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Sample records for africa economics experiment

  1. South Africa; Selected Economic Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1996-01-01

    This Selected Economic Issues paper examines economic development in South Africa during 1995–96. The paper highlights that in 1995, the economy of South Africa grew by 3.3 percent, the third consecutive year of economic growth, and it is expected to grow between 3½ and 4 percent in 1996. Some aspects of the unemployment problem are addressed in this paper. The paper also focuses on the implications for policy of the steps taken in 1994 and 1995 to establish an outward-oriented economy, af...

  2. The Play Experiences of Preschool Children from a Low-socio-economic Rural Community in Worcester, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartie, Michelle; Dunnell, Alex; Kaplan, Jesse; Oosthuizen, Dianka; Smit, Danielle; van Dyk, Anchen; Cloete, Lizahn; Duvenage, Mia

    2016-06-01

    Occupational therapists believe that play is a child's main occupation and is considered essential for healthy motor, cognitive and emotional development. However, play spaces and activities in low socio-economic areas are often different to those provided in structured occupational therapy treatment environments. The main objective was to determine play opportunities, activities, equipment, toys and the play environment for 5- to 6-year-olds living in a low-socio-economic community outside a small town in South Africa, in order to understand the nature of play in this environment better. Participant observation together with an adapted photovoice method to capture the play experience was used. Data was analysed using inductive content analysis. Two global themes emerged from the results: "neighbourhood children find ways to play" and "context influences play". Children were given ample opportunity to play and participated in extensive outdoor play. Their games were highly social and involved the imaginative use of found items as toys. Play was also used to make sense of social hazards. An understanding of play in a low-income context has implications for the development of future play assessments and the provision of play therapy in these communities. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The Play Experiences of Preschool Children from a Low-socio-economic Rural Community in Worcester, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartie, Michelle; Dunnell, Alex; Kaplan, Jesse; Oosthuizen, Dianka; Smit, Danielle; van Dyk, Anchen; Cloete, Lizahn; Duvenage, Mia

    2016-06-01

    Occupational therapists believe that play is a child's main occupation and is considered essential for healthy motor, cognitive and emotional development. However, play spaces and activities in low socio-economic areas are often different to those provided in structured occupational therapy treatment environments. The main objective was to determine play opportunities, activities, equipment, toys and the play environment for 5- to 6-year-olds living in a low-socio-economic community outside a small town in South Africa, in order to understand the nature of play in this environment better. Participant observation together with an adapted photovoice method to capture the play experience was used. Data was analysed using inductive content analysis. Two global themes emerged from the results: "neighbourhood children find ways to play" and "context influences play". Children were given ample opportunity to play and participated in extensive outdoor play. Their games were highly social and involved the imaginative use of found items as toys. Play was also used to make sense of social hazards. An understanding of play in a low-income context has implications for the development of future play assessments and the provision of play therapy in these communities. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26348391

  4. Understanding South Africa's Economic Puzzles

    OpenAIRE

    Dani Rodrik

    2006-01-01

    South Africa has undergone a remarkable transformation since its democratic transition in 1994, but economic growth and employment generation have been disappointing. Most worryingly, unemployment is currently among the highest in the world. While the proximate cause of high unemployment is that prevailing wages levels are too high, the deeper cause lies elsewhere, and is intimately connected to the inability of the South African to generate much growth momentum in the past decade. High unemp...

  5. The economics of marriage in North Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Assaad, Ragui; Krafft, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Marriage is the single most important economic transaction and social transition in the lives of young people. Yet little is known about the economics of marriage in much of the developing world. This paper examines the economics of marriage in North Africa, where asymmetric rights in marriage create incentives for extensive up-front bargaining and detailed marriage contracts. As well as describing the limited literature on the economics of marriage in North Africa, this paper draws on econom...

  6. Local Economic Development Debates in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    This report discusses Local Economic Development (LED) in South Africa, specifically questions regarding the meaning of LED -- what a 'pro-poor' LED consists of in South Africa, and how residual anti-poor strategies are followed up with a globalized context. It is important to connect LED to globalization since it has pushed local municipalities to become more entreprenurial.

  7. Engendering Economic Policy in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene); A. Oduro (Amo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDespite Africa's relatively commendable growth performance since 2000, growth has not been accompanied by structural transformations. First, there has been little diversification from agriculture into industry, particularly manufacturing. Second, the poverty headcount and inequality rema

  8. South Africa Economic Update, February 2016

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    Promoting faster growth and poverty alleviation through competition is particularly important for South Africa, which is facing weak economic growth and limited fiscal resources and has to look to avenues outside the fiscal space to stimulate faster sustainable growth and progress towards its ultimate goal of eliminating poverty, outlined in the 2030 National Development Plan (NDP). The up...

  9. South Africa: poised for economic growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuma, J. (African National Congress (South Africa))

    1993-01-01

    South Africa is now emerging from the period of Apartheid. Elections will be held soon, but the economic damage caused by Apartheid has to be rectified. Partly this will be through an industrial strategy, and the minerals industry will play its part. The coal mining industry provides a large proportion of South Africa's exports and 90% of electricity. It is also the basis of a synfuels industry. The coal industry will continue to be an important source of exports, either directly, or as the provider of power to energy intensive industries such as aluminium production.

  10. Economic Geography and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Maarten; Garretsen, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africas (SSA) physical geography is often blamed for its poor economic performance. A countrys geographical location does, however, not only determine its agricultural conditions or disease environment. It also pins down a countrys relative position vis--vis other countries, affecting it

  11. Private Enterprise-led Economic Development in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2014-01-01

    of the world’s ten fastest-growing economies in 2010 were from there. But their growth has failed to translate into job creation and inclusive development. This experience has encouraged a renewed search for a sustainable economic development model for the sub-continent. The present dissertation contributes...... economics (i.e. the human side of economic activities) as a new theoretical platform for understanding economic growth and development. Furthermore, it introduces human capability development and the enabling factors as a framework for studying entrepreneurship and enterprise growth strategies in SSA.......As a continent, Africa occupies nearly a quarter of the World’s land area and home for one-seventh of its population. But a large proportion of the people, especially those living in Sub-Sahara Africa (SSA) are mired in abject poverty. Recent years have witnessed some positive developments. Six...

  12. Regional trade and economic networks in West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    To date, most of the literature on economic networks in West Africa has considered networks in a metaphorical way. The aim of this paper is to go one step further by showing how network analysis may be applied to the study of regional trade in West Africa. After a brief review of the literature, this exploratory paper investigates two main issues related to regional trade. We start by discussing how recent developments in regional trade in West Africa, brought on by urbanization, liberalizati...

  13. Africa's Pulse, October 2013 : An Analysis of Issues Shaping Africa's Economic Future

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    This Africa's pulse newsletter includes the following headings: economic prospects for Sub-Saharan Africa remain strong, but growth is vulnerable to a sharp decline in commodity prices; the region's progress on reducing poverty has been slow, hindered by high inequality; and faster reduction in poverty will require growth with equity.

  14. Economics of land degradation in Eastern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kirui, Oliver Kiptoo; Mirzabaev, Alisher

    2014-01-01

    Land degradation remains a serious impediment to improving livelihoods in the Eastern Africa region. This working paper presents a general overview of the state and extent of land degradation in East Africa, explores its proximate and underlying drivers, identifies the land degradation hotspots in the region, and also discusses the productivity and poverty impacts of land degradation in the region. It is intended to serve as an exploratory tool for the ensuing more detailed quantitative analy...

  15. Challenges and economic implications in the control of foot and mouth disease in sub-saharan Africa: lessons from the zambian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkala, Y; Simuunza, M; Pfeiffer, D U; Munang'andu, H M; Mulumba, M; Kasanga, C J; Muma, J B; Mweene, A S

    2014-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease is one of the world's most important livestock diseases for trade. FMD infections are complex in nature and there are many epidemiological factors needing clarification. Key questions relate to the control challenges and economic impact of the disease for resource-poor FMD endemic countries like Zambia. A review of the control challenges and economic impact of FMD outbreaks in Zambia was made. Information was collected from peer-reviewed journals articles, conference proceedings, unpublished scientific reports, and personal communication with scientists and personal field experiences. The challenges of controlling FMD using mainly vaccination and movement control are discussed. Impacts include losses in income of over US$ 1.6 billion from exports of beef and sable antelopes and an annual cost of over US$ 2.7 million on preventive measures. Further impacts included unquantified losses in production and low investment in agriculture resulting in slow economic growth. FMD persistence may be a result of inadequate epidemiological understanding of the disease and ineffectiveness of the control measures that are being applied. The identified gaps may be considered in the annual appraisal of the FMD national control strategy in order to advance on the progressive control pathway. PMID:25276472

  16. Challenges and Economic Implications in the Control of Foot and Mouth Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa: Lessons from the Zambian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sinkala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Foot and mouth disease is one of the world’s most important livestock diseases for trade. FMD infections are complex in nature and there are many epidemiological factors needing clarification. Key questions relate to the control challenges and economic impact of the disease for resource-poor FMD endemic countries like Zambia. A review of the control challenges and economic impact of FMD outbreaks in Zambia was made. Information was collected from peer-reviewed journals articles, conference proceedings, unpublished scientific reports, and personal communication with scientists and personal field experiences. The challenges of controlling FMD using mainly vaccination and movement control are discussed. Impacts include losses in income of over US$ 1.6 billion from exports of beef and sable antelopes and an annual cost of over US$ 2.7 million on preventive measures. Further impacts included unquantified losses in production and low investment in agriculture resulting in slow economic growth. FMD persistence may be a result of inadequate epidemiological understanding of the disease and ineffectiveness of the control measures that are being applied. The identified gaps may be considered in the annual appraisal of the FMD national control strategy in order to advance on the progressive control pathway.

  17. Innovation systems, saving, trust, and economic development in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pamuk, H.

    2014-01-01

    The five essays in the dissertation explore the interaction between economic development in Africa and three economic concepts from different fields: decentralized agricultural innovation systems, trust and saving practices. A relatively new view to boost agricultural growth is the implementation of

  18. Middle East and North Africa Economic Monitor, April 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Devarajan, Shantayanan; Mottaghi, Lili; Do, Quy-Toan; Jelil, Mohamed Abdel

    2016-01-01

    The short term economic outlook for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region remains “cautiously pessimistic”. A combination of civil wars and refugee inflows, terrorist attacks, cheap oil, and subdued global economic recovery is expected to keep average growth in the MENA region around 3 percent in 2016, for the fourth year in a row. Furthermore, the humanitarian and economic situation in the war torn countries keep deteriorating. In this report we will explore ways in which a strategy...

  19. Bravo! China: Experience Chinese Culture in Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiShegxian

    2004-01-01

    On july 13,2004,"Hail for China and Africa; A Chinese Cultural Tour of Africa" was launched in Prertoria,South Africa,Senior Officials from china and South Africa attended the opening ceremony,including Chinese State Councilor Madame Chen Zhili ,South Africa cultural minister,agricultural minister and mayor of Pretoria.

  20. Middle East and North Africa Economic Monitor, April 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Devarajan, Shantayanan; Mottaghi, Lili

    2015-01-01

    The economic outlook for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region in 2015 is slightly more favorable than in 2013-14, when the region as a whole grew at 3 percent a year. The World Bank group’s latest MENA Economic Monitor projects MENA’s economic growth to average 5.2 percent in 2015 driven by domestic consumption, easing political tensions crowding-in investments in Egypt and Tunisia, and full resumption of oil production in Libya. However the violent conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Gaza,...

  1. Regional Economic Integration in the Middle East and North Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Rouis, Mustapha

    2013-01-01

    Limited integration has stifled the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region's significant potential for economic growth and job creation. Home to 5.5 percentage of the world's population and 3.9 percentage of the world's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the region's share of nonoil world trade is only 1.8 percentages. By contrast, countries opting for a liberal trade and investment regime ...

  2. EVOLUTION OF ECONOMIC POLICY IN POST-APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA

    OpenAIRE

    Hittler, Candice

    2009-01-01

    Since 1994 South Africa has been unable to sustainably achieve the rates of economic growth necessary to decrease its very high level of unemployment. Inadequate growth has been exacerbated by a structural increase in the share of private non-tradables (skill-intensive) employment alongside a parallel decline in tradable (low-skill) employment. Against this backdrop the concept of “The Developmental State” has resurfaced in policy discussions. The 2009 Manifesto of the African National Congre...

  3. Economic growth and poverty alleviation in Africa - linking hard and soft economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a quick glance at the dominant issues that have characterized the development economics debate during the past five decades. It is based on a review of a selection of literature that highlights the dominant perspectives in development economics. It draws a distinction between...... soft and hard economics, arguing that economic growth must be converted into social change that benefits poor for it to be described as development-oriented. It provides a direction for future research into issues of economic growth and poverty alleviation in Sub-Sahara Africa...

  4. Laser propulsion experiments in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Max M.; Moorgawa, Ashokabose; Forbes, Andrew; Klopper, Wouter; McKenzie, Edric; Boutchiama, David; Bencherif, Hassan

    2002-09-01

    Two sets of experiments indicate a renewal of interest in South Africa in the topic of laser propulsion. Both sets were conducted under the auspices of the new National Laser Center. In the first set, a 1 kW, CO2 laser (1 kHz, 1 J, 100 ns) was used to propel small (ca 1 gram) targets through a vertical tube-launcher and the momentum-coupling coefficient for a variety of conditions was estimated. The somewhat disappointing results were accounted for in terms of the poor beam quality from a single oscillator and premature break-down of the exhaust vapor in the tube. These experiments were conducted with one module of the now dismantled 'MLIS' uranium isotope separation system. The second set of experiments being conducted in Durban with a small but more energetic 'marking' laser (CO2 20 Hz., 4 J, 100 ns). The chief purpose of this, was to better understand the discrepancies between the recent vertical propulsion experiment at Pelindaba and earlier propulsion attempts with the original MLIS chain. Preliminary pendulum experiments were carried out. Burning targets exhibited enhanced coupling for single pulses.

  5. Does China and Africa South-South cooperation lead to economic development in Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonfodji, P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since a few decades now Chinese enterprises’ investments abroad have seen a continuous and steady ascension. At first cautious and just across the Chinese national borders, these investments, slowly but surely, spread like a sheet of water that seeps into the heart of each continent on the globe. This global infiltration of Chinese companies coincides with the popularity in the use of the expression “South-South Cooperation” to characterize a type of relations between countries categorized as being “developing”. Accordingly this paper seeks to examine the role of the use of this concept as a “channel to achieve common development” in the context of Chinese enterprises’ outward direct investments in Africa adopting insights from international business production theories combined with an historical analysis of the notion of South-South Cooperation. Drawing on primary data gathered during my fieldwork in China in the period stretching from December 2011 to February 2012 and secondary data sources, it is argued that these Chinese investments supported by the Chinese government rhetoric on South-South cooperation, cannot lead to significant economic development in Africa like it has happened in China in the eighties. Rather and at most Chinese investments in Africa show some “trickle-down” effects characterised by very limited economic development in scattered localities throughout the African continent.

  6. Gender differences in economic experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Ergun, Selim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the experimental economics literature on gender differences concerning four salient subjects: risk aversion, trust, deception and leadership. We review both experiments conducted in a laboratory and field experiments. We summarize very briefly the main characteristics of the experiments we review and point out the main results related to gender differences. The vast majority of the articles we have revised document gender differences in behavior; differences which could be explained by sex-role stereotypes which could be formed even in early stages of life and/or hormonal differences such as the female hormone oxytocin or estrogen.

    Este artículo revisa la literatura en el área de economía experimental sobre las diferencias de género en cuatro temas destacados: aversión al riesgo, confianza, engaño y liderazgo. Se revisan tanto experimentos realizados en laboratorios como experimentos de campo. Resumimos brevemente las principales características de los experimentos que consideramos y señalamos los principales resultados relacionados con las diferencias de género. La gran mayoría de los artículos que hemos revisado documentan diferencias de género en el comportamiento. Estas diferencias podrían explicarse por los estereotipos de roles sexuales que podrían formarse incluso en edades tempranas y / o diferencias hormonales como la hormona femenina oxitocina, o el estrógeno.

  7. Islamic finance and Africa Economic Resurgence: Opportunities and Challenges (Research Paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Al Amine, Muhammad Al Bashir

    2014-01-01

    This book is a research study that outlines briefly the different opportunities for Islamic finance in Africa for Islamic finance investors and the financial system in Africa and its economic development. This study treats also the challenges facing the development of Islamic finance in Africa.

  8. Turkey’s Strategic Economic Relations with Africa: Trends and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigozie ENWERE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ottoman Empire had extensive economic relations with Africa which provides the structural frameworks for the speedy acceleration of economic partnership and trade interactions between Africa and modern Turkey. This study seeks to examine the structural relevance, challenges and prospects of Turkey’s economic relations and interest in Africa from the traditional period of Ottoman Empire to the contemporary era of competitive interdependence. From a broad perspective, trade interactions between Turkey was driven but the values of economic pluralism and less of colonialist tendencies. Therefore, the greatest challenge that tacitly limits the geometric expansion of trade is the shift in perception of Africa as a hub for disease, economic stagnation, waste and wars. This form of stereotype is a direct input of neo-colonial propaganda adopted by the Western media to keep at bay competitive investors from Africa. So, Africa with an economic growth rate of over 5% offers Turkey new horizon for economic diversification. The consistent use of soft power by Turkey has brought new image and perception of Turkey as a credible economic partner with pragmatic approach promote symbiotic trade relations devoid of the manipulative devices of free market syndrome that benefits only the West at the detriment of Africa. Africa sees Turkey as an economic partner that will assist the continent to intensify the industrialization of its economic base in line with the global economic configuration. Therefore, Turkey-Africa economic partnership and trade volume is likely to expand in future because Turkey’s opening to Africa has created new markets and investment potential that will increase Africa’s participation in global economy and enhance Turkey’s role as a major player in the politics of resource allocation in the international economic system.

  9. South Africa's economic policies on unemployment : a historical analysis of two decades of transition / Lorainne Steenkamp

    OpenAIRE

    Steenkamp, Lorainne

    2015-01-01

    After twenty years of democracy, the most pressing problem facing South Africa is the absence of sustainable economic growth and job creation. Since 1994, major economic reforms and adjustments have been made, which were seen as a requirement for achieving economic growth and development. However, despite these efforts, unemployment in South Africa remains a challenging problem. The main objectives of the study are, firstly, to examine South Africa’s economic policy initiatives implemented...

  10. Explaining long-run economic development in Africa : do initial conditions matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, J.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that Africa is the poorest region in the world in terms of income levels per head of the population and also, on average, the slowest growing continent of the world. However, these averages hide an enormous within-Africa diversity both in economic performance and in economic fundame

  11. Explaining long-run economic development in Africa: do initial conditions matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Bolt, J.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that Africa is the poorest region in the world in terms of income levels per head of the population and also, on average, the slowest growing continent of the world. However, these averages hide an enormous within-Africa diversity both in economic performance and in economic fundamentals. This thesis focuses on this diversity as we analyse institutional and economic developments for the majority of the African countries from a historical perspective, based on data from anthro...

  12. Energy consumption and economic development in Sub-Sahara Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebede, Ellene [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Science, 210 Campbell, Hall, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088 (United States); Kagochi, John [School of Business Administration, University of Houston-Victoria, 3007, N. Ben Wilson, Victoria, 77901 (United States); Jolly, Curtis M. [Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, 212 Comer, Hall Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Sub-Saharan African countries' economic development is dependent on energy consumption. This paper assesses total energy demand, which is composed of traditional energy (wood fuel) and commercial energy (electricity and petroleum), in the Central, East, South, and West regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. Cross-sectional time series data for 20 countries in 25 years are analyzed, and the results of the study show that wood fuel accounts for 70% of energy consumption, followed by petroleum, with most industrial activities utilizing some form of wood fuel. Regression results suggest that energy demand is inversely related to the price of petroleum and industrial development, but positively related to GDP, population growth rate, and agricultural expansion, and that price elasticity is less than one. The model results also show that there are regional differences in energy demand. In addition, the interaction of population growth rates by regions generates mixed results, and there are regional differences in the use of commercial energy consumption, and GDP growth. The findings of this study suggest that countries must diversify their energy sources and introduce energy-efficient devices and equipment at all levels of the economy to improve GDP growth rate and GDP per capita. (author)

  13. Energy consumption and economic development in Sub-Sahara Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sub-Saharan African countries' economic development is dependent on energy consumption. This paper assesses total energy demand, which is composed of traditional energy (wood fuel) and commercial energy (electricity and petroleum), in the Central, East, South, and West regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. Cross-sectional time series data for 20 countries in 25 years are analyzed, and the results of the study show that wood fuel accounts for 70% of energy consumption, followed by petroleum, with most industrial activities utilizing some form of wood fuel. Regression results suggest that energy demand is inversely related to the price of petroleum and industrial development, but positively related to GDP, population growth rate, and agricultural expansion, and that price elasticity is less than one. The model results also show that there are regional differences in energy demand. In addition, the interaction of population growth rates by regions generates mixed results, and there are regional differences in the use of commercial energy consumption, and GDP growth. The findings of this study suggest that countries must diversify their energy sources and introduce energy-efficient devices and equipment at all levels of the economy to improve GDP growth rate and GDP per capita. (author)

  14. Africa trade and investment with BRIC nations in a changing economic landscape: the role of China

    OpenAIRE

    Ndambendia, Houdou

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the trade and investment cooperation between African states and BRIC countries in a dynamic economic environment. No doubt that given it size and open up strategy, China is playing an outstanding role in this cooperation. It appears as the top trading and investor partner among BRIC countries with Africa. Trade is mainly dominated by raw materials coming from Africa to BRIC and manufactured products going to Africa from BRIC. China has the most geographically diversified ...

  15. Chinese foreign direct investment in Africa: making sense of a new economic reality

    OpenAIRE

    20482884 - Bezuidenhout, Henri; 20242719 - Claassen, Carike; Loots, Alida Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    China’s economic progress and relations with other developing regions have received much attention, particularly the way in which Sino-African relations have evolved since 2000. This paper aims to put Chinese FDI in Africa into perspective and provide some answers on the nature and possible impact of these flows to the continent. The study examines Chinese FDI flows to Africa between 2003 and 2008. During this period, China’s outward FDI to Africa was concentrated in diversified, medium growt...

  16. Balancing Economic and Other Discourses in the Internationalization of Higher Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Mel; Nilan, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Since the end of the apartheid era in South Africa, "internationalization" of higher education has been a popular theme as the country takes its place as a regional leader in education and research in sub-Saharan Africa. However, competing discourses of internationalization have produced economic and moral dilemmas rather than the realization of…

  17. Private Enterprise-Led Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John Ernest

    Private Enterprise-Led Development in Sub-Saharan Africa provides a novel theoretical and conceptual model to guide research into Africa's economic development. It endorses the view that private enterprise-led growth will help reduce poverty since it strengthens individuals' capacity to care...

  18. The impact of demographical development on the economic growth of Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Matějčková, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    Diploma thesis is focused on the impact of demographic development on economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa. The influence is analyzed by using appropriate demographic variable - total fertility rate and economic variable - GNI per capita, in 45 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. These endogenous variables have been selected based on theoretical overview and theirs influence has been analyzed by simultaneous econometric model. Endogenous variables are explained by exogenous variables, for examp...

  19. Informing road traffic intervention choices in South Africa: the role of economic evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, Hadley K.H.; Boikhutso, Nkuli; Hyder, Adnan A; Bertram, Melanie; Hofman, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Given the burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in South Africa, economic evaluations of prevention interventions are necessary for informing and prioritising public health planning and policy with regard to road safety.Methods: In view of the dearth of RTI cost analysis, and in order to understand the extent to which RTI-related costs in South Africa compare with those in other low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), we reviewed published economic evaluations of RTI-related ...

  20. Advancing drug availability-experiences from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Richard A; Kaye, Richard Mugula; Ddungu, Henry; Mwangi-Powell, Faith

    2010-07-01

    International health and drug regulatory authorities acknowledge that analgesics (especially opioids) are insufficiently available for pain management in many countries. In Africa, reported morphine consumption is far below the global mean, with multiple factors hampering opioid supply. Since 2006, the African Palliative Care Association has hosted three regional drug availability workshops across the continent to address this issue. Using an interactive format, the workshops have identified country-specific barriers to opioid and other essential medication accessibility before supporting participants to develop action plans to address recognized impediments. Despite multiple challenges, a number of successes have arisen from the implementation of the plans. However, key issues remain, including the introduction of supportive policy environments, effective educational initiatives, and measures to address supply-chain obstacles impeding drug availability. PMID:20619205

  1. Economic and geopolitical dimensions of renewable vs. nuclear energy in North Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addressing issues of renewable energy in North Africa must incorporate concerns regarding the compatibility of energy mixes with the nature of political regimes, their geopolitical relevance, and their socio-economic effects, in addition to economic cost-benefit deliberations. One important and under-researched aspect of nuclear energy refers to the trade-off between socio-economic development and political power conservation. Competing interests in North Africa's energy market as well as aspects of regional cooperation capacity are important when assessing the choice between renewable and nuclear energy. Therefore, the future course of meeting North Africa's energy needs is subject to a complex political and economic interplay between domestic and geopolitical development interests. The objective of this paper is to explore this complexity in more detail. We argue that the identification of any energy alternative as superior is hardly convincing unless certain standards of inclusive governance are met. We also find that it is important to highlight political-economic differences between energy importers like Morocco and Tunisia and energy exporters like Algeria, Libya, and Egypt. - Research highlights: → North Africa confronted with severe energy supply challenges in near future. → Trade-off between socio-economic development and political power conservation matters. → Economic and geopolitical dimensions of trade-off heterogeneous across North Africa.

  2. Economic and geopolitical dimensions of renewable vs. nuclear energy in North Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marktanner, Marcus, E-mail: marktanner@aub.edu.lb [American University of Beirut, Department of Economics, P.O. Box 11-0236/Economics, Riad El-Solh/Beirut 1107 2020 (Lebanon); Salman, Lana, E-mail: lss06@aub.edu.lb [American University of Beirut, Department of Economics, P.O. Box 11-0236/Economics, Riad El-Solh/Beirut 1107 2020 (Lebanon)

    2011-08-15

    Addressing issues of renewable energy in North Africa must incorporate concerns regarding the compatibility of energy mixes with the nature of political regimes, their geopolitical relevance, and their socio-economic effects, in addition to economic cost-benefit deliberations. One important and under-researched aspect of nuclear energy refers to the trade-off between socio-economic development and political power conservation. Competing interests in North Africa's energy market as well as aspects of regional cooperation capacity are important when assessing the choice between renewable and nuclear energy. Therefore, the future course of meeting North Africa's energy needs is subject to a complex political and economic interplay between domestic and geopolitical development interests. The objective of this paper is to explore this complexity in more detail. We argue that the identification of any energy alternative as superior is hardly convincing unless certain standards of inclusive governance are met. We also find that it is important to highlight political-economic differences between energy importers like Morocco and Tunisia and energy exporters like Algeria, Libya, and Egypt. - Research Highlights: > North Africa confronted with severe energy supply challenges in near future. > Trade-off between socio-economic development and political power conservation matters. > Economic and geopolitical dimensions of trade-off heterogeneous across North Africa.

  3. China's economic embrace of Africa: An international comparative perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Broich, T.; Szirmai, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the entry of China into the game of foreign finance in Africa. It analyses the scope, destination and sectoral distribution of Chinese financial flows and trade in comparison with Western patterns and trends of aid, foreign direct investment (FDI) and trade. China's foreign aid and manufacturing investment flow to Africa's physical infrastructure and productive sectors of agriculture and manufacturing fill the vacuum which emerged when Western financial flows shifted to o...

  4. Socio-economic analysis of conservation agriculture in southern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.‏ United Nations Development Programme

    2011-01-01

    Southern Africa, a region little affected by the Green Revolution and likely to suffer severe detrimental impacts from climate change, faces pervasive poverty, hunger, and environmental degradation. Conservation agriculture may be a sustainable and effective way to resolve these issues, but stakeholders need accessible and solid evidence of its effectiveness. The purpose of this report is to analyze the impact of CA on the Southern Africans countries of South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe thro...

  5. Experiences of project developers around CDM projects in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project developers in South Africa are puzzled with the long process of evaluating and registering their CDM projects. In addition to other obstacles, we find that South African big businesses are rather reluctant to engage in any new business activities such as CDM projects and municipalities often lack the necessary flexibility. This offers opportunities for small-scale project developers who spot the opportunities and find creative solutions to overcome these difficulties. - Highlights: • First paper analysing the experience of small project developers in South Africa. • Project developers in South Africa are puzzled with the long process. • South African big businesses are reluctant to engage in CDM projects. • Small-scale project developers spot opportunities and find creative solutions to overcome difficulties. • Also, we saw learning processes of South African administration in support of CDM projects

  6. Everything is connected: An Interpretive study of local economic development in South Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwaramba, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Tourism in South Africa has emerged as a popular poverty reduction strategy. Nevertheless, benefit of the sector to previously disadvantaged communities remains highly contested. In efforts to increase equitable economic impacts of tourism, the Eastern Cape local government introduced a Local Econom

  7. Health economics of blood transfusion safety - focus on sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, Marinus; Sibinga, Cees Th. Smit; Postma, Maarten J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives. Health economics provides a standardised methodology for valid comparisons of interventions in different fields of health care. This review discusses the health economic evaluations of strategies to enhance blood product safety in sub-Saharan Africa Methods. We reviewed he

  8. CHINA’S ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES IN AFRICA: TRADE, FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT AND AID

    OpenAIRE

    Michałowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines the nature of China’s economic activities in Africa in three dimensions: merchandise trade, foreign direct investment, and aid. These are three main channels through which China’s presence on the continent affects Africa’s economic growth and development. China’s economic relations with Africa are, to a large extent, driven by Chinese demand for natural resources, especially oil and minerals. It is the most visible in Sino-African trade, where fuels alone account for about ...

  9. Employment creation through public works programmes and projects in South Africa: Experiences and potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D. Thwala

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/objectives: The aim of this article is to look at the experiences, problems and the potential contribution of employment creation programmes in alleviating the unemployment problem in other African countries through the construction of public infrastructure through the use of labour-intensive methods. The article then describes the problems and experiences that have been encountered in South Africa in relation to employment creation through the construction of public infrastructure.Problem investigated: In South Africa the levels of unemployment and poverty are extremely high and unemployment is one of South Africa's most pressing problems. At the same time there is a lack of capacity and skills at institutional, community and individual levels. Labour-intensive programmes generate more direct and indirect local employment opportunities and income by using locally available inputs (materials, simple tools and local labour and thus creating a greater demand for local products and services than do high-technology programmes reliant on imported technology and equipment. Design/Methodology/Approach: Drawing on research on labour-intensive, public works programmes and projects, the paper is mainly a literature review. From a theoretical perspective supported by experience elsewhere in Africa, there are reasons for considering that properly formulated employment creation programmes based on the use of labour-intensive methods could be established to construct and maintain the required physical infrastructure, thus creating employment, skills and institutional capacities. The article closes with some recommendations for the future programmes success.Findings/Implications: The article attributes the failure of projects and programmes in South Africa to different factors which must be avoided in future in order for projects and programmes to be successful in South Africa. Investment in infrastructure has a huge potential to redress the high

  10. Africa : Social and Economic Development Goals - A Progress Report

    OpenAIRE

    Mattimore, Angel

    2002-01-01

    During the 1998 Second Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD II), a set of ambitious poverty reduction and human development goals were established for the Africa region, drawing on and reaffirming commitments made three years earlier at the First TICAD conference and at the United Nation (UN) Social Summit in Copenhagen. The Second TICAD Agenda for Action dealt with...

  11. China's economic embrace of Africa: An international comparative perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broich, T.; Szirmai, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the entry of China into the game of foreign finance in Africa. It analyses the scope, destination and sectoral distribution of Chinese financial flows and trade in comparison with Western patterns and trends of aid, foreign direct investment (FDI) and trade. China's foreign aid

  12. Responsible Investment: A Vehicle for Environmentally Sustainable Economic Growth in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Giamporcaro, Stephanie; Pretorius, Lise; Visser, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores whether any investment products or strategies in South Africa take environmental sustainability into account. By looking at how environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria are used in investment decision making, we found that most socially-responsible investment products and responsible investment strategies largely focus on infrastructure, development, and black economic empowerment. Environmental criteria do not yet receive comparable attention from South Africa...

  13. Balancing Economic and other Discourses in the Internationalization of Higher Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Mel; Nilan, Pam

    2007-05-01

    Since the end of the apartheid era in South Africa, "internationalization" of higher education has been a popular theme as the country takes its place as a regional leader in education and research in sub-Saharan Africa. However, competing discourses of internationalization have produced economic and moral dilemmas rather than the realization of philanthropic academic aims. The process of internationalizing higher education in South Africa has been greatly compromised by under-funding and over-crowding of post-secondary education institutions in the country.

  14. Integrating Gender into Economic Reform through the Special Program of Assistance for Africa (SPA)

    OpenAIRE

    Blackden, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Special Program of Assistance: Background and Context The Special Program of Assistance for low-income debt-distressed countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (SPA) was launched in 1987. According to the Phase 4 document, two problems characterized Sub-Saharan Africa’s economic crisis at that time. First, poor economic policies and structural weaknesses were putting a brake on economic development. Second, this was compounded by a lack of resources to finance imports and key expenditures, especia...

  15. Everything is connected: An Interpretive study of local economic development in South Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Kwaramba, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Tourism in South Africa has emerged as a popular poverty reduction strategy. Nevertheless, benefit of the sector to previously disadvantaged communities remains highly contested. In efforts to increase equitable economic impacts of tourism, the Eastern Cape local government introduced a Local Economic Development (LED) women township tourism home-stay pilot project under the aegis of the national Black Economic Empowerment legislation. The thesis identifies factors defined by the institutiona...

  16. Food inflation in South Africa: some implications for economic policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Logan

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the trends in food price movements in South Africa between 1980 and 2008. There are three main results emanating from the analysis in this paper. Firstly, food price movements have played a large role in generating inflationary episodes in South Africa. Secondly, while external influences do matter, South African food price movements are mainly due to domestic influences. This implies that national policy has an important role to play in taming domestic food price inflation. Thirdly, given the strong second round impacts, food price movements warrant special attention in monetary policymaking. Core measures of inflation that exclude food price movements may not accurately reflect the underlying inflationary pressures in the economy and could compromise the attainment of the goal of price stability.

  17. The economics of wind energy in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battery charging and water pumping has been the only applications for wind energy in South Africa till now. A conservative estimate of the wind resource indicates that approximately 5% to 6% of the South African energy demands can be supplied from wind. However the low cost of electricity due to the abundance of cheap coal has made it difficult to justify the use of grid connected wind turbines. As with other countries where wind energy is now a part of the total energy package, South Africa will also have to go through a process of wind energy having to prove itself as a viable option while at the same time have a cost disadvantage. (Author)

  18. Food inflation in South Africa: some implications for economic policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Logan

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the trends in food price movements in South Africa between 1980 and 2008. There are three main results emanating from the analysis in this paper. Firstly, food price movements have played a large role in generating inflationary episodes in South Africa. Secondly, while external influences do matter, South African food price movements are mainly due to domestic influences. This implies that national policy has an important role to play in taming domestic food price inflation. Thirdly, given the strong second round impacts, food price movements warrant special attention in monetary policymaking. Core measures of inflation that exclude food price movements may not accurately reflect the underlying inflationary pressures in the economy and could compromise the attainment of the goal of price stability. PMID:21966701

  19. South Africa Economic Update : Focus on Export Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    In its National Development Plan 2030 and its New Growth Path (2011), South Africa identifies the export sector as an engine for faster, more inclusive, and job-intensive growth. The National Development Plan is targeting export volume growth of 6 percent a year, to achieve an annual increase in real Gross Domestic Product, or GDP growth of about 5.5 percent and to help generate 11 million...

  20. Economics of Malaria Prevention in US Travelers to West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Kenji; Coleman, Margaret S.; Khan, Nomana; Jentes, Emily S.; Arguin, Paul; Rao, Sowmya R.; Regina C LaRocque; Sotir, Mark J.; Brunette, Gary; Ryan, Edward T.; Meltzer, Martin I.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pretravel health consultations help international travelers manage travel-related illness risks through education, vaccination, and medication. This study evaluated costs and benefits of that portion of the health consultation associated with malaria prevention provided to US travelers bound for West Africa. Methods. The estimated change in disease risk and associated costs and benefits resulting from traveler adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis were calculated from 2 perspectiv...

  1. Economics of Malaria Prevention in US Travelers to West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Kenji; Coleman, Margaret S.; Khan, Nomana; Jentes, Emily S.; Arguin, Paul; Rao, Sowmya R.; Regina C LaRocque; Sotir, Mark J.; Brunette, Gary; Ryan, Edward T.; Meltzer, Martin I.; ,

    2013-01-01

    Background.  Pretravel health consultations help international travelers manage travel-related illness risks through education, vaccination, and medication. This study evaluated costs and benefits of that portion of the health consultation associated with malaria prevention provided to US travelers bound for West Africa. Methods.  The estimated change in disease risk and associated costs and benefits resulting from traveler adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis were calculated from 2 perspect...

  2. The Economic Implications of Introducing Carbon Taxes in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Thomas Channing

    2014-01-01

    national welfare and employment by about 1.2 and 0.6 percent, respectively. However, if trading partners unilaterally impose a carbon consumption tax on South African exports, then welfare/employment losses exceed those from a domestic carbon tax. South Africa can lessen welfare/employment losses...... by introducing its own border carbon adjustments. The mode for recycling carbon tax revenues strongly influences distributional outcomes, with tradeoffs between growth and equity....

  3. The new international financial architecture: Lessons and experiences from Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick R Outa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the requirements and successes of the New International Financial Architecture (NIFA on transparency and corporate governance from a global perspective with a special focus on Africa. In recent years, transparency, accountability and governance have become key topics with many countries around the world having adopted International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS and corporate governance codes. The outcomes of these initiatives have been unconvincing. Desktop research was used to gather literature and data on compliance with corporate governance codes and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS and other NIFA requirements. This study established that in spite of many regional and global initiatives by the World Bank and relevant regulators, compliance with IFRS and governance in parts of Africa has yet to reach its best level and guidelines are not fully followed leading to opportunities for improvement and policy adjustments. This research has implications and uses for both global and local institutions and regulators concerned with economic stability and growth including the World Bank, central banks, capital markets and boards of companies and the government in general. The findings contribute to governance debates by providing additional perspectives from Africa on compliance with accounting standards and codes in a region where research and corporate governance and reporting issues are still confusing.

  4. Economics and planning in the veterinary undergraduate programme: a model for sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlangwa, J E; Kisauzi, D N

    1993-09-01

    Veterinarians in sub-Saharan Africa work in resource-deficient environments. Decisions taken by veterinarians in this sub-region, on animal health, animal husbandry and public health issues, are therefore influenced by economic factors including macro-economic considerations related to the current structural adjustment programmes being implemented in the sub-region. In turn, decisions or advice given by veterinarians have socio-economic consequences on clients, on the effectiveness of the delivery systems for veterinary services and on the growth of national economies. For these reasons, economics and planning should be essential components of all modern veterinary undergraduate programmes in sub-Saharan Africa, in order to give veterinarians a basis for making decisions and giving advice which is both technically and economically sound. The authors argue that principles of livestock economics, livestock enterprise management, livestock investment analysis and economics of animal health care are necessary elements in economics and planning courses. They propose a division of these elements into discrete course units to allow for flexibility and adaptability to the different curriculum structures of schools in sub-Saharan Africa and, possibly, continuing professional development courses. The resource requirement for teaching the courses, the integration of the units in the undergraduate programme and the problems which are likely to be encountered in developing the courses are discussed. PMID:8219326

  5. Lab experiments in demographic fieldwork: Understanding gender dynamics in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nii-Amoo Dodoo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropological literature has long linked bridewealth payments to decision-making about fertility. Recent research underscores the significance of men's preferences regarding women's reproductive behavior, and suggests that bridewealth payments place constraints on women's reproductive autonomy. Yet because survey data on bridewealth are rare, and the collection of new survey data on bridewealth presents serious challenges, this explanation could not be tested. Objective: Our objective in this paper is to highlight the potential utility of lab experiments (in particular, vignette experiments for improving our understanding of gender relations in Africa, using the hypothesized effect of bridewealth on normative constraints on women's reproductive autonomy as an illustration. Methods: We discuss our reasons for turning to lab experiments, and to vignette experiments in particular. We also summarize a series of studies (Horne, Dodoo, and Dodoo 2013; Dodoo, Horne, and Biney 2014 which have implemented our experimental approach. Results: Our experimental evidence shows that bridewealth payments are associated with greater normative constraints on women's reproductive autonomy. We also find that these negative effects of bridewealth are consistent across participant ages, and do not appear to be ameliorated by female schooling. Conclusions: We conclude that lab experiments in general (and vignette experiments in particular are underutilized methodological tools that may be useful for helping us gain a better understanding of the cultural context of gender relations in Africa; and that demographic research more generally may benefit from taking advantage of the strengths of experimental methods.

  6. A Dream Experiment in Development Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prakarsh; Russo, Alexa

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a unique project carried out by 13 teams of four students each in the undergraduate Development Economics class during the 2012 spring semester at a private liberal arts college. The goal of the "Dream Experiment" was to think of an idea that promotes development, employs concepts from development…

  7. The Economics of Information: A Classroom Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netusil, Noelwah R.; Haupert, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Describes an economics class experiment where students ranked the quality of baked pies according to limited information. The limited sets of information included brand name and packaging only, price only, advertising only, word-of-mouth, and taste test. Discusses signals of quality and consumer decisions. (MJP)

  8. Economic Growth, Entrepreneurship and the Business Environment in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mthuli Ncube

    2005-01-01

    Research on causes of underdevelopment traps and economic growth can be traced back to the work of Young (1928), Rosenstein-Rodan (1943) and Nurkse (1953). The seminal work of Kormendi and Meguire (1985), Grier and Tullock (1998), Barro (1991), Abramovitz (1986) and Baumol (1986), revived the debate on causes of economic growth. Later work by Quah (1997), Salai-I-Martin (1987,2004) has sought to identify the factors driving economic growth across various regions around the world in a manner t...

  9. Technology, Political Economy, and Economic Development in the Middle East and North Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brach, Juliane

    2009-01-01

    Comparing the pace and extent of economic development across the developing regions yields that Arab countries have displaced a weak economic performance over the past 20 years, despite their favorable geo-strategic location and a high density of national and international structural adjustment...... efforts. Using cross-country regressions, this paper identifies two binding constraints to economic development in the Arab countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA): 1) Most countries are not able to apply or adopt existing technologies efficiently and 2) The economically inefficient...

  10. Does military spending nonlinearly affect economic growth in South Africa?

    OpenAIRE

    Phiri, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Using annual data collected from 1988 to 2014, this study provides evidence of a nonlinear relationship between military spending, economic growth and other growth determinants for the South African economy. The empirical study is based on estimates of a logistic smooth transition regression (LSTR) model and our empirical results point to an inverted U-shaped relationship between military spending and economic growth for the data. Furthermore, our empirical results suggest that the current le...

  11. SMME MODEL FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AN EMPIRICAL CASE FOR THE NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Venditto

    2004-01-01

    South Africa has been facing the double challenge of integrating into global markets as a competitive economy and of overcoming the internal problems created and constantly reinforced by the previous regime. To realize the objective of economic growth through competitiveness on the one hand and employment generation and income distribution on the other, the small business sector assumes a critical role. In order to be conducive to economic growth and employment creation, small business develo...

  12. Middle East and North Africa Economic Developments and Prospects, 2009 : Navigating through the Global Recession

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this 2009 Middle East and North Africa (MENA) economic developments and prospects is to review the implication of the triple food-fuel-financial crisis for MENA economies. Chapter one reviews the year 2008 and the first few months of 2009. It discusses the impact of the global economic environment and MENA countries' responses to the initial impact of the food-fuel-financi...

  13. Economic Partnership Agreements of the EU: Impact on Regional Integration in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Marinov, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    The development and dynamics of regional integration in Africa are severely influenced by the transformation of the trade relations between African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries and the EU, imposed by the Cotonou agreement. Economic relations now based on unilateral trade preferences provided by the EU are envisaged to be based on Economic partnership agreements (EPAs) that should regulate trade and cooperation establishing new trade regimes between the EU and ACP regions selected by...

  14. Foreign direct investment and economic growth: ADRL and causality analysis for South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    SUNDE, Tafirenyika

    2016-01-01

    The article empirically investigated economic growth as a function of foreign direct investment and exports in South Africa. The article applied the autoregressive distributed lag model, known as the ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration for the long run relationship between economic growth, foreign direct investment and exports. The error correction model was used to examine the short run dynamics; and the VECM Granger causality approach was used to investigate the direction of causa...

  15. Entrepreneurship as a source of economic, political, and social improvement in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Rabarijaona, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A three-country case study was used to analyze the economic, political, and social impacts of entrepreneurship, and the development of entrepreneurship in Sub-Saharan Africa was studied through the lens of five entrepreneurial factors (freedom, labor, infrastructure, governance, and business environment). An increase of foreign direct investments, growing economic freedom for citizens, and a higher gross domestic product per capita wer...

  16. Implications of Severe Economic Decline & Demographic Pressures on Youth Literacy in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, Comfort O.

    2009-01-01

    Although literacy rates have improved somehow in recent years, there are still large numbers of people that are illiterates in developing countries. This paper examines the impact of severe economic decline and demographic pressures on youth literacy rate in Sub-Saharan Africa. In this study, a cross-sectional data of 39 Sub-Saharan African…

  17. Economic, Environmental, and Social Evaluation of Africa's Small-Scale Fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2015-01-01

    This report is the culmination of a cross-African countries analytical and empirical study commissioned by the World Bank, which set out to improve the understanding of the characteristics and environmental, economic, and social performances of small-scale fisheries in Africa. It applies a common evaluation tool, called Fishery Performance Indicators (FPIs), which evaluates the ecological,...

  18. The Least Developed Countries of Africa - the problems of the economic development and the resolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Smékalová, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    The region of Subsaharan Africa is the most underdeveloped area in the world. There is the highest number of the Least Developed Countries of the world. The backwardness of the African countries takes effect by the poverty and heavy political, economical and social problems. The local governments, foreign investors and international organizations can improve the situation in African The Least Developed Countries.

  19. Soil fertility decline and economic policy reform in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, N.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    Two decades of economic reforms in Africa have not resulted in the anticipated growth in per capita agricultural production. Declining output-fertiliser price ratios, particularly for food crops, contributed to soil fertility depletion and agricultural stagnation. Current prices of agricultural prod

  20. Intense convection over West Africa during AMMA SOP3 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenouo, André; Sall, Saïdou Moustapha; Badiane, Daouda; Gaye, Amadou Thierno; Kamga Mkankam, F.

    2016-11-01

    ERA-Interim product from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) assimilation of African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) resources, Meteosat satellite images, and synoptic observations were used to study local- and regional-scale environments associated with intense convective systems during the AMMA-SOP3 experiment over West Africa in the Northern Hemisphere of summer 2006. The convective system, from the 21st to 23rd of August 2006, was more active at 0000 and 1800 UTC showing diurnal cycle of deep convection over West Africa where the African easterly waves (AEWs) are developed downstream. Downstream barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions associated with strong AEWs are important for the maintenance of AEW activity in West Africa. Barotropic energy conversions dominate south of the African easterly jet (AEJ), while baroclinic energy conversions are most important north of the AEJ. From a dynamical viewpoint, the low-level vorticity presents strong positive values over the sea and Sahara zone, indicating that exists on the cyclonic shear side of the African easterly jet, which is consistent with baroclinic growth. The 925-hPa equivalent potential temperature structure show a maximum over the Sahara which corresponds to the depression observed in this region. A mosaic of three hourly infrared (IR) satellite images, depicts a very distinct signal from an initial region of convection, developing through several stages and moving off the African coast. These observations, along with those available from the World Weather Watch, provide an opportunity to carry out numerical weather prediction (NWP) studies over West Africa utilizing high resolution limited area models.

  1. An Economic Analysis of Sports Performance in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    John Luiz; Riyas Fadal

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop insight into the socio-economic determinants of African sports performance. Previous studies have argued that a country’s success in sports is directly related to the economic resources that are available for those sports. However, factors that are used to determine the levels of success for developed countries are not necessarily the same, or bear the same weight, as for developing countries. The premise of this study is to identify specific factors ...

  2. Social influences towards conformism in economic experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Hargreaves Heap, Shaun P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the economic experimental evidence on conformism. There is nothing to match the early psychology experiments where subjects were often swayed by the behaviour of others to an extraordinary degree, but there is plenty of evidence of conformism. This seems built-in to our sociality either because we have preferences for conversation or status which are activated by the knowledge of what others do, or because other people face relevantly similar decisions to our own an...

  3. THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CORRUPTION IN AFRICA AND THE WAY FORWARD : Case study: Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Njomen, Pride; Njomen, Pride Nkwinja

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is based on a holistic approach to analysing corruption and its economic impact in Africa, using Cameroon as a case study. It seek to analyse precolonial Africa and how their justice system led to low corruption and the slave trade how slavery contributed to today’s corruption the colonial rule how the divide and rule policies, imposed taxes etc., led to deaths, especially in the Congo, suppression of civil rights, exploitation and misery up to the 1960s, obstruction of natural...

  4. Neoliberalism’s legacy in Southern Africa: the economic and social impact of adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bidaurrazaga Aurre

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to provide a better understanding of the problems involved in the processes of economic liberalization undertaken in Africa, specifically in the various economies of Southern Africa, over the last two decades through the application of structural adjustment programs. An examination of the results, particularly the consequences for the most disadvantaged sectors of these societies in terms of social vulnerability and marginalization, makes clear that criticism of the liberalizing model, analysis of the most recently implemented initiatives, and proposals for alternatives that favour the meeting of basic needs among the population, are essential.

  5. Does HIV/AIDS matter for economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mveyange, Anthony Francis; Skovsgaard, Christian; Lesner, Tine

    Estimating the impact of HIV/AIDS epidemic on economic growth is challenging because of endogeneity concerns. In this paper, we use novel data on male circumcision and distance from the first HIV outbreak as instrumental variables for the HIV/AIDS epidemic in 241 regions across 25 countries in sub......-Saharan Africa during 2003–12. Our main finding shows that the impact of HIV/AIDS epidemic on economic growth is negative but statistically insignificant. Further investigation on the main channels through which HIV/AIDS may affect economic growth—namely human capital, population growth, and productivity...

  6. Middle East and North Africa Economic Monitor, October 2014 : Corrosive Subsidies

    OpenAIRE

    Devarajan, Shantayanan

    2014-01-01

    The economic outlook for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region in 2015 is slightly more favorable than in 2013-14, when the region as a whole grew at 3 percent a year. The World Bank group’s latest MENA Economic Monitor projects MENA’s economic growth to average 5.2 percent in 2015 driven by domestic consumption, easing political tensions crowding-in investments in Egypt and Tunisia, and full resumption of oil production in Libya. However the violent conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Gaza,...

  7. Impact of Selected Economic Indicators on Foreign Investment Inflow in Nigeria and South Africa: Optimal Indicators Search

    OpenAIRE

    Onuorah Anastasia; Nzotta Samuel Mbadike; Ozurumba Benedict Anayachukwu; Chigbu Emmanuel Ezeji

    2015-01-01

    Search for ways of attracting foreign investment into developing countries raises great interest among researchers and therefore, there is a search for the economic indicators affecting foreign investment appeal in Africa. This study focuses on the impact of economic indicators of Banking Sector Development Model on foreign investment inflows in Nigeria and South Africa. Various data on banking sector; economic indicators of the classified model were sourced from state statistical bulletins a...

  8. Africa : Economic Partnership Agreements between Africa and the European Union, What to do Now? Summary Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    This report addresses the question raised in its title - now that 18 interim Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) have been initialed and negotiations of full EPAs have been launched, what should African countries and regional EPA-groups do? Part two of the report analyzes the outcome of the EPA negotiations thus far, the interim EPAs' implications for the trade and related policies of p...

  9. Economic value addition, employment, and enterprise profiles of local authorities in the Free State, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danie Francois Toerien

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A strong underlying structure in the economic, demographic, and entrepreneurial domains of local authorities (municipalities in the Free State, South Africa was detected through cluster and other analyses. The structure is indicative of a system in which economic value addition, population size, employment creation, and entrepreneurial domains are dynamically linked. The agriculture, mining, and fuel and chemicals sectors dominate the economic value addition in some municipalities, whereas others are without a single dominating economic sector (i.e. they have well-balanced economies. The agriculture and households sectors are significant sources of employment in all municipalities. Cluster sequence analyses of the municipalities revealed statistically significant recurring patterns of value addition, employment, and entrepreneurship, further strengthening the detection of orderliness, which can promote mutual learning. The Metsimaholo municipality with a significant manufacturing base is an atypical Free State municipality and provides an outstanding example of the economic, demographic, and entrepreneurial impacts of value addition to local or external primary products.

  10. GLOBAL ECONOMIC CRISIS: A VIEW FROM SOUTH AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Bond

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Any analysis of the erratic unfolding of global economic crisis is bound to be hotly contested. This is particularly so in mid-1999, amid claims from Washington that the past two years' dangers of financial meltdown and deflation were averted and finally extinguished through a combination of policy measures and good fortune: slightly looser Federal Reserve monetary policy adopted in September 1998, in the immediate wake of the successful public-private bailout of the Long Term Capital Management hedge fund; a new $90 billion International Monetary Fund (IMF insurance scheme announced the following month; the convening of key countries in a Forum on Financial Stability; the lack of financial contagion (contrary to expectations in the wake of Brazil's January 1999 currency meltdown; the long-awaited revival (however infirm of the Japanese economy; new plans for somewhat more transparent budgetary and exchange rate systems in emerging markets; and a decision at the G-8 Cologne meeting in June 1999 to sell 10% of the IMF's gold to fund partial debt relief for the poorest Third World countries. Indeed many observers were surprised at IMF Managing Director Michel Camdessus's success at turning the debt relief strategy into a vehicle for tougher "Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility" conditions, just months after the IMF was criticised to the point of ridicule for its East Asian, Russian and Brazilian mishaps (effectively, granting $200 billion in bad loans over 15 months, in exchange for the application of inappropriate austerity measures.

  11. Human resource management in South Africa: A macro-economic audit

    OpenAIRE

    van Zyl, G

    1999-01-01

    There should be no doubt in the minds of important economic decision-makers that the widely reported lack of international competitiveness of the South African economy must be addressed as a matter of urgency. Low levels of labour productivity are often listed as one of the major reasons for the lack of international competitiveness. This paper attempts to research the macro aspects of human resource management in South Africa as an essential element of the current debate on the level of co...

  12. Techno-economic analysis of nuclear project management in South Africa / Kit Fung Jeffrey Chan

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Kit Fung Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This research report is a techno-economic analysis of the nuclear project management capacity in South Africa. It will focus on the project development phases of the nuclear expansion programme. The author has nuclear engineering training background and also currently involved in the Eskom new build programme (Medupi & Kusile) and the coal refurbishment projects. The following thinking philosophy is used to structure this research report: * Project management practise for nuclear projects glo...

  13. The prevalence of self-reported vision difficulty in economically disadvantaged regions of South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jyoti Jaggernath; Prasidh Ramson; Farai Chinanayi; Tom Zhuwau; Lene Øverland

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vision impairment, resulting in vision difficulties, is a leading cause of disability, and hence one of the key barriers for people to access education and employment, which may force them into poverty.Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of self-reported vision difficulties as an indicator of vision impairment in economically disadvantaged regions in South Africa, and to examine the relationship between self-reported vision difficulties and ...

  14. The "Out of Africa" Hypothesis, Human Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Quamrul; Galor, Oded

    2012-01-01

    This research argues that deep-rooted factors, determined tens of thousands of years ago, had a significant effect on the course of economic development from the dawn of human civilization to the contemporary era. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that in the course of the exodus of Homo sapiens out of Africa, variation in migratory distance from the cradle of humankind to various settlements across the globe affected genetic diversity and has had a direct long-lasting ef...

  15. The "Out of Africa" Hypothesis, Human Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Quamrul Ashraf; Oded Galor

    2011-01-01

    This research argues that deep-rooted factors, determined tens of thousands of years ago, had a significant effect on the course of economic development from the dawn of human civilization to the contemporary era. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that, in the course of the exodus of Homo sapiens out of Africa, variation in migratory distance from the cradle of humankind to various settlements across the globe affected genetic diversity and has had a long-lasting effect o...

  16. The 'Out of Africa' Hypothesis, Human Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Quamrul; Galor, Oded

    2011-01-01

    This research argues that deep-rooted factors, determined tens of thousands of years ago, had a significant effect on the course of economic development from the dawn of human civilization to the contemporary era. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that, in the course of the exodus of Homo sapiens out of Africa, variation in migratory distance from the cradle of humankind to various settlements across the globe affected genetic diversity and has had a long-lasting effect o...

  17. The "Out of Africa" hypothesis, human genetic diversity, and comparative economic development

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Quamrul; Galor, Oded

    2012-01-01

    This research argues that deep-rooted factors, determined tens of thousands of years ago, had a significant effect on the course of economic development from the dawn of human civilization to the contemporary era. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that in the course of the exodus of Homo sapiens out of Africa, variation in migratory distance from the cradle of humankind to various settlements across the globe affected genetic diversity and has had a direct long-lasting ef...

  18. The "Out of Africa" hypothesis, human genetic diversity, and comparative economic development

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Quamrul; Galor, Oded

    2010-01-01

    This research argues that deep-rooted factors, determined tens of thousands of years ago, had a signifcant effect on the course of economic development from the dawn of human civilization to the contemporary era. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that, in the course of the exodus of Homo sapiens out of Africa, variation in migratory distance from the cradle of humankind to various settlements across the globe affected genetic diversity and has had a long-lasting effect on...

  19. The 'Out of Africa' Hypothesis, Human Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Quamrul; Galor, Oded

    2013-01-01

    This research argues that deep-rooted factors, determined tens of thousands of years ago, had a significant effect on the course of economic development from the dawn of human civilization to the contemporary era. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that, in the course of the exodus of Homo sapiens out of Africa, variation in migratory distance from the cradle of humankind to various settlements across the globe affected genetic diversity and has had a lon...

  20. Institutions and Economic Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Dynamic Panel Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Kilishi; H. I. Mobolaji; M. A. Yaru; A. T. Yakubu

    2013-01-01

    There is growing emphasis on the role of institutions and governance on explaining Africa’s economic growth. However, it is not clear which of the institutions matter most. Therefore ,the objective of this paper is to answer two separate questions: (i) Do institutions rea lly matter in Sub-Saharan Africa?, (ii) If institutions matter, which of them matters most? Arellano and Bond first difference and Blundell-Bond System Generalize d Method of Moment (GMM) estimators were used to estimate the...

  1. Techno economic viability of desalination processes in South Africa / Laubscher, L.J.

    OpenAIRE

    Laubscher, Louis Jacobus

    2011-01-01

    The provision of fresh water to sustain current economic development and the ever increasing population is one of the world?s greatest challenges and will become increasingly acute in the immediate future. South Africa is currently utilizing 98% of its available fresh water and with the current growth in population and economy fresh water will rapidly become a limited resource. Cape Town, Port Elizabeth and Durban have been identified by the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry as coastal...

  2. Economic and ethical challenges of "land grabs" in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kleemann, Linda; Lay, Jann; Nolte, Kerstin; Ott, Konrad; Thiele, Rainer; Voget-Kleschin, Lieske

    2013-01-01

    For local people in sub-Saharan Africa, large land investment projects currently imply many risks and few benefits. Drawing on own ethical and economic research and using evidence from the authors' case studies in Kenya, Mali and Zambia and a new database of large-scale land acquisitions worldwide, this brief offers policy recommendations for host governments, investors and the international community so as to achieve a more favourable balance of risks and benefits in land investment projects...

  3. The price of corporate social responsibility: The case of black economic empowerment transactions in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, William E.; Todd M Alessandri; Black, Sylvia Sloan

    2005-01-01

    Since the demise of apartheid in South Africa, corporations have been encouraged to participate in the governmental goal of increasing corporate ownership by the black majority population. One vehicle that has arisen to help facilitate an increase in corporate ownership has been black economic empowerment (BEE) transactions. BEE transactions are essentially private placements of equity. Firms that have taken this socially activist position of selling portions of their equity, usually at a sub...

  4. From Apartheid to Neoliberalism : A study of the Economic Development in Post-Apartheid South Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakken, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the social and economic development in Post-Apartheid South Africa and the role of neoliberal advocates in the shaping of the country‘s broader developmental path after 1994. South Africa‘s ruling party, the African National Congress (ANC), inherited a two folded legacy. On the one hand it took over the most developed economy on the African continent. On the other, a legacy of massive inequality and racial segregation. This thesis describes why a neoliberal trajectory wa...

  5. Breaking the Barriers to Higher Economic Growth : Better Governance and Deeper Reforms in the Middle East and North Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Nabli, Mustapha Kamel

    2007-01-01

    Contents of the report are as follows: Long-term economic development: challenges and prospects for the Arab countries by Mustapha K. Nabli. Reform complementarities and economic growth in the Middle East and North Africa by Mustapha Kamel Nabli, and Marie-Ange Veganzones-Varoudakis. After Argentina: was MENA right to be cautious? By Mustapha K. Nabli. Restarting Arab economic reform by Mu...

  6. Laboratory Experiments in Teaching Public Economics and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špačková Zuzana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with classroom experiments in economics, which have been derived from laboratory experiments. These experiments cover a broad range of topics, from strictly economic ones (like market games or auctions to those with overlaps to other domains such as public policy. The paper discusses different methodologies of research and classroom experiments, introduces the benefits of the latter and presents a concrete teaching experiment used in public economics courses at the Faculty of Economics and Administration of Masaryk University. Another link between economic experiments and public policy is outlined here as well, namely the importance of experimental results for public policy makers.

  7. The economics of renewable energy expansion in rural Sub-Saharan Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerating development in Sub-Saharan Africa will require massive expansion of access to electricity-currently reaching only about one third of households. This paper explores how essential economic development might be reconciled with the need to keep carbon emissions in check. We develop a geographically explicit framework and use spatial modeling and cost estimates from recent engineering studies to determine where stand-alone renewable energy generation is a cost effective alternative to centralized grid supply. Our results suggest that decentralized renewable energy will likely play an important role in expanding rural energy access. However, it will be the lowest cost option for a minority of households in Africa, even when likely cost reductions over the next 20 years are considered. Decentralized renewables are competitive mostly in remote and rural areas, while grid connected supply dominates denser areas where the majority of households reside. These findings underscore the need to decarbonize the fuel mix for centralized power generation as it expands in Africa. - Research highlights: → Expansion of electricity access in Sub-Saharan Africa remains a development priority. → Low carbon options are important to reduce GHG emissions growth and avoid lock-ins. → Spatially explicit cost modeling guides choice of supply options. → Decentralized renewables are lowest cost for a significant minority of households. → Grid supply remains attractive, suggesting focus on decarbonizing centralized supply.

  8. Healthcare workers’ experiences of HIV testing in Tshwane, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamakwa S. Mataboge

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In an era when antiretroviral (ARV therapy has become part of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV prevention strategy, early testing and introduction to ARVs iscritical for improving public health outcomes in general and, in particular, the lives of people living with HIV. South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV as compared with the rest of the world. Initiated voluntary HIV counselling and testing and provider initiated counselling and testing (PICT are required in order to increase the uptake of HIV testing.Objectives: To explore and describe the experiences of healthcare workers who are themselves in need of HIV testing.Method: A descriptive, exploratory design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with the 26 healthcare workers who were involved in HIV testing in the Tshwane district of South Africa. The participants were sampled purposively from two healthcare settings. A thematic framework was used for data analysis.Results: There was a complication with regard to PICT as healthcare workers felt they could not initiate HIV testing for themselves and or their work colleagues without their confidentiality being compromised. This was complicated further by both the perceived and actual fear of stigmatisation and discrimination. It was difficult for qualified staff to support and encourage the uptake of HIV testing by students nurses as this was seen, albeit incorrectly, as targeting the students in a negative manner.Conclusion: There is a need for accessible HIV testing policies for healthcare workers in order to increase access to HIV testing and prevent the progression of the disease

  9. Breaking the Back of Economic and Financial (Il)Literacy in South Africa: A Critical Reflection of the Role of Economic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maistry, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    South African society is characterized by high levels of poverty and unemployment. South Africa has an embarrassingly uneven distribution of income as reflected by the Gini-coefficient. While much of the country's economic ailments can be attributed to poor and selective application of economic policies during the apartheid era, there is a growing…

  10. The financial and economic feasibility of rural household biodigesters for poor communities in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael T; Goebel, Jessica Schroenn; Blignaut, James N

    2014-02-01

    Given the persistence of systemic poverty in, most notably, the rural parts of South Africa, the question is whether the use of biodigesters as a source of energy offers potential solutions to some of the difficulties and development needs faced by people in these areas. At the core, this translates into whether this technology would be financially and economically feasible for installation and use by rural households. Here we conduct both a financial and an economic cost-benefit analysis in one such community based on survey data from 120 households. Analysis of these data and supporting literature reveals that a biodigester is not a financially feasible investment for a rural household. Substantial economic benefits are, however, found to make a biodigester a worthwhile investment from a broader societal perspective. This is a compelling argument for further study and the consideration of government support in the light of broader economy-wide benefits.

  11. How crude oil consumption impacts on economic growth of Sub-Saharan Africa?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the causality relationship between crude oil consumption and economic growth in twenty three Sub-Saharan African countries. We applied a multivariate panel Granger causality framework during 1985–2011 and we included crude oil price as the control variable of the model. The results indicate that in the short-run, there is a bi-directional causality relationship between crude oil consumption and economic growth in oil importing region and there is a uni-directional causality relationship from crude oil consumption to GDP in oil exporting region. However, in the long-run there is a bi-directional causality relationship between them in both regions. Therefore, reducing crude oil consumption without employing appropriate policies adversely impacts on economic growth of Sub-Saharan Africa. Hence, in order to reduce crude oil dependency of the region policymakers should pay more attention to the issue of energy efficiency programs. - Highlights: ► We examined Granger causality among oil consumption and GDP in Sub-Saharan Africa. ► Crude oil price is the control variable of the model. ► There is short run bi-directional causality among oil and GDP (oil importing). ► There is short run uni-directional causality from oil to GDP (oil exporting). ► There is a long run bi-directional causality among oil and GDP in both regions

  12. The contribution of African women to economic growth and development in post-colonial Africa : historical perspectives and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Akyeampong, Emmanuel; Fofack, Hippolyte

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws on history, anthropology, and economics to examine the dynamics and extent of women's contribution to growth and economic development in post-colonial Africa. The paper investigates the paradox of increased female enrollment in education and the persistence of gender discrimination in labor force participation; it also considers the overwhelming importance of the informal ...

  13. The Ghosts of Colonialism: Economic Inequity in Post-Apartheid South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Farkash, Andrew Tzvi

    2015-01-01

    Although political apartheid in South Africa ended in 1993, racial and economic inequity persisted. The end of White minority rule in government prompted the birth of the multicultural/non-racial “Rainbow Nation,” promising freedom and equality for all South Africans. However, the shift in political representation to Black majority rule in 1994—led by the African National Congress (ANC) and former president Nelson Mandela—failed to confront and reverse the vast inequities produced by the form...

  14. Working Paper 73 - Economic and Political Causes of Civil Wars in Africa: Some Econometric Results

    OpenAIRE

    John Anyanwu

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated whether civil wars in Africa have economic andpolitical causes. The model is based on the Collier-Hoeffler “greed” and “grievance”theory in which rebels will conduct a civil war for “loot-seeking” and “justiceseeking”reasons. Using logit models the propositions were tested empirically. Inparticular, six variables, GDP per capita growth rate in the preceding period, theamount of natural resources (proxied by primary commodity exports-GDP ratio),peace duration, de...

  15. The economics of renewable energy expansion in rural Sub-Saharan Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deichmann, Uwe; Murray, Siobhan [Development Research Group, World Bank, MSN MC3-300, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433-0002 (United States); Meisner, Craig [Europe and Central Asia Department, World Bank (United States); Wheeler, David [Center for Global Development, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Accelerating development in Sub-Saharan Africa will require massive expansion of access to electricity - currently reaching only about one third of households. This paper explores how essential economic development might be reconciled with the need to keep carbon emissions in check. We develop a geographically explicit framework and use spatial modeling and cost estimates from recent engineering studies to determine where stand-alone renewable energy generation is a cost effective alternative to centralized grid supply. Our results suggest that decentralized renewable energy will likely play an important role in expanding rural energy access. However, it will be the lowest cost option for a minority of households in Africa, even when likely cost reductions over the next 20 years are considered. Decentralized renewables are competitive mostly in remote and rural areas, while grid connected supply dominates denser areas where the majority of households reside. These findings underscore the need to decarbonize the fuel mix for centralized power generation as it expands in Africa. (author)

  16. Foreign Direct Investment, Economic Freedom and Economic Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kazeem Bello Ajide; Perekunah Bright Eregha

    2015-01-01

    The controversies that trailed whether direct impact of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on growth are conditional on a certain intermediating links or not, has made an inquiry into the likely mediating links in the FDI growth space a recurring subject of discourse.While the importance of institution has prominently featured as playing a vital role on the one hand, economic freedom (a key institutional component) has consistently been elected, as a good candidate surrog...

  17. Harnessing the sun. The economics of solar photovoltaic electricity in East Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondraczek, Janosch

    2014-08-29

    In this thesis, I address four distinct - yet closely linked - research questions related to the adoption of solar energy technologies in East Africa, which will be summarized in the following section. Chapter 2 starts with an analysis of the history, status and prospects of solar energy markets in Kenya and Tanzania, and a comparison of both countries. Chapter 3 investigates the main determinants of solar home system (SHS) adoption in Kenya, and lighting fuel choices among Kenyan households. Chapter 4 examines the cost of (and potential for) large-scale, grid-connected solar PV adoption in Kenya, and Chapter 5 looks at the influence of financing costs on the economics of solar PV on a global level. With my research I therefore contribute to the policy debate surrounding the African energy challenge by looking at two countries in particular, namely Kenya and Tanzania. I have chosen this geographic focus deliberately, as both countries - while well-endowed with sunshine - at present use only very little solar energy. Thus, while the practical focus on East Africa in three of the four chapters implies that the wider African energy challenge is not tackled head on, many of the findings and conclusions from the study of Kenya and Tanzania are in my view transferable to other countries in Africa, and probably even beyond that continent. In conducting research on the solar energy markets of East Africa over the past five years (2009-2014) I have certainly learnt that this continent does not offer the easiest research environment, and a clear focus on a small set of countries and only one renewable energy technology has been very important. Rigorous, high-quality research requires good information, such as data and statistics, as well as appropriate methods; and while the latter are in good supply, the former are painfully lacking for many aspects of life in East Africa. This poses a major challenge for (quantitative) research and has greatly impacted what I could and

  18. Harnessing the sun. The economics of solar photovoltaic electricity in East Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, I address four distinct - yet closely linked - research questions related to the adoption of solar energy technologies in East Africa, which will be summarized in the following section. Chapter 2 starts with an analysis of the history, status and prospects of solar energy markets in Kenya and Tanzania, and a comparison of both countries. Chapter 3 investigates the main determinants of solar home system (SHS) adoption in Kenya, and lighting fuel choices among Kenyan households. Chapter 4 examines the cost of (and potential for) large-scale, grid-connected solar PV adoption in Kenya, and Chapter 5 looks at the influence of financing costs on the economics of solar PV on a global level. With my research I therefore contribute to the policy debate surrounding the African energy challenge by looking at two countries in particular, namely Kenya and Tanzania. I have chosen this geographic focus deliberately, as both countries - while well-endowed with sunshine - at present use only very little solar energy. Thus, while the practical focus on East Africa in three of the four chapters implies that the wider African energy challenge is not tackled head on, many of the findings and conclusions from the study of Kenya and Tanzania are in my view transferable to other countries in Africa, and probably even beyond that continent. In conducting research on the solar energy markets of East Africa over the past five years (2009-2014) I have certainly learnt that this continent does not offer the easiest research environment, and a clear focus on a small set of countries and only one renewable energy technology has been very important. Rigorous, high-quality research requires good information, such as data and statistics, as well as appropriate methods; and while the latter are in good supply, the former are painfully lacking for many aspects of life in East Africa. This poses a major challenge for (quantitative) research and has greatly impacted what I could and

  19. Insurance penetration and economic growth in Africa: Dynamic effects analysis using Bayesian TVP-VAR approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Olayungbo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the dynamic interactions between insurance and economic growth in eight African countries for the period of 1970–2013. Insurance demand is measured by insurance penetration which accounts for income differences across the sample countries. A Bayesian Time Varying Parameter Vector Auto regression (TVP-VAR model with stochastic volatility is used to analyze the short run and the long run among the variables of interest. Using insurance penetration as a measure of insurance to economic growth, we find positive relationship for Egypt, while short-run negative and long-run positive effects are found for Kenya, Mauritius, and South Africa. On the contrary, negative effects are found for Algeria, Nigeria, Tunisia, and Zimbabwe. Implementation of sound financial reforms and wide insurance coverage are proposed recommendations for insurance development in the selected African countries.

  20. The Agricultural Industry And Economic Growth In South Africa – An Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. TEWELDEMEDHIN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study measures the source of short-term agricultural economic growth in South Africa, using the Exact Maximum Likelihood (EML method by categorizing the variables into five main categories: cyclical reversion, structural policies and institutions, stabilization policies, cyclical volatility and external conditions. The statistically significant finding of structural policies and institutional category variables imply that the sector growth was achieved with improved education, financial depth, and trade openness. However, the negative relationship of financial depth (RDGDP indicates the sector is suffering from a debt crisis. Therefore, farmers need to follow an effective debt management system. The cyclical reversion was found to be statistically significant and related negatively. This shows that there is an important connection between the business cycle and agricultural economic growth.

  1. Socio-economic impacts and determinants of parasitic weed infestation in rainfed rice systems of sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    N'cho, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: rice; weed; weed management practices, adoption, impact, parasitic weeds; Rhamphicarpa fistulosa; Striga asiatica; Striga hermonthica, double hurdle model; multivariate probit, productivity, stochastic frontier analysis, data envelopment analysis, directional distance function, sub-Saharan Africa, Benin, Cote d’Ivoire, Tanzania. Socio-economic impacts and determinants of parasitic weed infestation in rainfed rice systems of sub-Saharan Africa Simon A. N’cho Abstract Ric...

  2. Relational issues of law and economic integration in Africa : perspectives from constitutional, public and private international law.

    OpenAIRE

    Oppong, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis examines how relational issues of law in economic integration are being approached in Africa. At its core, relational issues deal with the legal interactions among community, national, regional and international legal systems within the context of economic integration. The theory is that effective economic integration is the product of properly structuring and managing – within well-defined legal frameworks – vertical, horizontal and vertico-horizontal relations among states, lega...

  3. Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerer, Colin F; Dreber, Anna; Forsell, Eskil; Ho, Teck-Hua; Huber, Jürgen; Johannesson, Magnus; Kirchler, Michael; Almenberg, Johan; Altmejd, Adam; Chan, Taizan; Heikensten, Emma; Holzmeister, Felix; Imai, Taisuke; Isaksson, Siri; Nave, Gideon; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Razen, Michael; Wu, Hang

    2016-03-25

    The replicability of some scientific findings has recently been called into question. To contribute data about replicability in economics, we replicated 18 studies published in the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics between 2011 and 2014. All of these replications followed predefined analysis plans that were made publicly available beforehand, and they all have a statistical power of at least 90% to detect the original effect size at the 5% significance level. We found a significant effect in the same direction as in the original study for 11 replications (61%); on average, the replicated effect size is 66% of the original. The replicability rate varies between 67% and 78% for four additional replicability indicators, including a prediction market measure of peer beliefs. PMID:26940865

  4. Mathematics Registers in Indigenous Languages: Experiences from South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Through reporting on an initiative in South Africa that aimed to provide epistemological access to teachers and learners of mathematics (and science) through translating mathematical concepts into two indigenous languages, this paper argues for the urgent development of mathematical registers in indigenous languages for mathematics and …

  5. Understanding growth of East Africa highland banana: experiments and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyombi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Key words: leaf area; radiation interception; QUEFTS model; fertilizer recovery fractions; nutrient mass fractions; crop growth; calibration; validation; radiation use efficiency; sensitivity analysis East Africa Highland banana yields on smallholder farms in the Great Lakes region are small (11−2

  6. The East Asian Development Experience: Policy Lessons, Implications, and Recommendations for Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA Global Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashford C. Chea

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the development experience of East Asia and draws lessons for Sub-Saharan Africa in building global competitiveness. It starts with a historical perspective of both regions’ developmental trajectories. This is followed by an analysis of the causes of East Asia’s superior economic performance and development and SSA underdevelopment. The article also draws policy lessons from East Asia development strategies for SSA global competitiveness. The paper ends with a presentation of policy implications and recommendations for building SSA global competitiveness in the region’s efforts to transform from poverty to prosperity.

  7. Uranium resources in South Africa: a review of geology and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South African uranium resources are hosted dominantly by quartz-pebble conglomerates with associated gold mineralisation, with the rest being found in sandstones and coal in the Karoo Supergroup. South Africa's known uranium resources, as at 1 January 1993, stands at 297 900 tonnes U, but in terms of economic viability in the current market situation they are substantially lower. Uranium production in South Africa is at present inextricably linked to the gold mining industry, which is in a parlous state, with many mines facing closure if a sustained rise in the gold price does not come about in the near future. Gold production is falling steadily because of the state of the gold market, and uranium is an inevitable casualty. The dependence of the uranium industry on the unpredictable and volatile gold market is unsatisfactory, and alternative sources of uranium are being sought. Attention has been focussed on the Karoo Supergroup which is the only other potentially viable source of uranium outside the Witwatersrand Basin. Factors which were re-examined are the influence of stratigraphy, source areas, tectonics and volcanism on the distribution of uranium. Uranium mineralisation in the Namaqualand Metamorphic Complex, which has associated monazite ores, is briefly mentioned. (author). 16 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  8. Environmental and resource economics in South Africa: Status quo and lessons for developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wise

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the potential contributions of environmental and resource economics (ERE to the achievement of sustainable development in developing countries; and highlight the limitations associated with applying ERE within a developing-country context, using examples from South Africa. We fInd that ERE has much to offer in helping to overcome the challenges associated with sustainable development in developing countries, but that the developing-country context needs to be taken into account before applying tools and methods that were designed with the developedcountry context in mind. In particular, the unique and often complex socioecological context of developing countries needs to be considered and integrated into policy and management prescriptions.

  9. Economic viability of a residential building integrated photovoltaic generator in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziuku, Sosten; Meyer, Edson L. [Fort Hare Institute of Technology, University of Fort Hare, Private Bag X1314, Alice 5700 (South Africa)

    2012-07-01

    A photovoltaic (PV) generator was integrated onto the north facing roof of an energy efficient house in South Africa. The building integrated photovoltaic generator (BIPV) supplies power to the household loads and the grid and is also the roof facade. This paper presents an economic evaluation of the viability of the BIPV system using methods of investment analysis. The capital cost and life cycle cost of energy were found to be ZAR 52 631-58/kWp and ZAR 1-94/kWh respectively. The payback period was 8 years and adjusted internal rate of return 9.3%. Parametric sensitivity analysis revealed that a 50% decrease in module price results in a 29% reduction in life cycle cost of energy and more than 50% reduction in payback period.

  10. Giving tranexamic acid to reduce surgical bleeding in sub-Saharan Africa: an economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perel Pablo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of safe and effective alternatives to blood transfusion is a public health priority. In sub-Saharan Africa, blood shortage is a cause of mortality and morbidity. Blood transfusion can also transmit viral infections. Giving tranexamic acid (TXA to bleeding surgical patients has been shown to reduce both the number of blood transfusions and the volume of blood transfused. The objective of this study is to investigate whether routinely administering TXA to bleeding elective surgical patients is cost effective by both averting deaths occurring from the shortage of blood, and by preventing infections from blood transfusions. Methods A decision tree was constructed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of providing TXA compared with no TXA in patients with surgical bleeding in four African countries with different human immunodeficiency virus (HIV prevalence and blood donation rates (Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania and Botswana. The principal outcome measures were cost per life saved and cost per infection averted (HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C averted in 2007 International dollars ($. The probability of receiving a blood transfusion with and without TXA and the risk of blood borne viral infection were estimated. The impact of uncertainty in model parameters was explored using one-way deterministic sensitivity analyses. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed using Monte Carlo simulation. Results The incremental cost per life saved is $87 for Kenya and $93 for Tanzania. In Botswana and South Africa, TXA administration is not life saving but is highly cost saving since fewer units of blood are transfused. Further, in Botswana the administration of TXA averts one case of HIV and four cases of Hepatitis B (HBV per 1,000 surgical patients. In South Africa, one case of HBV is averted per 1,000 surgical patients. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the model. Conclusion An economic

  11. The new international financial architecture: Lessons and experiences from Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Erick R Outa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the requirements and successes of the New International Financial Architecture (NIFA) on transparency and corporate governance from a global perspective with a special focus on Africa. In recent years, transparency, accountability and governance have become key topics with many countries around the world having adopted International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and corporate governance codes. The outcomes of these initiatives have been unconvinc...

  12. The prevalence of self-reported vision difficulty in economically disadvantaged regions of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin S. Naidoo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vision impairment, resulting in vision difficulties, is a leading cause of disability, and hence one of the key barriers for people to access education and employment, which may force them into poverty.Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of self-reported vision difficulties as an indicator of vision impairment in economically disadvantaged regions in South Africa, and to examine the relationship between self-reported vision difficulties and socio-economic markers of poverty, namely, income, education and health service needs.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in economically disadvantaged districts to collect data from households on poverty and health, including vision difficulty. As visual acuity measurements were not conducted, the researchers used the term vision difficulty as an indicator of vision impairment. Data were collected from 27 districts (74 901 respondents. Logistic regression analysis and chi-square tests were used to determine bivariate relationships between variables and self-reported vision difficulty. Kernel density estimators were used for age, categorised by self-reported and not reported vision difficulty.Results: Prevalence of self-reported vision difficulty was 11.2% (95% CI, 8.7% – 13.7%. More women (12.7% compared to men (9.5% self-reported vision difficulty (p < 0.01. Self-reported vision difficulty was higher (14.2% for respondents that do not spend any money. A statistically significant relationship was found between the highest level of education and self-reporting of vision difficulty; as completed highest level of education increased, self-reporting of vision difficulty became lower (p < 0.01. A significantly higher prevalence of self-reported vision difficulty was found in respondents who are employed (p < 0.01, 17% (95% CI: 12.8% – 21.1%.Conclusion: The evidence from this study suggests associations between socio-economic factors and vision

  13. The Role of Primary Commodities in Economic Development: Sub-Saharan Africa Versus the Rest of the World

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Carmignani; Abdur Chowdhury

    2007-01-01

    The impact of the dependence on primary commodities for economic development is analysed within the framework of growth regressions. While there is no evidence of a generalized primary commodity curse, reliance on primary commodities does retard growth in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Which factors account for theis SSA specificity. Some suggest that SSA specializes in commodities that are not conductive to economic growth and that SSA depends on primary commodities more deeply than the rest of t...

  14. Optimal Design of an Experiment in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Werner; Ponce de Leon, Antonio C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of optimal design principles in an experiment examining individual decision making under risk. It provides general principles on how to conduct experiments in a probit model estimation situation and illust rates the benefit of those techniques through equivalent number of observations. (author's abstract)

  15. Tourism in Middle East and North Africa : A Strategy to Promote Recovery, Economic Diversification and Job Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Simon C.; Malinska, Jana; McConaghy, Peter; Al Rowais, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Often described as the cradle of civilization, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region boasts rich cultural assets, and is the historical origin of major religions including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. This cultural heritage, coupled with the region s rich natural wonders, has made tourism a critical sector for economic and social development in the region. Tourism is a vital ...

  16. The ASEAN Economic Community and the European experience

    OpenAIRE

    Plummer, Michael G.; Reid W. Click

    2006-01-01

    In November 2002, it was proposed at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Heads of Government meeting in Phnom Penh that the region should consider the possibility of creating an ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) by 2020. The name is evocative, for an Economic Community immediately brings to mind the European experience. In fact, when the Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) was re-inventing itself, it was proposed that the words behind the organization's acronym be replaced w...

  17. Economic Specialisation, Resource Variability, and the Origins of Intensive Agriculture in Eastern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew I J Davies

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Eastern Africa contrasting ecological zones within relatively short distances encourage economic specialisations which are reliant upon one another. Connections between different economic groups are facilitated by a variety of institutionalised networks that encourage the movement of both goods and people across boundaries. The role of livestock as essential capital ensures a strong impetus to increase agricultural production for exchange while, at the same time, the need to acquire livestock through ties to the pastoral community ensures that certain agriculturalists are confined to relatively limited areas at the margins of pastoral zones. In contrast to traditional models of agricultural development, the shift to intensive techniques may not be a radical departure from earlier practices, but rather much less labour intensive and gradually developed, aimed at expanding and improving natural zones of high productivity. This situation may have been exasperated by climatic fluctuations while lineage systems of social organisation encourage the localised marginalisation of politically unified descent groups and the development and expansion of large-scale agricultural works.

  18. Measuring the Economic Value of Pre-MBA Work Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaple, Ronald N.; Johnston, Mark W.; Whittingham, Keith L.

    2010-01-01

    Pre-MBA work experience is required for admission to many graduate schools of business. In the present study, MBA graduates with a wide range of pre-MBA work experience were surveyed to assess the economic value of such work experience. No evidence was found of a systematic financial advantage to students from working for several years before…

  19. Co-exploratory climate risk workshops: Experiences from urban Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Steynor

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the context for a place-based co-exploratory analysis of climate risks, the elements and steps incorporated in the approach, reflections on the effectiveness of this approach in addressing multi-stressor, place-based decision-making and the challenges that still remain in further refining the approach. The co-exploration approach is complementary to the objectives of the Global Framework for Climate Services and provides lessons for uptake of climate information into urban adaptation planning in Africa.

  20. Unearthing White Academics' Experience of Teaching in Higher Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawitz, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The real and imagined racial differences and similarities between groups of students and staff have consequences in everyday experiences in South Africa. One aspect of engaging with the challenges facing higher education transformation post-Apartheid is through understanding how the racialized context interacts with the experience of teaching.…

  1. AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS RESEARCH AND THE EXPERIMENT STATION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Debertin, David L.; Bradford, Garnett L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of agricultural economics research within the land-grant university system. Fundamental differences between research in the biological sciences and the social sciences are delineated. Implications of these differences for experiment station research programs are discussed. Recommendations are made which have potential for enhancing the role of agricultural economics within colleges of agriculture.

  2. Regional developments in energy systems, economics and climate. 6.3. Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, I.; Mackenzie, G.; Abdallah, S. (Risoe DTU, UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark)); Zhou, P. (EECG (Botswana))

    2008-12-15

    Most of the nations of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), with the notable exceptions of South Africa and a few others, fall into the category of 'least developed countries' (LDCs), typically with per-capita GDP below USD 2,000. LDCs are characterised by industrial sectors that provide only a small proportion of GDP. Although the contribution of agriculture to GDP also appears low, most people in these countries depend largely on agriculture for survival. Poverty levels-the fraction of people with an income below 1 USD per day-are in general above 40%. While provision of basic services like clean water and sanitation is improving in many LDCs, access to modern forms of energy like electricity and gas remains extremely low. The low level of economic development determines the low level of energy consumption, and also the forms of energy used. Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the world's lowest per-capita consumption rates of modern energy, and even this is declining, since the rate of electrification cannot keep pace with population increase. The low level of electrification is due to a number of factors including poverty in general, a highly-dispersed rural population, a low degree of industrialisation, a historically inefficient energy sector, and difficulties in accessing capital to finance the development of modern energy sources. For LDCs throughout this region the major part of energy is used in households. By far the largest part of this energy is used for cooking and comes from traditional biomass such as firewood, charcoal and agricultural waste, which supplies as much as 95% of all energy consumed in some countries, and an average of 81% for the whole SSA region. The major developmental challenges for all the countries in the region may be expressed in terms of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Although there is no specific MDG for energy, it is now widely accepted that access to energy contributes, and is indeed essential to the achievement of

  3. THE DIRECT IMPACT OF ECONOMIC GROWTH ON THE SINO-AFRICA COOPERATION A special case of Zhejiang province and Ghana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Kwame Agbanyo

    2014-01-01

    The goal for economic policy thus became the emulation of the economic structure found in Venice and in Holland, the bringing together of as many diverse professions as possible, all subject to increasing returns and technology change. Development strategy became one of the benchmarking and emulation. (Erik s. Reinert: How countries got rich and how poor countries stay poor, 2007, p95).The purpose of this study is to gain deep understanding of the impact of economic development on the China-Africa cooperation.

  4. Blood Trials: Transfusions, Injections, and Experiments in Africa, 1890-1920.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunseri, Thaddeus

    2016-07-01

    From about 1880 to 1920, a culture of medical experimentation promoted blood transfusion as a therapy for severe anemia in Europe, which was applied in German East Africa in 1892 for a case of blackwater fever, a complication of malaria afflicting mainly Europeans. This first case of blood transfusion in Africa, in which an African's blood was transfused into a German official, complicates the dominant narrative that blood transfusions in Africa came only after World War I. Medical researchers moreover experimented with blood serum therapies on human and animal subjects in Europe and Africa, injecting blood of different species, "races" and ethnicities into others to demonstrate parasite transmissibility and to discover vaccines for diseases such as malaria, sleeping sickness, and yellow fever. While research in German colonies is highlighted here, this was a transnational medical culture that crossed borders and oceans. This research is of interest as a possible early pathway for the epidemic spread of HIV and other zoonoses in Africa and the world, which biomedical researchers have identified as emerging in West-Central Africa sometime around the turn of the twentieth century. PMID:26514397

  5. Environmental and economic impacts of livestock productivity increase in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Luis Alfaro

    2012-12-01

    Livestock production in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is not matching the annual 2.5 % growth of its population. Regional per capita meat and milk production corresponds, respectively, to about 13 and 8 % of developed countries indicators. Livestock performances in this region have decreased within the last 30 years. In fact, SSA, with a 12 % bovine extraction rate against a world average of 21 %, includes about 16 % of world cattle, only producing 6 and 2.6 % of global meat and milk, respectively. These low performances have economic and environmental consequences reflecting the necessity for upgrading livestock managing skills in the region. This effort includes various components such as sanitary prophylaxis, reproduction, nutrition, and in particular, substantial increase in livestock yield for human consumption. This will allow for an improved animal and pasture management and soil preservation, enhancing meat production and decreasing methane and nitrogen emissions from enteric fermentation and manure processing. These environmental gains due to increased livestock off-take rates can represent relevant credits in the global Environmental Carbon Market under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Kyoto protocol. These credits can be used for investments in livestock essential services and marketing facilities leading to improved productivity.

  6. Reconcilability of Socio-Economic Development and Environmental Conservation in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudi, Lisa-Marie; Azadi, Hossein; Witlox, Frank

    2012-04-01

    Are the achievements of sustainable development and the improvement of environmental standards mutually exclusive in the 21st century? Is there a possibility to combine the two? This study is an effort to investigate the mutual exclusiveness of the two policy areas and asks for the necessity and possibility to combine the two with a reference to Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). After describing the historical, geographical, and climatic backgrounds of SSA, negative effects of global warming and local environmentally harmful practices are discussed. Subsequently, the appropriate development measures for the region are elaborated in order to understand their compatibility with regards to improving the environment. It is concluded that to change the dependency on agriculture, the economy needs to be restructured towards technologies. Furthermore, it is found that there is a direct link between global warming and economic efficiency. Theories, which imply that some regions are simply 'too poor to be green', are investigated and rebutted by another theory, which states that it is indeed possible to industrialize in an environmentally friendly way. It follows that environmental and development measures are interconnected, equally important and can be reconciled. The paper finally concludes that the threat posed by global warming and the previously practised environmentally-harmful local measures might be so pressing that it may be too tragic to go for 'develop first and clean up later' approach.

  7. Effect of Black Economic Empowerment on profit and competitiveness of firms in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewert P.J. Kleynhans

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The key obstacle hindering optimal profitability levels and competitiveness in firms in South Africa is the application of labour legislation policies and tools aimed at narrowing the income gap between different racial groups and resolving inequality amongst a diverse workforce.Research purpose: This article determined whether the implementation of a Black Economic Empowerment (BEE policy by companies has a positive effect on their growth in terms of profits and competitiveness.Motivation for the study: This study determined whether the implementation of BEE could be profitable for companies.Research design, approach and method: A quantitative study was undertaken in order to find empirical evidence supporting the relation between high BEE Scores, profitability and competitiveness. The empirical investigation utilised regression analysis, correlations and other methods, based on data between January 2009 and December 2011. The BEE Scorecard was used to obtain BEE scores of the top 50 BEE companies. Thereafter, the top 50 companies’ financial information was gathered from the Johannesburg Securities Exchange.Main findings: The implementation of BEE within companies has a positive effect on profitability, turnover and investment. Numerous factors have, however, been hindering,while other factors enhanced the success of BEE.Practical/managerial implications: The findings encourage mangers to engage in BEE as it may facilitate higher profits and indicates where labour legislation could be improved.Contribution/value-add: Value was added through new research determining the effects of BEE and labour legislation on profitability and competitiveness of firms on a micro-level.

  8. Self-selection in economic experiments: Any difference between laboratory and internet-based experiments?

    OpenAIRE

    Gruener , Sven

    2015-01-01

    In comparison to traditional laboratory experiments, internet-based experiments reduce the experimental subject’s opportunity costs. Consequently, the samples of these two experiments will likely be different in spite of size and composition. This finding is important to consider when interpreting economic experiments because self-selection may bias the external validity of experiments.

  9. LITERATURE AND IDENTITY: AFRICA AND THE DIASPORIC EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Benedict Binebai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature across ages and continents have functioned as the embodiment and interpreter of a peoples’ culture, a conveyor of a people’s language as well as their philosophy, politics, psychology and national character. This is essentially a literary tradition influenced by the search for our roots. Literature whether cast in the mode of agitation, negotiation or based on historical reconstruction or mythological recreation has a touch of identity. That quest for distinctiveness makes literature an epistemological body for contest and negotiation and as a carrier of eccentricity. Across the world, works have been written based on peoples’ culture. Thus, using the post colonialism theory, this paper investigates the dialectical link between literature and identity in Africa and the diaspora. It argues that literature across generic boundaries is a fundamental indicator of identity. Moreover that literature is empowered by identity as identity can also be empowered by literature. The paper concludes that the symbiotic relationship between literature and identity is a fundamental linkage to national and racial heritage.

  10. What does an inventory of recent innovation experiences tell us about agricultural innovation in Africa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triomphe, B.; Floquet, A.; Kamau, G.; Letty, B.; Vodouche, S.D.; Ng’ang’a, T.; Stevens, J.; Berg, van den J.; Selemna, N.; Bridier, B.; Crane, T.A.; Almekinders, C.J.M.; Waters-Bayer, A.; Hocdé, H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Within the context of the European-funded JOLISAA project (JOint Learning in and about Innovation Systems in African Agriculture), an inventory of agricultural innovation experiences was made in Benin, Kenya and South Africa. The objective was to assess multi-stakeholder agricultural innova

  11. Enhancing Critical Consciousness through a Cross-Cultural Immersion Experience in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Mi; VanVoorhis, Richard W.; Ellenwood, Audrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Using phenomenological approaches, the author explored the meanings and essences of a cross-cultural immersion experience in South Africa among counseling master's-level students. Five core themes--the meaning of being American, sociopolitical awareness, engagement with South Africans and their communities, appreciation of life, and commitment to…

  12. What Does an Inventory of Recent Innovation Experiences Tell Us about Agricultural Innovation in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triomphe, Bernard; Floquet, Anne; Kamau, Geoffrey; Letty, Brigid; Vodouhe, Simplice Davo; Ng'ang'a, Teresiah; Stevens, Joe; van den Berg, Jolanda; Selemna, Nour; Bridier, Bernard; Crane, Todd; Almekinders, Cornelia; Waters-Bayer, Ann; Hocde, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Within the context of the European-funded JOLISAA project (JOint Learning in and about Innovation Systems in African Agriculture), an inventory of agricultural innovation experiences was made in Benin, Kenya and South Africa. The objective was to assess multi-stakeholder agricultural innovation processes involving smallholders. Approach:…

  13. Race and Assessment Practice in South Africa: Understanding Black Academic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawitz, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to transform the racialised system of higher education in South Africa inherited from apartheid, there has been little research published that interrogates the relationship between race and the experience of academic staff within the South African higher education environment. Drawing on critical discourse analysis and critical…

  14. A tale of two sisters : Investigating the socio-economic outcomes of teen childbearing in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kakal, Tasneem Aliasgar

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis mixed methods study attempts to understand the effect of teenage childbearing in determining future socio-economic consequences for teenage mothers. This is accomplished by assessing the effect of a teen birth on outcomes such as educational attainment, employment, welfare and poverty in South Africa by applying a sibling-fixed effects technique. Using the National Income Dynamics Study dataset (2012), the paper compares siblings to control for family background heterogeneity...

  15. Occurrence of Eimeria Species Parasites on Small-Scale Commercial Chicken Farms in Africa and Indication of Economic Profitability

    OpenAIRE

    Fornace, KM; Clark, EL; Macdonald, SE; B. Namangala; E. Karimuribo; Awuni, JA; Thieme, O; Blake, DP; Rushton, J.

    2013-01-01

    Small-scale commercial poultry production is emerging as an important form of livestock production in Africa, providing sources of income and animal protein to many poor households, yet the occurrence and impact of coccidiosis on this relatively new production system remains unknown. The primary objective of this study was to examine Eimeria parasite occurrence on small-scale commercial poultry farms in Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. Additionally, farm economic viability was measured by calculat...

  16. Middle East and North Africa Quarterly Economic Brief, January 2014 : Growth Slowdown Heightens the Need for Reforms

    OpenAIRE

    Devarajan, Shantayanan; Mottaghi, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing regional tensions, together with a challenging (albeit slightly improving) external environment, have hit the economies of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region hard. Economic growth is slowing, fiscal buffers are depleting, unemployment is rising, and inflation is mounting in seven of the region’s most vulnerable economies-- Egypt, Tunisia, Iran, Lebanon, Jordan, Yemen and Libya. Short-term policy actions such as increasing public sector wages and subsidies—aimed at reducing...

  17. Rebalancing China's Economic Growth:Some Insights from Japan's Experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoyuki Fukumoto; Ichiro Muto

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges China faces is reshaping its heavily investment-driven mode of economic growth.By investigating how the rebalancing of Japan's economic growth mode was realized in the 1970s,we indicate that it is essential in rebalancing to correct the distortions in factor cost (labor cost and capital cost) in a harmonious way.In addition,we refer to Japan's experience to indicate that rebalancing of domestic growth does not necessarily lead to external rebalancing.

  18. Landslides in Equatorial Africa: Identifying culturally, technically and economically feasible resilience strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervyn, Matthieu; de Hontheim, Astrid; Dewitte, Olivier; Jacobs, Liesbet; Maes, Jan; Mertens, Kewan; Trefois, Philippe; Vranken, Liesbet; Poesen, Jean

    2014-05-01

    Landslides (LS) cause significant impacts in many equatorial regions. Their impact depends on their size and speed, the elements at risk and the vulnerability of these elements. This problem is particularly acute in Equatorial Africa characterized by mountainous topography, intense rains, deep weathering profiles, high population density and high vulnerability to geohazards. Every year LS cause fatalities and result in structural and functional damage to infrastructure and properties. Losses from LS are expected to increase in the future in response to the demographic pressure causing more development in landslide-prone areas (LSPA), deforestation and associated changes in land use and land cover, and the changing climate causing higher or more intense rainfalls. Many studies investigated how natural factors and human activities control the occurrence or re-activation of LS. These studies typically delivered susceptibility maps but these are insufficient to lead to efficient risk management. Building resilience requires to have a true hazard estimate, accounting not only for the spatial distribution of future LS but also for their temporal occurrence and the hazard intensity, to quantitatively analyse the socio-economic consequences of LS and to identify effective resilience strategies that are cost-effective, technically efficient and that are culturally acceptable and adapted to the livelihoods of the vulnerable population. Such an analysis is crucial as it enables to provide practical recommendations for households and policy makers to mitigate LS-related damages. This project focuses on 4 representative study areas known for having suffered severely from rainfall-triggered LS in Uganda (Mount Elgon, Mount Rwenzori) and SW and NW Cameroon (Mount Cameroon, Bamenda). In two of these regions, some preliminary studies on LS characteristics and susceptibility mapping have been carried out, while hazard maps, a socio-economic impact analysis and resilience strategies

  19. Middle East and North Africa Economic Developments and Prospects, January 2011 : Sustaining the Recovery and Looking Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    The impact of the global financial and economic crisis on the Middle East and North Africa region was relatively mild. Lack of integration and a large public sector helped insulate the region to some extent, but now these and other factors are slowing down the speed of its economic recovery. The report examines the major factors threatening the recovery and those that obstruct long-term growth – especially non-oil export growth, which in net terms contributed little to regional growth during ...

  20. Investing in Africa's Youth (Based on the African Economic Outlook 2008). Policy Insights No. 62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Some 133 million young people (half of Africa's young) are illiterate; many have few or no skills. Such figures tell their own story: African youth need vocational training. This brief reports that technical and vocational systems in Africa are poorly funded and managed, and advocates for the integration of skill-development strategies into…

  1. Exploring the authenticity of the tourist experience in culture heritage tourism in South Africa / Milena Ivanovic

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanovic, Milena

    2011-01-01

    The research question addressed by this dissertation is: How is the tourist experience formed and what constitutes the authenticity of the tourist experience for two market segments (motivated and not motivated by learning) of tourists visiting (political) cultural heritage sites in South Africa. The study explores the correlation between three types of authenticity, namely objective, constructed and existential on two independent tourist samples, motivated and not motivated by...

  2. Employment creation through public works programmes and projects in South Africa: Experiences and potentials

    OpenAIRE

    W. D. Thwala

    2008-01-01

    Purpose/objectives: The aim of this article is to look at the experiences, problems and the potential contribution of employment creation programmes in alleviating the unemployment problem in other African countries through the construction of public infrastructure through the use of labour-intensive methods. The article then describes the problems and experiences that have been encountered in South Africa in relation to employment creation through the construction of public infrastruct...

  3. Private Enterprise-led Economic Development in Africa:A Socio-cultural Perspective. Doctoral Dissertation Volume 1

    OpenAIRE

    Kuada, John

    2014-01-01

    As a continent, Africa occupies nearly a quarter of the World’s land area and home for one-seventh of its population. But a large proportion of the people, especially those living in Sub-Sahara Africa (SSA) are mired in abject poverty. Recent years have witnessed some positive developments. Six of the world’s ten fastest-growing economies in 2010 were from there. But their growth has failed to translate into job creation and inclusive development. This experience has encouraged a renewed sear...

  4. A review of literature on drug use in Sub-Saharan Africa countries and its economic and social implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affinnih, Y H

    1999-02-01

    The drug problem in Africa cannot be seen as an isolated phenomenon but rather as part of the larger narcoscape which partakes of the fluid yet disjunctive qualities of Appadurai's landscapes. In this volatile environment, the transformation of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) nations from transit points in an international drug network to consumer countries seems inevitable. At the same time, Africa has undergone rapid economic and social changes that have facilitate this shift. A review of the literature reveals that there is a pressing need to investigate current trends and patterns of drug use in the countries of SSA. These nations, struggling with the consequences of AIDS, famine, refugees, and political unrest, could ill afford to address the consequences of widespread drug use. It is critical, therefore, that they address the drug problem before it reaches crisis proportions. To do so, they need information describing the magnitude of the problem as well as a firm understanding of the relationships between drug use and crime, unemployment, violence, and the breakdown of family life. The more that is known about the nature and complexity of drug use in Africa, the better policymakers can formulate a sound and effective strategy to curtail the drug "epidemic."

  5. Issues in African land policy: Experiences from Southern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Julian F.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides an overview of current land policy issues in the southern African region, drawn from assessments of six individual country experiences. It sets out the issues surrounding land policy development and land reform in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe, and of wider relevance in the region as a whole. The first chapter offers an overview of major land policy issues facing the countries of the region. Chapter Two provides a brief review of recent literature which assesses the rel...

  6. Ethanolamine experience at Koeberg nuclear power station, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following testing of ethanolamine as an alternative to ammonia on Unit 2 in 1997, Unit 1 of the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station was converted to ethanolamine in 1998. The Unit has now operated for just over one and a half cycle on ETA. The decision to change to ETA was made to achieve further reductions in feedwater iron transport. Koeberg has always operated ammonia/hydrazine AVT control and ran the feedwater pH at 9.6-9.7 before the changeover. The original pH levels were increased in response to concerns over flow-accelerated corrosion. A by product of reducing the FAC rates is a reduction in iron transport. Although nominally all-ferrous, there are a number of small copper-containing components and the Koeberg Engineering Department would not countenance a further increase in ammonia concentrations in case of copper transport to the SGs. This led to ethanolamine being selected as an alternative to ammonia. The Koeberg condensate polishing plant has been modified, largely to accommodate ETA operation, but is not currently operable in the modified configuration. It is therefore on standby while ETA is implemented. The SG blowdown demineralizers have begun to be operated past ammonia/ETA break, but optimisation is largely dependent on CPP availability in the modified configuration. This paper documents the Koeberg experience to date of operation under an ethanolamine-AVT regime. As one of the few plants outside of the USA to have changed to ethanolamine, it is hoped we can make a valuable contribution for other non-US plants considering such a move. (authors)

  7. "State of the Art" or Dismal Science? The Economic Debate in South Africa since 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, David

    2016-01-01

    Both the loss of prestige caused to mainstream economics by the global financial crisis and the resurgence of heterodox economics have proved to be superficial. "Where it counts" (in the teaching of economics, in the most important policy circles, and in the most prestigious journals) neoliberal economics has proven resilient to dissent.…

  8. Competition in electricity spot markets. Economic theory and international experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehr, Nils-Henrik von der; Harbord, David

    1998-09-01

    This publication gives a survey of economic theory and international experience connected to electricity spot markets. The main purpose is to consider the attempts that have been made to apply economic theory and empirical methods to the analysis of electricity markets, and to evaluate them in light of theoretical considerations and empirical evidence. The publication describes in simple terms the basic pool pricing mechanism, and experience with pools in a number of countries. It is worth emphasizing that it is not the purpose to treat in extensive detail the structure of electricity pools around the world. Key factors of the markets in England and Wales, Norway and Australia are described in order to allow for a comparison of design issues and evaluation of competitive performance. 80 refs., 14 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. The experience of living with stroke in low urban and rural socioeconomic areas of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maleka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of stroke on stroke survivors are profound and affecttheir quality of life. The aim of this study was to establish the experience of peopleliving with stroke in low socioeconomic urban and rural areas of South Africa.A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was used to collect data.Participants were identified from stroke registers and recruited from PHC clinicsin Soweto, Gauteng and Limpopo provinces. Participants had to have had a stroke,be above the age of 18 and had lived in the community six months to a year followingtheir stroke. The researcher or research assistant conducted the interviews ofparticipants who had had strokes as well as their caregivers in the home language of the participants. The interviewswere audio taped, transcribed and translated into English. A thematic content analysis was done.Thirty two participants were interviewed, 13 from Soweto, Gauteng, and 19 from rural Limpopo provinces. Theresults suggest that the sudden, overwhelming transformation as a result of a stroke forms a background for loss ofcommunity mobility, social isolation, role reversal within the family and community, loss of role within the family andcommunity, loss of meaningful activities of daily living, loss of hope and threat to livelihood amongst stroke survivorsliving in low socioeconomic areas of South Africa.An overwhelming picture of despondency was found, with few positive stories told in both settings. The themesidentified from the interviews reflected the experience and issues that a patient with stroke has to deal with in lowsocioeconomic areas of South Africa.

  10. Lived experiences of male intimate partners of female rape victims in Cape Town, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Evalina van Wijk; Sinegugu E. Duma; Pat M. Mayers

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sexual violence in South Africa is a major public health and social problem. Sexual assault or rape is a traumatic event which disrupts not only the life of the female rape victim, but also that of her male intimate partner (MIP), irrespective of whether he witnessed or was informed of the incident.Objectives: The study aimed to explore the lived experiences of MIPs of female rape victims and the meaning of these experiences in the six months following the partner’s rape.Method: W...

  11. Economic Liberalization and Women's Education: Prospects for Post-Apartheid South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Ali A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines women's education and related issues in South Africa in light of restrictions on educational spending imposed by Structural Adjustment Programs stipulated by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. Argues that the contraction of educational resources will have a strong negative effect on women's education, particularly for black…

  12. Organised labour and neo-liberal economic and political reforms in West and Central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, P.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the impact of current neoliberal political reforms on trade union performance in West and Central Africa. To what extent have trade unions been involved in the political restructuring of the State? Has political liberalization constrained or enhanced their political influence a

  13. Mapping Socio-Economic Status, Geographical Location and Matriculation Pass Rates in Gauteng, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, Richelle; Morton McKay, Tracey

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, prior to 1994, the racially defined geographical neighbourhood in which a child resided usually determined which school they could enrol in. Post 1994, this changed to legally allow enrolment in any public school. Unfortunately, due to the legacy of apartheid, in particular, resource allocation inequity, schools in African areas…

  14. The problems of pricing and selling socio-economic grey literature in Africa : the case of the National Institute of Development Research and Documentation (NIR), University of Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Kwafo-Akoto, Kate (NIR); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    1996-01-01

    In Africa, socio-economic grey literature (GL) constitutes a substantialproportion of literature produced especially in the universities through their research activities. The paper analyses some of the key problems encountered in pricing and selling GL produced by universities in Africa such as their specialised subject content which fail to appeal to the general public. Discusses the role being played by the National Institute of Development Research and Documentation in building the resear...

  15. The Economic Impact of Ebola on Sub-Saharan Africa : Updated Estimates for 2015

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    The most severe impact of the Ebola epidemic, which began in Guinea in December 2013 and quickly spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone, has been in lost human lives and suffering. This report, prepared for the World Economic Forum at Davos, focuses on the indirect, economic costs, in particular the effects on economic output in 2015. Most of the economic cost is driven by aversion behavior, w...

  16. Occurrence of Eimeria species parasites on small-scale commercial chicken farms in Africa and indication of economic profitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Fornace

    Full Text Available Small-scale commercial poultry production is emerging as an important form of livestock production in Africa, providing sources of income and animal protein to many poor households, yet the occurrence and impact of coccidiosis on this relatively new production system remains unknown. The primary objective of this study was to examine Eimeria parasite occurrence on small-scale commercial poultry farms in Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. Additionally, farm economic viability was measured by calculating the farm gross margin and enterprise budget. Using these economic measures as global assessments of farm productivity, encompassing the diversity present in regional husbandry systems with a measure of fundamental local relevance, we investigated the detection of specific Eimeria species as indicators of farm profitability. Faecal samples and data on production parameters were collected from small-scale (less than 2,000 birds per batch intensive broiler and layer farms in peri-urban Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. All seven Eimeria species recognised to infect the chicken were detected in each country. Furthermore, two of the three genetic variants (operational taxonomic units identified previously in Australia have been described outside of Australia for the first time. Detection of the most pathogenic Eimeria species associated with decreased farm profitability and may be considered as an indicator of likely farm performance. While a causal link remains to be demonstrated, the presence of highly pathogenic enteric parasites may pose a threat to profitable, sustainable small-scale poultry enterprises in Africa.

  17. Occurrence of Eimeria species parasites on small-scale commercial chicken farms in Africa and indication of economic profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornace, Kimberly M; Clark, Emily L; Macdonald, Sarah E; Namangala, Boniface; Karimuribo, Esron; Awuni, Joseph A; Thieme, Olaf; Blake, Damer P; Rushton, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Small-scale commercial poultry production is emerging as an important form of livestock production in Africa, providing sources of income and animal protein to many poor households, yet the occurrence and impact of coccidiosis on this relatively new production system remains unknown. The primary objective of this study was to examine Eimeria parasite occurrence on small-scale commercial poultry farms in Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. Additionally, farm economic viability was measured by calculating the farm gross margin and enterprise budget. Using these economic measures as global assessments of farm productivity, encompassing the diversity present in regional husbandry systems with a measure of fundamental local relevance, we investigated the detection of specific Eimeria species as indicators of farm profitability. Faecal samples and data on production parameters were collected from small-scale (less than 2,000 birds per batch) intensive broiler and layer farms in peri-urban Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. All seven Eimeria species recognised to infect the chicken were detected in each country. Furthermore, two of the three genetic variants (operational taxonomic units) identified previously in Australia have been described outside of Australia for the first time. Detection of the most pathogenic Eimeria species associated with decreased farm profitability and may be considered as an indicator of likely farm performance. While a causal link remains to be demonstrated, the presence of highly pathogenic enteric parasites may pose a threat to profitable, sustainable small-scale poultry enterprises in Africa.

  18. The effects of financial development, economic growth, coal consumption and trade openness on CO2 emissions in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explores the effects of financial development, economic growth, coal consumption and trade openness on environmental performance using time series data over the period 1965–2008 in case of South Africa. The ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration has been used to test the long run relationship among the variables while short run dynamics have been investigated by applying error correction method (ECM). The unit root properties of the variables are examined by applying Saikkonen and Lütkepohl (2002. Econometric Theory 18, 313–348) structural break unit root test. Our findings confirmed long run relationship among the variables. Results showed that a rise in economic growth increases energy emissions, while financial development reduces it. Coal consumption has significant contribution to deteriorate environment in South African economy. Trade openness improves environmental quality by reducing the growth of energy pollutants. Our empirical results also verified the existence of environmental Kuznets curve. This paper opens up new insights for South African economy to sustain economic growth by controlling environment from degrdation through efficient use of energy. - Highlights: • We found that a rise in economic growth increases energy emissions. • We found that financial development lowers energy emissions. • We found that coal consumption significantly deteriorate environment. • We found that trade openness improves environmental quality. • Existence of EKC is also found

  19. Global Trade Models and Economic Policy Analyses: Relevance, Risks and Repercussions for Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Hammouda, Hakim; Osakwe, Patrick N.

    2006-01-01

    Computable general equilibrium (CGE) models are widely used for trade policy analyses and recommendations. Simulation results from these models have also been used as a basis for offering advice to African countries on what positions to take in multilateral trade negotiations. There is however increasing discomfort with the use of these models for policy recommendations, especially in Africa. In this paper we compare the results of several CGE studies that examined the impact of potential Doh...

  20. The Economic Impact of the 2014 Ebola Epidemic : Short and Medium Term Estimates for West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 outbreak of the Ebola virus disease in West Africa has taken a devastating human toll. Although the outbreak originated in rural Guinea, it has hit hardest in Liberia and Sierra Leone, in part because it has reached urban areas in these two countries, a factor that distinguishes this outbreak from previous episodes elsewhere. As of October 3, 2014, there had been 3,431 recorded de...

  1. The economics of certified organic farming in tropical Africa: A preliminary assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbon, Peter; Bolwig, Simon

    2007-01-01

    The paper examines the relative profitability of certified organic and conventional farming operations in tropical Africa as well as differences between organic and conventional farmers in rates of adoption of farming practices and in household factor endowments. The paper is based on three surveys in Uganda of smallholder farmers of respectively, organic coffee, cocoa, and pineapple and of matching control groups of conventional farmers. Organic production was in all cases organised on a con...

  2. The Role of Information and Communication Technology in Rural Socio-Economic Development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell C.C. Musingafi; Shupikai Zebron

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the role, challenges, and benefits of information and communication technology (ICT) in the rural areas development efforts and processes in Africa. Modern ICT is largely about the capability to electronically input, process, store, output, transmit, and receive data and information. The efficient use of ICT, driven by better high-speed internet (broadband) access, is widely recognised as key to raising productivity and stimulating innovation in the global village. Du...

  3. Reforming Land-Tenure Systems in South Africa: Routes to Socio-Economic and Agricultural Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeks, Celine; Azadi, Hossein; Khachak, Parisa Rafiaani; Troyo-Dieguez, Enrique; Van Passel, Steven; Witlox, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Given the historical development of land tenure in South Africa, the aim of this article is to examine the best routes to alleviate poverty and retain sustainable agriculture in the country. First, a theoretical framework is presented that relates land tenure to sustainability, and three historical periods (pre-colonial, colonial, and apartheid) are then considered to explain the changes in land tenure and their consequences. The progress and main limitations of post-apartheid land reform to ...

  4. African marketing boards under structural adjustment : the experience of Sub-Saharan Africa during the 1980s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, van der H.L.; Haaren, van W.T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Sum.: The economic policy of structural adjustment, which was initiated in most African countries during the 1980s, posed a serious threat to agricultural marketing boards in sub-Saharan Africa. Two elements of structural adjustment were particularly ominous: 'privatization' threatened the continued

  5. An economic comparison of typical dairy farming systems in South Africa, Morocco, Uganda and Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndambi, Oghaiki Asaah; Hemme, Torsten

    2009-08-01

    Population growth, urbanisation and increased per capita milk consumption are main reasons for recent increasing milk demand in Africa. Due to globalisation, it is important to know how competitive various production systems are, especially as most governments promote local production and disfavour dairy imports. The TIPI-CAL (Technology Impact, Policy Impact Calculations model) was used to analyse and compare costs and returns of predominant dairy farming systems in South Africa, Morocco, Uganda and Cameroon. Results show that, as farms grew larger in size, family resources (especially land and labour) became insufficient and there was need for their acquisition from external sources. Though extensive dairy farming systems had the lowest cost of milk production (<20 US-$ per 100 kg milk), their input productivities and milk yields were lower, leading to very low net cash returns from dairying. Large intensive farms in South Africa had relatively low costs (<30 US-$ per 100 kg milk) and a high Return on Investment (ROI) due to a higher efficiency of input utilisation. It was concluded that, intensification of dairy farming and simultaneously increasing the scale of production will greatly increase productivity of farm inputs, thus recommended for development of the dairy sector in African countries. PMID:19082756

  6. Socio-economic determinants in selecting childhood diarrhoea treatment options in Sub-Saharan Africa: A multilevel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawoko Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhoea disease which has been attributed to poverty constitutes a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children aged five and below in most low-and-middle income countries. This study sought to examine the contribution of individual and neighbourhood socio-economic characteristics to caregiver's treatment choices for managing childhood diarrhoea at household level in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Multilevel multinomial logistic regression analysis was applied to Demographic and Health Survey data conducted in 11 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The unit of analysis were the 12,988 caregivers of children who were reported to have had diarrhoea two weeks prior to the survey period. Results There were variability in selecting treatment options based on several socioeconomic characteristics. Multilevel-multinomial regression analysis indicated that higher level of education of both the caregiver and that of the partner, as well as caregivers occupation were associated with selection of medical centre, pharmacies and home care as compared to no treatment. In contrast, caregiver's partners' occupation was negatively associated with selection medical centre and home care for managing diarrhoea. In addition, a low-level of neighbourhood socio-economic disadvantage was significantly associated with selection of both medical centre and pharmacy stores and medicine vendors. Conclusion In the light of the findings from this study, intervention aimed at improving on care seeking for managing diarrhoea episode and other childhood infectious disease should jointly consider the influence of both individual SEP and the level of economic development of the communities in which caregivers of these children resides.

  7. Globalization, governance, and the economic performance of Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Amavilah, Voxi Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    I estimate and compare the effects of globalization, governance, and conventional factors and forces on the economic performance of Sub-Saharan African countries. The analysis finds that both physical and human capita as well as unexplained technical residuals affect economic performance, although human capital and technical change do not always have statistically significant impacts. The policy implication of these results calls for improvement of all three variables. Economic ...

  8. The Non-Economic Quality of Life on a Sub-National Level in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Stephanie; Naude, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Most research on the non-economic quality of life have been (a) on a national level or performed on cross-country comparisons, and/or (b) used subjective indicators to measure how people perceive their non-economic quality of life. In this paper, our main contribution is to construct objective indicators of the non-economic quality of life for 354…

  9. Parameterising User Uptake in Economic Evaluations: The role of discrete choice experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Quaife, Matthew; Vickerman, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Model-based economic evaluations of new interventions have shown that user behaviour (uptake) is a critical driver of overall impact achieved. However, early economic evaluations, prior to introduction, often rely on assumed levels of uptake based on expert opinion or uptake of similar interventions. In addition to the likely uncertainty surrounding these uptake assumptions, they also do not allow for uptake to be a function of product, intervention, or user characteristics. This letter proposes using uptake projections from discrete choice experiments (DCE) to better parameterize uptake and substitution in cost-effectiveness models. A simple impact model is developed and illustrated using an example from the HIV prevention field in South Africa. Comparison between the conventional approach and the DCE-based approach shows that, in our example, DCE-based impact predictions varied by up to 50% from conventional estimates and provided far more nuanced projections. In the absence of observed uptake data and to model the effect of variations in intervention characteristics, DCE-based uptake predictions are likely to greatly improve models parameterizing uptake solely based on expert opinion. This is particularly important for global and national level decision making around introducing new and probably more expensive interventions, particularly where resources are most constrained.

  10. Parameterising User Uptake in Economic Evaluations: The role of discrete choice experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaife, Matthew; Vickerman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Model‐based economic evaluations of new interventions have shown that user behaviour (uptake) is a critical driver of overall impact achieved. However, early economic evaluations, prior to introduction, often rely on assumed levels of uptake based on expert opinion or uptake of similar interventions. In addition to the likely uncertainty surrounding these uptake assumptions, they also do not allow for uptake to be a function of product, intervention, or user characteristics. This letter proposes using uptake projections from discrete choice experiments (DCE) to better parameterize uptake and substitution in cost‐effectiveness models. A simple impact model is developed and illustrated using an example from the HIV prevention field in South Africa. Comparison between the conventional approach and the DCE‐based approach shows that, in our example, DCE‐based impact predictions varied by up to 50% from conventional estimates and provided far more nuanced projections. In the absence of observed uptake data and to model the effect of variations in intervention characteristics, DCE‐based uptake predictions are likely to greatly improve models parameterizing uptake solely based on expert opinion. This is particularly important for global and national level decision making around introducing new and probably more expensive interventions, particularly where resources are most constrained. PMID:26773825

  11. The lived experiences of street children in Durban, South Africa: Violence, substance use, and resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Hills

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available South African studies have suggested that street children are resilient but also suicidal, engage in unprotected sex and other high risk sexual behaviour as a means of survival, have high rates of substance abuse and are physically abused and stigmatized due to their state of homelessness. However, few studies have explored in a more holistic manner the lived experiences of street children in South Africa. The main purpose of this study was to explore qualitatively the lived experiences of street children living on the street of Durban, in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Adolescents (six males and four females between the ages of 14 and 18 years (average age=16 were purposively selected and in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted. An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the transcribed data revealed that incidence of violence and drug and alcohol use were common experiences of street life. Yet despite these challenges survival was made possible through personal and emotional strength, cultural values, religious beliefs, supportive peer relationships, and participation in sports activities. These protective, resilience resources should be strengthened in health promotion interventions with a focus on mental health, the prevention of violence, substance use, and daily physical activities that seems to provide meaning and hope.

  12. The lived experiences of street children in Durban, South Africa: Violence, substance use, and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Frances; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Asante, Kwaku Oppong

    2016-01-01

    South African studies have suggested that street children are resilient but also suicidal, engage in unprotected sex and other high risk sexual behaviour as a means of survival, have high rates of substance abuse and are physically abused and stigmatized due to their state of homelessness. However, few studies have explored in a more holistic manner the lived experiences of street children in South Africa. The main purpose of this study was to explore qualitatively the lived experiences of street children living on the street of Durban, in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Adolescents (six males and four females) between the ages of 14 and 18 years (average age=16) were purposively selected and in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted. An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the transcribed data revealed that incidence of violence and drug and alcohol use were common experiences of street life. Yet despite these challenges survival was made possible through personal and emotional strength, cultural values, religious beliefs, supportive peer relationships, and participation in sports activities. These protective, resilience resources should be strengthened in health promotion interventions with a focus on mental health, the prevention of violence, substance use, and daily physical activities that seems to provide meaning and hope. PMID:27291160

  13. The lived experiences of street children in Durban, South Africa: Violence, substance use, and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Frances; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Asante, Kwaku Oppong

    2016-01-01

    South African studies have suggested that street children are resilient but also suicidal, engage in unprotected sex and other high risk sexual behaviour as a means of survival, have high rates of substance abuse and are physically abused and stigmatized due to their state of homelessness. However, few studies have explored in a more holistic manner the lived experiences of street children in South Africa. The main purpose of this study was to explore qualitatively the lived experiences of street children living on the street of Durban, in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Adolescents (six males and four females) between the ages of 14 and 18 years (average age=16) were purposively selected and in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted. An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the transcribed data revealed that incidence of violence and drug and alcohol use were common experiences of street life. Yet despite these challenges survival was made possible through personal and emotional strength, cultural values, religious beliefs, supportive peer relationships, and participation in sports activities. These protective, resilience resources should be strengthened in health promotion interventions with a focus on mental health, the prevention of violence, substance use, and daily physical activities that seems to provide meaning and hope.

  14. Gender and urban infrastructural poverty experience in Africa: A preliminary survey in Ibadan city, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimi. A. Asiyanbola

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines gender differences in the urban infrastructural poverty experience in an African city – Ibadan, Nigeria. The result of the cross-sectional survey of 232 households sampled in Ibadan city shows that there is intra-urban variation in the women and men urban infrastructure experience in Ibadan. The result of the correlation analysis shows that there is significant relationship between women and men urban infrastructure experience and the household income, educational level, household size and the stage in the life cycle; only with the urban infrastructure experience of the women is a significant relationship found with the occupation and the responsibility in the household. The result of the multiple linear regression analysis shows that the impact/effect of the socio-cultural, demographic and economic characteristics are more on women experience of urban infrastructure than on men’s experience. While the relative contributions of the economic characteristics, family characteristics and socio-cultural characteristics in that order are all significant in explaining the variance in women’s experience of urban infrastructure, only economic characteristics and family characteristics in that order are found to be significant in the case of the men. Also, the most important socio-cultural demographic and economic variables as shown by the beta coefficients for women are household income, household size, and responsibility in the household, while for men are the household income and the household size. Policy implications of the findings are highlighted in the paper.

  15. On the contemporary African experience: Towards a humanistic mode of philosophy for Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukpokolo Isaac E.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that Africa today is confronted with many economic, political, social, and developmental problems. The big question and the basic challenge is therefore how best we can tackle these problems especially as we begin and forge ahead in the third millennium. This paper attempts to elucidate a fundamental role that philosophy can play in this regard. It holds that philosophy, as a discipline in the humanities, can help shape fresh ideas that are humanistic in nature in the sense that they encourage free enquiry and social agreement which are vital pillars for a fair and prosperous society; for a society without such genuine humanistic values will show many of the symptoms which are present in contemporary African societies.

  16. Municipal Local Economic Development and the Multiplier effect: Piloting a Community Enterprise Identification Method in South Africa and Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucienne Heideman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Local Economic Development (LED is a contested concept in southern Africa, and has become synonymous with delivery of generic job-creation projects, often grant-dependent and unsustainable. Municipal LED has followed this pattern in South Africa since 1994, with little lasting success. Each local economy is unique, and has its own problems and opportunities. The ’Plugging the Leaks’ method recognizes that communities themselves know best how money enters and exits their area. By asking people to analyse their local economy as a 'leaky bucket', the method puts control back in the hands of local people, rather than external experts, and allows them to analyse their own local economy to identify gaps and opportunities for enterprise. By better networking and working collectively to improve their local economy, local communities are able to re-circulate cash internally. This circulation of cash is explained as the local multiplier effect in the workshops. A pilot process of running ‘Plugging the Leaks’ workshops in low income communities in South Africa and Namibia revealed that spending choices in these communities are severely limited in a context where there is no effective welfare state. Therefore, empowerment with this method came from the discovery of collective action and networking, rather than from individual spending choices. Local start-up business tends to be limited to survivalist and copy-cat one-person ventures, and are a last resort when formal employment is absent. In this context collective enterprise offers the necessary empowerment for people to attempt financially sustainable ventures that respond to a gap in the local economy. The pilot project is attempting to show that municipal LED staff can play the role of facilitator for initiating the enterprise-identification process and further mobilise state enterprise support agencies around the locus of LED, without crossing the line between facilitation and implementation

  17. Uncertainty, Economic Reforms and Private Investment in the Middle East and North Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Aysan, Ahmet Faruk; Pang, Gaobo; Véganzonès -Varoudakis, Marie-Ange

    2006-01-01

    During the 1980s and the 1990s, private investment in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has on average shown a decreasing or stagnant trend. This contrasts with the situation of the Asian economies, where private investment has always been more dynamic. In this paper, it is empirically shown for a panel of 39 developing economies--among which four MENA countries-- that in addition to the traditional determinants of investment--such as the growth anticipations and the real interest rate-...

  18. Money, power and HIV: economic influences and HIV among men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Andrew; Kanyemba, Brian; Syvertsen, Jennifer; Adebajo, Sylvia; Baral, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Despite consistent evidence, effective interventions and political declarations to reduce HIV infections among men who have sex with men (MSM), coverage of MSM programmes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) remains low. Punitive legal frameworks and hostile social circumstances and inadequate health systems further contribute to the high HIV burden among MSM in SSA. The authors use the Modified Social Ecological Model to discuss economic influences in relation to HIV and MSM in SSA. Nigerian, South African and Ugandan case studies are used to highlight economic factors and considerations related to HIV among MSM. The authors argue that criminalisation of consensual sexual practices among adults increases the frequency of human rights violations contributing to the incidence of HIV infections. Furthermore, marginalisation and disempowerment of MSM limits their livelihood opportunities, increases the prevalence of sex work and drug use and limits financial access to HIV services. Sexual and social networks are complex and ignoring the needs of MSM results in increased risks for HIV acquisition and transmission to all sexual partners with cumulative economic and health implications. The authors recommend a public health and human rights approach that employs effective interventions at multiple levels to reduce the HIV burden among MSM and the general population in SSA.

  19. Foreign Direct Investment Effect on Economic Growth: Evidence from Guinea Republic in West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Keita Mohamed Lamine; Dakai Yang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to understand the contribution of Foreign Direct Investment on Guinea Republic¡¯s Economic growth. The Granger Causality Test is used to study the relationship between FDI and Economic Growth proxies. Our results show that the level of FDI is still low in order to promote economic growth for the Guinea Republic. Indeed, the Granger Causality Test demonstrated that the GDP can promote the level of foreign direct investment, which means that if the level of GDP increase...

  20. Operating a railway system within a challenging environment: Economic history and experiences of Zimbabwe’s national railways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mbohwa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a historical background to the development of the railways in Zimbabwe and then discusses their current state. Besides being a landlocked country in Southern Africa, Zimbabwe has since 2000 been saddled with socio-economic and political challenges which have seen a decline in all economic indices, hence posing some challenges to its railways. This article discusses the challenges faced by the railways as a result of high inflation, unstable currency exchange rate, brain drain, poor management, government interference in management, customs border delays, and energy shortage. The problems have been addressed in unique ways and unusual solutions are proposed. These include customer financing for maintenance and spares and the resuscitation of steam locomotives. The presented solutions, lessons and issues from this experience contribute to discussions and study of railway logistics in challenging environments. Finally, current and future research issues, which have a global appeal, are presented.

  1. Telemedicine as a Tool for Europe-Africa Cooperation: A Practical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Manuel; Santiago, Fernando; Silva, Luís; Ferreira, Ricardo; Machado, José; Castela, Eduardo

    This paper presents the experience of an Europe-Africa telemedicine network, focused on the pediatric area, and involving hospitals located in Luanda (Angola), Benguela (Angola), Praia (Cape Verde) and Coimbra (Portugal). In the scope of this network, the cooperation between these hospitals goes beyond the teleconsultation sessions. Tele-training, clinical experience exchange, patient transfer agreements and health staff training to local development of new medical capabilities are some of the involved activities. It is therefore agreed that this kind of technical and knowledge network could also be expanded to other African countries with clear benefits to the local citizens, overcoming the digital-divide and improving the cooperation between developed and developing countries.

  2. Many paths to walk. The political and economic integration of nomadic communities in Roman North Africa (I-III cent. A.D.)

    OpenAIRE

    Vanacker, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    The colonial image of endemic political and economic antagonism between nomadic and sedentary groups in the context of Roman North Africa should be discarded. Likewise, the rigid adherence to symbiosis and cooperation in more recent studies is based on a rather one-sided reading of anthropological literature. For the analysis of literary, epigraphic and archaeological sources, supported by insights derived from anthropology, shows that political and economic integration trajectories of nomads...

  3. Many paths to walk. The political and economic integration of nomadic communities in Roman North Africa (I-III cent. A.D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanacker, Wouter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The colonial image of endemic political and economic antagonism between nomadic and sedentary groups in the context of Roman North Africa should be discarded. Likewise, the rigid adherence to symbiosis and cooperation in more recent studies is based on a rather one-sided reading of anthropological literature. For the analysis of literary, epigraphic and archaeological sources, supported by insights derived from anthropology, shows that political and economic integration trajectories of nomads were much more complex, diverse, and dynamic.

  4. The experience of cash transfers in alleviating childhood poverty in South Africa: mothers' experiences of the Child Support Grant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembe-Mkabile, Wanga; Surender, Rebecca; Surrender, Rebecca; Sanders, David; Jackson, Debra; Doherty, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Cash transfer (CT) programmes are increasingly being used as policy instruments to address child poverty and child health outcomes in developing countries. As the largest cash-transfer programme in Africa, the South African Child Support Grant (CSG) provides an important opportunity to further understand how a CT of its kind works in a developing country context. We explored the experiences and views of CSG recipients and non-recipients from four diverse settings in South Africa. Four major themes emerged from the data: barriers to accessing the CSG; how the CSG is utilised and the ways in which it makes a difference; the mechanisms for supplementing the CSG; and the impact of not receiving the grant. Findings show that administrative factors continue to be the greatest barrier to CSG receipt, pointing to the need for further improvements in managing queues, waiting times and coordination between departments for applicants trying to submit their applications. Many recipients, especially those where the grant was the only source of income, acknowledged the importance of the CSG, while also emphasising its inadequacy. To maximise their impact, CT programmes such as the CSG need to be fully funded and form part of a broader basket of poverty alleviation strategies.

  5. South Africa: Distance Higher Education Policies for Access, Social Equity, Quality, and Social and Economic Responsiveness in a Context of the Diversity of Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badat, Saleem

    2005-01-01

    The principal concern of this paper is the implication of the increasing diversity of higher education provision in South Africa for equity of access and opportunity for historically disadvantaged social groups, high-quality provision, and social and economic responsiveness in distance higher education. This diversity is signalled by a variety of…

  6. Review: Joseph Patrick Ganahl, Corruption, Good Governance, and the African State: A Critical Analysis of the Political-Economic Foundations of Corruption in Sub-Saharan Africa (2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhart Kößler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the monograph:Joseph Patrick Ganahl, Corruption, Good Governance, and the African State: A Critical Analysis of the Political-Economic Foundations of Corruption in Sub-Saharan Africa, Potsdam: Potsdam University Press, 2013, ISBN 9783869562483, 300 pp.

  7. Interpreting the Economic Growth and Development Policies of Post-Apartheid South Africa: Its Influence on Higher Education and Prospects for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynon, Diane E.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is structured as a critical policy analysis employing historical methods. It examines how the post apartheid government's economic growth and development polices have informed the higher education system and how this has changed women's financial, occupational, political, social, and educational prospects in South Africa. Through…

  8. Fish species substitution and misnaming in South Africa: An economic, safety and sustainability conundrum revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthorn, Donna-Mareè; Duncan, John; Kastern, Chris; Francis, Junaid; Hoffman, Louwrens C

    2015-10-15

    While fish species mislabelling has emerged as a global problem, the tracking of improvements or deteriorations in seafood trading practices is challenging without a consistent basis for monitoring. The aim of this study was to develop a robust, repeatable species authentication protocol that could be used to benchmark the current and future incidences of fish mislabelling in South Africa. Using this approach, 149 fish samples collected from restaurants and retailers in three provinces (KwaZulu-Natal, Western Cape and Gauteng) were identified using DNA barcoding, supplemented in certain cases with mitochondrial control region sequencing. Overall, 18% of samples were incorrectly described in terms of species, with similar misrepresentation rates in restaurants (18%) and retail outlets (19%). While there appears to be some improvement in the transparency of local seafood marketing compared to previous studies, the results remain of concern and signal the need for enhanced seafood labelling regulations, monitoring and law enforcement.

  9. Financial and Economic Costs of the Elimination and Eradication of Onchocerciasis (River Blindness in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Eun Kim

    Full Text Available Onchocerciasis (river blindness is a parasitic disease transmitted by blackflies. Symptoms include severe itching, skin lesions, and vision impairment including blindness. More than 99% of all cases are concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. Fortunately, vector control and community-directed treatment with ivermectin have significantly decreased morbidity, and the treatment goal is shifting from control to elimination in Africa.We estimated financial resources and societal opportunity costs associated with scaling up community-directed treatment with ivermectin and implementing surveillance and response systems in endemic African regions for alternative treatment goals--control, elimination, and eradication. We used a micro-costing approach that allows adjustment for time-variant resource utilization and for the heterogeneity in the demographic, epidemiological, and political situation.The elimination and eradication scenarios, which include scaling up treatments to hypo-endemic and operationally challenging areas at the latest by 2021 and implementing intensive surveillance, would allow savings of $1.5 billion and $1.6 billion over 2013-2045 as compared to the control scenario. Although the elimination and eradication scenarios would require higher surveillance costs ($215 million and $242 million than the control scenario ($47 million, intensive surveillance would enable treatments to be safely stopped earlier, thereby saving unnecessary costs for prolonged treatments as in the control scenario lacking such surveillance and response systems.The elimination and eradication of onchocerciasis are predicted to allow substantial cost-savings in the long run. To realize cost-savings, policymakers should keep empowering community volunteers, and pharmaceutical companies would need to continue drug donation. To sustain high surveillance costs required for elimination and eradication, endemic countries would need to enhance their domestic funding capacity

  10. Economic Diplomacy in Africa: The Impact of Regional Integration versus Bilateral Diplomacy on Bilateral Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afesorgbor, Sylvanus Kwaku

    The paper examines the impact of two main instruments of economic diplomacy — regional integration and commercial diplomacy on export flows among African states. We test whether there is any evidence of a trade-off or complementary interaction between these two instruments in trade facilitation. We...... compare the effects of these two instruments of economic diplomacy on bilateral trade by employing a gravity model for 45 African states over the period 1980-2005. The results show that bilateral diplomatic exchange is a relatively more significant determinant of bilateral exports among African states...... that there exists a trade-off between regional integration and commercial diplomacy in facilitating exports or a lack of complementarity between these two instruments of economic diplomacy....

  11. Non-Economic Determinants of Energy Use in Rural Areas of South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annecke, W. (Energy and Development Research Center, University of Cape Town, South Africa)

    1999-03-29

    This project will begin to determine the forces and dimensions in rural energy-use patterns and begin to address policy and implementation needs for the future. This entails: Forecasting the social and economic benefits that electrification is assumed to deliver regarding education and women's lives; Assessing negative perceptions of users, which have been established through the slow uptake of electricity; Making recommendations as to how these perceptions could be addressed in policy development and in the continuing electrification program; Making recommendations to policy makers on how to support and make optimal use of current energy-use practices where these are socio-economically sound; Identifying misinformation and wasteful practices; and Other recommendations, which will significantly improve the success of the rural electrification program in a socio-economically sound manner, as identified in the course of the work.

  12. The Potential of Capstone Learning Experiences in addressing perceived shortcomings in LLB Training in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geo Quinot

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Current debates about legal education in South Africa have revealed the perception that the LLB curriculum does not adequately integrate various outcomes, in particular outcomes relating to the development of skills in communication, problem solving, ethics, and in general a holistic view of the law in practice. One mechanism that has been mooted as a potential remedy to this situation is capstone courses, which will consolidate and integrate the four years of study in the final year and build a bridge to the world of practice. A literature review on capstone courses and learning experiences (collectively referred to as capstones indicates that these curriculum devices as modes of instruction offer particular pedagogical advantages. These include inculcating a strong perception of coherence across the curriculum and hence discipline in students, providing the opportunity for students to reflect on their learning during the course of the entire programme, creating an opportunity to engage with the complexity of law and legal practice, and guiding students through the transition from university to professional identity. An empirical analysis of the modes of instruction used in LLB curricula at 13 South African law faculties/schools indicates that there are six categories of existing modules or learning experiences that already exhibit elements of capstone-course design. These are clinics, internships, moots, research projects, topical capstones and capstone assessment. A further comparative study into foreign law curricula in especially Australia and the United States of America reveals four further noteworthy approaches to capstone-course design, namely problem-based learning, the virtual office, conferences and remedies courses. The empirical study suggests that capstones indeed hold the potential as learning experiences to address some of the challenges facing legal education in South Africa but that further development of this curriculum

  13. Healthcare experiences of lesbian and bisexual women in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Riley

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the health needs and experiences of South African lesbian and bisexual women is imperative for implementing effective and inclusive public health strategies. Such understanding, however, is limited due to the exclusion of these women from most existing research on healthcare access in the region. This paper bridges that gap by investigating the healthcare experiences of lesbian and bisexual women in Cape Town. Data were gathered from 22 interviews with self-identified lesbian and bisexual community members and university students in the Cape Town area. Interviews explored obstacles women face in accessing affirming services, different experiences with public and private healthcare, fear of stigma/discrimination, availability of relevant sexual health information and suggestions to improve existing programmes. Findings suggest that South African lesbians and bisexual women may have a range of both positive and negative experiences in public and private health services, that they use protective strategies when 'coming out' and that they find that sexual health information pertinent to them is largely unavailable. These discussions contribute to a more inclusive understanding of the experiences of lesbian and bisexual women accessing healthcare and other services and help to inform providers, thereby enabling them to deliver more meaningful care to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons in South Africa. PMID:25291355

  14. Economic growth, employment and poverty in the Middle East and North Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Messkoub (Mahmood)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis paper  provides an assessment of economic growth, employment and poverty reduction in the Arab MENA region. Considering the high rate of unemployment (especially the youth unemployment) and poverty in most countries in the region employment and poverty impacts of growth are of parti

  15. Oil and the economic geography of the Middle East and North Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives us the opportunity to follow the development of the field of economic geography as applied to the Middle East during the past half century. The materials are arranged under the following three headings: Geography and Petroleum: Boundaries and Boundary Disputes: and Social Geography

  16. Linking Globalization, Economic Growth and Poverty: Impacts of Agribusiness Strategies on Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Cacho, Joyce; Weatherspoon, Dave; Christy, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyzes the increased role of the domestic and multinational private sectors in economic development within SSA. The globalization process demands that private sector strategies must now be assessed by their contributions to emerging economies, as well as by company goals.

  17. Primary Education in Sub-Saharan Africa--A Moral Issue, an Economic Matter, or Both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daun, Holger

    2000-01-01

    Rates of primary enrollment, female primary enrollment, private school enrollment, and literacy during 1960-92 were analyzed for 39 sub-Saharan African countries. Throughout the period, strongly Christian countries had higher enrollment and literacy rates than strongly Islamic countries, regardless of economic level, type of state, or colonial…

  18. Africa Development Indicators 2006

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2006-01-01

    Africa Development Indicators 2006 is the latest annual report from the World Bank on social and economic conditions across the continent. It was revamped this year to better report and monitor the challenges and transformations in Africa. Africa Development Indicators has evolved from a single data book, and this year consists of three independent but complementary products: this book, which brings together an essay and key outcome indicators for Africa, the Little Data Book on Africa 2006, ...

  19. Using Field Experiments to Change the Template of How We Teach Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, John A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why field experiments can improve what we teach and how we teach economics. Economists no longer operate as passive observers of economic phenomena. Instead, they participate actively in the research process by collecting data from field experiments to investigate the economics of everyday life. This change can…

  20. Why did Arabia separate from Africa? Insights from 3-D laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellahsen, N.; Faccenna, C.; Funiciello, F.; Daniel, J. M.; Jolivet, L.

    2003-11-01

    We have performed 3-D scaled lithospheric experiments to investigate the role of the gravitational force exerted by a subducting slab on the deformation of the subducting plate itself. Experiments have been constructed using a dense silicone putty plate, to simulate a thin viscous lithosphere, floating in the middle of a large box filled with glucose syrup, simulating the upper mantle. We examine three different plate configurations: (i) subduction of a uniform oceanic plate, (ii) subduction of an oceanic-continental plate system and, (iii) subduction of a more complex oceanic-continental system simulating the asymmetric Africa-Eurasia system. Each model has been performed with and without the presence of a circular weak zone inside the subducting plate to test the near-surface weakening effect of a plume activity. Our results show that a subducting plate can deform in its interior only if the force distribution varies laterally along the subduction zone, i.e. by the asymmetrical entrance of continental material along the trench. In particular, extensional deformation of the plate occurs when a portion of the subduction zone is locked by the collisional process. The results of this study can be used to analyze the formation of the Arabian plate. We found that intraplate stresses, similar to those that generated the Africa-Arabia break-up, can be related to the Neogene evolution of the northern convergent margin of the African plate, where a lateral change from collision (Mediterranean and Bitlis) to active subduction (Makran) has been described. Second, intraplate stress and strain localization are favored by the presence of a weakness zone, such as the one generated by the Afar plume, producing a pattern of extensional deformation belts resembling the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden rift system.

  1. Jobless Economic Growth in Africa: Is there a Role for Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Kobena T. Hanson; Frannie Leautier

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs data from 48 African countries over the period 1990-2010 to investigate the performance of African economies with respect to job creation and its relation to economic growth. We submit that the main drivers, among others, appear to be the creative use of the agricultural sector and the level of innovation and sophistication in agriculture. The insights provide some lessons for countries seeking to speed up job creation under low growth scenarios as well as those seeking to ...

  2. The state of neoliberalism in South Africa: economic, social, and health transformation in question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, P; Pillay, Y G; Sanders, D

    1997-01-01

    Recent overhauls of the South African government's ruling machinery in the context of an ever-deepening commitment to neoliberal economic philosophy, have done serious, even irreparable harm to this country's political transformation. Notwithstanding some progress in policies adopted by the Department of Health, the March 1996 closure of the Reconstruction and Development Ministry and the subsequent announcement of a neoliberal macroeconomic policy have been cause for disgruntlement by those advocating progressive social and health policies.

  3. Working Paper 147 - Gold Mining in Africa-Maximizing Economic Returns for Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ousman Gajigo; Emelly Mutambatsere; Guirane Samba Ndiaye

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the maximization of economic returns from mining for African countries. We focus on gold mining, a significant sector in at least 34 African countries. Our point of departure in the paper is the well-documented reality that a large number of resource-rich African countries have benefited little from their resource endowments. This group includes many gold-producing countries. Part of the reason for this state of affairs is the fact that countries have received smaller ...

  4. Empirical Analysis of China-Africa Economic and Trade Cooperation for Good or Bad: A Case of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansein Ladislaus Rutaihwa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated China-Africa Economic and Trade ties taking Tanzania as the case study and the prime objective was to identify the main drivers for the bilateral trade and the benefits of the ties. The study draws theoretical framework from Realism, Dependency and Marxist theories of Imperialism. The dependency theory explains underdevelopment while the Marxist explains dominant state expansion. This study mainly employs descriptive research approach to asses China-Tanzania economic and trade ties. Data is drawn from industrial annual reports, previous research, journals, magazines, documentation and websites. Other sources are Tanzania Investment Centre (TIC and Business Registration and Licensing Agency of Tanzania (BRELA. The scope of the study is limited to 1990-2010. The findings of the study show that engagement of China in Tanzania poses both opportunities and challenges. The nature of China`s investment in Tanzania has been capital intensive and been mostly directed to strategic industries, particularly manufacturing sector the leading sector in which Chinese investors have injected more projects, followed by construction, agricultural, tourism and services sectors among others. Similarly, the study finds that the imported commodities and goods from China have been affordable to most of low-income earners hence increases consumers choice and contribution to Tanzania Economic growth. However, the negative effects cannot be neglected; the investments have led into the influx of low quality products that do not meet market standards. Therefore, this study recommends that the government should ensure that the partnership with China is for a win-win situation.

  5. Some policy and economic realities of biomass development and management in Africa and Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic and policy reality for woodfuel development and management is not a positive one in many Asian and African countries. Often woodfuel resources are not regarded seriously enough from an economic or policy point of view. Woodfuels are invariably undervalued at their source; often insufficient cost-benefit and product consumption analysis is carried out on potential woodfuel development interventions; interfuel substitution on a non-distorted cost basis may not be considered, particularly when forestry agencies are the sole intervener; government policies and legislation are usually non-supportive, if not disruptive, to sustainable woodfuel management, including management by the private sector; and a lack of intersectoral linkages and liaison among government agencies is exacerbating woodfuel-forestry resource degradation and constraining new development. It is not a rosy picture. Developing a comprehensive policy for woodfuels/forestry development and management will not only affect the woodfuels/forestry resource per se, but can positively affect the environment and household incomes. But governments and international funding agencies have to recognize that woodfuels are important from an energy, economic and environmental point of view

  6. Health economics and health policy: experiences from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Health economics has had a significant impact on the New Zealand health system over the past 30 years. In this paper, I set out a framework for thinking about health economics, give some historical background to New Zealand and the New Zealand health system, and discuss examples of how health economics has influenced thinking about the organisation of the health sector and priority setting. I conclude the paper with overall observations about the role of health economics in health policy in New Zealand, also identifying where health economics has not made the contribution it could and where further influence might be beneficial.

  7. Institutional change and economic development : evidence from natural and artefactual field experiments in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melesse, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis title: Institutional Change and Economic Development: Evidence from Natural and Artefactual Field Experiments in Ethiopia Mequanint Biset Melesse Abstract Institutions are the essential underpinning of economic development. A large volume of empirical literature has documented conclusive evid

  8. Asymmetric Power Boosts Extortion in an Economic Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, Kristin; Milinski, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Direct reciprocity is a major mechanism for the evolution of cooperation. Several classical studies have suggested that humans should quickly learn to adopt reciprocal strategies to establish mutual cooperation in repeated interactions. On the other hand, the recently discovered theory of ZD strategies has found that subjects who use extortionate strategies are able to exploit and subdue cooperators. Although such extortioners have been predicted to succeed in any population of adaptive opponents, theoretical follow-up studies questioned whether extortion can evolve in reality. However, most of these studies presumed that individuals have similar strategic possibilities and comparable outside options, whereas asymmetries are ubiquitous in real world applications. Here we show with a model and an economic experiment that extortionate strategies readily emerge once subjects differ in their strategic power. Our experiment combines a repeated social dilemma with asymmetric partner choice. In our main treatment there is one randomly chosen group member who is unilaterally allowed to exchange one of the other group members after every ten rounds of the social dilemma. We find that this asymmetric replacement opportunity generally promotes cooperation, but often the resulting payoff distribution reflects the underlying power structure. Almost half of the subjects in a better strategic position turn into extortioners, who quickly proceed to exploit their peers. By adapting their cooperation probabilities consistent with ZD theory, extortioners force their co-players to cooperate without being similarly cooperative themselves. Comparison to non-extortionate players under the same conditions indicates a substantial net gain to extortion. Our results thus highlight how power asymmetries can endanger mutually beneficial interactions, and transform them into exploitative relationships. In particular, our results indicate that the extortionate strategies predicted from ZD theory

  9. Nonlinear co-integration between unemployment and economic growth in South Africa:

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Phiri

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a momentum threshold autoregressive (MTAR) model is used to evaluate nonlinear equilibrium reversion between unemployment and economic growth for South African data between the periods 2000–2013. To attain this objective we estimate the first-difference and the gap model variations of Okun’s specification. For the latter model variation, we employ three de-trending methods to obtain the relevant ‘gap’ data; namely, the Hodrick-Prescott (HP) filter, the Baxter-King (BK) filter a...

  10. Randomized Impact Evaluation of Education Interventions: Experiences and Lessons from a Reading to Learn Intervention in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngware, Moses Waithanji; Abuya, Benta; Oketch, Moses; Admassu, Kassahun; Mutisya, Maurice; Musyoka, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences and lessons learnt during the design and implementation of the randomized impact evaluation (IE) of a reading to learn (RtL) intervention in early primary grades. The study was to assess the impact of RtL on literacy and numeracy among pupils in low-performing districts in East Africa. The intervention was…

  11. "We Must Believe in Ourselves": Attitudes and Experiences of Adult Learners with Disabilities in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Peter; Modipa, Taadi Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Many adults with disabilities in South Africa never had a chance to attend school or dropped out at an early age because of poverty and discrimination. This article investigates the attitudes and experiences of adults with disabilities regarding education. It draws on an interactional model of disability and an embodied understanding of cognition…

  12. 'Issues of equity are also issues of rights': Lessons from experiences in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London Leslie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rights approaches to health have been criticized as antithetical to equity, principally because they are seen to prioritise rights of individuals at the expense of the interests of groups, a core tenet of public health. The objective of this study was to identify how human rights approaches can promote health equity. Methods The Network on Equity in Health in Southern Africa undertook an exploration of three regional case studies – antiretroviral access, patient rights charters and civic organization for health. A combination of archival reviews and stakeholder interviews were complemented with a literature review to provide a theoretical framework for the empirical evidence. Results Critical success factors for equity are the importance of rights approaches addressing the full spectrum from civil and political, through to socio-economic rights, as well as the need to locate rights in a group context. Human rights approaches succeed in achieving health equity when coupled with community engagement in ways that reinforce community capacity, particularly when strengthening the collective agency of its most vulnerable groups. Additionally, human rights approaches provide opportunities for mobilising resources outside the health sector, and must aim to address the public-private divide at local, national and international levels. Conclusion Where it is clear that rights approaches are predicated upon understanding the need to prioritize vulnerable groups and where the way rights are operationalised recognizes the role of agency on the part of those most affected in realising their socio-economic rights, human rights approaches appear to offer powerful tools to support social justice and health equity.

  13. Experiences in sub-Saharan Africa with GM crop risk communication: outcome of a workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racovita, Monica; Obonyo, Dennis Ndolo; Abdallah, Roshan; Anguzu, Robert; Bamwenda, Gratian; Kiggundu, Andrew; Maganga, Harrison; Muchiri, Nancy; Nzeduru, Chinyere; Otadoh, Jane; Rumjaun, Anwar; Suleiman, Iro; Sunil, Manjusha; Tepfer, Mark; Timpo, Samuel; van der Walt, Wynand; Kaboré-Zoungrana, Chantal; Nfor, Lilian; Craig, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    In tackling agricultural challenges, policy-makers in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) have increasingly considered genetically modified (GM) crops as a potential tool to increase productivity and to improve product quality. Yet, as elsewhere in the world, the adoption of GM crops in SSA has been marked by controversy, encompassing not only the potential risks to animal and human health, and to the environment, but also other concerns such as ethical issues, public participation in decision-making, socio-economic factors and intellectual property rights. With these non-scientific factors complicating an already controversial situation, disseminating credible information to the public as well as facilitating stakeholder input into decision-making is essential. In SSA, there are various and innovative risk communication approaches and strategies being developed, yet a comprehensive analysis of such data is missing. This gap is addressed by giving an overview of current strategies, identifying similarities and differences between various country and institutional approaches and promoting a way forward, building on a recent workshop with risk communicators working in SSA. PMID:23090016

  14. Experiences of leadership in health care in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curry Leslie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leadership is widely regarded as central to effective health-care systems, and resources are increasingly devoted to the cultivation of strong health-care leadership. Nevertheless, the literature regarding leadership capacity building has been developed primarily in the context of high-income settings. Less research has been done on leadership in low-income settings, including sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in health care, with attention to historical, political and sociocultural context. We sought to characterize the experiences of individuals in key health-care leadership roles in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using in-person interviews with individuals (n = 17 in health-care leadership roles in four countries in sub-Saharan Africa: the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, the Republic of Ghana, the Republic of Liberia and the Republic of Rwanda. Individuals were identified by their country’s minister of health as key leaders in the health sector and were nominated to serve as delegates to a global health leadership conference in June 2010, at Yale University in the United States. Interviews were audio recorded and professionally transcribed. Data analysis was performed by a five-person multidisciplinary team using the constant comparative method, facilitated by ATLAS.ti 5.0 software. Results Five key themes emerged as important to participants in their leadership roles: having an aspirational, value-based vision for improving the future health of the country, being self-aware and having the ability to identify and use complementary skills of others, tending to relationships, using data in decision making, and sustaining a commitment to learning. Conclusions Current models of leadership capacity building address the need for core technical and management competencies. While these competencies are important, skills relevant to managing relationships are also critical in the sub

  15. Pilanesberg National Park, North West Province, South Africa: Uniting economic development with ecological design – A history, 1960s to 1984

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Carruthers

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the late 1970s, a ground-breaking project began in the Pilanesberg district in what is now the North West Province of South Africa to create a wildlife conservation and eco-tourism venture from degraded marginal farmland in an aesthetically attractive extinct volcanic crater. The establishment of this national park was innovative in a number of respects, including a partnership between landscape and ecological designers, local community development and participation, regional tourist satisfaction, trophy hunting, environmental education, ecological restoration, and wildlife conservation and management. This paper briefly explored the park’s early history, explaining its landscape, its early peopling and historical land use. The narrative then concentrated on the first five years of the park’s existence, from its inception in 1977, under the aegis of Agricor, Bophuthatswana’s rural development agency, to 1984, when responsibility for the park was given over to Bophuthatswana National Parks, a parastatal agency, and a new era began. The article contended that 1984 is an appropriate date on which to conclude the early history of the Pilanesberg National Park (PNP because it was then that the experimental phase of the park ended: its infrastructure was sufficiently developed to offer a satisfactory visitor experience, the management plan was revised, its bureaucratic structures were consolidated and an attitude survey amongst the local community was undertaken. Embedding the originating period of the PNP in its historical, political and socio-economic context, the paper foregrounded those elements in the park’s beginnings that were new in the southern African protected area arena. Thus, elements that relate to socio-politics, landscape and ecological design and restoration, and early relations with neighbouring communities were emphasised. This paper has been written by an historian and is therefore conceptual and historical, conforming

  16. Consultants Group Meeting on Production System Analysis and Economics for Tsetse Fly Mass-Rearing and the Use of the Sterile Insect Technique in Eradication Programmes in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D philosophy to one of large-scale production. 2. At the current status of the programme, the main cost of production is staff cost, accounting for over 50%. Operational costs are approximately US$ 0.40 per usuable pupa and US$ 0.60 per sterile male pupa. These costs are in line with other studies on production and are quite good for an R and D operation. 3. Estimations of field operation costs, including sterile male release for eradication and sterile female release for detection, indicate the feasibility of SIT programmes in a West African situation, but also show the value of a lower cost of mass-produced flies as an important consideration in making decisions regarding eradication programmes. The group concluded that: 1. The Tsetse Unit at Seibersdorf should focus its structure and activities to R and D with respect to mass-rearing techniques for the SIT in Africa. 2. A number of experiments should be conducted which might help to overcome problems and limiting factors of the present rearing methods. An emphasis on improvements in mass-rearing is justified given the economic indicators shown as a result of the present study. 3. Written documentation should be generated immediately so that the current production process is defined, controllable, transferable and easily discussed. 4. In order to assess more rigorously the actual overhead costs to the production colony (i.e. the Glossina tachinoides model) and the scope for targeting cost reductions, it is necessar to identify, quantify and accurately cot the actual overheads of the production unit. Similarly, disaggregation of the consumable usage is necessary in order to carry out constructive cost analysis. In addressing criteria for the development of a successful mass-rearing facility for the SIT in Africa, the group commented on the relative merits of tsetse production contracted to private industry or performed by an agency, regional or national facility, and made a comparison of the advantages of a mobile

  17. ECONOMIC THOUGHT ABOUT PRIVATE SECTOR EDUCATION: POLICY IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT OF UNIVERSITIES IN AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. AYENI

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study provides relevant economic ideas that can assist Nigeria and other Africancountries in making innovative policies at privatizing university education. A review of the education market scene on the continent provides an imperfect market with adverse consequences occasioned by inadequate information and unbridled competition.Advocating a joint role for sharing the costs and benefits of university education between government and private sectors, the study suggests a four-policy option for adoption by Nigeria and other African countries. These are, in ascending order of importance: regulated private, subsidized private, competitive private, and complementary private systems of iversity educationUsing the Backcock University in Nigeria as an example, this paper demonstrates thepositive managerial influence of a competitive and complementary system of private university. Nevertheless, to forestall market failure, this study rounds off by pointing out the reformatory, regulatory and redemptive roles of government in the management ofprivate universities in Nigeria and other African countries.

  18. Sawah Rice Eco-technology and Actualization of Green Revolution in West Africa: Experience from Nigeria and Ghana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O. I. OLADELE; T. WAKATSUKI

    2010-01-01

    The development and dissemination of sawah rice eco-technology in Nigeria and Ghana as prerequisites for the actualization of green revolution in West Africa were described. It showed that the neglect of the eco-technology and the overemphasis of the biotechnology have rendered the ineffective transferability of the green revolution process from Asia to Africa. The sawah eco-technology increases yield up to 5 t/hm2 through bunding and the use of inlet and outlet connecting irrigation and drainage, which enhances effective water control and management, improves the efficiency of fertilizer, improves nitrogen fixation by soil microbes and algae, increases the use of wetlands, improves soil organic matter accumulation, suppresses weed growth, and enhances immune mechanism of rice through nutrient supply. The current experience has therefore established that the technology overcomes the constraints that have limited the realization of green revolution in West Africa.

  19. THE QUEST FOR A SUPRANATIONAL ENTITY IN WEST AFRICA: CAN THE ECONOMIC COMMUNITY OF WEST AFRICAN STATES ATTAIN THE STATUS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadesola O Lokulo-Sodipe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To reflect the growing trends in the international scene and in furtherance of the objective of its Revised 1993 Treaty, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS summit in December 2006 revolutionised the structure of ECOWAS by re-designating the Executive Secretariat into a quasi-independent commission headed by a President with a Vice President and seven commissioners. The rationale behind the revision was to make ECOWAS a supranational entity. This article considers whether or not a supranational system is essential for the attainment of ECOWAS' objectives. It asks if the conditions for an effective supranational system are in place in the West African sub-region which could provide a solid foundation for its success and why the quest for a supranational system has not yielded any fruitful result in West Africa. It argues that a retreat from the quest for supranationalism and a return to an inter-governmental system would be a retreat rather than the way forward, and expresses the need for the course of action to be sustained courageously till the impact of integration begins to emerge, and the disguised, patriotic impulse of states to protect their national sovereignty gives way to the full manifestation of ECOWAS as a supranational entity.

  20. An exploratory study of early letter-sound knowledge in a low socio-economic context in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley O'Carroll

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores one aspect of early literacy development in a low socio-economic context in South Africa. Assessments conducted with a sample of children from two disadvantaged communities in Cape Town indicated that in this context, almost half of the learners entering Grade One were unable to recognise any letters. A Grade R intervention conducted by volunteers showed that children from this context were able to learn letter-sounds in Grade R through a programme that focused on teaching letter-sounds in the context of building language skills, emergent writing and concepts about print. In order to strengthen the effectiveness of the intervention, the volunteer programme was supplemented by support for the Grade R teacher and teaching assistant. Follow-up assessments of one of the intervention groups at the end of Grade One revealed significant correlations between early Grade One letter knowledge and end of Grade One word reading and spelling skills. The findings of this exploratory study are in line with research that shows the importance of letter-sound knowledge in the earliest stages of learning to read. This raises concerns about the historical lack of emphasis in the Grade R curriculum on this aspect of early literacy development. Although the study has a narrow focus and conclusions cannot be drawn about other aspects of early literacy learning in this context, the results suggest an urgent need for quality Grade R teacher training programmes with a specific focus on emergent literacy.

  1. Reforming Urban Water Utilities in Western and Central Africa : Experiences with Public-Private Partnerships, Volume 2. Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Fall, Matar; Marin, Philippe; Locussol, Alain; Verspyck, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Western and Central Africa has one of the longest experiences with public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the developing world, both for water supply and for combined power and water supply utilities. Cote d'Ivoire has a successful partnership dating from 1959, and over the last two decades as many as 15 countries (out of 23 in the region) have experimented with PPPs: eight for water su...

  2. Children's experiences of corporal punishment: A qualitative study in an urban township of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Alison; Daniels, Karen; Tomlinson, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to violence is a serious mental and public health issue. In particular, children exposed to violence are at risk for poor developmental outcomes and physical and mental health problems. One area that has been shown to increase the risk for poor outcomes is the use of corporal punishment as a discipline method. While researchers are starting to ask children directly about their experiences of violence, there is limited research with children about their perspectives on physical punishment, particularly in low-and middle-income countries (LMIC). This paper begins to address this gap by reporting on the spontaneous data that emerged during 24 qualitative interviews that were conducted with children, aged 8-12 in South Africa. The themes that emerged indicated that corporal punishment is an everyday experience, that it has negative emotional and behavioral consequences, and that it plays a role in how children resolve interpersonal conflicts. The study highlights the challenges for violence prevention interventions in under-resourced contexts. PMID:26094159

  3. Nurses’ experiences and understanding of workplace violence in a trauma and emergency department in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Kennedy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Violence in South African society has reached epidemic levels and has permeated the walls of the workplace. The aim of the study was to gain a deeper understanding of how nurses experience and understand workplace violence perpetrated by patients, and to make recommendations to reduce this type of violence. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted to explore the experiences and coping mechanisms of nurses regarding workplace violence. The purposive sample comprised eight nurses working in the Trauma and Emergency Department in the Western Cape, South Africa. Thematic analysis was done of the semi-structured interviews. Four main themes and 10 categories were identified. Nurses are experiencing physical threats, verbal abuse and psychological and imminent violence on a regular basis. They tend to ‘normalise’ abusive patient behaviour because of the perception that workplace abuse ‘comes with the territory’, which resulted in under-reporting. However, perpetrators received compromised care by being avoided, ignored or given only minimal nursing care. Coping mechanisms ranged from using colleagues as sounding boards, helping out with duties, taking a smoke break and using friends and family to get it ‘off their chest’. The tolerance of non-physical violence and the absence of policies to deal with the violence, contribute to under-reporting.

  4. Decision Support Systems for Water Resources Management in Developing Countries: Learning from Experiences in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Giupponi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Decision support system (DSS tools are rather popular in the literature on water resources management. The European Project “Splash” conducted a survey of the literature and of DSS implementation in developing countries with specific reference on Africa. Experts in the field were consulted through an ad hoc questionnaire and interviews. The results of the survey indicate that the exchange of experiences amongst projects with similar objectives or even the same case study is very limited, with a tendency towards restarting every time from scratch. As a consequence, it seems that DSS developments have produced only limited positive impacts. Most experts contacted shared either the frustration deriving from the limited impacts on intended end-users, who rarely used the tool after the project end, or in the case of ongoing projects, the preoccupation for future maintenance. Responses from the questionnaires indicate that priority efforts should not focus on developing the tools, but rather on improving the effectiveness and applicability of integrated water resource management legislative and planning frameworks, training and capacity building, networking and cooperation, harmonization of transnational data infrastructures and, very importantly, learning from past experiences and adopting enhanced protocols for DSS development.

  5. Children's experiences of corporal punishment: A qualitative study in an urban township of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Alison; Daniels, Karen; Tomlinson, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to violence is a serious mental and public health issue. In particular, children exposed to violence are at risk for poor developmental outcomes and physical and mental health problems. One area that has been shown to increase the risk for poor outcomes is the use of corporal punishment as a discipline method. While researchers are starting to ask children directly about their experiences of violence, there is limited research with children about their perspectives on physical punishment, particularly in low-and middle-income countries (LMIC). This paper begins to address this gap by reporting on the spontaneous data that emerged during 24 qualitative interviews that were conducted with children, aged 8-12 in South Africa. The themes that emerged indicated that corporal punishment is an everyday experience, that it has negative emotional and behavioral consequences, and that it plays a role in how children resolve interpersonal conflicts. The study highlights the challenges for violence prevention interventions in under-resourced contexts.

  6. The Exceptional State in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    China's relations with African states have undergone significant changes in recent years. China has projected its relationship with Africa as one of equality and ‘mutual help’. Such perceptions of foreign policy stem from the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence and the shared experience...... of imperialist domination and economic underdevelopment. Moreover, various public statements by China's elites suggest that China is expected to play a much more prominent, even exceptional role in Africa. This purportedly entails moving beyond the hegemonic West's interventionist aid or security policies......, and is also implicitly designed to highlight the West's shortcomings in promoting African economic growth or peace. Yet where does this perception of exceptionalism come from? Why does Beijing feel that it has to play a leading role in Africa's development? How can Beijing distinguish itself from the nations...

  7. Building Geophysics Talent and Opportunity in Africa: Experience from the AfricaArray/Wits Geophysics Field School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. J.; Manzi, M.; Scheiber-Enslin, S. E.; Durrheim, R. J.; Jones, M. Q. W.; Nyblade, A.

    2015-12-01

    There are many challenges faced by geophysics students and academic staff in Africa that make it difficult to develop effective field and research programs. Challenges to conducting field work that have been identified, and that can be tackled are: lack of training on geophysical equipment and lack of exposure to field program design and implementation. To address these challenges, the AfricaArray/Wits Geophysics field school is designed to expose participants to a wide variety of geophysical instruments and the entire workflow of a geophysical project. The AA field school was initially developed for the geophysics students at the University of the Witwatersrand. However, by increasing the number of participants, we are able to make more effective use of a large pool of equipment, while addressing challenging geophysical problems at a remote field site. These additional participants are selected partially based on the likely hood of being able start a field school at their home institution. A good candidate would have access to geophysical equipment, but may not have knowledge of how to use it or how to effectively design surveys. These are frequently junior staff members or graduate students in leadership roles. The three week program introduces participants to the full geophysical field workflow. The first week is spent designing a geophysical survey, including determining the cost. The second week is spent collecting data to address a real geophysical challenge, such as determining overburden thickness, loss of ground features due to dykes in a mine, or finding water. The third week is spent interpreting and integrating the various data sets culminating in a final presentation. Participants are given all lecture material and much of the software is open access; this is done to encourage using the material at the home institution. One innovation has been to use graduate students as instructors, thus building a pool of talent that has developed the logistic and

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COURTS AND THE OTHER ARMS OF GOVERNMENT IN PROMOTING AND PROTECTING SOCIO-ECONOMIC RIGHTS IN SOUTH AFRICA: WHAT ABOUT SEPARATION OF POWERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Davis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The keynote speech was delivered by Judge Dennis Davis, a Judge of the High Court, Cape Town and Judge President of the Competition Appeal Court. His speech was delivered on 16 November 2012 at the 3rd Human Rights Indaba on The Role of International Law in Understanding and Applying the Socio-economic Rights in South Africa's Bill of Rights co-hosted by the Konrad-Adenauer Foundation and the Faculty of Law of North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus. Judge Davis investigates the relationship between courts and the other arms of government in promoting and protecting socio-economic rights in South Africa and airs his views on the doctrine of the separation of powers.

  9. Fiscal stimulation of human capital and resultant economic growth in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhardus van Zyl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Shift-share analysis of employment as a measuring instrument for human resource management is proposed by this study. The results obtained through this technique can assist human resource management on the macro-level in making informed and strategic decisions regarding future employment practices and trends. This technique is often applied to studies of economic geography, and is illustrated in this article through its application to the estimation of future employment potential of manufacturing industries of South Africa’s Southern District Municipality. The economy in this region is mainly dependent on gold mining, which is declining as gold reserves are becoming depleted. As a result, a large section of the area’s population will be unemployed in future, causing adversity and other development needs. Shift-share analysis provides insight into the shifts of employment in the various sectors over time, as well as insight into the national share effect on employment in the region, including the regional-industrial mix and the competitive share effects. It was found that the sectors with the highest employment creation potential are: transport equipment, wood and paper products, metal products, and furniture. Some suggestions are also made regarding the ways that this information can be utilised in human resource management.

  10. Qualitative performance and economic analysis of low cost solar fish driers in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshood Keke Mustapha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative performance and economic analysis of five low cost solar driers were evaluated at the Zoology and Physics Laboratories of the University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria. The solar driers were constructed from mosquito net, plastic, aluminum and glass with black stone inserted in it. The driers were found to be better than the other driers because they are cheap, reliable, safe to use, easy to repair, well insulated, and cost effective. The solar driers are compact, efficient with drying of fish with lowest moisture content achieved within a few days and the dried products of good quality, with long shelf life, highly acceptable to consumers. The driers save man-hour, money, use renewable energy, with no operational or maintenance costs. The driers have a long life span, with net income to fisher folks very high and the payback time for the driers very low. The adoption of the driers will contribute to the economy of rural populace in the developing countries where there is no electricity and the challenges of deforestation are becoming prominent. The improved low cost solar driers will ensure food safety and security and assist in combating climate change resulting from burning of wood and fossil fuel.

  11. Economic evaluations of interventions to reduce neonatal morbidity and mortality: a review of the evidence in LMICs and its implications for South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Maredza, Mandy; Chola, Lumbwe; Hofman, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Background Newborn mortality, comprising a third of all under-5 deaths, has hardly changed in low and middle income countries (LMICs) including South Africa over the past decade. To attain the MDG 4 target, greater emphasis must be placed on wide-scale implementation of proven, cost-effective interventions. This paper reviews economic evidence on effective neonatal health interventions in LMICs from 2000–2013; documents lessons for South African policy on neonatal health; and identifies gaps ...

  12. Student experiences of participating in five collaborative blended learning courses in Africa and Asia: a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Salla; Yan, Weirong; Meragia, Elnta; Mahomed, Hassan; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Skinner, Donald; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2016-01-01

    Background As blended learning (BL; a combination of face-to-face and e-learning methods) becomes more commonplace, it is important to assess whether students find it useful for their studies. ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH (African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research; Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health) were unique capacity-building projects, focusing on developing BL in Africa and Asia on issues related to global health. Objective We aimed to evaluate the student experience of participating in any of five ARCADE BL courses implemented collaboratively at institutions from Africa, Asia, and Europe. Design A post-course student survey with 118 students was conducted. The data were collected using email or through an e-learning platform. Data were analysed with SAS, using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. We focused on the associations between various demographic and experience variables and student-reported overall perceptions of the courses. Results In total, 82 students responded to the survey. In bivariate logistic regression, the course a student took [p=0.0067, odds ratio (OR)=0.192; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.058–0.633], male gender of student (p=0.0474, OR=0.255; 95% CI: 0.066–0.985), not experiencing technical problems (pstudent needs (p=0.0036, OR=0.165; 95% CI: 0.049–0.555) were found to be associated with a more positive perception of BL, as measured by student rating of the overall helpfulness of the e-learning component to their studies. In contrast, perceiving the assessment as adequate was associated with a worse perception of overall usefulness. In a multiple regression, the course, experiencing no technical problems, and perceiving the discussion as adequate remained significantly associated with a more positively rated perception of the usefulness of the online component of the blended courses. Discussion The results suggest that lack of technical

  13. An Argument for South Africa's Accession to the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in the light of its importance and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Viljoen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The universality, indivisibility, interdependence and interrelatedness of all rights have been universally acclaimed since the drafting in 1948 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. However, despite the doctrine of indivisibility, civil and political rights (CPRs have for a long time been treated as being enforceable judicially at the national, regional and international levels, while socio-economic rights (SERs have not. With the elaboration and adoption of an Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (OP-ICESCR, which mandates the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR to consider individual communications detailing the violations of SERs, the justiciability of SERs was also fully recognised at the international level. This paper undertakes an analysis of the importance and implications of the individual communications procedure under the OP-ICESCR and details some of the reasons why it would be beneficial for South Africa to accede thereto. The argument for accession by South Africa to the OP-ICESCR departs from the premise that South Africa's ratification of the ICESCR is imminent. Having signed the ICESCR on 3 October 1994, the South African Cabinet on 10 October 2012 decided that South Africa should ratify the Covenant. The authors argue that acceding to the OP-ICESCR will complement domestic protection and will confirm South Africa's global leadership in the field of justiciable SERs. Logic dictates that South Africa should confirm at the international level its position as a world leader on the national justiciability and legal enforcement of SERs, as indeed it has done during the drafting process of the OP-ICESCR. Accession to OP-ICESCR, the argument continues, will not detract from the country's sovereignty, especially in the light of the requirement of the exhaustion of domestic remedies, including the condition that applicants must show that they have suffered a

  14. The financial and economic crisis and pension systems: International experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Eich, Frank

    2009-01-01

    There has been much discussion in the British general and specialised media over the last year on the adverse consequences of the economic and financial crisis on the British pension system. It should come as no surprise that the crisis has also adversely affected pension systems in most other countries too. This paper contributes to the current debate on pensions in the UK by discussing how pension systems outside the UK have been affected by the economic and financial crisis, and what gover...

  15. Tourism as a driver of economic development - the Colombian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Benković, Andreja; Mejía, Juan Felipe

    2008-01-01

    The current paper analyzes the importance and potentials of the tourism sector for economic development. It is divided into four major parts. After a short introduction, section two presents some theoretical insights into the topic of economic development. Commenting on the most relevant components of the catching-up theory by Abramovitz (1986) and the structural change theory by Baumol (1967) and others, it could be realized that growth and the accompanying structural changes in the distribu...

  16. Economic Adjustment, Education and Human Resource Development in Africa: The Case of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geo-Jaja, Macleans A.; Mangum, Garth

    2003-07-01

    On the basis of the Nigerian experience, this article argues that the structural adjustment programs of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, when misapplied, can have a devastating effect on the educational systems that are essential to human resource development. The paper considers how the objectives of structural adjustment might have been accomplished without harming education, and recommends an outcomes-based educational policy for Nigeria which could serve equally well in other developing nations. The key message of the paper is that the ongoing austerity programs have been secured at excessively high human cost, and that it is time for a policy redirection that reaffirms education as the essential tool of all development.

  17. Electricity consumption and economic growth: a time series experience for 17 African countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the availability of electricity by itself is not a panacea for the economic and social problems facing Africa, the supply of electricity is nevertheless believed to be a necessary requirement for Africa's economic and social development. This paper tests the long-run and causal relationship between electricity consumption per capita and real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita for 17 African countries for the period 1971-2001 using a newly developed cointegration test proposed by Pesaran et al. (2001) and using a modified version of the Granger causality test due to Toda and Yamamoto (1995). The advantage of using these two approaches is that they both avoid the pre-testing bias associated with conventional unit root and cointegration tests. The empirical evidence shows that there was a long-run relationship between electricity consumption per capita and real GDP per capita for only 9 countries and Granger causality for only 12 countries. For 6 countries there was a positive uni-directional causality running from real GDP per capita to electricity consumption per capita; an opposite causality for 3 countries and bi-directional causality for the remaining 3 countries. The result should, however, be interpreted with care as electricity consumption accounts for less than 4% of total energy consumption in Africa and only grid-supplied electricity is taken into account

  18. Legacy, legitimacy, and possibility: an exploration of community health worker experience across the generations in Khayelitsha, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Alison

    2013-06-01

    In South Africa, the response to HIV and TB epidemics is complex, varied, and contextually defined. "Task-shifting" and a movement toward a decentralized model of care have led to an increased reliance on community health workers (CHWs) providing health care services to residents of impoverished, peri-urban areas. Public health policy tends to present CHWs as a homogeneous group, with little attention paid to the nuances of experience, motivation, and understanding, which distinguish these care workers from one another and from other kinds of health workers. An exploration of the layered meanings of providing community health care services under financially, politically, and socially difficult conditions reveals clear distinctions of experience across the generations. Many older CHWs say that ubuntu, a notion of shared African humanity, is being "killed off" by the younger generation, whereas younger CHWs often describe older women as being "jealous" of the opportunities that this younger generation has for education, training, and employment. The structure of the South African health system, past and present responses to disease epidemics, and the legacy of apartheid's structural violence have amplified these generational differences among CHWs. Using ethnographic data collected from approximately 20 CHWS in a peri-urban settlement in Cape Town, South Africa, I explore how CHWs experience and understand legitimacy in the moral economy of care. A call for closer attention to the experiences of CHWs is critical when designing public health policies for the delivery of health care services in impoverished communities in South Africa.

  19. Environmental quality and economic growth: Searching for environmental Kuznets curves for air and water pollutants in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orubu, Christopher O. [Department of Economics, Delta State University, Abraka (Nigeria); Omotor, Douglason G., E-mail: yomotor@yahoo.com [Department of Economics, Delta State University, Abraka (Nigeria)

    2011-07-15

    This study investigated the relationship between per capita income and environmental degradation in Africa, using longitudinal data on suspended particulate matter and organic water pollutants. The specific objective was to estimate environmental Kuznets curves for two indicators of environmental quality and to establish whether the estimated relationships conform to the inverted U-shape hypothesis. The results of the empirical investigation generally suggest the existence of an environmental Kuznets curve for suspended particulate matter. In the case of organic water pollutants, the evidence weighs more in favor of rising pollution as per capita income increases. The turning point levels of income established for the two indicators of environmental quality were however generally low, when compared to evidence from existing studies. On the face value, this suggests that African countries may be turning the corner of the environmental Kuznets curve, much faster, and at lower levels of income, much in line with the emerging idea of a 'revised environmental Kuznets curve'. The results also suggest that economic growth and rising incomes may matter in African countries in order to curb pollution from these pollutants, but more stringent policy measures, particularly at the industrial level would be required to curb environmental degradation from organic water pollutants. - Highlights: > The specific objective was to establish whether the relationships conform to the inverted U-shape hypothesis. > Evidence suggests the existence of an environmental Kuznets curve for suspended particulate matter. > The turning point levels of income established for the two indicators were however generally low. > We conclude that African countries may be turning the corner of the environmental Kuznets curve, much faster, and at lower levels of income.

  20. Lived experiences of male intimate partners of female rape victims in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalina van Wijk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual violence in South Africa is a major public health and social problem. Sexual assault or rape is a traumatic event which disrupts not only the life of the female rape victim, but also that of her male intimate partner (MIP, irrespective of whether he witnessed or was informed of the incident. Objectives: The study aimed to explore the lived experiences of MIPs of female rape victims and the meaning of these experiences in the six months following the partner’s rape. Method: We conducted a longitudinal hermeneutic phenomenological study. Nine purposively sampled adult MIPs were interviewed over a period of six months. The participants were in an intimate relationship with a female rape victim prior to and immediately after the rape; their partners had been treated at a specialised centre for victims of rape and sexual assault. Four interviews were conducted with each of the nine intimate partners of female rape victims: (1 within 14 days of, (2 a month after, (3 three months after, and (4 six months after the rape. Results: Two major themes emerged: being-in-the-world as a secondary victim of rape, and living in multiple worlds, those of their female partners, family, friends, society, employers or colleagues, professionals and the justice system. The participant’s familiar world became strange and even threatening, and his relationship with his partner became uncertain. Conclusion: Early supportive intervention for intimate partners of female rape victims is required to prevent on-going emotional trauma and alleviate the effects of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and suffering at intra- and interpersonal levels.

  1. [Thought Experiments of Economic Surplus: Science and Economy in Ernst Mach's Epistemology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulz, Monika

    2015-03-01

    Thought Experiments of Economic Surplus: Science and Economy in Ernst Mach's Epistemology. Thought experiments are an important element in Ernst Mach's epistemology: They facilitate amplifying our knowledge by experimenting with thoughts; they thus exceed the empirical experience and suspend the quest for immediate utility. In an economical perspective, Mach suggested that thought experiments depended on the production of an economic surplus based on the division of labor relieving the struggle for survival of the individual. Thus, as frequently emphasized, in Mach's epistemology, not only the 'economy of thought' is an important feature; instead, also the socioeconomic conditions of science play a decisive role. The paper discusses the mental and social economic aspects of experimental thinking in Mach's epistemology and examines those within the contemporary evolutionary, physiological, and economic contexts.

  2. Economic aspects of triticale growing: Australian farmer experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katharine V; Elleway, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Australian farmers grow triticale for economic benefit. A range of farmers in different localities, with different farm size, soil type, rainfall and proximity to markets, were asked why they grew triticale and how it contributed to their farm economics. The main encouragements to grow triticale relate to its agronomic prowess: its reliability and magnitude of production on all soil types and particularly in conditions in which other crops are relatively poor producers. Also in favour of triticale is its ability to produce economic return following a high yielding wheat crop, whilst providing soil benefits as a rotation crop reducing root and stubble diseases. Triticale's versatility and utility as high grade animal feed, by supplying grazing, fodder for conservation, and grain for on-farm animal production, further encourages farmers to include triticale in their cropping programs. The main inhibitor to growing triticale relates to the cost and ease of marketing the product, relative to other crops, and even triticale enthusiasts do not persist with triticale, if the economics are not in its favour. A downturn in the dairy industry, and the cessation of triticale grain receivals at bulk handling sites has resulted in a contraction of triticale production in some regions. Less triticale is likely to be grown where farmers have to provide their own storage, find their own markets, freight the product further, or have limited market options. New specific markets, such as high grade hay from reduced-awn triticale varieties, for the horse industry, may increase the profitability of triticale producing enterprises.

  3. Capacity development for health research in Africa: experiences managing the African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship Program

    OpenAIRE

    Wambugu Susan W; Izugbara Chimaraoke O; Kabiru Caroline W; Ezeh Alex C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Africa's progress depends on her capacity to generate, adapt, and use scientific knowledge to meet regional health and development needs. Yet, Africa's higher education institutions that are mandated to foster this capacity lack adequate resources to generate and apply knowledge, raising the need for innovative approaches to enhance research capacity. In this paper, we describe a newly-developed program to support PhD research in health and population sciences at African universities...

  4. The Africa Competitiveness Report 2011

    OpenAIRE

    World Economic Forum; World Bank; African Development Bank

    2011-01-01

    The Africa competitiveness report 2011 comes out as the world emerges from the most significant financial and economic crisis in generations. While many advanced economies are still struggling to get their economies back on a solid footing, Africa has, for the most part, weathered the storm remarkably well. The Africa competitiveness report focuses on harnessing Africa's underutilized reso...

  5. Prefarm Systems and economical analysis of practical experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gnip

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The system of Precision farming guarantees a detail monitoring of data and information necessary for a successful decision in a crop production. The system is designed for a data collection from several sources. The data are collected by a service company and also directly by farmers. The paper also analyses the economical efficiency on the base of Medlov Farm. Next development is currently running under projects Prezem and AgriSensor.

  6. Developing a new mid-level health worker: lessons from South Africa's experience with clinical associates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Fonn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mid-level medical workers play an important role in health systems and hold great potential for addressing the human resource shortage, especially in low- and middle-income countries. South Africa began the production of its first mid-level medical workers – known as clinical associates – in small numbers in 2008. Objective: We describe the way in which scopes of practice and course design were negotiated and assess progress during the early years. We derive lessons for other countries wishing to introduce new types of mid-level worker. Methods: We conducted a rapid assessment in 2010 consisting of a review of 19 documents and 11 semi-structured interviews with a variety of stakeholders. A thematic analysis was performed. Results: Central to the success of the clinical associate training programme was a clear definition and understanding of the interests of various stakeholders. Stakeholder sensitivities were taken into account in the conceptualisation of the role and scope of practice of the clinical associate. This was achieved by dealing with quality of care concerns through service-based training and doctor supervision, and using a national curriculum framework to set uniform standards. Conclusions: This new mid-level medical worker can contribute to the quality of district hospital care and address human resource shortages. However, a number of significant challenges lie ahead. To sustain and expand on early achievements, clinical associates must be produced in greater numbers and the required funding, training capacity, public sector posts, and supervision must be made available. Retaining the new cadre will depend on the public system becoming an employer of choice. Nonetheless, the South African experience yields positive lessons that could be of use to other countries contemplating similar initiatives.

  7. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa

  8. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  9. The realities of nuclear power: international economic and regulatory experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book is aimed at the energy industry, energy ministries, nuclear power organisations and national agencies. A description is given of a framework for evaluating nuclear power technology development, along with the economic evaluation of nuclear power. The contrasting records are examined of four of the major users of nuclear power - the USA, the Federal Republic of Germany, Canada and France, and factors are identified which have been important in determining the success or otherwise of each of the four nuclear power programmes. Finally the future of nuclear power is discussed. (U.K.)

  10. A geomorphic and soil description of the long-term fire experiment in the Kruger National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik J. Venter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1954, the experimental burning programme into fire research was initiated in the Kruger National Park (KNP, South Africa. It is viewed as one of the last remaining long- term landscape fire experiments in Africa. Throughout the more than five decades of fire treatments in the experiment, numerous surveys (expanding various spatial and temporal scales, research projects (covering biotic and abiotic components and analyses have been conducted with the aim to assess the impacts of different fire regimes on the savannah biome. The design of the experiment intended to test the effect of season and frequency of burning on vegetation within four major landscapes in the KNP. However, these effects have been partly obscured by factors not fully taken into account by the experimental design, namely, herbivory, artificial water provision and soil variation. Soil variation between replicates in the same landscape, as well as within individual replicates, has raised the issue of the representivity of the trial. This paper provided a description and ranking of the experimental burning trial according to the geomorphic and soil characteristics of each plot in comparison to the surrounding landscape.Conservation implications: The KNP burn plots are one of the largest and longest-running fire experiments on fire ecology in African savannahs. However, studies need to consider the underlying geomorphic and soil template when designing experiments and interpreting results. This work describes the representivity of the plots across, and within, treatments.

  11. Experience and economic evaluation of backwashable hollow fiber filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the initial applications of filtration systems to nuclear power plants, filtration has been provided by precoat and cartridge type filters as required. These filters provide good effluent but generate a great amount of burial volume. This makes the cost of diatomaceous earth or other precoat media and spent cartridge filter burial costs not as significant. Today, however, and in particular in the future with present burial sites being restricted and the compact surcharge being imposed, volume reduction is a first priority in all considerations of waste handling. This paper discusses the hollow fiber filter process development, test data, results and economics of the 5 gpm hollow fiber filter system as tested on low TDS and high TDS solids from a secondary PWR. With this incineratible hollow fiber filter, the volume of drummed material is limited to the captured crud only. The effluent quality from these tests exceeded the NPDES discharge permit requirements

  12. Colaborar con África: la experiencia del retorno Work with Africa: The experience of returning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Jerez Molina

    2010-09-01

    ? These are the main questions where our investigation comes from. Methodology: Non-directive interviews to seven nurses who had collaborated with the program. The obtained data were analysed by using The Taylor and Bogdan's method for the analysis of qualitative data. Results: The interviewed people affirm that, after the experience, one learns to appreciate what is available in the Western World. At the beginning it looks as if the nursery practice changes but, indeed, the human beings can adapt themselves to the environment either when arriving to Africa or when departing from. The imprint of these experiences makes the person. Very little differences are observed for people who have travelled more than once. Discussion-Conclusions: The experiences of each individual can be very different having in mind the objectives initially planned. The same can be said for the imprint of these experiences. But it is clear that, after a quite short time, any change in the nursing practice is not significant.

  13. 非洲区域经济发展差异时空变化研究%Analysis on Spatio-Temporal Evolvement of Regional Economic Disparities Characteristics in Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋大亮; 任则沛; 张振克

    2015-01-01

    Africa is an ancient continent with wide range of latitude, where there are many emerging economics. In order to figure out the characteristics of development of African economy and give the reference for multi-party coop-eration, this paper concentrates on regional economic unequal development in Africa. Based on the data of population and GDP, using Theil index mainly, in the consideration of industrial structure,the paper studies the regulation of spatial and temporal evolvement of regional economic disparities in five dif-ferent regions in Africa. At present, its most features are :(1) The regional economic disparitie in Africa had been decreasing from 2004 to 2012;(2)It is increasingly obvious that North Africa Region and South Africa Region have been economic centers in African continent among five regions .The regional disparity has been increased little, while the inter-region disparity has in-creased tremendously, which is the most significant contribution to regional economic disparity. The inter-region disparity in South Africa Region is the largest in Africa, followed by North Africa Region and Central Africa Region;(3) The influence of economic crisis is a mirror of industrial structure of regional economy. Political environment, affect economy directly or indirect-ly. The disparities of industrial structure and political turbulence play a important role in regional economic disparities.%非洲地区社会经济发展不平衡。以空间地理区位划分的五大区域为研究对象,利用泰尔指数对南非、北非、中非、西非和东非地区的进行差异性研究,结合各地区产业结构,分析区域经济时空变化的原因,发现:1)2004年~2012年,非洲区域总体经济差异呈现下降趋势,年际变化呈现出“减—增—减”的波动;2)区域内差异是影响区域总体差异的主导因素,其中南非地区内部差异贡献最大;3)各地区国家之间产业结构的差异与政治

  14. THE MIGRANT WORKER AND LEGISLATIVE PROTECTION. A DISCUSSION OF THE SOUTH AFRICA EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chux G. Iwu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of this paper, a migrant is defined as an asylum seeker, a refugee, a legal and or an illegal immigrant. Labour migration in South Africa has received little attention due to concerns with immigration, which are regarded as far more immediate and pressing. This consideration and others provide the impetus for this paper, which in the opinion of the authors adds to the growing concern over the issues of xenophobia and incidences of maltreatment of African immigrants in South Africa, especially against the background of the bold posture of South Africa’s constitution as the most promising constitution in the world. One must note that South Africa’s independence in 1994 and the prospects of a booming economy in a democratic setting unleashed a floodgate for immigration into the Republic from a variety of countries in Africa including Eastern Europe. This paper finds that despite narratives that tend to argue that migrant workers are deficiently protected in South Africa, evidence suggests that their rights within and outside of the workplace are indeed under the veil of protection by the legislation and the courts. Nonetheless, we are of the opinion that more interventions need to be in place, especially with regard to mitigating the levels of exploitation of migrant workers. This and many other recommendations have been put forward considering that migrant workers are susceptible to exploitation.

  15. Parent Participation in School Governance: A Legal Analysis of Experiences in South Africa and Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathon, Justin; Beckmann, Johan; Bjork, Lars G.

    2011-01-01

    This comparative study on the educational governance systems of South Africa and the Commonwealth of Kentucky examines legal evidence from judicial decisions and administrative law to understand similarities in how school-based governance structures have been developed. We found that although school-level governance structures may provide greater…

  16. Options for Tsetse Eradication in the Moist Savannah Zone of West Africa: Technical and Economic Feasibility, Phase 1 - GIS-Based Study. Programme Against African Trypanosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This desk study was initiated with two objectives: - To examine the economic costs and benefits of a range of different sized tsetse eradication projects in the Moist Savannah Zone of West Africa (MSZ), and; - To test the hypothesis that larger tsetse control projects are more economically efficient than smaller projects in that region. The limited nature of the study precluded detailed examination of the socio-cultural and environmental issues relating to controlling trypanosomosis although these are briefly considered; nor did it aim to compare vector control with other methods of combating trypanosomosis such as the therapeutic or prophylactic use of drugs. However, by computing benefits over just 10 years an indirect comparison is made with the strategy that maintains that eradicating tsetse flies is not justified as, sooner or later, rapidly increasing population pressure will autonomously eradicate tsetse flies and hence trypanosomosis. This analysis suggests that such a strategy is not justified economically. As the basis of the economic evaluation was a study of projects in defined areas it was first necessary to iteratively examine the technical and economic issues relating to project selection and design. In this respect, the re-invasion issue was considered to be the major influence as it threatens both the sustainability and economic performance of tsetse eradication. Consequently, it was considered that the river basin was the smallest size of project that would optimise economic performance. This particular observation relates uniquely to the MSZ and may not apply to more southerly areas where fly distribution is more ubiquitous or to other parts of Africa. By basing the economic analysis on an evaluation of projects, albeit hypothetical, it was possible to use real data as the baseline database and the projects could be designed in response to actual tsetse and trypanosomosis scenarios. The group of study areas were chosen to be representative of the

  17. E3: Education, Experience, Employment The Economic Ladder to Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne L Seifert

    2011-10-01

    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) literate citizenry is critical for Idaho's economy to effectively compete and grow in today's global marketplace and enhance Idaho workforce capabilities. Idaho's blueprint presents a collaboration design developed by a group of Idaho stakeholders including state level (STEM) educators, state and federal government, other agencies, and industry across the state. The purpose the Idaho Learn and Earn Blueprint Design is to describe a comprehensive plan for improving STEM education in Idaho through a collaborative partnerships and a series of grant supported projects underpinning this strategic design process building pathways to overcome hurdles in today's economy, and moving communities and families up their economic ladder. The Idaho Learn and Earn Blueprint Design focuses on three industry sectors; energy, advanced manufacturing, and health care. All are important in Idaho and have room for job growth potential among both displaced workers and graduates. Representatives from each sector are members of the design team and assist in developing grants and implementing the actions outlined in the design as the program goes forward. Idaho's current programs are generally institution specific. Each of the state's two-year colleges, along with regional groups and employers, are already working towards improving STEM education across the state. A key aspect of this design is to bring these groups together to focus on four unique goals: (1) Providing industry driven curriculum directly tied to skill based career needs; (2) Enhancing collaboration among stakeholders; (3) Providing access to learn and earn programs; and (4) Improving public and student awareness and interest in targeted industry sector career and educational opportunities.

  18. Investment in Agricultural Water for Poverty Reduction and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa : Synthesis Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    The report analyses the contribution to date of agricultural water management to poverty reduction and growth in the in sub-Saharan Africa region, the reasons for its slow expansion and apparently poor track record, as well as the ways in which increased investment in agricultural water management could make a sustainable contribution to further poverty reduction and growth. The first chap...

  19. Assessing the Impact of Privatization Policy on Telecommunications Sector Effectiveness and Economic Activity in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Oneurine B.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, privatization has been a growing phenomenon in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is viewed as an instrument used by the public sector to reduce the role of the state in the economies while enhancing the scope of private ownership and participation of goods and services (Akram et al, 2011). Researchers have noted that the telecommunication…

  20. The experience of bedaquiline implementation at a decentralised clinic in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariem, R.; Cox, V.; de Azevedo, V.; Hughes, J.; Mohr, E.; Durán, L. Triviño; Ndjeka, N.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a serious public health problem, but the new drugs bedaquiline (BDQ) and delamanid offer hope to improve outcomes and minimise toxicity. In Khayelitsha, South Africa, patients are routinely started on BDQ in the out-patient setting. This report from the field describes BDQ use in the out-patient setting at the Nolungile Clinic. The clinic staff overall report a positive experience using the drug. Challenges have been based largely on the logistics of drug supply and delivery. BDQ can be started successfully in the out-patient setting, and can be a positive experience for both patients and providers. La tuberculose multirésistante (TB-MDR) est un problème de santé publique grave, mais les nouveaux médicaments que sont la bédaquiline (BDQ) et le délamanide apportent un espoir d'améliorer les résultats tout en réduisant la toxicité. A Khayelitsha, Afrique du Sud, les patients démarrent leur traitement par BDQ en consultation externe en routine. Ce rapport du terrain décrit l'utilisation de la BDQ à la consultation externe du dispensaire Nolungile. Dans l'ensemble, le personnel du centre de santé exprime une expérience positive du médicament. Les défis ont surtout été liés à la logistique de l'approvisionnement et de la distribution du médicament. La BDQ peut être mise en route avec succès dans le cadre d'une consultation externe et peut constituer une expérience positive pour les patients et les prestataires de soins. La tuberculosis multirresistente (TB-MDR) representa un grave problema de salud pública, pero la utilización de nuevos medicamentos como la bedaquilina (BDQ) y el delamanid ofrece perspectivas de mejores desenlaces terapéuticos y disminución de la toxicidad asociada. En Khayelitsha, Suráfrica, se inicia de manera sistemática el tratamiento ambulatorio con BDQ. En el presente informe del terreno, se describe la utilización de BDQ en tratamiento antituberculoso ambulatorio en el

  1. Ex-Ante Economic Impact Assessment of Genetically Modified Banana Resistant to Xanthomonas Wilt in the Great Lakes Region of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainembabazi, John Herbert; Tripathi, Leena; Rusike, Joseph; Abdoulaye, Tahirou; Manyong, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Background Credible empirical evidence is scanty on the social implications of genetically modified (GM) crops in Africa, especially on vegetatively propagated crops. Little is known about the future success of introducing GM technologies into staple crops such as bananas, which are widely produced and consumed in the Great Lakes Region of Africa (GLA). GM banana has a potential to control the destructive banana Xanthomonas wilt disease. Objective To gain a better understanding of future adoption and consumption of GM banana in the GLA countries which are yet to permit the production of GM crops; specifically, to evaluate the potential economic impacts of GM cultivars resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt disease. Data Sources The paper uses data collected from farmers, traders, agricultural extension agents and key informants in the GLA. Analysis We analyze the perceptions of the respondents about the adoption and consumption of GM crop. Economic surplus model is used to determine future economic benefits and costs of producing GM banana. Results On the release of GM banana for commercialization, the expected initial adoption rate ranges from 21 to 70%, while the ceiling adoption rate is up to 100%. Investment in the development of GM banana is economically viable. However, aggregate benefits vary substantially across the target countries ranging from US$ 20 million to 953 million, highest in countries where disease incidence and production losses are high, ranging from 51 to 83% of production. Conclusion The findings support investment in the development of GM banana resistant to Xanthomonas wilt disease. The main beneficiaries of this technology development are farmers and consumers, although the latter benefit more than the former from reduced prices. Designing a participatory breeding program involving farmers and consumers signifies the successful adoption and consumption of GM banana in the target countries. PMID:26414379

  2. Healer shopping in Africa: new evidence from rural-urban qualitative study of diabetes experiences

    OpenAIRE

    de-Graft Aikins, Ama

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To provide counterevidence to existing literature on healer shopping in Africa through a systematic analysis of illness practices by Ghanaians with diabetes; to outline approaches towards improving patient centred health care and policy development regarding diabetes in Ghana. Design Longitudinal qualitative study with individual interviews, group interviews, and ethnographies. Settings Two urban towns (Accra, Tema) and two rural towns (Nkoranza and Kintampo) in Ghana...

  3. The potential of capstone learning experiences in addressing perceived shortcomings in LLB training in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Geo Quinot; SP van Tonder

    2014-01-01

    Current debates about legal education in South Africa have revealed the perception that the LLB curriculum does not adequately integrate various outcomes, in particular outcomes relating to the development of skills in communication, problem solving, ethics, and in general a holistic view of the law in practice. One mechanism that has been mooted as a potential remedy to this situation is capstone courses, which will consolidate and integrate the four years of study in the final year and buil...

  4. Uncertainty in greenhouse-gas emission scenario projections: Experiences from Mexico and South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig, Daniel

    This report outlines approaches to quantify the uncertainty associated with national greenhouse-gas emission scenario projections. It does so by describing practical applications of those approaches in two countries – Mexico and South Africa. The goal of the report is to promote uncertainty...... quantification, because quantifying uncertainty has the potential to foster more robust climate-change mitigation plans. To this end the report also summarises the rationale for quantifying uncertainty in greenhouse-gas emission scenario projections....

  5. Experiences of leadership in health care in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Curry Leslie; Taylor Lauren; Chen Peggy; Bradley Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Leadership is widely regarded as central to effective health-care systems, and resources are increasingly devoted to the cultivation of strong health-care leadership. Nevertheless, the literature regarding leadership capacity building has been developed primarily in the context of high-income settings. Less research has been done on leadership in low-income settings, including sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in health care, with attention to historical, political and soci...

  6. The Sub-Saharan Africa Challenge Program: An experiment in mainstreaming institutional learning and change

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Anne Starks; Jones, Monty; von Kaufmann, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    The Sub-Saharan Africa Challenge Program (SSA CP) shows how the principles of institutional learning and change (ILAC) can be applied. This Brief outlines the basic components of the SSA CP and highlights various ILAC features of the Program. These include an innovation systems orientation; an approach to ‘thinking globally and acting locally’; the location of research within a broader context of policy, market and institutional change; and an emphasis on collaboration and learning among prog...

  7. Work experience, job-fulfillment and burnout among VMMC providers in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Perry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human resource capacity is vital to the scale-up of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC services. VMMC providers are at risk of "burnout" from performing a single task repeatedly in a high volume work environment that produces long work hours and intense work effort. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Systematic Monitoring of the Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Scale-up (SYMMACS surveyed VMMC providers in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe in 2011 (n = 357 and 2012 (n = 591. Providers self-reported on their training, work experience, levels of job-fulfillment and work fatigue/burnout. Data analysis included a descriptive analysis of VMMC provider characteristics, and both bivariate and multivariate analyses of factors associated with provider work fatigue/burnout. In 2012, Kenyan providers had worked in VMMC for a median of 31 months compared to South Africa (10 months, Tanzania (15 months, and Zimbabwe (11 months. More than three-quarters (78 - 99% of providers in all countries in 2012 reported that VMMC is a personally fulfilling job. However, 67% of Kenyan providers reported starting to experience work fatigue/burnout compared to South Africa (33%, Zimbabwe (17%, and Tanzania (15%. Despite the high level of work fatigue/burnout in Kenya, none of the measured factors (i.e., gender, age, full-time versus part-time status, length of service, number of operations performed, or cadre were significantly associated with work fatigue/burnout in 2011. In 2012, logistic regression found increases in age (p<.05 and number of months working in VMMC (p<.01 were associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing work fatigue/burnout, while higher career total VMMCs decreased the likelihood of experiencing burnout. CONCLUSION: Given cross-country differences, further elucidation of cultural and other contextual factors that may influence provider burnout is required. Continuing to emphasize the contribution that providers make in

  8. The Role of Primary Commodities in Economic Development: Sub-Saharan Africa versus Rest of the World

    OpenAIRE

    Carmignani, Fabrizio; Chowdhury, Abdur

    2010-01-01

    We study the nexus between natural resources and growth in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and find that SSA is indeed special: resources dependence retards growth in SSA, but not elsewhere. The natural resources curse is thus specific to SSA. We then show that this specificity does not depend on the type of primary commodities on which SSA specializes. Instead, the SSA specificity appears to arise from the interaction between institutions and natural resources.

  9. A Comprehensive Socio-economic Model of the Experience Economy : the Territorial Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Guex, Delphine,; Crevoisier, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the economic dimension of the experience economy, i.e. how economic value is created between customers and producers and is articulated to monetary transactions. After discussing the Pine & Gilmore’s metaphor of stage and concept of admission fees, we propose the model of the Territorial Stage constituted by two elements. First, the Territorial Stage depends on the accumulation of transactions along history (complex process in time and space). Second, the accumulation of...

  10. When is Economic Growth Pro-Poor? Experiences in Malaysia and Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood Hasan Khan

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on two central issues related to the contrasting experiences of Malaysia and Pakistan regarding poverty reduction. First, it examines the structure of economic growth and its proximate determinants in the two countries, including the initial conditions, institutional changes, and macroeconomic policies. Second, it analyzes the links between economic growth and poverty reduction, particularly focusing on public policy mechanisms to reduce poverty and inequality. Malaysia, un...

  11. Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palley, Paul D; Parcero, Miriam E

    2016-10-01

    A review of literature in the calendar year 2015 dedicated to environmental policies and sustainable development, and economic policies. This review is divided into these sections: sustainable development, irrigation, ecosystems and water management, climate change and disaster risk management, economic growth, water supply policies, water consumption, water price regulation, and water price valuation.

  12. Generation 2030/Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Danzhen; Hug, Lucia; Anthony, David

    2014-01-01

    Until relatively recently, much of Africa has been among the economically least developed and least densely populated places on earth, replete with villages and rural communities. Africa is changing rapidly, in its economy, trade and investment; in climate change; in conflict and stability; in urbanization, migration patterns, and most of all in…

  13. Chemical safety of cassava products in regions adopting cassava production and processing - experience from Southern Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyirenda, D.B.; Chiwona-Karltun, L.; Chitundu, M.;

    2011-01-01

    The cassava belt area in Southern Africa is experiencing an unforeseen surge in cassava production, processing and consumption. Little documentation exists on the effects of this surge on processing procedures, the prevailing levels of cyanogenic glucosides of products consumed and the levels...... and perceptions concerning cassava and chemical food safety. Chips, mixed biscuits and flour, procured from households and markets in three regions of Zambia (Luapula-North, Western and Southern) as well as products from the Northern, Central and Southern regions of Malawi, were analyzed for total cyanogenic...

  14. The return of the Pholela experiment: medical history and primary health care in post-Apartheid South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Howard

    2014-10-01

    I examine why South Africa's pioneering Pholela model of primary health care, dating from the 1940s, held such appeal for the country's new policymakers after 1994, and why those policymakers have failed to make it the basis of an effective public health care system since then. In the 1940s, the innovative Pholela experiment had served as such a model, to be replicated gradually throughout the country until a new health care system in its image was finally in place. However, this vision was dashed by the hostility of the mainstream medical profession and, after 1948, even more so by the new apartheid government, causing the idea to wither and become no more than a vanishing memory. In the 1990s, the model resurfaced as part of the country's transition to democracy, eliciting great enthusiasm among a new generation of health policymakers. I conclude by looking at the fate to date of this second coming of the Pholela experiment.

  15. Investment Climate in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Bridgman, David; Adamali, Aref

    2015-01-01

    The World Bank Group has been working on investment climate reform in Sub-Saharan Africa for nearly a decade, a period characterized by dramatic economic growth on the continent. Establishing links between such reform interventions and economic growth, however, is a complex problem. Although this note finds some connection between investment climate reform and economic growth, establishing ...

  16. Sharing perspectives and experiences of doctoral fellows in the first cohort of Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa: 2011–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde Adedokun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resolution of public health problems in Africa remains a challenge because of insufficient skilled human resource capacity. The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA was established to enhance capacity in multi-disciplinary health research that will make a positive impact on population health in Africa. Objective: The first cohort of the CARTA program describes their perspectives and experiences during the 4 years of fellowship and puts forward suggestions for future progress and direction of research in Africa. Conclusions: The model of training as shown by the CARTA program is an effective model of research capacity building in African academic institutions. An expansion of the program is therefore warranted to reach out to more African academics in search of advanced research training.

  17. Africa's intra-regional, inter-regional and intercontinental electricity trade - Techno-politico-economic considerations and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, Babu

    2007-07-01

    The majority of Africa's population does not have access to electricity. The Sub-Saharan African is largely hit save South Africa. Among the many reasons for this situation, the major one is: the insufficient growth of the investment against the demand of electricity. This is to say that the investment has not been able to keep pace with the demand which has been rising with the growing population and with the economic activities. As a result, there is a backlog of investment. To circumvent this situation, 4 billion dollar annual investment is needed in the electricity sector. But the risks and high transaction costs of African economies deter investors and are relatively unable to attract them. Furthermore, a number of African economies are small due to which the benefits of the economy of scale are not realizable. Moreover, isolated and individualistic planning makes countries incur huge investment and makes the supply of electricity to disadvantaged areas even costlier. The supply costs can be reduced by invoking meticulously to coordinated combined planning and regional integration. New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) advocates a development paradigm based on the principles of interdependence, cooperation, and regional integration. However, the absence of infrastructure and institutions and harmonized policies obstruct the integration of electricity supply systems. Creating regional electricity markets is a way to reduce risks and transaction costs and to lure investors to develop much needed electricity generation and transmission facilities for increasing electricity access in rural areas. This paper extends the themes of regional integration to establishing the regional electricity markets/power pools. It considers the intra-regional and inter-regional electricity trade in Africa. It also considers Africa's inter-continental trade that is its trade with Europe and Asia. This paper examines technical constraints, proposes solutions

  18. Border cases between autonomy and relevance: Economic sciences in Berlin--A natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düppe, Till

    2015-06-01

    The faculty of economics at today's Humboldt University in Berlin, as no other institution of economics, has witnessed three radical ruptures in its history: in 1933, National Socialism replaced the pluralism prevailing in the Weimar Republic by imposing a "German economics"; after WWII, GDR authorities replaced this NS regime by imposing a Marxist imperative, which after the fall of the wall was replaced by the Western standards of neoclassical economics. In reconstructing these three reforms, institutional history can serve as a context in which questions about the political nature of economic knowledge can be answered that remain speculative in a conceptual context. I thus present a natural experiment in the political epistemology of economics: How do economists respond to, resist, and stabilize, changing political regimes? How do economists renegotiate the autonomy of economic knowledge given changing demands as of its social task? Among others, I show that contrary to Robert Merton's old, but still widely held thesis in political epistemology-that the values of science are compatible only with democratic regimes-the totalitarian and authoritarian regimes created better conditions for methodological pluralism in economics than democratic society.

  19. Border cases between autonomy and relevance: Economic sciences in Berlin--A natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düppe, Till

    2015-06-01

    The faculty of economics at today's Humboldt University in Berlin, as no other institution of economics, has witnessed three radical ruptures in its history: in 1933, National Socialism replaced the pluralism prevailing in the Weimar Republic by imposing a "German economics"; after WWII, GDR authorities replaced this NS regime by imposing a Marxist imperative, which after the fall of the wall was replaced by the Western standards of neoclassical economics. In reconstructing these three reforms, institutional history can serve as a context in which questions about the political nature of economic knowledge can be answered that remain speculative in a conceptual context. I thus present a natural experiment in the political epistemology of economics: How do economists respond to, resist, and stabilize, changing political regimes? How do economists renegotiate the autonomy of economic knowledge given changing demands as of its social task? Among others, I show that contrary to Robert Merton's old, but still widely held thesis in political epistemology-that the values of science are compatible only with democratic regimes-the totalitarian and authoritarian regimes created better conditions for methodological pluralism in economics than democratic society. PMID:26227228

  20. Socio-economic status and overweight or obesity among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhstorfer, B H; Mousoulis, C; Uthman, O A; Robertson, W

    2016-02-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity have emerged as a public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a systematic review with the aim to examine the association between socio-economic status (SES) and overweight or obesity among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa. In March 2014 we searched five electronic databases for reports which presented cross-sectional data on prevalence levels of overweight or obesity stratified by SES groups among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa. We used a random-effect model to pool the relative indexes of inequality of the association from the individual studies. In total, 20 reports satisfied the inclusion criteria providing results of 21 datasets. The risk of overweight or obesity in children from highest SES households was 5.28 times as high as that of children from lowest SES households (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.62 to 10.66). On subgroup analysis, this association was statistically significant for household income and composite SES measures but not for parental educational attainment and occupation type. Similarly, the risk of overweight or obesity in children attending affluent (private) schools was 15.94 times as high as that of children going to either urban or rural public schools (95% CI 5.82 to 43.68). The magnitude of the association tended to be stronger for area or school-type compared with composite measures. In summary, children from higher SES households and those attending private schools tended to be overweight and obese.

  1. Socio-economic status and overweight or obesity among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhstorfer, B H; Mousoulis, C; Uthman, O A; Robertson, W

    2016-02-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity have emerged as a public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a systematic review with the aim to examine the association between socio-economic status (SES) and overweight or obesity among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa. In March 2014 we searched five electronic databases for reports which presented cross-sectional data on prevalence levels of overweight or obesity stratified by SES groups among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa. We used a random-effect model to pool the relative indexes of inequality of the association from the individual studies. In total, 20 reports satisfied the inclusion criteria providing results of 21 datasets. The risk of overweight or obesity in children from highest SES households was 5.28 times as high as that of children from lowest SES households (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.62 to 10.66). On subgroup analysis, this association was statistically significant for household income and composite SES measures but not for parental educational attainment and occupation type. Similarly, the risk of overweight or obesity in children attending affluent (private) schools was 15.94 times as high as that of children going to either urban or rural public schools (95% CI 5.82 to 43.68). The magnitude of the association tended to be stronger for area or school-type compared with composite measures. In summary, children from higher SES households and those attending private schools tended to be overweight and obese. PMID:26781602

  2. The impact of economic shocks in the rest of the world on South Africa: Evidence from a global VAR

    OpenAIRE

    Annari de Waal; Renee van Eyden

    2013-01-01

    The significant change in South Africa’s trade patterns over the past two decades should affect the impact of shocks in the rest of the world on the country, since South Africa is a small open economy. We investigate the effect with the use of a global vector autoregression (GVAR) model from 1979Q2 to 2009Q4. To account for changes in international trade linkages, we assemble the country-specific foreign variables with time-varying trade-weighted data. We show that the long-term impact of a s...

  3. Economism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Simons

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern society is characterised not only by a fascination with scientific technology as a means of solving all problems, especially those that stand in the way of material progress (technicism, but also by an obsessive interest in everything that has to do with money (economism or mammonism. The article discusses the relationship between technicism and economism, on the basis of their relationship to utilitarian thinking: the quest for the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people. Recent major studies of neo-liberalism (seen as an intensification of utilitarianism by Laval and Dardot are used as reference to the development of utilitarianism. It is suggested that the western view of the world, as expressed in economism and technicism, with a utilitarian ethics, features three absolutisations: those of theoretical thinking, technology and economics. In a second part, the article draws on the framework of reformational philosophy to suggest an approach that, in principle, is not marred by such absolutisations.

  4. Lidar Observations of Tropospheric Aerosols Over Northeastern South Africa During the ARREX and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Piketh, Stuart J.; Barenbrug, Marguerite; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the ARREX-1999 and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season experiments a micropulse lidar (523 nm) instrument was operated at the Skukuza Airport in northeastern South Africa. The Mar was collocated with a diverse array of passive radiometric equipment. For SAFARI-2000 the processed Mar data yields a daytime time-series of layer mean/derived aerosol optical properties, including extinction-to-backscatter ratios and vertical extinction cross-section profile. Combined with 523 run aerosol optical depth and spectral Angstrom exponent calculations from available CIMEL sun-photometer data and normalized broadband flux measurements the temporal evolution of the near surface aerosol layer optical properties is analyzed for climatological trends. For the densest smoke/haze events the extinction-to-backscatter ratio is found to be between 60-80/sr, and corresponding Angstrom exponent calculations near and above 1.75. The optical characteristics of an evolving smoke event from SAFARI-2000 are extensively detailed. The advecting smoke was embedded within two distinct stratified thermodynamic layers, causing the particulate mass to advect over the instrument array in an incoherent manner on the afternoon of its occurrence. Surface broadband flux forcing due to the smoke is calculated, as is the evolution in the vertical aerosol extinction profile as measured by the Han Finally, observations of persistent elevated aerosol during ARREX-1999 are presented and discussed. The lack of corroborating observations the following year makes these observation; both unique and noteworthy in the scope of regional aerosol transport over southern Africa.

  5. Patient experiences and health system responsiveness among older adults in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background As populations age, health systems must adapt and develop approaches that meet the needs of older patients with increasing multiple chronic conditions. Understanding older populations’ perceptions of quality of care is critical to developing measures to increase the utilization of primary healthcare services. Using the data from the Global Study on Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) survey, the current study aims to evaluate the degree of perceived responsiveness with outpatient and inpatient healthcare in South Africa. Methods We conducted a national population-based cross-sectional study with a sample of 3,840 individuals aged 50 years or older in South Africa in 2008. The questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics, healthcare utilization and responsiveness, and other health variables. Results Healthcare utilization was 9% inpatient care in the past 3 years and 50% outpatient care in the past 12 months. The overall mean perceived responsiveness score for inpatient care was 71 and for outpatient care 69. According to the evaluation of inpatient care, autonomy and prompt attention showed the lowest while quality, confidentiality, and dignity showed the highest degree of perceived responsiveness among all the areas analyzed. Regarding outpatient care, prompt attention showed the lowest while quality, confidentiality, and dignity the highest degree of perceived responsiveness scores. Overall, perceived healthcare responsiveness was higher in private than in public inpatient and outpatient healthcare facilities. Multivariate analysis found that being from the White population group (OR=3.96, CI=1.54–19.19), not a public health facility (OR=0.34, CI=0.17–0.69), poor subjective health status (OR=0.53, CI=0.38–0.75) and having health insurance paying for the outpatient care visit (OR=3.39, CI=1.24–9.27) were associated with outpatient perceived healthcare responsiveness, whereas male gender (OR=0.36, CI=0.14–0.89), 80 years or older (OR=5

  6. "No one can ask me 'Why do you take that stuff?'": men's experiences of antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Molly; Collumbien, Martine; Hosegood, Victoria

    2010-03-01

    This paper examines the way gender shaped the health behaviours, health care experiences and narratives of HIV-positive men initiating antiretroviral treatment in South Africa. We conducted participant observation and in-depth, semi-structured interviews with eight men enrolled in a public HIV treatment programme in a rural health district in KwaZulu-Natal. We also interviewed their family members and programme staff. The study found that men's narratives and experiences of antiretroviral therapy (ART) were complex. Descriptions of control and coping juxtaposed with low self-esteem and guilt. Improvements in health following treatment increased optimism about the future but were readily undermined by men's concerns about being unable to meet strongly gendered expectations in relation to family and work. Alcohol use and abuse by men themselves or by family members was found to be an important issue influencing disclosure, uptake and adherence. Given messages discouraging alcohol use during treatment, men reported self-imposed delays to enrolment while they tried to stop or reduce alcohol use, although none had sought advice or professional help in doing so. Men also felt very threatened by alcohol abuse by family members fearing accidental disclose, insults and violence. With regards to health providers, men held strong views as to appropriate and professional behaviour by programme staff, particularly regarding confidentiality. As ART programmes in Africa become established and evolve, we not only need to identify barriers to men's access and adherence but monitor their health and treatment experiences. These findings suggest that the issue of alcohol and ART warrants further investigation. Additional training for primary health care providers and counsellors on health promotion with men may be useful. PMID:20390516

  7. The symptom experience of people living with HIV and AIDS in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaswana-Mafuya Nancy

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptom management for persons living with HIV (PLHIV or AIDS is an important part of care management. Limited information about symptom prevalence exists about HIV infected persons in South Africa, in particular in the context of antiretroviral treatment (ART. The aim of this study was to assess HIV symptoms and demographic, social and disease variables of people living with HIV in South Africa. Methods In 2007 607 PLHIV, sampled by all districts in the Eastern Cape Province and recruited through convenience sampling, were interviewed by PLHIV at health facilities, key informants in the community and support groups. Results Two-thirds of the PLHIV (66% classified themselves with being given an AIDS (advanced stage of HIV diagnosis, 48% were currently on ART, 35% were currently on a disability grant for HIV/AIDS and for 13% the disability grant had been stopped. Participants reported that on the day of the interview, they were experiencing an average of 26.1 symptoms out of a possible 64. In a regression model with demographic and social variables, higher HIV symptom levels were associated with lower educational levels, higher age, urban residence and not on a disability grant, lack of enough food and having a health insurance, and in a regression model with demographic, social and disease variables only being on ART, lack of enough food and having a health insurance were associated with HIV symptoms. Conclusion Symptom assessment provides information that may be valuable in evaluating AIDS treatment regimens and defining strategies to improve quality of life. Because of the high levels of symptoms reported, the results imply an urgent need for effective health care, home- and community-based as well as self-care symptom management to help patients and their families manage and control AIDS symptoms.

  8. Financial Liberalization and Economic Growth in the North Africa Region: Cointegration Panel Analysis by DOLS and FMOLS Models

    OpenAIRE

    Khattab, Ahmed; IHADIYAN, Abid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. This article aims at examining the impact of financial liberalization on the economic growth in the North African countries. The econometric study, which covers the period between 1995 and 2013, relies on a sample composed of four Northern African countries and referring to the database of the World Bank data (2013), Heritage Foundation (2013) and Financial Openness of (the Institute for international and development Economics, 2009). The estimate model of cointegration panel reveal...

  9. The dynamics of household dissolution and change in socio-economic position: A survival model in a rural South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Sartorius, Kurt; Sartorius, Benn K. D.; Collinson, Mark A.; TOLLMAN, STEPHEN M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates household dissolution and changes in asset wealth (socio-economic position) in a rural South African community containing settled refugees. Survival analysis applied to a longitudinal dataset indicated that the covariates increasing the risk of forced household dissolution were a reduction in socio-economic position (asset wealth), adult deaths and the permanent outmigration of more than 40% of the household. Conversely, the risk of dissolution was reduced by bigger ho...

  10. Construction and economic growth in developing countries of Africa: evidence from data of the last thirty years

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The role of construction in economic growth and development has been addressed by various writers and international bodies, many of whom have focused in developing countries. The main aspect derived from a seminal work in this field (Bon, 1992) is that there is a changing development pattern of the construction industry based on the stage of development of a country’s economy. That is in the early stages of the economic development, the share of construction in gross domestic product (GDP) in...

  11. Middle East and North Africa Economic Developments and Prospects, October 2012 : Looking Ahead After a Year in Transition

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    The Arab Republic of Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and the Republic of Yemen are recovering after a period of economic growth decelerations accompanying the Arab Spring uprisings of 2011. Economic recovery was relatively quick, with industrial production recovering in a matter of months and, in the cases of Egypt and Tunisia, the growth dips of 2011 were smaller than the average growth declines observed around the year of transition during past transitions to democracy. Importantly, the growth decele...

  12. The contribution of women entrepreneurs to the economic growth of the North West Province, South Africa / Senye Monica Kedibone

    OpenAIRE

    Senye, Monica Kedibone

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of women entrepreneurs to the economic growth of the North West Province. The aim of the study was to identify the contribution of women entrepreneurs in the economic growth, to determine forces driving women to become entrepreneurs. The study also aimed at examining future challenges for women entrepreneurs as well as strategies to advance women entrepreneurs . The Quantitative research method was chosen for the study and the targeted populat...

  13. The legacy of parental divorce: social, economic and demographic experiences in adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Kiernan, Kathleen

    1997-01-01

    This study addresses three questions. Firstly, to what extent does divorce during childhood have long-term consequences for the educational attainment, economic situation, partnership formation and dissolution, and parenthood behaviour in adulthood? We show that in most of these domains children who experience parental divorce in childhood have more negative experiences than children reared by both their parents. However, in answering our second question, as to whether child and family charac...

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  15. Preparing North American Preservice Teachers for Global Perspectives: An International Teaching Practicum Experience in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwebi, Bosire Monari; Brigham, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Given the economic, political, and social conditions in the world today and the increased diversity in Canadian classrooms, schools require teachers who have a strong sense of self-awareness and understanding of global issues. This article is based on empirical research involving preservice teachers from an Atlantic Canadian university. The…

  16. Managing organizational performance in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2012-01-01

    Discusses the interplay of political, economic, social and cultural factors in the management of the performance of public and private organizations in Africa......Discusses the interplay of political, economic, social and cultural factors in the management of the performance of public and private organizations in Africa...

  17. A Philosophical Analysis of the Challenges of Science and Technology in Contemporary Africa: The Nigerian Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinnawonu B. Monehin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Science and technology engendered unexpected social, political and health related problems. These included corrupt and dubious utilization of information and communication technology, environmental pollution and protection and depletion of the ozone layer which endangered human health. This sstudy examined the positive and negative implications of science and technology in Africa using Nigeria as a case study. This attempt became germane owing to the important place of the scientific and technological enterprise in the entire pattern of human life. The critical and conceptual methods of analysis were employed and the available literatures on the problem provided the background for the study. The study showed the dangers in uncontrolled destructive character of scientific and technological knowledge to human survival and suggested appropriate control measures. The study, therefore, suggested resource control, the control of chemical and biological weapons and the abuse of information and communication technology. Manufacturers of various technologies needed to create subsidiary technology and put in place necessary mechanisms for curtailing the foreseeable consequences of their products. Indeed, technological civilization should not be blindly embraced.

  18. Addressing Trade-offs: Experiences from Conservation and Development Initiatives in the Mkuze Wetlands, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catie Burlando

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Present-day conservation policies generally include the aim to integrate biodiversity conservation and local development, and describe this as a win–win solution that can satisfy all interests. This is challenged by research claiming that many efforts fail to match practice to rhetoric. South Africa has made strong commitments to fulfill the dual goals of conservation and development, and the iSimangaliso Wetland Park is promoted as an example of this. We explore present and potential outcomes of conservation and development interventions in a community bordering the Wetland Park through the perspective of different stakeholders, with the aim of uncovering opportunities and risks. In terms of improving local livelihoods as well as involvement in conservation, the success of the studied interventions varied. Local communities may accept restrictions on resource use as a result of realistic and fairly negotiated trade-offs, but if perceived as unjust and imposed from above, then mistrust and resistance will increase. In this area, collaboration between conservation organizations and the local community had improved, but still faced problems associated with unequal power relations, unrealistic expectations, and a lack of trust, transparency, and communication. As unsustainable efforts are a waste of funds and engagement, and may even become counterproductive, policy visions need to be matched by realistic allocations of staff, time, funds, and training. At the national and international level, the true cost of conservation has to be recognized and budgeted for if efforts at integrating conservation and development are to succeed.

  19. Adapting to climate change and disaster risk reduction through sustainable land management: Experiences in Tajikistan, East Africa, US, Argentina and Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The special session will share and discuss experiences from different regions, namely from Tajikistan, East Africa, US, Argentina and Mongolia. Within the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) in Tajikistan 70 SLM technologies and approaches on how to implement SLM were documented with the Wor...

  20. The Global Economic Crisis: Setbacks to the Educational Agenda for the Minority in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingubu, Moses Shiasha

    2010-01-01

    This paper captures the impact of the Global Economic Crisis on educational programs serving minority groups in developing countries. It has been established that the most vulnerable groupings include nomadic and pastoralist communities, slum dwellers, children in war zones, and women. Various educational interventions such as mobile schooling,…

  1. A tale of two sisters : Investigating the socio-economic outcomes of teen childbearing in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Kakal (Tasneem Aliasgar)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis mixed methods study attempts to understand the effect of teenage childbearing in determining future socio-economic consequences for teenage mothers. This is accomplished by assessing the effect of a teen birth on outcomes such as educational attainment, employment, welfare and pover

  2. Improving farmyard poultry production in Africa: Interventions and their economic assessment. Proceedings of a final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major objective of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture is to support research projects involving nuclear and related techniques leading to improved animal production in developing countries. Chicken produced on a relatively small scale, at the farmyard level, are an important source of animal protein for human consumption in developing countries. Limiting factors to maximize this resource include infectious diseases and overall production management. A Coordinated Research Project on Small Scale Poultry Production was initiated in 1998 to evaluate the impact and cost efficacy of inputs in management and veterinary care and provide guidelines to improve the livelihood of farmers. This publication contains the results of the FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project entitled Assessment of the Effectiveness of Vaccination Strategies against Newcastle Disease (ND) and Gumboro Disease (IBR) using Immunoassay-based Technologies for Increasing Farmyard Poultry Production in Africa. Thirteen research contract holders in Africa evaluated the major constraints to poultry production in different regions of their countries, analysed the disease situation, management and marketing practises and developed improved ND vaccination and husbandry strategies with the support of the four research agreement holders. This exercise highlighted the added benefit strategic vaccination had on the survival rate and the number of birds produced. A thermostable ND-vaccine seed strain (provided by CSIRO, Australia) reduced the cost of vaccination substantially, as it could be produced locally, with the added advantage of being thermo-resistant, thus reducing the need of a prolonged cool chain. This was further improved by the training of 'village vaccinators' performing vaccine inoculations without the need of veterinary staff on place, insuring vaccination frequency. The efficacy and the level of protection resulting from vaccination were evaluated based on

  3. The effect of economic change and elite framing on support for welfare state retrenchment: a survey experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Marx; G. Schumacher

    2016-01-01

    How do economic downturns affect citizens’ support for welfare state retrenchment? Existing observational studies fail to isolate the effect of economic conditions and the effect of elite framing of these conditions. We therefore designed a survey experiment to evaluate how economic change in conjun

  4. Experience and challenges from clinical trials with malaria vaccines in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangoka, Grace; Ogutu, Bernhards; Msambichaka, Beverly; Mzee, Tutu; Salim, Nahya; Kafuruki, Shubis; Mpina, Maxmillian; Shekalaghe, Seif; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vaccines are considered amongst the most important modalities for potential elimination of malaria disease and transmission. Research and development in this field has been an area of intense effort by many groups over the last few decades. Despite this, there is currently no licensed malaria vaccine. Researchers, clinical trialists and vaccine developers have been working on many approached to make malaria vaccine available.African research institutions have developed and demonstrated a great capacity to undertake clinical trials in accordance to the International Conference on Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) standards in the last decade; particularly in the field of malaria vaccines and anti-malarial drugs. This capacity is a result of networking among African scientists in collaboration with other partners; this has traversed both clinical trials and malaria control programmes as part of the Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP). GMAP outlined and support global strategies toward the elimination and eradication of malaria in many areas, translating in reduction in public health burden, especially for African children. In the sub-Saharan region the capacity to undertake more clinical trials remains small in comparison to the actual need.However, sustainability of the already developed capacity is essential and crucial for the evaluation of different interventions and diagnostic tools/strategies for other diseases like TB, HIV, neglected tropical diseases and non-communicable diseases. There is urgent need for innovative mechanisms for the sustainability and expansion of the capacity in clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa as the catalyst for health improvement and maintained. PMID:23496910

  5. Scaling up delivery of contraceptive implants in sub-Saharan Africa: operational experiences of Marie Stopes International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Susan; Thurston, Sarah; Weinberger, Michelle; Nuccio, Olivia; Fuchs-Montgomery, Nomi

    2014-02-01

    Contraceptive implants offer promising opportunities for addressing the high and growing unmet need for modern contraceptives in sub-Saharan Africa. Marie Stopes International (MSI) offers implants as one of many family planning options. Between 2008 and 2012, MSI scaled up voluntary access to implants in 15 sub-Saharan African countries, from 80,041 implants in 2008 to 754,329 implants in 2012. This 9-fold increase amounted to more than 1.7 million implants delivered cumulatively over the 5-year period. High levels of client satisfaction were attained alongside service provision scale up by using existing MSI service delivery channels-mobile outreach, social franchising, and clinics-to implement strategies that broadened access for underserved clients and maintained service quality. Use of adaptive and context-specific service delivery models and attention to key operational components, including sufficient numbers of trained providers, strong supply chains, diverse financing mechanisms, and implant removal services, underpinned our service delivery efforts. Accounting for 70% of the implants delivered by MSI in 2012, mobile outreach services through dedicated MSI provider teams played a central role in scale-up efforts, fueled in part by the provision of free or heavily subsidized services. Social franchising also demonstrated promise for future program growth, along with MSI clinics. Continued high growth in implant provision between 2011 and 2012 in all sub-Saharan African countries indicates the region's capacity for further service delivery expansion. Meeting the expected rising demand for implants and ensuring long-term sustainable access to the method, as part of a comprehensive method mix, will require continued use of appropriate service delivery models, effective operations, and ongoing collaboration between the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors. MSI's experience can be instructive for future efforts to ensure contraceptive access and choice

  6. Scaling up delivery of contraceptive implants in sub-Saharan Africa: operational experiences of Marie Stopes International

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Susan; Thurston, Sarah; Weinberger, Michelle; Nuccio, Olivia; Fuchs-Montgomery, Nomi

    2014-01-01

    Contraceptive implants offer promising opportunities for addressing the high and growing unmet need for modern contraceptives in sub-Saharan Africa. Marie Stopes International (MSI) offers implants as one of many family planning options. Between 2008 and 2012, MSI scaled up voluntary access to implants in 15 sub-Saharan African countries, from 80,041 implants in 2008 to 754,329 implants in 2012. This 9-fold increase amounted to more than 1.7 million implants delivered cumulatively over the 5-year period. High levels of client satisfaction were attained alongside service provision scale up by using existing MSI service delivery channels—mobile outreach, social franchising, and clinics—to implement strategies that broadened access for underserved clients and maintained service quality. Use of adaptive and context-specific service delivery models and attention to key operational components, including sufficient numbers of trained providers, strong supply chains, diverse financing mechanisms, and implant removal services, underpinned our service delivery efforts. Accounting for 70% of the implants delivered by MSI in 2012, mobile outreach services through dedicated MSI provider teams played a central role in scale-up efforts, fueled in part by the provision of free or heavily subsidized services. Social franchising also demonstrated promise for future program growth, along with MSI clinics. Continued high growth in implant provision between 2011 and 2012 in all sub-Saharan African countries indicates the region's capacity for further service delivery expansion. Meeting the expected rising demand for implants and ensuring long-term sustainable access to the method, as part of a comprehensive method mix, will require continued use of appropriate service delivery models, effective operations, and ongoing collaboration between the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors. MSI's experience can be instructive for future efforts to ensure contraceptive access and

  7. A partial economic evaluation of blended learning in teaching health research methods: a three-university collaboration in South Africa, Sweden, and Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpu, Minna; Atkins, Salla; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Nkonki, Lungiswa

    2016-01-01

    Background Novel research training approaches are needed in global health, particularly in sub-Saharan African universities, to support strengthening of health systems and services. Blended learning (BL), combining face-to-face teaching with computer-based technologies, is also an accessible and flexible education method for teaching global health and related topics. When organised as inter-institutional collaboration, BL also has potential for sharing teaching resources. However, there is insufficient data on the costs of BL in higher education. Objective Our goal was to evaluate the total provider costs of BL in teaching health research methods in a three-university collaboration. Design A retrospective evaluation was performed on a BL course on randomised controlled trials, which was led by Stellenbosch University (SU) in South Africa and joined by Swedish and Ugandan universities. For all three universities, the costs of the BL course were evaluated using activity-based costing with an ingredients approach. For SU, the costs of the same course delivered with a classroom learning (CL) approach were also estimated. The learning outcomes of both approaches were explored using course grades as an intermediate outcome measure. Results In this contextually bound pilot evaluation, BL had substantially higher costs than the traditional CL approach in South Africa, even when average per-site or per-student costs were considered. Staff costs were the major cost driver in both approaches, but total staff costs were three times higher for the BL course at SU. This implies that inter-institutional BL can be more time consuming, for example, due to use of new technologies. Explorative findings indicated that there was little difference in students’ learning outcomes. Conclusions The total provider costs of the inter-institutional BL course were higher than the CL course at SU. Long-term economic evaluations of BL with societal perspective are warranted before conclusions

  8. The East-Asian economic growth miracle : lessons for sub-Sahara Africa / Stephanie van der Westhuizen

    OpenAIRE

    Rossouw, Stephanié

    2003-01-01

    The economic performance of eight East Asian countries - Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia - have been described as the "East Asian Miracle" because of their economies' significant growth since the 1960s. In these eight countries real per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) rose twice as fast as in any other region between 1965 and 1990. In contrast, much of Sub-Sahara African (SSA) remains in poverty with slow growth in many SSA...

  9. Can the restrictive harvest period policy conserve mopane worms in Southern Africa? A bio-economic modelling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wisdom Akpalu; Edwin Muchapondwa; Precious Zikhali

    2007-01-01

    Imbrasia Belina also known as the mopane worm, like other edible insects and caterpillars, is a vital source of protein to Southern African countries. The worms live and graze on mopane trees, which occupy agricultural land. With increasing commercialization of the worm, the management of the worm, which was hitherto organized as a common property resource, has degraded to a near open access. In this paper, a simple bio-economic modeling approach has been taken to show that, for some optimal ...

  10. Effect of socially responsible investment on economic development in South Africa : an econometric analysis / Paul-Francois Muzindutsi.

    OpenAIRE

    Muzindutsi, Paul-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Changes in economic, environmental and social conditions have exposed our society to many challenges such as hunger and poverty, epidemic diseases and dramatic climate changes. As business entities operating within the community, companies have the immense task of assisting the community to address these challenges. To carry out this task, companies use socially responsible investment (SRI) initiatives in the effort to give back to local communities. These initiatives focus on environmental, ...

  11. Measuring the controllable variables in the customer experience in convenience stores at filling stations / N. Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Africa, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Convenience stores are playing a pivotal role in the contribution to profitability in the fuels retail environment. In order to increase market share that will lead to increased profits it is imperative to provide excellent customer service. Customer experience has been identified as the key construct in the modern retail environment to be addressed, in order to ensure a satisfied customer. It has been noted that customer experience is not measured in the convenience stores, bu...

  12. Experiences of women who have lost young children to AIDS in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demmer Craig

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AIDS continues to be the leading cause of death in South Africa. Little is known about the experiences of mothers who have lost a young child to AIDS. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of women who had lost a young child to HIV/AIDS in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 women who had lost a child to AIDS. The average age of the deceased children was six years. Interviews were also conducted with 12 key informants to obtain their perspectives on working with women who had lost a child to AIDS. A thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed. Results In addition to the pain of losing a child, the women in this study had to endure multiple stresses within a harsh and sometimes hostile environment. Confronted with pervasive stigma and extreme poverty, they had few people they could rely on during their child's sickness and death. They were forced to keep their emotions to themselves since they were not likely to obtain much support from family members or people in the community. Throughout the period of caring for a sick child and watching the child die, they were essentially alone. The demands of caring for their child and subsequent grief, together with daily subsistence worries, took its toll. Key informants struggled to address the needs of these women due to several factors, including scarce resources, lack of training around bereavement issues, reluctance by people in the community to seek help with emotional issues, and poverty. Conclusions The present study offers one of the first perspectives on the experiences of mothers who have lost a young child to AIDS. Interventions that are tailored to the local context and address bereavement issues, as well as other issues that affect the daily lives of these mothers, are urgently needed. Further studies are needed to identify factors that promote resilience among these

  13. Brief reflections on the basis of energy law in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    African energy resources are more than sufficient to meet the continent's needs; but the interest they arouse both strategically and economically is the source of the difficulties facing the African continent in this field. Hence the need for Africa, using particularly its regional organizations and drawing on other international experiences, to work at a synchronization of energy law across the continent. (authors)

  14. Reforming Urban Water Utilities in Western and Central Africa : Experiences with Public-Private Partnerships, Volume 1. Impact and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Fall, Matar; Marin, Philippe; Locussol, Alain; Verspyck, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Western and Central Africa has one of the longest experiences with public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the developing world, both for water supply and for combined power and water supply utilities. Cote d'Ivoire has a successful partnership dating from 1959, and over the last two decades as many as 15 countries (out of 23 in the region) have experimented with PPPs: eight for water su...

  15. Using Economic Incentives to Reduce Electricity Consumption: A field Experiment in Matsuyama, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Mizobuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effectiveness of economic incentives in promoting electricity-conservation behavior among Japanese households. Fifty-three Japanese households participated in a field experiment and were offered monetary rewards depending on their rate of reduction in electricity consumption. To avoid bias in sample selection, which is typically present in previous studies, we adopted a request-based approach for recruiting participants. Results showed that only 34% of the participants succeeded in reducing their electricity consumption, and the average reduction rate was –4.8%. Econometric analysis confirmed that monetary rewards had a positive influence on the electricity conservation behavior, especially of family members who typically stay at home on weekdays. Responses to the questionnaires administered before and after the experiment suggest that participants may have underestimated the marginal costs of the electricity conservation behavior. The efficacy of economic incentives, established in our study, offers a potential measure for encouraging electricity-conservation behavior among Japanese households.

  16. The Relation Between Income and Hunting in Tropical Forests: an Economic Experiment in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José D. Machoa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Hunting in tropical forests is both a major cause of biodiversity loss and an important food source for millions of people. A question with important policy implications is how changes in income level affect how much people hunt. This study, which was carried out in an indigenous community in the Amazon, explored the relation between income and consumption of wild meat using an economic experiment in the form of a lottery, and involved the local people, not only as experimental subjects, but also in the interpretation of results. The results suggested that an increase in steady employment, rather than in income alone, may lead to the substitution of non-hunted foods for wild meat. The kind of social learning that participation in this type of economic experiment implies may potentially affect the way people manage resources in real life.

  17. The Economic Domino Effect: A Phenomenological Study Exploring Community College Faculty's Lived Experiences during Financial Hard Times in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tridai A.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lived experiences of eight full-time community college faculty members who taught during the economic crisis of 2008. The study was guided by the central research question, "How do community college faculty members describe their lived experiences regarding the recent economic crisis of 2008 and its impact…

  18. Towards happiness: Experiences of work-role fit, meaningfulness and work engagement of industrial/organisational psychologists in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn E. van Zyl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The work of industrial/organisational (I/O psychologists presents an interesting and relevant context for studying meaning and engagement as components of happiness.Research purpose: The aim of this study was to determine how I/O psychologists experience the meaning of their work and to investigate the relationships between their experiences of work-role fit, meaning of work, psychological meaningfulness and work engagement, utilising the happiness framework proposed by Seligman (2002.Motivation for the study: I/O psychologists spend more than 88% of their working day with people, and they are primary role models for happiness in the workplace. Information about their work engagement and experiences of meaning is therefore needed.Research design, approach and method: A survey design was used. A convenience sample (n = 106 was taken of I/O psychologists in South Africa. A biographical questionnaire, the Work-Role Fit Scale, the Work-Life Questionnaire, the Psychological Meaningfulness Scale, the Work Engagement Scale and a survey measuring the actual and desired time spent on six broad categories of work were administered.Main findings: Work-role fit predicted psychological meaningfulness and work engagement. The calling orientation to work predicted both psychological meaningfulness and work engagement. Work-role fit mediated the relationship between the meaning of work and psychological meaningfulness. Work-role fit partially mediated the relationship between a calling orientation to work and work engagement.Practical implications: A calling orientation to work should be fostered in I/O psychologists because it contributes to experiences of work-role fit, psychological meaningfulness and work engagement.Contribution/value-add: The results of this study contribute to scientific knowledge about work-role fit, engagement and meaning as components of happiness of I/O psychologists.

  19. Who Engages in Water Scarcity Conflicts? A Field Experiment with Irrigators in Semi-arid Africa

    OpenAIRE

    D'Exelle, Ben; Lecoutere, Els; Van Campenhout, Bjorn

    2010-01-01

    Does water scarcity induce conflict? And who would engage in a water scarcity conflict? In this paper we look for evidence of the relation between water scarcity and conflictive behavior. With a framed field experiment conducted with smallholder irrigators from semi-arid Tanzania that replicates appropriation from an occasionally scarce common water flow we assess what type of water users is more inclined to react in conflictive way to scarcity. On average, water scarcity induces selfish appr...

  20. Breast cancer survival experiences at a tertiary hospital in sub-Saharan Africa: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Galukande, Moses; Wabinga, Henry; Mirembe, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer of the breast is a major health burden and the most common cancer among women worldwide. Though its incidence is fourfold greater in high-income countries, in sharp contrast, mortality rates are greatest among the low-income countries. Early detection linked to appropriate treatment is the most effective strategy to improve survival. The purpose of this study therefore was to establish the survival experiences of women with breast cancer at a Ugandan hospital. Methods This s...

  1. Analog-experiment analysis of ash-deposition monitoring model of boiler economizers in power plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wei-liang; XIA Guo-dong; XU Shou-chen

    2005-01-01

    Ash deposition is a form of particulate fouling, and appears usually in boiler economizers. The ash deposition increases capital expenditure, energy input and maintenance costs. An analog experiment for monitoring ash deposition was performed from the analogous objective of a 410 t/h boiler economizer to verify the rationality and reliability of the ash-deposition-monitoring model presented in order to increase the security and economy in economizer running. The analog experiment platform is a tube-shell exchanger that conforms well to the conditions of a self-modeling area. The analog flue gas in the shell side is the heated air mixed with ash,and in the tube side the fluid is water heated by the flue gas. The fluid state in the water side and the flue gas side follows the second self-modeling area. A 4-factor-3 level orthogonal table was used to schedule 9 operation conditions of orthogonal experiment, with the 4 factors being heat power, flue gas velocity, ashes grain diameter and adding ashes quantity while the three levels are different values due to different position classes in every factor. The ash deposition thermal resistances is calculated by the model with the measure parameters of temperature and pressure drop. It shows that the values of the ash deposition thermal resistances gradually increase up to a stable state. And the experimental results are reliable by F testing method at α = 0. 001. Therefore, the model can be applied in online monitoring of ash deposition in a boiler economizers in power plants and provides scientific decision on ash deposition prediction and sootblowing.

  2. The Identification of Potential Resilient Estuary-based Enterprises to Encourage Economic Empowerment in South Africa: a Toolkit Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles Mander

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that ecosystem services can be used as the foundation to provide economic opportunities to empower the disadvantaged. The Ecosystem Services Framework (ESF approach for poverty alleviation, which balances resource conservation and human resource use, has received much attention in the literature. However, few projects have successfully achieved both conservation and economic objectives. This is partly due to there being a hiatus between theory and practice, due to the absence of tools that help make the transition between conceptual frameworks and theory, to practical integration of ecosystem services into decision making. To address this hiatus, an existing conceptual framework for analyzing the robustness of social-ecological systems was translated into a practical toolkit to help understand the complexity of social-ecological systems (SES. The toolkit can be used by a diversity of stakeholders as a decision making aid for assessing ecosystem services supply and demand and associated enterprise opportunities. The toolkit is participatory and combines both a generic "top-down" scientific approach with a case-specific "bottom-up" approach. It promotes a shared understanding of the utilization of ecosystem services, which is the foundation of identifying resilient enterprises. The toolkit comprises four steps: (i ecosystem services supply and demand assessment; (ii roles identification; (iii enterprise opportunity identification; and (vi enterprise risk assessment, and was tested at two estuary study sites. Implementation of the toolkit requires the populating of preprogrammed Excel worksheets through the holding of workshops that are attended by stakeholders associated with the ecosystems. It was concluded that for an enterprise to be resilient, it must be resilient at an external SES level,which the toolkit addresses, and at an internal business functioning level, e.g., social dynamics among personnel, skills, and literacy

  3. Biomethanol production from gasification of non-woody plant in South Africa: Optimum scale and economic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methanol production from biomass is a promising carbon neutral fuel, well suited for use in fuel cell vehicles (FCVs), as transportation fuel and as chemical building block. The concept used in this study incorporates an innovative Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER) gasification process, which enables an efficient conversion of biomass into a hydrogen-rich gas (syngas) and then, uses the Mitsubishi methanol converter (superconverter) for methanol synthesis. Technical and economic prospects for production of methanol have been evaluated. The methanol plants described have a biomass input between 10 and 2000 MWth. The economy of the methanol production plants is very dependent on the production capacity and large-scale facilities are required to benefit from economies of scale. However, large-scale plants are likely to have higher transportation costs per unit biomass transported as a result of longer transportation distances. Analyses show that lower unit investment costs accompanying increased production scale outweighs the cost for transporting larger quantities of biomass. The unit cost of methanol production mostly depends on the capital investments. The total unit cost of methanol is found to decrease from about 10.66 R/l for a 10 MWth to about 6.44 R/l for a 60 MWth and 3.95 R/l for a 400 MWth methanol plant. The unit costs stabilise (a near flat profile was observed) for plant sizes between 400 and 2000 MWth, but the unit cost do however continue to decrease to about 2.89 R/l for a 2000 MWth plant. Long term cost reduction mainly resides in technological learning and large-scale production. Therefore, technology development towards large-scale technology that takes into account sustainable biomass production could be a better choice due to economic reasons.

  4. Physics in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the role of basic sciences in the development of technology. This is then tied up with the broader issue of the importance of scientific and technological knowledge in the socio-economic development of a country. Physics forms the basis for most of the natural and applied sciences and technology. The state of physics in Africa is reviewed. The need for regional and international cooperation in physics education and research in Africa is stressed. (author). 13 refs, 2 tabs

  5. GREAT TREK INTO AFRICA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On the eve of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation, to be held between November 2 and 5 in Beijing, Beijing Review reporter Li Li talks with South African Kobus van der Wath, the founder and Managing Director of The Beijing Axis, a consulting firm based in Beijing and Johannesburg that serves foreign organizations with a "China agenda," especially those from Africa. Van der Wath discussed China’s economic boom and its implications for the African continent

  6. Experiences with the control of schistosomiasis mansoni in two foci in Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gryseels

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiences with population-based chemotherapy and other methods for the control of schistosomiasis mansoni in two subsaharan foci are described. In the forest area of Maniema (Zaire, intense transmission of Schistosoma mansoni, high prevalences and intensities of infection, and important morbidity have been documental. Taking into account the limited financial means and the poor logistic conditions, the control strategy has been based mainly on targeted chemotherapy of heavily infected people (>600 epg. After ten years of intervention, prevalences and intensities have hardly been affected, but the initial severe hepatosplenic morbidity has almost disappeared. In Burundi, a national research and control programme has been initiated in 1982. Prevalences, intensities and morbidity were moderate, transmission was focal and erratic in time and space. A more structural control strategy was developed, based on screening and selective therapy, health education, sanitation and domestic water supply. Prevalences and intensities have been considerably reduced, though the results show focal and unpredicatable variations. Transmission and reinfection were not signifcantly affected by chemotherapy alone, and eventual outcome of repeated selective treatment appears to be limited by the sensitivity of the screening method. Intestinal morbidity was strongly reduced by community-based selective treatment, but hepatosplenic enlargement was hardly affected; this is possibly due to the confounding impact of increasing malaria morbidity. The experiences show the importance of local structures and conditions for the development of an adapted control strategy. It is further concluded that population-based chemotherapy is a highly valid tool for the rapid control of morbidity, but should in most operational conditions not be considered as a tool for transmission control. Integration of planning, execution and surveillance in regular health services...

  7. Research-policy partnerships - experiences of the Mental Health and Poverty Project in Ghana, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzoev Tolib N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partnerships are increasingly common in conducting research. However, there is little published evidence about processes in research-policy partnerships in different contexts. This paper contributes to filling this gap by analysing experiences of research-policy partnerships between Ministries of Health and research organisations for the implementation of the Mental Health and Poverty Project in Ghana, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. Methods A conceptual framework for understanding and assessing research-policy partnerships was developed and guided this study. The data collection methods for this qualitative study included semi-structured interviews with Ministry of Health Partners (MOHPs and Research Partners (RPs in each country. Results The term partnership was perceived by the partners as a collaboration involving mutually-agreed goals and objectives. The principles of trust, openness, equality and mutual respect were identified as constituting the core of partnerships. The MOHPs and RPs had clearly defined roles, with the MOHPs largely providing political support and RPs leading the research agenda. Different influences affected partnerships. At the individual level, personal relationships and ability to compromise within partnerships were seen as important. At the organisational level, the main influences included the degree of formalisation of roles and responsibilities and the internal structures and procedures affecting decision-making. At the contextual level, political environment and the degree of health system decentralisation affected partnerships. Conclusions Several lessons can be learned from these experiences. Taking account of influences on the partnership at individual, organisation and contextual/system levels can increase its effectiveness. A common understanding of mutually-agreed goals and objectives of the partnership is essential. It is important to give attention to the processes of initiating and

  8. Quantifying dust plume formation and aerosol size distribution during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in North Africa

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Basit Ali

    2015-01-01

    Dust particles mixed in the free troposphere have longer lifetimes than airborne particles near the surface. Their cumulative radiative impact on earth’s meteorological processes and climate might be significant despite their relatively small contribution to total dust abundance. One example is the elevated dust--laden Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the equatorial North Atlantic, which cools the sea surface and likely suppresses hurricane activity. To understand the formation mechanisms of SAL, we combine model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM--I), which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. We employed the Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF--Chem) to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The experimental domain covers northwest Africa including the southern Sahara, Morocco and part of the Atlantic Ocean with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground--based observations show that WRF--Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol distribution across the entire region and along the airplane’s tracks. We evaluated several aerosol uplift processes and found that orographic lifting, aerosol transport through the land/sea interface with steep gradients of meteorological characteristics, and interaction of sea breezes with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface--detached aerosol plume over the ocean. Comparisons of simulated dust size distributions with airplane and ground--based observations are generally good, but suggest

  9. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager's job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  10. Ethical challenges in cluster randomized controlled trials: experiences from public health interventions in Africa and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osrin, David; Azad, Kishwar; Fernandez, Armida; Manandhar, Dharma S; Mwansambo, Charles W; Tripathy, Prasanta; Costello, Anthony M

    2009-10-01

    Public health interventions usually operate at the level of groups rather than individuals, and cluster randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are one means of evaluating their effectiveness. Using examples from six such trials in Bangladesh, India, Malawi and Nepal, we discuss our experience of the ethical issues that arise in their conduct. We set cluster RCTs in the broader context of public health research, highlighting debates about the need to reconcile individual autonomy with the common good and about the ethics of public health research in low-income settings in general. After a brief introduction to cluster RCTs, we discuss particular challenges we have faced. These include the nature of - and responsibility for - group consent, and the need for consent by individuals within groups to intervention and data collection. We discuss the timing of consent in relation to the implementation of public health strategies, and the problem of securing ethical review and approval in a complex domain. Finally, we consider the debate about benefits to control groups and the standard of care that they should receive, and the issue of post-trial adoption of the intervention under test.

  11. Experiences and Challenges of Community Participation in Urban Renewal Projects: The Case of Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Didibhuku Thwala

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Urban renewal and inner city regeneration have become critical efforts for the South African government, which has invested in several structures to stem the tide of decline in its nine major cities. Commitment to the alleviation of poverty is a focal point of the renewal and regeneration agenda and will remain so in the future. This effort is motivated by the fact that around 24% of the South African population currently lives on less than USD 1.00 per day, below the poverty line defined by the World Bank. The Central Government has made numerous public commitments to development, a part of which concerns extensive infrastructure investment and service delivery. Communities are expected to participate fully in the planning and implementation of these urban renewal projects. To this aim, participation is a process through which stakeholders influence and share control over development initiatives and the decisions and resources which affect them. Community participation should be aimed at empowering people by ensuring the development of skills and the creation of employment opportunities. This paper first explores the concept of community participation, and will then look at relevant past experiences in relation to community participation in urban renewal projects. Furthermore, the paper outlines the challenges and problems of community participation in urban renewal projects in Johannesburg, and finally, close with recommendations for the future.

  12. Midwives’ experiences of managing women in labour in the Limpopo Province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonto M. Maputle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of midwives managing women during labour at a tertiary care hospital in the Limpopo Province. An exploratory, descriptive, contextual and inductive design was applied to this qualitative research study. Purposive sampling was used to select midwives who were working in the childbirth unit and had managed women during labour. A sample of 12 midwives participated in this study. Data were collected by means of unstructured individual interviews and analysed through an open coding method by the researchers and the independent co-coder. Findings: Categories identified were lack of mutual participation and responsibility sharing, dependency and lack of decision-making, lack of information-sharing, empowering autonomy and informed choices opportunities, lack of open communication and listening, non-accommodative midwifery actions, and lack of human and material infrastructure. To ensure the validity of the results, criteria to measure trustworthiness were utilized.Conclusions: This study has implications for woman-centered care by midwives managing women in labour and provides appropriate guidelines that should be integrated into the Batho-Pele Principles.

  13. Midwives’ experiences of managing women in labour in the Limpopo Province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Maputle

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of midwives managing women during labour at a tertiary care hospital in the Limpopo Province. An exploratory, descriptive, contextual and inductive design was applied to this qualitative research study. Purposive sampling was used to select midwives who were working in the childbirth unit and had managed women during labour. A sample of 12 midwives participated in this study. Data were collected by means of unstructured individual interviews and analysed through an open coding method by the researchers and the independent co-coder. Findings: Categories identified were lack of mutual participation and responsibility sharing, dependency and lack of decision-making, lack of information-sharing, empowering autonomy and informed choices opportunities, lack of open communication and listening, non-accommodative midwifery actions, and lack of human and material infrastructure. To ensure the validity of the results, criteria to measure trustworthiness were utilized.Conclusions: This study has implications for woman-centered care by midwives managing women in labour and provides appropriate guidelines that should be integrated into the Batho-Pele Principles.

  14. Experiences of newly qualified nurses of University of Limpopo, Turfloop Campus executing mandatory community service in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrén, Christina; Hammami, Karim

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anxiety because of lack in organization and management skills, fear of legal disputes and the possibility of losing their professional registration is real concerns of nurses in the immediate period of post-qualification. Many of the countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, as South Africa, are facing severe shortages of skilled health staff. One of the most important factors is the exodus of health care staff, which is largely a symptom of other health system deficits. Aim: To determine ...

  15. Study of the impact of food irradiation on preventing losses: Experience in Africa. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been positive developments on food irradiation in different regions of the world, especially in the United States of America and several Asian and Latin American countries. In some countries in Africa, this technology has been studied in the past few decades with encouraging results. To assist these countries in conducting pilot scale research and development on irradiation of specific commodities of interest to them including market testing and feasibility to establish commercial irradiators for multi-purpose application, a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Impact of Irradiation to Prevent Food Losses in Africa was carried out between 1995 and 1999. This CRP demonstrated that food irradiation has a potential to reduce losses of basic staple food crops including yams, dried and smoked fish, potatoes and onions through pilot scale experiments carried out in some African countries. Small scale market testing of such irradiated food such as spices, potatoes and onions showed encouraging results. In some countries (Cote d'Ivoire, Egypt, Ghana, Senegal and South Africa), it is feasible to establish commercial irradiation facilities for treating food. In Morocco, irradiation shows a potential to meet quarantine requirements in international food trade. It should be noted that commercial scale application of irradiation of some food products has been carried out in South Africa since the 1980s

  16. What Policies Increase Prosocial Behavior? An Experiment with Referees at the Journal of Public Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Chetty, Raj; Saez, Emmanuel; Sándor, László

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate policies to increase prosocial behavior using a field experiment with 1,500 referees at the Journal of Public Economics. We randomly assign referees to four groups: a control group with a six-week deadline to submit a referee report; a group with a four-week deadline; a cash incentive group rewarded with $100 for meeting the four-week deadline; and a social incentive group in which referees were told that their turnaround times would be publicly posted. We obtain four sets of resu...

  17. Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner; Bjørnskov, Christian; Justesen, Mogens Kamp

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how economic shocks affect individual well-being in developing countries. Using the case of a sudden and unanticipated currency devaluation in Botswana as a quasi-experiment, we examine how this monetary shock affects individuals' evaluations of well-being. We do so by using......-treatment respondents, surveyed after the devaluation. Our estimates show that the devaluation had a large and significantly negative effect on individuals' evaluations of subjective well-being. These results suggest that macroeconomic shocks, such as unanticipated currency devaluations, may have significant short...

  18. Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner; Bjørnskov, Christian; Kamp Justesen, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how economic shocks affect individual well-being in developing countries. Using the case of a sudden and unanticipated currency devaluation in Botswana as a quasi-experiment, we examine how this monetary shock affects individuals’ evaluations of well-being. We do so by using......-treatment respondents, surveyed after the devaluation. Our estimates show that the devaluation had a large and significantly negative effect on individuals’ evaluations of subjective well-being. These results suggest that macroeconomic shocks, such as unanticipated currency devaluations, may have significant short...

  19. Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part II: Decision Experiments to Estimate Economic Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonka, Steven T.; Changnon, Stanley A.; Hofing, Steven

    1988-08-01

    Difficulty in evaluating the economic effectiveness of climate information is a significant impediment to expanding the use of that information. An innovative approach, combining a decision experiment and an empirical economic analysis was implemented in this paper as a mans to conduct such an economic evaluation. The decision setting was that of planning the distribution of varieties and amounts of seed corn for a major seed corn producing firm in the midwestern United States. Actual managers, accustomed to making this decision, wore provided forecasts of July and August temperature and precipitation. Their responses to that information were evaluated in terms of cost savings for the firm. Across the range of relevant parameter values tested, savings from the use of perfect forecast information were estimated to be 2% to 5% of production costs. Interestingly, imperfect forecasts of relatively adverse conditions were shown to have considerable value. For example, forecasts of adverse condition accurate only 50% of the time, wore shown to have about two-thirds of the value of perfect forecast information.

  20. Africa: signs of hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Kirsten

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The dawning of the 21st century generally brought new hope to African leaders and countless thousands of ordinary citizens of many countries on the continent. The first signs of a new turn of events shone through by the end of the last decade of the previous century. This was manifested by economic growth rates that started to pick up in a number of African states, by pro-democracy movements which in country after country succeeded in replacing authoritarian regimes, and by the winding down and termination of some of Africa’s most devastating wars. The results of this analysis confirm the above-mentioned positive political, economic and conflict trends in Africa. It is clearly a significant turn of events given the well-known political and economic predicament with which Africa is struggling. When this negative legacy and Cold War background of Africa is considered, the importance of present developments is clear to see. The identified heightened sense of purpose among the leaders and peoples of Africa and the changed mood and need among Africans to take charge of their own future that found expression in the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD are indeed significant and bode well for the future of the continent. A word of warning here is, however, necessary. Our conduct with Africa must be very cautious and we must guard against over-optimism and the exaggerated belief that Africa is now on a trajectory of sustained development and peace. We cannot generalise about Africa – for that the continent is just too big and diverse from a geographical, cultural, economic and political point of view.

  1. Community health workers for ART in sub-Saharan Africa: learning from experience – capitalizing on new opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schouten Erik

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Low-income countries with high HIV/AIDS burdens in sub-Saharan Africa must deal with severe shortages of qualified human resources for health. This situation has triggered the renewed interest in community health workers, as they may play an important role in scaling-up antiretroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS by taking over a number of tasks from the professional health workers. Currently, a wide variety of community health workers are active in many antiretroviral treatment delivery sites. This article investigates whether present community health worker programmes for antiretroviral treatment are taking into account the lessons learnt from past experiences with community health worker programmes in primary health care and to what extent they are seizing the new antiretroviral treatment-specific opportunities. Based on a desk review of multi-purpose community health worker programmes for primary health care and of recent experiences with antiretroviral treatment-related community health workers, we developed an analytic framework of 10 criteria: eight conditions for successful large-scale antiretroviral treatment-related community health worker programmes and two antiretroviral treatment-specific opportunities. Our appraisal of six community health worker programmes, which we identified during field work in Ethiopia, Malawi and Uganda in 2007, shows that while some lessons from the past have been learnt, others are not being sufficiently considered and antiretroviral treatment-specific opportunities are not being sufficiently seized. In particular, all programmes have learnt the lesson that without adequate remuneration, community health workers cannot be retained in the long term. Yet we contend that the apparently insufficient attention to issues such as quality supervision and continuous training will lead to decreasing quality of the programmes over time. The life experience of people living with HIV/AIDS is still a relatively

  2. EXPERIENCES AND TENDENCIES TO DECENTRALIZE THE CAPABILITIES OF THE ECONOMIC POLICY AT THE EUROPEAN UNION LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodescu Anca

    2011-07-01

    , coordinator: Professor Dr. Valeriu Ioan Franc. The question we intend to answer, in the present phase of our research, based on the comparative analysis of the decentralisation systems of several Member States of European Union, respectively on the analysis of the regional disparities existing at the European Union level and of the effects of the economic integration, is- to what extent the capabilities of the regional policy should rather be concentrated in the hands of regional authorities or of the European Union than to be left individually to the Member States which should conceive their own regional policy? What we intend in this paper, based on the analysis of some experiences to decentralize the capabilities of economic policy at the European Union level, is to identify the regional implications of the interconnection of decentralization, centralization, respectively supra-nationalization tendencies and, implicitly, the analysis of the way to reconfigure the role of state in economy at the regional level, in the context of integration in the European model. The examination of the way to reconfigure the role of state in economy at regional level requires the review of the allocative, distributive, and regulating roles of the state from a regional perspective, the analysis, on one side, of the decentralization of economic policy capabilities from the national level to the regional level (for example, national level: pure public goods supply, for instance, national defence and the centralization of fiscal policy capabilities in order to achieve macroeconomic stability and revenue redistribution; regional level: mixed public goods supply, for instance, waste collection and community policy, on the other hand, the centralization/decentralization of regional capabilities at the European Union level.

  3. Dr Phil Mjwara Director General, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Ministry of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa visit the Alice experiment introduce by Prof. Jurgen Schukraft, spokeperson for Alice.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Phil Mjwara Director General, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Ministry of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa visit the Alice experiment introduce by Prof. Jurgen Schukraft, spokeperson for Alice.

  4. Uranium in a changing South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1980s, the Republic of South Africa was the world's second-largest producer of uranium, and the country historically has been a major exporter of many other important mineral resources, including gold, platinum group metals, manganese, vanadium, and gem-quality diamonds. Yet political turbulence in the latter part of the decade caused economic stress on South Africa. Apartheid, the country's disenfranchisement of the black majority, put South Africa in the international spotlight. The world responded by implementing economic sanctions against South Africa, to pressure its government into change. In the past several years, South Africa has made significant progress toward ending apartheid. As a result, many US economic sanctions previously maintained against the country have been lifted. However, economic troubles continue to plague South Africa; repealing sanctions has done little to alleviate its economic and political challenges

  5. Uranium in a changing South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    In the early 1980s, the Republic of South Africa was the world's second-largest producer of uranium, and the country historically has been a major exporter of many other important mineral resources, including gold, platinum group metals, manganese, vanadium, and gem-quality diamonds. Yet political turbulence in the latter part of the decade caused economic stress on South Africa. Apartheid, the country's disenfranchisement of the black majority, put South Africa in the international spotlight. The world responded by implementing economic sanctions against South Africa, to pressure its government into change. In the past several years, South Africa has made significant progress toward ending apartheid. As a result, many US economic sanctions previously maintained against the country have been lifted. However, economic troubles continue to plague South Africa; repealing sanctions has done little to alleviate its economic and political challenges.

  6. Dust plume formation in the free troposphere and aerosol size distribution during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in North Africa

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Basit Ali

    2015-11-27

    Dust particles mixed in the free troposphere have longer lifetimes than airborne particles near the surface. Their cumulative radiative impact on earth’s meteorological processes and climate might be significant despite their relatively small contribution to total dust abundance. One example is the elevated dust-laden Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic, which cools the sea surface. To understand the formation mechanisms of a dust layer in the free troposphere, this study combines model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-I), which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. The Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF-Chem) is employed to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The model domain covers northwest Africa and adjacent water with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of the most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground-based observations show that WRF-Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol distribution across the entire region and along the airplane’s tracks. Several mechanisms that cause aerosol entrainment into the free troposphere are evaluated and it is found that orographic lifting, and interaction of sea breeze with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface-detached aerosol plume over the ocean. The model dust emission scheme is tuned to simultaneously fit the observed total optical depth and the ratio of aerosol optical depths generated by fine and coarse dust modes. Comparisons of simulated dust size distributions with

  7. Post-Gondwana geomorphic evolution of southwestern Africa: Implications for hte controls on landscape development from observations and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Alan R.; Kooi, Henk; Beaumont, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between morphology and surficial geology is used to quantify the denudation that has occurred across southwestern Africa sicne the fragmentation of Gondwana during the Early Mesozoic. Two main points emerge. Signficant denudation, of the order of kilometers, is widespread except in the Kalahari region of the continental interior. The denudation is systematically distributed so that the continental exterior catchment, draining directly to the Cape basin, is denuded to a greater depth than the interior catchment inland of the Great Escarpment. The analysis also implies tha the majority of the denudation occurred before the beginning of the Cenozoic for both teh exerior and interior catchments. Existing models of landscape development are reviewed, and implications of the denudation chronology are incorporated into a revised conceptual model. This revision implies tha thte primary effect of rifting on the subsequent landscape evolution is that it generates two distinct drainage regimes. A marginal upwarp, or rift flank uplift, separates rejuvenated rivers that drain into the subsiding rift from rivers in the continetal interior that are deflected but not rejuvenated. The two catchments evolve independently unless they are integrated by breaching of hte marginal upwarp. If this occurs, the exterior baselevel is communicated to the interior catchment that is denuded accordingly. Denudation rates generally decrease as the margin evolves, and this decrease is reinforced by the exposure of substrate that is resistant to denudation and/or a change to a more arid climate. The observations do not reveal a particular style of smaller-scale landscape evolution, sucha s escarpment retreat, that is responsible for the differential denudation across the region. It is proposed that numerical model experiments, which reflect the observational insights at the large scale, may identify the smaller-scale controls on escarpment development if the model and natural

  8. Post-Gondwana geomorphic evolution of southwestern Africa: Implications for hte controls on landscape development from observations and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Alan R.; Kooi, Henk; Beaumont, Christopher

    1994-06-01

    The relationship between morphology and surficial geology is used to quantify the denudation that has occurred across southwestern Africa sicne the fragmentation of Gondwana during the Early Mesozoic. Two main points emerge. Signficant denudation, of the order of kilometers, is widespread except in the Kalahari region of the continental interior. The denudation is systematically distributed so that the continental exterior catchment, draining directly to the Cape basin, is denuded to a greater depth than the interior catchment inland of the Great Escarpment. The analysis also implies tha the majority of the denudation occurred before the beginning of the Cenozoic for both teh exerior and interior catchments. Existing models of landscape development are reviewed, and implications of the denudation chronology are incorporated into a revised conceptual model. This revision implies tha thte primary effect of rifting on the subsequent landscape evolution is that it generates two distinct drainage regimes. A marginal upwarp, or rift flank uplift, separates rejuvenated rivers that drain into the subsiding rift from rivers in the continetal interior that are deflected but not rejuvenated. The two catchments evolve independently unless they are integrated by breaching of hte marginal upwarp. If this occurs, the exterior baselevel is communicated to the interior catchment that is denuded accordingly. Denudation rates generally decrease as the margin evolves, and this decrease is reinforced by the exposure of substrate that is resistant to denudation and/or a change to a more arid climate. The observations do not reveal a particular style of smaller-scale landscape evolution, sucha s escarpment retreat, that is responsible for the differential denudation across the region. It is proposed that numerical model experiments, which reflect the observational insights at the large scale, may identify the smaller-scale controls on escarpment development if the model and natural

  9. Economic stress or random variation? Revisiting german reunification as a natural experiment to investigate the effect of economic contraction on sex ratios at birth

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Schnettler; Sebastian Klüsener

    2013-01-01

    Background The economic stress hypothesis (ESH) predicts decreases in the sex ratio at birth (SRB) following economic decline. However, as many factors influence the SRB, this hypothesis is difficult to test empirically. Thus, researchers make use of quasi-experiments such as German reunification: The economy in East, but not in West Germany, underwent a rapid decline in 1991. A co-occurrence of a decline in the East German SRB in 1991 has been interpreted by some as support for the ESH. Howe...

  10. Different approaches to the Czech and Chinese university students in Business Economics: A teaching experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Wozniaková

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available University internationalization in the field of education as well as in the field of science and research is one of the main priorities of VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava. VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava has several double degree agreements with foreign universities, mostly from Western Europe – e.g. Great Britain, Finland, but also with foreign universities outside Europe. In 2009 VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava signed a memorandum with Hubei University of Technology. This cooperation involves travelling of the Czech teachers to China and teaching several subjects at Hubei University of Technology as well as teaching 3rd year Chinese students at VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava (Czech Republic. This paper brings own teaching experience of the European lecturer who gave the lectures at the Chinese university for the Chinese students studying in English. Ishikawa diagram was used to determine the main causes of Chinese students’ failure in Business Economics. This paper brings modified methods of teaching Business Economics to be more suitable for Chinese students as well as critical review of Chinese students’ learning styles and characteristics observed by the author of the paper.

  11. Export Diversification in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Huria, Ankur; Brenton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Economic activity in many African countries remains highly concentrated and exports are often dominated by mineral resources or a few primary products. The World Bank’s 2011 report on light manufacturing in Africa identified poor trade logistics performance as a constraint that especially penalized African exporters that relied on imported inputs, very often making them uncompetitive. The ...

  12. Economics of Large Helium Cryogenic Systems experience from Recent Projects at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Claudet, S; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    1999-01-01

    Large projects based on applied superconductivity, such as particle accelerators, tokamaks or SMES, require powerful and complex helium cryogenic systems, the cost of which represents a significant, if not dominant fraction of the total capital and operational expenditure. It is therefore important to establish guidelines and scaling laws for costing such systems, based on synthetic estimators of their size and performance. Although such data has already been published for many years, the experience recently gathered at CERN with the LEP and LHC projects, which have de facto turned the laboratory into a major world cryogenic center, can be exploited to update this information and broaden the range of application of the scaling laws. We report on the economics of 4.5 K and 1.8 K refrigeration, cryogen distribution and storage systems, and indicate paths towards their cost-to-performance optimisation.

  13. An economic experiment reveals that humans prefer pool punishment to maintain the commons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traulsen, Arne; Röhl, Torsten; Milinski, Manfred

    2012-09-22

    Punishment can stabilize costly cooperation and ensure the success of a common project that is threatened by free-riders. Punishment mechanisms can be classified into pool punishment, where the punishment act is carried out by a paid third party, (e.g. a police system or a sheriff), and peer punishment, where the punishment act is carried out by peers. Which punishment mechanism is preferred when both are concurrently available within a society? In an economic experiment, we show that the majority of subjects choose pool punishment, despite being costly even in the absence of defectors, when second-order free-riders, cooperators that do not punish, are also punished. Pool punishers are mutually enforcing their support for the punishment organization, stably trapping each other. Our experimental results show how organized punishment could have displaced individual punishment in human societies.

  14. Economic and technical experience of nuclear power production in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power, utilizing light-water reactor technology, is a significant source of electric power generation in the United States of America, accounting for about 12% of the electric power production in 1981, more than either oil-fired or hydroelectric generation. It is also the single fastest growing source of central station electric generation in the US, supplying over 40% of the generation in some major industrialized areas, including northern Illinois. The operating experience of LWRs in the United States over the past 25 years is reviewed and, based on that experience, economics, operations, safety, environmental impacts and public acceptance are discussed. An inescapable conclusion is that such plants are well suited for operation on large, interconnected electric power systems. Compared with coal-fired central station electric generation, such plants are cost competitive in most areas and are more reliable. Furthermore, the health and safety record of the nuclear industry has not been surpassed by any other major industry. Nevertheless, there has been a decline in public acceptance of nuclear power, highlighting the fallibility of plant systems and equipment as well as of human and institutional response. Together with excess generating reserve margins, financial stress and nuclear licensing difficulties, this decline has been a contributing factor to the absence of any new plant orders in the US since 1978. The conclusion is that nuclear power has served the consumer well and that, while much remains to be done to realize its full potential, there is no turning back on nuclear power in the US. At the same time, the prospects for new orders in the US will depend upon such factors as capacity requirements, economics, utility confidence and financing capability, regulatory environment, public acceptance, assurance of lifetime supplies of fuel at competitive prices and the availability of other options for bulk power generation. (author)

  15. Experiences in conducting multiple community-based HIV prevention trials among women in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moodley Jothi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa, with its scientific capacity, good infrastructure and high HIV incidence rates, is ideally positioned to conduct large-scale HIV prevention trials. The HIV Prevention Research Unit of the South African Medical Research Council conducted four phase III and one phase IIb trials of women-initiated HIV prevention options in KwaZulu-Natal between 2003 and 2009. A total of 7046 women participated, with HIV prevalence between 25% and 45% and HIV incidence ranging from 4.5-9.1% per year. Unfortunately none of the interventions tested had any impact on reducing the risk of HIV acquisition; however, extremely valuable experience was gained, lessons learned and capacity built, while the communities gained associated benefits. Experience Our experience in conducting these trials ranged from setting up community partnerships to developing clinical research sites and dissemination of trial results. Community engagement included setting up community-based research sites with approval from both political and traditional leaders, and developing community advisory groups to assist with the research process. Community-wide education on HIV/sexually transmitted infection prevention, treatment and care was provided to over 90 000 individuals. Myths and misconceptions were addressed through methods such as anonymous suggestion boxes in clinic waiting areas and intensive education and counselling. Attempts were made to involve male partners to foster support and facilitate recruitment of women. Peer educator programmes were initiated to provide ongoing education and also to facilitate recruitment of women to the trials. Recruitment strategies such as door-to-door recruitment and community group meetings were initiated. Over 90% of women enrolled were retained. Community benefits from the trial included education on HIV prevention, treatment and care and provision of ancillary care (such as Pap smears, reproductive health care and

  16. Urbanising Africa: the city centre revisited: Experiences with inner-city revitalisation from Johannesburg (South Africa), Mbabane (Swaziland), Lusaka (Zambia), Harare and Bulawayo (Zimbabwe)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Ahmad (Peter); I. Chirisa (Innocent); L. Magwaro-Ndiweni (Linda); M.W. Michundu (Mazuba); W.N. Ndela (William); M. Nkonge (Mphangela); D. Sachs (Daniella)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDrawing on practical experiences of almost 15 years working within Gauteng Province and the City of Johannesburg my paper will focus on the location of poor communities within Johannesburg in relation to selected Inner-City areas and public transportation networks. The introduction notes

  17. South Africa; Financial System Stability Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses findings of the Financial System Stability Assessment for South Africa. South Africa’s financial sector operates in a challenging economic environment. Despite remarkable progress since the end of apartheid in 1994, South Africa still has one of the world’s highest unemployment and income inequality rates. Slow economic growth since 2008 has further aggravated unemployment, real disposable income is stagnant, and households are heavily indebted. Relatively high capita...

  18. Financial policy of prevention and liquidation of consequences of global economic instability: foreign experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrushevska Viktoriia V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers main measures of the financial policy realised in the countries of the world, in particular, Europe, USA, China and Japan, directed at prevention and liquidation of consequences of crisis phenomena of the world economy. It considers programmes of support of economy and financial sector of different countries adopted during the period of the world financial crisis of 2007 – 2009. It marks out that an important element of successful realisation of anti-crisis measures is a correct co-ordination of the budget and tax policy and money and loan policy. It positively marks out experience of application of active arbitrary stimulating policy under crisis conditions. In view of increase of efficiency of macro-economic management an important task of the future would be improvement of anti-crisis mechanisms with consideration of their influence upon short-term dynamics and long-term growth. The conducted analysis allows making a conclusion that mistakes of the financial policy are one of the main reasons of overheating the world economy, while analysis and use of experience of the leading countries of the world would allow increase of quality of the financial policy, directed at reduction of crisis vulnerability.

  19. Urbanising Africa: the city centre revisited: Experiences with inner-city revitalisation from Johannesburg (South Africa), Mbabane (Swaziland), Lusaka (Zambia), Harare and Bulawayo (Zimbabwe)

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Peter; Chirisa, Innocent; Magwaro-Ndiweni, Linda; Michundu, Mazuba; Ndela, William; Nkonge, Mphangela; Sachs, Daniella

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDrawing on practical experiences of almost 15 years working within Gauteng Province and the City of Johannesburg my paper will focus on the location of poor communities within Johannesburg in relation to selected Inner-City areas and public transportation networks. The introduction notes the historical foundations and spatial legacies of the City (for example, the mining industry, pre and post apartheid doctrines and migration patterns). It acknowledges that these foundations, leg...

  20. Disarming not defending Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Moorcraft

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Most sub-Saharan states cannot protect themselves from major military threats, especially extra-continental ones. From the perspective of the big international players the question is: should Africa be protected? In this collection of essays, the impact of Africa's global marginalisation is duly noted. This fundamental facet of Africa's security dilemma, however, is not analysed in any meaningful way. True, the usual malaises, including 'ethnic nationalism', are paraded, but there is no mention of the current debate on how Africa's 'ethnic' wars are interpreted by the international media, and its assumed impact on humanitarian and military intervention. If they have not done so already, the editors should read Tim Allen and Jean Seaton's new book, The Media of Conflict. Here the implications of the so-called second scramble for Africa, including the role of aid agencies and the International Monetary Fund, are scrutinised. Seaton and Allen reject the notion of mindless, primordial violence in Africa, and instead examine the repercussions of foreign intervention (most egregiously French meddling in Rwanda as well as the rational economic motivations of the assorted warlords.

  1. Realizing or relinquishing rights? Homeless youth, their life on the streets and their knowledge and experience of health and social services in Hillbrow, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathebula, Sibusiso Donald; Ross, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Poverty and youth unemployment are critical issues in South Africa with homeless persons begging at traffic light intersections in all major cities. Support services represent one way of empowering homeless youth. The study therefore examined the experiences of 10 homeless young adult males in Hillbrow, Johannesburg and whether they were aware of local health and social services. Qualitative interviews revealed that participants experienced poor health, addiction, physical violence, psychological trauma, and public hostility. Despite limited education, they were aware of and utilized local health and social services. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for social work.

  2. Building climate change adaptation on community experiences: Lessons from community-based natural resource management in southern Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chishakwe, Nyasha; Murray, Laurel; Chambwera, Muyeye

    2012-05-15

    This publication, produced in collaboration with WWF Southern Africa, looks at how community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) can inform and contribute to climate change adaptation at the community level, specifically to community-based adaptation (CBA) to climate change. It provides a framework for analysing the two approaches at conceptual and practical levels. Using case studies from southern Africa, the publication demonstrates the synergies between CBA and CBNRM, most important of which are the adaptation co-benefits between the two. While local incentives have driven community action in CBNRM, it is the evolution of an enabling environment in the region, in the form of institutions, policies, capacity and collaboration which characterises the scaling up of CBNRM to national and regional levels.

  3. Impact of Inadequate Experience and Skill on the Construction Sector in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ntuli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Civil engineering contractors encounter serious challenges in order to sustain their businesses, especially in a weak economic climate. A certain level of construction experience, expertise and training are required to manage a sustainable construction company. The Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB was established in 2000 as a statutory body to provide leadership to stakeholders and stimulate sustainable growth, reform and improvement of the construction sector for effective infrastructure delivery and improvement of construction skills. The objectives of this research were to investigate challenges faced by civil engineering contractors whilst making their enterprises sustainable. Contractors’ views were presented at “Construction Indaba 2011” held on 1–2 June 2011 and hosted by eThekwini Municipality’s Business Support, Tourism and Markets in Durban KwaZulu-Natal. Discussion and findings revealed to a skills’ shortage in the construction section and underlined the need for continuous training of the contractors’ employees. The South African government in conjunction with all stakeholders should develop and implement contractor programs to address the lack of technical and management skills in the construction sector.

  4. Experiences in conducting multiple community-based HIV prevention trials among women in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Moodley Jothi; Maharaj Rashika; Guddera Vijayanand; Govinden Roshini; Gappoo Sharika; Ganesh Shay; Dladla-Qwabe Nozizwe; Coumi Nicola; Ramjee Gita; Morar Neetha; Naidoo Sarita; Palanee Thesla

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background South Africa, with its scientific capacity, good infrastructure and high HIV incidence rates, is ideally positioned to conduct large-scale HIV prevention trials. The HIV Prevention Research Unit of the South African Medical Research Council conducted four phase III and one phase IIb trials of women-initiated HIV prevention options in KwaZulu-Natal between 2003 and 2009. A total of 7046 women participated, with HIV prevalence between 25% and 45% and HIV incidence ranging fr...

  5. Poverty reduction and investing in people : the new role of safety nets in Africa experiences from 22 countries

    OpenAIRE

    Monchuk, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Safety nets are on the rise in Africa, and beginning to evolve from scattered standalone programs into systems. Until recently, many African countries approached social protection on an ad-hoc basis. But when the global crisis threatened recent progress in poverty reduction, safety nets increasingly began to be viewed as core instruments for poverty reduction in the region. Social protection programming has started to develop from emergency food aid programs to one-off interventions to regula...

  6. Utility experiences in redevelopment of formerly used sites -- Wisconsin Electric's risk management and economic development activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisconsin Electric Power Company, which recently celebrated its 100th anniversary, has actively promoted the redevelopment of its former sites as well as those of its customers. Serving Milwaukee and southeast Wisconsin, Wisconsin Electric's (WE) sites include former power plants, landfills, right-of-ways, and manufactured gas plant sites. In setting an example for others, as well as seeking to maximize the economic value of these sites, WE has either redeveloped or promoted the redevelopment of these sites by others. Examples include the East Wells Power Plant (now home of the Milwaukee Repertory Theater), the Lakeside Power Plant Site (now the home of Harnischfeger Corporation's headquarters), and the Commerce Street Power Plant located on the Milwaukee River near downtown Milwaukee. In each case the company evaluated the potential environmental liabilities against the unrealized asset value derived from facility location, site size, architectural uniqueness, or other characteristics. At the Commerce Street Power Plant, walking distance to the downtown Milwaukee business district combined with river frontage, were significant site values leveraged against a $5 million asbestos and lead-based paint removal project done to prepare the plant for marketing. More recently, WE has used its experience in promoting the redevelopment of the Menomonee River Valley, the original core of Milwaukee's industrial community, and in advancing a more practical regulatory approach to redeveloping older sites. Finally, the company is working with a non-profit community health clinic, community groups and local foundations in linking these redevelopment activities with the economic and physical health of inner city residents

  7. Implementing greenhouse gas trading in Europe. Lessons from economic literature and international experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Commission (document COM (2001) 581) has recently presented a directive proposal to the European Parliament and Council in order to implement a greenhouse gas emission trading scheme. If this proposal survives the policy process, it will create the most ambitious trading system ever implemented. However, the legislative process is an opportunity for various interest groups to amend environmental policies, which as a result generally deviate further from what economic literature proposes. A close look at implemented emission trading schemes, stressing their discrepancies with economic literature requests, is thus useful to increase the chances of forthcoming emission trading schemes to go through the political process. We thus review ten emission trading systems, which are either implemented or at an advanced stage of the policy process. We draw attention to major points to be aware of when designing an emission trading system: sectoral and spatial coverage, permits allocation, temporal flexibility, trading organisation, monitoring, enforcement, compliance, and the harmonisation vs. subsidiarity issue. The aim is to evaluate how far experiences in emission trading move away from theory and why. We then provide some lessons and recommendations on how to implement a greenhouse gas emission trading program in Europe. We identify some pros of the Commission proposal (spatial and sectoral coverage, temporal flexibility, trading organisation, compliance rules), some potential drawbacks (allocation rules, monitoring and enforcement) and items on which further guidance is needed (monitoring and allocation rules). Lastly, the European Commission should devote prominent attention to the US NOX Ozone Transport Commission budget program, as the only example of integration between the federal and state levels

  8. Food and environmental policies in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, M R; Biswas, A K

    1986-08-01

    Not only is Africa experiencing severe food production and nutrition problems, but environmental conditions, on which agricultural production ultimately depends, are deteriorating. A meeting of the African Ministers of Environment was held in Cairo last December, and an African solution to an African problem was put forth. The proposed program is examined in this paper. The usable extent of the pastoral area in the arid and semi-arid regions of Africa nas been reduced by 25% since 1968. At present only about 35% of the former area of slightly productive savannah is left. Africa's rich fishing grounds are being overfished and coastal regions are threatened by pollution. Africa's problems are linked with very high rates of population growth, rapid rates of urbanization, inappropriate development policies that have neglected the agricultural sector, and nonavailability of skilled manpower. The Cairo Program of African Cooperation included the following proposals: 8 continent-wide networks of institutions are to be established or strenghened in the fields of climatology, soils and fertilizers, water resources, energy, genetic resources, environmental monitoring, science and technology, and education and training; all available African skills and experience are to be applied to seek economically feasible, environmentally sound and socially acceptable solutions in certain regions; subregional cooperation is to be strenghened in terms of implementation of priority activities; 4 committees were established in areas of priority concerns; and a formula to provide US$32.5 million to finance the follow-up activities was approved.

  9. Brand Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Ponte, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    a. Lisa Ann Richey, Roskilde University and Stefano Ponte, Danish Institute for International Studies - Brand Aid and Africa b. Fantu Cheru, Nordic Africa Institute - The Right to Consume: Compassion and the Intricate New Phase of Capitalism and Africa c. Rita Abrahamsen, University of Ottawa...... - Celebrity Interventions g. Lisa Ann Richey, Roskilde University and Stefano Ponte, Danish Institute for International Studies – Conclusions and a Research Agenda...

  10. If cooperation is likely punish mildly: insights from economic experiments based on the snowdrift game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo-Luo Jiang

    Full Text Available Punishment may deter antisocial behavior. Yet to punish is costly, and the costs often do not offset the gains that are due to elevated levels of cooperation. However, the effectiveness of punishment depends not only on how costly it is, but also on the circumstances defining the social dilemma. Using the snowdrift game as the basis, we have conducted a series of economic experiments to determine whether severe punishment is more effective than mild punishment. We have observed that severe punishment is not necessarily more effective, even if the cost of punishment is identical in both cases. The benefits of severe punishment become evident only under extremely adverse conditions, when to cooperate is highly improbable in the absence of sanctions. If cooperation is likely, mild punishment is not less effective and leads to higher average payoffs, and is thus the much preferred alternative. Presented results suggest that the positive effects of punishment stem not only from imposed fines, but may also have a psychological background. Small fines can do wonders in motivating us to chose cooperation over defection, but without the paralyzing effect that may be brought about by large fines. The later should be utilized only when absolutely necessary.

  11. Orthogonal experiment on reclaimed water treatment and economic optimization model in green building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何强; 张成; 柴宏祥; 樊明玉

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of superior drainage in green building treated by combinational technique of coagulation sedimentation and constructed wetland was launched. The results show that the regression equation relating to effluent BOD5,cubage load (Nv),temperature (t) and addition dosage (ρ) is BOD5=2.05Nv-0.41t-0.82ρ+38.9. The orthogonal experiment results of constructed wetland post-treatment show that the regression equation relating to effluent BOD5,cubage load (NA),and temperature (t) is BOD5=1 190NA-0.32t+12.2. Based on the two orthogonal regression equations,combined of green building municipal gray reclaimed water quantity requirements in different seasons,a technology investment on economic optimization model of combinational technique was established. The results offer technological support for reclaimed water treatment,which regards superior drainage as the source and is purified by combinational technique of coagulation sedimentation and constructed wetland. According to the model,the reasonable scale of reclaimed water treatment systems can be determined,the treatment efficacy can be well predicted,and both the design and operating can be effectively guided.

  12. ICTs for Agriculture in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Zyl, Omri Van; Alexander, Trish; Graaf, Liezl De; Mukherjee, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The strategic application of information and communications technology (ICT) to the agricultural industry, the largest economic sector in most African countries, offers the best opportunity for economic growth and poverty alleviation on the continent. Food security is paramount for the survival of individuals, families, and ultimately nations, yet Africa's agriculture sector has been in de...

  13. Climate change and farmers responses in rural china, lessons for Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. van Dijk (Meine Pieter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHow does China deal with the consequences of climate change and can we learn from that experience in Africa? Important external drivers in China such as rapid economic growth, urbanization, climate change and a growing awareness of environmental degradation have contributed to a shift in

  14. The politics of neoliberal reforms in Africa : State and civil society in Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, P.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Neoliberalism has become the dominant development agenda in Africa, but neoliberal experiments have displayed a remarkable diversity in different countries. This book focuses on Cameroon, where the neoliberal project has been influenced by the nation's complex economic and political history. Current

  15. Soil quality improvement for crop production in semi-arid West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouédraogo, E.

    2004-01-01

    Soil quality maintenance and crop production improvement in semi-arid West Africa require appropriate cropping technologies, which are ecologically sound and economically viable. Thus, on-farm and on-station experiments have been carried out on the central plateau and in the south of Burkina Faso Th

  16. "Community Psychology Is for Poor, Black People": Pedagogy and Teaching of Community Psychology in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolissen, Ronelle; Rohleder, Poul; Bozalek, Vivienne; Swartz, Leslie; Leibowitz, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    The term "community" holds historical connotations of political, economic, and social disadvantage in South Africa. Many South African students tend to interpret the term "community" in ways that suggest that community and community psychology describe the experiences of exclusively poor, black people. Critical pedagogies that position the…

  17. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Genotype Testing at First-line Antiretroviral Therapy Failure for HIV-Infected Patients in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Levison, Julie H.; Wood, Robin; Scott, Callie A.; Ciaranello, Andrea L.; Martinson, Neil A.; Rusu, Corina; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Rochelle P Walensky

    2012-01-01

    Using a computer simulation of human immunodeficiency virus infection we project that genotype resistance testing at first-line antiretroviral therapy failure is very cost-effective in South Africa. The cost-effectiveness will depend on prevalence of wild-type virus and timely response to genotype results.

  18. Using Seasonal Climate Forecasts to Guide Disaster Management: The Red Cross Experience during the 2008 West Africa Floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arame Tall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, the seasonal forecast issued at the Seasonal Climate Outlook Forum for West Africa (PRESAO announced a high risk of above-normal rainfall for the July–September rainy season. With probabilities for above-normal rainfall of 0.45, this forecast indicated noteworthy increases in the risk of heavy rainfall. When this information reached the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC West and Central Africa Office, it led to significant changes in the organization’s flood response operations. The IFRC regional office requested funds in advance of anticipated floods, prepositioned disaster relief items in strategic locations across West Africa to benefit up to 9,500 families, updated its flood contingency plans, and alerted vulnerable communities and decision-makers across the region. This forecast-based preparedness resulted in a decrease in the number of lives, property, and livelihoods lost to floods, compared to just one year prior in 2007 when similar floods claimed above 300 lives in the region. This article demonstrates how a science-based early warning informed decisions and saved lives by triggering action in anticipation of forecast events. It analyses what it took to move decision-makers to action, based on seasonal climate information, and to overcome traditional barriers to the uptake of seasonal climate information in the region, providing evidence that these barriers can be overcome. While some institutional, communication and technical barriers were addressed in 2008, many challenges remain. Scientists and humanitarians need to build more common ground.

  19. Crescimento econômico em economias emergentes selecionadas: Brasil, Rússia, Índia, China (BRIC e África do Sul Economic growth in selected emerging economies: Brazil, Russia, India, China (BRIC and South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Vilela Vieira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo investiga, do ponto de vista teórico e empírico, os principais determinantes das taxas de crescimento econômico para Brasil, Rússia, Índia, China (BRIC e África do Sul. Os resultados empíricos da análise de decomposição de variância (ADV para o crescimento do PIB real revelaram uma predominância do papel da taxa de investimento e da inflação para o crescimento econômico desses países, ainda que outros fatores, como a taxa de juros real (Brasil, Índia e África do Sul, a taxa de câmbio real efetiva (China e Índia, os fluxos de IDE (China e África do Sul e o crescimento populacional (Índia e Rússia tenham sido importantes, embora com uma contribuição menor em termos relativos.The paper investigates on theoretical and empirical grounds the main determinants of economic growth for Brazil, Russia, India, China (BRIC and South Africa. The empirical results from the variance decomposition analysis (VDA for the real GDP growth reveal a primary role played by the investment rate and inflation to explain economic growth in these countries, but other factors, such as the real interest rate (Brazil, India and South Africa, the real effective exchange rate (China and India, FDI flows (China and South Africa and population growth (India and Russia are also important, regardless of their lower relative contribution.

  20. Elaboration of procedure for analysis of industrial and economic activities: the experience of LUKoil petroleum company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and engineering centre within LUKoil company for economic studies has elaborated a method permitting analysis of production and economic activities of the LUKOIL petroleum production complex. The method envisages the following trends of analysis: general assessment of production and economic activities, analysis of basic production assets, manpower and wages use, net cost of marketable products, the state of finances, as well as specific features in analyzing the activities undertaken by joint ventures

  1. Understanding the Relationships between Gender Inequitable Behaviours, Childhood Trauma and Socio-Economic Status in Single and Multiple Perpetrator Rape in Rural South Africa: Structural Equation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewkes, Rachel; Nduna, Mzikazi; Jama-Shai, Nwabisa; Chirwa, Esnat; Dunkle, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions to prevent rape perpetration must be designed to address its drivers. This paper seeks to extend understanding of drivers of single and multiple perpetrator rape (referred to here as SPR and MPR respectively) and the relationships between socio-economic status, childhood trauma, peer pressure, other masculine behaviours and rape. Method 1370 young men aged 15 to 26 were interviewed as part of the randomised controlled trial evaluation of Stepping Stones in the rural Eastern Cape. We used multinomial to compare the characteristics of men who reported rape perpetration at baseline. We used structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine pathways to rape perpetration. Results 76.1% of young men had never raped, 10.0% had perpetrated SPR and 13.9% MPR. The factors associated with both MPR and SPR (compared to never having raped) were indicators of socio-economic status (SES), childhood trauma, sexual coercion by a woman, drug and alcohol use, peer pressure susceptibility, having had transactional sex, multiple sexual partners and being physically violent towards a partner. The SEM showed the relationship between SES and rape perpetration to be mediated by gender inequitable masculinity. It was complex as there was a direct path indicating that SES correlated with the masculinity variable directly such that men of higher SES had more gender inequitable masculinities, and indirect path mediated by peer pressure resistance indicated that the former pertained so long as men lacked peer pressure resistance. Having a higher SES conveyed greater resistance for some men. There was also a path mediated through childhood trauma, such that men of lower SES were more likely to have a higher childhood trauma exposure and this correlated with a higher likelihood of having the gender inequitable masculinity (with or without the mediating effect of peer pressure resistance). Discussion Both higher and lower socio-economic status were associated with raping

  2. A within-sample investigation of test-retest reliability in choice experiment surveys with real economic incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkbak, Morten Raun; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the level of agreement between respondents' choices in identical choice sets in a test-retest choice experiment for a market good with real economic incentives, thus investigating whether the incentivised CE method can be reliable and stable over time. Besides...

  3. Foreign experience of human resource management and possibility of its application in the social and economic conditions of Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Onyusheva Irina Valeryevna; Kazybayeva Alua Serikbekovna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a detailed view of the foreign experience of human resource management. There is an international review, including such countries as the USA, Japan, Sweden, Finland, Germany, England, France etc. Types and peculiarities of human resource management as well as a applicability in the social and economic conditions of Kazakhstan are identified and analyzed.

  4. Juventud Sin Futuro : Subjective experiences of Spanish youth: resistance and organization in the context of economic crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Trejo Mendez (Paulina)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper looks at the subjective experiences of Spanish organized youth who are being affected by the economic crisis. This paper follows a standpoint epistemology. This research focuses on how their practices question the current dominant discourse depicting today’s Spanish youth as a

  5. The long-term agroecological research (LTAR) experiment supports organic yields, soil quality, and economic performance in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Long-Term Agroecological Research (LTAR) experiment, at the Iowa State University Neely-Kinyon Farm in Greenfield, Iowa, was established in 1998 to compare the agronomic, ecological and economic performance of conventional and organic cropping systems. The main goals of the project are to evalua...

  6. The Rise and Fall of the Concept of The Experience Economy in the Local Economic Development of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freire-Gibb, L. Carlos

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the concept of “The Experience Economy“ (TEE) in the Danish local economic policy. The term is rarely known worldwide; however, it has become quite popular among the Danes and other Scandinavians. Its origin comes from the American business-marketing field ...

  7. The cost implications of participatory research. Experience of a health services review in a rural region in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty; Price

    1998-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study objectives were to estimate the total costs incurred by a comprehensive review of primary health care services in a rural region in South Africa, and to determine which of these costs were incurred because of the participatory research techniques employed by the review. DESIGN: The costing study estimated the direct and indirect costs of each component of the review in order to determine total costs. Costs that were linked to participatory research activities were aggregated separately. SETTING: The review that was costed was conducted in an area that included the former 'homeland' KaNgwane and the adjacent areas of 'white' South Africa, in part of what is now known as Mpumalanga Province. SUBJECTS: Not relevant. OUTCOME MEASURES: Direct, indirect, total, research and participation costs were used as outcome measures. RESULTS: Expenditure generated by participatory research techniques was estimated to be almost 14% of the total (direct and indirect) costs. CONCLUSIONS: Despite these costs, participatory research techniques are invaluable in terms of the many benefits they have for a research project. However, because of these costs, it is important that the financing of participatory research should be carefully planned. Projects must budget for the direct costs of participatory techniques, participating organisations and individuals must be committed to bearing the indirect costs of participation, and, increasingly, funders must consider funding these indirect costs. This is important in the South African situation, where public health research relies increasingly on the participation of relevant stakeholders. PMID:9608312

  8. ChinAfrica : How can the Sino-African cooperation be beneficial for Africa ?

    OpenAIRE

    Marchiori, Luca

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, different scenarios of increased cooperation between China and African countries are simulated. Recent intensifications of political and economic ties between China and Sub-Saharan African countries may give hope that an economic improvement in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is possible. Three channels may lead to a catching-up of Africa with China : a reduction in Africa's investment ristk, an increase in its total factor productivity (TFP) and an improvement of its worker skills. A...

  9. Predictions of sea-level rise for coastal geosystem of Togo (between Volta and Mono Rivers in the Gulf of Benin/West Africa); Physical and economic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coastal zone of Togo is very narrow and covers an area of 1,710 square kilometers. It constitutes an essential economic potential of the country due to the concentration of more than 90% of its economic activities, more than 42% of its whole population and of that of Lome. The coastal landscape encompasses the delta system of the Volta river in Ghana to which are adjoined the clearly differentiated offshore bars, parallel to the coast and the uninterrupted lagoon systems which run into the alluvial plain of the Mono River. The coastline is located in the current offshore bar at a mean of 2 and 3 meters above average sea level. It is lower, at 1 meter in the barrier crossbar at the level of the lagoon and river mouths. The climatic regime of the coastal zone depends upon two air currents with two contrasted seasons during the year. The temperatures are constant throughout the year and vary between 25 deg. and 28 deg. C. The coastal geosystem is fed by the Volta and Mono Rivers. The dams built on the two rivers put a limit on the sedimentary volume drift to the sea: this accentuates the sedimentary loss and erosion in the lagoon zone and around the mouths of the rivers. The hydrodynamic regime is conditioned by local and regional meteorological elements, namely the marine winds of the Southern Ocean which generate swells and waves. These waves create on the coast a current of coastal drifting west to east, which activates the mechanism of the coastal morphosedimentary process. An examination of the sandy coasts where a current withdrawal of the seashore is noticed in West and Central Africa shows that this dynamic process is generally the result of human action. It is not linked to the sea transgression correlative to the greenhouse effect. Scientific research as regards climate confirms the greenhouse effect linked to the increase of the CO2 content in the atmosphere which could probably be the cause of climatic change with subsequent rise in temperature from 1

  10. BRICS Regional Policy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Deych

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an analysis of the BRICS as a whole and an analysis of each member’s policies in Africa. It exploresthe countries’ political and economic interests in Africa, the various patterns and strategies of each country’s cooperationwith Africa, and estimates the impact of BRICS aid and investment on the African economy and Africa’s development. TheBRICS countries have emerged as the new effective actors in the world arena. Their global economic weight and politicalinfluence continue to grow. Not only is the group focusing its attention on strengthening the internal ties of its members, but itis also focusing on assistance to Africa, as a way to implement the emerging powers efforts to change the existing world order.The BRICS is deepening its engagement with African countries, which gained great success in their development in recentyears. Its focus on Africa is determined by the important role of African resources and by the continent’s growing influencein the world economy and contemporary international relations. BRICS countries are major trade partners of Africa, andAfrica’s trade with BRICS members is growing faster than its trade with the traditional partners. Africa has become themain destination for BRICS development aid and investment. The BRICS is also focusing on African infrastructure. BRICScountries use soft power widely, through developing humanitarian ties with Africa, particularly in health care and education.The BRICS is also an active participant in peacekeeping and conflict resolution in Africa. Members currently tend tocompete in Africa, but they are taking steps toward collaboration. The BRICS contributes much to the African economy. Itspresence has become important for the continent and receives a positive response there.

  11. Peace and Development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, J. Martin

    2005-01-01

    Africa faces three simultaneous problems that must be addressed; economic development, disease, and peace. Drawing on the work of Jeffrey Sachs and others, this article explains the nature of each of these problems and possible solutions. A comprehensive program of action is advocated with sustained commitment to support those nations that are truly using that support to free themselves from the vicious cycles of war, disease, and poverty that currently plague much of Africa.

  12. An Evaluation of the Social Economic Assessment Toolbox (SEAT) Implementation on Stakeholder Relationships and Community Development in South Africa: A Case Study of Rustenburg Platinum Mine in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kapisha, Besa

    2008-01-01

    The information presented in this report is an outcome of the application of the Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox (SEAT) to Rustenburg Platinum Mine (RPMR). SEAT was designed to assist Anglo American Group of companies identify and manage their social and economic impacts, both positive and negative. The project investigated the impacts achieved through the implementation of SEAT. The research aimed to collect and analyse data to determine whether the mine meets its sustainable development o...

  13. Pilanesberg National Park, North West Province, South Africa: Uniting economic development with ecological design – A history, 1960s to 1984

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Carruthers

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1970s, a ground-breaking project began in the Pilanesberg district in what is now the North West Province of South Africa to create a wildlife conservation and eco-tourism venture from degraded marginal farmland in an aesthetically attractive extinct volcanic crater. The establishment of this national park was innovative in a number of respects, including a partnership between landscape and ecological designers, local community development and participation, regional tourist ...

  14. The Comparative Economics of Catch-Up in Output per worker, total factor productivity and technological gain in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    John Ssozi; Simplice Asongu

    2015-01-01

    After investigating the effect of external financial flows on total factor productivity and technological gain, we use the beta catch-up and sigma convergence to compare dispersions in output per worker, total factor productivity and technological gain in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) for the years 1980-2010. The comparative evidence is articulated with income levels, years of schooling, and health factors. We find; first, a positive association between foreign direct investment, trade openness, f...

  15. The Comparative Economics of Catch-Up in Output per worker, total factor productivity and technological gain in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ssozi, John; Asongu, Simplice A

    2015-01-01

    After investigating the effect of external financial flows on total factor productivity and technological gain, we use the beta catch-up and sigma convergence to compare dispersions in output per worker, total factor productivity and technological gain in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) for the years 1980-2010. The comparative evidence is articulated with income levels, years of schooling, and health factors. We find; first, a positive association between foreign direct investment, trade openness, ...

  16. Experimental methods: Extra-laboratory experiments extending the reach of experimental economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Charness; U. Gneezy; M.A. Kuhn

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new organizing scheme for classifying types of experiments. In addition to the standard categories of laboratory and field experiments, we suggest a new category: "extra-laboratory experiments." These are experiments that have the same spirit as laboratory experiments, but are conducted

  17. Where to Target Conservation Agriculture for African Smallholders? How to Overcome Challenges Associated with its Implementation? Experience from Eastern and Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Baudron

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the paper by Giller et al. (2009, the debate surrounding the suitability of conservation agriculture (CA for African smallholders has remained polarized between proponents and opponents. The debate also gave rise to a few studies that attempted to identify the “niche” where CA would fit in the region, but the insight offered by these studies has been limited. In this paper, we first analyze the rationale of adoption where it occurred globally to define “drivers” of adoption. Our analysis suggests that CA has first and foremost been adopted under the premises of being energy-saving (time and/or power, erosion-controlling, and water-use efficient, but rarely to increase yield. We then define the niche where CA fits, based on these drivers of adoption, as systems where (1 the energy available for crop establishment is limited and/or costly (including labor and draft power; (2 delayed planting results in a significant yield decline; (3 yield is limited or co-limited by water; and/or (4 severe erosion problems threaten the short- to medium-term productivity of farmland. In Eastern and Southern Africa, this niche appears rather large and likely to expand in the near future. When implemented within this niche, CA may still be limited by “performance challenges” that do not constitute drivers or barriers to adoption, but limitations to the performance of CA. We argue that most of these performance challenges can (and should be addressed by agronomic and socio-economic research, and provide four examples where the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT and its partners have been successfully alleviating four very different challenges through research and development (R&D in Eastern and Southern Africa. Finally, we describe an iterative and multi-scale R&D approach currently used by CIMMYT in Eastern and Southern Africa to overcome challenges associated with the implementation of CA by African smallholders. This

  18. How can community health programmes build enabling environments for transformative communication? Experiences from India and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine; Cornish, Flora

    2012-05-01

    Much research has examined how to empower the poor to articulate demands for health-enabling living conditions. Less is known about creating receptive social environments where the powerful heed the voices of the poor. We explore the potential for 'transformative communication' between the poor and the powerful, through comparing two well-documented case studies of HIV/AIDS management. The Entabeni Project in South Africa sought to empower impoverished women to deliver home-based nursing to people with AIDS. It successfully provided short-term welfare, but did not achieve local leadership or sustainability. The Sonagachi Project in India, an HIV-prevention programme targeting female sex workers, became locally led and sustainable. We highlight the strategies through which Sonagachi, but not Entabeni, altered the material, symbolic and relational contexts of participants' lives, enabling transformative communication and opportunities for sexual health-enabling social change. PMID:21604108

  19. Financing Water in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Bayliss, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Despite repeated policy initiatives from donors and governments, the human and economic cost of continued lack of access to safe water and sanitation in sub-Saharan Africa remains high. Progress is in large part constrained by a persistent ‘financing gap’. This paper shows that a radical reorientation of policy is needed to achieve a significant increase in investment finance in order to raise access levels. Rather than continuing to pursue policies that have failed for the past two decades, ...

  20. Sensitivity of tropical rainbelt over Africa and Middle East to dust shortwave absorption: Experiments using a high resolution AGCM

    KAUST Repository

    Kunhu Bangalth, Hamza

    2015-04-01

    Response of the rainbelt over Africa to dust direct radiative forcing has been an area of lively debate and is a subject of ongoing research. Previous modeling studies have contrasting results producing different amplitudes or even signs of responses. Uncertainties in the dust radiative forcing are thought to be the major cause of discrepancies in the simulated responses among various studies. The imaginary part of mineral dust shortwave refractive index, which defines the dust absorptivity, has a wide range of values estimated from various observational and modeling studies, as it depends on dust chemical composition and mineralogy. Balkanski et al. (2007) estimated dust shortwave refractive indices by assuming 3 different hematite contents, 0.9%, 1.5% and 2.7% by volume, which corresponds to inefficient, standard, and very efficient dust shortwave absorption, respectively. To investigate the sensitivity of the position and intensity of the tropical rainbelt over Africa and its extension to the Arabian Peninsula to dust shortwave absorption, we have conducted ensembles of numerical simulations for each of the three dust absorptivity scenarios using a high resolution Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM), GFDL\\'s High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM), at a spatial resolution of 25 km. We found that the strength and the latitudinal extent of the rainbelt are very sensitive to dust shortwave absorption, as well as circulations at various spatiotemporal scales that drive the climate of the region. Reference: Balkanski, Y., M. Schulz, T. Claquin, and S. Guibert (2007), Reevaluation of mineral aerosol radiative forcings suggests a better agreement with satellite and AERONET data, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 81 - 95.

  1. The effect of perceived regional accents on individual economic behavior: a lab experiment on linguistic performance, cognitive ratings and economic decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heblich, Stephan; Lameli, Alfred; Riener, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Does it matter if you speak with a regional accent? Speaking immediately reveals something of one's own social and cultural identity, be it consciously or unconsciously. Perceiving accents involves not only reconstructing such imprints but also augmenting them with particular attitudes and stereotypes. Even though we know much about attitudes and stereotypes that are transmitted by, e.g. skin color, names or physical attractiveness, we do not yet have satisfactory answers how accent perception affects human behavior. How do people act in economically relevant contexts when they are confronted with regional accents? This paper reports a laboratory experiment where we address this question. Participants in our experiment conduct cognitive tests where they can choose to either cooperate or compete with a randomly matched male opponent identified only via his rendering of a standardized text in either a regional accent or standard accent. We find a strong connection between the linguistic performance and the cognitive rating of the opponent. When matched with an opponent who speaks the accent of the participant's home region--the in-group opponent--, individuals tend to cooperate significantly more often. By contrast, they are more likely to compete when matched with an accent speaker from outside their home region, the out-group opponent. Our findings demonstrate, firstly, that the perception of an out-group accent leads not only to social discrimination but also influences economic decisions. Secondly, they suggest that this economic behavior is not necessarily attributable to the perception of a regional accent per se, but rather to the social rating of linguistic distance and the in-group/out-group perception it evokes. PMID:25671607

  2. The Effect of Perceived Regional Accents on Individual Economic Behavior: A Lab Experiment on Linguistic Performance, Cognitive Ratings and Economic Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heblich, Stephan; Lameli, Alfred; Riener, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Does it matter if you speak with a regional accent? Speaking immediately reveals something of one’s own social and cultural identity, be it consciously or unconsciously. Perceiving accents involves not only reconstructing such imprints but also augmenting them with particular attitudes and stereotypes. Even though we know much about attitudes and stereotypes that are transmitted by, e.g. skin color, names or physical attractiveness, we do not yet have satisfactory answers how accent perception affects human behavior. How do people act in economically relevant contexts when they are confronted with regional accents? This paper reports a laboratory experiment where we address this question. Participants in our experiment conduct cognitive tests where they can choose to either cooperate or compete with a randomly matched male opponent identified only via his rendering of a standardized text in either a regional accent or standard accent. We find a strong connection between the linguistic performance and the cognitive rating of the opponent. When matched with an opponent who speaks the accent of the participant’s home region—the in-group opponent –, individuals tend to cooperate significantly more often. By contrast, they are more likely to compete when matched with an accent speaker from outside their home region, the out-group opponent. Our findings demonstrate, firstly, that the perception of an out-group accent leads not only to social discrimination but also influences economic decisions. Secondly, they suggest that this economic behavior is not necessarily attributable to the perception of a regional accent per se, but rather to the social rating of linguistic distance and the in-group/out-group perception it evokes. PMID:25671607

  3. Economic consequences of improved temperature forecasts: An experiment with the Florida citrus growers (control group results). Executive summary. [weather forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is being planned to show that frost and freeze prediction improvements are possible utilizing timely Synchronous Meteorological Satellite temperature measurements and that this information can affect Florida citrus grower operations and decisions so as to significantly reduce the cost for frost and freeze protection and crop losses. The design and implementation of the first phase of an economic experiment which will monitor citrus growers decisions, actions, costs and losses, and meteorological forecasts and actual weather events was carried out. The economic experiment was designed to measure the change in annual protection costs and crop losses which are the direct result of improved temperature forecasts. To estimate the benefits that may result from improved temperature forecasting capability, control and test groups were established with effective separation being accomplished temporally. The control group, utilizing current forecasting capability, was observed during the 1976-77 frost season and the results are reported. A brief overview is given of the economic experiment, the results obtained to date, and the work which still remains to be done.

  4. Economic consequences of improved temperature forecasts: An experiment with the Florida citrus growers (control group results). [weather forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is being planned to show that frost and freeze prediction improvements are possible utilizing timely Synchronous Meteorological Satellite temperature measurements and that this information can affect Florida citrus grower operations and decisions. An economic experiment was carried out which will monitor citrus growers' decisions, actions, costs and losses, and meteorological forecasts and actual weather events and will establish the economic benefits of improved temperature forecasts. A summary is given of the economic experiment, the results obtained to date, and the work which still remains to be done. Specifically, the experiment design is described in detail as are the developed data collection methodology and procedures, sampling plan, data reduction techniques, cost and loss models, establishment of frost severity measures, data obtained from citrus growers, National Weather Service, and Federal Crop Insurance Corp., resulting protection costs and crop losses for the control group sample, extrapolation of results of control group to the Florida citrus industry and the method for normalization of these results to a normal or average frost season so that results may be compared with anticipated similar results from test group measurements.

  5. Socio-economic factors, gender and smoking as determinants of COPD in a low-income country of sub-Saharan Africa : FRESH AIR Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, Frederik; Chavannes, Niels; Kirenga, Bruce; Jones, Rupert; Williams, Sian; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Vonk, Judith; Kocks, Janwillem; de Jong, Corina; van der Molen, Thys

    2016-01-01

    In Uganda, biomass smoke seems to be the largest risk factor for the development of COPD, but socio-economic factors and gender may have a role. Therefore, more in-depth research is needed to understand the risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of socio-economic factors a

  6. Evaluating the Effects of Vocational Training in Africa (based on the "African Economic Outlook 2008"), OECD Development Centre Policy Insights, No. 61

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingombe, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The impact of vocational training on economic growth and poverty reduction in African countries is unknown. Without such knowledge, however, countries and donors cannot formulate appropriate policies. Even the 35 countries surveyed in the 2008 "African Economic Outlook" can only supply approximate data. More and better data are needed to monitor…

  7. 'We keep her status to ourselves': experiences of stigma and discrimination among HIV-discordant couples in South Africa, Tanzania and Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispel, Laetitia C; Cloete, Allanise; Metcalf, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    In HIV-discordant relationships, the HIV-negative partner also carries the burden of a stigmatised disease. For this reason, couples often hide their HIV-discordant status from family, friends and community members. This perpetuates the silence around HIV-discordant relationships and impacts on targeted HIV prevention, treatment and counselling efforts. This article reports on experiences of stigma and discrimination among HIV-discordant couples in South Africa, Tanzania and Ukraine. During 2008, HIV-discordant couples who had been in a relationship for at least one year were recruited purposively through health-care providers and civil society organisations in the three countries. Participants completed a brief self-administered questionnaire, while semi-structured interviews were conducted with each partner separately and with both partners together. Interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Fifty-one couples were recruited: 26 from South Africa, 10 from Tanzania, and 15 from Ukraine. Although most participants had disclosed their HIV status to someone other than their partner, few were living openly with HIV discordance. Experiences of stigma were common and included being subjected to gossip, rumours and name-calling, and HIV-negative partners being labelled as HIV-positive. Perpetrators of discrimination included family members and health workers. Stigma and discrimination present unique and complex challenges to couples in HIV sero-discordant relationships in these three diverse countries. Addressing stigmatisation of HIV-discordant couples requires a holistic human rights approach and specific programme efforts to address discrimination in the health system.

  8. The Role of Economic Development in Curriculum Development Process in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Call for New Approach to Socioeconomic Development in Africa with a Special Reference to Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odiemo, Luke Okunya

    2008-01-01

    The main hypothesis here is that the notion of economic and social development has been misconceived by most stakeholders in matters of development. This misconception is the main cause of underdevelopment in Kenya, which leads to all the reasons most authors and commentators have given to explain Kenya's situation. Therefore, it is only possible…

  9. AFRICA2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alphonce Shiundu

    2011-01-01

    THE big story out of Africa in 2011 was the referendum in southern Sudan.That culminated in the birth of a new country,the Republic of South Sudan,which joins the struggling band of developing nations.Africa's newest independent country is high on the hope of prosperity,wary about conflict,dogged with corruption,poverty and hunger,but nonetheless independent.

  10. Reporting Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baffour Ankomah

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available When opening this conference, Professor Lizette Rabe quoted a statistic that struck a chord with me.
    In a six-month period between March and August 2000, the TransAfrica Forum in the USA had counted 89 stories on Africa published by The New York Times and Washington Post. Of the 89, 75 were negative, and 63 of the 89 were about conflict in Africa.
    What this statistic does is to portray in a small way the massive problem of how Africa is reported by the Western media, and which we, the African media, sometimes reflect and amplify in our reporting of the continent, by mimicking the Western media.
    No right-thinking African will ever deny that conflict does happen in Africa. However, the problem with the negative reporting is that it does not put the raw facts in context.
    Africa is a continent of 53 countries. It is the most variegated continent on Earth. Conflict is part and parcel of human nature, of life. In that context, Africans would not be human if conflict did not happen on this huge, variegated continent.

  11. Value Added Tax Impacton Economic Activity: Importance, Implication and Assessment –The Romanian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana MUREȘAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the impact of VAT upon the economic activity in Romania. By developing a new mathematical model we offer several dy-namic and effcient possibilities for observing the modifcations caused by the temporary reduc-tion of taxes upon the personal incomes which suggest that the resulting additional incomes are often saved and less consumed. Analyzing several temporary reductions in incomes, the model describes also a scheme regarding the developments of economic growth. Based on this scheme, are revealed the different arrangements in which a present economic activity infuences a future one. According to the proposed model, it is highlighted that the national income increases as a response to the aggregated demand.

  12. Integration processes in CIS and international experience in economic and political cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Anatolyevich Tsvetkov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the modern tendencies and prospects of development of global integration in the global economic environment. It is shown that post-socialist transformation do not fit the classic model of transformational crossings, as have other stages, different specific hierarchy of procedural and structural factors are mixed, implement simultaneous transformations in various fields, save the importance of powerful items, stimulate the emergence of complex conflicts. Great attention is paid to the peculiarities of integration processes in Europe, in North America, the Asia-Pacific region. On the example of the European Union (EU, the North American free trade agreement (NAFTA, the Asia-Pacific economic cooperation (APEC, which are the centers of global integration, which focused on large-scale economic, financial, scientific-technological and human resources, by their importance comparable to their political, military-strategic values, analyzed the stages of formation and development of the integration of the unions further directions of their strategic development.

  13. Community perceptions of repeat HIV-testing: experiences of the ANRS 12249 Treatment as Prevention trial in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Zuma, Thembelihle; Chikovore, Jeremiah; Gillespie, Natasha; Grant, Merridy; Iwuji, Collins; Larmarange, Joseph; McGrath, Nuala; Lert, France; Imrie, John

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the ANRS 12249 Treatment as Prevention (TasP) trial, we investigated perceptions of regular and repeat HIV-testing in rural KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa), an area of very high HIV prevalence and incidence. We conducted two qualitative studies, before (2010) and during the early implementation stages of the trial (2013-2014), to appreciate the evolution in community perceptions of repeat HIV-testing over this period of rapid changes in HIV-testing and treatment approaches. Repeated focus group discussions were organized with young adults, older adults and mixed groups. Repeat and regular HIV-testing was overall well perceived before, and well received during, trial implementation. Yet community members were not able to articulate reasons why people might want to test regularly or repeatedly, apart from individual sexual risk-taking. Repeat home-based HIV-testing was considered as feasible and convenient, and described as more acceptable than clinic-based HIV-testing, mostly because of privacy and confidentiality. However, socially regulated discourses around appropriate sexual behaviour and perceptions of stigma and prejudice regarding HIV and sexual risk-taking were consistently reported. This study suggests several avenues to improve HIV-testing acceptability, including implementing diverse and personalised approaches to HIV-testing and care, and providing opportunities for antiretroviral therapy initiation and care at home. PMID:27421048

  14. Economic Returns of the Occupational Education Experience Based on Two Missouri Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dianna

    2011-01-01

    A commonly held belief is that formal education has a strong positive association with earnings (Sanchez, 1998). The motivation for individuals to pursue and complete an education beyond high school is likely founded in the hopes of higher paying jobs or a higher position. The "economic benefits" of a community college education can be defined as…

  15. An Experiment in Education Provision during Economic Hardship: A Third World Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Norrel A.

    1991-01-01

    Under the Post-Primary Project, Trinidad and Tobago may legitimately claim to have achieved some educational expansion under difficult economic circumstances. Although top-down curriculum management and a strong remediation emphasis limited program success, the school clustering concept, along with increased vocational training, offers a promising…

  16. Experiences of including costs of added life years in health economic evaluations in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pirhonen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is of importance to include the appropriate costs and outcomes when evaluating a health intervention. Sweden is the only country where the national guidelines of decisions on reimbursement explicitly state that costs of added life years should be accounted for when presenting health economic evaluations. The aim of this article is to, from a theoretical and empirical point of view, critically analyze the Swedish recommendations used by the Dental and Pharmaceutical Benefits Agency (TLV, when it comes to the use of costs of added life years in economic evaluations of health care. The aim is furthermore to analyze the numbers used in Sweden and discuss their impact on the incremental cost‑effectiveness ratios of assessed technologies. If following a societal perspective, based on welfare economics, there is strong support for the inclusion of costs of added life years in health economic evaluations. These costs have a large impact on the results. However this fact may be in conflict with ethical concerns of allocation of health care resources, such as favoring the younger part of the population over the older. It is important that the estimates of production and consumption reflect the true societal values, which is not the case with the values used in Sweden.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/fe.v15i2.925

  17. Does the wage tax system cause budget deficts? A macro-economic experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Riedl; F.A.A.M. van Winden

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we investigate experimentally the economic functioning of a wage tax financed unemployment benefit system in an international economy, in particular in reaction to budget deficits and tax adjustment. Our results support the hypothesis that due to out-of-equilibrium price uncertainty pr

  18. Energy issues in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of the energy sector-and the petroleum sector in particular-in sub-Saharan Africa might well be considered an insignificant issue compared with many of the energy concerns which now command international attention. However, the World Bank believes that it is important for all those in international energy not to forget about the crucial problems facing Africa. They should become informed and concerned about these problems, and, hopefully, work together to bring about a satisfactory solution for an ongoing development dilemma. Simply put, the cost of imported energy to the African economy is exorbitantly high, sapping the resources needed to produce economic growth and social progress. This paper reports that, to address this issue, the World Bank is about to undertake a major initiative-two ground-breaking studies in the field of energy for sub-Saharan Africa. Both of these proposed studies are designed to find ways to reduce the burden of the cost of energy imports, mainly petroleum products, to this continent. One study will examine the design (and, subsequently, the implementation) of a rationalization scheme for the supply and distribution of petroleum products throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The other will consider the feasibility of transporting Nigeria's natural gas to neighbors to the west, all of which presently are importers of energy

  19. Experiences and Lessons for Africa from China's Success in Agricultural Development%中国农业发展对非洲的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小云; 郭占锋; 武晋

    2011-01-01

    China and African countries are both agricultural countries mainly based on smallholders' family agriculture,while they have different achievements in agricultural development over the past 30 years.The main factors that influence agricultural development between China and Africa are the followings:the historical and cultural background;the agricultural technology production pattern;the agricultural development strategies,policies and the capacity of implementation;the organizational system of agricultural science and technology extension;the external learning mechanism and external support conditions.African countries should learn from experiences of China in agricultural development in the agricultural production pattern;agricultural development strategies and policies;agricultural extension and technology diffusion system and so on.For the mode of China-Africa agricultural cooperation in the future,China should help African countries strengthen agricultural research and extension support system;increase investment in the field of agricultural development in Africa and explore the new model of triangular cooperation from 'China-West Countries-Africa'.%中国和大多非洲国家是基于小农家庭经营为主体的农业国家,但近30年来中非农业发展成就迥异。影响中非农业发展的主要因素有:历史文化背景;农业技术生产模式;农业发展战略、政策和执行能力;农业科技推广组织系统;外部学习机制和外部支持状况。中国农业发展在农业生产模式、农业发展战略和政策、农业科技推广和技术扩散体系等方面,值得非洲国家借鉴。在未来中非农业合作层面,中国应帮助非洲国家加强农业研究与推广支持体系建设;加大对非洲农业发展领域的投资;探索中-西-非三方合作新模式。

  20. Assessing participatory practices in community-based natural resource management: experiences in community engagement from southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, J; Stringer, L C; Dougill, A J; Leventon, J; Nshimbi, M; Chama, F; Kafwifwi, A; Muledi, J I; Kaumbu, J-M K; Falcao, M; Muhorro, S; Munyemba, F; Kalaba, G M; Syampungani, S

    2014-05-01

    The emphasis on participatory environmental management within international development has started to overcome critiques of traditional exclusionary environmental policy, aligning with shifts towards decentralisation and community empowerment. However, questions are raised regarding the extent to which participation in project design and implementation is meaningful and really engages communities in the process. Calls have been made for further local-level (project and community-scale) research to identify practices that can increase the likelihood of meaningful community engagement within externally initiated projects. This paper presents data from three community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) project case studies from southern Africa, which promote Joint Forest Management (JFM), tree planting for carbon and conservation agriculture. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders, community-level meetings, focus groups and interviews. We find that an important first step for a meaningful community engagement process is to define 'community' in an open and participatory manner. Two-way communication at all stages of the community engagement process is shown to be critical, and charismatic leadership based on mutual respect and clarity of roles and responsibilities is vital to improve the likelihood of participants developing understanding of project aims and philosophy. This can lead to successful project outcomes through community ownership of the project goals and empowerment in project implementation. Specific engagement methods are found to be less important than the contextual and environmental factors associated with each project, but consideration should be given to identifying appropriate methods to ensure community representation. Our findings extend current thinking on the evaluation of participation by making explicit links between the community engagement process and project outcomes, and by

  1. Pan-Africanism, the Mystique of World Black Unity: An Afro-American Scholar's Sojourn in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Robert

    1977-01-01

    The author explores the ideology of Pan-Africanism in terms of the social and economic position of Blacks in the United States. He briefly describes his visit to Africa (Senegal and Nigeria) and the effects that this experience has had in forming his political viewpoint. (MC)

  2. How much demand for New HIV prevention technologies can we really expect? Results from a discrete choice experiment in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fern Terris-Prestholt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For the first time in the history of HIV, new bio-medical interventions have been shown to be effective in preventing HIV transmission. For these new HIV prevention technologies (NPTs to have an impact on the epidemic, they must be widely used. This study uses a discrete choice experiment (DCE to: understand the relative strength of women's preferences for product characteristics, understand the implications for substitution away from male condoms, and inform realistic modelling of their potential impact and cost-effectiveness. METHODS: A DCE was conducted among 1017 women in urban South Africa. Women were presented with choices between potential women's NPTs (microbicides, diaphragm, female condom and 'what I did last time' (use or not use a condom with different HIV and pregnancy prevention effectiveness' and prices. Choice probabilities are estimated using the nested logit model and used to predict uptake. RESULTS: In this high HIV prevalence setting, HIV prevention effectiveness is the main driver of uptake followed by pregnancy prevention effectiveness. For example a microbicide with poor effectiveness would have niche appeal at just 11% predicted uptake, while a highly effective microbicide (95% effective against HIV and pregnancy would have far wider appeal (56% predicted uptake. Though women who reported not using condoms were more likely to choose the NPTs, at current very high rates of male condom use in South Africa (60%, about half of microbicide uptake is projected to be among those currently not using condoms. CONCLUSIONS: Women are very interested in NPTs, especially if highly effective in preventing HIV and pregnancy. Women in greatest need were also most likely to switch to the new products. Where products are not yet available for distribution, proxy data, such as that generated by DCEs, can bring realism to overly optimistic uptake scenarios found in many current impact models.

  3. South Africa and the BRICS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk; Owiso, Michael

    its image and unleash the developmental potential for the rest of the African continent. Comparably, South Africa is probably the least influential member of the BRICS, and this raises the following questions. First, how does South Africa´s affiliation impact on the development and benefits regarding......South Africa and the BRICS: A critical appraisal Michael Omondi Owiso and Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt Abstract The objective of the BRICS was originally supposed to merge economic synergies and create an alternative voice in the global governance system. Debates around the ability of the BRICS...... to acquire this clout continue to dominate academia and the global discourse. Although the alliance is still in its nascent stage, scholarly attention is increasingly looking at its internal dynamics. The inclusion of South Africa being the smallest economy in the BRICS was indeed an effort to consolidate...

  4. A regional and multi-faceted approach to postgraduate water education – the WaterNet experience in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Love

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the experience of a regional network of academic departments involved in water education that started as a project and evolved, over a period of 12 yr, into an independent network organisation. The paper pursues three objectives. First, it argues that it makes good sense to organise postgraduate education and research on water resources on a regional scale and presents the WaterNet experience as an example that a regional approach can work. Second, it presents preliminary findings and conclusions that the regional approach presented by WaterNet did make a contribution to the capacity needs of the region both in terms of management and research capacity. Third, it draws two generalised lessons from the WaterNet experience. Lesson one pertains to the importance of legitimate ownership and an accountability structure for network effectiveness. Lesson two is related to the financial and intellectual resources required to jointly developing educational programmes through shared experience.

  5. South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that South Africa's main reason for entering the international nuclear market is, and always has been, to sell its uranium abroad. From 1939-45 South Africa took part in the war against Nazi Germany, and the South African government of the time sought to help the Allied war effort in all ways that were practical. Later, during the Cold War, it tried to help build up the West's nuclear arsenal. In 1944, the British government secretly asked General Smuts---prime minister of South Africa since 1939 and a member of Churchill's War Cabinet---to survey South Africa's deposits of uranium. The survey, carried out with U.S. and British help, showed that the deposits were large, generally low-grade, but, in most cases, associated with gold and therefore could be profitably mined. In 1951, South Africa became a significant producer, with lucrative contracts for the sale of all its output to the U.S.-U.K.-Canada Joint Development Agency and one of the three main suppliers to the U.S. nuclear weapons program. In time, government controls eased and uranium production and marketing became a purely commercial operation

  6. Towards happiness: Experiences of work–role fit, meaningfulness and work engagement of industrial/organisational psychologists in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Llewellyn E. van Zyl; Elmari Deacon; Sebastiaan Rothmann

    2010-01-01

    Orientation: The work of industrial/organisational (I/O) psychologists presents an interesting and relevant context for studying meaning and engagement as components of happiness.Research purpose: The aim of this study was to determine how I/O psychologists experience the meaning of their work and to investigate the relationships between their experiences of work-role fit, meaning of work, psychological meaningfulness and work engagement, utilising the happiness framework proposed by Seligman...

  7. A study of descriptive data for orphans and non-orphans on key criteria of economic vulnerability in two municipalities in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Skinner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally assumed that orphan status increases the risk to children of a range of negative outcomes. In South Africa, death of parents due to HIV-related illness is contributing to a rapid increase in the prevalence of orphans. This paper presents descriptive data from two South African communities, namely Kopanong, in the Free State and Kanana in the North West province, characterising the differences between orphans (double, maternal and paternal and non-orphans on key criteria of social vulnerability.Objectives: The objective was to obtain a better understanding of how different types of orphans and non-orphans may differ in these key areas as a crucial starting point for addressing the devastating consequences the AIDS epidemic has on these children’s lives. While the study focuses on two specific areas these will provide insight into the general situation of orphans in South Africa.Methods: A cross-sectional census survey was conducted in the two communities of Kopanong, comprising n = 5254 households and Kanana, comprising n = 12 984 households.Results: In Kopanong, 8.2% of children had lost both parents, 19.1% had lost their father and 6.5% their mother only, whilst in Kanana the results were 6.5%, 28.1% and 3.7% respectively. Loss of both parents appeared to have a consistent impact on material need, including access to food, clothing and essential services, whilst loss of a single parent seems to have a more variable impact. At present, there are very few child headed households, but this constitutes a risk in the longer term. Conclusions: Orphans appear to be more vulnerable in terms of material need. Children assessed in this study as being most in need were not accessing adequately many services directed at them. There is a need to extend understanding and measurement of emotional need and abuse.

  8. A study of descriptive data for orphans and non-orphans on key criteria of economic vulnerability in two municipalities in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Skinner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally assumed that orphan status increases the risk to children of a range of negative outcomes. In South Africa, death of parents due to HIV-related illness is contributing to a rapid increase in the prevalence of orphans. This paper presents descriptive data from two South African communities, namely Kopanong, in the Free State and Kanana in the North West province, characterising the differences between orphans (double, maternal and paternal and non-orphans on key criteria of social vulnerability.Objectives: The objective was to obtain a better understanding of how different types of orphans and non-orphans may differ in these key areas as a crucial starting point for addressing the devastating consequences the AIDS epidemic has on these children’s lives. While the study focuses on two specific areas these will provide insight into the general situation of orphans in South Africa.Methods: A cross-sectional census survey was conducted in the two communities of Kopanong, comprising n = 5254 households and Kanana, comprising n = 12 984 households.Results: In Kopanong, 8.2% of children had lost both parents, 19.1% had lost their father and 6.5% their mother only, whilst in Kanana the results were 6.5%, 28.1% and 3.7% respectively. Loss of both parents appeared to have a consistent impact on material need, including access to food, clothing and essential services, whilst loss of a single parent seems to have a more variable impact. At present, there are very few child headed households, but this constitutes a risk in the longer term.Conclusions: Orphans appear to be more vulnerable in terms of material need. Children assessed in this study as being most in need were not accessing adequately many services directed at them. There is a need to extend understanding and measurement of emotional need and abuse. 

  9. Success in the Academic Labour Market for Economics - The German Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Heining, Jörg; Jerger, Jürgen; Lingens, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Based on CV information of tenured professors and post-doc researchers in the field of economics at German universities we construct a unique data set. This data set contains detailed information on the career path and on personal characteristics of individuals. Using this data we analyse the determinants of success in the academic labour market. Our notion of success is the (conditional) probability of becoming tenured, i.e. the hazard rate. Estimating a Cox (1972) regressi...

  10. Role of Economic Policies in Protecting the Environment: The Experience of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid Faruqee

    1996-01-01

    Economic policies that ensure efficient allocation of resources is a necessary, but not a sufficient condition for creating appropriate environmental incentives. Environment-specific policies are also needed to correct market failures leading to environment problems. Two types of policies can be used to deal with environmental problems—command and control policies and incentive- or market-based policies. Command and control policies involve government mandating of environmental quality standa...

  11. Reflexivity, Expectations Feedback and almost Self-fulfilling Equilibria: Economic Theory, Empirical Evidence and Laboratory Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Hommes, C.

    2013-01-01

    This discussion paper led to a publication in the 'Journal of Economic Methodology' , 20(4), 2013. We discuss recent work on bounded rationality and learning in relation to Soros' principle of reflexivity and stress the empirical importance of non-rational, almost self-fulfilling equilibria in positive feedback systems. As an empirical example, we discuss a behavioral asset pricing model with heterogeneous expectations. Bubble and crash dynamics is triggered by shocks to fundamentals and ampl...

  12. Increasing Use of Postpartum Family Planning and the Postpartum IUD: Early Experiences in West and Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleah, Tsigue; Hyjazi, Yolande; Austin, Suzanne; Diallo, Abdoulaye; Dao, Blami; Waxman, Rachel; Karna, Priya

    2016-08-11

    A global resurgence of interest in the intrauterine device (IUD) as an effective long-acting reversible contraceptive and in improving access to a wide range of contraceptive methods, as well as an emphasis on encouraging women to give birth in health care facilities, has led programs to introduce postpartum IUD (PPIUD) services into postpartum family planning (PPFP) programs. We describe strategic, organizational, and technical elements that contributed to early successes of a regional initiative in West and Central Africa to train antenatal, maternity, and postnatal care providers in PPFP counseling for the full range of available methods and in PPIUD service delivery. In November 2013, the initiative provided competency-based training in Guinea for providers from the main public teaching hospital in 5 selected countries (Benin, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Niger, and Senegal) with no prior PPFP counseling or PPIUD capacity. The training was followed by a transfer-of-learning visit and monitoring to support the trained providers. One additional country, Togo, replicated the initiative's model in 2014. Although nascent, this initiative has introduced high-quality PPFP and PPIUD services to the region, where less than 1% of married women of reproductive age use the IUD. In total, 21 providers were trained in PPFP counseling, 18 of whom were also trained in PPIUD insertion. From 2014 to 2015, more than 15,000 women were counseled about PPFP, and 2,269 women chose and received the PPIUD in Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Niger, Senegal, and Togo. (Introduction of PPIUD services in Chad has been delayed.) South-South collaboration has been central to the initiative's accomplishments: Guinea's clinical centers of excellence and qualified trainers provided a culturally resonant example of a PPFP/PPIUD program, and trainings are creating a network of regional trainers to facilitate expansion. Two of the selected countries (Benin and Niger) have expanded their PPFP/PPUID training

  13. Increasing Use of Postpartum Family Planning and the Postpartum IUD: Early Experiences in West and Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleah, Tsigue; Hyjazi, Yolande; Austin, Suzanne; Diallo, Abdoulaye; Dao, Blami; Waxman, Rachel; Karna, Priya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A global resurgence of interest in the intrauterine device (IUD) as an effective long-acting reversible contraceptive and in improving access to a wide range of contraceptive methods, as well as an emphasis on encouraging women to give birth in health care facilities, has led programs to introduce postpartum IUD (PPIUD) services into postpartum family planning (PPFP) programs. We describe strategic, organizational, and technical elements that contributed to early successes of a regional initiative in West and Central Africa to train antenatal, maternity, and postnatal care providers in PPFP counseling for the full range of available methods and in PPIUD service delivery. In November 2013, the initiative provided competency-based training in Guinea for providers from the main public teaching hospital in 5 selected countries (Benin, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Niger, and Senegal) with no prior PPFP counseling or PPIUD capacity. The training was followed by a transfer-of-learning visit and monitoring to support the trained providers. One additional country, Togo, replicated the initiative’s model in 2014. Although nascent, this initiative has introduced high-quality PPFP and PPIUD services to the region, where less than 1% of married women of reproductive age use the IUD. In total, 21 providers were trained in PPFP counseling, 18 of whom were also trained in PPIUD insertion. From 2014 to 2015, more than 15,000 women were counseled about PPFP, and 2,269 women chose and received the PPIUD in Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, Niger, Senegal, and Togo. (Introduction of PPIUD services in Chad has been delayed.) South–South collaboration has been central to the initiative’s accomplishments: Guinea’s clinical centers of excellence and qualified trainers provided a culturally resonant example of a PPFP/PPIUD program, and trainings are creating a network of regional trainers to facilitate expansion. Two of the selected countries (Benin and Niger) have expanded their PPFP

  14. Gender differences in sleep deprivation effects on risk and inequality aversion: evidence from an economic experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Ferrara

    Full Text Available Excessive working hours--even at night--are becoming increasingly common in our modern 24/7 society. The prefrontal cortex (PFC is particularly vulnerable to the effects of sleep loss and, consequently, the specific behaviors subserved by the functional integrity of the PFC, such as risk-taking and pro-social behavior, may be affected significantly. This paper seeks to assess the effects of one night of sleep deprivation on subjects' risk and social preferences, which are probably the most explored behavioral domains in the tradition of Experimental Economics. This novel cross-over study employs thirty-two university students (gender-balanced participating to 2 counterbalanced laboratory sessions in which they perform standard risk and social preference elicitation protocols. One session was after one night of undisturbed sleep at home, and the other was after one night of sleep deprivation in the laboratory. Sleep deprivation causes increased sleepiness and decreased alertness in all subjects. After sleep loss males make riskier decisions compared to the rested condition, while females do the opposite. Females likewise show decreased inequity aversion after sleep deprivation. As for the relationship between cognitive ability and economic decisions, sleep deprived individuals with higher cognitive reflection show lower risk aversion and more altruistic behavior. These results show that one night of sleep deprivation alters economic behavior in a gender-sensitive way. Females' reaction to sleep deprivation, characterized by reduced risky choices and increased egoism compared to males, may be related to intrinsic psychological gender differences, such as in the way men and women weigh up probabilities in their decision-making, and/or to the different neurofunctional substrate of their decision-making.

  15. Gender differences in sleep deprivation effects on risk and inequality aversion: evidence from an economic experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Michele; Bottasso, Anna; Tempesta, Daniela; Carrieri, Marika; De Gennaro, Luigi; Ponti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Excessive working hours--even at night--are becoming increasingly common in our modern 24/7 society. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is particularly vulnerable to the effects of sleep loss and, consequently, the specific behaviors subserved by the functional integrity of the PFC, such as risk-taking and pro-social behavior, may be affected significantly. This paper seeks to assess the effects of one night of sleep deprivation on subjects' risk and social preferences, which are probably the most explored behavioral domains in the tradition of Experimental Economics. This novel cross-over study employs thirty-two university students (gender-balanced) participating to 2 counterbalanced laboratory sessions in which they perform standard risk and social preference elicitation protocols. One session was after one night of undisturbed sleep at home, and the other was after one night of sleep deprivation in the laboratory. Sleep deprivation causes increased sleepiness and decreased alertness in all subjects. After sleep loss males make riskier decisions compared to the rested condition, while females do the opposite. Females likewise show decreased inequity aversion after sleep deprivation. As for the relationship between cognitive ability and economic decisions, sleep deprived individuals with higher cognitive reflection show lower risk aversion and more altruistic behavior. These results show that one night of sleep deprivation alters economic behavior in a gender-sensitive way. Females' reaction to sleep deprivation, characterized by reduced risky choices and increased egoism compared to males, may be related to intrinsic psychological gender differences, such as in the way men and women weigh up probabilities in their decision-making, and/or to the different neurofunctional substrate of their decision-making.

  16. The Neglected Economic Dimensions of ECOWAS’s Negotiated Peace Accords in West Africa Vernachlässigte ökonomische Dimensionen von ECOWAS-Friedensvereinbarungen in Westafrika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwesi Aning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its first intervention in Liberia in December 1989, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS has, in conjunction with the African Union (AU and the United Nations (UN, managed to resolve intrastate violence in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Côte d’Ivoire through its political and military interventions. One aspect of the work undertaken by the ECOWAS that has received little scholarly attention are the economic dimensions of the peace accords it has negotiated. To date, no scholarly work that we know of has focused on this aspect of ECOWAS peace initiatives. The same is true of other peace initiatives, such as those in Côte d’Ivoire, led by other actors. This paper seeks to bridge these scholarly lacunae by evaluating the economic dimensions of peace agreements in these three countries, and by examining how these agreements address the distribution and management of economic resources. We argue that because these conflicts were partially underpinned by the mismanagement of economic resources, the search for peace should necessarily include addressing economic issues at the negotiating table.Seit ihrer ersten Intervention in Liberia im Dezember 1989 ist es der Wirtschaftsgemeinschaft Westafrikanischer Staaten (Economic Community of West African States, ECOWAS – gemeinsam mit der Afrikanischen Union (AU und den Vereinten Nationen (VN – gelungen, durch politische und militärische Interventionen gewaltsame innerstaatliche Konflikte in Liberia, Sierra Leone und Côte d’Ivoire zu lösen. Den ökonomischen Dimensionen der von ECOWAS ausgehandelten Friedensvereinbarungen wurde bislang von wissenschaftlicher Seite wenig Aufmerksamkeit entgegengebracht; es gibt keine Forschungsarbeit, die diesen Aspekt der ECOWAS-Friedensinitiativen in den Fokus rückt. Das gilt auch für Friedensinitiativen anderer Akteure, zum Beispiel in Côte d’Ivoire. Mit dem vorliegenden Beitrag wird versucht, diese Forschungslücke zu überbrücken. Wir

  17. Using ICT at an Open Distance Learning (ODL) Institution in South Africa: The Learning Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokiwa, S. A.; Phasha, T. N.

    2012-01-01

    For students with visual impairments, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become an important means through which they can learn and access learning materials at various levels of education. However, their learning experiences in using such form of technologies have been rarely documented, thus suggests society's lack of…

  18. A little bit of Africa in Brazil: ethnobiology experiences in the field of Afro-Brazilian religions

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2014-01-01

    This essay, which is the fourth in the series “Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Ethnobiologists and Their First Time in the Field”, is a personal reflection by the researcher on his first field experience with ethnobiology of so called Afro-brazilian cults. The author recounts his feelings and concerns associated with initial fieldwork.

  19. A little bit of Africa in Brazil: ethnobiology experiences in the field of Afro-Brazilian religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2014-01-01

    This essay, which is the fourth in the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Ethnobiologists and Their First Time in the Field", is a personal reflection by the researcher on his first field experience with ethnobiology of so called Afro-Brazilian cults. The author recounts his feelings and concerns associated with initial fieldwork. PMID:24467714

  20. Chronicling Educator Practices and Experiences in the Context of Democratic Schooling and Quality Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mncube, Vusi; Harber, Clive

    2010-01-01

    An interview-based qualitative study was undertaken to explore the experiences and practices of educators in providing democratic schooling as a way of delivering quality education for learners in schools. The exploration looked at educators' understandings of the concept of democracy in schools, their understanding of the concept quality…

  1. A regional and multi-faceted approach to postgraduate water education: The WaterNet experience in Southern Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, L.; Van der Zaag, P.; Gumbo, B.; Rockström, J.; Love, D.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the experience of a regional network of academic departments involved in water education that started as a project and evolved, over a period of 12 yr, into an independent network organisation. The paper pursues three objectives. First, it argues that it makes good sense to organi

  2. Development in China and Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Shiwei

    2014-01-01

    My dissertation studies the development of China and Africa over the past two decades. First, China has maintained a high rate of economic growth in the past twenty years. At the same time, we observe a rapid growth in the African export flows to China, even faster than those to the US and EU. We ar

  3. The role of scientists in societal development - challenges for South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. van Eldik

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available International and local trends and experiences confirm the importance of reassessing; the role and responsibilities of scientists in South Africa. Revised strategies for human resource development, equipped with scientific and technological expertise and skills, offer tremendous challenges to scientists and the higher education system of the country. Simultaneously the contributions of scien­tists, through their involvement in research and development, to new knowledge as well as the application and utilisation of knowledge in new processes, products and technology transfer, is of vital importance for the economic development of South Africa.

  4. Endogenising demographic variables in demo-economic models: the Bachue experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wery, R; Rodgers, G

    1980-01-01

    The attempt is made in this discussion to describe and draw lessons from the treatment of behavioral demographic variables in the Bachue demo-economic models constructed for the Philippines, Kenya, Brazil and Yugoslavia. Focus is on certain theoretical, technical and practical problems encountered in inserting demographic variables in the system as a whole; how they have been measured in the various applications of the Bachue models, how they are behaviorally explained and linked to the other elements in the system, the data sources used, and some issues of econometric estimates and modelling. 8 issues are dealt with: population accounting and lag structure; fertility; mortality; migration; nuptiality; household formation; schooling; and labor force participation. In each case model structure, dependent and explanatory variables, and empirical strategy are discussed. Summary tables compare the approaches of the different models. The specifics of each country situation rule out the identification of the best solution. Some suggestions regarding more promising approaches are included with respect to choice of variables and the estimation of behavioral models. The endogenous nature of certain demographic elements of a demo-economic model are clear, but construction of the Bachue models has shown that there are no exact rules valid for all cases. There is considerable variety in the way characteristics of the population have been represented in the various applications.

  5. The marketing and economic implications of the manipulation of share prices: Nigeria stock exchange experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajayi Ezekiel Oluwole

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the marketing and economic effects of the manipulation of share prices in the Nigerian Stock Exchange. The survey research design was adopted. Data collected was analyzed using the regression analysis. Student t- test was used to test the two hypotheses formulated at 0.05 level of significance. The findings of the study revealed that capital market infractions such as fraudulent disposal of investor assets, illegal fund management and the wonder bank syndrome, others are insider dealings, corporate accounting fraud and share price manipulations affects the capital market and the economy .The study concluded that share prices manipulation actually influences the marketing and economic values of the shares being manipulated. It was recommended that the Nigerian government must put in place strong regulatory measures and punish the entire offender that has been found guilty. It was also recommended that for the market to rebound, stockbrokers that accessed margin facility from banks should be provided with certain percentage of their contributions to the loan as cushion to help them move on with their business.

  6. Management of Epistaxis – A Single Centre Experience and Economic Considerations

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keane, E

    2016-06-01

    Epistaxis represents the most common ENT emergency and its management has been a focus of audit recently, with consideration given to the associated economic burden. The aim of our study is to evaluate the management of epistaxis in terms of treatments used, duration of stay, recurrence and cost. A retrospective review of hospital inpatient enquiry (HIPE) data from a single secondary referral centre was undertaken during a four year period. Four hundrefd and thirty-four patients were identified. The majority (n= 262, 60.3%) were male and the average age was 64.2 years. The vast majority (n=362, 83.4%) were managed non-operatively. Only 15 patients (3.4%) were managed surgically. The average length of stay was 2.5 days and did not vary greatly between the treatment groups. The recurrence rate was 8.2% (n=36). Approximate costs of packing vs EUA and cautery suggest that packing alone is more economical but more data is needed to fully compare the options.

  7. ISSUES AND ECONOMIC ROLE OF WAQF IN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION: MALAYSIAN EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farra Munna Harun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As early as 1980, the Malaysian federal government’s spending on education, was the highest in East Asia and higher than the OECD average of 3.4% of GDP. This demonstrates that the Malaysian Government has big expenses from educational sector and respectively is amenability for Malaysian economic budget. In other side Waqf in Malaysia is one of large financial source that has not been fully explored.  By using qualitative methodology through content analysis this paper attempt to explore the issues and economic role of Waqf in Malaysia, especially in Higher Education Institution (HEI and attempt to study how Waqf fund empowering the education. This study found that taking the que from the institutions of Waqf, the exploration and development of waqf fund can be exalarate through the formation of formal organizations at state and federal level and rearrange the Malaysian educational budget and policy to support the better quality of HEI.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v8i1.1997

  8. How advocates use health economic data and projections: the Irish experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    Approximately 30,000 people die in Ireland each year. Currently over 6000 people access specialist palliative care services annually, a figure that is projected to rise to 12,500 by 2016. In 2006, the Irish Hospice Foundation entered a joint advocacy alliance with the Irish Cancer Society and the Irish Association for Palliative Care. By speaking with one voice and using quality data, these three national voluntary groups were able to influence government and social partners to address clearly identified regional inequities in the provision of palliative care services. Over the past three years, there has been significant public investment in palliative care services, culminating in the recent publication by the national health agency of a five-year plan for a comprehensive national palliative care service. However, the sudden economic downturn in 2008 and the severe deterioration of public finances threaten the implementation of the plan. New services can only be developed if there is strong evidence to illustrate that they are cost-effective in delivering patient care. Having reviewed the international evidence, the joint advocacy group has used this economic evidence to strengthen the case that the development of palliative care services can actually save money in health budgets. The campaign mounted by the joint advocacy group was greatly facilitated by the existence of good data and an agreed evidence-based policy on what constitutes a comprehensive service.

  9. Secondary school educators' experiences of the educator-learner relationship in the Gauteng Province of South Africa / Chrische Knoesen

    OpenAIRE

    Knoesen, Chrische

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this study was to explore the experiences of secondary school educators concerning the educator-learner relationship. The study hopes to add value in developing sustainable support to enhance the quality of life and well-being of South African educators. The study highlights specific aspects of the educators’ perspective (Koomen et al., 2011; Philip, 2008; Skaalvik & Skaalvik, 2011; Easter et al., 2008), such as cultural perspective, attachment perspective, career satisfaction pe...

  10. AFRICA 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alphonce; Shiundu

    2011-01-01

    A year highlighted by a new nation,regime change,famine and hopes for climate change solutions THE big story out of Africa in 2011 was the referendum in southern Sudan.That culminated in the birth of a new country,the Republic of South Sudan,which joins the struggling band of developing nations.

  11. Understanding the Relationships between Gender Inequitable Behaviours, Childhood Trauma and Socio-Economic Status in Single and Multiple Perpetrator Rape in Rural South Africa: Structural Equation Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Jewkes; Mzikazi Nduna; Nwabisa Jama-Shai; Esnat Chirwa; Kristin Dunkle

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions to prevent rape perpetration must be designed to address its drivers. This paper seeks to extend understanding of drivers of single and multiple perpetrator rape (referred to here as SPR and MPR respectively) and the relationships between socio-economic status, childhood trauma, peer pressure, other masculine behaviours and rape. Method 1370 young men aged 15 to 26 were interviewed as part of the randomised controlled trial evaluation of Stepping Stones in the rural E...

  12. The socio-cultural and economic impact of refugees on the host indigenous communities in West Africa : a case study of Liberian refugees at Buduburam community in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Boamah-Gyau, Kwame

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with refugees and their impact on the host community. Throughout the World, the UNHCR is not only concerned with the hosting, feeding, sheltering, clothing and educating the refugees. It is also addressing their impact on the host communities that face the consequences of their presence. In the effort to host protracted refugees, many developing host communities face various forms of socio-cultural influence and economic challenges. Previous findings from researc...

  13. Is a 10-sow unit economically sustainable? A profitability assessment of productivity amongst small-holder pig farmers, Mpumalanga, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Munzhelele

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of small-holder pig farmers in Mpumalanga had between 1- and 10-sow herds. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the current government agricultural intervention (supply of 10 sows and a boar in terms of technical and economic feasibilities and ascertain whether the small-scale pig value chain system alleviates poverty. Data were obtained from 220 randomly selected small-holder pig farmers using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results showed that 58% farrowed ≤ 10 piglets/born/sow/litter, 44.2% practiced no weaning method and many fed swill and leftovers alone (41.6%. Pair-wise association revealed that the feeding of commercial feeds had a relationship with pigs in relatively good to very good body condition. Pigs in poor body condition were positively correlated with the feeding of swill alone. The economic models for the 10-sow unit proved that pig farming is unprofitable if the current management and feeding systems that operate in the commercial industry are utilised. However, only through a combination of cooperative systems, benefits of economies of scale, reduction of preweaning mortalities and structured government inputs can pig production be profitable at this scale of production.Keywords: piglets; market; profit; economics; feeds

  14. Economic Growth as a Function of Quality Education: a note on Pakistan’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Waqar Hussain

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research studies on the role that quality education plays in the economic uplift of a country has proved a positive causal relationship between the efficiency and quality of education of the labour force. It is in terms of quality of education that the very notion of the human capital makes sense. But in most of the developing countries, including Pakistan, in view of their typical socio-political conditions, emphasis is more on quantity rather than quality. As a result social cohesion and productivity two major objectives of national education are lacking. On the contrary, a mutually exclusive stratification in the society is more prominent. Based on the deductions made from the research studies conducted in the developed world, this paper outlines a scheme of guidance which may help improve the quality of education across the board. In Pakistan overhauling of the examination system, harmonious curriculum with practical orientation have been pointed out as some key areas to begin with.

  15. The instability of world oil market and its impact on economic development: Indonesia's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world oil market has been characterized by fluctuating prices which have a direct impact on the world economy. If the world oil price rises in real terms, upstream activities become more attractive to producers, and if the price declines, downstream opportunities become more attractive. The world oil market is currently determined not only by producers and consumers, but also by the futures trade. In addition, the elasticity of oil prices has increased since the 1970s through competition among producers and competition from other energy sources. The Asia Pacific countries are experiencing rapid economic growth, and are thus heavily dependent on oil, but generally have small reserves. Their reserves/production ratio is ca 20 years, with a major share coming from China and Indonesia. The current situation of tight and inadequate supply may increase the region's dependence on Middle East sources. The effects of the three recent major oil crises on the Asia Pacific countries are reviewed and the role of oil and gas in Indonesia's economic development is described. Export earnings from oil and gas represent a major share of total Indonesian export revenues, and taxes and receipts from oil companies continue to be the largest receipts in Indonesian government revenues. Slow changes in the primary fuel mix and high growth in domestic consumption may turn Indonesia into a net oil importer before the year 2000. A major effort to decrease domestic oil consumption has been implemented by using natural gas and coal in the power generation sector. On the supply side, recoverable oil and gas reserves of 50 billion bbl and 200 trillion ft3 respectively may be present but their development depends on the investment scheme of the continuing exploration program

  16. Socio-economic factors, gender and smoking as determinants of COPD in a low-income country of sub-Saharan Africa: FRESH AIR Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Frederik; Chavannes, Niels; Kirenga, Bruce; Jones, Rupert; Williams, Sian; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Vonk, Judith; Kocks, Janwillem; de Jong, Corina; van der Molen, Thys

    2016-01-01

    In Uganda, biomass smoke seems to be the largest risk factor for the development of COPD, but socio-economic factors and gender may have a role. Therefore, more in-depth research is needed to understand the risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of socio-economic factors and gender differences on the COPD prevalence in Uganda. The population comprised 588 randomly selected participants (>30 years) who previously completed the FRESH AIR Uganda study. In this post hoc analysis, the impact of several socio-economic characteristics, gender and smoking on the prevalence of COPD was assessed using a logistic regression model. The main risk factors associated with COPD were non-Bantu ethnicity (odds ratio (OR) 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06–2.82, P=0.030), biomass fuel use for heating (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.03–3.00, P=0.038), former smoker (OR 1.87, 95% CI 0.97–3.60, P=0.063) and being unmarried (OR 0.087, 95% CI 0.93–2.95, P=0.087). A substantial difference in the prevalence of COPD was seen between the two ethnic groups: non-Bantu 20% and Bantu 12.9%. Additional analysis between these two groups showed significant differences in socio-economic circumstances: non-Bantu people smoked more (57.7% vs 10.7%), lived in tobacco-growing areas (72% vs 14.8%) and were less educated (28.5% vs 12.9% had no education). With regard to gender, men with COPD were unmarried (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.25–7.61, P=0.015) and used more biomass fuel for heating (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.02–4.54, P=0.045), and women with COPD were former smokers (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.22–9.22, P=0.019). Only a few socio-economic factors (i.e., smoking, biomass fuel use for heating, marital status and non-Bantu ethnicity) have been found to be associated with COPD. This applied for gender differences as well (i.e., for men, marital status and biomass fuel for heating, and for women being a former smoker). More research is needed to clarify the complexity of the different risk factors

  17. Development and preliminary validation of a screen for interpersonal childhood trauma experiences among school-going youth in Durban, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Steven J; Valjee, Sachet R; Penning, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and preliminary validation of the Developmental Trauma Inventory (DTI), which is a 36-item, retrospective, self-administered screen for interpersonal childhood trauma experiences developed specifically for the South African context. Preliminary validation of the inventory was conducted using a sample of 720 school-going adolescents attending a high school in the Durban Metropolitan area (South Africa). Factor analysis produced the best fit for a 10-factor model (emotional abuse, community assault, domestic assault, poverty, witnessing community violence, witnessing domestic violence, indecent assault, domestic neglect, rape, and domestic injury). Contrary to expectations, items relating to loss and separation (e.g. death of a parent) did not produce a clear factor structure. Identified scales had good internal consistency (0.70 to 0.81), low factor inter-correlations, and high concurrent criterion-related validity in the sense that all scales were significantly correlated with scores on clinical measures of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or complex PTSD. These findings provide preliminary support for the utility of DTI in the South African context. PMID:25860304

  18. The relationship between inclusive growth, inequality and poverty in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed BEN AMAR; Nahed ZGHIDI

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of this work, our attention focuses on explaining how economic progress in Africa is not transformed into a development. Economic growth in Africa has been accompanied by growing inequalities of all kinds, while much of the population continues to live in landlocked areas and condemned to marginalization and excluding. Particularly, this work deals verify the relationship between inclusive growth, inequality, poverty and human development in Africa. We can remi...

  19. Economic Intervention and Parenting: A Randomized Experiment of Statewide Child Development Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yunju; Wikoff, Nora; Sherraden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We examine the effects of Child Development Accounts (CDAs) on parenting stress and practices. Methods: We use data from the SEED for Oklahoma Kids (SEED OK) experiment. SEED OK selected caregivers of infants from Oklahoma birth certificates using a probability sampling method, randomly assigned caregivers to the treatment (n = 1,132)…

  20. Anonymity in giving in a natural context : an economic field experiment in thirty churches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetevent, Adriaan R.

    2003-01-01

    The role of anonymity in giving is examined in a field experiment performed in thirty Dutch churches. For a period of 29 weeks, the means by which offerings are gathered is determined by chance, prescribing for each offering the use of either `closed' collection bags or open collection baskets. When

  1. A Methodology for Forecasting Damage & Economic Consequences to Floods: Building on the National Flood Interoperability Experiment (NFIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tootle, G. A.; Gutenson, J. L.; Zhu, L.; Ernest, A. N. S.; Oubeidillah, A.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    The National Flood Interoperability Experiment (NFIE) held June 3-July 17, 2015 at the National Water Center (NWC) in Tuscaloosa, Alabama sought to demonstrate an increase in flood predictive capacity for the coterminous United States (CONUS). Accordingly, NFIE-derived technologies and workflows offer the ability to forecast flood damage and economic consequence estimates that coincide with the hydrologic and hydraulic estimations these physics-based models generate. A model providing an accurate prediction of damage and economic consequences is a valuable asset when allocating funding for disaster response, recovery, and relief. Damage prediction and economic consequence assessment also offer an adaptation planning mechanism for defending particularly valuable or vulnerable structures. The NFIE, held at the NWC on The University of Alabama (UA) campus led to the development of this large scale flow and inundation forecasting framework. Currently, the system can produce 15-hour lead-time forecasts for the entire coterminous United States (CONUS). A concept which is anticipated to become operational as of May 2016 within the NWC. The processing of such a large-scale, fine resolution model is accomplished in a parallel computing environment using large supercomputing clusters. Traditionally, flood damage and economic consequence assessment is calculated in a desktop computing environment with a ménage of meteorology, hydrology, hydraulic, and damage assessment tools. In the United States, there are a range of these flood damage/ economic consequence assessment software's available to local, state, and federal emergency management agencies. Among the more commonly used and freely accessible models are the Hydrologic Engineering Center's Flood Damage Reduction Analysis (HEC-FDA), Flood Impact Assessment (HEC-FIA), and Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) United States Multi-Hazard (Hazus-MH). All of which exist only in a desktop environment. With this

  2. Entrepreneurship Development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Schaumburg-Müller, Henrik; Jeppesen, Søren; Langevang, Thilde

    2010-01-01

    This working paper is a report from the workshop on Entrepreneurship Development arranged by the Centre for Business and Development Studies at CBS and the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs in September 2010. The objective of the workshop was to use the participants’ joint knowledge and experiences to discuss and provide conclusions on what role entrepreneurship development has played and can play to stimulate growth and employment in Africa. Entrepreneurship development is understood as the...

  3. Turnover of professional nurses at Mokopane Hospital in the Limpopo Province, South Africa: Experiences of nursing unit managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogale L. Mmamma

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staff turnover of professional nurses remains a concern for public and private hospitals management because it has an impact on the morale of nurses and it may also lead to poor patient care.Objectives: The objectives of this study were to explore and describe the experiences of nursing unit managers with regard to the turnover of professional nurses who were under their supervision.Method: A qualitative, explorative, descriptive research design was used to determine the experiences of nursing unit managers related to the turnover of professional nurses. Data collection was done by using semi-structured one-to-one interviews with professional nurses .Two groups of participants were interviewed: Those working day duty (n = 9 and those working night duty (n = 3 who were at work on the anticipated days for data collection.Results: The findings revealed that every unit was experiencing a shortage of professional nurses, which caused other nurses to work overtime with an inevitable increase in workload. That led to tiredness, conflict amongst professional nurses, job dissatisfaction, and absenteeism which compromised nursing care. This resulted in patient dissatisfaction and sometimes led to deaths that could have been prevented.Conclusion: It is recommended that staff turnover should be addressed by the hospital top management implementing several strategies. For example, top management could ensure that staff members work in a healthy environment with resources that they need during the provision of care, address the effects of the staff turnover, support the staff members and refrain from putting pressure on nursing unit managers whilst they are attending to problems.

  4. Women's experiences with oral and vaginal pre-exposure prophylaxis: the VOICE-C qualitative study in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane van der Straten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In VOICE, a multisite HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP trial, plasma drug levels pointed to widespread product nonuse, despite high adherence estimated by self-reports and clinic product counts. Using a socio-ecological framework (SEF, we explored socio-cultural and contextual factors that influenced participants' experience of daily vaginal gel and oral tablet regimens in VOICE. METHODS: In Johannesburg, a qualitative ancillary study was concurrently conducted among randomly selected VOICE participants assigned to in-depth interviews (n = 41, serial ethnographic interviews (n = 21, or focus group discussions (n = 40. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed, translated, and coded thematically for analysis. RESULTS: Of the 102 participants, the mean age was 27 years, and 96% had a primary sex partner with whom 43% cohabitated. Few women reported lasting nonuse, which they typically attributed to missed visits, lack of product replenishments, and family-related travel or work. Women acknowledged occasionally skipping or mistiming doses because they forgot, were busy, felt lazy or bored, feared or experienced side effects. However, nearly all knew or heard of other study participants who did not use products daily. Three overarching themes emerged from further analyses: ambivalence toward research, preserving a healthy status, and managing social relationships. These themes highlighted the profound and complex meanings associated with participating in a blinded HIV PrEP trial and taking antiretroviral-based products. The unknown efficacy of products, their connection with HIV infection, challenges with daily regimen given social risks, lack of support-from partners and significant others-and the relationship tradeoffs entailed by using the products appear to discourage adequate product use. CONCLUSIONS: Personal acknowledgment of product nonuse was challenging. This qualitative inquiry highlighted key influences at all SEF levels that

  5. Clinician perceptions and patient experiences of antiretroviral treatment integration in primary health care clinics, Tshwane, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maphuthego D. Mathibe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary Health Care (PHC clinicians and patients are major role players in the South African antiretroviral treatment programme. Understanding their perceptions and experiences of integrated care and the management of people living with HIV and AIDS in PHC facilities is necessary for successful implementation and sustainability of integration.Objective: This study explored clinician perceptions and patient experiences of integration of antiretroviral treatment in PHC clinics.Method: An exploratory, qualitative study was conducted in four city of Tshwane PHC facilities. Two urban and two rural facilities following different models of integration were included. A self-administered questionnaire with open-ended items was completed by 35 clinicians and four focus group interviews were conducted with HIV-positive patients. The data were coded and categories were grouped into sub-themes and themes.Results: Workload, staff development and support for integration affected clinicians’ performance and viewpoints. They perceived promotion of privacy, reduced discrimination and increased access to comprehensive care as benefits of service integration. Delays, poor patient care and patient dissatisfaction were viewed as negative aspects of integration. In three facilities patients were satisfied with integration or semi-integration and felt common queues prevented stigma and discrimination, whilst the reverse was true in the facility with separate services. Single-month issuance of antiretroviral drugs and clinic schedule organisation was viewed negatively, as well as poor staff attitudes, poor communication and long waiting times.Conclusion: Although a fully integrated service model is preferable, aspects that need further attention are management support from health authorities for health facilities, improved working conditions and appropriate staff development opportunities.

  6. The impacts of lower population growth on the quality of life and economic development: China's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z; Zhang, L

    1994-02-01

    China's population in 1993 was 1.18 billion, which makes it the most populous nation in the world. The Chinese population policy aims to control growth and improve the quality of human resources. Most Chinese recognize the need for family planning. Replacement level fertility has been achieved, because there are limited resources to support a large population. Scarce resources are limiting economic development. There has been a loss of arable land, and the dream of 2 hectares of land, a cow, a wife and children, and a comfortable bed are not attainable. Water resources are also limited, the ratio of water to arable land is unevenly balanced, and there is overdrawing of groundwater. Energy shortages, environmental pollution, and pressure on employment are other effects of population pressure. The surplus labor force is about 150-190 million farmering laborers. Labor productivity has declined due to excess labor. Projections are that 20-25% of employees are surplus, and unemployed in urban areas will total 10 million. Without a strong family planning program, there will be a rural labor surplus of 200-360 million people by the year 2000. One benefit of lower population growth is the savings in child-rearing expenses. Estimated births averted between 1971 and 1992 was about 250 million, which translates to a savings of $500 billion. About 66% of this sum would be recovered in the same period and 33% would be recovered between 1993-2007. Government and nongovernmental spending on family planning totaled an estimated $10 billion between 1971-92. The ratio of input to output for averted births is 1 to 17. Total spending would have been RMB 2500 billion yuan for child rearing of averted births between 1971-92 and RMB 1828 billion yuan between 1991-2005. The saved money could be invested in economic development. An estimated 10% of national income could be saved. Another benefit from low population growth is the increased consumption evident between 1971-90. There has not

  7. The effect of socio-economic background and campus experience on students' career aspirations : an empirical study at Wuhan university of technology

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Career aspirations reflect the individual social desires. This study aims to discover the influence of socio-economic background and campus experience on students’ career aspirations, by addressing the following research questions: what are the aspirations among the students toward future career? Does students’ socio-economic background affect their aspirations regarding future employment? And does students’ experience on campus affect their aspirations regarding future employment? A quantita...

  8. Simple economic evaluation and applications experiments for photovoltaic systems for remote sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, M. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simple evaluation of the cost effectiveness of photovoltaic systems is presented. The evaluation is based on a calculation of breakeven costs of photovoltaics (PV) arrays with the levelized costs of two alternative energy sources (1) extension of the utility grid and (2) diesel generators. A selected number of PV applications experiments that are in progress in remote areas of the US are summarized. These applications experiments range from a 23 watt insect survey trap to a 100 kW PV system for a national park complex. It is concluded that PV systems for remote areas are now cost effective in remote small applications with commercially available technology and will be cost competitive for intermediate scale systems (approx. 10 kW) in the 1980s if the DOE 1986 Commercial Readiness Goals are achieved.

  9. Economic Experience in Creation and Operation of Commercial Propulsion Nuclear Plants. Annex VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annex considers the reduction of capital costs in commercial nuclear power by employing commercial scale production and common technologies of equipment design and fabrication, based on the vast production and operation experience of Russian Federation nuclear propulsion plants. The performed consideration proves the expediency of adopting the most effective engineering solutions and approaches used for production of propulsion nuclear plants in the production of commercial nuclear power plants

  10. Anonymity in giving in a natural context : an economic field experiment in thirty churches

    OpenAIRE

    Adriaan R. Soetevent

    2003-01-01

    The role of anonymity in giving is examined in a field experiment performed in thirty Dutch churches. For a period of 29 weeks, the means by which offerings are gathered is determined by chance, prescribing for each offering the use of either `closed' collection bags or open collection baskets. When using baskets, attendants' contributions can be identified by their direct neighbors, and attendants can observe the total amount given by the people who preceded them. Initially, contributions to...

  11. Ecotourism Experiences Promoting Conservation and Changing Economic Values: The Case of Mon Repos Turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.

    2012-01-01

    Each year during the turtle watching season, Mon Repos turtle rookery in Queensland attracts many ecotourists interested in seeing sea turtles nesting or hatching. As part of their visit, visitors are able to learn about the biology of and threats to marine turtles. A sample of visitors were surveyed in order to determine whether their experiences at Mon Repos changed their conservation attitudes and their intended behaviours for protecting sea turtles. Using these results, the role of enviro...

  12. Issues and Economic Role of Waqf In Higher Education Institution: Malaysian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farra Munna Harun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As early as 1980, the Malaysianfederal government’s spending on education, was the highest in East Asia andhigher than the OECD average of 3.4% of GDP. This demonstrates that theMalaysian Government has big expenses from educational sector and respectivelyis amenability for Malaysian economic budget. In other side Waqf in Malaysia isone of large financial source that has not been fully explored. By using qualitative methodology through content analysis this paper attempt to explore the issues andeconomic role of Waqf in Malaysia, especially in Higher Education Institution(HEI and attempt to study how Waqf fund empowering the education. Thisstudy found that taking the que from the institutions of Waqf, the explorationand development of waqf fund can be exalarate through the formation of formalorganizations at state and federal level and rearrange the Malaysian educationalbudget and policy to support the better quality of HEI.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v8i1.2514 

  13. Is a 10-sow unit economically sustainable? A profitability assessment of productivity amongst small-holder pig farmers, Mpumalanga, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzhelele, Priscilla; Oguttu, James W; Fasina, Folorunso O

    2016-01-01

    The majority of small-holder pig farmers in Mpumalanga had between 1- and 10-sow herds. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the current government agricultural intervention (supply of 10 sows and a boar) in terms of technical and economic feasibilities and ascertain whether the small-scale pig value chain system alleviates poverty. Data were obtained from 220 randomly selected small-holder pig farmers using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results showed that 58% farrowed ≤ 10 piglets/born/sow/litter, 44.2% practiced no weaning method and many fed swill and leftovers alone (41.6%). Pair-wise association revealed that the feeding of commercial feeds had a relationship with pigs in relatively good to very good body condition. Pigs in poor body condition were positively correlated with the feeding of swill alone. The economic models for the 10-sow unit proved that pig farming is unprofitable if the current management and feeding systems that operate in the commercial industry are utilised. However, only through a combination of cooperative systems, benefits of economies of scale, reduction of preweaning mortalities and structured government inputs can pig production be profitable at this scale of production. PMID:27247064

  14. Is a 10-sow unit economically sustainable? A profitability assessment of productivity amongst small-holder pig farmers, Mpumalanga, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzhelele, Priscilla; Oguttu, James W; Fasina, Folorunso O

    2016-05-12

    The majority of small-holder pig farmers in Mpumalanga had between 1- and 10-sow herds. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the current government agricultural intervention (supply of 10 sows and a boar) in terms of technical and economic feasibilities and ascertain whether the small-scale pig value chain system alleviates poverty. Data were obtained from 220 randomly selected small-holder pig farmers using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results showed that 58% farrowed ≤ 10 piglets/born/sow/litter, 44.2% practiced no weaning method and many fed swill and leftovers alone (41.6%). Pair-wise association revealed that the feeding of commercial feeds had a relationship with pigs in relatively good to very good body condition. Pigs in poor body condition were positively correlated with the feeding of swill alone. The economic models for the 10-sow unit proved that pig farming is unprofitable if the current management and feeding systems that operate in the commercial industry are utilised. However, only through a combination of cooperative systems, benefits of economies of scale, reduction of preweaning mortalities and structured government inputs can pig production be profitable at this scale of production.

  15. Foreign Direct Investment in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppesen, Soeren; Claire MAINGUY

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about impact of FDI on economic development in Africa compared to other developing countries, which the paper seeks to address by focusing on examples of impact in Mali and South Africa. The arugment put forward is that the impact has to be identified at the level of the industry or sector and the level of the firm with regard to employment effect, income generation and skills development. The mining and electricity and railway sectors in Mali are investigated and compared to ...

  16. Trade networks in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    To date, most of the literature on trade networks in West Africa has considered networks in a metaphorical way. The aim of this paper is to go one step further by showing how social network analysis may be applied to the study of regional trade in West Africa. After a brief review of the literature...... at the influence of spatial location and geographic scale on traders’ abilities to trade. In both cases, we argue that the value of social network analysis in exploring how traders have progressively adapted to social and spatial changes in economic activities has been greatly underestimated. Our discussion...

  17. DEEPENING ECONOMIC RELATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Inaugurated as a vehicle to improve cooperation between China and the African continent in 2000, the annual Forum on China-Africa Cooperation has become a platform for communication and cooperation. On the eve of the Beijing Summit and the Third Ministerial Conference of the forum, to be held in early November, Beijing Review reporter Liu Wei spoke to Zhou Yabin, head of the West Asia and Africa Affairs Department of the Chinese Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM), about Sino-African trade and the forum’s agenda on promoting the economic relations between China and Africa.

  18. Family values of young people in Limpopo, South Africa: A sociocultural psychological study on perceptions and experiences of reproduction and parenthood

    OpenAIRE

    Spjeldnæs, Ingrid Onarheim

    2013-01-01

    Background: The institution of the family in South Africa is commonly described as being in a state of crisis, and young people’s family values are key in learning about how to break the negative trends in the institution of the family in the country (Holborn & Eddy, 2011). The aim of this thesis was to improve understanding of values related to reproduction and family life among young people in poverty-ridden communities in South Africa. Methods: The research problem was ap...

  19. Qualitative soil moisture assessment in semi-arid Africa: the role of experience and training on inter-rater reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rinderer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil and water management is particularly relevant in semi-arid regions to enhance agricultural productivity. During periods of water scarcity soil moisture differences are important indicators of the soil water deficit and are traditionally used for allocating water resources among farmers of a village community. Here we present a simple, inexpensive soil wetness classification scheme based on qualitative indicators which one can see or touch on the soil surface. It incorporates the local farmers' knowledge on the best soil moisture conditions for seeding and brick making in the semi-arid environment of the study site near Arusha, Tanzania. The scheme was tested twice in 2014 with farmers, students and experts (April: 40 persons, June: 25 persons for inter-rater reliability, bias of individuals and functional relation between qualitative and quantitative soil moisture values. During the test in April farmers assigned the same wetness class in 46% of all cases while students and experts agreed in about 60% of all cases. Students who had been trained in how to apply the method gained higher inter-rater reliability than their colleagues with only a basic introduction. When repeating the test in June, participants were given improved instructions, organized in small sub-groups, which resulted in a higher inter-rater reliability among farmers. In 66% of all classifications farmers assigned the same wetness class and the spread of class assignments was smaller. This study demonstrates that a wetness classification scheme based on qualitative indicators is a robust tool and can be applied successfully regardless of experience in crop growing and education level when an in-depth introduction and training is provided. The use of a simple and clear layout of the assessment form is important for reliable wetness class assignments.

  20. Qualitative soil moisture assessment in semi-arid Africa - the role of experience and training on inter-rater reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderer, M.; Komakech, H. C.; Müller, D.; Wiesenberg, G. L. B.; Seibert, J.

    2015-08-01

    Soil and water management is particularly relevant in semi-arid regions to enhance agricultural productivity. During periods of water scarcity, soil moisture differences are important indicators of the soil water deficit and are traditionally used for allocating water resources among farmers of a village community. Here we present a simple, inexpensive soil wetness classification scheme based on qualitative indicators which one can see or touch on the soil surface. It incorporates the local farmers' knowledge on the best soil moisture conditions for seeding and brick making in the semi-arid environment of the study site near Arusha, Tanzania. The scheme was tested twice in 2014 with farmers, students and experts (April: 40 persons, June: 25 persons) for inter-rater reliability, bias of individuals and functional relation between qualitative and quantitative soil moisture values. During the test in April farmers assigned the same wetness class in 46 % of all cases, while students and experts agreed on about 60 % of all cases. Students who had been trained in how to apply the method gained higher inter-rater reliability than their colleagues with only a basic introduction. When repeating the test in June, participants were given improved instructions, organized in small subgroups, which resulted in a higher inter-rater reliability among farmers. In 66 % of all classifications, farmers assigned the same wetness class and the spread of class assignments was smaller. This study demonstrates that a wetness classification scheme based on qualitative indicators is a robust tool and can be applied successfully regardless of experience in crop growing and education level when an in-depth introduction and training is provided. The use of a simple and clear layout of the assessment form is important for reliable wetness class assignments.