .... This report contains articles from Sub-Saharan Africa, Angola, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mozambique, Namibia, Sierra Leone, Togo, Zambia, and South Africa, the articles deal mainly with Politics, Sociology...

  4. Sub-Saharan Africa Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1985-01-01

    .... This report from Sub-Saharan Africa, Benin, Botswana, Burkina, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa...

  5. Sub-Saharan Africa Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1985-01-01

    .... This report on Sub-Saharan Africa, Angola, Botswana, Burkina, Cameroon, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Senegal, South Africa, and Swaziland, contains...

  6. Sub-Saharan Africa Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1985-01-01

    .... This report from Sub-Sahara Africa, Angola, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda...

  7. Sub-Saharan Africa Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1985-01-01

    .... This report from Sub-Saharan Africa, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burundi, Ghana, Lesoto, Liberia, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, Seychelles, South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe, contains articles...

  8. Sex-linked dominant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  9. Transformation of Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Theory of an Africa as a Unification. Nation: A Re—thinking of the Structural ... context of the Cold War, and the current colonialism from globalisation requires that African intellectuals re—emerge once ..... The notion of the Africa-nation complements and deepens the theories of. Pan-Africanism and African renaissance.

  10. Banking in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; Cull, R.; Berger, A.; Molyneux, P.; Wilson, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper takes stock of the current state of banking systems across Sub-Saharan Africa and discusses recent developments including innovations that might help Africa leapfrog more traditional banking models. Using an array of different data, the paper documents that African banking systems are

  11. Africa, Agriculture, Aid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyvenhoven, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a world that is developing fast, Africa¿s relative stagnation is a human tragedy that challenges the development profession. Although climate and geography, and their effect on local institutions, are not in Africa¿s favour, inappropriate policies (including neglect of agriculture) and weak

  12. Western Cape, South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This permits safe artificial recharge of the various water quality portions at different points in the aquifer, either for recycling ... transferred to other potential sites for establishment of similar systems in arid and semi-arid areas of South Africa and the ... studies from over 50 countries from Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South ...

  13. Multilingualism in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Bonny Norton; Ridge, Stanley G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews recent research in multilingualism in Southern Africa, focusing on the role of languages in education, sociolinguistics, and language policy. Much of the research is on South Africa. Topics discussed include language of instruction in schools, teacher education, higher education, adult literacy, language contact, gender and linguistic…

  14. Generation 2030/Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Danzhen; Hug, Lucia; Anthony, David

    2014-01-01

    Until relatively recently, much of Africa has been among the economically least developed and least densely populated places on earth, replete with villages and rural communities. Africa is changing rapidly, in its economy, trade and investment; in climate change; in conflict and stability; in urbanization, migration patterns, and most of all in…

  15. The South Africa Case

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    pwust

    In keeping with its surging economic growth and regional influence, South Africa has become an emerging donor that is increasingly involved in Africa as a development ...... External trends such as the OECD Science and Technology Review are also used as inputs. The CSIR actively promotes collaborative research, ...

  16. Archives: Africa Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 57 ... Archives: Africa Development. Journal Home > Archives: Africa Development. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 57 Items, 1 2 > >>. 2017 ...

  17. Aerosol measurements over Southern Africa using LIDAR, satellite and sun-photometer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available .O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 2Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Lynwood Road, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS), 11-15 August 2009 3Department of Physics...

  18. AfricaArray seismological studies of the structure and evolution of the African continent

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Durrheim, RJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The AfricaArray programme seeks to build geoscience capacity and conduct research that supports development in Africa. This paper reports on investigations of the structure and evolution of the African continent that have been concluded since...

  19. An architecture for synchronous micro-volunteering in Africa using social media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available -1 An Architecture for Synchronous Micro-Volunteering in Africa using Social Media Laurie Butgereit Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University and Meraka Institute, CSIR, South Africa lbutgereit@meraka.org.za Reinhardt A Botha Nelson Mandela Metropolitan...

  20. Short course on: Rehabilitation design of flexible pavements in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available This report contains a set of practical course notes on the Rehabilitation Design of flexible pavements in southern Africa based on extensive research by various researchers and / or practitioners in South Africa. The course is intended...

  1. The Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA): A tool to aid developers and decision makers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabille, E

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Why is a wind atlas important for South Africa? This presentation recommends that a dedicated wind energy measurement programme needs to be undertaken to confirm the true wind energy potential in South Africa....

  2. Human plague occurrences in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neerinckx, Simon; Bertherat, Eric; Leirs, Herwig

    2010-01-01

    Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, but particularly in Africa. Despite the long-standing history of human plague, it is difficult to get a historical and recent overview of the general situation. We searched and screened available information sources on human plague occurrences...... in African countries and compiled information on when, where and how many cases occurred in a centralised database. We found records that plague was probably already present before the third pandemic and that hundreds of thousands of human infections have been reported in 26 countries since 1877...... Africa and Madagascar. We show that public health concerns regarding the current plague situation are justified and that the disease should not be neglected, despite the sometimes questionability of the numbers of cases. We conclude that improving plague surveillance strategies is absolutely necessary...

  3. Studentification in Bloemfontein, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Anton

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Studentification is a global phenomenon that has been prominent in urban geographical discourse since the large-scale expansion of higher education in the early 1990s. In many developed and developing world countries, expansion in student enrolment has outstripped the ability of institutions of higher learning to provide adequate accommodation. Similar trends have been recorded in South Africa. The task of this paper is to investigate studentification as experienced in one of South Africa’s secondary cities. The paper draws attention to the economic, socio-cultural, and physical characteristics of this form of student housing on host locations. It is argued that studentification holds both positive and negative impacts for the host communities of Bloemfontein. Finally, it is suggested that studentification in South Africa requires greater research attention.

  4. On the link between partial meet, kernel, and infra contraction and its application to horn logic

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Booth, R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intelligence Research 42 (2011) 31-53 Submitted 4/11; published 9/11 On the Link between Partial Meet, Kernel, and Infra Contraction and its Application to Horn Logic Richard Booth richard.booth@uni.lu Universit e du Luxembourg Luxembourg Thomas Meyer... tommie.meyer@meraka.org.za Centre for Arti cial Intelligence Research University of KwaZulu-Natal and CSIR Meraka Institute South Africa Ivan Varzinczak ivan.varzinczak@meraka.org.za Centre for Arti cial Intelligence Research University of Kwa...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science of Addiction Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post-Award Concerns General Information Grant & Contract Application Process ... about the link between drug misuse and HIV. Post on Facebook or Twitter ; add photos to your ...

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter ... Network TV Organizations: AIDS.gov AIDS Alliance for Children, Youth and Families The American Academy of Child & ...

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... other organizations in your tweets to spread the word even further. Tweet About Learn the Link To ... other organizations in your tweets to spread the word even further. Share with Flickr, Pinterest or Instagram ...

  8. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr ...

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS ...

  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts ...

  11. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... you can easily copy and paste to help let folks know about Learn the Link. Be sure ... once can have serious health consequences. We also work to reach parents and teachers—influential figures in ...

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with ... Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the ...

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... for contracting or transmitting HIV/AIDS or other infectious diseases. Research Reports: HIV/AIDS : Explores the link between ... AIDS medical practice guidelines, HIV treatment and prevention clinical trials, and other research information for health care ...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked with HIV/AIDS since the beginning of the epidemic. Although injection drug use is ... transmitted between users. Other infections, such as hepatitis C, can also be spread this way. Hepatitis C ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... or transmitting HIV/AIDS or other infectious diseases. Research Reports: HIV/AIDS : Explores the link between drug misuse and HIV/AIDS, populations most at risk, trends in HIV/AIDS, and ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the ... about the link between drug misuse and HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and ...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Prevention Recovery Substance Use and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Search ... the link between drug misuse and HIV/AIDS, populations most at risk, trends in HIV/AIDS, and ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... events, and radio stations for helping to raise awareness of the link between non-injection drug use and HIV. Television Networks: MunDos Azteca America Univision Telemundo Galavision ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... educational institutions, magazines, newspapers, companies, events, and radio stations for helping to raise awareness of the link ... Poets Sistahs Getting Real About HIV Conference Radio Stations: WTOP Radio WPFW Radio WOL Radio News & Events ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people on HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), for example, who continue to misuse drugs. The Learn the Link public service campaign is just one example of how NIDA continues to respond to the ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn the Link campaign uses TV, print, and Web public service announcements (PSAs), as well as posters, e-cards, and other tools to send the message to America's youth that ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Campaign Overview The Learn the Link campaign uses TV, print, and Web public service announcements (PSAs), as ... CW BET NBC ABC FOX LATV My Network TV Organizations: AIDS.gov AIDS Alliance for Children, Youth ...

  3. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... among the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the ... information about the link between drug misuse and HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and ...

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and ... Link campaign. This campaign shows teens and young adults that non-injection drug use and alcohol use ...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... works, disrupting the parts of the brain that people use to weigh risks and benefits when making ... and HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and teachers, and the media with links ...

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Drug & Alcohol Facts Week NIDA TV PEERx Drugs & Health Blog The NIDA Science Fair Award for Addiction Science USA Science & Engineering Festival Drug & Alcohol Chat Day HBO Addiction Project Learn the Link Videos NIDA ...

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... pictures from NIDA images. Visit the NIDA Flickr account for images. Share your favorite image! Check out ... your use to share on your social media accounts. About the Campaign Overview The Learn the Link ...

  8. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube ...

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... teens and young adults have never known a world without it. NIDA’s "Learn the Link" campaign continues ... drug misuse and HIV/AIDS. In the early years of the HIV epidemic, it became clear that ...

  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... contracting or transmitting HIV/AIDS or other infectious diseases. Research Reports: HIV/AIDS : Explores the link between drug misuse and HIV/AIDS, populations most at risk, trends in HIV/AIDS, and ...

  11. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook ... HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and teachers, and the media with links to ...

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... NIDA Science Fair Award for Addiction Science USA Science & Engineering Festival Drug & Alcohol Chat Day HBO Addiction Project Learn the Link Videos NIDA and Scholastic - Heads Up NIDA Media Campaign Postcards Public Service Announcements Other Government Observances ...

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV ... the parts of the brain that people use to weigh risks and benefits when making decisions. This page connects you to information about the ...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... for breaking the harmful links between them, we will continue to update this Web site. Sincerely, Nora D. Volkow, M.D. ... require the free Adobe Reader . Microsoft PowerPoint documents require the free ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). AIDS is a ... time. The virus (HIV) and the disease it causes (AIDS) are often linked and referred to as " ...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). AIDS is a disease of the immune system for which there ... causes (AIDS) are often linked and referred to as "HIV/AIDS." HIV can be transferred between people ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... updates. Read on to Learn the Link between drug use and HIV and to help us Send the ... since the beginning of the epidemic. Although injection drug use is well known in this regard, the role ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... It contains information for young people, parents and teachers, and the media with links to our latest ... through 15 (as well as their parents and teachers). It provides them with useful information on the ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Notes Podcasts E-Newsletters Public Education Projects National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week NIDA TV PEERx Drugs & Health Blog ... Award for Addiction Science USA Science & Engineering Festival Drug & Alcohol Chat Day HBO Addiction Project Learn the Link ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can affect anyone. Watch the “d’cisions” Videos Campaign Materials After the Party Posters: We have developed ... share on your social media accounts. About the Campaign Overview The Learn the Link campaign uses TV, ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube ...

  3. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect anyone. Watch the “d’cisions” Videos Campaign Materials After the Party Posters: We have developed posters ... the Learn the Link message. Campaign messages and materials were tested among various groups of young people, ...

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). AIDS is a disease of the immune system for which there is ... the present time. The virus (HIV) and the disease it causes (AIDS) are often linked and referred ...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to-Read Drug Facts Web site describes the dangers of drug misuse and its link to HIV ... groups of young people, guiding the use of technology, the discussion between friends, and the importance of ...

  6. Review: John S. Saul, Liberation Lite: The Roots of Recolonization in Southern Africa (2011 Buchbesprechung: John S. Saul, Liberation Lite: The Roots of Recolonization in Southern Africa (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Melber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the monograph: John S. Saul, Liberation Lite: The Roots of Recolonization in Southern Africa, Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press, 2011, ISBN 978-1-59221-835-6, 133 pagesBesprechung der Monographie: John S. Saul, Liberation Lite: The Roots of Recolonization in Southern Africa, Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press, 2011, ISBN 978-1-59221-835-6, 133 Seiten

  7. Review of blackfly (Diptera : Simuliidae control in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Myburgh

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The medical, veterinary and economic importance of blackflies in South Africa, and the historical development of blackfly control programmes in various South African rivers, are reviewed in this paper. In 1996 it was estimated that blackflies can cause more than R 88 million damages per annum along the middle and lower Orange River where Simulium chutteri is considered the main pest species. A clear link between the construction of dams and the spread of the blackfly problem was shown. Four phases characterize the development of blackfly control in South Africa: (1 during the 1960s blackflies in the Vaal River were controlled with DDT; (2, during the 1970s and into the 1980s blackflies were controlled using water-flow manipulation; (3 when used at strategic times, water-flow manipulation could be used to enhance the effect of natural predator populations; and (4 during the 1990s the organophosphate temephos and toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis were tested for their efficacy against blackflies. The larvicides temephos and B. thuringiensis proved to be effective and are still used in several control programmes. The latest research focuses on the factors that influence adult blackfly survival and annoyance, as well as the development of methods that can be used to protect sheep from blackfly attacks.

  8. Medics on the Move South Africa: Access to Medical Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Van de Poel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available South African medical students who are Cuban-trained and therefore Spanish- speaking, on their return to South Africa need to learn medical vocabulary, terminology, and appropriate interactional discourse in the two major languages of English and Afrikaans, in order to be able to practise professional medicine effectively and efficiently. Indeed, their language problems are further compounded by differences in medical equipment and in medical practices between Cuba and South Africa. To meet these particular students’ needs and provide a communication support tool, the concept of a paper-based pocket-size multi-lingual illustrated dictionary was introduced as an additional component in a blended learning approach, to complement online materials called MoM-SA. The dictionary, to which students are invited to add material, has word lists in English, Afrikaans and Spanish, and offers links to the online materials. Students can add terminology, translations into other African languages and images, so that the dictionary grows and reflects the everyday needs of the students, who, at the same time, become co-owners of the dictionary; thus, process has become content and, as a result, learner motivation has increased.

  9. Intra-Africa agricultural trade: A South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Daya

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this paper is to assess and provide an overview of the magnitude of current agricultural trade patterns between South Africa and the five leading regional economic communities (REC's in Africa. This paper also seeks to examine some of the constraints limiting greater intra-African agricultural trade. This is done in order to better understand the role South Africa currently plays and could potentially play in promoting intra-Africa trade. Design/Methodology/Approach: Trade flows between South Africa and the leading REC's are outlined and explained. Trade data and tariff data is sourced from available databases. Non-tariff barriers and other impediments to greater intra-African trade are examined with reference to available literature and discussions the authors have had with trade experts and policy makers. Findings: South Africa is the most active country in intra-Africa agricultural trade. However, it is a relationship defined predominantly on exports to Africa with a low level of imports. South Africa exports a diverse range of value added products whilst imports remain concentrated in commodities. Significant imbalances in agricultural trade between South Africa and the respective REC's continue to persist. Regional trade arrangements have fostered greater trade but significant obstacles to greater trade remain. Implications: African countries that do not invest in infrastructure and create a trade-enabling environment and diversify their production, limit their potential to the supply of one or two commodities thereby perpetuating the trend of huge trade imbalances in favour of South Africa. Originality/Value: This work provides a platform for assessing trade relationships and examining impediments to greater trade. It is also relevant in guiding future research on priority markets in Africa as export destinations and import suppliers in light of increasing regional integration initiatives and governments commitment to

  10. Sugary beverage taxation in South Africa: Household expenditure, demand system elasticities, and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Stacey, Nicholas; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Hofman, Karen

    2017-01-01

    South Africa faces a severe and growing obesity epidemic. Obesity and its co-morbidities raise public and private expenditures on healthcare. Sugary beverages are heavily consumed in South Africa and are linked to the onset of overweight and obesity. Excise taxation of sugary beverages has been proposed and adopted in other settings as a means to reduce harms from their consumption. A tax on the sugar content of non-alcoholic beverages has been proposed for implementation in South Africa, how...

  11. Bibliography on marine pollution in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Darracott, DA

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available The South African Committee in Oceanographic Research (SANCOR) has been requested to compile a comprehensive bibliography on marine biology in South Africa. It is hoped that it will appear in 1977. SANCOR has made funds available on its 1976 budget...

  12. and pearl millet in southern africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    availed germplasm and the National Agricultural. Research Systcm (NARS) scientists over time were able to ... variety development and variety sharing is available in the record of germplasm spillovers in southern Africa. ..... Stoskoi', N.C., Tomes D.T. and Christic B.R.. 1993. Plant breeding theory and praetice. Boulder ...

  13. Boys are not exempt: Sexual exploitation of adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Jones K; Saewyc, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    Research on youth sexual exploitation in Africa has largely neglected the experiences of exploited boys. To date, much of the research in sub-Saharan Africa continues to consider boys mainly as exploiters but not as exploited. Using the only publicly available population-based surveys from the National Survey of Adolescents, conducted in four sub-Saharan African countries - Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi, and Uganda-we assessed factors associated with transactional sexual behaviour among never-married adolescent boys and girls. We also examined whether boys' reported sexual exploitation was linked to similar risky sexual behaviours as has been noted among girls in sub-Saharan Africa. Results from our analyses indicated that even though adolescent girls have a somewhat higher likelihood of reporting sexual abuse and exploitation, the odds of trading sex were significantly elevated for previously traumatized boys (that is those with a history of sexual and physical abuse) but not for their female counterparts. Just like adolescent girls, transactional sexual behaviour was associated with the risk of having concurrent multiple sexual partners for boys. These findings support the reality of boys' sexual exploitation within the African context, and further highlight the importance of including males in general and boys in particular in population-based studies on sexual health, risk, and protective factors in the sub-Saharan African region. Understanding the factors linked to sexual exploitation for both boys and girls will help in developing policies and programs that could improve the overall sexual and reproductive health outcomes among adolescents and youth in sub-Saharan Africa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. World Small Hydropower Development Report 2013 - Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonker Klunne, W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1. International Renewable Energy Agency (2011). Renewable Energy Profiles: Africa, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. 2. Central Intelligence Agency (2012). The World Factbook. Available from www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world- factbook...

  15. Correlation study with the light weight deflectometer in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Horak, E

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Light Falling Weight Deflectometer (LWD) has recently become available in South Africa as a portable, light weight, user friendly version of the well established Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD). This device uses very similar technology...

  16. Questioning South Africa's 'genetic link' requirement for surrogacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-02

    May 2, 2014 ... intelligence, memory, patience, beauty and related traits that tend to confer competitive advantage. Perhaps in such a society children would be 'reduced to' their genetic potential and not given the freedom to act in accordance with their own desires. Maybe there would be even more systematic kinds of ...

  17. The Policy Paradox in Africa : Strengthening Links between ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    15 juil. 2007 ... DREAM IT, un programme de recherche aux fins d'autonomisation de tous les Mongols grâce aux TIC. La Mongolie est confrontée à de nombreux défis, notamment de piètres infrastructures, un territoire très vaste, des populations rurales dispersées, des conditions climatiques extrêmes, la.

  18. The Policy Paradox in Africa: Strengthening Links between ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    15 juil. 2007 ... DREAM IT, un programme de recherche aux fins d'autonomisation de tous les Mongols grâce aux TIC. La Mongolie est confrontée à de nombreux défis, notamment de piètres infrastructures, un territoire très vaste, des populations rurales dispersées, des conditions climatiques extrêmes, la.

  19. The Policy Paradox in Africa : Strengthening Links between ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    15 juil. 2007 ... Il devient de plus en plus évident que, sans des changements fondamentaux aux politiques intérieures et internationales, l'Afrique n'atteindra pas les objectifs du Millénaire pour le développement à l'horizon 2015. Malgré le consensus qui semble se réaliser sur la nécessité d'augmenter l'aide à l'Afrique, ...

  20. Africa (south of the Sahara)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Sexton, V.S.; Msiak, H.

    1976-01-01

    This review of the development and current status of psychology in Africa focuses on Africa south of the Sahara, excluding South Africa. The author discusses the research topics which have attracted the attention of psychologists in Africa, including perception (illusions, pictorial representation

  1. Poverty reduction in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Paul

    2007-10-23

    Poverty in Africa has been rising for the last quarter-century, while it has been falling in the rest of the developing world. Africa's distinctive problem is that its economies have not been growing. This article attempts to synthesize a range of recent research to account for this failure of the growth process. I argue that the reasons lie not in African peculiarities but rather in geographic features that globally cause problems but that are disproportionately pronounced in Africa. These features interact to create three distinct challenges that are likely to require international interventions beyond the conventional reliance on aid.

  2. China in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The media hype about China’s engagements across the African continent has caused a lot of contention. The Western media has been particularly negative towards China’s activities in Africa, using headline grabbing scare-mongering quotes from various politicians such as “Cameron warns Africa of the ‘Chinese invasion’ as they pour billions into the continent” (Groves, 2011) and “Hillary Clinton warns Africa of ‘New Colonialism’” (Lee, 2011). There are numerous queries raised, especially about ...

  3. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  4. Harmful Use of Alcohol: A Shadow over Sub-Saharan Africa in Need of Workable Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ferreira-Borges

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributable burden of disease in Africa are expected to rise in the near future, yet. increasing alcohol-related harm receives little attention from policymakers and from the population in general. Even where new legislation is proposed it is rarely enacted into law. Being at the center of social and cultural activities in many countries, alcohol’s negative role in society and contribution to countries’ burden of disease are rarely questioned. After the momentum created by the adoption in 2010 of the WHO Global Strategy and the WHO Regional Strategy (for Africa to Reduce the Harmful Use of Alcohol, and the WHO Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases, in 2013, little seems to have been done to address the increasing use of alcohol, its associated burden and the new challenges that derive from the growing influence of the alcohol industry in Africa. In this review, we argue that to have a positive impact on the health of African populations, action addressing specific features of alcohol policy in the continent is needed, namely focusing on particularities linked to alcohol availability, like unrecorded and illicit production, outlet licensing, the expansion of formal production, marketing initiatives and taxation policies.

  5. Africa and Precambrian biological evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Knoll

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available African sedimentary rocks and their contained fossils have played a fundamental role in the unravelling of Precambrian biological history. Various lines of evidence including stromatolites, filamentous and coccoidal microfossils, stable isotope ratios, organic carbon distribution, and oxide facies iron formation suggest that a complex prokaryotic ecosystem fueled by photosynthesis, and perhaps including aerobic photoautotrophs, existed as early as 3 500 m.y. ago. The primary sources of data on early Archean life are rock sequences in southern Africa and Australia. The diversity of later Archean (ca. 2 700 m.y. communities is attested to by abundant and varied stromatolites found in Zimbabwe. The extensive growth and consolidation of continents that heralded the Proterozoic Eon had profound effects on the earth’s biota. Primary productivity must have increased substantially, resulting in the establishment of an 02-rich atmosphere, and, subsequently, the radiation of aerobic respirers. Southern African sequences provide critical evidence bearing on this crust/atmosphere/biota interaction; however, the best known microfossils of this age come from North America. Upper Proterozoic sedimentary rocks abound in Africa. Stromatolites from northwestern Africa have been well studied; however, microfossil occurrences remain but sketchily described. Contemporaneous sequences from Scandinavia and Australia document the initial radiation of eukaryotes in the planktonic realm, as well as a terminal Precambrian episode of extinction among plankters. Early heterotrophic protists are known from several continents. The Nama Group of South West Africa/Namibia contains important evidence of early invertebrates. In general, Precambrian evolution can be viewed as a series of increasingly elevated biological plateaus connected by steps marking relatively short periods of evolutionary innovation and radiation. With each step, communities have increased in complexity

  6. Strengthening Africa's science granting councils as champions of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Science granting councils are central to funding and catalyzing research and innovation, particularly in national science systems in sub-Saharan Africa. The availability of reliable indicators—to monitor Africa's scientific and technological developments, implement science policies and strategies, track public investment in ...

  7. Mobile phone in Africa: providing services to the masses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available The story of mobile telecommunications in Africa and the developing world is a remarkable one. Africa's mobile cellular growth rate has been the highest of any region over the past 5 years, averaging close to 60% year on year. Large cellular...

  8. Plasmodium falciparum parasite prevalence in East Africa: A Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Empirical data on malaria endemicity are rarely available for public domain use to guide effective malaria control. This paper describes the work carried in East Africa since 1997 as part of a pan-African collaboration to map the risk of malaria, Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa (MARA) aimed at redressing deficiency ...

  9. An alternative approach to financing development in Africa | Adeolu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To make adequate capital available to finance development projects in Africa, several important and innovative ideas became popular in the early and later post-independent years. Much of these ideas included a ... development projects in Africa. Keywords: Entrepreneurship, de facto political power, development finance ...

  10. Marine water-quality management in South- Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taljaard, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa the ultimate goal in water quality management is to keep the water resources suitable for all ''beneficial uses''. Beneficial uses provide a basis for the derivation of water quality guidelines, which, for South Africa, are defined...

  11. Prosecuting International Crimes in Africa: Lessons from Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article the former Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda reflects on his experiences to respond to the question: what options are available for Africa in dealing with mass atrocity crimes based on the ICTR experience? The article notes the pedigree of Africa in terms of international criminal ...

  12. The mobile phone in Africa: Providing services to the masses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available The story of mobile telecommunications in Africa and the developing world is a remarkable one. Africa's mobile cellular growth rate has been the highest of any region over the past 5 years, averaging close to 60% year on year. Large cellular...

  13. Nurturing talent in Africa

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The first African School of Physics draws to a close tomorrow, and I’m proud that CERN has been a part of it. From an initiative launched by Fermilab scientist Christine Darve, the African School of Physics has grown to involve institutes and universities from all over Europe and the United States.   It’s being hosted by South Africa’s National Institute for Theoretical Physics, NITheP, at Stellenbosch, and has attracted 150 applicants from all over the continent and beyond for the 65 places available. That alone makes it a success, even before NITheP Director Frederik Scholtz uttered his words of welcome nearly three weeks ago.. When I show people the map of where CERN’s users come from, it’s gratifying to see it spanning the world, and in particular to see southern hemisphere countries starting to join the global particle physics family. Africa, however, remains notable more for the number of countries that are not involved than for those that ...

  14. Women in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Manon

    1975-01-01

    The role and status of women in Africa has changed profoundly since the end of the colonial period. Many differences in women's status and role are based on geography, history, nationality, political and socioeconomic systems, culture, and religion. (JR)

  15. Mortality in patients with HIV-1 infection starting antiretroviral therapy in South Africa, Europe, or North America: a collaborative analysis of prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Boulle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High early mortality in patients with HIV-1 starting antiretroviral therapy (ART in sub-Saharan Africa, compared to Europe and North America, is well documented. Longer-term comparisons between settings have been limited by poor ascertainment of mortality in high burden African settings. This study aimed to compare mortality up to four years on ART between South Africa, Europe, and North America.Data from four South African cohorts in which patients lost to follow-up (LTF could be linked to the national population register to determine vital status were combined with data from Europe and North America. Cumulative mortality, crude and adjusted (for characteristics at ART initiation mortality rate ratios (relative to South Africa, and predicted mortality rates were described by region at 0-3, 3-6, 6-12, 12-24, and 24-48 months on ART for the period 2001-2010. Of the adults included (30,467 [South Africa], 29,727 [Europe], and 7,160 [North America], 20,306 (67%, 9,961 (34%, and 824 (12% were women. Patients began treatment with markedly more advanced disease in South Africa (median CD4 count 102, 213, and 172 cells/µl in South Africa, Europe, and North America, respectively. High early mortality after starting ART in South Africa occurred mainly in patients starting ART with CD4 count <50 cells/µl. Cumulative mortality at 4 years was 16.6%, 4.7%, and 15.3% in South Africa, Europe, and North America, respectively. Mortality was initially much lower in Europe and North America than South Africa, but the differences were reduced or reversed (North America at longer durations on ART (adjusted rate ratios 0.46, 95% CI 0.37-0.58, and 1.62, 95% CI 1.27-2.05 between 24 and 48 months on ART comparing Europe and North America to South Africa. While bias due to under-ascertainment of mortality was minimised through death registry linkage, residual bias could still be present due to differing approaches to and frequency of linkage.After accounting for under

  16. Physics in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allotey, F.K.A.

    1996-09-01

    The paper discusses the role of basic sciences in the development of technology. This is then tied up with the broader issue of the importance of scientific and technological knowledge in the socio-economic development of a country. Physics forms the basis for most of the natural and applied sciences and technology. The state of physics in Africa is reviewed. The need for regional and international cooperation in physics education and research in Africa is stressed. (author). 13 refs, 2 tabs

  17. Climate strategy for Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Hernes, Helga; Dalfelt, Arne; Berntsen, Terje; Holtsmark, Bjart; Næss, Lars Otto; Selrod, Rolf; Aaheim, H. Asbjørn

    1995-01-01

    1. General observations Africa south of the Sahara is probably the most vulnerable region when it comes to the impact and consequences of climate changes. Yet the African continent runs a serious risk of being marginalized in the global dialogue on climate issues. Africa contributes little to the global emissions of CO2, and other greenhouse gases. The major focus of the Framework Convention on Climate Change is on abatement and mitigation of emissions rather than adaptation to the con...

  18. Astronomy Landscape in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemaungani, Takalani

    2015-01-01

    The vision for astronomy in Africa is embedded in the African Space Policy of the African Union in early 2014. The vision is about positioning Africa as an emerging hub for astronomy sciences and facilities. Africa recognized the need to take advantage of its natural resource, the geographical advantage of the clear southern skies and pristine sites for astronomy. The Pan African University (PAU) initiative also presents an opportunity as a post-graduate training and research network of university nodes in five regions of Africa and supported by the African Union. The Southern African node based in South Africa concentrates on space sciences which also includes astronomy. The PAU aims to provide the opportunity for advanced graduate training and postgraduate research to high-performing African students. Objectives also include promoting mobility of students and teachers and harmonizing programs and degrees.A number of astronomy initiatives have burgeoned in the Southern African region and these include the Southern Africa Largest Optical Telescope (SALT), HESS (High Energy Stereoscopic System), the SKA (Square Kilometre Array) and the AVN (African Very Long Baseline Interferometer Network). There is a growing appetite for astronomy sciences in Africa. In East Africa, the astronomy community is well organized and is growing - the East African Astronomical society (EAAS) held its successful fourth annual conference since 2010 on 30 June to 04 July 2014 at the University of Rwanda. Centred around the 'Role of Astronomy in Socio-Economic Transformation,' this conference aimed at strengthening capacity building in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Science in general, while providing a forum for astronomers from the region to train young and upcoming scientists.

  19. Oil is killing Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, H.

    2007-09-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa, with its mining and petroleum resources, is still the object of covetous desires from developed countries. The Gulf of Guinea is a promising area and probably the future battlefield of the 21. century. The fighters of this war are the African people and the big powers, the USA and China at the head, who call upon mercenaries to get their share of this fabulous treasure. Oil was a chance for Africa, but now oil is killing it

  20. Why Africa matters: evolution of Old World Salvia (Lamiaceae) in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Maria; Claßen-Bockhoff, Regine

    2014-07-01

    Salvia is the largest genus in Lamiaceae and it has recently been found to be non-monophyletic. Molecular data on Old World Salvia are largely lacking. In this study, we present data concerning Salvia in Africa. The focus is on the colonization of the continent, character evolution and the switch of pollination systems in the genus. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference were used for phylogenetic reconstruction. Analyses were based on two nuclear markers [internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and external transcribed spacer (ETS)] and one plastid marker (rpl32-trnL). Sequence data were generated for 41 of the 62 African taxa (66 %). Mesquite was used to reconstruct ancestral character states for distribution, life form, calyx shape, stamen type and pollination syndrome. Salvia in Africa is non-monophyletic. Each of the five major regions in Africa, except Madagascar, was colonized at least twice, and floristic links between North African, south-west Asian and European species are strongly supported. The large radiation in Sub-Saharan Africa (23 species) can be traced back to dispersal from North Africa via East Africa to the Cape Region. Adaptation to bird pollination in southern Africa and Madagascar reflects parallel evolution. The phenotypic diversity in African Salvia is associated with repeated introductions to the continent. Many important evolutionary processes, such as colonization, adaptation, parallelism and character transformation, are reflected in this comparatively small group. The data presented in this study can help to understand the evolution of Salvia sensu lato and other large genera. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Decolonizing Bioethics in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay-Adeyelure, O.C.

    2017-01-01

    The global spread of bioethics from its North-American and European provenance to non-Western societies is currently raising some concerns. Part of the concern has to do with whether or not the exportation of bioethics in its full Western sense to developing non-Western states is an instance of ethical imperialism or bioethical neocolonialism. This paper attempts an exploration of this debate in the context of bioethics in sub-Saharan Africa. Rather than conceding that bioethics has a colonial agenda in Africa, this paper defends the position that the current bioethics trend in sub-Saharan Africa is an unintended imperialistic project. It argues that its colonizing character is not entirely a product of the Western programmed goals of training and institution building; rather, it is a structural consequence of many receptive African minds and institutions. Though bioethics in Africa is turning out as a colonizing project, one serious implication of such trend, if unchecked urgently, is that bioethics’ invaluable relevance to Africa is being incapacitated. This paper, therefore, attempts a decolonizing trajectory of bioethics in Africa. Contrary to the pretense of ‘African bioethics,’ which some African scholars are now defending, this paper through the logic of decolonization makes case for ‘bioethics in Africa’. In such logic, the principle of existential needs is prioritized over the principle of identity and authenticity that define African voice in bioethics. PMID:28344985

  2. Free Space Optics Availability and Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Tóth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Free Space Optics technology is a new progressive communication form. The basic FSO link is made of two FSO heads which communicate through a laser beam on a specific wavelength. FSO link requires a direct visibility between its nodes. It is a very efficient form for data transmission for short distance communication links. This paper describes basic FSO features with consideration on negative weather factors which have the negative influence on signal transmission. The unique fog sensor will be presented in this paper. This device gathers some specific data about weather conditions. Measured data is processed mathematically and results can be used in further FSO link evaluation as well as in process of switching FSO link with some form of back up radio link.

  3. Africa's highest mountain harbours Africa's tallest trees

    OpenAIRE

    Hemp Andreas; Zimmermann Reiner; Remmele Sabine; Pommer Ulf; Berauer Bernd; Hemp Claudia; Fischer Markus

    2017-01-01

    While world records of tree heights were set by American, Australian and Asian tree species, Africa seemed to play no role here. In our study we show that Entandrophragma excelsum (Meliaceae) found in a remote valley at Kilimanjaro has to be included in the list of the world’s superlative trees. Estimating tree age from growth rates monitored by high resolution dendrometry indicates that tall individuals may reach more than 470 years of age. A unique combination of anatomical peculiarities an...

  4. Walking and the social life of solar charging in rural Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bidwell, NJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction September 2013/ Vol. 20(4), Walking and the Social Life of Solar Charging in Rural Africa NICOLA J. BIDWELL, University of Pretoria, South Africa, and CSIR – Meraka Institute, South Africa MASBULELE SIYA...

  5. Extending freight flow modelling to sub-Saharan Africa to inform infrastructure investments - trade data issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havenga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the first attempt by researchers at Stellenbosch University to model freight flows between and for 17 countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. The model will be informed by and linked to the South African surface Freight Demand Model (FDM given these dimensions. By analysing and collating available datasets and developing a freight flow model, a better understanding of freight movements between countries can be obtained and then used for long-term planning efforts. A simple methodology is envisaged that will entail a high-level corridor classification that links a major district in the country with a similar district in another country. Existing trade data will be used to corroborate new base-year economic demand and supply volumetric data that will be generated from social accounting matrices for each country. The trade data will also provide initial flow dynamics between countries that will be refined according to the new volumes. The model can then generate commodity-level corridor flows between SSA countries, and between SSA countries and the rest of the world, as well as intra-country rural and metropolitan flows, using a gravity-based modelling approach. This article outlines efforts to harmonise trade data between the 17 countries identified, as well as between these countries and the rest of the world as a first step towards developing a freight demand model for sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Science councils in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available General. Circular 6/2006. Johannesburg. Commentary South African Journal of Science 104, November/December 2008 435 Science councils in South Africa R.J. Scholes*, F. Anderson, C. Kenyon, J. Napier, P. Ngoepe, B. van Wilgen and A. Weaver The CSIR... over a period of about ten years—a scale of investment that is hard to muster within a single university, and is only palatable to the local private sector once the commer- cial outcomes are fairly clear. Given that the success rate within a given...

  7. Sub-Saharan Africa at the global education market: role of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramil Ravilevich Asmyatullin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is dedicated to the development of the higher education in Sub-Saharan countries, particularly to the topic of internationalization of education. Most African countries have underdeveloped education systems. The quality and availability of higher education is a formidable obstacle for economic and social development. There is a growing demand for higher education in the SSA, but national education systems can’t cope fully with it. Hence many students go abroad, mostly in other African countries. The article focuses on the position of South Africa in the global and regional education market. As it’s a regional leader in this field South Africa attracts more than a half of international students within the Sub-Saharan Africa. The main reasons why African students choose South Africa are geographic proximity, familiar culture, lack of wanted higher education programs in their countries. However, there are as well disadvantages like xenophobia and race discrimination. South Africa has become a leader in Africa in the field of higher education, but it plays still small part at a global scale.

  8. Marine incursion: the freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are the product of a marine invasion into west Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony B Wilson

    Full Text Available The spectacular marine-like diversity of the endemic fauna of Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the African Great Lakes, led early researchers to suggest that the lake must have once been connected to the ocean. Recent geophysical reconstructions clearly indicate that Lake Tanganyika formed by rifting in the African subcontinent and was never directly linked to the sea. Although the Lake has a high proportion of specialized endemics, the absence of close relatives outside Tanganyika has complicated phylogeographic reconstructions of the timing of lake colonization and intralacustrine diversification. The freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are members of a large group of pellonuline herring found in western and southern Africa, offering one of the best opportunities to trace the evolutionary history of members of Tanganyika's biota. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that herring colonized West Africa 25-50MYA, at the end of a major marine incursion in the region. Pellonuline herring subsequently experienced an evolutionary radiation in West Africa, spreading across the continent and reaching East Africa's Lake Tanganyika during its early formation. While Lake Tanganyika has never been directly connected with the sea, the endemic freshwater herring of the lake are the descendents of an ancient marine incursion, a scenario which may also explain the origin of other Tanganyikan endemics.

  9. International aspects of the creation of Union of South Africa in 1910

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Alexandrovna Arkhangelskaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of South Africa as a unified state is intertwined with the events of international scale. The colonization of South of Africa is linked to the resettlement of the Dutch and the English, engaged in various entrepreneurial activities - trade, mining, agriculture, etc. The formation of South African Union was preceded by a long period when the idea of uniting the British colonial possessions in southern Africa was consistently formed and created by long-term plans. At the same time, several powers competed for economic penetration into South Africa, for instance, albeit to a lesser degree, the United States of America in addition to Germany and England. From 1869 to 1886 the world's largest deposits of diamonds and gold were discovered, which produced a staggering effect on the whole world and radically changed the situation in the region. Conflict of interests in the struggle for control over the richest resources led to war (both campaigns are sometimes called the Boer War, which was the first one in the 20th century. The Anglo-Boer War, the largest international event is of interest from a wide variety of points of view, had left a notable mark in the history of Russia. The Russian government sought to support the Boers and take advantage of the difficulties of their then main rival in the world arena at a time, and the Boers in turn needed the support of world powers in their struggle. Although diplomatic relations with Russia were established the Russian embassy in Pretoria never appeared, due to the fact that a year later the war began. As a result of the war and the processes taking place in the southern part of Africa, emerged the British dominion - South African Union. The approval by the British Parliament of the “South Africa Act” liquidated the last obstacles to the establishment of the Union, and on May 31, 1910, the establishment of a new state, the South African Union, was officially proclaimed. Therefore the socio

  10. Female homicidal strangulation in urban South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arendse Najuwa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female strangulation in South Africa occurs in a context of pervasive and often extreme violence perpetrated against women, and therefore represents a major public health, social and human rights concern. South African studies that provide accurate descriptions of the occurrence of strangulation incidents among female homicide victims are limited. The current study describes the extent, distribution and patterns of homicidal strangulation of women in the four largest South African metropolitan centres, Tshwane/Pretoria, Johannesburg, Cape Town and Ethekwini/Durban. Methods The study is a register-based cross sectional investigation of female homicidal strangulation, as reported in the National Injury Mortality Surveillance System for the four cities, for the period 2001 to 2005. Crude, unadjusted female strangulation rates for age and population group, and proportions of strangulation across specific circumstances of occurrence were compiled for each year and aggregated in some cases. Results This study reports that female homicidal strangulation in urban South Africa ranges from 1.71/100 000 to 0.70/100 000. Rates have generally declined in all the cities, except Cape Town. The highest rates were reported in the over 60 and the 20 to 39 year old populations, and amongst women of mixed descent. Most strangulations occurred from the early morning hours and across typical working hours in Johannesburg and Durban, and to a lesser extent in Cape Town. Occurrences across Johannesburg, Durban and Pretoria were distributed across the days of the week; an exception was Cape Town, which reported the highest rates over the weekend. Cape Town also reported distinctly high blood alcohol content levels of strangulation victims. The seasonal variation in strangulation deaths suggested a pattern of occurrence generally spanning the period from end-winter to summer. Across cities, the predominant crime scene was linked to the domestic

  11. Nigerian tourists to South Africa: Challenges, expectations and demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikechukwu O. Ezeuduji

    2013-08-01

    Research purpose: This paper investigated the challenges, demands and expectations of Nigerian tourists to South Africa. Motivation for the study: Nigeria, along with other African nations, has been identified as one of the core regional source markets with air links to South Africa. Increasing revenue generated from regional tourism is important to South African Tourism. Research design, approach and method: Descriptive statistics and Chi-square tests were used to analyse the data collected using a questionnaire survey of 320 Nigerian tourists to South Africa. Main findings: Results showed that Nigerian tourists visit South Africa mostly for the purposes of business, holiday, visiting friends and relatives, education and medical care. Challenges perceived by these Nigerian tourists visiting South Africa include long waiting time for the visa process in Nigeria, expensive cost of living in South Africa, safety and security problems, not so many airlines to choose from and expensive flight costs. Nigerian tourists mostly expect South Africans to be friendlier and have expectations of linking up with new business partners or performing transactions. They also have a strong demand for shopping, leisure and quality education. Practical/managerial implications: This study recommends a bilateral tourism relationship agreement between the Nigerian and South African governments to ameliorate the visa process; targeted marketing communications by South African Tourism toward Nigerian tourists based on study results; strong police presence and proper policing in South Africa; air transport liberalisation and low-cost carriers implementation for shared economic growth within the African region. Contribution/value-add: No former research has specifically identified Nigerian tourists’ challenges, expectations and demands whilst visiting South Africa.

  12. Wildlife biomaterial banking in Africa for now and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Paul; Kotze, Antoinette

    2006-08-01

    The Wildlife Biological Resource Centre (wBRC) together with its partners in BioBank SA, have created a Biological Resource Bank (BRB) that is dedicated to the acquisition, processing, banking, using and provision of biomaterials to the scientific and conservation industry that are viable, diverse and representative of southern Africa's wildlife populations. Banked biomaterials include tissue such as muscle, kidney, fat, liver, embryos, fibroblast cultures, blood, sperm, hair, egg shells and other tissue, fluids and cells. Biomaterials are made available for research, biodiversity conservation and biotechnology development. Biomaterials are used in many disciplines, including genetics, reproduction, nutrition, and disease studies. Biomaterials from selected species are also useful for the detection and monitoring of Persistent Organic Pollutants and other potentially harmful substances found in the environment. Biomaterials are made available to third parties with prior consent from the biomaterials "owner" and only after the signing of a customised Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) or Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The training of staff from National and Provincial Game Reserves, Zoological Gardens, Animal Breeders and laboratories is carried out on a regular basis with the aim of securing good quality biomaterials. Sampling kits are made available to persons tasked with the collection of wildlife biomaterials. The Biobank SA consortium acts as an integrated resource centre linking partner collections. The consortium's operational arm, namely wBRC, is active in the development of relevant policy, regulations and legislation pertaining to biomaterials, including Access and Benefit Sharing systems. The main sponsor of the project is the Department of Science and Technology, National Government of South Africa.

  13. Has climate change driven urbanization in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J. Vernon; Storeygard, Adam; Deichmann, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    This paper documents strong but differentiated links between climate and urbanization in large panels of districts and cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, which has dried substantially in the past fifty years. The key dimension of heterogeneity is whether cities are likely to have manufacturing for export outside their regions, as opposed to being exclusively market towns providing local services to agricultural hinterlands. In regions where cities are likely to be manufacturing centers (25% of our sample), drier conditions increase urbanization and total urban incomes. There, urban migration provides an “escape” from negative agricultural moisture shocks. However, in the remaining market towns (75% of our sample), cities just service agriculture. Reduced farm incomes from negative shocks reduce demand for urban services and derived demand for urban labor. There, drying has little impact on urbanization or total urban incomes. Lack of structural transformation in Africa inhibits a better response to climate change. PMID:28458445

  14. Has climate change driven urbanization in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J Vernon; Storeygard, Adam; Deichmann, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    This paper documents strong but differentiated links between climate and urbanization in large panels of districts and cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, which has dried substantially in the past fifty years. The key dimension of heterogeneity is whether cities are likely to have manufacturing for export outside their regions, as opposed to being exclusively market towns providing local services to agricultural hinterlands. In regions where cities are likely to be manufacturing centers (25% of our sample), drier conditions increase urbanization and total urban incomes. There, urban migration provides an "escape" from negative agricultural moisture shocks. However, in the remaining market towns (75% of our sample), cities just service agriculture. Reduced farm incomes from negative shocks reduce demand for urban services and derived demand for urban labor. There, drying has little impact on urbanization or total urban incomes. Lack of structural transformation in Africa inhibits a better response to climate change.

  15. All projects related to south africa | Page 4 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will allow the Institute for Security Studies (ISS), through its Organized Crime and Money Laundering Programme (OCML), to explore the causal links between weak state authority and the emergence of criminal governance structures in two cities: Cape Town, South Africa, and Dakar, Sénégal. Start Date: July 10, ...

  16. Integration | Okba | Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Click on the link to view. JOURNAL OF THE MUSICAL ARTS IN AFRICA VOLUME 10 2013, 103–104. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about ...

  17. Forensic telepsychiatry : a possible solution for South Africa? | Mars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: South Africa has a shortage of facilities and psychiatrists to assess adjudicative competence of prisoners awaiting assessment under sections 77 to 79 of the Criminal Procedures Act of 1977. Various solutions have been proposed by the Department of Health. The recent linking of a Magistrate's court and a prison ...

  18. The Complexity of Environmental Protection in Sub-Saharan Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The principal purpose of this article is to draw attention to the growing threat to human health and the environment posed by the increased generation of and the complex problems attending hazardous wastes in sub-Saharan Africa, and the need to protect this region. This subject is vitally linked to the need to reduce ...

  19. All projects related to South Africa | Page 4 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will allow the Institute for Security Studies (ISS), through its Organized Crime and Money Laundering Programme (OCML), to explore the causal links between weak state authority and the emergence of criminal governance structures in two cities: Cape Town, South Africa, and Dakar, Sénégal. Start Date: July 10, ...

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Local Governance between South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In April 2014 South Africa will be celebrating 20 years of democracy, which requires introspection on its state of local governance. China is used as a comparative case study because its economic growth has been strongly linked to local governance strategies. The article makes use of three variables to determine strategies ...

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and transmission in Africa: Household ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with the bacterium which leads to chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric cancers and gastric malt lymphoma has been reported to follow a pattern linked to geographic and socio-demographic factors. Studies have documented a higher prevalence in Africa than elsewhere although the pathological outcomes do ...

  2. Atovaquone/proguanil resistance in Africa: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Kim P; Alifrangis, Michael; Salanti, Ali

    2003-01-01

    The Atovaquone/proguanil combination has quickly been established as an effective chemoprophylaxis for travellers to areas with chloroquineresistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. We describe the molecular cause of the first reported case of primary Atovaquone/proguanil resistance observed in our...... department in a Plasmodium falciparum infected traveller returning from West Africa, and link our findings to other reports of resistance....

  3. PORTUGAL AND SOUTH AFRICA: CLOSE ALLIES OR UNWILLING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Francois

    construction of the railway line that linked Lourenço Marques to the mining towns in the Transvaal.10 Another factor that ..... service and the supply of aircraft ammunition by South Africa. 42 NARS, BTS, Box 74/29 (F1), .... forces while Portuguese aircraft provided protection for the South African aircraft operating in Angola.

  4. lessons from iSimangaliso World Heritage Park, South Africa.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Dennis Ocholla

    This paper explores the suitability of the ecological management approach to the management of the world heritage sites with an aim of linking sustainable livelihoods of local people and the protection of the resource. There are eight World. Heritage Sites in South Africa; two of these, UKhahlamba Drakensberg and ...

  5. SOUTH AFRICA AND THE SEARCH OF STRATEGIC EFFECT IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abel Esterhuyse

    African agenda and high involvement in African issues, to confusion, a lack of strategic direction and an inability to ... brings the unresolved issue of South Africa's identity, a host of domestic limitations linked to material ..... divergent missions. Air superiority, armour and artillery may be key capabilities for deterrence. Besides ...

  6. Africa Centre for Systematic Reviews and Knowledge Translation ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Africa Centre for Systematic Reviews and Knowledge Translation. There is increasing global recognition of the need to link research evidence to policy decisions and practice. However, health policy leaders have failed to fully apply research findings to formulate policies, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

  7. Science-based health innovation in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years emerging markets such as India, China, and Brazil have developed appropriate business models and lower-cost technological innovations to address health challenges locally and internationally. But it is not well understood what capabilities African countries, with their high disease burden, have in science-based health innovation. This gap in knowledge is addressed by this series in BMC International Health and Human Rights. The series presents the results of extensive on-the-ground research in the form of four country case studies of health and biotechnology innovation, six studies of institutions within Africa involved in health product development, and one study of health venture funds in Africa. To the best of our knowledge it is the first extensive collection of empirical work on African science-based health innovation. The four country cases are Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The six case studies of institutions are A to Z Textiles (Tanzania, Acorn Technologies (South Africa, Bioventures venture capital fund (South Africa, the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA; Madagascar, the Kenyan Medical Research Institute (KEMRI; Kenya, and Niprisan’s development by Nigeria’s National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development and Xechem (Nigeria. All of the examples highlight pioneering attempts to build technological capacity, create economic opportunities, and retain talent on a continent significantly affected by brain drain. They point to the practical challenges for innovators on the ground, and suggest potentially helpful policies, funding streams, and other support systems. For African nations, health innovation represents an opportunity to increase domestic capacity to solve health challenges; for international funders, it is an opportunity to move beyond foreign aid and dependency. The shared goal is creating self-sustaining innovation that has both health and development impacts. While

  8. A Political Economy of Water in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry A. Swatuk

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Southern Africa is a region characterised by extensive socio-economic underdevelopment. Given water’s key role in social organisation, water allocation, use and management in Southern Africa is embedded in deep historical and structural processes of regional underdevelopment. Gini coefficients of income inequality in several states of the region are the most extreme in the world. Recent data from South Africa shows that Gini coefficients of water inequality vary directly with income inequality. Recent attempts to improve water resources management in the region through IWRM have failed to consider these facts, focusing instead on a mix of institutional, policy and legal reforms. The results of these reforms have been poor. In this essay, I employ a modified version of Allan’s (2003 'water paradigms' framework to locate and assess the positions and interests of actors involved in water resources management in Southern Africa. The essay shows that Southern Africa’s history of underdevelopment has created a dense web of powerful political, economic and social interests linked by a shared technocentric understanding of and approach to water use: i.e. water for 'high modern-style' development, or as labelled by Allen, 'the hydraulic mission'. What is less readily acknowledged is the wide-spread societal support for this mission. For this reason, ecocentric approaches to water management most commonly associated with influential international actors such as the IUCN and World Wide Fund for Nature have limited local support and are of minor relevance to Southern African decision-makers. However, actors supportive of an ecocentric perspective demonstrate considerable ability to inhibit water infrastructure development across the region. In the face of abiding poverty and inequality, and vulnerability to water insecurity, widespread societal support for a technocentric approach to resource use offers a pathway toward broad-based social benefits

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... projects/learn-link-drugs-hiv . 120x90 460x80 486x60 Social Media Send the message to young people and ... available for your use to share on your social media accounts. About the Campaign Overview The Learn ...

  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... projects/learn-link-drugs-hiv . 120x90 460x80 486x60 Social Media Send the message to young people and to ... available for your use to share on your social media accounts. About the Campaign Overview The Learn the ...

  11. Quantitative maps of groundwater resources in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, A M; Bonsor, H C; Dochartaigh, B É Ó; Taylor, R G

    2012-01-01

    In Africa, groundwater is the major source of drinking water and its use for irrigation is forecast to increase substantially to combat growing food insecurity. Despite this, there is little quantitative information on groundwater resources in Africa, and groundwater storage is consequently omitted from assessments of freshwater availability. Here we present the first quantitative continent-wide maps of aquifer storage and potential borehole yields in Africa based on an extensive review of available maps, publications and data. We estimate total groundwater storage in Africa to be 0.66 million km 3 (0.36–1.75 million km 3 ). Not all of this groundwater storage is available for abstraction, but the estimated volume is more than 100 times estimates of annual renewable freshwater resources on Africa. Groundwater resources are unevenly distributed: the largest groundwater volumes are found in the large sedimentary aquifers in the North African countries Libya, Algeria, Egypt and Sudan. Nevertheless, for many African countries appropriately sited and constructed boreholes can support handpump abstraction (yields of 0.1–0.3 l s −1 ), and contain sufficient storage to sustain abstraction through inter-annual variations in recharge. The maps show further that the potential for higher yielding boreholes ( > 5 l s −1 ) is much more limited. Therefore, strategies for increasing irrigation or supplying water to rapidly urbanizing cities that are predicated on the widespread drilling of high yielding boreholes are likely to be unsuccessful. As groundwater is the largest and most widely distributed store of freshwater in Africa, the quantitative maps are intended to lead to more realistic assessments of water security and water stress, and to promote a more quantitative approach to mapping of groundwater resources at national and regional level. (letter)

  12. Curbing stem cell tourism in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelein Meissner-Roloff

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have received much attention globally due in part to the immense therapeutic potential they harbor. Unfortunately, malpractice and exploitation (financial and emotional of vulnerable patients have also drawn attention to this field as a result of the detrimental consequences experienced by some individuals that have undergone unproven stem cell therapies. South Africa has had limited exposure to stem cells and their applications and, while any exploitation is detrimental to the field of stem cells, South Africa is particularly vulnerable in this regard. The current absence of adequate legislation and the inability to enforce existing legislation, coupled to the sea of misinformation available on the Internet could lead to an increase in illegitimate stem cell practices in South Africa. Circumstances are already precarious because of a lack of understanding of concepts involved in stem cell applications. What is more, credible and easily accessible information is not available to the public. This in turn cultivates fears born out of existing superstitions, cultural beliefs, rituals and practices. Certain cultural or religious concerns could potentially hinder the effective application of stem cell therapies in South Africa and novel ways of addressing these concerns are necessary. Understanding how scientific progress and its implementation will affect each individual and, consequently, the community, will be of cardinal importance to the success of the fields of stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine in South Africa. A failure to understand the ethical, cultural or moral ramifications when new scientific concepts are introduced could hinder the efficacy and speed of bringing discoveries to the patient. Neglecting proper procedure for establishing the field would lead to long delays in gaining public support in South Africa. Understanding the dangers of stem cell tourism – where vulnerable patients are subjected to unproven stem

  13. Distribution and establishment of the alien Australian redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, in South Africa and Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Nunes

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The Australian redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus, von Martens, is native to Australasia, but has been widely translocated around the world due to aquaculture and aquarium trade. Mostly as a result of escape from aquaculture facilities, this species has established extralimital populations in Australia and alien populations in Europe, Asia, Central America and Africa. In South Africa, C. quadricarinatus was first sampled from the wild in 2002 in the Komati River, following its escape from an aquaculture facility in Swaziland, but data on the current status of its populations are not available. Methods To establish a better understanding of its distribution, rate of spread and population status, we surveyed a total of 46 sites in various river systems in South Africa and Swaziland. Surveys were performed between September 2015 and August 2016 and involved visual observations and the use of collapsible crayfish traps. Results Cherax quadricarinatus is now present in the Komati, Lomati, Mbuluzi, Mlawula and Usutu rivers, and it was also detected in several off-channel irrigation impoundments. Where present, it was generally abundant, with populations having multiple size cohorts and containing ovigerous females. In the Komati River, it has spread more than 112 km downstream of the initial introduction point and 33 km upstream of a tributary, resulting in a mean spread rate of 8 km year−1 downstream and 4.7 km year−1 upstream. In Swaziland, estimated downstream spread rate might reach 14.6 km year−1. Individuals were generally larger and heavier closer to the introduction site, which might be linked to juvenile dispersal. Discussion These findings demonstrate that C. quadricarinatus is established in South Africa and Swaziland and that the species has spread, not only within the river where it was first introduced, but also between rivers. Considering the strong impacts that alien crayfish usually have on invaded ecosystems

  14. Delays in seeking an abortion until the second trimester: a qualitative study in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mosotho

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite changes to the South African abortion legislation in 1996, barriers to women accessing abortions still exist. Second trimester abortions, an inherently more risky procedure, continue to be 20% of all abortions. Understanding the reasons why women delay seeking an abortion until the second trimester is important for informing interventions to reduce the proportion of second trimester abortions in South Africa. Methods Qualitative research methods were used to collect data. Twenty-seven in-depth interviews were conducted in 2006 with women seeking a second trimester abortion at one public sector tertiary hospital and two NGO health care facilities in the greater Cape Town area, South Africa. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results Almost all women described multiple and interrelated factors that influenced the timing of seeking an abortion. Reasons why women delayed seeking an abortion were complex and were linked to changes in personal circumstances often leading to indecision, delays in detecting a pregnancy and health service related barriers that hindered access to abortion services. Conclusion Understanding the complex reasons why women delay seeking an abortion until the second trimester can inform health care interventions aimed at reducing the proportion of second trimester abortions in South Africa.

  15. Harmful Use of Alcohol: A Shadow over Sub-Saharan Africa in Need of Workable Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Borges, Carina; Parry, Charles D H; Babor, Thomas F

    2017-03-27

    Alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributable burden of disease in Africa are expected to rise in the near future, yet. increasing alcohol-related harm receives little attention from policymakers and from the population in general. Even where new legislation is proposed it is rarely enacted into law. Being at the center of social and cultural activities in many countries, alcohol's negative role in society and contribution to countries' burden of disease are rarely questioned. After the momentum created by the adoption in 2010 of the WHO Global Strategy and the WHO Regional Strategy (for Africa) to Reduce the Harmful Use of Alcohol, and the WHO Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases, in 2013, little seems to have been done to address the increasing use of alcohol, its associated burden and the new challenges that derive from the growing influence of the alcohol industry in Africa. In this review, we argue that to have a positive impact on the health of African populations, action addressing specific features of alcohol policy in the continent is needed, namely focusing on particularities linked to alcohol availability, like unrecorded and illicit production, outlet licensing, the expansion of formal production, marketing initiatives and taxation policies.

  16. Metabolic syndrome in sub-Saharan Africa: "smaller twin" of a region's prostatic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejike, Chukwunonso E C C; Ezeanyika, Lawrence U S

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) constitute many of the health concerns of males around the world. Prostate cancer is the major cause of death after lung cancer in men. Benign prostate hyperplasia affects most males above 40 years of age. A variety of factors, chiefly age, genetics and lifestyle, have been linked to the development of PC and BPH. The metabolic syndrome describes a chain of chronic disorders that are inter-related in aetiology, and result from unhealthy lifestyles, often due to an affluent economy. The eating of processed foods and a sedentary lifestyle apparently are status symbols among the middle and upper classes in sub-Saharan Africa. These have resulted in a surge in the disease burden of sub-Saharan Africa. This paper looks at the aetiology and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and prostatic diseases, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Evidence from the available literature shows that prostate disorders may be related to the metabolic syndrome. There is a likelihood that if sub-Saharan Africans keep copying the lifestyles of the developed world, especially in the direction of the nature of food items consumed, then the rising prevalence of diseases of the metabolic syndrome and the attendant prostate disorders may become very formidable healthcare "twin" problems for the region.

  17. U.S. Africa Command: Shaping Africa for the Future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sholley, Hans

    2006-01-01

    .... It is argued the current Unified Command Plan is ill designed to address the complexities of the continent of Africa and that a proposed United States Africa Command would be better positioned...

  18. the consequences of humanitarian peacekeeping in africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hennie

    on a functionalist theoretical perspective, or systems approach, which underlies the ..... business. The extent of peacekeeping in Africa is not limited only by political will, but by the availability of funds as well. The AU experience has been that even ..... The issue of integrating unintended consequences into the planning and.

  19. Cystic echinococcosis in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahlers, Kerstin; Menezes, Colin N.; Wong, Michelle L.; Zeyhle, Eberhard; Ahmed, Mohammed E.; Ocaido, Michael; Stijnis, Cornelis; Romig, Thomas; Kern, Peter; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is regarded as endemic in sub-Saharan Africa; however, for most countries only scarce data, if any, exist. For most of the continent, information about burden of disease is not available; neither are data for the animal hosts involved in the lifecycle of the parasite, thus

  20. Strong wind climatic zones in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, AC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper South Africa is divided into strong wind climate zones, which indicate the main sources of annual maximum wind gusts. By the analysis of wind gust data of 94 weather stations, which had continuous climate time series of 10 years...