WorldWideScience

Sample records for afm

  1. AFM image artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gołek, F., E-mail: golek@ifd.uni.wroc.pl; Mazur, P.; Ryszka, Z.; Zuber, S.

    2014-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important tool in surface science and nanotechnology. It is obvious that the intrinsic limitations of AFM must be understood in order to get useful information about surface structure of the material under study. The ability to recognize artifacts should assist in reliable evaluation of instrument operation and in reporting of data. In this paper, we discuss the most frequently encountered image artifacts in atomic force microscopy. A variety of artifacts are illustrated by the results obtained with the aid of contact AFM (C-AFM), which can help avoid misinterpretations. It is shown that, despite inaccuracies in AFM image generation, in many cases valuable information can be obtained.

  2. Characterization of semiconducting nanorods by AFM and conducting AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One-dimensional nanostructures, such as nanorods or nanotubes, exhibit technological potential for many device applications like efficient low-cost ZnO nanorod-polymer solar cells. However, achieving control over the growth of such nanostructures leading to proper dimensional confinement (nanorods diameter, length, density and orientation) is still a challenging task. On the other hand, the AFM and Conducting AFM (C-AFM) are well known as valuable tools for nanometer scale characterization of different types of nanostructures such as high-k oxides. Here, we focus on the capabilities of AFM and C-AFM techniques for vertical arrays of semiconducting nanorods. We examined in detail the topography of the ZnO nanorods grown on Si and ITO substrates. It was shown that tapping mode AFM is an appropriate tool to reveal the morphological features of vertical ZnO nanorods on the nanoscale. In particular, side ZnO facets were found and analyzed. Furthermore, the applicability of C-AFM, in particular of two-dimensional current mapping, for the characterization of semiconducting nanorods, such as ZnO or Si, will be discussed. (author)

  3. High accuracy FIONA-AFM hybrid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-protein complexes are ubiquitous and play essential roles in many biological mechanisms. Single molecule imaging techniques such as electron microscopy (EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are powerful methods for characterizing the structural properties of multi-protein and multi-protein-DNA complexes. However, a significant limitation to these techniques is the ability to distinguish different proteins from one another. Here, we combine high resolution fluorescence microscopy and AFM (FIONA-AFM) to allow the identification of different proteins in such complexes. Using quantum dots as fiducial markers in addition to fluorescently labeled proteins, we are able to align fluorescence and AFM information to ≥8 nm accuracy. This accuracy is sufficient to identify individual fluorescently labeled proteins in most multi-protein complexes. We investigate the limitations of localization precision and accuracy in fluorescence and AFM images separately and their effects on the overall registration accuracy of FIONA-AFM hybrid images. This combination of the two orthogonal techniques (FIONA and AFM) opens a wide spectrum of possible applications to the study of protein interactions, because AFM can yield high resolution (5-10 nm) information about the conformational properties of multi-protein complexes and the fluorescence can indicate spatial relationships of the proteins in the complexes. -- Research highlights: → Integration of fluorescent signals in AFM topography with high (<10 nm) accuracy. → Investigation of limitations and quantitative analysis of fluorescence-AFM image registration using quantum dots. → Fluorescence center tracking and display as localization probability distributions in AFM topography (FIONA-AFM). → Application of FIONA-AFM to a biological sample containing damaged DNA and the DNA repair proteins UvrA and UvrB conjugated to quantum dots.

  4. Reconstruction Algorithms in Undersampled AFM Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen;

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a study of spatial undersampling in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging followed by different image reconstruction techniques based on sparse approximation as well as interpolation. The main reasons for using undersampling is that it reduces the path length and thereby the...... scanning time as well as the amount of interaction between the AFM probe and the specimen. It can easily be applied on conventional AFM hardware. Due to undersampling, it is then necessary to further process the acquired image in order to reconstruct an approximation of the image. Based on real AFM cell...

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFM562 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM562 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...562Z 759 - - - - Show AFM562 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM562 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM5-C/AFM...562Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...562 (AFM562Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-C/AFM562Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXCAATAATTGATCTTCAGGGTATTAAATCATATTCA

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFM168 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM168 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM...168F 592 - - - - - - Show AFM168 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM168 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM1-C/AFM...168Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...168 (AFM168Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-C/AFM168Q.Seq.d/ ATTAAACTTTTTGTCACATATATAATTAAATAAAATGTCAGAAAG

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFM842 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM842 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...842Z 358 - - - - Show AFM842 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM842 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM8-B/AFM...842Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...842 (AFM842Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-B/AFM842Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTGTTGGTGCTGGTCGTGTTGAACAACTCGATACTA

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFM880 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM880 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM...880F 569 - - - - - - Show AFM880 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM880 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM8-D/AFM...880Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...880 (AFM880Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-D/AFM880Q.Seq.d/ ACTTTTACTTAAATAATTTCCAAAATGTCAGAAACTACACCAGTT

  9. Dicty_cDB: AFM685 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM685 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...685Z 532 - - - - Show AFM685 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM685 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM6-D/AFM...685Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...685 (AFM685Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-D/AFM685Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXATCACCACAATCANCAATATCAACAACATCAACAA

  10. Dicty_cDB: AFM307 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM307 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...307Z 314 - - - - Show AFM307 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM307 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM3-A/AFM...307Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...307 (AFM307Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-A/AFM307Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXCGTCATGAAAGAAGATGCCATCGTTTGTAACATTG

  11. Dicty_cDB: AFM419 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM419 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...419Z 552 - - - - Show AFM419 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM419 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM4-A/AFM...419Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...419 (AFM419Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-A/AFM419Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXGTGAACAAAGAACTCACATCAGACATTACAGTTTA

  12. Dicty_cDB: AFM105 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM105 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...105Z 742 - - - - Show AFM105 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM105 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM1-A/AFM...105Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...105 (AFM105Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-A/AFM105Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXATCAATATAGTTTATAACTCAACCCAACGTTATGA

  13. Dicty_cDB: AFM447 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM447 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...447Z 647 - - - - Show AFM447 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM447 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM4-B/AFM...447Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...447 (AFM447Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-B/AFM447Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXATATGCTTAATAAACCAATTGAAAATATTGTTTTC

  14. Dicty_cDB: AFM246 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM246 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...246Z 559 - - - - Show AFM246 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM246 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM2-B/AFM...246Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...246 (AFM246Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-B/AFM246Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXAGATTAAACAATTCATTCTTGATGAATGTGATACC

  15. Dicty_cDB: AFM360 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM360 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM...360F 630 - - - - - - Show AFM360 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM360 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM3-C/AFM...360Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...360 (AFM360Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-C/AFM360Q.Seq.d/ ATCTATAGCTTTATATTAAAAAGATAATTTAAAAATGTTTAAAAG

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFM607 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM607 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...607Z 617 - - - - Show AFM607 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM607 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM6-A/AFM...607Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...607 (AFM607Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-A/AFM607Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXANNACAAGAAATAAANCAAGANCAATTGAGTCNAC

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFM692 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM692 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...692Z 739 - - - - Show AFM692 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM692 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM6-D/AFM...692Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...692 (AFM692Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-D/AFM692Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXATGGCAAAACAGTTGGGGTTTAACCACTCGTACCA

  18. Dicty_cDB: AFM818 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM818 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM...818F 156 - - - - - - Show AFM818 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM818 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM8-A/AFM...818Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...818 (AFM818Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-A/AFM818Q.Seq.d/ GGAAGTTAGAGCAGCAGTAGTAGTAGTAGCAGTAGTAGTAGTTAG

  19. Dicty_cDB: AFM665 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM665 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM...665F 165 - - - - - - Show AFM665 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM665 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM6-C/AFM...665Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...665 (AFM665Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-C/AFM665Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTCAATTTTTCTAATTTTTAATTTTTTTATATATATACATAA

  20. Dicty_cDB: AFM247 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM247 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...247Z 829 - - - - Show AFM247 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM247 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM2-B/AFM...247Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...247 (AFM247Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-B/AFM247Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTCCCTTTAGTCCTANATAANAGGTGGTACCAATTT

  1. Dicty_cDB: AFM190 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM190 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM...190F 158 - - - - - - Show AFM190 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM190 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM1-D/AFM...190Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...190 (AFM190Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-D/AFM190Q.Seq.d/ ATTCAAAAAAAAAAATATTAAATCATTGTAGTATTTTGTTCNTAT

  2. Dicty_cDB: AFM579 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM579 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM...579F 522 - - - - - - Show AFM579 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM579 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM5-D/AFM...579Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...579 (AFM579Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-D/AFM579Q.Seq.d/ ATTCATCACCCTACAATTTAATTACATACATATATATATATAAAC

  3. Dicty_cDB: AFM321 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM321 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM...321F 684 - - - - - - Show AFM321 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM321 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM3-A/AFM...321Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...321 (AFM321Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-A/AFM321Q.Seq.d/ AATTATAACAATTATTAAAAACAAAAAGATATTTTGTTTTTTCTT

  4. Dicty_cDB: AFM503 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM503 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...503Z 790 - - - - Show AFM503 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM503 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM5-A/AFM...503Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...503 (AFM503Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-A/AFM503Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXGGTAAGNCTNTTNCNTNGGAGGTGAAGGTAGGGGC

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFM361 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM361 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...361Z 702 - - - - Show AFM361 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM361 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM3-C/AFM...361Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...361 (AFM361Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-C/AFM361Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXAGTTATCAGATTCCTGTTTTGTTATCTCTTCAACT

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFM586 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM586 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...586Z 766 - - - - Show AFM586 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM586 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM5-D/AFM...586Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...586 (AFM586Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-D/AFM586Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXGTCGCTTCAGATCCATTATCAAATATCACCGAACC

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFM861 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM861 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...861Z 711 - - - - Show AFM861 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM861 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM8-C/AFM...861Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...861 (AFM861Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-C/AFM861Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTCGAAGATGTAAAGAAAATCGCTACCTCACAAAAA

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFM279 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM279 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...279Z 657 - - - - Show AFM279 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM279 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM2-D/AFM...279Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...279 (AFM279Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-D/AFM279Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTCCAAACTATGGAAGAATTAGTACTACCAACAAGA

  9. Dicty_cDB: AFM379 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM379 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...379Z 655 - - - - Show AFM379 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM379 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM3-D/AFM...379Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...379 (AFM379Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-D/AFM379Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXACGTGCCGTTGGTAATATTGTCACTGGTGAATCTA

  10. Dicty_cDB: AFM642 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM642 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...642Z 645 - - - - Show AFM642 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM642 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM6-B/AFM...642Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...642 (AFM642Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-B/AFM642Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXAATTATGTAAGAAATATAACTGTTTATTGATGGTT

  11. Dicty_cDB: AFM517 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM517 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...517Z 684 - - - - Show AFM517 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM517 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM5-A/AFM...517Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...517 (AFM517Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-A/AFM517Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXCTACCTCACAAAAAGGTAATGCCGTTTTCTGTTGG

  12. Dicty_cDB: AFM359 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM359 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...359Z 711 - - - - Show AFM359 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM359 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM3-C/AFM...359Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...359 (AFM359Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-C/AFM359Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXGATCCAGACGTTGAAAGAGATTTACTTGATATTTT

  13. Dicty_cDB: AFM446 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM446 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...446Z 724 - - - - Show AFM446 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM446 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM4-B/AFM...446Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...446 (AFM446Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-B/AFM446Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXCCATTAGATGCAAGAGGTGAAGTTGATGAATGTGC

  14. Dicty_cDB: AFM504 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM504 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...504Z 623 - - - - Show AFM504 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM504 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM5-A/AFM...504Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...504 (AFM504Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-A/AFM504Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTGANCAAAATTTAGTTGATTGCTCTGGTCCAGAAG

  15. Dicty_cDB: AFM826 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM826 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM...826Z 165 - - - - Show AFM826 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM826 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM8-B/AFM...826Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM...826 (AFM826Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-B/AFM826Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTAAATCAATTCCAGATTTATTGGAATTGGATCATC

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFM474 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM474 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM474P (Link to Original site) AFM474F 537 AFM...474Z 755 AFM474P 1272 - - Show AFM474 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM474 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...4-D/AFM474Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM474P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM474 (AFM474Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-D/AFM474Q.Seq.d/ CAACATGTTCAAAATT

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFM220 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM220 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM220P (Link to Original site) AFM220F 634 AFM...220Z 697 AFM220P 1311 - - Show AFM220 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM220 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...2-A/AFM220Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM220P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM220 (AFM220Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-A/AFM220Q.Seq.d/ ATTATTTTTTATTTTA

  18. Dicty_cDB: AFM802 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM802 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM802P (Link to Original site) AFM802F 128 AFM...802Z 117 AFM802P 225 - - Show AFM802 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM802 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-A/AFM802Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM802P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM802 (AFM802Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-A/AFM802Q.Seq.d/ ATAAATATAAATAATAA

  19. Dicty_cDB: AFM325 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM325 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM325P (Link to Original site) AFM325F 457 AFM...325Z 563 AFM325P 1000 - - Show AFM325 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM325 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...3-B/AFM325Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM325P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM325 (AFM325Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-B/AFM325Q.Seq.d/ CAAAAAGTTTTTTCAC

  20. Dicty_cDB: AFM694 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM694 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM694P (Link to Original site) AFM694F 596 AFM...694Z 387 AFM694P 963 - - Show AFM694 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM694 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-D/AFM694Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM694P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM694 (AFM694Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-D/AFM694Q.Seq.d/ AATTTATTTATTTATTC

  1. Dicty_cDB: AFM191 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM191 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM191P (Link to Original site) AFM191F 623 AFM...191Z 747 AFM191P 1350 - - Show AFM191 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM191 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-D/AFM191Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM191P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM191 (AFM191Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-D/AFM191Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTCTATTTTCTTT

  2. Dicty_cDB: AFM221 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM221 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM221P (Link to Original site) AFM221F 624 AFM...221Z 732 AFM221P 1336 - - Show AFM221 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM221 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...2-A/AFM221Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM221P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM221 (AFM221Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-A/AFM221Q.Seq.d/ ACACAACAATTTATAA

  3. Dicty_cDB: AFM744 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM744 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM744P (Link to Original site) AFM744F 591 AFM...744Z 685 AFM744P 1256 - - Show AFM744 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM744 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-B/AFM744Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM744P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM744 (AFM744Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-B/AFM744Q.Seq.d/ ATATATATAAAAAATG

  4. Dicty_cDB: AFM772 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM772 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM772P (Link to Original site) AFM772F 609 AFM...772Z 754 AFM772P 1343 - - Show AFM772 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM772 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-C/AFM772Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM772P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM772 (AFM772Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-C/AFM772Q.Seq.d/ ATTTAATAATACACAT

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFM628 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM628 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM628P (Link to Original site) AFM628F 615 AFM...628Z 714 AFM628P 1309 - - Show AFM628 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM628 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-B/AFM628Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM628P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM628 (AFM628Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-B/AFM628Q.Seq.d/ ACCCAAGTGAATTCAT

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFM173 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM173 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM173P (Link to Original site) AFM173F 595 AFM...173Z 662 AFM173P 1237 - - Show AFM173 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM173 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-D/AFM173Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM173P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM173 (AFM173Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-D/AFM173Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTCCAATTGATAA

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFM715 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM715 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM715P (Link to Original site) AFM715F 169 AFM...715Z 265 AFM715P 414 - - Show AFM715 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM715 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-A/AFM715Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM715P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM715 (AFM715Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-A/AFM715Q.Seq.d/ AATTTATTTTTTTTCAT

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFM606 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM606 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM606P (Link to Original site) AFM606F 607 AFM...606Z 742 AFM606P 1329 - - Show AFM606 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM606 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-A/AFM606Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM606P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM606 (AFM606Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-A/AFM606Q.Seq.d/ AAGTTTAGAATTAGAA

  9. Dicty_cDB: AFM471 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM471 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM471P (Link to Original site) AFM471F 537 AFM...471Z 694 AFM471P 1211 - - Show AFM471 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM471 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...4-C/AFM471Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM471P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM471 (AFM471Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-C/AFM471Q.Seq.d/ ATATAAAAAATGGCAT

  10. Dicty_cDB: AFM174 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM174 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM174P (Link to Original site) AFM174F 544 AFM...174Z 566 AFM174P 1090 - - Show AFM174 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM174 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-D/AFM174Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM174P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM174 (AFM174Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-D/AFM174Q.Seq.d/ ATTCAATTTTGTAATT

  11. Dicty_cDB: AFM240 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM240 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM240P (Link to Original site) AFM240F 638 AFM...240Z 291 AFM240P 909 - - Show AFM240 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM240 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...2-B/AFM240Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM240P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM240 (AFM240Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-B/AFM240Q.Seq.d/ TATTAAAAAAATGTACT

  12. Dicty_cDB: AFM106 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM106 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM106P (Link to Original site) AFM106F 527 AFM...106Z 527 AFM106P 1034 - - Show AFM106 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM106 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-A/AFM106Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM106P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM106 (AFM106Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-A/AFM106Q.Seq.d/ AATTTTTTTTCTTTTC

  13. Dicty_cDB: AFM862 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM862 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM862P (Link to Original site) AFM862F 837 AFM...862Z 612 AFM862P 1429 - - Show AFM862 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM862 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-C/AFM862Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM862P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM862 (AFM862Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-C/AFM862Q.Seq.d/ AAGGTAGTGACAACAT

  14. Dicty_cDB: AFM536 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM536 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM536P (Link to Original site) AFM536F 144 AFM...536Z 443 AFM536P 567 - - Show AFM536 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM536 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...5-B/AFM536Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM536P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM536 (AFM536Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-B/AFM536Q.Seq.d/ ATTTATTTATCTGTTTA

  15. Dicty_cDB: AFM659 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM659 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM659P (Link to Original site) AFM659F 686 AFM...659Z 742 AFM659P 1408 - - Show AFM659 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM659 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-C/AFM659Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM659P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM659 (AFM659Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-C/AFM659Q.Seq.d/ GTTAAAAAGGAAGTGA

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFM362 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM362 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM362P (Link to Original site) AFM362F 524 AFM...362Z 752 AFM362P 1256 - - Show AFM362 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM362 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...3-C/AFM362Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM362P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM362 (AFM362Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-C/AFM362Q.Seq.d/ TGGAATATTTTTTTTT

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFM283 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM283 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM283P (Link to Original site) AFM283F 572 AFM...283Z 658 AFM283P 1210 - - Show AFM283 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM283 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...2-D/AFM283Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM283P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM283 (AFM283Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-D/AFM283Q.Seq.d/ TTGCAATTGTTTCCCA

  18. Dicty_cDB: AFM817 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM817 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM817P (Link to Original site) AFM817F 138 AFM...817Z 521 AFM817P 639 - - Show AFM817 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM817 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-A/AFM817Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM817P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM817 (AFM817Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-A/AFM817Q.Seq.d/ AATTATTTAGACCACAC

  19. Dicty_cDB: AFM691 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM691 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM691P (Link to Original site) AFM691F 606 AFM...691Z 709 AFM691P 1295 - - Show AFM691 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM691 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-D/AFM691Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM691P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM691 (AFM691Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-D/AFM691Q.Seq.d/ AATAATAATAATAATA

  20. Dicty_cDB: AFM166 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM166 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM166P (Link to Original site) AFM166F 580 AFM...166Z 741 AFM166P 1301 - - Show AFM166 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM166 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-C/AFM166Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM166P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM166 (AFM166Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-C/AFM166Q.Seq.d/ ATCACACATAAAAAAT

  1. Dicty_cDB: AFM747 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM747 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM747P (Link to Original site) AFM747F 585 AFM...747Z 743 AFM747P 1308 - - Show AFM747 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM747 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-B/AFM747Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM747P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM747 (AFM747Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-B/AFM747Q.Seq.d/ ATTTAGGTCCTATATT

  2. Dicty_cDB: AFM856 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM856 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM856P (Link to Original site) AFM856F 505 AFM...856Z 554 AFM856P 1039 - - Show AFM856 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM856 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-C/AFM856Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM856P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM856 (AFM856Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-C/AFM856Q.Seq.d/ ATTCAATTTTGTAATT

  3. Dicty_cDB: AFM712 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM712 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM712P (Link to Original site) AFM712F 557 AFM...712Z 696 AFM712P 1233 - - Show AFM712 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM712 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-A/AFM712Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM712P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM712 (AFM712Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-A/AFM712Q.Seq.d/ ATATCAGCAGCTAAAA

  4. Dicty_cDB: AFM103 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM103 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM103P (Link to Original site) AFM103F 125 AFM...103Z 666 AFM103P 771 - - Show AFM103 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM103 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-A/AFM103Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM103P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM103 (AFM103Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-A/AFM103Q.Seq.d/ AATATTTTAGTTTTAGG

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFM683 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM683 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM683P (Link to Original site) AFM683F 606 AFM...683Z 706 AFM683P 1292 - - Show AFM683 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM683 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-D/AFM683Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM683P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM683 (AFM683Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-D/AFM683Q.Seq.d/ ATTCAATTTTGTAATT

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFM666 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM666 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM666P (Link to Original site) AFM666F 624 AFM...666Z 657 AFM666P 1261 - - Show AFM666 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM666 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-C/AFM666Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM666P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM666 (AFM666Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-C/AFM666Q.Seq.d/ ATAAAATATTTTAATA

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFM610 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM610 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM610P (Link to Original site) AFM610F 134 AFM...610Z 234 AFM610P 348 - - Show AFM610 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM610 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-A/AFM610Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM610P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM610 (AFM610Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-A/AFM610Q.Seq.d/ ATTGTAGTATTTTGTTC

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFM843 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM843 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM843P (Link to Original site) AFM843F 553 AFM...843Z 735 AFM843P 1268 - - Show AFM843 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM843 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-B/AFM843Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM843P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM843 (AFM843Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-B/AFM843Q.Seq.d/ ATTAAACAACTCAAAA

  9. Dicty_cDB: AFM746 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM746 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM746P (Link to Original site) AFM746F 621 AFM...746Z 733 AFM746P 1334 - - Show AFM746 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM746 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-B/AFM746Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM746P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM746 (AFM746Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-B/AFM746Q.Seq.d/ ATTTACAGTTACTGAA

  10. Dicty_cDB: AFM825 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM825 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM825P (Link to Original site) AFM825F 551 AFM...825Z 684 AFM825P 1215 - - Show AFM825 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM825 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-B/AFM825Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM825P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM825 (AFM825Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-B/AFM825Q.Seq.d/ AACTAAATTAAATAAA

  11. Dicty_cDB: AFM520 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM520 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM520P (Link to Original site) AFM520F 612 AFM...520Z 731 AFM520P 1323 - - Show AFM520 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM520 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...5-A/AFM520Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM520P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM520 (AFM520Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-A/AFM520Q.Seq.d/ ATTCATTCAATTTTGT

  12. Dicty_cDB: AFM627 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM627 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM627P (Link to Original site) AFM627F 484 AFM...627Z 523 AFM627P 987 - - Show AFM627 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM627 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-B/AFM627Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM627P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM627 (AFM627Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-B/AFM627Q.Seq.d/ TNTGGNCAAGGTTGTAG

  13. Dicty_cDB: AFM133 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM133 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM133P (Link to Original site) AFM133F 638 AFM...133Z 647 AFM133P 1265 - - Show AFM133 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM133 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-B/AFM133Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM133P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM133 (AFM133Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-B/AFM133Q.Seq.d/ AAAACATCTCTATTTT

  14. Dicty_cDB: AFM426 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM426 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM426P (Link to Original site) AFM426F 579 AFM...426Z 658 AFM426P 1217 - - Show AFM426 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM426 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...4-B/AFM426Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM426P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM426 (AFM426Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-B/AFM426Q.Seq.d/ GAAAAATAAATTTATT

  15. Dicty_cDB: AFM537 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM537 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM537P (Link to Original site) AFM537F 220 AFM...537Z 668 AFM537P 868 - - Show AFM537 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM537 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...5-B/AFM537Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM537P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM537 (AFM537Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-B/AFM537Q.Seq.d/ ATTAAATTCCATCATTG

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFM134 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM134 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM134P (Link to Original site) AFM134F 542 AFM...134Z 759 AFM134P 1281 - - Show AFM134 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM134 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-B/AFM134Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM134P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM134 (AFM134Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-B/AFM134Q.Seq.d/ AATTTTATTTTTAATC

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFM881 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM881 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM881P (Link to Original site) AFM881F 604 AFM...881Z 557 AFM881P 1141 - - Show AFM881 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM881 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-D/AFM881Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM881P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM881 (AFM881Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-D/AFM881Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTCTCCATCATCA

  18. Dicty_cDB: AFM713 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM713 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM713P (Link to Original site) AFM713F 511 AFM...713Z 676 AFM713P 1167 - - Show AFM713 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM713 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-A/AFM713Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM713P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM713 (AFM713Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-A/AFM713Q.Seq.d/ TCAATATTGCGAGACG

  19. Dicty_cDB: AFM453 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM453 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM453P (Link to Original site) AFM453F 422 AFM...453Z 720 AFM453P 1122 - - Show AFM453 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM453 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...4-C/AFM453Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM453P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM453 (AFM453Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-C/AFM453Q.Seq.d/ AAATTAAAAAAATAAA

  20. Dicty_cDB: AFM148 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM148 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM148P (Link to Original site) AFM148F 586 AFM...148Z 765 AFM148P 1331 - - Show AFM148 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM148 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-B/AFM148Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM148P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM148 (AFM148Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-B/AFM148Q.Seq.d/ AAATTAATTTTGTGTG

  1. Dicty_cDB: AFM472 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM472 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM472P (Link to Original site) AFM472F 693 AFM...472Z 695 AFM472P 1368 - - Show AFM472 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM472 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...4-C/AFM472Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM472P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM472 (AFM472Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-C/AFM472Q.Seq.d/ ATTTCAAGTTTAACTA

  2. Dicty_cDB: AFM686 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM686 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM686P (Link to Original site) AFM686F 655 AFM...686Z 688 AFM686P 1323 - - Show AFM686 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM686 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-D/AFM686Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM686P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM686 (AFM686Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-D/AFM686Q.Seq.d/ ACACCTTATTTATTAT

  3. Dicty_cDB: AFM815 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM815 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM815P (Link to Original site) AFM815F 649 AFM...815Z 685 AFM815P 1314 - - Show AFM815 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM815 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-A/AFM815Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM815P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM815 (AFM815Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-A/AFM815Q.Seq.d/ AAACACACTAACACAT

  4. Dicty_cDB: AFM425 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM425 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM425P (Link to Original site) AFM425F 539 AFM...425Z 724 AFM425P 1243 - - Show AFM425 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM425 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...4-B/AFM425Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM425P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM425 (AFM425Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-B/AFM425Q.Seq.d/ AAAAAAATAATGATCA

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFM388 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM388 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM388P (Link to Original site) AFM388F 137 AFM...388Z 260 AFM388P 377 - - Show AFM388 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM388 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...3-D/AFM388Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM388P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM388 (AFM388Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-D/AFM388Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTTTTTTTCCTAAC

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFM855 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM855 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM855P (Link to Original site) AFM855F 541 AFM...855Z 649 AFM855P 1170 - - Show AFM855 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM855 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...8-C/AFM855Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM855P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM855 (AFM855Q) /CSM/AF/AFM8-C/AFM855Q.Seq.d/ ANATTAAAAGTTAACT

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFM609 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM609 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM609P (Link to Original site) AFM609F 641 AFM...609Z 705 AFM609P 1326 - - Show AFM609 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM609 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-A/AFM609Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM609P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM609 (AFM609Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-A/AFM609Q.Seq.d/ CAGATGTAATACCAAC

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFM558 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM558 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM558P (Link to Original site) AFM558F 578 AFM...558Z 737 AFM558P 1295 - - Show AFM558 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM558 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...5-C/AFM558Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM558P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM558 (AFM558Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-C/AFM558Q.Seq.d/ GCATATACATATACAT

  9. Dicty_cDB: AFM252 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM252 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM252P (Link to Original site) AFM252F 544 AFM...252Z 683 AFM252P 1207 - - Show AFM252 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM252 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...2-C/AFM252Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM252P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM252 (AFM252Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-C/AFM252Q.Seq.d/ AAAAAAATGCAAGATA

  10. Dicty_cDB: AFM118 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM118 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM118P (Link to Original site) AFM118F 573 AFM...118Z 730 AFM118P 1283 - - Show AFM118 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM118 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-A/AFM118Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM118P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM118 (AFM118Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-A/AFM118Q.Seq.d/ AACCAAATCAAGAAAA

  11. Dicty_cDB: AFM452 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM452 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM452P (Link to Original site) AFM452F 126 AFM...452Z 412 AFM452P 518 - - Show AFM452 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM452 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...4-C/AFM452Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM452P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM452 (AFM452Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-C/AFM452Q.Seq.d/ AATAAACAATCAAATAA

  12. Dicty_cDB: AFM302 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM302 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM302P (Link to Original site) AFM302F 518 AFM...302Z 768 AFM302P 1266 - - Show AFM302 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM302 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...3-A/AFM302Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM302P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM302 (AFM302Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-A/AFM302Q.Seq.d/ AATTGATAAAATTAAA

  13. Dicty_cDB: AFM794 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM794 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM794P (Link to Original site) AFM794F 623 AFM...794Z 698 AFM794P 1301 - - Show AFM794 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM794 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-D/AFM794Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM794P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM794 (AFM794Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-D/AFM794Q.Seq.d/ TAATAATAATTATTAT

  14. Dicty_cDB: AFM380 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM380 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM380P (Link to Original site) AFM380F 573 AFM...380Z 180 AFM380P 733 - - Show AFM380 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM380 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...3-D/AFM380Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM380P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM380 (AFM380Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-D/AFM380Q.Seq.d/ AAAATTATTTCCCACCC

  15. Dicty_cDB: AFM386 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM386 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM386P (Link to Original site) AFM386F 618 AFM...386Z 757 AFM386P 1355 - - Show AFM386 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM386 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...3-D/AFM386Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM386P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM386 (AFM386Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-D/AFM386Q.Seq.d/ AGAACTGTTACAGCAG

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFM585 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM585 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM585P (Link to Original site) AFM585F 600 AFM...585Z 768 AFM585P 1348 - - Show AFM585 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM585 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...5-D/AFM585Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM585P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM585 (AFM585Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-D/AFM585Q.Seq.d/ AATTTTGTAATTATAA

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFM578 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM578 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM578P (Link to Original site) AFM578F 727 AFM...578Z 447 AFM578P 1154 - - Show AFM578 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM578 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...5-D/AFM578Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM578P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM578 (AFM578Q) /CSM/AF/AFM5-D/AFM578Q.Seq.d/ ATCGCCTCACTTTTTA

  18. Dicty_cDB: AFM377 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM377 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM377P (Link to Original site) AFM377F 559 AFM...377Z 215 AFM377P 754 - - Show AFM377 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM377 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...3-D/AFM377Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM377P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM377 (AFM377Q) /CSM/AF/AFM3-D/AFM377Q.Seq.d/ ATATAAAAAATGGCATC

  19. Dicty_cDB: AFM409 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM409 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM409P (Link to Original site) AFM409F 553 AFM...409Z 724 AFM409P 1257 - - Show AFM409 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM409 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...4-A/AFM409Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM409P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM409 (AFM409Q) /CSM/AF/AFM4-A/AFM409Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTGTATTATATAT

  20. Dicty_cDB: AFM241 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM241 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM241P (Link to Original site) AFM241F 620 AFM...241Z 717 AFM241P 1317 - - Show AFM241 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM241 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...2-B/AFM241Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM241P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM241 (AFM241Q) /CSM/AF/AFM2-B/AFM241Q.Seq.d/ ATTGTCATAATAATAT

  1. Dicty_cDB: AFM194 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM194 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM194P (Link to Original site) AFM194F 623 AFM...194Z 703 AFM194P 1306 - - Show AFM194 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM194 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...1-D/AFM194Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM194P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM194 (AFM194Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-D/AFM194Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTATAATCACTGT

  2. Dicty_cDB: AFM771 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM771 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM771P (Link to Original site) AFM771F 695 AFM...771Z 862 AFM771P 1537 - - Show AFM771 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM771 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...7-C/AFM771Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM771P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM771 (AFM771Q) /CSM/AF/AFM7-C/AFM771Q.Seq.d/ GAGGGCAACGGGATAT

  3. Dicty_cDB: AFM643 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM643 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM643P (Link to Original site) AFM643F 581 AFM...643Z 599 AFM643P 1160 - - Show AFM643 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFM643 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM...6-B/AFM643Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM643P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFM643 (AFM643Q) /CSM/AF/AFM6-B/AFM643Q.Seq.d/ ATAGTAATTATTTTTT

  4. Single ricin detection by AFM chemomechanical mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research reports a method of detecting ricin molecules immobilized on chemically modified gold (Au;111) surface by chemomechanically mapping the molecular interactions with a chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. AFM images resolved the different fold-up conformations of single...

  5. Surface analysis with STM and AFM

    CERN Document Server

    Magonov, Sergi N

    1996-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are powerful tools for surface examination. In the past, many STM and AFM studies led to erroneous conclusions due to lack of proper theoretical considerations and of an understanding of how image patterns are affected by measurement conditions. For this book, two world experts, one on theoretical analysis and the other on experimental characterization, have joined forces to bring together essential components of STM and AFM studies: The practical aspects of STM, the image simulation by surface electron density plot calculat

  6. An AFM Observation on Fossil Cytoplasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin; YU Junping; FANG Xiaohong

    2008-01-01

    Fossil cytoplasm is a new research topic of interest in paleobotany. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a new technology applied widely in physics and biology; however, it is rarely used in paleontology. Here we applied AFM for the first time to study fossil cytoplasm. The results indicate that the fossil cytoplasm is heterogeneous and full of ultrastructures, just like extant cytoplasm, and that the application of AFM, especially in combination with other techniques, can reveal the subcellular details of fossil plants with more confidence.

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFM236 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM236 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM236P (Link to Original site) AFM236F ... FVLFEQKDYETLSVPWKFQKKLKEIQGSGVVDNPGSTPNPSPNPSPNPVPGNTS NAPT STGRESLETQRDIIQMKSKIDLLSNSLLQLVEQMKVTKPPTNNFSN ... FVLFEQKDYETLSVPWKFQKKLKEIQGSGVVDNPGSTPNPSPNPSPNPVPGNTS NAPT STGRESLETQRDIIQMKSKIDLLSNSLLQLVEQMKVTKPPTNNFSN ...

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFM455 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM455 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM455P (Link to Original site) AFM455F ... FVLFEQKDYETLSVPWKFQKKLKEIQGSGVVDNPGSTPNPSPNPSPNPVPGNTS NAPTST GRESLETQRDIIQMKSKIDLLSNSLLQLVEQMKVTKPPTNNFSN ... FVLFEQKDYETLSVPWKFQKKLKEIQGSGVVDNPGSTPNPSPNPSPNPVPGNTS NAPTST GRESLETQRDIIQMKSKIDLLSNSLLQLVEQMKVTKPPTNNFSN ...

  9. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  10. Dicty_cDB: AFM130 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value (Q4QQW4) RecName: Full=Histone deacetylase...ton... 278 3e-73 ( Q13547 ) RecName: Full=Histone deacetylase 1; Short=HD1... 278 3e-73 AY893466...00 100.0 %: >> prediction for AFM130 is 5' end seq. ID AFM130F 5' end seq. >AFM130F.Seq ATTTATTTTGTAAATATACA...sukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFM1-B/AFM130Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFM130P (Link to Original site) Represe...ntative DNA sequence >AFM130 (AFM130Q) /CSM/AF/AFM1-B/AFM130Q.Seq.d/ ATTTATTTTGTAAATA

  11. Synthesis and AFM visualization of DNA nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel bottom-up approach for the fabrication of various desired nanostructures, based on self-assembly of oligonucleotides governed by Watson-Crick base pairing. Using this approach, we designed Y-shaped, closed Y-shaped, H-shaped, and hexagonal structures with oligonucleotides. These structures were autonomously fabricated simply by mixing equimolar solutions of oligonucleotides and performing hybridization. After synthesis of the nanostructures, we confirmed their validity by agarose gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscope (AFM) visualization. We detected bands of the desired molecular sizes in the gel electrophoresis and observed the desired structures by AFM analysis. We concluded that the synthesized structures were consistent with our intended design and that AFM visualization is a very useful tool for the observation of nanostructures

  12. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  13. AFM-CMM integrated instrument user manual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, Francesco; Bariani, Paolo

    This manual gives general important guidelines for a proper use of the integrated AFM-CMM instrument. More information can be collected reading: • N. Kofod Ph.D thesis [1]; • P. Bariani Ph.D thesis [2]; • Dualscope DME 95-200 operation manuals [3]; • SPIP help [4] • Stitching software user manual...

  14. Dicty_cDB: AFM126 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM126 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM126F 585 - ... cfnsksckinsk*nhwysrvnhnvksyncq*trsylft rii*ilfr**f*csr *kq*w*klsiryysynefr**iklfl**srifpn*wkriwm*inn svtim ...

  15. Advanced nanoscale metrology of pole-tip recession with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopes (AFM) have been widely used for precision metrology. However, most conventional AFM revealed their limits in accuracy due to the inferior characteristics of piezoelectric tube scanner. In order to overcome these limits, we introduced the new XE AFM, which has a z-scanner separated from the x-y scanner. With the new XE AFM, we were able to successfully measure dimensions of pole-tip recession (PTR) in magneto-resistance (MR) head, which had been difficult to be measured by conventional AFM. In addition, we found that it is important to use non-contact AFM, not tapping mode AFM for accurate measurement of PTR since the tapping force can depress the pole-tip region and make the PTR value appear larger than it actually is. In order to confirm this phenomenon, we performed force modulation microscopy and contact mode AFM at various force set points

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFM493 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM493 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM493P (Link to Original site) AFM493F ... CP000901_2522( CP000901 |pid:none) Yersinia pestis Angola , complet... 266 9e-70 AM286415_1135( AM286415 |pid ...

  17. Structural insight into iodide uptake by AFm phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimoz, Laure; Wieland, Erich; Taviot-Guého, Christine; Dähn, Rainer; Vespa, Marika; Churakov, Sergey V

    2012-04-01

    The ability of cement phases carrying positively charged surfaces to retard the mobility of (129)I, present as iodide (I(-)) in groundwater, was investigated in the context of safe disposal of radioactive waste. (125)I sorption experiments on ettringite, hydrotalcite, chloride-, carbonate- and sulfate-containing AFm phases indicated that calcium-monosulfate (AFm-SO(4)) is the only phase that takes up trace levels of iodide. The structures of AFm phases prepared by coprecipitating iodide with other anions were investigated in order to understand this preferential uptake mechanism. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations showed a segregation of monoiodide (AFm-I(2)) and Friedel's salt (AFm-Cl(2)) for I-Cl mixtures, whereas interstratifications of AFm-I(2) and hemicarboaluminate (AFm-OH-(CO(3))(0.5)) were observed for the I-CO(3) systems. In contrast, XRD measurements indicated the formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4) for the I-SO(4) mixtures. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed a modification of the coordination environment of iodine in I-CO(3) and in I-SO(4) samples compared to pure AFm-I(2). This is assumed to be due to the introduction of stacking faults in I-CO(3) samples on one hand and due to the presence of sulfate and associated space-filling water molecules as close neighbors in I-SO(4) samples on the other hand. The formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4), with a short-range mixing of iodide and sulfate, implies that AFm-SO(4) bears the potential to retard (129)I. PMID:22376086

  18. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  19. AFM 4.0: a toolbox for DNA microarray analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Jorgensen, Paul; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Tyers, Mike

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a series of programs, collectively packaged as Array File Maker 4.0 (AFM), that manipulate and manage DNA microarray data. AFM 4.0 is simple to use, applicable to any organism or microarray, and operates within the familiar confines of Microsoft Excel. Given a database of expression ratios, AFM 4.0 generates input files for clustering, helps prepare colored figures and Venn diagrams, and can uncover aneuploidy in yeast microarray data. AFM 4.0 should be especially useful to ...

  20. Mapping of enzyme activity by detection of enzymatic products during AFM imaging with integrated SECM-AFM probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranz, C.; Kueng, A; Lugstein, A.; Bertagnolli, E.; Mizaikoff, B

    2004-08-15

    With the integration of submicro- and nanoelectrodes into atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes using microfabrication techniques, an elegant approach combining scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) with AFM has recently been introduced. Simultaneous contact mode imaging of a micropatterned sample with immobilized enzyme spots and imaging of enzyme activity is shown. In contrast to force spectroscopy the conversion of an enzymatic byproduct is directly detected during AFM imaging and correlated to the activity of the enzyme.

  1. Spin-3/2 Ising model AFM/AFM two-layer lattice with crystal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erhan Albayrak; Ali Yigit

    2009-01-01

    The spin-3/2 Ising model is investigated for the case of antiferromagnetic (AFM/AFM) interactions on the two-layer Bethe lattice by using the exact recursion relations in the pairwise approach for given coordination numbers q = 3, 4 and 6 when the layers are under the influences of equal external magnetic and equal crystal fields. The ground state, (GS) phase diagrams are obtained on the different planes in detail and then the temperature-dependent phase diagrams of the system are calculated accordingly. It is observed that the system presents both second- and first-order phase transitions for all q, therefore, tricritical points. It is also found that the system exhibits double-critical end points and isolated points. The model aiso presents two Néel temperatures, T_N, and the existence of which leads to the reentrant behaviour.

  2. Dicty_cDB: AFM219 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM219 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM219F 627 - ... v*vvvm lqeivmmvihvqlisvqsqpavfdl--- Frame B: fr**f*csr *kq*w*klsiryysynefr**iklfl**srifpn*wkri*crstip*ll** ... sktis*lsllcqnyq*sfhiqrf*ni*irr***clgih**kvgcrfgwftycsr e ny*sy*twscc**tlcn*flll*ktyfkinnsy*nnn*tsmsmv*flwc ...

  3. Dicty_cDB: AFM652 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM652 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM652F 598 - ... misvvyvlvmv*vvvml qeivmmvihvqlisv--- Frame C: r**f*csr *kq*w*klsiryysynefr**iklfl**srifpn*wkri*crstip*ll** ... sktis*lsllcqnyq*sfhiqrf*ni*irr***cldih**kvgcrfgwftycsr en y*sy*twscc**tlcn*flll*ktyfkinnsy*nnn*tsmsmv*flwc ...

  4. Dicty_cDB: AFM734 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM734 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM734Z 65 ... 152123_6( AC152123 |pid:none) Genomic sequence for broccoli ... [Bra... 123 4e-27 CR954204_278( CR954204 |pid:none ...

  5. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Van Veldhoven, E.; Maas, D.; Sadeghian, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope(AFM) probes by He+beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the fina

  6. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Veldhoven, E. van; Maas, D.J.; Sadeghian Marnani, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope (AFM) probes by He+ beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+ beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the f

  7. Fabrication and analysis of cylindrical resin AFM microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheneler, D., E-mail: D.Cheneler@bham.ac.uk [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bowen, J. [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Leigh, S.J.; Purssell, C.P.; Billson, D.R.; Hutchins, D.A. [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Ward, M.C.L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    In this paper a new method of fabricating cylindrical resin microcantilevers using the Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) technique of Micro-stereolithography (MSL) is described. The method is rapid and commercially viable, allowing the fabrication of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers which exhibit much larger spring constants than those currently commercial available. This allows for experimentation in a force regime orders of magnitude higher than currently possible using the AFM. This makes these cantilevers ideally suited for AFM-based depth sensing indentation. Due to their geometry, the assumptions used in the standard Euler-Bernoulli beam theory usually used to analyse AFM cantilevers may no longer be valid. Therefore approximate analytical solutions based on Timoshenko beam theory have been derived for the stiffness and resonant frequency of these cantilevers. Prototypes of the cantilevers have been fabricated and tested. Results show good agreement between experiment and theory. -- Highlights: {yields} Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) has been used to make commercially viable AFM cantilevers. {yields} Analytical expressions for resonant frequency of Timoshenko beams has been derived. {yields} Dynamics of cylindrical AFM cantilevers has been discussed. {yields} Expressions for dynamic properties of conical AFM cantilevers has been derived. {yields} Effect of metallisation of cylindrical AFM cantilevers has been discussed.

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFM144 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM144 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) AFM144F 623 - ... 348 5e-95 DQ507282_1( DQ507282 |pid:none) Belgica antarctica ... clone Ba-U06 va... 348 9e-95 BC115214_1( BC115214 ...

  9. Fabrication and analysis of cylindrical resin AFM microcantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a new method of fabricating cylindrical resin microcantilevers using the Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) technique of Micro-stereolithography (MSL) is described. The method is rapid and commercially viable, allowing the fabrication of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers which exhibit much larger spring constants than those currently commercial available. This allows for experimentation in a force regime orders of magnitude higher than currently possible using the AFM. This makes these cantilevers ideally suited for AFM-based depth sensing indentation. Due to their geometry, the assumptions used in the standard Euler-Bernoulli beam theory usually used to analyse AFM cantilevers may no longer be valid. Therefore approximate analytical solutions based on Timoshenko beam theory have been derived for the stiffness and resonant frequency of these cantilevers. Prototypes of the cantilevers have been fabricated and tested. Results show good agreement between experiment and theory. -- Highlights: → Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) has been used to make commercially viable AFM cantilevers. → Analytical expressions for resonant frequency of Timoshenko beams has been derived. → Dynamics of cylindrical AFM cantilevers has been discussed. → Expressions for dynamic properties of conical AFM cantilevers has been derived. → Effect of metallisation of cylindrical AFM cantilevers has been discussed.

  10. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  11. Segmental calibration for commercial AFM in vertical direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Lu, Mingzhen; Li, Wei; Xu, Xuefang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is most widely applied in scientific research and industrial production. AFM is a scanning probe imaging and measuring device, useful for physical and chemical studies. Depends on its basic structure, microscopic surface pattern can be measured and captured by mechanically scanning. Its vertical and horizon resolution can reach to 0.01nm and 0.1nm. Commonly the measurement values of commercial AFM are directly from scanning piezoelectric tube, so that it not a traceable value. In order to solve the problem of commercial AFM's traceability, step height standard references are applied to calibrate the piezoelectric ceramic housing in scanning tube. All of the serial of step height standard references, covering the commercial AFM vertical scale, are calibrated by Metrology AFM developed by National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. Three interferometers have been assembled in its XYZ axis, therefore the measurement value can directly trace to laser wavelength. Because of nonlinear characteristic of PZT, the method of segmental calibration is proposed. The measurement scale can be divided into several subsections corresponding to the calibrated values of the series of step height standards references. By this method the accuracy of measurements can be ensured in each segment measurement scale and the calibration level of the whole instrument can be promoted. In order to get a standard step shape by commercial AFM, substrate removal method is applied to deal with the bow shape problem.

  12. Nonlinear Dynamical analysis of an AFM tapping mode microcantilever beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choura S.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We focus in this paper on the modeling and dynamical analysis of a tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM microcantilever beam. This latter is subjected to a harmonic excitation of its base displacement and to Van der Waals and DMT contact forces at its free end. For AFM design purposes, we derive a mathematical model for accurate description of the AFM microbeam dynamics. We solve the resulting equations of motions and associated boundary conditions using the Galerkin method. We find that using one-mode approximation in tapping mode operating in the neighborhood of the contact region one-mode approximation may lead to erroneous results.

  13. Ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GAF01 to remove AFM1 in vitro and to counteract AFM1 immunotoxicity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbès, Samir; Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Jebali, Rania; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Oueslati, Ridha

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) has been detected in many parts of the world both in raw milk and many dairy products, causing great economic losses and human disease. Unfortunately, there are few studies dealing with AFM1 immunotoxicity/interactions with lactic acid bacteria for potential application as a natural preventive agent. The aim of this study was to isolate (from dairy products) food-grade probiotic bacteria able to degrade/bind AFM1 in vitro and evaluate whether the same organism(s) could impart a protective role against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity in exposed Balb/c mice. Bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01) were isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter and then tested for abilities to eliminate AFM1 from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and reconstituted milk (containing 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 µg AFM1/ml) after 0, 6, and 24 h at 37°C. Results showed that the selected bacteria could 'remove' AFM1 both in PBS and skimmed milk. The binding abilities of AFM1 by L. plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01 strains (at 10(8) CFU/ml) in PBS and reconstituted milk ranged, respectively, from 16.1-78.6% and 15.3-95.1%; overall, L. rhamnosus showed a better potential for removal than L. plantarum. 'Removal' appeared to be by simple binding; the bacteria/AFM1 complex was stable and only a very small proportion of mycotoxin was released back into the solution. L. rhamnosus GAF01 had the highest binding capacity and was selected for use in the in vivo study. Those results indicated that use of the organism prevented AFM1-induced effects on total white and red blood cells, and lymphocyte subtypes, after 15 days of host treatment. These studies clearly indicated that L. rhamnosus GAF01 was able to bind AFM1 in vitro and-by mechanisms that might also be related to a binding effect-counteract AFM1-induced immunotoxicity. Moreover, by itself, this bacterium was not toxic and could potentially be used as an additive in dairy products and in biotechnology for

  14. Automated handling and assembly of customizable AFM-tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenwerfer, M.; Eichhorn, V.; Jasper, D.;

    2011-01-01

    resolution. The AFM has become a standard and widely spread instrument for characterizing such nanoscale devices and can be found in most of today's research and development areas. However, the characterization of three dimensional high-aspect ratio and sidewall structures is still a bottleneck. Novel...... exchangeable and customizable scanning probe tips, so-called NanoBits, can be attached to standard AFM cantilevers offering unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of the tips to the surface topology of the specific application. In order to realize the in-situ exchange of NanoBits within the AFM...... environment the NanoBits have to be provided in a freestanding way that allows the AFM cantilever to be aligned and connected to the NanoBits. Due to the fact that direct microfabrication of such structures is still challenging, a nanorobotic preassembly of NanoBits cartridges is reasonable. These cartridges...

  15. Nanotribological surface characterization by frequency modulated torsional resonance mode AFM

    OpenAIRE

    Yurtsever, Ayhan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an experimental method to measure in-plane surface properties on the nanometer scale by torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy and to understand the underlying system dynamics. The invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the advances in development of new AFM based techniques have significantly enhanced the capability to probe surface properties with nanometer resolution. However, most of these techniques are based on a flexural oscillat...

  16. Roughness measurements with an AFM-CMM instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, Francesco; Bariani, Paolo; De Chiffre, Leonardo;

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, application of a Large Range AFM to roughness analyses is presented: measurements on different calibration standards covering a range of 4.8×0.1 mm2 were performed. Upon extraction of single profiles from the three-dimensional data set, roughness can be evaluated in compliance with...... ISO standards. Profiles from the Large range AFM were directly compared with those obtained by a traceable stylus instrument, resulting from probing the same surface region....

  17. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrnoosh Damircheli; Amir F. Payam; Ricardo Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the ...

  18. Measurements of CD and sidewall profile of EUV photomask structures using CD-AFM and tilting-AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate and traceable measurements of critical dimension (CD) and sidewall profile of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photomask structures using atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are introduced in this paper. An instrument complementarily applied with two kinds of AFM techniques, the CD-AFM and the tilting-AFM, has been developed. High measurement stability of the instrument is demonstrated, for instance, the long-term CD stability is better than 1 nm over 500 successive measurements over 55 h. To traceably calibrate the effective tip geometry, transmission electron microscopes-based method is applied, which uses either the silicon crystal lattice or the structure pitch value calibrated by metrological AFMs as an internal scale. Several grating patterns with different nominal CDs and line/space ratios of an EUV photomask have been measured using the developed methods. A data evaluation method with considered higher order tip effect due to the non-vertical sidewall is introduced. Detailed measurement results of a test EUV photomask, such as middle CD, left and right sidewall angle, feature height, line edge roughness and edge profiles are given. Finally, the AFM results are compared to that of a PTB EUV scatterometer. The comparison of the middle CD yields a linear relation within a spread of only about ±2 nm and an offset of the absolute values below 3 nm. For the sidewall angle, both methods yield consistent results within a range of about 2°. (paper)

  19. Characterisation of tissue factor-bearing extracellular vesicles with AFM: comparison of air-tapping-mode AFM and liquid Peak Force AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hardij

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are shed from cells and carry markers of the parent cells. Vesicles derived from cancer cells reach the bloodstream and locally influence important physiological processes. It has been previously shown that procoagulant vesicles are circulating in patients’ fluids. These EVs are therefore considered as promising biomarkers for the thrombotic risk. Because of their small size, classical methods such as flow cytometry suffer from limitation for their characterisation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM has been proposed as a promising complementary method for the characterisation of EVs. Objectives: The objectives of this study are: (a to develop and validate AFM with specific antibodies (anti-TF and (b to compare air and liquid modes for EVs’ size and number determination as potential biomarkers of the prothrombotic risk. Methods: AFM multimode nanoscope III was used for air tapping mode (TM. AFM catalyst was used for liquid Peak Force Tapping (PFT mode. Vesicles are generated according to Davila et al.'s protocol. Substrates are coated with various concentrations of antibodies, thanks to ethanolamine and glutaraldehyde. Results: Vesicles were immobilised on antibody-coated surfaces to select tissue factor (TF-positive vesicles. The size range of vesicles observed in liquid PFT mode is 6–10 times higher than in air mode. This corresponds to the data found in the literature. Conclusion: We recommend liquid PFT mode to analyse vesicles on 5 µg/ml antibody-coated substrates.

  20. Immobilisation of living bacteria for AFM imaging under physiological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louise Meyer, Rikke, E-mail: rikke.meyer@inano.au.dk [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Zhou, Xingfei [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Tang, Lone [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Kingshott, Peter [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2010-10-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) holds great potential for studying the nanoscale surface structures of living cells, and to measure their interactions with abiotic surfaces, other cells, or specific biomolecules. However, the application of AFM in microbiology is challenging due to the difficulty of immobilising bacterial cells to a flat surface without changing the cell surface properties or cell viability. We have performed an extensive and thorough study of how to functionalise surfaces in order to immobilise living bacteria for AFM studies in liquid environments. Our aim was to develop a scheme which allows bacterial cells to be immobilised to a flat surface with sufficient strength to avoid detachment during the AFM scanning, and without affecting cell surface chemistry, structure, and viability. We compare and evaluate published methods, and present a new, reproducible, and generally applicable scheme for immobilising bacteria cells for an AFM imaging. Bacterial cells were immobilised to modified glass surfaces by physical confinement of cells in microwells, physisorption to positively charged surfaces, covalent binding to amine- or carboxyl-terminated surfaces, and adsorption to surfaces coated with highly adhesive polyphenolic proteins originating from the mussel Mytilus edulis. Living cells could be immobilised with all of these approaches, but many cells detached when immobilised by electrostatic interactions and imaged in buffers like PBS or MOPS. Cells were more firmly attached when immobilised by covalent binding, although some cells still detached during AFM imaging. The most successful method revealed was immobilisation by polyphenolic proteins, which facilitated firm immobilisation of the cells. Furthermore, the cell viability was not affected by this immobilisation scheme, and adhesive proteins thus provide a fast, reproducible, and generally applicable scheme for immobilising living bacteria for an AFM imaging.

  1. AFM based electrical investigations on Ge nanodomes on Si(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The potential application of nanodots, nanowires, and nanodomes (NDs) in optoelectronics and photovoltaics has triggered intensive research on such low-dimensional nanostructures. In this work, we report on the electrical characterization of individual Ge nanodomes utilizing conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), and photoconductive AFM (PC-AFM. The Ge ND samples were prepared by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on Si(001) substrates under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. Facetted islands exhibiting {113} and {15 3 23} facets could be identified via AFM topography measurements. The AFM based electrical characterizations were performed under ambient conditions in dark and under illumination. Two-dimensional current maps revealed a higher conductivity of the NDs compared to the surrounding. Conductivity variations within single NDs could be observed, which will be discussed with respect to Ge ND facets an silicon intermixing. Local current-to-voltage (IV) measurements on top of individual NDs revealed a dependence of the IV characteristics on the ND size. Additionally, the generation of a photovoltage due to light exposure has been observed. (author)

  2. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R; Barth, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. PMID:26617348

  3. Improvement in metrology on new 3D-AFM platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Ingo; Osborn, Marc; Hand, Sean; Chen, Qi

    2008-10-01

    According to the 2007 edition of the ITRS roadmap, the requirement for CD uniformity of isolated lines on a binary or attenuated phase shift mask is 2.1nm (3σ) in 2008 and requires improvement to1.3 nm (3σ) in 2010. In order to meet the increasing demand for CD uniformity on photo masks, improved CD metrology is required. A next generation AFM, InSightTM 3DAFM, has been developed to meet these increased requirements for advanced photo mask metrology. The new system achieves 2X improvement in CD and depth precision on advanced photo masks features over the previous generation 3D-AFM. This paper provides measurement data including depth, CD, and sidewall angle metrology. In addition the unique capabilities of damage-free defect inspection and Nanoimprint characterization by 3D AFM are presented.

  4. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  5. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces. (paper)

  6. Neutron detection using CR-39 and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AFM has been applied in many CR-39 track formation analyses. In this paper, the use of AFM in the neutron detection and analysis of the track formation is reported. The irradiation was made with an 1.5 GBq (0.5 Ci) 241Am-Be neutron source, with and without a polyethylene radiator. The surface analysis was made to the CR-39 fresh material without irradiation, after the irradiation, and after a very short etching time. The results show important differences between the irradiation, with and without polyethylene radiator, and the latent tracks of the neutron in the CR-39 polycarbonate. The development of track formation after very short etching time and pits characterization were measured too using the AFM facilities. (Author)

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFM502 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM502 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFM502P (Link to Original site) AFM502F ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1312 0.0 2 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 712 0.0 ( P54640 ) RecName: Full ... =Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 382 e-104 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ... rot... 328 2e-88 ( Q94504 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 7; EC=3.4.22... 315 2e-84 ( Q94503 ) RecName: Fu ...

  8. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Damircheli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM. Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  9. Multiple regimes of operation in bimodal AFM: understanding the energy of cantilever eigenmodes

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Kiracofe; Arvind Raman; Dalia Yablon

    2013-01-01

    One of the key goals in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is to enhance material property contrast with high resolution. Bimodal AFM, where two eigenmodes are simultaneously excited, confers significant advantages over conventional single-frequency tapping mode AFM due to its ability to provide contrast between regions with different material properties under gentle imaging conditions. Bimodal AFM traditionally uses the first two eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever. In this work, the authors...

  10. Control Issues in High-speed AFM for Biological Applications: Collagen Imaging Example 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Q; Leang, KK; Sadoun, E; Reed, MJ; Devasia, S

    2004-01-01

    This article considers the precision positioning problem associated with high-speed operation of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and presents an inversion-based control approach to achieve precision positioning. Although AFMs have high (nanoscale) spatial resolution, a problem with current AFM systems is that they have low temporal resolution, i.e., AFM imaging is slow. In particular, current AFM imaging cannot be used to provide three-dimensional, time-lapse images of fast processes when ...

  11. Resonant Response of Rectangular AFM Cantilever in Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Hang; HUANG Wen-Hao

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic characteristics of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers can be influenced by their working media.We perform an experimental study on the resonant responses of rectangular AFM cantilevers with different sizes immersed in various viscous fluids. The measured resonance frequencies in liquids are used to validate several theoretical models. Comparison shows the analytical model proposed by Sader [J. Appl. Phys. 84 (1998) 64] can give the best agreement with the experimental results with the maximum relative error nearly 16% for all the cantilevers in different liquids. The ratio between the resonant frequencies in air and water is almost independent of the cantilever length, which is consistent with the theoretical analyses.

  12. Characterization of large area nanostructured surfaces using AFM measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido;

    2012-01-01

    A surface characterisation study has been developed to validate an innovative tool making solution for nano patterning large areas via anodizing of aluminium (Al) and subsequent nickel electroforming. A surface topography characterization through atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated a decreased...... magnitude of the 3D surface amplitude parameters chosen for the analysis, when increasing the Al purity from 99,5% to 99,999%. AFM was then employed to evaluate the periodical arrangements of the nano structured cells. Image processing was used to estimate the average areas value, the height variation...

  13. Phase contrast and DIC illumination for AFM hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution optical microscopy is an essential pre-requisite for life science force microscopy, particularly for applications in cell biology and medicine. Identification and validation of cells is typically established with techniques like phase contrast microscopy or differential interference contrast microscopy. The option to select or monitor individual cells online with such light microscopy techniques while performing atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements is therefore extremely beneficial. Here, we report two conceptually different strategies to implement these light microscopy techniques in a fully functional AFM head at the ultimate resolution of the Abbe diffraction limit

  14. AFM reconstruction of complex-shaped chiral plasmonic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Kondratov, Alexey V; Gainutdinov, Radmir V

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the optical metamaterial phenomena has the plasmonic nature and their investigation requires very accurate knowledge of the fabricated structures shape with a focus on the periodical features. We describe a consistent approach to the shape reconstruction of the plasmonic nanostructures. This includes vertical and tilted spike AFM probes fabrication, AFM imaging and specific post-processing. We studied a complex-shaped chiral metamaterial and conclude that the described post-processing routine extends possibilities of the existing deconvolution algorithms in the case of periodical structures with known rotational symmetry, by providing valuable information about periodical features.

  15. Dicty_cDB: AFM656 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM656 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM656Z 54 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1059 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 351 7e-96 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 188 8e-47 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFM602 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM602 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM602Z 58 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1114 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 373 e-102 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 196 4e-49 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFM708 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM708 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM708Z 62 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1154 0.0 1 ( BJ401286 ) Dictyostelium discoideu ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 402 e-111 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 212 6e-54 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  18. Dicty_cDB: AFM293 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM293 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM293Z 58 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1144 0.0 1 ( BJ401286 ) Dictyostelium discoideu ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 381 e-105 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 206 4e-52 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  19. Dicty_cDB: AFM682 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM682 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM682Z 57 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1120 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 373 e-102 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 194 1e-48 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  20. Dicty_cDB: AFM673 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM673 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM673Z 57 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1094 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 367 e-100 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 198 7e-50 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  1. Dicty_cDB: AFM633 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM633 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM633Z 59 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 975 0.0 2 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum s ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 324 e-100 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 170 1e-46 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  2. Dicty_cDB: AFM572 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM572 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM572Z 54 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1066 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 356 2e-97 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 189 4e-47 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  3. Dicty_cDB: AFM540 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM540 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM540Z 63 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1126 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 377 e-103 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 200 2e-50 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  4. Dicty_cDB: AFM621 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM621 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM621Z 68 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1294 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 401 e-111 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 214 1e-54 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFM475 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM475 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM475Z 58 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1138 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 377 e-103 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 206 5e-52 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFM595 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM595 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM595Z 56 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1092 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 367 e-101 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 199 4e-50 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFM872 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM872 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) - - AFM872Z 54 ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 1065 0.0 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... ts: (bits) Value ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 353 2e-96 ( P54640 ) RecName: Fu ... ll=Cysteine proteina se 5; EC=3.4.22... 190 2e-47 L36205_1( L36205 |pid: ...

  8. AFM Study of Structure Influence on Butterfly Wings Coloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinara Sultanovna Dallaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the structural coloration of the butterfly Vanessa Atalanta wings and shows how the atomic force microscopy (AFM can be applied to the study of wings morphology and wings surface behavior under the temperature. The role of the wings morphology in colors was investigated. Different colors of wings have different topology and can be identified by them. AFM in semi-contact mode was used to study the wings surface. The wing surface area, which is close to the butterfly body, has shiny brown color and the peak of surface roughness is about 600 nm. The changing of morphology at different temperatures is shown.

  9. Modular design of AFM probe with sputtered silicon tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, Jacob; Bouwstra, Siebe;

    2001-01-01

    of the thin films constituting the cantilever. The AFM probe has an integrated tip made of a thick sputtered silicon layer, which is deposited after the probe has been defined and just before the cantilevers are released. The tips are so-called rocket tips made by reactive ion etching. We present......We present an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe with integrated piezoresistive read-out. The probe consists of a micromachined cantilever with a tip at the end. The cantilever is a multilayer structure with its thickness defined by etch-stop and the bending controlled by fitting the thicknesses...

  10. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate. A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit. The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil. The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer. The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Photonic wires sidewall roughness measures using AFM capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2008-01-01

    roughness leads to loss increase thus limiting the propagation length and postponing the commercialization of such structures. In this paper we present a new algorithm for measuring the sidewall roughness of our devices based on atomic force microscope (AFM) approach. Using this algorithm, the roughness can...

  12. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  13. Vergelijkend AFM Onderzoek: microstructuur van bitumen in relatie tot healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmets, A.J.M.; Nahar, S.N.; Dillingh, B.; Fischer, H.; Scarpas, A.; Erkens, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this report we present the background, the scientific and experimental approach and the results of AFM experiments performed on two different batches of bitumen. The specific bitumen researched in this project has also been studied in the context of the InfraQuest project ‘Pragmatisch Healing On

  14. AFM lithography of aluminum for fabrication of nanomechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Zachary James; Abadal, G.; Hansen, Ole;

    2003-01-01

    Nanolithography by local anodic oxidation of surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to be more reproducible when using dynamic, non-contact mode. Hereby, the tip/sample interaction forces are reduced dramatically compared to contact mode, and thus tip wear is greatly reduced. Ano...

  15. Modular design of AFM probe with sputtered silicon tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, Jacob; Bouwstra, Siebe; Boisen, Anja

    We present an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe with integrated piezoresistive read-out. The probe consists of a micromachined cantilever with a tip at the end. The cantilever is a multilayer structure with its thickness defined by etch-stop and the bending controlled by fitting the thicknesses...

  16. Simultaneous nc-AFM/STM measurements with atomic resolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hapala, Prokop; Ondráček, Martin; Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Švec, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel

    Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2015 - (Morita, S.; Giessibl, F.; Meyer, E.; Wiesendanger, R.), s. 29-49. (NanoScience and Technology. 3). ISBN 978-3-319-15587-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02079S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM * STM * DFT simulations * electron transport * atomic contrast Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  17. Theoretical challenges of simultaneous nc-AFM/STM experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Pavel

    Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2015 - (Moriarty, P.; Gauthi, S.), s. 81-92. (Advances in Atom and Single Molecule Machines). ISBN 978-3-319-17400-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02079S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM * STM * DFT simulations * electron transport * atomic contrast Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  18. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-L-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-L-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg2+ and Ca2+ was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane stabilization while

  19. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonergan, N.E.; Britt, L.D.; Sullivan, C.J., E-mail: sullivcj@evms.edu

    2014-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-L-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-L-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane

  20. AFM study of polymer lubricants on hard disk surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, G. W.; Troemel, M.; Li, S. F. Y.

    Thin liquid films of PFPE (perfluoropolyether) lubricants dip-coated on hard disk surfaces were imaged with non-contact mode AFM. Demnum lubricants with phosphazene additives exhibited strong interactions with a silicon tip due to the formation of liquid bridges between the lubricants and the tip, as indicated by a remarkable hysteresis loop between approach and retraction curves in force vs. distance measurements. Features resulting from capillary forces due to tip tapping to the lubricants were revealed, which demonstrated that the capillary forces could be used to lock the non-contacting tip at a certain separation from the substrate surface to obtain AFM images. Force vs. distance curves for Fomblin Z-dol lubricants showed negligible hysteresis effects and features corresponding to lateral distortion of the tip by the lubricants only were observed. In both cases, only when the tip was positioned far above the surfaces could the natural distributions of the lubricants be imaged.

  1. AFM tip characterization by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable determination of the surface potential with spatial resolution is key for understanding complex interfaces that range from nanostructured surfaces to molecular systems to biological membranes. In this context, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has become the atomic force microscope (AFM) method of choice for mapping the local electrostatic surface potential as it changes laterally due to variations in the surface work function or surface charge distribution. For reliable KPFM measurements, the influence of the tip on the measured electrostatic surface potential has to be understood. We show here that the mean Kelvin voltage can be used for a straightforward characterization of the electrostatic signature of neutral, charged and polar tips, the starting point for quantitative measurements and for tip-charge control for AFM manipulation experiments. This is proven on thin MgO(001) islands supported on Ag(001) and is supported by theoretical modeling, which shows that single ions or dipoles at the tip apex dominate the mean Kelvin voltage.

  2. Cellular transfer and AFM imaging of cancer cells using Bioimprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melville DOS

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A technique for permanently capturing a replica impression of biological cells has been developed to facilitate analysis using nanometer resolution imaging tools, namely the atomic force microscope (AFM. The method, termed Bioimprint™, creates a permanent cell 'footprint' in a non-biohazardous Poly (dimethylsiloxane (PDMS polymer composite. The transfer of nanometer scale biological information is presented as an alternative imaging technique at a resolution beyond that of optical microscopy. By transferring cell topology into a rigid medium more suited for AFM imaging, many of the limitations associated with scanning of biological specimens can be overcome. Potential for this technique is demonstrated by analyzing Bioimprint™ replicas created from human endometrial cancer cells. The high resolution transfer of this process is further detailed by imaging membrane morphological structures consistent with exocytosis. The integration of soft lithography to replicate biological materials presents an enhanced method for the study of biological systems at the nanoscale.

  3. Vacuolar structures can be identified by AFM elasticity mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riethmueller, Christoph [Institute of Physiology II, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: chrth@uni-muenster.de; Schaeffer, Tilman E. [Institute of Physics, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Kienberger, Ferry [Institute of Biophysics, University of Linz, Linz (Austria); Stracke, Werner [Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Oberleithner, Hans [Institute of Physiology II, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Fluid-filled organelles like vesicles, endosomes and pinosomes are inevitable parts of cellular signalling and transport. Endothelial cells, building a barrier between blood and tissue, can form vacuolar organelles. These structures are implicated in upregulated fluid transport across the endothelium under inflammatory conditions. Vacuolar organelles have been described by transmission electron microscopy so far. Here, we present a method that images and mechanically characterizes intracellular structures in whole cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). After crosslinking the cellular proteins with the fixative glutaraldehyde, plasma membrane depressions become observable, which are scattered around the cell nucleus. Nanomechanical analysis identifies them as spots of reduced stiffness. Scanning electron microscopy confirms their pit-like appearance. In addition, fluorescence microscopy detects an analogous pattern of protein-poor spots, thereby confirming mechanical rigidity to arise from crosslinked proteins. This AFM application opens up a mechanical dimension for the investigation of intracellular organelles.

  4. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugirg, Benedikt R.; Koebley, Sean R.; Schniepp, Hannes C.; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches--AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation--proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field.

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFM364 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM364 (Link to dictyBase) - G02992 DDB0167434 - AFM364P (Link to Original ... 03344 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cysteine proteina ... 206 7e-49 1 ( C92839 ) Dictyostelium discoideum ... oso... 143 3e-33 ( P04989 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 2; EC=3.4.22... 84 3e-15 ( Q94504 ) RecName: Ful ... l=Cysteine proteina se 7; EC=3.4.22... 57 2e-07 EF567049_1( EF567049 |p ... _HG_... 57 3e-07 ( P04988 ) RecName: Full=Cysteine proteina se 1; EC=3.4.22... 56 6e-07 AC116305_68( AC116305 | ...

  6. Adhesion forces in AFM of redox responsive polymer grafts: Effects of tip hydrophilicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xueling; Kieviet, Bernard D.; Song, Jing; Schön, Peter M.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-02-01

    The adherence between silicon nitride AFM tips and redox-active poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) grafts on gold was investigated by electrochemical AFM force spectroscopy. Before the adhesion measurements silicon nitride AFM probes were cleaned with organic solvents (acetone and ethanol) or piranha solution. Interestingly, these different AFM tip cleaning procedures drastically affected the observed adhesion forces. Water contact angle measurements on the corresponding AFM probe chips showed that piranha treatment resulted in a significant increase of AFM probe chip surface hydrophilicity compared to the organic solvent treatment. Obviously this hydrophilicity change caused drastic, even opposite changes in the tip-PFS adhesive force measurement upon electrode potential change to reversibly oxidize and reduce the PFS grafts. Our findings are of pivotal importance for AFM tip adhesion measurements utilizing standard silicon nitride AFM tips. Probe hydrophilicity must be carefully taken into consideration and controlled.

  7. AFM tip characterization by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, C.; Hynninen, T.; Bieletzki, M.; Henry, C.R.; Foster, Adam S.; Esch, F; Heiz, U.

    2010-01-01

    Reliable determination of the surface potential with spatial resolution is key for understanding complex interfaces that range from nanostructured surfaces to molecular systems to biological membranes. In this context, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has become the atomic force microscope (AFM) method of choice for mapping the local electrostatic surface potential as it changes laterally due to variations in the surface work function or surface charge distribution. For reliable KPFM meas...

  8. AFM studies of nonspecific binding of enzyme on DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张益; 谢恒月; 等

    1996-01-01

    Atomic force microscope(AFM) is used to study restriction endonuclease digestion of plasmid DNA,pWRr plasmid DNA is digested by Hind Ⅲ,and the specific and the nonspecific binding of the restriction endonuclease are imaged,and the biological function of the enzyme binding to nonspecific sites is discussed.In addition,it is found that nonspecific binding of Hind ǚ could not induce the DNA characteristic bending angle.

  9. Measuring radial Young's modulus of DNA by tapping mode AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on tapping mode AFM imaging, a method was demonstrated to evaluate compression elasticity of single double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules in the force region. With images under ambient conditions, Young's moduli of dsDNA in compression were calculated. Results demonstrated that Young's moduli of dsDNA can be simply deduced according to the proposed model. The method can also be used to evaluate the compression elasticity of similar soft nanomaterials.

  10. Vergelijkend AFM Onderzoek: microstructuur van bitumen in relatie tot healing

    OpenAIRE

    Schmets, A. J. M.; Nahar, S.N.; Dillingh, B.; Fischer, H.; Scarpas, A.; Erkens, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this report we present the background, the scientific and experimental approach and the results of AFM experiments performed on two different batches of bitumen. The specific bitumen researched in this project has also been studied in the context of the InfraQuest project ‘Pragmatisch Healing Onderzoek’. It has been known for quite some time already that bitumen posessess a microstructure at the typical length scale of micrometers. This can be shown experimentally by imaging the bitumen su...

  11. Investigation of the Mechanoelectrical Transduction at Single Stereocilia by Afm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, M. G.; Fink, S.; Löffler, K.; Koitschev, A.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2003-02-01

    The transduction of sound into an electrical signal in the inner ear is closely related to the mechanical properties of the hair bundles cytoskeleton and cross-linkage. In this study the effect of lateral cross-links on hair bundle mechanics and the transduction current response is demonstrated on the level of individual stereocilia. For experiments stereocilia of outer hair cells of postnatal rats (P3 - P8) were scanned with a sharp AFM tip at nanometerscale. Transduction currents were simultaneously recorded in the whole-cell-recording mode with patch clamp. AFM was used as a nanotool for local mechanical stimulation and force measurement at stereocilia whereas patch clamp serves as a detector for the electrical response of the cell. In a first experiment force transmission between adjacent stereocilia of the V- and W- shaped hair bundles of outer hair cells was investigated. Results showed that a force exerted to a single stereocilium declined to 36 % at the nearest adjacent stereocilium of the same row. This result supposes AFM to be convenient for local displacement of single stereocilia. For control, the local response of transduction channels was measured at single stereocilia of the same hair bundle. Measured transduction current amplitudes ranged from 9 to 49 pA supposing an opening of one to five transduction channels. Both, weak force transmission by lateral cross-links and small transduction current amplitudes indicate a weak mechanical interaction between individual stereocilia of the tallest row of stereocilia of outer hair cells from postnatal rats.

  12. Characterization of spin crossover crystal surface by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, C.; Berini, B.; Boukheddaden, K.; Codjovi, E.; Linares, J.; Varret, F. [GEMAC, CNRS, Universite de Versailles, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles cedex (France); Garcia, Y.; Naik, A.D. [Unite de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganiques et Organiques, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place L. Pasteur 1, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Imaging nano-domains in spin crossover (SCO) compounds remains so far an unreached goal. We report on the first AFM tapping-mode investigation of SCO single crystals, performed at room temperature with the well known mononuclear compound [Fe(ptz){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} (ptz = 1-propyl-tetrazole) and the trinuclear supramolecular compound [Fe{sub 3}(hyetrz){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 6} (hyetrz = 4-(2{sup '}-hydroxyethyl)-1,2,4-triazole) which shows a gradual spin conversion centred at room temperature. The natural surface of the former crystal revealed a volatile coating of the scanned area attributed to the transport of adsorbed water under the effect of interaction with the AFM tip. The second one showed astonishing leopard-skin patterns assigned to the effect of atmospheric humidity on this hygroscopic compound. Their origin is discussed. We suggest the use of fluid coating layers as a general method for revealing the nano-patterning of physical properties (e.g. like-spin domains) at the surface of dielectric materials. AFM-tapping images of [Fe{sub 3}(hyetrz){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 6} at room temperature and ambient atmosphere. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. AFM imaging of functionalized carbon nanotubes on biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, C.; Liashkovich, I.; Neves, V.; Danzberger, J.; Heister, E.; Rangl, M.; Coley, H. M.; McFadden, J.; Flahaut, E.; Gruber, H. J.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Kienberger, F.; Ebner, A.

    2009-10-01

    Multifunctional carbon nanotubes are promising for biomedical applications as their nano-size, together with their physical stability, gives access into the cell and various cellular compartments including the nucleus. However, the direct and label-free detection of carbon nanotube uptake into cells is a challenging task. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of resolving details of cellular surfaces at the nanometer scale and thus allows following of the docking of carbon nanotubes to biological membranes. Here we present topographical AFM images of non-covalently functionalized single walled (SWNT) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) immobilized on different biological membranes, such as plasma membranes and nuclear envelopes, as well as on a monolayer of avidin molecules. We were able to visualize DWNT on the nuclear membrane while at the same time resolving individual nuclear pore complexes. Furthermore, we succeeded in localizing individual SWNT at the border of incubated cells and in identifying bundles of DWNT on cell surfaces by AFM imaging.

  14. Temperature-dependent imaging of living cells by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of lateral organization of plasma membranes is a prerequisite to the understanding of membrane structure-function relationships in living cells. Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions are responsible for the existence of various membrane microdomains involved in cell signalization and in numerous pathologies. Developing approaches for characterizing microdomains associate identification tools like recognition imaging with high-resolution topographical imaging. Membrane properties are markedly dependent on temperature. However, mesoscopic scale topographical information of cell surface in a temperature range covering most of cell biology experimentation is still lacking. In this work we have examined the possibility of imaging the temperature-dependent behavior of eukaryotic cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results establish that the surface of living CV1 kidney cells can be imaged by AFM, between 5 and 37 deg. C, both in contact and tapping modes. These first temperature-dependent data show that large cell structures appeared essentially stable at a microscopic scale. On the other hand, as shown by contact mode AFM, the surface was highly dynamic at a mesoscopic scale, with marked changes in apparent topography, friction, and deflection signals. When keeping the scanning conditions constant, a progressive loss in the image contrast was however observed, using tapping mode, on decreasing the temperature

  15. Noncontact AFM Imaging of Atomic Defects on the Rutile TiO2 (110) Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jeppe Vang

    2015-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) operated in the noncontact mode (nc-AFM) offers a unique tool for real space, atomic-scale characterisation of point defects and molecules on surfaces, irrespective of the substrate being electrically conducting or non-conducting. The nc-AFM has therefore in recent...... years become an important tool for fundamental analysis of defects at the atomic scale on metal oxide systems. Here the principles of the nc-AFM technique are presented and I review the recent interplay between atom-resolved nc-AFM experiments and atomistic nc-AFM simulations of the predominant defects...... on the rutile TiO2(110) surface. The present Chapter continues the review of nc-AFM initiated in Chap. 7 by Barth....

  16. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  17. Single microparticles mass measurement using an AFM cantilever resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Mauro, Marco; Ferrini, Gianluca; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In this work is presented a microbalance for single microparticle sensing based on resonating AFM cantilever. The variation of the resonator eigenfrequency is related to the particle mass positioned at the free apex of the cantilever. An all-digital phase locked loop (PLL) control system is developed to detect the variations in cantilever eigenfrequency. Two particle populations of different materials are used in the experimental test, demonstrating a mass sensitivity of 15 Hz/pg in ambient conditions. Thereby it is validated the possibility of developing an inexpensive, portable and sensitive microbalance for point-mass sensing.

  18. Adhesion experiments using an AFM-Parameters of influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhesion measurements were performed by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). It was shown that many parameters need to be controlled in order to provide reproducible and quantitative results. Adhesion forces were shown to depend on combination of materials characteristics and testing geometry as well as experimental protocol (contact time, contact force and contact area). This contact area was modified by means of FIB (Focused Ion Beam) milling and deliberate abrasion. As a result, a drastic change in adhesion could be observed. Still, those are problems connected to adjustment of interacting surfaces.

  19. Dicty_cDB: AFM809 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFM809 (Link to dictyBase) - G21616 DDB0231736 - - (Link to Original site) ... slug cDNA, clone SSI661. 192 5e-74 2 ( EL371623 ) CCE L13642.b1_C04.ab1 CCE (LMS) endive Cichorium en... 5 ... 2 0.014 1 ( EL354988 ) CCE M11643.b1_F07.ab1 CCE (LMS) endive Cichorium en... 5 ... 2 0.014 1 ( EL349132 ) CCE L5548.b1_H19.ab1 CCE (LMS) endive Cichorium end... 5 ...

  20. AFM characterization of protein net formation on a fibrous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assis O.B.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme protein net is set on a glass fiber support using the self-assembly technique. Enzymatic film formation is followed by surface imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM. Change in roughness as a function of deposition time is used as an indirect indicator of film formation. The objective was to form a protein film that would have no effect on the permeability of the medium, aiming at its application as a bioactive membrane or reactor suitable for bacteria and chemical interactions in aqueous media.

  1. An AFM study of the interactions between colloidal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lüderitz, Liset

    2012-01-01

    Im vorliegenden Forschungsprojekt werden die Wechselwirkungskräfte zwischen zwei Kolloidteilchen untersucht. Die Wechselwirkungen zwischen kolloidalen Teilchen können sich von denen zwischen makroskopischen Körpern unterscheiden. Die Wechselwirkungen wurden mit einem „Colloidal Probe Atomic Force Microscope“ (CP-AFM) in verschiedenen Elektrolyten gemessen: CsCl, KCl, NaCl und LiCl. Die resultierenden Kräfte können sich je nach verwendeter Elektrolytlösung unterscheiden, was als Ionenspezifitä...

  2. AFM-based manipulation of InAs nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A controlled method of manipulation of nanowires was found using the tip of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Manipulation is done in the 'Retrace Lift' mode, where feedback is turned off for the reverse scan and the tip follows a nominal path. The effective manipulation force during the reverse scan can be changed by varying an offset in the height of the tip over the surface. Using this method, we have studied InAs nanowires on different substrates. We have also investigated interactions between wires and with gold features patterned onto the substrates

  3. Physical properties of polyacrylamide gels probed by AFM and rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidine, Yara; Laurent, Valérie M.; Michel, Richard; Duperray, Alain; Iulian Palade, Liviu; Verdier, Claude

    2015-02-01

    Polymer gels have been shown to behave as viscoelastic materials but only a small amount of data is usually provided in the glass transition. In this paper, the dynamic moduli G\\prime and G\\prime\\prime of polyacrylamide hydrogels are investigated using both an AFM in contact force modulation mode and a classical rheometer. The validity is shown by the matching of the two techniques. Measurements are carried out on gels of increasing polymer concentration in a wide frequency range. A model based on fractional derivatives is successfully used, covering the whole frequency range. G\\text{N}0 , the plateau modulus, as well as several other parameters are obtained at low frequencies. The model also predicts the slope a of both moduli in the glass transition, and a transition frequency f\\text{T} is introduced to separate the gel-like behavior with the glassy state. Its variation with polymer content c gives a dependence f\\text{T}∼ c1.6 , in good agreement with previous theories. Therefore, the AFM data provides new information on the physics of polymer gels.

  4. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm x 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  5. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m−1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification. (paper)

  6. AFM investigation of kraft pulp ber swelling in controlled humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Kraft pulp fibers are wood fibers from softwood, typically spruce and pine, which are the main constituent for so called kraft paper. Kraft paper is used mainly for packaging applications, where a high strength is required. In this work, the swelling behavior of spruce kraft pulp fibers is investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To perform this task, the AFM was equipped with a fluid cell and a setup where the relative humidity inside the fluid cell can be controlled. The setup enables to select any humidity value between approximately 5% and 80% relative humidity. With this setup, a change in surface morphology of the scanned area could be observed. Furthermore, the evolution of the characteristic surface wrinkles of dried pulp fibers with increasing humidity was quantified in two different ways. One way is to measure the distance between the surface wrinkles, the other to determine their height. It could be shown that the distance between the wrinkles is increasing, whereas the height is decreasing. This means that the surface is becoming smoother when the ber is swelling, which is best observed on a completely wet fiber. (author)

  7. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  8. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  9. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Chung-Hsing [Division of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chang-Hsiang [Department of Dentistry, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China); Li, Hsi-Hsin, E-mail: mhho@mail.ntust.edu.t [Deputy Superintendent, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  10. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  11. Preparation of cell membranes for high resolution imaging by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cell membrane structure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been limited because of the softness of cell membranes. Here, we utilize a new technique of sample preparation to lay red blood cell membranes on the top of a mica surface to obtain high resolution images by in-situ AFM on both sides of cell membranes. Our results indicate that the location of oligosaccharides and proteins in red blood cell membranes might be different from the current membrane model. The inner membrane leaflet is covered by dense proteins with fewer free lipids than expected. In contrast, the outer membrane leaflet is quite smooth; oligosaccharides and peptides supposed to protrude out of the outer membrane leaflet surface might be actually hidden in the middle of hydrophilic lipid heads; transmembrane proteins might form domains in the membranes revealed by PNGase F and trypsin digestion. Our result could be significant to interpret some functions about red blood cell membranes and guide to heal the blood diseases related to cell membranes.

  12. Accuracy optimization of high-speed AFM measurements using Design of Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Marinello, F.; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard;

    2010-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is being increasingly employed in industrial micro/nano manufacturing applications and integrated into production lines. In order to achieve reliable process and product control at high measuring speed, instrument optimization is needed. Quantitative AFM measurement...... perform the optimization of AFM measurements on calibrated one-dimensional silicon grating featuring a triangular periodical profile (slopes of 54.7 degrees, period of 3 μm)....

  13. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette

    OpenAIRE

    Phillip Roder; Carsten Hille

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive w...

  14. AFM research on Fe-based nanocrystal crystallization mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The cross-section pattern of Fe-based alloy ribbon (Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9) annealed at different temperatures was investigated by AFM (atomic force microscope), and the effect mechanism of Nb and Cu in Fe-based alloy ribbon annealing was analyzed with XRD diffraction crystal analysis technique and other research results. New concepts of encapsulated grain, Nb vacancy cluster, Nb-B atom cluster and so on were proposed and used to describe the formation mechanism of α-Fe (Si) nanocrystal. Finally, a three-phase (separation phase, encapsulated phase and nanocrystalline phase) interconnected structure model in Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy was established.

  15. AFM nanometrology interferometric system with the compensation of angle errors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabina, Jan; Lazar, Josef; Klapetek, P.; Číp, Ondřej

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2011, 80823U:1-6. ISBN 978-0-8194-8678-3. [Optical Measurement Systems for Industrial Inspection VII. Munich (DE), 23.05.2011-26.05.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk 2C06012; GA MPO 2A-1TP1/127; GA MPO FT-TA3/133; GA MPO 2A-3TP1/113; GA ČR GA102/09/1276; GA ČR GA102/07/1179 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : atomic force microscopy (AFM) * nanometrology * nanoscale * nanopositioning * interferometry * abbe errors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  16. AFM study of steel corrosion in aqueous solutions in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz-Benito, B.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Early corrosion stages are studied in carbon steel by means of a solution simulating that contained in concrete pores. Non-carbonated solution contains 5% NaCl. The atomic force microscopy (AFM technique is used to study material performance after different immersion times (up to 48 h. Obtained data are compared to electrochemical ones (corrosion potential and polarization resistance. Analysis of images and roughness evolution along time shows that steel initially tends to reach passivity, although the passive layer rapidly loses its protective character due to chloride attack.

    Este trabajo estudia los primeros estados de la corrosión de un acero al carbono en una disolución que simula la existente en los poros del hormigón, sin carbonatar, con un 5% de NaCl. Para ello, se ha empleado la técnica de microscopía de fuerza atómica (AFM, estudiando el comportamiento del material tras diferentes tiempos de inmersión, hasta 48 h, en la disolución. Estos datos se comparan con datos electroquímicos (potencial de corrosión y resistencia de polarización. El análisis de las imágenes y la evolución de la rugosidad con el tiempo muestran que el acero tiende inicialmente a pasivarse, pero la capa pasiva pierde rápidamente su carácter protector debido al ataque de los cloruros.

  17. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  18. Investigation of Amyloid Structures at Nanoscale via AFM based Dynamic Nanomechncial Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    material research. Among kinds of techniques, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the advantages in amyloid study, due to the real-space nano-resolution, the possibilities to characterize in physiological condition, and easy operation without staining requirement. The recent developed AFM based dynamic...

  19. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  20. In situ, controlled and reproducible attachment of carbon nanotubes onto conductive AFM tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An effective and controllable method was developed to fabricate CNT AFM probes in-situ. • Individual carbon nanotube was assembled. • The alignment angle and protruding length of as-produced CNT probes are excellent. - Abstract: Owing to the small diameter, wear resistance, high aspect ratio of their cylindrical structure and outstanding young's modulus, carbon nanotubes are regarded as excellent probes for atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging and various applications. To take the best out of carbon nanotubes’ potentials as AFM probes, we present a facile and reliable method to attach a single carbon nanotube onto an AFM probe covered with conductive Au layer. The method involves the following steps: positioning the AFM probe exactly onto a designated multiple-walled carbon nanotube growing vertically on a conductive substrate, establishing physical contact of the probe apex to the carbon nanotube with an appropriate force, and finally flowing a DC current of typically 100 μA from the AFM probe to the substrate through the carbon nanotube. The current flow results in the fracture and attachment of the carbon nanotube onto the AFM probe. Our method is similar to that reported in previous studies to cut and assemble carbon nanotubes by flowing current under SEM, but by our method we succeed to achieve superior control of protruding length and reproducible attachment angle of the carbon nanotube in one step. Moreover, it is now possible to reliably prepare carbon nanotube probes in-situ during AFM experiments

  1. Direct manipulation of intracellular stress fibres using a hook-shaped AFM probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, Shinichi; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Harada, Ichiro; Afrin, Rehana [Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-S2-8, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Nakayama, Tomonobu [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Ikai, Atsushi, E-mail: smachida@bio.titech.ac.jp [Innovation Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-S2-8, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2010-09-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a highly successful technique for imaging nanometre-sized samples and measuring pico- to nano-newton forces acting between atoms and molecules. When it comes to the manipulation of larger samples with forces of tens and hundreds of nano-newtons, however, the present chemistry-based modification protocols for functionalizing AFM cantilevers to achieve the formation of covalent/non-covalent linkages between the AFM probe and the sample surface do not produce strong enough bonds. For the purpose of measuring the fracture strength and other mechanical properties of stress fibres (SFs) in living as well as semi-intact fibroblast cells, we fabricated an AFM probe with a hooking function by focused ion beam technology and used the AFM probe hook to capture, pull and eventually sever a chosen SF labelled with green or red fluorescent protein.

  2. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  3. Investigation of pyrite surface state by DFT and AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    先永骏; 聂琪; 文书明; 刘建; 邓久帅

    2015-01-01

    The surface states of pyrite (FeS2) were theoretically investigated using first principle calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT). The results indicate that both the (200) and (311) surfaces of pyrite undergo significant surface atom relaxation after geometry optimization, which results in a considerable distortion of the surface region. In the normal direction, i.e., perpendicular to the surface, S atoms in the first surface layer move outward from the bulk, while Fe atoms move toward the bulk, forming an S-rich surface. The surface relaxation processes are driven by electrostatic interaction, which is evidenced by a relative decrease in the surface energy after surface relaxation. Such a relaxation process is visually interpreted through the qualitative analysis of molecular mechanics. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis reveals that only sulfur atom is visible on the pyrite surface. This result is consistent with the DFT data. Such S-rich surface has important influence on the flotation properties of pyrite.

  4. STM, SECPM, AFM and Electrochemistry on Single Crystalline Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Stimming

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Scanning probe microscopy (SPM techniques have had a great impact on research fields of surface science and nanotechnology during the last decades. They are used to investigate surfaces with scanning ranges between several 100 mm down to atomic resolution. Depending on experimental conditions, and the interaction forces between probe and sample, different SPM techniques allow mapping of different surface properties. In this work, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM in air and under electrochemical conditions (EC-STM, atomic force microscopy (AFM in air and scanning electrochemical potential microscopy (SECPM under electrochemical conditions, were used to study different single crystalline surfaces in electrochemistry. Especially SECPM offers potentially new insights into the solid-liquid interface by providing the possibility to image the potential distribution of the surface, with a resolution that is comparable to STM. In electrocatalysis, nanostructured catalysts supported on different electrode materials often show behavior different from their bulk electrodes. This was experimentally and theoretically shown for several combinations and recently on Pt on Au(111 towards fuel cell relevant reactions. For these investigations single crystals often provide accurate and well defined reference and support systems. We will show heteroepitaxially grown Ru, Ir and Rh single crystalline surface films and bulk Au single crystals with different orientations under electrochemical conditions. Image studies from all three different SPM methods will be presented and compared to electrochemical data obtained by cyclic voltammetry in acidic media. The quality of the single crystalline supports will be verified by the SPM images and the cyclic voltammograms. Furthermore, an outlook will be presented on how such supports can be used in electrocatalytic studies.

  5. Correcting for AFM tip induced topography convolutions in protein–DNA samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging offers information on many unique parameters of protein–DNA complexes. However, exact lateral dimensions of molecules or protein assemblies are convoluted with the finite size of the mechanical imaging probe, the AFM tip. An approximate knowledge of the tip dimensions allows correction for these convolutions. In the past, a variety of standards for tip size evaluation have been described, such as metal beads or nanotubes. In the context of protein–DNA samples, being able to exploit the DNA directly for such lateral image (length) corrections without the need to apply additional calibration particles is highly desirable, avoiding crowding and confusion in the images. Here, we systematically evaluate and compare simple geometrical model approaches for DNA as a lateral calibration standard in AFM imaging. -- Highlights: ► Establishing DNA as a lateral calibration marker for AFM on protein–DNA samples. ► Comparison of different models for DNA sections for AFM tip parameter derivation. ► Electron microscopy evaluation of analytically derived AFM probe dimensions. ► Application to different sample particles for laterally corrected AFM scales.

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Aflatoxin (AFM1) in Milk Collected from Dairy Farms in Faisalabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milk contamination with aflatoxin (AFM1) is an issue of great concern in developing countries like Pakistan which demands a great attention. Milk constitutes an important part of human diet, particularly for the youngs. So, it is our utmost need to assess the presence of AFM1 in milk. In the present study assessment of AFM1 in milk collected from different dairy farms of Faisalabad was carried out using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with Fluorescence detector. The results were compared with pre-established maximum residual limit (MRL) in order to evaluate the safety of milk for human consumption. The study revealed that all the 50 tested samples were found positive for AFM1 contamination at various levels. Among buffalo dairy farms concentration of AFM1 ranged between 0.0513 λg L-1 and 0.1006 μg L-1. From the cow dairy farms, the AFM1 contamination level was found lowest with a mean of 0.0397 μg L-1 and the highest AFM1 contamination level was with a mean of 0.1143 μg L-1. Overall percentage of AFM1 contamination and concentration levels were found higher in the milk collected from buffalo dairy farms as compared to cow dairy farms. 21 out of 25 (84 percentage) buffalo and 18 out of 25 (72 percentage) cow milk samples were exceeded the European Commission MRL of 0.050 mu g L-1. The results of the present study will be helpful for regulations implementation in order to minimize or avoid the AFM1 contamination in milk from the farms in the study area. (author)

  7. Surface Mapping with an AFM-CMM Integrated System and Stitching Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Marinello, Francesco; Bariani, Paolo;

    2004-01-01

    In the context of micro-technology, dimensions in the order of hundreds of micrometers are often to be measured, while the detection of the finest details and the analysis of nano-roughness call for the use of highly resolving sensors. AFM probes, owing to the sharpness of their tip combined with...... an AFM scanner mounted on the z axis of a three axes CMM (1) . The instrument is now equipped with an AFM scanner DME DS 95–200 characterized by a scanning range of 200X200 microns2. In the paper the development and implementation of a stitching procedure for surface mapping is presented and...

  8. In Situ STM and AFM of the Copper Protein Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Esben P.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Madsen, L.L.;

    1997-01-01

    Scanning tunnel (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the in situ mode under potentiostatic control have opened new perspectives for mapping the two-dimensional organization of surface adsorbates in aqueous solution. In situ STM and AFM, however, also raise recognized problems. In the context...... approximately exponentially with increasing distance with a decay constant of 0.4–0.5 Å−1. In comparison in situ AFM shows structures laterally convoluted with the tip while the vertical extension is in the same range as the structural size of azurin. The results are of interest in relation to electron tunnel...

  9. Modelling and Measurement Uncertainty Estimation for Integrated AFM-CMM Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bariani, Paolo; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes modelling of an integrated AFM - CMM instrument, its calibration, and estimation of measurement uncertainty. Positioning errors were seen to limit the instrument performance. Software for off-line stitching of single AFM scans was developed and verified, which allows...... compensation of such errors. A geometrical model of the instrument was produced, describing the interaction between AFM and CMM systematic errors. The model parameters were quantified through calibration, and the model used for establishing an optimised measurement procedure for surface mapping. A maximum...

  10. Tuning the resonance of a photonic crystal microcavity with an AFM probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märki, Iwan; Salt, Martin; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2006-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results on switching and tuning of a two-dimensional photonic crystal resonant microcavity by means of a silicon AFM tip, probing the highly localized optical field in the vicinity of the cavity. On-off switching and modulation of the transmission signal in the kHz range is achieved by bringing an AFM tip onto the center of the microcavity, inducing a damping effect on the transmission resonance. Tuning of the resonant wavelength in the order of several nanometers becomes possible by inserting the AFM tip into one of the holes of the Bragg mirror forming the microcavity in the propagation direction. PMID:19516436

  11. Implementing atomic force microscopy (AFM) for studying kinetics of gold nanoparticle's growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiev, P.; Bojinova, A.; Kostova, B.;

    2013-01-01

    In a novel experimental approach Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was applied as a tool for studying the kinetics of gold nanoparticle growth. The gold nanoparticles were obtained by classical Turkevich citrate synthesis at two different temperatures. From the analysis of AFM images during the...... synthesis process the nanoparticle s' sizes were obtained. To demonstrate the applicability and the reliability of the proposed experimental approach we studied the nanoparticles growth at two different temperatures by spectrophotometric measurements and compared them with the results from AFM experimental...

  12. Mechanism of high-resolution STM/AFM imaging with functionalized tips

    OpenAIRE

    Hapala, Prokop; Kichin, Georgy; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan; Jelínek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    High resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) imaging with functionalized tips is well established, but a detailed understanding of the imaging mechanism is still missing. We present a numerical STM/AFM model, which takes into account the relaxation of the probe due to the tip-sample interaction. We demonstrate that the model is able to reproduce very well not only the experimental intra- and intermolecular contrasts, but also their evolution upon tip ...

  13. Ultra thin films of nanocrystalline Ge studied by AFM and interference enhanced Raman scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Balaji, S.; S. Mohan; Muthu, DVS; Sood, AK

    2003-01-01

    Initial growth stages of the ultra thin films of germanium (Ge) prepared by ion beam sputter deposition have been studied using atomic force microscope (AFM) and interference enhanced Raman scattering. The growth of the films follows Volmer–Weber growth mechanism. Analysis of the AFM images shows that Ostwald ripening of the grains occurs as the thickness of the film increases. Raman spectra of the Ge films reveal phonon confinement along the growth direction and show that the misfit str...

  14. Nano-Electrochemistry and Nano-Electrografting with an Original Combined AFM-SECM

    OpenAIRE

    Ammar Ben Brahim; Cédric Goyer; Christophe Demaille; Serge Palacin; Julienne Charlier; Federico Grisotto; Achraf Ghorbal

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantages of the combination between atomic force microscopy and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The combined technique can perform nano-electrochemical measurements onto agarose surface and nano-electrografting of non-conducting polymers onto conducting surfaces. This work was achieved by manufacturing an original Atomic Force Microscopy-Scanning ElectroChemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) electrode. The capabilities of the AFM-SECM-electrode were tested with the ...

  15. Characterization of the Polycaprolactone Melt Crystallization: Complementary Optical Microscopy, DSC, and AFM Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Speranza, V; Sorrentino, A; F. De Santis; Pantani, R.

    2014-01-01

    The first stages of the crystallization of polycaprolactone (PCL) were studied using several techniques. The crystallization exotherms measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were analyzed and compared with results obtained by polarized optical microscopy (POM), rheology, and atomic force microscope (AFM). The experimental results suggest a strong influence of the observation scale. In particular, the AFM, even if limited on time scale, appears to be the most sensitive technique t...

  16. AFM measurements of novel solar cells. Studying electronic properties of Si-based radial junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hývl, Matěj

    -, č. 1 (2014), s. 52-53. ISSN 1439-4243 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA ČR GA13-12386S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM measurements * conductive cantilever * electronic properties * nanowires * PF TUNA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.imaging-git.com/science/scanning-probe-microscopy/afm-measurements-novel-solar-cells

  17. Influence of the surface chemistry on the nanotribological behaviour of (AFM tip/graphite) couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jradi, Khalil [Universite du Quebec a Trois Rivieres, Centre Integre en pates et papiers, 3351 boulevard des forges, Trois Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada); Schmitt, Marjorie, E-mail: Marjorie.Schmitt@uha.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Bioorganique, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Mulhouse - CNRS, 3, rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Bistac, Sophie [Laboratoire de Photochimie et d' Ingenierie Macromoleculaires, 3, rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2012-03-01

    The development of the nanotechnology has made essential the knowledge of the tribological behaviour of carbonaceous materials, and more particularly of graphite. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is thus used to study the friction properties at this nanoscopic scale. In this work, results concerning the friction of AFM tips against graphite pins are presented, with a particular emphasis on the effect of the chemical modification of these tips on the tribological behaviour of graphite.

  18. Structure and Permeability of Ion-channels by Integrated AFM and Waveguide TIRF Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan Ramachandran; Fernando Teran Arce; Patel, Nirav R.; Quist, Arjan P.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Ratnesh Lal

    2014-01-01

    Membrane ion channels regulate key cellular functions and their activity is dependent on their 3D structure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images 3D structure of membrane channels placed on a solid substrate. Solid substrate prevents molecular transport through ion channels thus hindering any direct structure-function relationship analysis. Here we designed a ~70 nm nanopore to suspend a membrane, allowing fluidic access to both sides. We used these nanopores with AFM and total internal refle...

  19. Morphological analysis of polymers on hair fibers by SEM and AFM

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria Fernandes Monteiro; Aline Martins Duboc Natal; Luís Edmundo Bastos Soledade; Elson Longo

    2003-01-01

    The polyquaternium 7® polymer is widely used in cosmetic formulations. Morphologic alterations in hair fibers were observed after the application of the polyquaternium 7® polymer, using SEM and AFM. Continuous applications of this product indicated that it accumulates on the fibers, improving the aspect of the hair surface. Quantitative analysis of the images obtained by AFM was undertaken. The data obtained for the hair surface roughness indicates that the fibers treated with the polymer pre...

  20. Graphite–castor oil polyurethane composite electrode surfaces – AFM morphological and electrochemical characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Diculescu, Victor Constantin; Cervini, Priscila; Cavalheiro, Eder Tadeu Gomes; Brett, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Graphite–castor oil polyurethane composite electrodes with different graphite weight percentages, 30–70% graphite–polyurethane w w−1, were morphologically studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and voltammetry. AFM images and r.m.s. roughness measurements demonstrated that the polyurethane roughness decreased with increasing the graphite content, composites of 50% and 60% graphite–polyurethane w w−1 showing the smother electrode surface. The electrochemical characterisation was performed in...

  1. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, M. D.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Mamdouh, W.;

    2008-01-01

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display a...... addition, such biological amyloid fibril structures with highly stable mechanical properties can potentially be used to produce nanofibres (nanowires) that may be suitable for nanotechnological applications....

  2. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Roder

    Full Text Available Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy.

  3. AFM pictures of the surfaces of glass RPC electrodes damaged by water vapor contamination

    OpenAIRE

    T. Kubo; Nakano, E.; Teramoto, Y.

    2002-01-01

    We present surface pictures of the damaged electrodes from the Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPCs) taken by an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). For the test, a set of chambers were operated with freon mixed gas (damaged) and freonless gas (not damaged), contaminated with 1000 to 2000 ppm of water vapor. In the AFM pictures, clear differences in damage are seen between the electrodes in the chambers with the freon mixed gas and the freonless gas; a combination of freon and water vapor caused ...

  4. Integrated AFM-Raman for molecular characterization of peptide nano- and micro-tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sinjab, Faris

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused on exploring a unique integration of techniques, Raman micro-spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), which when combined offer more than the sum of their respective parts. The non-invasive chemical specificity afforded by Raman spectroscopy, combined with the nanoscale-resolution topographic imaging of AFM offer much individually. The physics underlying the practical application of each technique is very general; Raman spectroscopy detects molecular vibrational...

  5. Exploring the complex mechanical properties of xanthan scaffolds by AFM-based force spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Liang; Guanghong Zeng; Yinli Li; Shuai Zhang; Huiling Zhao; Lijun Guo; Bo Liu; Mingdong Dong

    2014-01-01

    The polysaccharide xanthan has been extensively studied owing to its potential application in tissue engineering. In this paper, xanthan scaffold structures were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM) in liquid, and the mechanical properties of the complex xanthan structures were investigated by using AFM-based force spectroscopy (FS). In this work, three types of structures in the xanthan scaffold were identified based on three types of FS stretching events. The fact that the complex ...

  6. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip–sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip–sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p–v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear

  7. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li–S batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Hiesgen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium–sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur−1 after 43 cycles.

  8. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Giovati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins (AFs are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue.

  9. Micro contact and stick-slip number between AFM probe tip and sample surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Xiangjun; (张向军); MENG; Yonggang; (孟永钢); WEN; Shizhu; (温诗铸)

    2003-01-01

    In an atomic force microscope (AFM), the cantilever probe, probe tip and sample surface form a micro system in which micro contact, elastic deformation, relative sliding and friction occur during scanning with the contact mode. In this paper, the energy conversion and dissipation during scanning process in the micro system is investigated based on the Mauges-Daules contact model. A dimensionless stick-slip number(η=( )) is defined to describe the micro stick-slip behavior under AFM. Through numerical simulation of the dynamics of the probe tip, it is shown that AFM lateral force is dependent on the defined stick-slip number. If η 1, the tip moves off the sticking points with an adhesion hysteresis, resulting in an energy dissipation. Therefore, the stick-slip number can serve as a characteristic parameter. Numerical simulation of AFM lateral force with different stick-slip numbers is in agreement with experimental results. Finally a method to extract frictional force from the AFM lateral force signal is proposed.

  10. A sub-50 nm three-step height sample for AFM calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuming; Li, Changsheng; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a sub-50 nm three-step height sample was made for vertical calibration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a new step height evaluation algorithm based on polynomial fitting is discussed. The influences of AFM artefacts such as particles, image bow and high-order errors on step height were studied. The experimental results showed that the polynomial order p2 and threshold t were not critical factors. However, the increment Δh and the polynomial order p used in the calculation of optimal shifting distance were important and must be carefully considered. Δh = 0.1 nm and p ≥ 4 were determined to get a stable step height. The sample had small roughness and good uniformity. It has the potential to serve as a high quality step height standard sample for AFM calibration.

  11. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution. PMID:24743419

  12. Influence of atomic force microscope (AFM) probe shape on adhesion force measured in humidity environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳丽; 涂育松; 谭惠丽

    2014-01-01

    In micro-manipulation, the adhesion force has very important influence on behaviors of micro-objects. Here, a theoretical study on the effects of humidity on the adhesion force is presented between atomic force microscope (AFM) tips and substrate. The analysis shows that the precise tip geometry plays a critical role on humidity depen-dence of the adhesion force, which is the dominant factor in manipulating micro-objects in AFM experiments. For a blunt (paraboloid) tip, the adhesion force versus humidity curves tends to the apparent contrast (peak-to-valley corrugation) with a broad range. This paper demonstrates that the abrupt change of the adhesion force has high correla-tion with probe curvatures, which is mediated by coordinates of solid-liquid-vapor contact lines (triple point) on the probe profiles. The study provides insights for further under-standing nanoscale adhesion forces and the way to choose probe shapes in manipulating micro-objects in AFM experiments.

  13. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces

  14. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application. Graphical abstract Silver nanoparticles attached to AFM tips using dielectrophoresis. Comparing nanoparticles attached using 1 kHz (left) to 1 MHz (right), SEM and optical (inset) images. PMID:26968565

  15. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simons Janet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM. We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV, revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution.

  16. Nanometric lateral scales as CRM candidates for AFM, SEM and optical diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) have designed nanometric lateral scales with a pitch of less than 100 nm for atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical diffractometer. The pitches of the scales were calibrated by nanometrological AFM with differential laser interferometer (DLI-AFM) and the uncertainty in the pitch measurements was evaluated. The average pitches were quite close to the designed pitches and the expanded uncertainty (k = 2) was less than 0.5% of the nominal pitch. It became clear that proposed nanometric lateral scales had sufficiently high quality as candidate certified reference materials (CRMs). A domestic intercomparison of the nanometric lateral scales is underway

  17. Fabrication of gold nanoelectrodes based on nanolithography electrochemically through a conductive AFM tip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tianfeng; ZHANG Xingtang; JIANG Xiaohong; LI Yuncai; DU Zuliang

    2005-01-01

    Gold nanoelectrodes were fabricated by approach of combining surface self-assembly with nanolithography electrochemically through a conductive AFM tip. The controllable structure with width and distance in nanometer as a template was constructed by nanolithography patterning process, which was accomplished by a conductive AFM tip on certain highly ordered long-tail organosilane monolayers. Then through adsorption of Cd2+ and exposure of the Cd2+-loaded surface to gaseous H2S, CdS nanowires were generated in a template-controlled self-assembly process. Finally, metallic gold nanowires were conversed from CdS nanowires by treatment with the aqueous solution of HAuCl4 via a redox chemical process, which had good conductivity proved by C-AFM.

  18. High Throughput Nanofabrication of Silicon Nanowire and Carbon Nanotube Tips on AFM Probes by Stencil-Deposited Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engstrøm, Daniel Southcott; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni;

    2011-01-01

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer...... demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes....

  19. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnally, Stewart M; Dev, Harveer S; Stewart, Andrew P; Barrera, Nelson P; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M; Edwardson, J Michael

    2008-08-01

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs. PMID:18514062

  20. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs

  1. Coexistence of orbital and CE-AFM orders in colossal magnetoresistance manganites: A symmetry perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The complex interplay between order parameters of different nature that dominates the physics of colossal magnetoresistance manganites is analysed from a symmetry based perspective. Phenomenological energies are given for the different competing phases. It is shown that the general trends observed in different systems, such as the mutual exclusion of orbital order and A-AFM order and the related stabilization of the CE-AFM order, stem to large extend from the symmetry of the parameters involved. The possible stabilization of complex phases where charge and orbital order coexist with magnetic and ferroelectric states is also anticipated.

  2. New insights into the mucoadhesion of pectins by AFM roughness parameters in combination with SPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Lars; Klösgen, Beate; Simonsen, Adam Cohen;

    2011-01-01

    The object of this study was to assess the mucoadhesion of the three main commercially available types of pectin by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Polyacrylic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidone were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Image analysis...... of the AFM scans revealed a significant change of roughness parameters when low-ester pectin was introduced to mica supported bovine submaxillarymucin, indicating a high mucoadhesion for this type of pectin. Only minor changes were observed with high-ester and amidated pectin. The same ranking order...

  3. Multiparametric imaging of biological systems by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Martínez-Martín, David; Medalsy, Izhar; Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how biological systems change their structural, biophysical and chemical properties to adjust functionality. Addressing this issue has been severely hampered by the lack of methods capable of imaging biosystems at high resolution while simultaneously mapping their multiple properties. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) now enable researchers to combine (sub)molecular imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological interactions. Here we discuss the principles and applications of advanced FD-based AFM tools for the quantitative multiparametric characterization of complex cellular and biomolecular systems under physiological conditions. PMID:23985731

  4. Modeling peak interaction forces of soft matter with dynamic AFM in liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas Guzman, Horacio Andres

    2014-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Física Teórica de la Materia Condensada. Fecha de lectura: 23-10-2014 The atomic force microscope (AFM) is an instrument that has revolutionized the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology by enabling the characterization and manipulation of materials with nanometer (one billionth of a meter), molecular and atomic resolution. In the last 28 years a variety of experimental AFM t...

  5. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  6. AFM and XPA data on structural features and properties of films and powders based on naphthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Nakusov, A. T.; Sozanov, V. G.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2015-06-01

    The template synthesis is used to produce powders and films based on naphthalocyanines and the corresponding metal complexes (Pc, CuPc, and NiPc). The atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray phase analysis (XPA) are employed in the study of structure and phase of fine powders and nanostructured films. The AFM data are used to determine the orientation and density of primary particles packed in the film. The XPA method is used to study the chemical composition and crystal structure of the synthesized samples. The regularities related to the structural features that affect the electrophysical properties of the films under study are revealed.

  7. Probing the PEDOT:PSS/cell interface with conductive colloidal probe AFM-SECM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, P.; Zhang, H.; Kranz, C.; Wallace, G. G.; Higgins, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical information e.g., oxygen reduction can be obtained simultaneously. Conductive colloid AFM-SECM probes modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) are used for single cell force measurements in mouse fibroblasts and single cell interactions are investigated as a function of the applied potential.Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical

  8. Ultra-high aspect ratio replaceable AFM tips using deformation-suppressed focused ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savenko, Alexey; Yildiz, Izzet; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth;

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio exchangeable and customizable tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) using lateral focused ion beam (FIB) milling is presented. While on-axis FIB milling does allow high aspect ratio (HAR) AFM tips to be defined, lateral milling gives far better flexibility...... in terms of defining the shape and size of the tip. Due to beam-induced deformation, it has so far not been possible to define HAR structures using lateral FIB milling. In this work we obtain aspect ratios of up to 45, with tip diameters down to 9 nm, by a deformation-suppressing writing strategy. Several...

  9. Sharing my fifteen years experiences in the research field of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guha T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Atomic Force Microscope (AFM was developed by Binnig and his coworkers in the year 1986. He was awarded Nobel Prize in physics for this work in 1986 in sharing with Rohrer and Ruska. Rationale to develop AFM: Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM, the precursor to AFM is efficient in imaging electrically conducting specimen at atomic resolution. The impetus for development of AFM came to Binnig’s mind because of relatively poor efficiency of STM to image electrically non-conducting biological samples. He wondered why the surfaces be always imaged with a current but not with a force. He thought if small forces of interactions between a probe tip atoms and specimen surface atoms could be detected and amplified then imaging of biological specimen would be possible at a very high resolution. AFM working Principle: AFM is a Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM by which imaging is realized by interaction of a probe with sample surface without any beam (light, electron and lens system. The probe is attached to a soft and sensitive cantilever and either specimen is scanned by probe or specimen scans itself under a stationary probe. Probe’s spring constant must be small and the deflection must be measurable along with high resonance frequency. The most commonly associated force with AFM is called Vander Waals force. Three modes of working are contact mode, non contact mode and tapping mode. In contact zone, the probe tip attached with cantilever is held less than a few A˚ from the sample surface and the inter-atomic force between the atoms of probe tip and sample surface is repulsive. In non-contact zone, the probe tip is held at a distance of 100s of A˚ from the sample surface and the inter-atomic force here is long range Vander Waals interaction and is attractive in nature. AFM is also called Scanning Force Microscope because the force of interaction between probe tip atoms and surface atoms is amplified to generate a signal voltage which modulates video

  10. Ultra thin films of nanocrystalline Ge studied by AFM and interference enhanced Raman scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Balaji; S Mohan; D V S Muthu; A K Sood

    2003-10-01

    Initial growth stages of the ultra thin films of germanium (Ge) prepared by ion beam sputter deposition have been studied using atomic force microscope (AFM) and interference enhanced Raman scattering. The growth of the films follows Volmer-Weber growth mechanism. Analysis of the AFM images shows that Ostwald ripening of the grains occurs as the thickness of the film increases. Raman spectra of the Ge films reveal phonon confinement along the growth direction and show that the misfit strain is relieved for film thickness greater than 4 nm.

  11. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets. PMID:26972765

  12. AFM based anodic oxidation and its application to oxidative cutting and welding of CNT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Probe anodic oxidation by atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most important techniques in fabricating nano structures and devices. The technique was further studied in this paper. By analyzing the distribution of the electric field on substrate surface the dependence of oxide characters on field was discussed. The impacts of various parameters on oxide fabrication were experimentally studied. Based on these studies, we realized the oxidative cutting and welding of carbon nanotube (CNT) by the AFM based oxidation technique and provided a novel technique for the assembly and fabrication of CNT based nano devices.

  13. MEMS piezoresistive ring resonator for AFM imaging with pico-Newton force resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of atomic force microscope (AFM) oscillating probes using electrostatic excitation and piezoresistive detection is presented. The probe is characterized by electrical methods in vacuum and by mechanical methods in air. A frequency-mixing measurement technique is developed to reduce the parasitic signal floor. The probe resonance frequencies are in the 1 MHz range and the quality factor is measured about 53 000 in vacuum and 3000 in air. The ring probe is mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up and topographic images of patterned sample surfaces are obtained. The force resolution deduced from the measurements is about 10 pN Hz−0.5. (paper)

  14. AFM pictures of the surfaces of glass RPC electrodes damaged by water vapor contamination

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, T; Teramoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    We present surface pictures of the damaged electrodes from the Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPCs) taken by an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). For the test, a set of chambers were operated with freon mixed gas (damaged) and freonless gas (not damaged), contaminated with 1000 to 2000 ppm of water vapor. In the AFM pictures, clear differences in damage are seen between the electrodes in the chambers with the freon mixed gas and the freonless gas; a combination of freon and water vapor caused the damage.

  15. Exploring the complex mechanical properties of xanthan scaffolds by AFM-based force spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The polysaccharide xanthan has been extensively studied owing to its potential application in tissue engineering. In this paper, xanthan scaffold structures were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM in liquid, and the mechanical properties of the complex xanthan structures were investigated by using AFM-based force spectroscopy (FS. In this work, three types of structures in the xanthan scaffold were identified based on three types of FS stretching events. The fact that the complex force responses are the combinations of different types of stretching events suggests complicated intermolecular interactions among xanthan fibrils. The results provide crucial information to understand the structures and mechanical properties of the xanthan scaffold.

  16. Effective AFM cantilever tip size: methods for in-situ determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragliano, Carlo; Glia, Ayoub; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations, knowledge of the cantilever tip radius R is essential for the quantitative interpretation of experimental observables. Here we propose two techniques to rapidly quantify in-situ the effective tip radius of AFM probes. The first method is based on the strong dependency of the minimum value of the free amplitude required to observe a sharp transition from attractive to repulsive force regimes on the AFM probe radius. Specifically, the sharper the tip, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe such a transition. The key trait of the second method is to treat the tip-sample system as a capacitor. Provided with an analytical model that takes into account the geometry of the tip-sample’s capacitance, one can quantify the effective size of the tip apex fitting the experimental capacitance versus distance curve. Flowchart-like algorithms, easily implementable on any hardware, are provided for both methods, giving a guideline to AFM practitioners. The methods’ robustness is assessed over a wide range of probes of different tip radii R (i.e. 4 < R < 50 nm) and geometries. Results obtained from both methods are compared with the nominal values given by manufacturers and verified by acquiring scanning electron microscopy images. Our observations show that while both methods are reliable and robust over the range of tip sizes tested, the critical amplitude method is more accurate for relatively sharp tips (4 nm < R < 10 nm).

  17. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Zandrini, Tommaso; De Marco, Carmela; Osellame, Roberto; Turri, Stefano; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample-tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips.

  18. Thin block copolymer films : film formation and corrugation under the AFM tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Fleer, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    The tip of an atomic force microscope was used to induce nanoscale ordering in thin films of polystyrene-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) block copolymers under low force. The AFM tip produces rims on a mesoscopic scale oriented perpendicularly to the scanning direction. A wide range of molecular weights of b

  19. Modelling the surface generation process during AFM probe-based machining: simulation and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The controlled removal of material conducted with the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe is a technique that has started gaining increased attention in recent years within the micro and nano manufacturing research community. The attractive characteristics of this process are that it is relatively simple to implement and low-cost compared with vacuum-based lithography techniques for micro and nano fabrication. However, similarly to any machining process, the resulting surface finish of features cut with an AFM probe can be critical. In this context, the focus of the paper is on the development and validation of a novel analytical model for predicting the floor surface roughness induced by AFM probe-based machining when generating cavities composed of linear parallel grooves. In addition to kinematic parameters, the proposed model takes into account the minimum chip thickness and elastic recovery associated with each phase present within the microstructure of a workpiece. The implementation of the model was carried out and its performance tested when processing a dual phase brass alloy using an AFM nano-indentation probe. A relatively good agreement was achieved between the analytical and experimental results with an average prediction error of 21% when assessing the arithmetic average roughness, Ra. (paper)

  20. Mechanism of high-resolution STM/AFM imaging with functionalized tips

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hapala, Prokop; Kichin, G.; Wagner, C.; Tautz, F.S.; Temirov, R.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 8 (2014), "085421-1"-"085421-9". ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J Grant ostatní: AVČR(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM * STM * high resolution Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  1. The atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM) and scanning force (SFM) microscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM) and scanning force (SFM) microscopies. These analysis methods are based on different physical principles. Nevertheless, in all of them, a probe is situated at a few angstroms or at the direct contact of the studied sample and carries out a controlled scanning of the sample surface. Their physical principles and their running ways are described. Their potentialities and limits are given too. With these analysis methods, and more particularly with the AFM can be observed the crystal structure of isolated biological molecules and the tri dimensional structure of biological molecules which are inserted in artificial membranes. One of the future prospect of the AFM in biology is the direct observation of living cells. Indeed, it will offer the opportunity to follow, with time and in space, the individual cells behaviour and their morphological modifications. Others uses and developments of the AFM concerns the in situ analysis of mechanisms which govern the crystal growth or the direct viewing of a protein enzymatic activity. (O.M.). 37 refs., 7 figs

  2. Afm Measrurements of Martian Soil Particles Using Mems Technology - Results from the PHOENIX Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautsch, S.; Parrat, D.; de Rooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Morookian, J. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Vijendran, S.; Sykulska, H.; Pike, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Light scattering experiments conducted on Mars indicated that soil particles have dimensions around 1 μm. Particles in that range play an important role in the gas exchange between sub-surface water ice and the atmosphere. Their shape can help tracing the geological history and may indicate past presence of liquid water. NASA's Phoenix mission therefore decided to analyze soil and dust particles in the sub-micrometer to a few micrometer range using an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the first time on another planet. The co-axially mounted AFM was capable of resolving particles with 10nm lateral resolution. A MEMS approach combined with mechatronic concepts for the scanner was selected for implementing the AFM. For redundancy, the sensor chip featured eight silicon cantilevers each with a 7 to 8 μm high tip. The cantilevers could be cleaved off if contaminated. During NASA's Phoenix Mission, which operated on the red planet from May to October 2008, we could demonstrate successful AFM operations. The instrument has executed 85 experiments of which 26 were needed for calibration. Of the remaining experiments about half (28) returned images where signatures of particles could be discerned.

  3. AFM imaging and analysis of local mechanical properties for detection of surface pattern of functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knotek, Petr, E-mail: petr.knotek@upce.cz [University of Pardubice, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Joint Laboratory of Solid State Chemistry of IMC ASCR and University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Chanova, Eliska; Rypacek, Frantisek [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovskeho sq. 2, 162 06 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01

    In this work we evaluate the applicability of different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes, such as Phase Shift Imaging, Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy (AFAM) and Force Spectroscopy, for mapping of the distribution pattern of low-molecular-weight biomimetic groups on polymer biomaterial surfaces. Patterns with either random or clustered spatial distribution of bioactive peptide group derived from fibronectin were prepared by surface deposition of functional block copolymer nano-colloids and grafted with RGDS peptide containing the sequence of amino acids arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–serine (conventionally labeled as RGDS) and carrying biotin as a tag. The biotin-tagged peptides were labeled with 40 nm streptavidin-modified Au nanospheres. The peptide molecules were localized through the detection of bound Au nanospheres by AFM, and thus, the surface distribution of peptides was revealed. AFM techniques capable of monitoring local mechanical properties of the surface were proved to be the most efficient for identification of Au nano-markers. The efficiency was successfully demonstrated on two different patterns, i.e. random and clustered distribution of RGDS peptides on structured surface of the polymer biomaterial. Highlights: ► Bioactive peptides for cell adhesion on PLA-b-PEO biomimetic surface were visualized. ► The biotin-tagged RGDS peptides were labeled with streptavidin-Au nanospheres. ► The RGDS pattern was detected using different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes. ► Phase Shift Image was proved to be suitable method for studying peptide distribution.

  4. Mechanical properties of single nanostructures investigated by in-situ AFM and micro-XRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, nanostructures attracted enormous attention due to size-effects influencing the structural, optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of materials with low dimensions. Concerning the mechanical properties mainly the plastic regime was explored showing a trend that ''smaller is stronger''. In contrast, studies of the elastic behaviour of nanowires revealed contradictory results concerning the influence of size-effects on the elasticity. To investigate single nanoobjects in the elastic regime, we combined an in-situ AFM with XRD in a microfocused beam. The AFM is used to image the sample surface, to select an individual nanostructure, and to apply pressure on a chosen object. Due to the interaction between the AFM-tip and the compressed object the resonance frequency of the AFM force sensor shifts to larger values enabling us to derive the stiffness of the contact area. Simultaneous to the pressure application, XRD images around a pre-defined Bragg peak are recorded. These images allow for the determination of the elastic lattice parameter change in-situ. From the contact stiffness and the lattice parameter change, the Young modulus of an individual nanoobject is derived. Here, we present results both for SiGe islands grown by liquid-phase epitaxy on Si wafers and GaAs nanorods created by selective-area metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaAs substrates.

  5. Accurate Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation of the Normal Spring Constant of Various AFM Cantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke’s law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  6. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  7. Evaluation of shooting distance by AFM and FTIR/ATR analysis of GSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yongyan; Lakadwar, Jyoti; Rabalais, J Wayne

    2008-11-01

    The techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy are applied to the analysis of gun-shot residue (GSR) to test their ability to determine shooting distance and discrimination of the powder manufacturers. AFM is a nondestructive technique that is capable of characterizing the shapes and size distributions of GSR particles with resolution down to less than a nanometer. This may be useful for estimation of the shooting distance. Our AFM images of GSR show that the size distribution of the particles is inversely proportional to the shooting distance. Discrimination of powder manufacturers is tested by FTIR/ATR investigation of GSR. Identifying the specific compounds in the GSR by FTIR/ATR was not possible because it is a mixture of the debris of several compounds that compose the residue. However, it is shown that the GSR from different cartridges has characteristic FTIR/ATR bands that may be useful in differentiating the powder manufacturers. It appears promising that the development of AFM and FTIR/ATR databases for various powder manufacturers may be useful in analysis and identification of GSR. PMID:18761553

  8. Characterization of Local Mechanical Properties of Polymer Thin Films and Polymer Nanocomposites via AFM indentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xu

    AFM indentation has become a tool with great potential in the characterization of nano-mechanical properties of materials. Thanks to the nanometer sized probes, AFM indentation is capable of capturing the changes of multiple properties within the range of tens of nanometers, such task would otherwise be difficult by using other experiment instruments. Despite the great potentials of AFM indentation, it operates based on a simple mechanism: driving the delicate AFM probe to indent the sample surface, and recording the force-displacement response. With limited information provided by AFM indentation, efforts are still required for any practice to successfully extract the desired nano-scale properties from specific materials. In this thesis, we focus on the mechanical properties of interphase between polymer and inorganic materials. It is known that in nanocomposites, a region of polymer exist around nanoparticles with altered molecular structures and improved properties, which is named as interphase polymer. The system with polymer thin films and inorganic material substrates is widely used to simulate the interphase effect in nanocomposites. In this thesis, we developed an efficient and reliable method to process film/substrate samples and characterize the changes of local mechanical properties inside the interphase region with ultra-high resolution AFM mechanical mapping technique. Applying this newly developed method, the interphase of several film/substrate pairs were examined and compared. The local mechanical properties on the other side of the polymer thin film, the free surface side, was also investigated using AFM indentation equipped with surface modified probes. In order to extract the full spectrum of local elastic modulus inside the surface region in the range of only tens of nanometers, the different contact mechanics models were studied and compared, and a Finite Element model was also established. Though the film/substrate system has been wide used as

  9. Calibration of AFM cantilever stiffness: a microfabricated array of reflective springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumpson, P J Peter J; Zhdan, Peter; Hedley, John

    2004-08-01

    Calibration of the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nanonewton and piconewton forces, which are critical to analytical applications of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules. We have developed a compact and easy-to-use reference standard for this calibration. The new artifact consists of an array of 12 dual spiral-cantilever springs, each supporting a mirrored polycrystalline silicon disc of 160 microm in diameter. These devices were fabricated by a three-layer polysilicon surface micromachining method, including a reflective layer of gold on chromium. We call such an array a Microfabricated Array of Reference Springs (MARS). These devices have a number of advantages. Cantilever calibration using this device is straightforward and rapid. The devices have very small inertia, and are therefore resistant to shock and vibration. This means they need no careful treatment except reasonably clean laboratory conditions. The array spans the range of spring constant from around 0.16 to 11 N/m important in AFM, allowing almost all contact-mode AFM cantilevers to be calibrated easily and rapidly. Each device incorporates its own discrete gold mirror to improve reflectivity. The incorporation of a gold mirror both simplifies calibration of the devices themselves (via Doppler velocimetry) and allows interferometric calibration of the AFM z-axis using the apparent periodicity in the force-distance curve before contact. Therefore, from a single force-distance curve, taking about one second to acquire, one can calibrate the cantilever spring constant and, optionally, the z-axis scale. These are all the data one needs to make accurate and reliable force measurements. PMID:15231316

  10. A nondestructive calibration method for maximizing the range and accuracy of AFM force measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a nondestructive method for the normal and lateral sensitivity calibrations of the optical lever in atomic force microscope (AFM) is presented. The practical application of this method in a dual-probe AFM is discussed in detail. To calibrate the conversion factors between photodiode responses and probe's deflection angles accurately without applying forces to the probe, a two-degrees-of-freedom flexure-hinge-based calibration device (FHCD) is developed. The device, which mainly consists of two mutually perpendicular flexure-hinge levers that share the same rotational center, serves as a switching mechanism for precise translation-to-rotation conversions both in the normal and lateral directions. During the calibration, a probe is attached to the FHCD at the meeting of the rotational axes of two levers. The FHCD is mounted on an AFM sample platform. The probe in this method acts as a mirror to be normally and laterally tilted at nanoscale angles to deflect the reflected laser beam by twisting the corresponding flexure-hinge levers, rather than the force-inducing probe deflection in traditional AFM calibration methods. With this method, the nondestructive calibration of the local and full-range sensitivities of the optical levers can be completed without destroying the probe tip or modifying the actual system setup of an AFM. Moreover, the nonlinearities of the optical levers are accurately compensated. Experimental results show that the linear ranges (with a deviation of 5% in the full range) of the force measurement are extended to 3.6 and 4.5 times in the normal and lateral directions, respectively, increasing to over 90% of the full range of the force measurement. (paper)

  11. Effects of the AFM tip trace on nanobundles formation on the polymer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Yongda, E-mail: yanyongda@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing of Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Sun Yang; Yang Yanting; Hu Zhenjiang [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing of Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Zhao Xuesen [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AFM tip is used to scratch the PC surface once to form nanobundle structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of the tip trace on bundles formation are studied based on a modified AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample scanning mode is feasible for perfect nanobundle structures formation. - Abstract: Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has become a popular experimental tool for the nanotribological studies. Nanobundles formation perpendicular to the scanning direction has been reported as a typical wear mode for the thermoplastics, and such bundle structures are also considered as sinusoidal wave micro-/nanostructures now. In the present study, the AFM tip based nanomechanical machining method is employed to scratch a polymer Polycarbonate (PC) surface for only once with the normal load of several micro-Newtons in order to achieve the perfect regular nanobundle structures. Based on a modified AFM system, effects of different tip traces in the tip scanning mode and in the sample scanning mode on nanobundles formation on the PC surface are studied. The experimental results show that the controlled reciprocal movement of the stage in the sample scanning mode is feasible for perfect nanobundle structures formation. Moreover, effects of the normal load and the feed on bundles formation in the sample scanning mode are analyzed. Experimental results reveal that the feed value directly affects the formed patterns including the bundles and grooves structures. The reciprocal effect of the tip trace is the decisive factor of forming ideal nanobundles. The repeating times on the same area acted by the tip which are larger than twice are necessary to form a perfect nanobundle structure.

  12. 基于稳健回归的 AFM 图像水平矫正算法%An AFM Image Leveling Algorithm Based on Robust Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟腾飞; 雷宏; 冯文森

    2014-01-01

    AFM( Atomic Force Microscope ,原子力显微镜)图像经常会出现背景倾斜或弯曲。背景倾斜的原因源于探针和样本表面的倾角或XYZ扫描仪带来的弯曲。本文将稳健的MM估计算法应用到AFM图像二维背景拟合中,消除背景的倾斜,并利用fast-s估计算法作为初始化,以缩短计算时间。实验结果表明,与传统方法相比,本方法的AFM图像水平矫正效果更好。%AFM images always have some background slope or curvature that must be removed from the image .Sources of the background can be an offset angle between the probe and surface , or curvature introduced into the image from the XYZ scanner . There are a number of background subtraction options that are possible .In this paper, we take use of mm-estimators, one most commonly employed robust regression technique to calculate the background in the image and enhance its speed via fast -s estima-tion approach .Numerical results prove its excellent performances in AFM image leveling compared with other traditional algo -rithms.

  13. AFM studies of environmental effects on nanomechanical properties and cellular structure of human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of cellular structure and physical and mechanical properties of hair are essential to develop better cosmetic products and advance biological and cosmetic science. Although the morphology of the cellular structure of human hair has been traditionally investigated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, these techniques provide limited capability to in situ study of the physical and mechanical properties of human hair in various environments. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) overcomes these problems and can be used for characterization in ambient conditions without requiring specific sample preparations and surface treatment. In this study, film thickness, adhesive forces and effective Young's modulus of various hair surfaces were measured at different environments (humidity and temperature) using force calibration plot technique with an AFM. Torsional resonance mode phase contrast images were also taken in order to characterize the morphology and cellular structure changes of human hair at different humidity. The correlation between the nanomechanical properties and the cellular structure of hair is discussed

  14. Conservative and dissipative tip-sample interaction forces probed with dynamic AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsmann, B.; Seidel, C.; Anczykowski, B.; Fuchs, H.

    1999-10-01

    The conservative and dissipative forces between tip and sample of a dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) were investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experimental AFM data obtained by the frequency modulation technique. In this way it became possible to reconstruct complete force versus distance curves and damping coefficient versus distance curves from experimental data without using fit parameters for the interaction force and without using analytical interaction models. A comparison with analytical approaches is given and a way to determine a damping coefficient curve from experimental data is proposed. The results include the determination of the first point of repulsive contact of a vibrating tip when approaching a sample. The capability of quantifying the tip-sample interaction is demonstrated using experimental data obtained with a silicon tip and a mica sample in UHV.

  15. Atom probe, AFM, and STM studies on vacuum-fired stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupnik, A; Frank, P; Leisch, M

    2009-04-01

    The surface morphology of grades 304L and 316LN stainless steels, after low-temperature bake-out process and vacuum annealing, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The local elemental composition on the surface before and after thermal treatment has been investigated by atom probe (AP) depth profiling measurements. After vacuum annealing, AFM and STM show significant changes in the surface structure and topology. Recrystallization and surface reconstruction is less pronounced on the 316LN stainless steel. AP depth profiling analyses result in noticeable nickel enrichment on the surface of grade 304L samples. Since hydrogen recombination is almost controlled by surface structure and composition, a strong influence on the outgassing behaviour by the particular surface microstructure can be deduced. PMID:19167824

  16. AFM Imaging of Mercaptobenzoic Acid on Au(110): Submolecular Contrast with Metal Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Robles, Roberto; Abufager, Paula; Lorente, Nicolas; Berndt, Richard

    2016-06-01

    A self-assembled monolayer of mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) on Au(110) is investigated with scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy (STM and AFM) and density functional calculations. High-resolution AFM images obtained with metallic tips show clear contrasts between oxygen atoms and phenyl moieties. The contrast above the oxygen atoms is due to attractive covalent interactions, which is different than previously reported high-resolution images, where Pauli repulsion dominated the image contrast. We show that the bonding of MBA to the substrate occurs mainly through dispersion interactions, whereas the thiol-Au bond contributes only a quarter of the adsorption energy. No indication of Au adatoms mediating the thiol-Au interaction was found in contrast to other thiol-bonded systems. However, MBA lifts the Au(110)-(2 × 1) reconstruction. PMID:27183144

  17. AFM surface imaging of AISI D2 tool steel machined by the EDM process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface morphology, surface roughness and micro-crack of AISI D2 tool steel machined by the electrical discharge machining (EDM) process were analyzed by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. Experimental results indicate that the surface texture after EDM is determined by the discharge energy during processing. An excellent machined finish can be obtained by setting the machine parameters at a low pulse energy. The surface roughness and the depth of the micro-cracks were proportional to the power input. Furthermore, the AFM application yielded information about the depth of the micro-cracks is particularly important in the post treatment of AISI D2 tool steel machined by EDM

  18. AFM surface imaging of AISI D2 tool steel machined by the EDM process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guu, Y.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National United University, 1 Lien Da, Kung-Ching Li, Miaoli 360, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: yhorng@nuu.edu.tw

    2005-04-15

    The surface morphology, surface roughness and micro-crack of AISI D2 tool steel machined by the electrical discharge machining (EDM) process were analyzed by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. Experimental results indicate that the surface texture after EDM is determined by the discharge energy during processing. An excellent machined finish can be obtained by setting the machine parameters at a low pulse energy. The surface roughness and the depth of the micro-cracks were proportional to the power input. Furthermore, the AFM application yielded information about the depth of the micro-cracks is particularly important in the post treatment of AISI D2 tool steel machined by EDM.

  19. A study of AFM-based scratch process on polycarbonate surface and grating application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the possibility of applying atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography to draw micro/nano-structures on the surface of a polycarbonate (PC) substrate. We also fabricated a grating structure on the PC surface using the scratch method. An AFM silicon tip coated with a diamond layer was utilized as a cutting tool to scratch the surface of the sample. In order to obtain pattern depth deeper than the control method of interaction force, we used a scanner movement method which the sample scanner moves along the Z-axis. A grating of 100 μm x 150 μm was fabricated by the step and repeat method wherein the sample stage is moved in the direction of the XY-axis. The period and the depth of the grating are 500 and 50 nm, respectively. Light of 632.8 nm wavelength was diffracted on the surface of the PC substrate.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and reaction behaviour of lamellar AFm phases with aliphatic sulfonate-anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The addition of alkanesulfonates as admixtures to cementitious materials allows the formation of new lamellar phases (AFm), which was proofed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The course of hydration was investigated by heat flow calorimetry. The layered structures of AFm phases are composed of brucite-like main layers and interlayers containing alkanesulfonate ions and additional H2O molecules. These structural not necessary H2O molecules release gradually at definite steps with increasing temperature. With varying relative humidity the layer thickness c' of short aliphatic chained calcium aluminate alkanesulfonate hydrates changes considerably, whereas large organic molecules dominate the layer thickness of those with longer aliphatic chains. By means of the increase of layer thickness with increasing chain lengths it is possible to determine the tilt angles of the aliphatic chains in the interlayers

  1. AFM method to detect differences in adhesion of silica bids to cancer and normal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Igor; Iyer, Swaminathan; Gaikwad, Ravi; Woodworth, Craig

    2009-03-01

    To date, the methods of detection of cancer cells have been mostly based on traditional techniques used in biology, such as visual identification of malignant changes, cell growth analysis, specific ligand-receptor labeling, or genetic tests. Despite being well developed, these methods are either insufficiently accurate or require a lengthy complicated analysis. A search for alternative methods for the detection of cancer cells may be a fruitful approach. Here we describe an AFM study that may result in a new method for detection of cancer cells in vitro. Here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study adhesion of single silica beads to malignant and normal cells cultured from human cervix. We found that adhesion depends on the time of contact, and can be statistically different for malignant and normal cells. Using these data, one could develop an optical method of cancer detection based on adhesion of various silica beads.

  2. AFM and STM investigations of hydrogenated amorphous silicon: topography and barrier heights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herion, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Schicht- und Ionentechnik; Szot, K. [Silesian Univ., Katowice (Poland); Barzen, S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Inst. for Laboratory Astrophysics; Siebke, F. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Schicht- und Ionentechnik; Teske, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Grenzflaechenforschung und Vakuumphysik

    1997-05-01

    As-grown films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H, highly phosphorous-doped) were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Hills up to 10 nm in height and 10 to 20 nm in diameter have been observed by AFM. By using STM in a new high-sensitivity mode, (1) atomically smooth areas (roughness about 0.3 A rms) which occur at the top of the hills, (2) subnanometer structures several A in height which cover large parts of the surface have been identified. Simultaneous measurements of the local apparent barrier heights (LABH) show a clear correlation to the topography. Areas showing subnanometer structures have always low LABHs while the highest values of the LABH occur on the smooth areas. (orig.). With 5 figs.

  3. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. AFM assessment of the surface nano/microstructure on chemically damaged historical and model glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Noemi [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kowal, Andrzej [Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, PAN, ul. Niezapominajek 8, 30239 Cracow (Poland); Rincon, Jesus-Maria [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion, CSIC, C. Serrano Galvache s/n, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Villegas, Maria-Angeles, E-mail: mariangeles.villegas@cchs.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C. Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Surface chemical damage on selected historical glasses from 13th to 19th centuries was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nano- and microstructure, roughness and topography of ancient glass samples have been compared with those of model glasses prepared by conventional melting at the laboratory with similar compositions to those most frequently found in historical glass pieces. The results obtained allow discussing the chemical degradation mechanisms in terms of the acid and/or basic chemical attack carried out by the combination of gaseous pollutants and environmental humidity. Even though deep corrosion features escape to the observation order of magnitude of the AF microscope used, the AFM technique proves to be quite useful for the study and evaluation of the most common surface pathologies of historical glasses with different compositions once submitted to natural weathering.

  5. Observation and Analysis of in vitro Expression of Mouse Heart Nuclear DNA Fragments by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using AFM,we observed linear chain-like complexes formed by some specific proteins and the multi-mRNAs during the in vitro expression of some active genes on the DNA fragments. The LDH mRNA in the multi-mRNA complex can in vitro translate LDH. Via AFM, we also discovered that nmRNA prepared from heart muscles, along with some specific proteins can form linear chain-like nmRNA complexes in which LDH mRNA can also translate LDH in vitro. Our work shows the prospective application of AFM in the research of the biological reaction of the active genes on the DNA fragments.

  6. Property and AFM analysis of copolymer from konjac graft acrylic acid by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water absorption property and construction of konjac glucomannon, copolymer and regenerated copolymer demonstrated by Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM)was studied in this paper. Result showed that the copolymer was 887.8 times distilled water and the water absorption of konjac glucomannan was only 60 times. The biggest water absorption speed of distilled water was 64.7 g.g-1. min-1.The water reserving percent was 92% at room temperature after 24 h from fully water absorbing.The largest second tap water absorption was 366 times which was higher than the first. The AFM images indicated konjac grafts acrylic acid and hydrophilic sturcture comes into being. During the course of regeneration the dimensional sturcture of the copolymer was changed to more regularly.So the water absorption of copolymer was higher than konjac and regenerater's was higher than copolymer. (authors)

  7. Quadruplex-targeting anticancer drug BRACO-19 voltammetric and AFM characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quadruplex-targeting anticancer drug BRACO-19 adsorption and redox behaviour were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface and by cyclic, differential pulse and square-wave voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. The AFM and voltammetric results demonstrated that the BRACO-19 orientation and strong adsorption, with the acridine aromatic core parallel or perpendicular to the carbon electrode surface depending on solution pH, directly influences the peak potentials and redox behaviour. BRACO-19 oxidation was a complex, pH-dependent, four-step electrode process. The first oxidation step was reversible, the second, third and fourth oxidation steps irreversible, and an electroactive irreversibly oxidized BRACO-19 oxidation product was formed. BRACO-19 reduction occurred in two irreversible, pH-independent steps. The proposed redox mechanisms are related to the pyrrolidine and acridine moieties

  8. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-11-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  9. Stability analysis of an oscillating tip-cantilever system in NC-AFM

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, G; Boisgard, R; Aimé, J P; Nony, Laurent; Boisgard, Rodolphe; Aim\\'{e}, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a theoretical and a numerical investigation of the stability of a tip-cantilever system used in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) when it oscillates close to a surface. No additional dissipative force is considered. The theoretical approach is based on a variational method exploiting a coarse grained operation that gives the temporal dependance of the non-linear coupled equations of motion in amplitude and phase of the oscillator. Stability criterions for the resonance peak are deduced and predict a stable behavior of the oscillator in the vicinity of the resonance. The numerical approach is based on the results obtained with a virtual NC-AFM developed by our group. The effect of the size of the stable domain in phase is investigated. These results are in particularly good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Also they show the influence of the phae shifter in the feedback loop and the way it can affect the damping signal.

  10. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  11. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM phase images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  12. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM phase images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Helas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  13. Aflatoxin M1 Concentration in Various Dairy Products: Evidence for Biologically Reduced Amount of AFM1 in Yoghurt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rahimirad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1, a carcinogenic substance is found in milk and dairy products. The effect of season and type of dairy products on AFMi level in northern Iran was investigated in this study.Three hundred samples (each season 75 samples including raw and pasteurized milk, yoghurt, cheese, and cream samples were collected from three distinct milk producing farms. The samples were subjected to chemical and solid phase extractions and were analyzed by using HPLC technique. Recovery percentages, limit of detection and limit of quantification values were determined.Seventy percent and 98% were the minimum and maximum recoveries for cheese and raw milk, respectively and 0.021 and 0.063 ppb were the limit of detection and limit of quantification values for AFM1. We found that in autumn and winter the highest level (0.121 ppb of AFM1 in cheese and cream samples and failed to detect any AFM1 in spring samples. Interestingly, our data showed that the yoghurt samples had the lowest level of AFM1 in all seasons.There are significant differences between the AFM1 levels in dairy products in various seasons and also various types of products, suggesting spring and summer yoghurt samples as the safest products from AFM1 level point of view.

  14. Probing interactions within the synaptic DNA-SfiI complex by AFM force spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2006-01-01

    SfiI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that function as tetramers binding two recognition regions for the DNA cleavage reaction. SfiI protein is an attractive and convenient model for studying synaptic complexes between DNA and proteins capable of site specific binding. SfiI enzymatic action has been very well characterized. However, properties of the complex prior to the cleavage reaction are not clear yet. We applied AFM single molecule force spectroscopy to analyze the strength of...

  15. Visualization of the equilibrium FCC catalyst surface by AFM and SEM-EDS

    OpenAIRE

    Bayraktar, Oğuz; Kugler, Edwin L.

    2003-01-01

    The deposition of metal contaminants (e.g., Ni, V, and Fe) from the hydrocarbon feed causes the deactivation of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst used in petroleum refining. It is very important to understand the changes in the morphology and chemical composition on the catalyst surface and how these structural and chemical changes affect the catalyst performance. In this research, metal-contaminated FCC catalysts from a commercial unit have been characterized using AFM together with SE...

  16. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamgain Hitesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and atomic force microscope (AFM can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and mouse melanoma (B16F1 cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor

  17. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results. PMID:26106951

  18. An AFM-based methodology for measuring axial and radial error motions of spindles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based methodology for measurement of axial and radial error motions of a high precision spindle. Based on a modified commercial AFM system, the AFM tip is employed as a cutting tool by which nano-grooves are scratched on a flat surface with the rotation of the spindle. By extracting the radial motion data of the spindle from the scratched nano-grooves, the radial error motion of the spindle can be calculated after subtracting the tilting errors from the original measurement data. Through recording the variation of the PZT displacement in the Z direction in AFM tapping mode during the spindle rotation, the axial error motion of the spindle can be obtained. Moreover the effects of the nano-scratching parameters on the scratched grooves, the tilting error removal method for both conditions and the method of data extraction from the scratched groove depth are studied in detail. The axial error motion of 124 nm and the radial error motion of 279 nm of a commercial high precision air bearing spindle are achieved by this novel method, which are comparable with the values provided by the manufacturer, verifying this method. This approach does not need an expensive standard part as in most conventional measurement approaches. Moreover, the axial and radial error motions of the spindle can both be obtained, indicating that this is a potential means of measuring the error motions of the high precision moving parts of ultra-precision machine tools in the future. (paper)

  19. AFM study of the kinetics of surface relief evolution in fatigued 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Jiří; Obrtlík, Karel; Polák, Jaroslav

    Rimini : Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia, 2001, s. No. 937. [European Conference on Advanced Materials and Processes "EUROMAT 2001" /7./. Rimini (IT), 10.06.2001-14.06.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/D055; GA ČR GA106/01/0376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : fatigue * AFM * surface relief Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  20. Pericellular Brush and Mechanics of Guinea Pig Fibroblast Cells Studied with AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, Maxim; Ablaeva, Yulija; Kalaparthi, Vivekanand; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Sokolov, Igor

    2016-07-12

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation method combined with the brush model can be used to separate the mechanical response of the cell body from deformation of the pericellular layer surrounding biological cells. Although self-consistency of the brush model to derive the elastic modulus of the cell body has been demonstrated, the model ability to characterize the pericellular layer has not been explicitly verified. Here we demonstrate it by using enzymatic removal of hyaluronic content of the pericellular brush for guinea pig fibroblast cells. The effect of this removal is clearly seen in the AFM force-separation curves associated with the pericellular brush layer. We further extend the brush model for brushes larger than the height of the AFM probe, which seems to be the case for fibroblast cells. In addition, we demonstrate that an extension of the brush model (i.e., double-brush model) is capable of detecting the hierarchical structure of the pericellular brush, which, for example, may consist of the pericellular coat and the membrane corrugation (microridges and microvilli). It allows us to quantitatively segregate the large soft polysaccharide pericellular coat from a relatively rigid and dense membrane corrugation layer. This was verified by comparison of the parameters of the membrane corrugation layer derived from the force curves collected on untreated cells (when this corrugation membrane part is hidden inside the pericellular brush layer) and on treated cells after the enzymatic removal of the pericellular coat part (when the corrugations are exposed to the AFM probe). We conclude that the brush model is capable of not only measuring the mechanics of the cell body but also the parameters of the pericellular brush layer, including quantitative characterization of the pericellular layer structure. PMID:27410750

  1. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7) and mouse melanoma (B16F1) cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 might be used as a phenotypic differentiation

  2. Fabrication of tuning-fork based AFM and STM tungsten probe

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Falih, Hisham

    2011-12-01

    We compare the sharpness of tungsten probe tips produced by the single-step and two-step dynamic electrochemical etching processes. A small radius of curvature (RoC) of 25 nm or less was routinely obtained when the two-step electrochemical etching (TEE) process was adopted, while the smallest achievable RoC was ∼10 nm, rendering it suitable for atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) applications. © 2011 IEEE.

  3. Damage of DNA ends induced by mechanical force during AFM nano-manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental and statistical study was carried out to explore the effects of mechanical forces on the ends of linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments. Mechanical force was applied onto individual DNA molecules during atomic force microscope (AFM)-based picking-up manipulation. By comparing the PCR efficiency of two DNA fragments with primers either at ends or at the inner regions, it was found that the ends of DNA fragments were damaged during picking-up process. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of elastic properties of DLC layers using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and AFM nanoindentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocourek, Tomáš; Růžek, Michal; Landa, Michal; Jelínek, Miroslav; Mikšovský, Jan; Kopeček, Jaromír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 2 (2011), S67-S70. ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : RUS-resonant ultrasound spectroscopy * PLD * diamond-like carbon * elastic properties * AFM nanoindentation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2011

  5. Endothelial permeability is controlled by spatially defined cytoskeletal mechanics: AFM force mapping of pulmonary endothelial monolayer

    OpenAIRE

    Birukova, Anna A.; Arce, Fernando T.; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Dudek, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Lal, Ratnesh; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2008-01-01

    Actomyosin contraction directly regulates endothelial cell (EC) permeability, but intracellular redistribution of cytoskeletal tension associated with EC permeability is poorly understood. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), EC permeability assays and fluorescence microscopy to link barrier regulation, cell remodeling and cytoskeletal mechanical properties in EC treated with barrier-protective as well as barrier-disruptive agonists. Thrombin, VEGF and H2O2 increased EC permeability, disrup...

  6. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    OpenAIRE

    Dongshi Guan; Zhi Hong Hang; Zsolt Marcet; Hui Liu; I. I. Kravchenko; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Penger Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optic...

  7. Crystal structures of Boro-AFm and sBoro-AFt phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structures of boron-containing AFm (B-AFm) and AFt (B-AFt) phases have been solved ab-initio and refined from X-ray powder diffraction. 11B NMR and Raman spectroscopies confirm the boron local environment in both compounds: three-fold coordinated in B-AFm corresponding to HBO32− species, and four-fold coordinated in B-AFt corresponding to B (OH)4− species. B-AFm crystallizes in the rhombohedral R3¯c space group and has the 3CaO·Al2O3·CaHBO3·12H2O (4CaO·Al2O3·1/2B2O3·12.5H2O, C4AB1/2H12.5) general formulae with planar trigonal HBO32− anions weakly bonded at the centre of the interlayer region. One HBO32− anion is statistically distributed with two weakly bonded water molecules on the same crystallographic site. B-AFt crystallizes in the trigonal P3cl space group and has the 3CaO·Al2O3·Ca(OH)2·2Ca(B (OH)4)2·24H2O (6CaO·Al2O3·2B2O3·33H2O, C6AB2H33) general formulae with tetrahedral B (OH)4− anions located in the channel region of the structure. All tetrahedral anions are oriented in a unique direction, leading to a hexagonal c lattice parameter about half that of ettringite.

  8. GROWTH MODES AND DEFECTS OF MANGANESE MERCURY THIOCYANATE CRYSTALS OBSERVED BY AFM

    OpenAIRE

    Y. L. GENG; Sun, Z. H.

    2009-01-01

    Growth mechanisms and defects formation of the manganese mercury thiocyanate (MMTC) crystal have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both screw dislocation controlled growth and 2D nucleation growth occur on the {110} faces. Stacking faults are observed among dislocation hillocks and the formation of them probably results from the different crystallization orientations of different spirals. Hollow channels are found around the nucleation islands and the formation of them is du...

  9. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry–Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10–15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force–distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students. (paper)

  10. Study on the nano machining process with a vibrating AFM tip on the polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polymer has been proved to be nano machined by a vibrating tip in tapping mode of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The force between the tip and the surface is an important factor which determines success of the machining process. Controlling this force with high accuracy is the foundation of nanomachining in AFM tapping mode. To achieve a deeper understanding on this process, the tip is modeled as a driving oscillator with damping. Factors affecting the nano machining process are studied. The Hertz elastic contact theory is used to calculate the maximum contact pressure applied by the tip which is employed as a criterion to judge the deformation state of the sample. The simulation results show that: The driven amplitude can be used as a main parameter of controlling the machined depth. Sharper tips and harder cantilevers should be used for successful nanomachining with the vibrating tip. Under the same conditions, a larger tip radius will not only result in the machining error, but also lead to failure of the nanomachining process. The higher driving frequency will lead to a larger tapping force. However it cannot be used as a parameter to control the machined depth because of its narrow variation range. But it is a main error source for the nanomachining process in AFM tapping mode. Moreover, a larger Young's modulus polymer sample will induce a smaller machined depth, a larger maximum contact pressure and a bigger tapping force.

  11. Single-cycle-PLL detection for real-time FM-AFM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecker, Benedikt; Dukic, Maja; Erickson, Blake; Ortmanns, Maurits; Fantner, Georg; Anders, Jens

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we present a novel architecture for phase-locked loop (PLL) based high-speed demodulation of frequency-modulated (FM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) signals. In our approach, we use single-sideband (SSB) frequency upconversion to translate the AFM signal from the position sensitive detector to a fixed intermediate frequency (IF) of 10 MHz. In this way, we fully benefit from the excellent noise performance of PLL-based FM demodulators still avoiding the intrinsic bandwidth limitation of such systems. In addition, the upconversion to a fixed IF renders the PLL demodulator independent of the cantilever's resonance frequency, allowing the system to work with a large range of cantilever frequencies. To investigate if the additional noise introduced by the SSB upconverter degrades the system noise figure we present a model of the AM-to-FM noise conversion in PLLs incorporating a phase-frequency detector. Using this model, we can predict an upper corner frequency for the demodulation bandwidth above which the converted noise from the single-sideband upconverter becomes the dominant noise source and therefore begins to deteriorate the overall system performance. The approach is validated by both electrical and AFM measurements obtained with a PCB-based prototype implementing the proposed demodulator architecture. PMID:24760947

  12. AFM imaging and fractal analysis of surface roughness of AlN epilayers on sapphire substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We determined the complexity of 3D surface roughness of aluminum nitride layers. • We used atomic force microscopy and analyzed their fractal geometry. • We determined the fractal dimension of surface roughness of aluminum nitride layers. • We determined the dependence of layer morphology on substrate temperature. - Abstract: The paper deals with AFM imaging and characterization of 3D surface morphology of aluminum nitride (AlN) epilayers on sapphire substrates prepared by magnetron sputtering. Due to the effect of temperature changes on epilayer's surface during the fabrication, a surface morphology is studied by combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fractal analysis methods. Both methods are useful tools that may assist manufacturers in developing and fabricating AlN thin films with optimal surface characteristics. Furthermore, they provide different yet complementary information to that offered by traditional surface statistical parameters. This combination is used for the first time for measurement on AlN epilayers on sapphire substrates, and provides the overall 3D morphology of the sample surfaces (by AFM imaging), and reveals fractal characteristics in the surface morphology (fractal analysis)

  13. Structure and permeability of ion-channels by integrated AFM and waveguide TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Patel, Nirav R; Quist, Arjan P; Cohen, Daniel A; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Membrane ion channels regulate key cellular functions and their activity is dependent on their 3D structure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images 3D structure of membrane channels placed on a solid substrate. Solid substrate prevents molecular transport through ion channels thus hindering any direct structure-function relationship analysis. Here we designed a ~70 nm nanopore to suspend a membrane, allowing fluidic access to both sides. We used these nanopores with AFM and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) for high resolution imaging and molecular transport measurement. Significantly, membranes over the nanopore were stable for repeated AFM imaging. We studied structure-activity relationship of gap junction hemichannels reconstituted in lipid bilayers. Individual hemichannels in the membrane overlying the nanopore were resolved and transport of hemichannel-permeant LY dye was visualized when the hemichannel was opened by lowering calcium in the medium. This integrated technique will allow direct structure-permeability relationship of many ion channels and receptors. PMID:24651823

  14. Robust deposition of lambda DNA on mica for imaging by AFM in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Nancy Anabel Gerling; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio

    2014-01-01

    Long DNA molecules remain difficult to image by atomic force microscopy (AFM) because of their tendency to entanglement and spontaneous formation of networks. We present a comparison of two different DNA deposition methods operating at room temperature and humidity conditions, aimed at reproducible imaging of isolated and relaxed λ DNA conformations by AFM in air. We first demonstrate that a standard deposition procedure, consisting in adsorption of DNA in the presence of divalent cations followed by washing and air-drying steps, yields a coexistence of different types of λ DNA networks with a only a few isolated DNA chains. In contrast, deposition using a spin-coating-based technique results in reproducible coverage of a significant fraction of the substrate area by isolated and relaxed λ DNA molecules, with the added benefit of a reduction in the effect of a residual layer that normally embeds DNA strands and leads to an apparent DNA height closer to the expected value. Furthermore, we show that deposition by spin-coating is also well-suited to visualize DNA-protein complexes. These results indicate that spin-coating is a simple, powerful alternative for reproducible sample preparation for AFM imaging. PMID:25195672

  15. Study on the nano machining process with a vibrating AFM tip on the polymer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Weitao [State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Robotics Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Yan Yongda, E-mail: yanyongda@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Robotics Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Hu Zhenjiang; Zhao Xuesen; Yan Jiucun; Dong Shen [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2012-01-15

    The polymer has been proved to be nano machined by a vibrating tip in tapping mode of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The force between the tip and the surface is an important factor which determines success of the machining process. Controlling this force with high accuracy is the foundation of nanomachining in AFM tapping mode. To achieve a deeper understanding on this process, the tip is modeled as a driving oscillator with damping. Factors affecting the nano machining process are studied. The Hertz elastic contact theory is used to calculate the maximum contact pressure applied by the tip which is employed as a criterion to judge the deformation state of the sample. The simulation results show that: The driven amplitude can be used as a main parameter of controlling the machined depth. Sharper tips and harder cantilevers should be used for successful nanomachining with the vibrating tip. Under the same conditions, a larger tip radius will not only result in the machining error, but also lead to failure of the nanomachining process. The higher driving frequency will lead to a larger tapping force. However it cannot be used as a parameter to control the machined depth because of its narrow variation range. But it is a main error source for the nanomachining process in AFM tapping mode. Moreover, a larger Young's modulus polymer sample will induce a smaller machined depth, a larger maximum contact pressure and a bigger tapping force.

  16. Direct comparison of AFM and SEM measurements on the same set of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvallée, A.; Feltin, N.; Ducourtieux, S.; Trabelsi, M.; Hochepied, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    This article is the first step in the development of a hybrid metrology combining AFM and SEM techniques for measuring the dimensions of a nanoparticle population in 3D space (X,Y,Z). This method exploits the strengths of each technique on the same set of nanoparticles. AFM is used for measuring the nanoparticle height and the measurements along X and Y axes are deduced from SEM images. A sampling method is proposed in order to obtain the best deposition conditions of SiO2 and gold nanoparticles on mica or silicon substrates. Only the isolated nanoparticles are taken into account in the histogram of size distribution. Moreover, a semi-automatic Matlab routine has also been developed to process the AFM and SEM images, measure and count the nanoparticles. This routine allows the user to exclusively select the isolated nanoparticles through a control interface. The measurements have been performed on spherical-like nanoparticles to test the method by comparing the results obtained with both techniques.

  17. Thermodynamic behavior of D-sphingosine/cholesterol monolayers and the topography observed by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are of a dynamic microdomain structure found in recent years,enriched in sphingolipids,cholesterol and particular proteins.The change of structure and function of lipid rafts could result in many diseases.In this work,the monolayer behavior of mixed systems of D-sphingosine with choles-terol was investigated in terms of the mean surface area per molecule(Am),excess molecular area(Aex),surface excess Gibbs energy(Gex),interaction parameter(ω),activity coefficients(1 and 2) as well as elasticity(Cs1) of formed films.The deposited Langmuir-Blodgett(LB) monolayers were inves-tigated with atomic force microscopy(AFM).Thermodynamic analysis indicates Aex and Gex in the binary systems with negative deviations from the ideal behavior,suggesting attractive interaction be-tween molecules.The stability,elasticity and activity coefficients show a marked dependence on the mole faction of D-sphingosine.The results of observation by AFM show that the single D-sphingosine molecular film took on small granule structure.When mixing the D-sphingosine and cholesterol at dif-ferent ratios,the mixed films transform from the chains structure to larger slice and net coexisting structure with the increasing of the cholesterol content.In the end,pure cholesterol forms more ag-gregated structure.AFM experiments effectively support the above findings and interpretation.

  18. A concept for automated nanoscale atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements using a priori knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nanometer coordinate measuring machine (NCMM) is developed for comparatively fast large area scans with high resolution. The system combines a metrological atomic force microscope (AFM) with a precise positioning system. The sample is moved under the probe system via the positioning system achieving a scan range of 25 × 25 × 5 mm3 with a resolution of 0.1 nm. A concept for AFM measurements using a priori knowledge is implemented. The a priori knowledge is generated through measurements with a white light interferometer and the use of CAD data. Dimensional markup language is used as a transfer and target format for a priori knowledge and measurement data. Using the a priori knowledge and template matching algorithms combined with the optical microscope of the NCMM, the region of interest can automatically be identified. In the next step the automatic measurement of the part coordinate system and the measurement elements with the AFM sensor of the NCMM is done. The automatic measurement involves intelligent measurement strategies, which are adapted to specific geometries of the measurement feature to reduce measurement time and drift effects

  19. Rational fabrication of a gold-coated AFM TERS tip by pulsed electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Kun; Huang, Teng-Xiang; Zeng, Zhi-Cong; Li, Mao-Hua; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Fang-Zu; Ren, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Reproducible fabrication of sharp gold- or silver-coated tips has become the bottleneck issue in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, especially for atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based TERS. Herein, we developed a novel method based on pulsed electrodeposition to coat a thin gold layer over atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to produce plasmonic TERS tips with high reproducibility. We systematically investigated the influence of the deposition potential and step time on the surface roughness and sharpness. This method allows the rational control of the radii of gold-coated TERS tips from a few to hundreds of nanometers, which allows us to systematically study the dependence of the TERS enhancement on the radius of the gold-coated AFM tip. The maximum TERS enhancement was achieved for the tip radius in the range of 60-75 nm in the gap mode. The coated gold layer has a strong adhesion with the silicon tip surface, which is highly stable in water, showing the great potential for application in the aqueous environment.

  20. AFM imaging and fractal analysis of surface roughness of AlN epilayers on sapphire substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallaeva, Dinara, E-mail: dinara.dallaeva@yandex.ru [Brno University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication, Physics Department, Technická 8, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Ţălu, Ştefan [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of AET, Discipline of Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Graphics, 103-105 B-dul Muncii Street, Cluj-Napoca 400641, Cluj (Romania); Stach, Sebastian [University of Silesia, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, Institute of Informatics, Department of Biomedical Computer Systems, ul. Będzińska 39, 41-205 Sosnowiec (Poland); Škarvada, Pavel; Tománek, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír [Brno University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication, Physics Department, Technická 8, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We determined the complexity of 3D surface roughness of aluminum nitride layers. • We used atomic force microscopy and analyzed their fractal geometry. • We determined the fractal dimension of surface roughness of aluminum nitride layers. • We determined the dependence of layer morphology on substrate temperature. - Abstract: The paper deals with AFM imaging and characterization of 3D surface morphology of aluminum nitride (AlN) epilayers on sapphire substrates prepared by magnetron sputtering. Due to the effect of temperature changes on epilayer's surface during the fabrication, a surface morphology is studied by combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fractal analysis methods. Both methods are useful tools that may assist manufacturers in developing and fabricating AlN thin films with optimal surface characteristics. Furthermore, they provide different yet complementary information to that offered by traditional surface statistical parameters. This combination is used for the first time for measurement on AlN epilayers on sapphire substrates, and provides the overall 3D morphology of the sample surfaces (by AFM imaging), and reveals fractal characteristics in the surface morphology (fractal analysis)

  1. Thermodynamic behavior of D-sphingosine/cholesterol monolayers and the topography observed by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO ChangChun; SUN RunGuang; ZHANG Jing; CHANG YiGuang; NIU ChunLing

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are of a dynamic microdomain structure found in recent years, enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and particular proteins. The change of structure and function of lipid rafts could result in many diseases. In this work, the monolayer behavior of mixed systems of D-sphingosine with choles-terol was investigated in terms of the mean surface area per molecule (Am), excess molecular area (△Aex), surface excess Gibbs energy (△Gex), interaction parameter (ω) activity coefficients (f1 and f2) as well as elasticity (Cs-1) of formed films. The deposited Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers were inves-tigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Thermodynamic analysis indicates △Aex and △Gex in the binary systems with negative deviations from the ideal behavior, suggesting attractive interaction be-tween molecules. The stability, elasticity and activity coefficients show a marked dependence on the mole faction of D-sphingosine. The results of observation by AFM show that the single D-sphingosine molecular film took on small granule structure. When mixing the D-sphingosine and cholesterol at dif-ferent ratios, the mixed films transform from the chains structure to larger slice and net coexisting structure with the increasing of the cholesterol content. In the end, pure cholesterol forms more ag-gregated structure. AFM experiments effectively support the above findings and interpretation.

  2. AFM and pulsed laser ablation methods for Cultural Heritage: application to archeometric analysis of stone artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Stranges, F.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F.; Antici, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) and of the pulsed laser ablation as methods for morphological diagnostic with nanoscale precision of archeological artifacts and corrosive patina removal from stone artifacts. We test our methodology on stone artifacts extracted from the Church of Sotterra (located in Calabria, South Italy). The AFM microscopy was compared with different petrographic, chemical, optical and morphological analysis methods for identifying the textural characteristics, evaluating the state of preservation and formulating some hypotheses about the provenance and composition of the impurity patina located on the artifact surfaces. We demonstrate that with the nanometric precision obtained with AFM microscopy, it is possible to distinguish the different states of preservation, much better than using conventional petrographic methods. The surface's roughness is evaluated from very small artifact's fragments, reducing the coring at micrometric scale with a minimal damage to the artworks. After the diagnosis, we performed restoration tests using the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method and compared it with the more common micro-sandblasting under dry conditions. We find that the PLA is highly effective for the removal of the surficial patina, with a control of a few hundreds of nanometers in the cleaning of surface, without introducing chemical or morphological damages to the artifacts. Moreover, PLA can be easily implemented in underwater conditions; this has the great advantage that stone and pottery artifacts for marine archeological sites do not need to be removed from the site.

  3. Fracture Growth Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Martinez, Jonathan; McLean, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant in orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent flaws will not cause failure during the design life. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environmentally-assisted cracking (K (sub EAC)) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched specimens SE(B) representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to the monopropellant at 50 degrees Centigrade for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant was found to be at least 22.0 kilopounds per square inch. The stress intensity factor of the weld material was at least 31.3 kilopounds per square inch.

  4. Simulation of CNT-AFM tip based on finite element analysis for targeted probe of the biological cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Miyake, Mikio; Ikeda, Shoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nano scale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cell's. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis.

  5. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  6. Design of a micro-cartridge system for the robotic assembly of exchangeable AFM-probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenwerfer, Malte; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Fatikow, Sergej;

    2013-01-01

    demand an even higher lateral resolution of the measurements. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a common tool for this characterization and a standard instrument for all kinds of research and development disciplines. However, the characterization of three dimensional high-aspect ratio and sidewall...... structures remains a hardly accomplishable task. Novel exchangeable and customizable scanning probe tips, so-called NanoBits, can be attached to standard AFM cantilevers offering unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of the tips to the surface topology of the specific application. The ultimate...... goal is the realization of an in-situ exchange of NanoBits within the regular AFM environment. For this, NanoBits have to be provided in a freestanding way, making them accessible for the AFM cantilever. The direct fabrication of such structures is still challenging, hence the robotic preassembly of...

  7. Fabrication of uniform and high resolution copper nanowire using intermediate self-assembled monolayers through direct AFM lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical AFM lithography was used to directly fabricate copper nanowires. The copper ions were strongly reduced by a negative sample bias at the point where the AFM tip was localized, and copper metal wires were successfully fabricated following the direction of the electrical field of the bias. A TDA⋅HCl self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was found to play an important role as an intermediate layer for enhancing the capability of high resolution and complete development after the AFM lithographic process. The physical and electrical properties of the wires were analyzed by AFM, EFM, SEM, TEM and I–V measurement. The fabricated copper has promising potential for applications such as masks and interconnectors for nanoelectronic devices. (paper)

  8. On the Accuracy of Imaging on the Nanometer Scale:Geometry versus Material Properties in High Resolution AFM Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam; Mechler; Janos; Kokavecz; Peter; Heszler

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Intermittent Contact Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (ICM-AFM) imaging of sub-micron morphology is a routine operation in many fields of research from materials science to molecular biology,typically used to obtain three dimensional geometrical measures of surface structures.When it comes to the nanometer-angstrom range,however,quantitative interpretation of AFM morphology is less straightforward.Reports of non-topography-originated features as well as anomalies and conflicting reports in nanostr...

  9. Localized electrografting of vinylic monomers on a conducting substrate by means of an integrated electrochemical AFM probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbal, Achraf; Grisotto, Federico; Charlier, Julienne; Palacin, Serge; Goyer, Cédric; Demaille, Christophe

    2009-05-11

    Combinations of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) with other scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), show great promise for directing localized modification, which is of great interest for chemical, biochemical and technical applications. Herein, an atomic force scanning electrochemical microscope is used as a new electrochemical lithographic tool (L-AFM-SECM) to locally electrograft, with submicrometer resolution, a non-conducting organic coating on a conducting substrate. PMID:19308970

  10. Versatile method for AFM-tip functionalization with biomolecules: fishing a ligand by means of an in situ click reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N.; Naik, Vikrant V.; Chu, Zonglin; Drew, Michael E.; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Yamakoshi, Yoko

    2015-04-01

    A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions.A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details with synthesis and characterization of compounds. Procedures for modifications of Au surfaces and AFM tips. AFM images and full PM-IRRAS spectra of modified surfaces. Detailed procedure for QCM measurement. A table showing ligand-receptor interaction probability. NMR, IR and MS charts. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01495f

  11. In situ Stiffness Adjustment of AFM Probes by Two Orders of Magnitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Lambertus Cornelis de Laat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The choice on which type of cantilever to use for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM depends on the type of the experiment being done. Typically, the cantilever has to be exchanged when a different stiffness is required and the entire alignment has to be repeated. In the present work, a method to adjust the stiffness in situ of a commercial AFM cantilever is developed. The adjustment is achieved by changing the effective length of the cantilever by electrostatic pull-in. By applying a voltage between the cantilever and an electrode (with an insulating layer at the point of contact, the cantilever snaps to the electrode, reducing the cantilever’s effective length. An analytical model was developed to find the pull-in voltage of the system. Subsequently, a finite element model was developed to study the pull-in behavior. The working principle of this concept is demonstrated with a proof-of-concept experiment. The electrode was positioned close to the cantilever by using a robotic nanomanipulator. To confirm the change in stiffness, the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever was measured for varying electrode positions. The results match with the theoretical expectations. The stiffness was adjusted in situ in the range of 0.2 N/m to 27 N/m, covering two orders of magnitude in one single cantilever. This proof-of-concept is the first step towards a micro fabricated prototype, that integrates the electrode positioning system and cantilever that can be used for actual AFM experiments.

  12. Cell visco-elasticity measured with AFM and optical trapping at sub-micrometer deformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanila Nawaz

    Full Text Available The measurement of the elastic properties of cells is widely used as an indicator for cellular changes during differentiation, upon drug treatment, or resulting from the interaction with the supporting matrix. Elasticity is routinely quantified by indenting the cell with a probe of an AFM while applying nano-Newton forces. Because the resulting deformations are in the micrometer range, the measurements will be affected by the finite thickness of the cell, viscous effects and even cell damage induced by the experiment itself. Here, we have analyzed the response of single 3T3 fibroblasts that were indented with a micrometer-sized bead attached to an AFM cantilever at forces from 30-600 pN, resulting in indentations ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 micrometer. To investigate the cellular response at lower forces up to 10 pN, we developed an optical trap to indent the cell in vertical direction, normal to the plane of the coverslip. Deformations of up to two hundred nanometers achieved at forces of up to 30 pN showed a reversible, thus truly elastic response that was independent on the rate of deformation. We found that at such small deformations, the elastic modulus of 100 Pa is largely determined by the presence of the actin cortex. At higher indentations, viscous effects led to an increase of the apparent elastic modulus. This viscous contribution that followed a weak power law, increased at larger cell indentations. Both AFM and optical trapping indentation experiments give consistent results for the cell elasticity. Optical trapping has the benefit of a lower force noise, which allows a more accurate determination of the absolute indentation. The combination of both techniques allows the investigation of single cells at small and large indentations and enables the separation of their viscous and elastic components.

  13. Characterization of Pebax angioplasty balloon surfaces with AFM, SEM, TEM, and SAXS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jacob A; Forsyth, Bruce; Zhou, Fang; Myers, Jason; Frethem, Chris; Haugstad, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In the medical device industry, angioplasty balloons have been widely used in the less invasive treatment of heart disease by expanding and relieving clogged structures in various arterial segments. However, new applications using thin coatings on the balloon surface have been explored to enhance therapeutic value in the delivery of pharmaceuticals (drug-elution) or control thermal energy output (RF ablation). In this study, angioplasty balloon materials comprised of poly(ether-block-amide) (Pebax) were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize physical properties at the balloon surface that may affect coating adhesion. The soft segment of this Pebax 1074 material is polyethylene oxide (PEO) and the hard segment is nylon-12. The morphology of the hard segments of this block co-polymer are found via AFM stiffness measurements to be (40 ± 20) nm by (300 ± 150) nm and are oriented parallel to the surface of the balloon. SAXS measurements found the lamellar spacing to be (18.5 ± 0.5) nm, and demonstrate a preferential orientation in agreement with TEM and AFM measurements. Fixation of this balloon in resin, followed by cryo-sectioning is shown to provide a novel manner in which to investigate surface characteristics on the balloon such as material or coating thickness as well as uniformity in comparison to the bulk structure. These outputs were deemed critical to improve overall balloon processing such as molding and surface treatment options for robust designs toward better procedural outcomes targeting new therapeutic areas. PMID:25891789

  14. AFM research on the mechanism of Fe-based alloy stress annealed inducing magnetic anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The cross-section of the Fe-based alloy (Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9) ribbon annealed at 540℃ under various tensile stress was investigated with atomic force microscope (AFM). The stress effect mechanism in Fe-based alloy ribbon tensile stress an-nealed inducing transverse magnetic anisotropy field was studied using the X-ray diffraction spectra and longitudinal drive giant magneto-impedance effect curves, and the model of direction dominant in encapsulated grain agglomeration was es-tablished. The relationship between the direction dominant in encapsulated grain agglomeration and magnetic anisotropy field was disclosed.

  15. AFM study of surface relief evolution in 316L steel fatigued at low and high temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Jiří; Valtr, B.; Weidner, A.; Petrenec, Martin; Obrtlík, Karel; Polák, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2010), s. 1625-1633. ISSN 1877-7058. [Fatigue 2010. Praha, 06.06.2010-11.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2371; GA AV ČR 1QS200410502; GA ČR GA106/06/1096 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Fatigue crack initiation * 316L steel * Persistent slip band (PSB) * Extrusion * Intrusion * Atomic force microscopy (AFM) Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  16. Tip loading effects on AFM-based transport measurements of metal–oxide interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we demonstrate the effects of tip loading force on the contact quality and local current–voltage character between conductive AFM tips and individual noble metal nanoparticle–strontium titanate (NP–STO) interfaces. These results show that though contact quality may improve with increased loading force, nanoparticle deformation remains negligible for loading forces in the nN–μN range. Maintaining a moderate loading force in the tens to hundreds of nN therefore enables size-dependent transport of individual NP–STO interfaces to be determined. (paper)

  17. Multiscale patterning of nanocomposite polyelectrolyte/nanoparticle films using inkjet printing and AFM scratching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, S. J.; Bowen, J.; Preece, J. A.

    2015-06-01

    The fabrication of structured polymer/nanoparticle composite films through a combination of additive, subtractive and self-assembly methodologies is investigated. Consumer grade inkjet printing hardware is employed to deposit cationic polyelectrolytes on (i) hydrophilic and (ii) hydrophobised glass substrates. The hydrophobisation process controls the spreading of the droplets and hence the lateral size of printed features. The printed cationic polyelectrolyte regions are used as a template to direct the self-assembly of negatively charged gold nanoparticles onto the surface. Micro-scale features are created in the polyelectrolyte/nanoparticle films using AFM scratching to selectively displace material. The effect of substrate wettability on film morphology is discussed.

  18. Mechanical force-induced DNA damage during AFM single-molecule manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many environmental factors can cause DNA damage, such as radiation, heat, oxygen free radical, etc., which can induce mutation during DNA replication. Meanwhile, DNA molecules are subjected to various mechanical forces in numerous biological processes. However, it is unknown whether the mechanical force would induce DNA damage and introduce mutation during DNA replication, With the combination of single-molecule manipulation based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecular polymerase chain reaction (SM-PCR) and Sanger's sequencing, we investigated the effect of mechanical force on DNA. The results show that mechanical force can cause DNA damage and induce DNA mutation during amplification. (authors)

  19. A Study on HA Titanium Surface with Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Three kinds of titanium surface especially the HA surface are analyzed. Titanium was treated by 3 kinds of methods that were acid & alkali, calcic solution and apatite solution. Samples were observed by optic microscope and atomic force microscope ( AFM). The typical surface morphology of the acid and alkali group is little holes, and on the two HA surface the tiny protuberances is typical. The surface treated by apatite solution was smoother than the two formers. The rough surface treated with acid and alkali was propitious to Ca + , Pand proteins' adhesion, and the relatively smooth HA surface was of benefit to the cell adhesion.

  20. A model for superconductivity induced by AFM magnons exchange in CuO2 layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors present the calculation of the critical superconducting temperature in La2-xMxCuO4. The pairing here is between the holes on the O-sites in the CuO2 layers and is ascribed to the fluctuations of the antiferromagnetic background of the localized spins on the Cu-sites. The effective O-holes interaction Hamiltonian is obtained integrating out the Cu-spins, and is interpreted as due to virtual exchange of either paramagnons or AFM magnons. In both cases the d-wave singlet pairing is found to have the highest critical temperature

  1. The process of collagen biomineralization observed by AFM in a model dual membrane diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation and simulation of naturally occurring mineralization can offer some new ideas in the design and fabrication of new functional materials for bone analogues. In this paper, a model dual membrane diffusion system (DMDS) was used to study the mineralization behaviour of collagen. The process of mineralization was observed by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results showed that the surface roughness and hardness of mineralized collagen fibers increased with time during the process of mineralization. The adhesion force of mineralized collagen fibers decreased with mineralization time. The micromechanical properties and microstructure changes of mineralized collagen fibers suggested that the mineralization was a step-by-step assembling process.

  2. Using AFM nanoindentation to investigate mechanical properties of cellulose fibers in controlled humidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In papermaking, fiber-fiber bonds are formed in the wet state and dried consecutively. Thus, it is of interest to investigate mechanical properties of cellulose fibers used in papermaking as a function of relative humidity and in the fully wet state. For this purpose, we chose atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation because it combines the possibility to gently image the surface before performing actual nanoindentation. Starting at the fully dried state, surface hardness is around 240 MPa and is reduced moderately to 90 MPa at 80% relative humidity and drops further to 3 MPa at the fully wet state. (author)

  3. Conductivity measurement of individual SnS nanoparticles by Peak Force AFM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prastani, C.; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Hývl, Matěj; Fejfar, Antonín; Nanu, M.; Nanu, D.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Rath, K.

    Melville: Materials Research Society, 2013 - (Brongersma, M.; Matias, V.; Segalman, R.; Shea, L.; Watanabe, H.). ( MRS Proceedings. 1557). ISSN 0272-9172. [ MRS Spring Meeting 2013. San Francisco (US), 01.04.2013-05.04.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA ČR GA13-12386S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanoparticles * SnS * AFM * Peak Force * conductivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1557/opl.2013.1108

  4. The AFM-FM phase transition in FeRh investigated using XMCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamm, Christian; Duerr, Hermann A.; Eberhardt, Wolfgang [BESSY, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Back, Christian [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Radu, Ilie [BESSY, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Thiele, Jan-Ulrich [Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, 3403 Yerba Buena Road, San Jose, CA 95135 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The phase transition from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering in FeRh is investigated in an element specific way by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Dichroism sum rules allow us to determine spin and orbital moments of the two elements. Increasing the temperature from 300 to 450 Kelvin, the magnetic moments in Fe and Rh both evolve from zero to their final value, while the ratio of Rh to Fe moments stays constant. We attribute this to a coexistence of the AFM and FM phases.

  5. Designer cantilevers for even more accurate quantitative measurements of biological systems with multifrequency AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contera, S.

    2016-04-01

    Multifrequency excitation/monitoring of cantilevers has made it possible both to achieve fast, relatively simple, nanometre-resolution quantitative mapping of mechanical of biological systems in solution using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single molecule resolution detection by nanomechanical biosensors. A recent paper by Penedo et al [2015 Nanotechnology 26 485706] has made a significant contribution by developing simple methods to improve the signal to noise ratio in liquid environments, by selectively enhancing cantilever modes, which will lead to even more accurate quantitative measurements.

  6. Surface Photovoltage Spectroscopy and AFM Analysis of CIGSe Thin Film Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gorji, Nima E.; Ugo Reggiani; Leonardo Sandrolini

    2015-01-01

    The band gap, grain size, and topography of a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin film solar cell are analyzed using surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPV) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. From the steep increase in SPV signal the band gap of the CIGSe absorber, In2S3 and ZnO layers are extracted and found to be 1.1, 1.3 and 2.6 eV, respectively. Already below the band gap of ZnO layer, a slight SPV response at 1.40 eV photon energies is observed indicating the presence of deep donor stat...

  7. Crystal structures of Boro-AFm and sBoro-AFt phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA DEN/DTCD/SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Mesbah, Adel [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA DEN/DTCD/SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Clermont Universite, ENSCCF, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cau Dit Coumes, Celine, E-mail: celine.cau-dit-coumes@cea.fr [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA DEN/DTCD/SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Renaudin, Guillaume [Clermont Universite, ENSCCF, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Leroux, Fabrice [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Mercier, Cyrille [LMCPA, Universite de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambresis, 59600 Maubeuge (France); Revel, Bertrand [Centre Commun de Mesure RMN, Universite Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, Cite Scientifique 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Damidot, Denis [EM Douai, MPE-GCE, 59508 Douai (France)

    2012-10-15

    Crystal structures of boron-containing AFm (B-AFm) and AFt (B-AFt) phases have been solved ab-initio and refined from X-ray powder diffraction. {sup 11}B NMR and Raman spectroscopies confirm the boron local environment in both compounds: three-fold coordinated in B-AFm corresponding to HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} species, and four-fold coordinated in B-AFt corresponding to B (OH){sub 4}{sup -} species. B-AFm crystallizes in the rhombohedral R3{sup Macron }c space group and has the 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaHBO{sub 3}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O (4CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}1/2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}12.5H{sub 2}O, C{sub 4}AB{sub 1/2}H{sub 12.5}) general formulae with planar trigonal HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anions weakly bonded at the centre of the interlayer region. One HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anion is statistically distributed with two weakly bonded water molecules on the same crystallographic site. B-AFt crystallizes in the trigonal P3cl space group and has the 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}Ca(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}2Ca(B (OH){sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O (6CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}33H{sub 2}O, C{sub 6}AB{sub 2}H{sub 33}) general formulae with tetrahedral B (OH){sub 4}{sup -} anions located in the channel region of the structure. All tetrahedral anions are oriented in a unique direction, leading to a hexagonal c lattice parameter about half that of ettringite.

  8. Two-dimensional dopant profiling for shallow junctions by TEM and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work concerns the development of the Etch/TEM and Etch/AFM methods to obtain quantitative 2-D dopant profiles for the ultra shallow p-n junctions of the next generation of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). For these methods, thin foil (TEM) or bulk (AFM) cross-sectional specimens were etched using a dopant selective chemical so that local areas of the dopant implanted source/drain (S/D) regions were etched to different depths. The surface topography of the S/D regions was determined from the thickness fringes for the TEM method and by the direct measurement for the AFM method. The local etched depths were converted to etch rates, and these were then converted to corresponding 1-D and 2-D dopant profiles by the experimentally independent etch rate calibration curves. Shallow junction MOSFET samples were designed and fabricated with junction depths 60nm (n+/p), 80nm (n+/p) and 120nm (p+/n) using 0.25μm process technology. A new method using SOG (Spin-on-Glass) contributed to the high quality XTEM thin foil specimens. Controlled stirring of the etchant increased the dopant concentration selectivity and etching consistency. Computer modelling simulated the isotropic etching behaviours, which can introduce the significant error in dopant profiling for shallow and abrupt junction samples. Comprehensive quantitative results enabled the optimum etching time to be determined for the first time. Etch/TEM method gave 1-D dopant profiles that showed good agreement with 1-D Spreading Resistance Probe (SRP) dopant profiles for determining junction depths. 2-D dopant profiles gave Leff, i.e. the shortest lateral distance between the S/D junctions, of major importance for MOSFET performance. Values for Leff of 161, 159 and 123nm were determined from 60, 80 and 120nm junction depth samples respectively, compared with the 215nm MOSFET gate length. The resolution and accuracy of the Etch/TEM method are estimated as 2 and 10nm respectively. For

  9. Label-free and quantitative evaluation of cytotoxicity based on surface nanostructure and biophysical property of cells utilizing AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Gi-Ja; Kang, Sung Wook; Cheong, Youjin; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the four commonly used cytotoxicity assays and the mechanical properties as evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were compared in a cellular system. A cytotoxicity assay is the first and most essential test to evaluate biocompatibility of various toxic substances. Many of the cytotoxicity methods require complicated and labor-intensive process, as well as introduce experimental error. In addition, these methods cannot provide instantaneous and quantitative cell viability information. AFM has become an exciting analytical tool in medical, biological, and biophysical research due to its unique abilities. AFM-based force-distance curve measurements precisely measure the changes in the biophysical properties of the cell. Therefore, we observed the morphological changes and mechanical property changes in L929 cells following sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) treatment utilizing AFM. AFM imaging showed that the toxic effects of SLS changed not only the spindle-like shape of L929 cells into a round shape, but also made a rough cell surface. As the concentration of SLS was increased, the surface roughness of L929 cell was increased, and stiffness decreased. We confirmed that inhibition of proliferation clearly increased with increases in SLS concentration based on results from MTT, WST, neutral red uptake, and LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity assays. The estimated IC₅₀ value by AFM analysis was similar to those of other conventional assays and was included within the 95% confidence interval range. We suggest that an AFM quantitative analysis of the morphological and biophysical changes in cells can be utilized as a new method for evaluating cytotoxicity. PMID:23582483

  10. Protein-DNA interactions in high speed AFM: single molecule diffusion analysis of human RAD54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Humberto; Suzuki, Yuki; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Wyman, Claire

    2011-11-01

    High-speed AFM (atomic force microscopy also called scanning force microscopy) provides nanometre spatial resolution and sub-second temporal resolution images of individual molecules. We exploit these features to study diffusion and motor activity of the RAD54 DNA repair factor. Human RAD54 functions at critical steps in recombinational-DNA repair. It is a member of the Swi2/Snf2 family of chromatin remodelers that translocate on DNA using ATP hydrolysis. A detailed single molecular description of DNA-protein interactions shows intermediate states and distribution of variable states, usually hidden by ensemble averaging. We measured the motion of individual proteins using single-particle tracking and observed that random walks were affected by imaging-buffer composition. Non-Brownian diffusion events were characterized in the presence and in the absence of nucleotide cofactors. Double-stranded DNA immobilized on the surface functioned as a trap reducing Brownian motion. Distinct short range slides and hops on DNA were visualized by high-speed AFM. These short-range interactions were usually inaccessible by other methods based on optical resolution. RAD54 monomers displayed a diffusive behavior unrelated to the motor activity. PMID:21986699

  11. Oscillatory structural forces due to nonionic surfactant micelles: data by colloidal-probe AFM vs theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Nikolay C; Danov, Krassimir D; Zeng, Yan; Kralchevsky, Peter A; von Klitzing, Regine

    2010-01-19

    Micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Brij 35 and Tween 20 are confined between two surfaces in a colloidal-probe atomic-force microscope (CP-AFM). The experimentally detected oscillatory forces due to the layer-by-layer expulsion of the micelles agree very well with the theoretical predictions for hard-sphere fluids. While the experiment gives parts of the stable branches of the force curve, the theoretical model allows reconstruction of the full oscillatory curve. Therewith, the strength and range of the ordering could be determined. The resulting aggregation number from the fits of the force curves for Brij 35 is close to 70 and exhibits a slight tendency to increase with the surfactant concentration. The last layer of micelles cannot be pressed out. The measured force-vs-distance curve has nonequilibrium portions, which represent "jumps" from one to another branch of the respective equilibrium oscillatory curve. In the case of Brij 35, at concentrations force oscillations are almost suppressed, which implies that the micelles of this surfactant are labile and are demolished by the hydrodynamic shear stresses due to the colloidal-probe motion. The comparison of the results for the two surfactants demonstrates that in some cases the micelles can be destroyed by the CP-AFM, but in other cases they can be stable and behave as rigid particles. This behavior correlates with the characteristic times of the slow micellar relaxation process for these surfactants. PMID:20067306

  12. Measuring cell surface elasticity on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli wild type and dispersin mutant by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is pathogenic and produces severe diarrhea in humans. A mutant of EAEC that does not produce dispersin, a cell surface protein, is not pathogenic. It has been proposed that dispersin imparts a positive charge to the bacterial cell surface allowing the bacteria to colonize on the negatively charged intestinal mucosa. However, physical properties of the bacterial cell surface, such as rigidity, may be influenced by the presence of dispersin and may contribute to pathogenicity. Using the system developed in our laboratory for mounting and imaging bacterial cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in liquid, on gelatin coated mica surfaces, studies were initiated to measure cell surface elasticity. This was carried out in both wild type EAEC, that produces dispersin, and the mutant that does not produce dispersin. This was accomplished using AFM force-distance (FD) spectroscopy on the wild type and mutant grown in liquid or on solid medium. Images in liquid and in air of both the wild-type and mutant grown in liquid and on solid media are presented. This work represents an initial step in efforts to understand the pathogenic role of the dispersin protein in the wild-type bacteria

  13. On the molecular interaction between albumin and ibuprofen: An AFM and QCM-D study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Etxebarria, Juan; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Georgieva, Radostina; Bäumler, Hans; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of proteins on surfaces often results in a change of their structural behavior and consequently, a loss of bioactivity. One experimental method to study interactions on a molecular level is single molecular force spectroscopy that permits to measure forces down to the pico-newton range. In this work, the binding force between human serum albumin (HSA), covalently immobilized on glutaraldehyde modified gold substrates, and ibuprofen sodium salt was studied by means of single molecular force spectroscopy. First of all, a protocol was established to functionalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips with ibuprofen. The immobilization protocol was additionally tested by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and contact angle measurements. AFM was used to characterize the adsorption of HSA on gold substrates, which lead to a packed monolayer of thickness slightly lower than the reported value in solution. Finally, single molecule spectroscopy results were used to characterize the binding force between albumin and ibuprofen and calculate the distance of the transition state (0.6 nm) and the dissociation rate constant (0.055 s(-1)). The results might indicate that part of the adsorbed protein still preserves its functionality upon adsorption. PMID:26218522

  14. Friction behavior of nano-textured polyimide surfaces measured by AFM colloidal probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang [College of Equipment Manufacturing, Hebei University of Engineering, Handan 056038 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu, Chunxia; Che, Hongwei; Hou, Junxian [College of Equipment Manufacturing, Hebei University of Engineering, Handan 056038 (China); Jia, Junhong, E-mail: jhjia@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Flat PI film and nano-textured PI film were prepared by spin-coating process. • The nano-textured PI surface has effectively reduced the adhesion and friction. • Friction increased with the increasing of contact area and adhesion. • The growth rate of friction decreased with the increasing of applied load. - Abstract: Flat polyimide (PI) film and silicon dioxide nanoparticle-textured PI film were prepared by means of the spin-coating technique. The adhesion and friction properties of the flat PI surface and nano-textured PI surface were investigated by a series of Atomic force microscope (AFM) colloidal probes. Experimental results revealed that the nano-textured PI surface can significantly reduce the adhesive force and friction force, compared with the flat PI surface. The main reason is that the nano-textures can reduce the contact area between the sample surface and colloidal probe. The effect of colloidal probe size on the friction behavior of the flat and nano-textured PI surfaces was evaluated. The adhesive force and friction force of nano-textured PI surface were increased with the increasing of the size of interacting pairs (AFM colloidal probe) due to the increased contact area. Moreover, the friction forces of flat and nano-textured PI surfaces were increased with applied load and sliding velocity.

  15. Nanopuller-open data acquisition platform for AFM force spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Konrad; Strzelecki, Janusz

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a widely used tool in force spectroscopy studies. Presently, this instrument is accessible from numerous vendors, albeit commercial solutions are expensive and almost always hardware and software closed. Approaches for open setups were published, as with modern low cost and readily available piezoelectric actuators, data acquisition interfaces and optoelectronic components building such force spectroscopy AFM is relatively easy. However, suitable software to control such laboratory made instrument was not released. Developing it in the lab requires significant time and effort. Our Nanopuller software described in this paper is intended to eliminate this obstacle. With only minimum adjustments this program can be used to control and acquire data with any suitable National Instruments universal digital/analog interface and piezoelectric actuator analog controller, giving significant freedom and flexibility in designing force spectroscopy experiment. Since the full code, written in a graphical LabVIEW environment is available, our Nanopuller can be easily customized. In this paper we describe the program and test its performance in controlling different setups. Successful and accurate force curve acquisition for standard samples (single molecules of I27O reference titin polyprotein and DNA as well as red blood cells) is shown. PMID:26994468

  16. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M., E-mail: mitjan.kalin@tint.fs.uni-lj.si

    2013-10-15

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2–20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  17. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M.

    2013-10-01

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2-20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  18. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2–20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  19. Friction behavior of nano-textured polyimide surfaces measured by AFM colloidal probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Flat PI film and nano-textured PI film were prepared by spin-coating process. • The nano-textured PI surface has effectively reduced the adhesion and friction. • Friction increased with the increasing of contact area and adhesion. • The growth rate of friction decreased with the increasing of applied load. - Abstract: Flat polyimide (PI) film and silicon dioxide nanoparticle-textured PI film were prepared by means of the spin-coating technique. The adhesion and friction properties of the flat PI surface and nano-textured PI surface were investigated by a series of Atomic force microscope (AFM) colloidal probes. Experimental results revealed that the nano-textured PI surface can significantly reduce the adhesive force and friction force, compared with the flat PI surface. The main reason is that the nano-textures can reduce the contact area between the sample surface and colloidal probe. The effect of colloidal probe size on the friction behavior of the flat and nano-textured PI surfaces was evaluated. The adhesive force and friction force of nano-textured PI surface were increased with the increasing of the size of interacting pairs (AFM colloidal probe) due to the increased contact area. Moreover, the friction forces of flat and nano-textured PI surfaces were increased with applied load and sliding velocity

  20. AFM Surface Roughness and Topography Analysis of Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pantić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is presenting AFM analysis of surface roughness of Lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD under different finishing procedure (techniques: polishing, glazing and grinding. Lithium disilicate glass ceramics is all-ceramic dental system which is characterized by high aesthetic quality and it can be freely said that properties of material provide all prosthetic requirements: function, biocompatibility and aesthetic. Experimental tests of surface roughness were investigated on 4 samples with dimensions: 18 mm length, 14 mm width and 12 mm height. Contact surfaces of three samples were treated with different finishing procedure (polishing, glazing and grinding, and the contact surface of the raw material is investigated as a fourth sample. Experimental measurements were done using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM of NT-MDT manufacturers, in the contact mode. All obtained results of different prepared samples are presented in the form of specific roughness parameters (Rа, Rz, Rmax, Rq and 3D surface topography.

  1. Structure of tetracene films on hydrogen-passivated Si(001) studied via STM, AFM, and NEXAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) have been used to study the structure of tetracene films on hydrogen-passivated Si(001). STM imaging of the films with nominal thickness of three monolayers (3 ML) exhibits the characteristic 'herringbone' molecular packing known from the bulk crystalline tetracene, showing standing molecules on the ab plane. The dimensions and orientation of the herringbone lattice indicate a commensurate structural relationship between the lattice and the crystalline substrate. The corresponding AFM images illustrate that at and above the third layer of the films, the islands are anisotropic, in contrast with the submonolayer fractals, with two preferred growth directions appearing orthogonal to each other. The polarization dependent NEXAFS measurements indicate that the average molecular tilting angle with respect to the surface first increases with the film thickness up to 3 ML, then stabilizes at a value close to the bulk tetracene case afterwards. The combined results indicate a distinct growth morphological change that occurs around a few monolayers of thickness

  2. Nitrogen ion implantation on stainless steel: AFM study of surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a study by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the modification of the surface topography of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel after N-ion implantation, irradiated by 1 x 1015 N2+/cm2 at 80 keV. Prior to the implantation surface modification, the samples were electropolished for the optimum observation of the surface at a small scale to obtain an initial surface with the smaller roughness. The electrolytic bath was composed of a mixture of water/sulphuric acid/orthophosphoric acid in percentages 20, 20 and 60%, respectively. Once the surface was optimized, the samples were implanted and observed by AFM, a new technique whose importance relies on its resolution power, allowing the acquisition of topographic images of the surface with nanometric resolution. Thanks to the high resolution power could be observed that ion implantation increases the surface roughness and promotes the apparition of 3 μm wide and 10 nm depth craters as well as the apparition of products with singular morphology

  3. Spontaneous aggregation of humic acid observed with AFM at different pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Claudio; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Angelico, Ruggero; Cho, Hyen Goo; Francioso, Ornella; Ertani, Andrea; Nardi, Serenella

    2015-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy in contact (AFM-C) mode was used to investigate the molecular dynamics of leonardite humic acid (HA) aggregate formed at different pH values. HA nanoparticles dispersed at pH values ranging from 2 to 12 were observed on a mica surface under dry conditions. The most clearly resolved and well-resulted AFM images of single particle were obtained at pH 5, where HA appeared as supramolecular particles with a conic shape and a hole in the centre. Those observations suggested that HA formed under these conditions exhibited a pseudo-amphiphilic nature, with secluded hydrophobic domains and polar subunits in direct contact with hydrophilic mica surface. Based on molecular simulation methods, a lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) model was proposed to explain the HA ring-like morphology. The LCC model optimized the parameters of β-O-4 linkages between 14 units of 1-4 phenyl propanoid, and resulted in an optimized structure comprising 45-50 linear helical molecules looped spirally around a central cavity. Those results added new insights on the adsorption mechanism of HA on polar surfaces as a function of pH, which was relevant from the point of view of natural aggregation in soil environment. PMID:26295541

  4. AFM and Moessbauer spectrometry investigation of crystallization process in Fe-Mo-Cu-B alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation, the effect of temperature annealing on the development of surface nano-crystallization of the Fe79Mo8Cu1B12 alloy is investigated. The surface morphology is examined using tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results are compared with those obtained by means of transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy, CEMS and XRD. It was found that the sample is not fully amorphous even in the as-quenched state. Minor amounts of bcc-Fe grains were detected. AFM results indicate large variations in morphology of density and size of surface protrusions. They are different at the top- (air side) and bottom-(wheel) side of the ribbon. The amount and size of nanocrystals increases with annealing temperature. The onset of the first crystallization is observed after annealing at 410 grad C when bcc-Fe nanograins (ca. 15 nm in size) are much better developed. More intense growth is evidenced at higher temperatures. The second crystallization which is characterized by occurrence of additional crystalline phases appears after annealing at 650 grad C. (authors)

  5. Hydrodynamics in nanoscale confinement: SFA and colloid probe AFM liquid drainage experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowska, M.; Popescu, M. N.; Ralston, J.

    2012-12-01

    Flow and drainage of very thin liquid films play an important role in mineral recovery, drop coalescence and emulsion stability, as well as lubrication of micromechanical devices. Studies of liquid flow under strong confinement (i.e., film thickness below a few hundred of nanometers and down to a few nanometers) can reveal the limits of applicability of a classical hydrodynamics description, but are very challenging. The Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) technique has enabled studies of drainage at nanoscale separation between atomically smooth mica sheets. The development of the colloid probe Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) as an alternative technique has allowed a significantly wider variety of confining solid surfaces to be studied. Both the SFA and the colloid probe AFM have been adapted to permit the surfaces confining the film to be soft, e.g., the surface of a drop or bubble, and therefore deformable. We present a succinct review of the experimental and theoretical modeling challenges for such studies and critically discuss the outcomes of recent experiments.

  6. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/Tl) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/Tl probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions

  7. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W. [Department of Microelectronic and Nanoelectronic Systems, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Ilmenau University of Technology, Gustav-Kirchhoffstr. 1, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  8. AFM, XRD and optical studies of silver nanostructures fabricated under extreme plasma conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the deposition of silver on silicon and glass substrates using ions generated in a 3.3 KJ dense plasma focus device. The hot and dense argon plasma formed during the focus phase ionizes the silver disc placed above the top of the anode. Glass and silicon substrates are placed at an axial position of 4.0 cm and 5.0 cm from the top of the anode and are exposed by two focus shots. The deposited materials obtained were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis Spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction shows the [111] and [200] reflections of silver deposited on silicon substrates whereas on glass only [111] plane is observed. The AFM of silver deposited on silicon substrates shows nanostructures which have triangular like shape. The UV spectra for silver nanostructures placed at 4.0 cm and 5.0 cm on glass substrate shows the absorption peak which originates from the surface plasmon absorption of nanosized silver particles. A red shift of ∼13 nm is observed for silver deposited on glass substrate placed at the distance of 5.0 cm from the top of anode.

  9. The use of functionalized AFM tips as molecular sensors in the detection of pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deda, Daiana K.; Pereira, Barbara B.S.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Silva, Aline N. da; Ribeiro, Gabrielle A.; Amarante, Adriano M.; Leite, Fabio L., E-mail: fabioleite@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (LNN/UFSCar), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica, Quimica e Matematica. Lab. de Nanoneurobiofisica; Franca, Eduardo F. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2013-11-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy, a technique derived from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), allowed to distinguish nonspecific and specific interactions between the acetolactate synthase enzyme (ALS) and anti-atrazine antibody biomolecules and the herbicides imazaquin, metsulfuron-methyl and atrazine. The presence of specific interactions increased the adhesion force (F{sub adh}) between the AFM tip and the herbicides, which made the modified tip a powerful biosensor. Increases of approximately 132% and 145% in the F{sub adh} values were observed when a tip functionalized with ALS was used to detect imazaquin and metsulfuron-methyl, respectively. The presence of specific interactions between the atrazine and the anti-atrazine antibody also caused an increase in the F{sub adh} values (approximately 175%) compared to those observed when using an unfunctionalized tip. The molecular modeling results obtained with the ALS enzyme suggest that the orientation of the biomolecule on the tip surface could be suitable for allowing interaction with the herbicides imazaquin and metsulfuron-methyl. (author)

  10. Casimir force experiments with quartz tuning forks and an atomic force microscope (AFM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, T [Binnotec, Bouchestr. 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: DrLudwig@thorstenludwig.de

    2008-04-25

    The aim of the measurement series is to study the Casimir force, specifically the effects of different materials and geometries. The art of measuring sub-nano Newton forces has been engineered to a great extent in the material sciences, especially for the atomic force microscope. In today's scanning microscope technologies there are several common methods used to measure sub-nano Newton forces. While the commercial atomic force microscopes (AFM) mostly work with soft silicon cantilevers, there are a large number of reports from university groups on the use of quartz tuning forks to get high resolution AFM pictures, to measure shear forces or to create new force sensors. The quartz tuning fork based force sensor has a number of advantages over the silicon cantilever, but also has some disadvantages. In this report the method based on quartz tuning forks is described with respect to their usability for Casimir force measurements and compared with other successful techniques. Furthermore, a design for Casimir force measurements that was set up in Berlin will be described and practical experimental aspects will be discussed. A status report on the Casimir experiments in Berlin will be given, including the experimental setup. In order to study the details of the Casimir effect the apparatus and active surfaces have to be improved further. The surfaces have to be flatter and cleaner. For better resolution, cantilevers and tuning forks with a low spring constant have to be employed.

  11. Casimir force experiments with quartz tuning forks and an atomic force microscope (AFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the measurement series is to study the Casimir force, specifically the effects of different materials and geometries. The art of measuring sub-nano Newton forces has been engineered to a great extent in the material sciences, especially for the atomic force microscope. In today's scanning microscope technologies there are several common methods used to measure sub-nano Newton forces. While the commercial atomic force microscopes (AFM) mostly work with soft silicon cantilevers, there are a large number of reports from university groups on the use of quartz tuning forks to get high resolution AFM pictures, to measure shear forces or to create new force sensors. The quartz tuning fork based force sensor has a number of advantages over the silicon cantilever, but also has some disadvantages. In this report the method based on quartz tuning forks is described with respect to their usability for Casimir force measurements and compared with other successful techniques. Furthermore, a design for Casimir force measurements that was set up in Berlin will be described and practical experimental aspects will be discussed. A status report on the Casimir experiments in Berlin will be given, including the experimental setup. In order to study the details of the Casimir effect the apparatus and active surfaces have to be improved further. The surfaces have to be flatter and cleaner. For better resolution, cantilevers and tuning forks with a low spring constant have to be employed

  12. Tribological behavior of micro/nano-patterned surfaces in contact with AFM colloidal probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaoliang; Wang Xiu; Kong Wen [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yi Gewen [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Jia Junhong, E-mail: jhjia@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-10-15

    In effort to investigate the influence of the micro/nano-patterning or surface texturing on the nanotribological properties of patterned surfaces, the patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars were fabricated by replica molding technique. The surface morphologies of patterned PDMS surfaces with varying pillar sizes and spacing between pillars were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AFM/FFM was used to acquire the friction force images of micro/nano-patterned surfaces using a colloidal probe. A difference in friction force produced a contrast on the friction force images when the colloidal probe slid over different regions of the patterned polymer surfaces. The average friction force of patterned surface was related to the spacing between the pillars and their size. It decreased with the decreasing of spacing between the pillars and the increasing of pillar size. A reduction in friction force was attributed to the reduced area of contact between patterned surface and colloidal probe. Additionally, the average friction force increased with increasing applied load and sliding velocity.

  13. Tribological behavior of micro/nano-patterned surfaces in contact with AFM colloidal probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiu; Kong, Wen; Yi, Gewen; Jia, Junhong

    2011-10-01

    In effort to investigate the influence of the micro/nano-patterning or surface texturing on the nanotribological properties of patterned surfaces, the patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars were fabricated by replica molding technique. The surface morphologies of patterned PDMS surfaces with varying pillar sizes and spacing between pillars were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AFM/FFM was used to acquire the friction force images of micro/nano-patterned surfaces using a colloidal probe. A difference in friction force produced a contrast on the friction force images when the colloidal probe slid over different regions of the patterned polymer surfaces. The average friction force of patterned surface was related to the spacing between the pillars and their size. It decreased with the decreasing of spacing between the pillars and the increasing of pillar size. A reduction in friction force was attributed to the reduced area of contact between patterned surface and colloidal probe. Additionally, the average friction force increased with increasing applied load and sliding velocity.

  14. Bacteria attachment to surfaces--AFM force spectroscopy and physicochemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2011-12-01

    Understanding bacterial adhesion to surfaces requires knowledge of the forces that govern bacterial-surface interactions. Biofilm formation on stainless steel 316 (SS316) by three bacterial species was investigated by examining surface force interaction between the cells and metal surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Bacterial-metal adhesion force was quantified at different surface delay time from 0 to 60s using AFM tip coated with three different bacterial species: Gram-negative Massilia timonae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The results revealed that bacterial adhesion forces on SS316 surface by Gram-negative bacteria is higher (8.53±1.40 nN and 7.88±0.94 nN) when compared to Gram-positive bacteria (1.44±0.21 nN). Physicochemical analysis on bacterial surface properties also revealed that M. timonae and P. aeruginosa showed higher hydrophobicity and surface charges than B. subtilis along with the capability of producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The higher hydrophobicity, surface charges, and greater propensity to form EPS by M. timonae and P. aeruginosa led to high adhesive force on the metal surface. PMID:21889162

  15. AFM Analysis of Copolymer From Konjac With Acrylic Acid by γ Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water absorption property and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis were studied to discover the relativity of water absorption and construction of original konjac powder, grafted copolymer and regenerator. The results show that the water absorption, speed and reserving percent of the grafted copolymer are affected by the size, the liquid ion concentration, the ambient temperature and water reserving time of the gel. At room temperature, the largest water absorption, water absorption speed and water reserving percent of grafted copolymer are 887 times, 64.7 g·g-1·min-1 and 92% in distilled water and 273 times, 27.6 g·g-1·min-1 and 84% in tap water respectively. The AFM images of grafted copolymer indicate that konjac grafts acrylic acid and then hydrophilic structure comes into being. During the course of regeneration the three dimensional structure of the copolymer was changed to more regularly. So the water absorption of copolymer is higher than that of konjac, and the water absorption of regenerator is 360 times, higher than that of copolymer. (authors)

  16. Enamel crystals of mice susceptible or resistant to dental fluorosis: an AFM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo BUZALAF

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to assess the overall apatite crystals profile in the enamel matrix of mice susceptible (A/J strain or resistant (129P3/J strain to dental fluorosis through analyses by atomic force microscopy (AFM. Material and Methods: Samples from the enamel matrix in the early stages of secretion and maturation were obtained from the incisors of mice from both strains. All detectable traces of matrix protein were removed from the samples by a sequential extraction procedure. The purified crystals (n=13 per strain were analyzed qualitatively in the AFM. Surface roughness profile (Ra was measured. Results: The mean (±SD Ra of the crystals of A/J strain (0.58±0.15 nm was lower than the one found for the 129P3/J strain (0.66±0.21 nm but the difference did not reach statistical significance (t=1.187, p=0.247. Crystals of the 129P3/J strain (70.42±6.79 nm were found to be significantly narrower (t=4.013, p=0.0013 than the same parameter measured for the A/J strain (90.42±15.86 nm. Conclusion: enamel crystals of the 129P3/J strain are narrower, which is indicative of slower crystal growth and could interfere in the occurrence of dental fluorosis.

  17. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution.

  18. Neural network approximation of tip-abrasion effects in AFM imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abrasion (wear) of tips used in scanning force microscopy (SFM) directly influences SFM image quality and is therefore of great relevance to quantitative SFM measurements. The increasing implementation of automated SFM measurement schemes has become a strong driving force for increasing efforts towards the prediction of tip wear, as it needs to be ensured that the probe is exchanged before a level of tip wear is reached that adversely affects the measurement quality. In this paper, we describe the identification of tip abrasion in a system of SFM measurements. We attempt to model the tip-abrasion process as a concatenation of a mapping from the measured AFM data to a regression vector and a nonlinear mapping from the regressor space to the output space. The mapping is formed as a basis function expansion. Feedforward neural networks are used to approximate this mapping. The one-hidden layer network gave a good quality of fit for the training and test sets for the tip-abrasion system. We illustrate our method with AFM measurements of both fine periodic structures and randomly oriented sharp features and compare our neural network results with those obtained using other methods

  19. Influence of the tip mass on the tip-sample interactions in TM-AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the influences of the tip mass ratio (the ratio of the tip mass to the cantilever mass), on the excitation of higher oscillation eigenmodes and also on the tip-sample interaction forces in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). A precise model for the cantilever dynamics capable of accurate simulations is essential for the investigation of the tip mass effects on the interaction forces. In the present work, the finite element method (FEM) is used for modeling the AFM cantilever to consider the oscillations of higher eigenmodes oscillations. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) is used to calculate precise data for the tip-sample force as a function of tip vertical position with respect to the sample. The results demonstrate that in the presence of nonlinear tip-sample interaction forces, the tip mass ratio plays a significant role in the excitations of higher eigenmodes and also in the normal force applied on the surface. Furthermore, it has been shown that the difference between responses of the FEM and point-mass models in different system operational conditions is highly affected by the tip mass ratio. -- Highlights: → A strong correlation exists between the tip mass ratio and the 18th harmonic amplitude. → Near the critical tip mass ratio a small change in the tip mass may lead to a significant force change. → Inaccuracy of the lumped model depends significantly on the tip mass ratio

  20. Comparison of the indentation and elasticity of E. coli and its spheroplasts by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a unique opportunity to study live individual bacteria at the nanometer scale. In addition to providing accurate morphological information, AFM can be exploited to investigate membrane protein localization and molecular interactions on the surface of living cells. A prerequisite for these studies is the development of robust procedures for sample preparation. While such procedures are established for intact bacteria, they are only beginning to emerge for bacterial spheroplasts. Spheroplasts are useful research models for studying mechanosensitive ion channels, membrane transport, lipopolysaccharide translocation, solute uptake, and the effects of antimicrobial agents on membranes. Furthermore, given the similarities between spheroplasts and cell wall-deficient (CWD) forms of pathogenic bacteria, spheroplast research could be relevant in biomedical research. In this paper, a new technique for immobilizing spheroplasts on mica pretreated with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and glutaraldehyde is described. Using this mounting technique, the indentation and cell elasticity of glutaraldehyde-fixed and untreated spheroplasts of E. coli in liquid were measured. These values are compared to those of intact E. coli. Untreated spheroplasts were found to be much softer than the intact cells and the silicon nitride cantilevers used in this study

  1. Quantitative description of collagen fibre network on trabecular bone surfaces based on AFM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, W-D; Chen, P-P; Xu, M-Q; Ao, Z; Liu, Y; Han, D; He, F

    2016-04-01

    The collagen fibre network is an important part of extracellular matrix (ECM) on trabecular bone surface. The geometry features of the network can provide us insights into its physical and physiological properties. However, previous researches have not focused on the geometry and the quantitative description of the collagen fibre network on trabecular bone surface. In this study,we developed a procedure to quantitatively describe the network and verified the validity of the procedure. The experiment proceeds as follow. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to acquire submicron resolution images of the trabecular surface. Then, an image analysing procedure was built to extract important parameters, including, fibre orientation, fibre density, fibre width, fibre crossing numbers, the number of holes formed by fibre s, and the area of holes from AFM images. In order to verify the validity of the parameters extracted by image analysing methods, we adopted two other methods, which are statistical geometry model and computer simulation, to calculate those same parameters and check the consistency of the three methods' results. Statistical tests indicate that there is no significant difference between three groups. We conclude that, (a) the ECM on trabecular surface mainly consists of random collagen fibre network with oriented fibres; (b) our method based on image analysing can be used to characterize quantitative geometry features of the collagen fibre network effectively. This method may provide a basis for quantitative investigating the architecture and function of collagen fibre network. PMID:26583563

  2. Advanced Compatibility Characterization Of AF-M315E With Spacecraft Propulsion System Materials Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Mark B.; Greene, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    All spacecraft require propulsion systems for thrust and maneuvering. Propulsion systems can be chemical, nuclear, electrical, cold gas or combinations thereof. Chemical propulsion has proven to be the most reliable technology since the deployment of launch vehicles. Performance, storability, and handling are three important aspects of liquid chemical propulsion. Bipropellant systems require a fuel and an oxidizer for propulsion, but monopropellants only require a fuel and a catalyst for propulsion and are therefore simpler and lighter. Hydrazine is the state of the art propellant for monopropellant systems, but has drawbacks because it is highly hazardous to human health, which requires extensive care in handling, complex ground ops due to safety and environmental considerations, and lengthy turnaround times for reusable spacecraft. All users of hydrazine monopropellant must contend with these issues and their associated costs. The development of a new monopropellant, intended to replace hydrazine, has been in progress for years. This project will apply advanced techniques to characterize the engineering properties of materials used in AF-M315E propulsion systems after propellant exposure. AF-M315E monopropellant has been selected HQ's Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) to replace toxic hydrazine for improved performance and reduce safety and health issues that will shorten reusable spacecraft turn-around time. In addition, this project will fundamentally strengthen JSC's core competency to evaluate, use and infuse liquid propellant systems.

  3. XPS and AFM analysis of antifouling PEG interfaces for microfabricated silicon biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sadhana; Johnson, Robert W; Desai, Tejal A

    2004-09-15

    In the past two decades, the biological and medical fields have seen great advances in the development of biosensors capable of quantifying biomolecules. Many of these biosensors have micro- and nano-scale features, are fabricated using biochip technology, and use silicon as a base material. The creation of antifouling sensor interfaces is critical to avoid serious consequences that arise due to their contact with biological fluids. To this end, we have created thin PEG interfaces of various grafting densities on silicon using a single-step PEG-silane coupling reaction scheme. Initial PEG concentration (5-50 mM) and coupling time (0.5-24 h) were varied to attain different grafting densities, and different PEG interfaces so created were analyzed using XPS and AFM. Furthermore, all the PEG interfaces were evaluated using XPS and AFM for their antifouling abilities using fibrinogen as the model protein. Results indicated that PEG interfaces created in this investigation are appropriate for biosensors with micro- and nano-scale features, and are efficient in controlling protein fouling. PMID:15308226

  4. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of thick lamellar stacks of phospholipid bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Schafer, Arne; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2007-01-01

    We report an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study on thick multi lamellar stacks of approx. 10 mum thickness (about 1500 stacked membranes) of DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phoshatidylcholine) deposited on silicon wafers. These thick stacks could be stabilized for measurements under excess water or solution. From force curves we determine the compressional modulus B and the rupture force F_r of the bilayers in the gel (ripple), the fluid phase and in the range of critical swelling close to the main transition. AFM allows to measure the compressional modulus of stacked membrane systems and values for B compare well to values reported in the literature. We observe pronounced ripples on the top layer in the Pbeta' (ripple) phase and find an increasing ripple period Lambda_r when approaching the temperature of the main phase transition into the fluid Lalpha phase at about 24 C. Metastable ripples with 2Lambda_r are observed. Lambda_r also increases with increasing osmotic pressure, i.e., for different concent...

  5. Nanoindentation and AFM studies of PECVD DLC and reactively sputtered Ti containing carbon films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Pauschitz; J Schalko; T Koch; C Eisenmenger-Sittner; S Kvasnica; Manish Roy

    2003-10-01

    Amorphous carbon film, also known as DLC film, is a promising material for tribological application. It is noted that properties relevant to tribological application change significantly depending on the method of preparation of these films. These properties are also altered by the composition of the films. In view of this, the objective of the present work is to compare the nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of diamond like carbon (DLC) film obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) with the Ti containing amorphous carbon (Ti/-C : H) film obtained by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition (UMSD). Towards that purpose, DLC and Ti/-C : H films are deposited on silicon substrate by PECVD and UMSD processes, respectively. The microstructural features and the mechanical properties of these films are evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nanoindentation and by AFM. The results show that the PECVD DLC film has a higher elastic modulus, hardness and roughness than the UMSD Ti/-C : H film. It also has a lower pull off force than Ti containing amorphous carbon film.

  6. Tracer kinetic modeling of [(11)C]AFM, a new PET imaging agent for the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganawa, Mika; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Planeta, Beata; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Lin, Shu-Fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Williams, Wendol; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E

    2013-12-01

    [(11)C]AFM, or [(11)C]2-[2-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenylthio]-5-fluoromethylphenylamine, is a new positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for the serotonin transporter (SERT). The purpose of this study was to determine the most appropriate kinetic model to quantify [(11)C]AFM binding in the healthy human brain. Positron emission tomography data and arterial input functions were acquired from 10 subjects. Compartmental modeling and the multilinear analysis-1(MA1) method were tested using the arterial input functions. The one-tissue model showed a lack of fit in low-binding regions, and the two-tissue model failed to estimate parameters reliably. Regional time-activity curves were well described by MA1. The rank order of [(11)C]AFM binding potential (BPND) matched well with the known regional SERT densities. For routine use of [(11)C]AFM, several noninvasive methods for quantification of regional binding were evaluated, including simplified reference tissue models (SRTM and SRTM2), and multilinear reference tissue models (MRTM and MRTM2). The best methods for region of interest (ROI) analysis were MA1, MRTM2, and SRTM2, with fixed population kinetic values ( or b') for the reference methods. The MA1 and MRTM2 methods were best for parametric imaging. These results showed that [(11)C]AFM is a suitable PET radioligand to image and quantify SERT in humans. PMID:23921898

  7. Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

    2014-02-28

    Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation. PMID:24651595

  8. Molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of AFM-based nanoscratching process with water-layer lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiaqi; Zhao, Jinsheng; Dong, Zeguang; Liu, Pinkuan

    2015-08-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) based direct nanoscratching has been thoroughly studied but the mechanism of nanoscratching with water-layer lubrication is yet to be well understood. In current study, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to evaluate the effects of the water-layer lubrication on the AFM-based nanoscratching process on monocrystalline copper. Comparisons of workpiece deformation, scratching forces, and friction coefficients are made between the water-lubricated and dry scratching under various thickness of water layer, scratching depth and scratching velocity. Simulation results reveal that the water layer has positive impact on the surface quality and significant influence on the scratching forces (normal forces and tangential forces). The friction coefficients of the tip in water-lubricated nanoscratching are significantly bigger than those in the dry process. Our simulation results shed lights on a promising AFM-based nanofabrication method, which can assist to get nanoscale surface morphologies with higher quality than traditional approaches.

  9. Current transient and in situ AFM studies of initial growth stages of electrochemically deposited nickel cobalt hydroxide nanosheet films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuyen; Carmezim, M João; Montemor, M Fátima

    2016-04-28

    Current transient evolution and in situ electrochemical AFM were used to study the initial stages of growth of electrochemically deposited nickel cobalt hydroxide films for energy storage applications. Current transients were taken at constant potentials, from -700 mV to -1000 mV, with a step of 50 mV. The current transients were fitted with three different nucleation models: Scharifker-Hill, Scharifker-Mostany and Mirkin-Nilov-Heerman-Tarallo and the results revealed that film growth was governed by a 3D instantaneous nucleation mechanism. In situ electrochemical AFM studies confirmed the instantaneous nucleation mechanism and revealed the early stage formation of nanosheets. The in situ AFM results were supported by the ex situ FEG-SEM results, showing the formation of nanoneedles at the first stages of nucleation and the growth into nanosheets with the increasing deposition time. PMID:27087173

  10. Nanomechanical characterization of nanostructured bainitic steel: Peak Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation with AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Rivas, Lucia; González-Orive, Alejandro; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Hernández-Creus, Alberto; Caballero, Francisca G; Vázquez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The full understanding of the deformation mechanisms in nanostructured bainite requires the local characterization of its mechanical properties, which are expected to change from one phase, bainitic ferrite, to another, austenite. This study becomes a challenging process due to the bainitic nanostructured nature and high Young's modulus. In this work, we have carried out such study by means of the combination of AFM-based techniques, such as nanoindentation and Peak Force Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PF-QNM) measurements. We have addressed critically the limits and advantages of these techniques and been able to measure some elastoplastic parameters of both phases. Specifically, we have analyzed by PF-QNM two nanostructured bainitic steels, with a finer and a coarser structure, and found that both phases have a similar Young's modulus. PMID:26602631

  11. Quantifying molecule-surface interactions using AFM-based single-molecule manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautz, F. S.; Wagner, C.; Temirov, R.; Fournier, N.; Green, M.; Esat, T.; Leinen, P.; Groetsch, A.; Ruiz, V. G.; Tkatchenko, A.; Li, C.; Muellen, K.; Rohlfing, M.

    2015-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy plays an important role in the investigation of molecular adsorption. Promising, is the possibility to probe the molecule-surface interaction while tuning its strength through AFM tip-induced single-molecule manipulation. Here, we outline a strategy to achieve quantitative understanding of such manipulation experiments. The example of qPlus sensor based PTCDA molecule lifting experiments is used to demonstrate how different aspects of the molecule-surface interaction, namely the short-range adsorption potential, the asymptotic van der Waals potential, local chemical bonds which are the source of the surface corrugation, and molecule-molecule interactions can be measured with SPM and interpreted by the help of force-field simulations.

  12. AFM characterization and electrochemical property of Ag nanowires by modified AAO template method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag nanowires as electrode materials were prepared from modified anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template method by using dextrose as reductive, and the process of Ag nanowires growth was monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structure and electrochemical properties of Ag nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis absorption spectra and cyclic voltammograms (CV) measurements. The results show that Ag nanowires prepared from AAO possessed typical face centered cubic structure with average diameter of 60 nm. Furthermore, the CV characterization reveals that Ag nanowires featured a pair of asymmetrical redox peaks with the position near 0.5 V and the microstructure was maintained in electrochemical reaction

  13. Corrosion behaviour of Ni in aprotic solvents an electrochemical, XPS and AFM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) techniques have been used to study the passivation of nickel in 0.1 M H2SO4 DMF and ACN solutions with different water content. Electrochemical results indicate the anodic formation of a thin, poor protective layer and the possibility of salt precipitation onto the metallic surface. ARXPS results indicate that while in the anodic film formed in DMF, Ni(OH)2 constitute the superficial component under which a discontinuous layer of NiO and NiSO4 is present. Ni(OH)2 and NiSO4 are the more superficial constituents in the passivation layer formed in ACN, while NiO becomes prevalent in the underlying layers. AFM images show that in both the solvents the sample surface is very dishomogeneous with flakes and fractures. (orig.)

  14. The photochromic process of polyoxometalate-based nanocomposite thin film by in situ AFM and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Wei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026 (China)]. E-mail: weifeng@newmail.dlmu.edu.cn; Ding Yongsheng [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026 (China); Liu Yan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026 (China); Lu Ran [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, ChangChun 130023 (China)

    2006-08-01

    The photochromic process of nanocomposite film containing nanometer-sized Keggin type phosphotungstic acid uniformly dispersed in polyacrylamide matrix was studied by in situ AFM and spectroscopy. Under UV irradiation, the film was reduced photochemically to yield blue species. With the increase of irradiation time, the photoreduction proceeded from one-electron to two-electron blue stage. During the photochromism, the size and morphology of composite particles changed due to the cross-linked reactions of polymeric radicals. The XPS studies indicated that the chemical environment of tungsten changed and the W{sup 5+}/W ratio increased as irradiation time prolonged. FT-IR results showed that the Keggin geometry of phosphotungstic acid was still preserved inside the composite during photochromism, and the interactions between polyanions and polymer matrix increased with the irradiation time. It was suggested that the degree of the photoreduction process depended on the varying of interactions between phosphotungstic acid and polymer.

  15. The photochromic process of polyoxometalate-based nanocomposite thin film by in situ AFM and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photochromic process of nanocomposite film containing nanometer-sized Keggin type phosphotungstic acid uniformly dispersed in polyacrylamide matrix was studied by in situ AFM and spectroscopy. Under UV irradiation, the film was reduced photochemically to yield blue species. With the increase of irradiation time, the photoreduction proceeded from one-electron to two-electron blue stage. During the photochromism, the size and morphology of composite particles changed due to the cross-linked reactions of polymeric radicals. The XPS studies indicated that the chemical environment of tungsten changed and the W5+/W ratio increased as irradiation time prolonged. FT-IR results showed that the Keggin geometry of phosphotungstic acid was still preserved inside the composite during photochromism, and the interactions between polyanions and polymer matrix increased with the irradiation time. It was suggested that the degree of the photoreduction process depended on the varying of interactions between phosphotungstic acid and polymer

  16. TEM and AFM study of WO3 nanosize growth on α-Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WO3 thin films have been deposited by thermal evaporation on (0001) and (1012 ) planes of alumina oxide single crystal and annealed either in Oxygen or in air atmosphere. The morphology and crystallographic structure of films (as-deposited and annealed films) have been characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and transmission electron diffraction (TED). During annealing, the films undergo important morphological and structural changes. The annealed films exhibit large grains. These grains have the monoclinic structure in epitaxial orientations. The grains are made of twinned microdomains elongated in the [100] direction resulting of a preferential growth. The microdomains are along the three different directions on the (0001) α-Al2O3 surface and only one direction on the (1012 ) α-Al2O3 one.(author)

  17. A novel AFM based method for force measurements between individual hair strands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions between hairs and other natural fibers are of broad interest for both applications and fundamental understanding of biological interfaces. We present a novel method, that allows force measurements between individual hair strands. Hair fragments can be laser-cut without altering their surface chemistry. Subsequently, they are glued onto Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers. This allows carrying out measurements between the hair fragment and surface immobilized hair in a well-defined crossed-cylinder geometry. Both force-distance and friction measurements are feasible. Measurements in air with controlled humidity and in aqueous environment show clear differences which can be explained by the dominating role of capillary interactions in air. Friction is found to be anisotropic, reflecting the fine structure of hair cuticula. While the investigations are focused on the particular example of human hair, we expect that the approach can be extended to other animal/plant fibers and thus offers perspectives for broad spectrum systems.

  18. A novel AFM based method for force measurements between individual hair strands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, Eva; Haefner, Wolfgang [Physical Chemistry II, University of Bayreuth, Universitaetsstrasse 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Wilco Bartels, Frank [Polymer Physics, Global PU Specialties Research, BASF Polyurethanes GmbH, Elastogranstrasse 60, 49448 Lemfoerde (Germany); Sugiharto, Albert [Polymer Physics and Analytics, G201, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Wood, Claudia [Care Chemicals and Formulators, Personal Care Ingredients, New Business and Application Development, BASF SE, E-EMV/GP - H201, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Fery, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.fery@uni-bayreuth.de [Physical Chemistry II, University of Bayreuth, Universitaetsstrasse 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Interactions between hairs and other natural fibers are of broad interest for both applications and fundamental understanding of biological interfaces. We present a novel method, that allows force measurements between individual hair strands. Hair fragments can be laser-cut without altering their surface chemistry. Subsequently, they are glued onto Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers. This allows carrying out measurements between the hair fragment and surface immobilized hair in a well-defined crossed-cylinder geometry. Both force-distance and friction measurements are feasible. Measurements in air with controlled humidity and in aqueous environment show clear differences which can be explained by the dominating role of capillary interactions in air. Friction is found to be anisotropic, reflecting the fine structure of hair cuticula. While the investigations are focused on the particular example of human hair, we expect that the approach can be extended to other animal/plant fibers and thus offers perspectives for broad spectrum systems.

  19. Pulse gas alignment and AFM manipulation of single-wall carbon nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN XiaoJun; WANG YueChao; XI Ning; DONG ZaiLi; TUNG Steve

    2008-01-01

    In the fabrication process of nanoelectronic device arrays based on single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT), oriented alignment of SWCNTs and property modification of metallic SWCNTs in the array are the key problems to be solved. Pulse gas alignment with substrate downward tilt is proposed to realize the controllable alignment of SWCNTs. Experimental results demonstrate that 84% SWCNTs are aligned in -15°- 15° angular to the pulse gas direction. A modified nanomanipulation technology based on atomic force microscope (AFM) is utilized to perform various kinds of SWCNT manipulation, such as SWCNT separation from the "Y" CNT, catalyst removal from the SWCNT end, continual nano buckles fabrication on SWCNT and even stretching to break, which provides a feasible way to modify the size, shape and the electrical property of SWCNTs.

  20. Atomic-scale non-contact AFM studies of alumina supported nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Nørregaard; Meinander, Kristoffer; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose;

    society today, both as the means for environmental protection and as the backbone technology for most of the chemical industries. Among important processes based on heterogeneous catalysis are biomass conversion, steam reforming of methane and the synthesis of synthetic fuel from hydrocarbons, coal......, petroleum coke or biomass. The development of new catalysts is given a very high priority since they facilitate a much better utilization of our scarce energy reserves and it can drive the concept of waste-free ‘green’ chemistry and the development of a sustainable energy sector. Metal oxide surfaces like...... electrically conducting or non-conducting [2]. We use nc-AFM to study the growth, shape and size of nanoparticles on spinel and alumina surfaces. In addition to this, we have grown a transition alumina thin film on a spinel surface in order to characterize such a film as well as studying the catalytic...

  1. Deformation characteristics of various grain boundary angles on AFM-based nanolithography using molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to verify the deformation characteristics of grain boundaries on the AFM-based nanolithography. The model used has about 750,000 (Cu) atoms and is composed of two different crystal orientations. The grain boundaries are located in the center of model and have 45, 90, 135, and -135 degree angles in the xz-plane. The tool is made of rigid diamond-like carbon and is in the shape of the Berkovich indenter. The simulation has four different stages: relaxation, indentation, re-relaxation, and lithography. The simulation results reveal that the lithography deforms the grain boundary shape by the tool. The deformation of grain boundary's angle proceeds to minimize the total potential energy of whole system. Consequently, the grain boundary angle is changed about 90 degrees

  2. Quantitative multichannel NC-AFM data analysis of graphene growth on SiC(0001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Held

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Noncontact atomic force microscopy provides access to several complementary signals, such as topography, damping, and contact potential. The traditional presentation of such data sets in adjacent figures or in colour-coded pseudo-three-dimensional plots gives only a qualitative impression. We introduce two-dimensional histograms for the representation of multichannel NC-AFM data sets in a quantitative fashion. Presentation and analysis are exemplified for topography and contact-potential data for graphene grown epitaxially on 6H-SiC(0001, as recorded by Kelvin probe force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Sample preparations by thermal decomposition in ultrahigh vacuum and in an argon atmosphere are compared and the respective growth mechanisms discussed.

  3. Nonlinear dynamic response of cantilever beam tip during atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanolithography of copper surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the nonlinear dynamic response of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beam tip during the nanolithography of a copper (Cu) surface using a high-depth feed. The dynamic motion of the tip is modeled using a combined approach based on Newton's law and empirical observations. The cutting force is determined from experimental observations of the piling height on the Cu surface and the rotation angle of the cantilever beam tip. It is found that the piling height increases linearly with the cantilever beam carrier velocity. Furthermore, the cantilever beam tip is found to execute a saw tooth motion. Both this motion and the shear cutting force are nonlinear. The elastic modulus in the y direction is variable. Finally, the velocity of the cantilever beam tip as it traverses the specimen surface has a discrete characteristic rather than a smooth, continuous profile

  4. AFM Study on Reliability of Nanoscale DLC Films Deposited by ECR-MPCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUShou-xing; ZHUShi-gen; DINGJian-ning

    2004-01-01

    Nanoindentation, scratch and wear tests based on an atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried out to study the reliability of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MPCVD). The predictors for film reliability were given to investigate the resistance of DLC films to indent, scratch, and wear. Experimental results showed that the films at 64.9nm and 12.07nm exhibited better reliability than thin one at 2.78nm, 4.48nm. In addition, the reliability strength of films above 12.07nm went stable, and the films showed good performance of anti-indentation, anti-scratch and anti-wear. Finally, size effect of nanoscale monolayer film was introduced to explain the reliability of nanoscale DLC films.

  5. Analysis of air adsorptive on solid surfaces by AFM and XPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rong-guang; Mitsuo KIDO

    2006-01-01

    Solid surfaces of HOPG,pure copper,chromium,zinc,copper and SUS304 steel were observed in ambient air with an a.c. non-contact mode of atomic force microscope(AFM). A type of film-like-domains (adsorptive) was detected on the above surfaces. The thickness of the adsorptive was about 1.2-2.4 nm in this case. The film-like-adsorptive was confirmed to be a liquid layer by the static contact-mode scanning,the measurement of the elasticity and viscosity images,and the detection of the condensation/ evaporation phenomena when the relative humidity changed. The liquid layer is considered to be condensed water covered with organic contaminant.

  6. Influence of the cantilever holder on the vibrations of AFM cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic techniques exploiting the vibration of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often superior to quasi-static operation, in particular with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio. Tapping mode, magnetic force microscopy or torsional resonance (TR)-mode for example exploit the resonance amplification of bending or torsional modes of the cantilever. In atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) and related techniques aiming to measure elasticity or adhesion quantitatively on a nanometre scale, the cantilever vibrates while the tip is in contact with a sample surface. The higher vibration modes are included in the evaluation. Well-defined resonance maxima of the cantilever are a prerequisite for all resonance techniques. To allow their handling, microscaled commercial cantilevers are fabricated in one piece with a holder of millimetre dimensions providing the base to which the cantilever beam is suspended. Here, we examine experimentally and theoretically how the cantilever holder influences the vibration of the cantilevers

  7. Measuring precision analysis of capsule vertical-AFM surface profiler system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A capsule surface profiler system based on vertical spindle structure and atomic force microscope (AFM) was developed, and its systematic measurement tests were carried out. In order to evaluate the measurement uncertainty, the experimental studies mainly included the air-bearing spindle rotation run out error test, the system static noise test, and the comprehensive test. The rotary precision of air bearing was tested and the error curve of the spindle was obtained with a standard ball and two-step separation method. Further, this error curve was eliminated as in a systematic error. Comprehensive measurement tests of the system prove that the noise peak value of this system is about 22 nm and its RMS is about 5.2 nm during the measurement process. (authors)

  8. Nanotribology at single crystal electrodes: Influence of ionic adsorbates on friction forces studied with AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausen, Florian; Nielinger, Michael; Ernst, Siegfried [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Bonn, Roemerstrasse 164, D-53117 Bonn (Germany); Baltruschat, Helmut [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Bonn, Roemerstrasse 164, D-53117 Bonn (Germany)], E-mail: baltruschat@uni-bonn.de

    2008-09-01

    We present friction force measurements on Au(1 1 1) single crystal electrode surfaces performed under electrochemical conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). At monoatomic steps friction is increased in both scan directions. In 0.05 M sulfuric acid an increase of friction is observed with the increase of adsorbed sulfate. Friction force increases non-linearly with load. Cu UPD also increases friction in presence of sulfate. However, in presence of 4 x 10{sup -4} M chloride friction is much smaller for all deposited Cu coverages - ranging from a submonolayer up to bulk copper compared to the solution without chloride. After dissolution of bulk copper clusters deposited on Au(1 1 1) we observed an area with higher friction forces due to the formation of an alloy between gold and copper.

  9. Nanotribology at single crystal electrodes: Influence of ionic adsorbates on friction forces studied with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present friction force measurements on Au(1 1 1) single crystal electrode surfaces performed under electrochemical conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). At monoatomic steps friction is increased in both scan directions. In 0.05 M sulfuric acid an increase of friction is observed with the increase of adsorbed sulfate. Friction force increases non-linearly with load. Cu UPD also increases friction in presence of sulfate. However, in presence of 4 x 10-4 M chloride friction is much smaller for all deposited Cu coverages - ranging from a submonolayer up to bulk copper compared to the solution without chloride. After dissolution of bulk copper clusters deposited on Au(1 1 1) we observed an area with higher friction forces due to the formation of an alloy between gold and copper

  10. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV (λ = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  11. The experimental rules of mica as a reference sample of AFM/FFM measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For the friction measurements with AFM/FFM, usually the relativevalues of friction signal can be obtained. In order to compare the micro-tribological properties of different samples, mica is often used as an reference sample for friction measurement. However, due to the friction force of new cleaved mica surface is unstable, it is urged to systematically investigate the tribological properties of mica to design the experimental rules of the reference sample mica for friction measurements. Experimental results show that the friction of mica varies with the cleaving time, humidity and surface state of tip. The friction measured with different tips on mica varies in the range of ± 15%. For a new tip, the friction increases with the tip’s wear and then becomes stable. For new cleaved mica, the friction increases within the first two hours and then keeps unchanged. The friction of mica also decreases with the relative humidity because of its hydrophilicity.

  12. FABRICATION AND AFM/FFM STUDIES OF C60-CONTAINING POLYELECTROLYTE SELF-ASSEMBLED FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Huang; Xiao-rong Hou; Yuan-kang He; Xiao-liang Zheng; Fang Wei; Xin-sheng Zhao; Wei-xiao Cao

    2002-01-01

    An initial investigation on the roughness and frictional properties of the self-assembled thin films from polyelectrolytes is presented. Star-shaped C60-poly(styrene-maleic anhydride) was successful prepared. The multilayer thin films have been fabricated on mica with diazoresin as the cationic polyelectrolyte and hydrolyzed star-shaped C60-poly(styrene-maleic anhydride) as the anionic polyelectrolyte via self-assembly technique. The crosslinking structure of the films is formed from the conversion of ionic bond to covalent bond after UV irradiation. AFM/FFM investigations provide insights into the roughness and frictional properties on a microscale. The roughness depends strongly on the number of film layers in the case of C60-containing films. The frictional forces of the films exhibited a well behaved non-linear relationship in response to the change of applied load. It supports the prediction of enhanced load-bearing property of C60-containing thin films.

  13. Is atomic-scale dissipation in NC-AFM real? Investigation using virtual atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a virtual dynamic atomic force microscope, that explicitly simulates the operation of a non-contact AFM experiment, we have performed calculations to investigate the formation of atomic-scale contrast in dissipation images. A non-conservative tip-surface interaction was implemented using the theory of dynamical response in scanning probe microscopy with energies and barriers derived from realistic atomistic modelling. It is shown how contrast in the damping signal is due to the hysteresis in the tip-surface force and not an artefact of the finite response of the complicated instrumentation. Topography and dissipation images of the CaO(001) surface are produced which show atomic-scale contrast in the dissipation with a corrugation of approximately 0.1 eV, which is typical of that observed in images of similar binary ionic surfaces. The effect of the fast-direction scanning speed on the image formation is also investigated and discussed

  14. Nanomechanical characterization of nanostructured bainitic steel: Peak Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Rivas, Lucia; González-Orive, Alejandro; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Hernández-Creus, Alberto; Caballero, Francisca G.; Vázquez, Luis

    2015-11-01

    The full understanding of the deformation mechanisms in nanostructured bainite requires the local characterization of its mechanical properties, which are expected to change from one phase, bainitic ferrite, to another, austenite. This study becomes a challenging process due to the bainitic nanostructured nature and high Young’s modulus. In this work, we have carried out such study by means of the combination of AFM-based techniques, such as nanoindentation and Peak Force Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PF-QNM) measurements. We have addressed critically the limits and advantages of these techniques and been able to measure some elastoplastic parameters of both phases. Specifically, we have analyzed by PF-QNM two nanostructured bainitic steels, with a finer and a coarser structure, and found that both phases have a similar Young’s modulus.

  15. Study on the specific interaction between angiogenin and aptamer by atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The specific interaction between angiogenin and aptamer has been investigated by using AFM. The specificity of the interaction is revealed by comparing the binding probability of aptamer to other elements in a series of control experiments.The results have shown that there is specific interaction force between angiogenin and aptamer. Moreover, the single molecular pull-off force between angiogenin and aptamer has also been determined using the Poisson statistical method to be 133.7±11.7 pN. These findings obtained are helpful to the better revelation of recognition mechanism between angiogenin and aptamer, which provided basis for further understanding the inhibition of the aptamer to angiogenic activity.

  16. Nano structural Formation of Pd-Co Bimetallic Complex on HOPG Surfaces: XPS and AFM Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new single source approach was developed to synthesize Pd-Co nanoparticles using a bimetallic compound, [Et3NH]2[CoPd2(μ-4-I-3,5-Me2pz)4Cl4](CoPd2), as a molecular precursor to obtain dispersed catalyst on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, in view of preparing oxygen reduction catalysts for low temperature fuel cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were employed to characterize the nano structure formations and to determine the composition and morphology of the complex on the HOPG. Results of high resolution XPS analysis (HR-XPS) revealed the binding energies corresponding to the atomic constituents of the precursor. When the precursor solution was placed on the surface of the HOPG, the bimetallic complex assumes a tubular structure and it appears that the surface of the HOPG offers a ground for the self-organization of nano structural formations.

  17. AFM study of adsorption of protein A on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the morphology and kinetics of adsorption of protein A on a PDMS surface is studied by AFM. The results of effects of pH, protein concentration and contact time of the adsorption reveal that the morphology of adsorbed protein A is significantly affected by pH and adsorbed surface concentration, in which the pH away from the isoelectric point (IEP) of protein A could produce electrical repulsion to change the protein conformation, while the high adsorbed surface protein volume results in molecular networks. Protein A can form an adsorbed protein film on PDMS with a maximum volume of 2.45 x 10-3 μm3. This work enhances our fundamental understanding of protein A adsorption on PDMS, a frequently used substrate component in miniaturized immunoassay devices.

  18. Membrane Surface Nanostructures and Adhesion Property of T Lymphocytes Exploited by AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Hongsong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The activation of T lymphocytes plays a very important role in T-cell-mediated immune response. Though there are many related literatures, the changes of membrane surface nanostructures and adhesion property of T lymphocytes at different activation stages have not been reported yet. However, these investigations will help us further understand the biophysical and immunologic function of T lymphocytes in the context of activation. In the present study, the membrane architectures of peripheral blood T lymphocytes were obtained by AFM, and adhesion force of the cell membrane were measured by acquiring force–distance curves. The results indicated that the cell volume increased with the increases of activation time, whereas membrane surface adhesion force decreased, even though the local stiffness for resting and activated cells is similar. The results provided complementary and important data to further understand the variation of biophysical properties of T lymphocytes in the context of in vitro activation.

  19. Electrochemical Single‐Molecule AFM of the Redox Metalloenzyme Copper Nitrite Reductase in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2012-01-01

    We studied the electrochemical behavior of the redox metalloenzyme copper nitrite reductase (CNiR, Achromobacter xylosoxidans) immobilized on a Au(111)‐electrode surface modified by a self‐assembled cysteamine molecular monolayer (SAM) using a combination of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemically......‐controlled atomic force microscopy (in situ AFM). The enzyme showed no voltammetric signals in the absence of nitrite substrate, whereas a strong reductive electrocatalytic signal appeared in the presence of nitrite. Such a pattern is common in protein film and monolayer voltammetry and points to conformational...... changes in the enzyme upon substrate binding. Binding thus either improves the enzyme/electrode contact, or opens intramolecular electron‐transfer channels between the redox center for electron inlet (a type I copper center) and the catalytic site for nitrite reduction (a type II copper center). The in...

  20. Syntheses, Spectroscopic and AFM Characterization of Some Manganese Porphyrins and Their Hybrid Silica Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Fagadar-Cosma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concerned with the manganese complexes of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin and of 5,10,15,20-tetra(3-hydroxyphenylporphyrin, which were prepared by metallation of the corresponding porphyrin ligands, and the study of their spectroscopic and photophysical behavior under strongly acidic and alkaline conditions. The second objective was to obtain and study some new hybrid materials, with special optoelectronic and surface properties, by impregnation of silica gels obtained by one step acid and by two steps acid-base catalysis with these Mn-porphyrins. The resulting nanomaterials exhibited interesting bathochromic and hyperchromic effects of their second band in the emission spectra in comparison with the Mn-porphyrins and also they have distinct orientation of the aggregates on surfaces, as shown by AFM images, making them useful for applications in medicine, formulation of sensors and for environmental-friendly catalysts for photodegradation of organic compounds.

  1. Investigation of Streptococcus mutans biofilm growth on modified Au(111)-surfaces using AFM and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    (hexadecanethiol, MHD) or hydrophilic (mercapto-hexadecanoic acid, MHDA) end groups. The voltammetric reductive desorption (RD) peaks of the thiol-based SAMs in the absence and presence of biofilms and growth medium was in focus as a sensitive probe of the SAM local environment.AFM showed that S. mutans had grown...... to dense monolayers on all the four modified Au(111)-surfaces after 24 hour. The growth rates were slightly different and fastest for MHD-modified surfaces but the biofilms after 24 hour were indistinguishable. Reductive desorption signals of all the four compounds in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 were...... very similar in the absence and presence of the biofilms and growth medium. RD in strongly alkaline solution where RD peak resolution is higher was also addressed. Most notably, the strong RD peaks of the long pure and functionalized MHD and MHDA in 0.1M NaOH remained in the presence either of biofilm...

  2. Hematite/silver nanoparticle bilayers on mica--AFM, SEM and streaming potential studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Bielańska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-15

    Bilayers of hematite/silver nanoparticles were obtained in the self-assembly process and thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and in situ streaming potential measurements. The hematite nanoparticles, forming a supporting layer, were 22 nm in diameter, exhibiting an isoelectric point at pH 8.9. The silver nanoparticles, used to obtain an external layer, were 29 nm in diameter, and remained negative within the pH range 3 to 11. In order to investigate the particle deposition, mica sheets were used as a model solid substrate. The coverage of the supporting layer was adjusted by changing the bulk concentration of the hematite suspension and the deposition time. Afterward, silver nanoparticle monolayers of controlled coverage were deposited under the diffusion-controlled transport. The coverage of bilayers was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited particles from SEM micrographs and AFM images. Additionally, the formation of the hematite/silver bilayers was investigated by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ conditions. The effect of the mica substrate and the coverage of a supporting layer on the zeta potential of bilayers was systematically studied. It was established that for the coverage exceeding 0.20, the zeta potential of bilayers was independent on the substrate and the supporting layer coverage. This behavior was theoretically interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. Beside significance for basic sciences, these measurements allowed to develop a robust method of preparing nanoparticle bilayers of controlled properties, having potential applications in catalytic processes. PMID:24767501

  3. Characterization of mineral-associated organic matter: a combined approach of AFM and NanoSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Lydia; Schurig, Christian; Eusterhues, Karin; Mueller, Carsten W.; Höschen, Carmen; Totsche, Kai-Uwe; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneous spatial distribution and amount of organic matter (OM) in soils, especially at the micro- or submicron-scale, has major consequences for the soil microstructure and for the accessibility of OM to decomposing microbial communities. Processes occurring at the microscale control soil properties and processes at larger scales, such as macro-aggregation and carbon turnover. Since OM acts as substrate and most important driver for biogeochemical processes, particular attention should be paid to its spatial interaction with soil minerals. In contrast to bulk analysis, Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) offers the possibility to examine the composition and spatial distribution of OM within the intact organo-mineral matrix. Nevertheless, the yield of secondary electrons is influenced by the individual topography of the analysed particles, which aggravated the quantitative interpretation of the data. A combination of NanoSIMS and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), enabled us to visualize and quantify the topographical features of individual particles and correct the NanoSIMS data for this effect. We performed adsorption experiments with water-soluble soil OM in 6 concentration steps, which was extracted from forest floor layer of a Podzol, and adsorbed to illite. Upon the end of the sorption experiments the liquid phase and the solid phase were separated and the carbon content was analysed with TOC- and C/N-measurement, respectively. For the spatially resolved analyses, the samples were applied as thin layers onto silicon wafers and individual particles were chosen by means of the AFM. Subsequently, the identical particles were analysed with NanoSIMS to investigate the distribution of C, N, O, Si, P and Al. The recorded data were analysed for differences in elemental distribution between the different concentration steps. Additionally, we performed a correlation of the detectable counts with the topography of the particle within one

  4. A torsional resonance mode AFM for in-plane tip surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changing the method of tip-sample interaction leads to contact, tapping and other dynamic imaging modes in atomic force microscopy (AFM) feedback controls. A common characteristic of these feedback controls is that the primary control signals are based on flexural deflection of the cantilever probes, statically or dynamically. We introduce a new AFM mode using the torsional resonance amplitude (or phase) to control the feedback loop and maintain the tip-surface relative position through lateral interaction. The torsional resonance mode (TRmode)provides complementary information to tapping mode for surface imaging and studies. The nature of tip-surface interaction of the TRmode facilitates phase measurements to resolve the in-plane anisotropy of materials as well as measurements of dynamic friction at nanometer scale. TRmode can image surfaces interleaved with TappingMode with the same probe and in the same area. In this way we are able to probe samples dynamically in both vertical and lateral dimensions with high sensitivity to local mechanical and tribological properties. The benefit of TRmode has been proven in studies of water adsorption on HOPG surface steps. TR phase data yields approximately 20 times stronger contrast than tapping phase at step edges, revealing detailed structures that cannot be resolved in tapping mode imaging. The effect of sample rotation relative to the torsional oscillation axis of the cantilever on TR phase contrast has been observed. Tip wear studies of TRmode demonstrated that the interaction forces between tip and sample could be controlled for minimum tip damage by the feedback loop

  5. AFM study of the thrombogenicity of carbon-based coatings for cardiovascular applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagkiozaki, V. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); AHEPA Hospital, 1st Cardiology Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); Logothetidis, S. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece)], E-mail: logot@auth.gr; Laskarakis, A. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); Giannoglou, G. [AHEPA Hospital, 1st Cardiology Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); Lousinian, S. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece)

    2008-08-25

    The new nanotechnologies in biomaterials for cardiovascular applications target at surface alterations for prevention of platelets aggregation and subsequent clotting as their usual failure arises from thrombogenicity. Knowledge of structural properties of platelets during their adhesion on nanostructure materials is required to obtain a comprehensive understanding of their activation and the conventional imaging tools require special preparation of the samples and does not guarantee the viability of the cells. Thus, in this study, the atomic force microscope (AFM) which is a non-destructive and nanoscale precision technique is implemented for the study of platelets' adhesion onto amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thin films and a methodology is developed. Carbon-based thin films grown by magnetron sputtering under different deposition conditions are considered to meet the requirements for biomedical applications and were selected as well-characterized, case study materials. Platelet rich plasma drawn from healthy donors was used for the study of platelets adhesion onto the a-C:H films. The fourier transform IR phase modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry (FTIRSE) (900-3500 cm{sup -1}) being a powerful, non-destructive, optical technique was used for the investigation of bonding structure of the adherent platelets onto the a-C:H materials and the contribution of the different vibration bands of the platelet bonding groups was shown and discussed. The effect of nanostructure, surface properties and wettability of the carbon thin films on their thrombogenic potential was verified and it was found that the different deposition conditions determine their structural, surface and biological properties. Thus, the tailoring of surface properties of biomaterials and the informative study of platelets-nanomaterials interactions with AFM and FTIRSE will revolutionize the development of less thrombogenic biomaterials.

  6. Raman confocal microscopy and AFM combined studies of cancerous cells treated with Paclitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derely, L.; Collart Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Michotte de Welle, Sylvain; Szabo, V.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2011-03-01

    Paclitaxel interferes with the normal function of microtubule breakdown, induces apoptosis in cancer cells and sequesters free tubulin. As this drug acts also on other cell mechanisms it is important to monitor its accumulation in the cell compartments. The intracellular spreading of the drug was followed using a WITEC 300R confocal Raman microscope equipped with a CCD camera. Hence Atomic force microscopy (an MFP3D- Asylum Research AFM) in imaging and force mode was used to determine the morphological and mechanical modifications induced on living cells. These studies were performed on living epithelial MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Paclitaxel was added to cell culture media for 3, 6 and 9 hours. Among the specific paclitaxel Raman bands we selected the one at 1670 cm-1 because it is not superposed by the spectrum of the cells. Confocal Raman images are formed by monitoring this band, the NH2 and the PO4 band. Paclitaxel slightly accumulates in the nucleus forming patches. The drug is also concentrated in the vicinity of the cell membrane and in an area close to the nucleus where proteins accumulate. Our AFM images reveal that the treated cancerous MCF-7 cells keep the same size as the non treated ones, but their shape becomes more oval. Cell's elasticity is also modified: a difference of 2 kPa in the Young Modulus characterizes the treated MCF-7 mammary cancerous cell. Our observations demonstrate that paclitaxel acts not only on microtubules but accumulates also in other cell compartments (nucleus) where microtubules are absent.

  7. AFM studies of swift heavy ion and electron irradiated mixed barium strontium borate nonlinear optical crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of novel nonlinear optical material of mixed barium strontium borate is grown in our laboratory by employing the low-temperature solution technique. Equal proportion (1:1 molar ratio) of AR grade barium borate and strontium borate are mixed together in double distilled water to prepare a supersaturated solution. The solution is allowed to evaporate at constant temperature (30 deg. C) in a Petri dish for about a week which resulted in the formation of seed crystals. These seed crystals are used to grow larger crystals by suspending them using fine silk thread in the supersaturated mother solution. The solution is allowed to evaporate at constant temperature. This resulted in the growth of good transparent crystals of dimension 15 mmx10 mmx1 mm after about one month. These crystals show good second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency. The mixed barium strontium borate crystal is found to be a promising nonlinear optical crystal, which possibly can be used for fabrication of photonic devices. The single crystals of mixed barium strontium borate are irradiated by 120 MeV Ag+13 swift heavy ions (SHI) of fluence 5x1011 ions/cm2 at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi and also by electrons of 8 MeV energy with a fluence 5.7x109/cm2 using Microtron accelerator at Mangalore University. Surface morphology studies of these crystals are carried out using atomic force microscope. The AFM topographical images of these SHI/electron irradiated single crystals of mixed barium strontium borate are obtained from different frames of the sample taken at different magnifications using atomic force microscope. An attempt is made to explain the surface damage caused due to SHI/electron irradiation using the observed AFM images

  8. The graphene sheet versus the 2DEG: a relativistic Fano spin-filter via STM and AFM tips

    OpenAIRE

    Seridonio, A. C.; Siqueira, E. C.; de Souza, F. M.; Machado, R. S.; Lyra, S. S.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    We explore theoretically the density of states (LDOS) probed by an STM tip of 2D systems hosting an adatom and a subsurface impurity,both capacitively coupled to AFM tips and traversed by antiparallel magnetic fields. Two kinds of setups are analyzed, a monolayer of graphene and a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The AFM tips set the impurity levels at the Fermi energy, where two contrasting behaviors emerge: the Fano factor for the graphene diverges, while in the 2DEG it approaches zero....

  9. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dague, E; Jauvert, E; Laplatine, L; Thibault, C [CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Viallet, B; Ressier, L, E-mail: edague@laas.fr, E-mail: laurence.ressier@insa-toulouse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, LPCNO, INSA-CNRS-UPS, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2011-09-30

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  10. Replication and dimensional quality control of industrial nanoscale surfaces using calibrated AFM measurements and SEM image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Marinello, F.;

    2010-01-01

    application of AFM to calibrate height, depth and pitch of sub-micrometer features and SEM image processing to detect replication accuracy in terms of number of replicated features. Surface replication is analyzed using a metrological approach: nano-features on nickel stampers and injection...

  11. The use of colloid probe microscopy to predict aerosolization performance in dry powder inhalers: AFM and in vitro correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Paul M; Tobyn, Michael J; Price, Robert; Buttrum, Mark; Dey, Fiona

    2006-08-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe technique was utilized to measure cohesion forces (separation energy) between three drug systems as a function of relative humidity (RH). The subsequent data was correlated with in vitro aerosolization data collected over the same RH range. Three drug-only systems were chosen for study; salbutamol sulphate (SS), triamcinolone acetonide (TAA), and di-sodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Analysis of the AFM and in vitro data suggested good correlations, with the separation energy being related inversely to the aerosolization performance (measured as fine particle fraction, FPF(LD)). In addition, the relationship between, cohesion, RH, and aerosolization performance was drug specific. For example, an increase in RH between 15% and 75% resulted in increased cohesion and decreased FPF(LD) for SS and DSCG. In comparison, for TAA, a decrease in cohesion and increased FPF(LD) was observed when RH was increased (15-75%). Linear regression analysis comparing AFM with in vitro data indicated R(2) values > 0.80, for all data sets, suggesting the AFM could be used to indicate in vitro aerosolization performance. PMID:16795018

  12. Radiation pressure excitation of Low Temperature Atomic Force & Magnetic Force Microscope (LT-AFM/MFM) for Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karci, Ozgur; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet; NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd. Team; Middle East Tech Univ Team

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel method for excitation of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilevers by means of radiation pressure for imaging in an AFM for the first time. Piezo excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, but it may cause spurious resonance peaks. A fiber optic interferometer with 1310 nm laser was used both to measure the deflection of cantilever and apply a force to the cantilever in a LT-AFM/MFM from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever`s resonance frequency by a digital Phase Lock Loop (PLL). The force exerted by the radiation pressure on a perfectly reflecting surface by a laser beam of power P is F = 2P/c. We typically modulate the laser beam by ~ 800 μW and obtain 10nm oscillation amplitude with Q ~ 8,000 at 2.5x10-4 mbar. The cantilever's stiffness can be accurately calibrated by using the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging a hard disk sample between 4-300K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO single crystal at 4K to for the first time.

  13. The effect of PeakForce tapping mode AFM imaging on the apparent shape of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczyk, W.; Schön, P.M.; Schönherr, H.

    2013-01-01

    Until now, TM AFM (tapping mode or intermittent contact mode atomic force microscopy) has been the most often applied direct imaging technique to analyze surface nanobubbles at the solid–aqueous interface. While the presence and number density of nanobubbles can be unequivocally detected and estimat

  14. Study of influence on micro-fabricated resistive switching organic ZrO2 array by C-AFM measurement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ying Li; Gaoyang Zhao; Zhibo Kou; Long Jin; Yajing Wang

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a comparison of the interfacial electronic properties between Pt/Ir conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) tip and ZrO2 organic array was carried out. A uniformed ZrO2 array was fabricated with a mean diameter of around 1 m using laser interference lithography. A C-AFM measurement set-up was built up. The - curve was directly measured of the organic ZrO2 array which shows a resistive switching characteristic by C-AFM measurement. The set voltage is 18.0 V and the reset voltage is −5.0 V. After the Pt layer was coated on the ZrO2 array, the set voltage decreases to 0.8 V and the reset voltage decreases to −2.2 V. This result shows that Pt layer can prevent the potential drop effectively. The electron barrier height between Pt/Ir C-AFM tip and organic ZrO2 array was enhanced by sputtering Pt layer on the ZrO2 organic array.

  15. Changes in collagen fibril pattern and adhesion force with collagenase-induced injury in rat Achilles tendon observed via AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Choi, Samjin; Chon, Jinmann; Yoo, Seungdon; Cho, Ilsung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-01-01

    The Achilles tendon consists mainly of type I collagen fibers that contain collagen fibrils. When the Achilles tendon is injured, it is inflamed. The collagenase-induced model has been widely used to study tendinitis. The major advantages of atomic force microscopy (AFM) over conventional optical and electron microscopy for bio-imaging include its non-requirement of a special coating and vacuum, and its capability to perform imaging in all environments. AFM force-distance measurements have become a fundamental tool in the fields of surface chemistry, biochemistry and materials science. Therefore, the changes in the ultrastructure and adhesion force of the collagen fibrils on the Achilles tendons of rats with Achilles tendinitis were observed using AFM. The changes in the structure of the Achilles tendons were evaluated based on the diameter and D-banding of the collagen fibrils. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis was induced with the injection of 30 microl crude collagenase into 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were each sacrificed on the first, second, third, fifth and seventh day after the collagenase injection. The normal and injured Achilles tendons were fixed in 4% buffered formalin and dehydrated with increasing concentrations of ethanol. AFM was performed using the non-contact mode at the resolution of 512 x 512 pixels, with a scan speed of 0.8 line/sec. The adhesion force was measured via the force-distance curve that resulted from the interactions between the AFM tip and the collagen fibril sample using the contact mode. The diameter of the collagen fibrils in the Achilles tendons significantly decreased (p force decreased until the fifth day after the collagenase injection, but increased on the seventh day after the collagenase injection (p < 0.0001). PMID:21446543

  16. Research on corona discharge based on AFM probe%基于AFM探针的电晕放电研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵贵; 孔德义; Juergen Brugger; 陈池来; 程玉鹏; 李庄

    2011-01-01

    针对扫描探针显微镜与质谱联用系统中的采样方式,提出了利用原子力显微镜(AFM)探针进行电晕放电解吸附的采样方案.运用ANSYS软件对AFM导电探针进行了有限元仿真,电场分析表明间距100 μm加1 kV高压时的AFM探针周围场强在0.32 ~62.4 V/μm间,验证了利用其产生电晕放电的可行性;通过实验观察了电晕放电现象及其规律,测得了AFM探针加高压时的伏安特性曲线,为下一步利用AFM探针产生电晕放电进行非触式采样奠定了良好的基础.%An atomic force microscopy ( AFM) probe based corona discharge sampling device for desorption ionization in scanning probe microscope mass spectrometer (SPM-MS) is put forward. Through finite element analysis, research is done on the mechanical and electrical character of the AFM probe tip. Electrical analysis shows that the field intensity around the AFM probe could achieve 0.32 -62.4 V/μun when the gap distance is 100 fun and the applied voltage is 1 kV, validating the feasibility and usability of the sampling device. The relationship between discharge current I and applied voltage V is studied through corona discharge experiment. These works lay a foundation for developing the corona discharge for non-contact sampling based on AFM probe.

  17. In situ AFM crystal growth and dissolution study of calcite in the presence of aqueous fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavouraki, A.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Koutsoukos, P. G.

    2009-04-01

    Fluoride is naturally abundant, encountered in rocks, soil and fresh and ocean water. Calcite crystals, during crystal growth may incorporate fluoride ions into their lattice (Okumura et al., 1983). In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the growth and dissolution of calcite {104} surfaces in aqueous solutions in the presence of fluoride, using a fluid cell in which the supersaturated and the understaturated solutions respectively, flow over a freshly cleaved calcite crystal. For growth experiments, supersaturation index (S.I.) with respect to calcite was equal to 0.89 and the initial solution pH 10.2. The crystal growth rates were measured from the closure of the rhombohedral etch pits along the [010] direction induced by an initial dissolution step using pure water. The spreading rate of 2-dimensional nuclei was also measured along the same direction. In the presence of low fluoride concentrations (≤0.33 mM), the crystal growth rate of calcite was unaffected. At higher concentrations (up to 5 mM) growth rate decreased substantially to 50% of the rate in the absence of fluoride. Potential fluoride sorption over the calcite surface may ascribe the decrease of growth rates. Dissolution experiments were conducted at pH= 7.2 and dissolution rates of calcite were measured from the spreading of rhombohedral etch pits along both [010] and [42] directions. The presence of low concentrations of fluoride (≤1.1 mM) in the undersaturated solutions enhanced the dissolution rate along the [42] direction by 50% in comparison with pure water. The morphology of rhombohedral etch pits changed to hexagonal in the presence of fluoride in the undersaturated solutions. The AFM dissolution experiments suggested that the fluoride ions adsorbed onto the calcite surface. Further increase of fluoride concentrations (up to 1.6 mM) resulted in the decrease of the calcite dissolution rate by 60% in both [010] and [42] directions. Reference: Okumura, M, Kitano, Y

  18. AFM/FFM测量参考样品云母的规范实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱林茂; 雒建斌; 温诗铸; 萧旭东

    2000-01-01

    在原子力/摩擦力显微镜(AFM/FFM)实验中, 通常只能得到摩擦力信号的相对值, 为了比较各种样品表面的微观摩擦性能, 常选用新鲜解理的云母作为摩擦力测量的参考样品. 由于新鲜解理云母表面摩擦性能的不稳定性, 使得不同条件下在云母表面上测得的摩擦力信号有较大的变化. 为此, 需要通过对云母表面摩擦性能的系统研究, 建立一个以云母为AFM/FFM摩擦力测试参考样品实验规范. 实验结果表明, 云母样品的摩擦特性受其解理时间的长短、湿度以及测试针尖的变化等多种因素的影响. 不同针尖在云母表面的摩擦力信号大约在±15%的范围内波动; 新针尖在云母表面作摩擦实验时, 摩擦力信号随磨损次数的增加逐渐增大, 然后趋于稳定. 对于新鲜解理的云母表面, 其摩擦力信号随解理时间的增长而逐渐增大并逐步趋于稳定. 由于云母表面的亲水性, 其摩擦力信号随湿度的增大而逐渐减小.

  19. Comparative quantification and statistical analysis of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 by TEM and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantification of nanometric precipitates in metallic alloys has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy, which is nominally a low throughput technique. This work presents a comparative study of quantification of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM quantification was compared with 2-D stereological results reported elsewhere. Also, a method was developed, using specialized software, to characterize nanometric size precipitates observed in dark-field TEM micrographs. Statistical analysis of the quantification results from both measurement techniques supports the use of AFM for precipitate characterization. Once the precipitate stoichiometry has been determined by appropriate analytical techniques like TEM, as it is the case for η′ and η in AA7075-T651, the relative ease with which specimens are prepared for AFM analysis could be advantageous in product and process development, and quality control, where a large number of samples are expected for analysis on a regular basis. - Highlights: • Nanometric MgZn2 precipitates in AA7075-T651 were characterized using AFM and TEM. • Phase-contrast AFM was used to differentiate metal matrix from MgZn2 precipitates. • TEM and AFM micrographs were analyzed using commercially available software. • AFM image analysis and TEM 2-D stereology render statistically equivalent results

  20. Analysis of aflatoxin M1 in milk and yogurt and AFM1 reduction by lactic acid bacteria used in Lebanese industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study a screening survey was undertaken to determine the presence and levels of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in locally produced dairy products. For this purpose, a total of 138 dairy samples (milk and yogurt) were analyzed to quantify AFM1 levels in these products. Results obtained showed that AFM1 was found in 40.62% and 32.81% of milk and yogurt samples respectively. The range of contamination levels varied between lower and higher than European regulation limit. Lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) used in the Lebanese traditional industry were screened for their ability to reduce the level of AFM1. Due to the lack in data on the natural occurrence of AFM1 in Lebanese dairy products, the aim of this work was to report some information and to state these products according to EC regulations. (author)

  1. IMPROVED FABRICATION METHOD FOR CARBON NANOTUBE PROBE OF ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY(AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zongwei; DONG Shen; GUO Liqiu; ZHAO Qingliang

    2006-01-01

    An improved arc discharge method is developed to fabricate carbon nanotube probe of atomic force microscopy (AFM) here. First, silicon probe and carbon nanotube are manipulated under an optical microscope by two high precision microtranslators. When silicon probe and carbon nanotube are very close, several tens voltage is applied between them. And carbon nanotube is divided and attached to the end of silicon probe, which mainly due to the arc welding function.Comparing with the arc discharge method before, the new method here needs no coat silicon probe with metal film in advance, which can greatly reduce the fabrication's difficulty. The fabricated carbon nanotube probe shows good property of higher aspect ratio and can more accurately reflect the true topography of silicon grating than silicon probe. Under the same image drive force, carbon nanotube probe had less indentation depth on soft triblock copolymer sample than silicon probe. This showed that carbon nanotube probe has lower spring constant and less damage to the scan sample than silicon probe.

  2. Control of a piezoelectrically actuated high-speed serial-kinematic AFM nanopositioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controller design to compensate vibration, hysteresis and time delay in a high-speed serial-kinematic X–Y nanopositioner is presented in this paper. A high-speed serial-kinematic X–Y nanopositioner, designed in-house, is installed in a commercial AFM and its scanning performance is studied. The impediments to fast scanning are (i) the presence of mechanical resonances in the nanopositioning stage, (ii) nonlinearities due to the piezoelectric actuators and (iii) time delay introduced by finite clock speeds of the signal conditioning circuitry associated with displacement sensors. In this paper an integral resonant controller is designed to mitigate the effect of the resonance along the X axis (fast axis). The control design accommodates for the time delay, thereby ensuring robust stability. A high gain integral controller is wrapped around the damped nanopositioner to ensure sufficient linearity near the region of operation. For actuation along the Y axis (slow axis), where the bandwidth requirement is less demanding, a notch filter is used to increase the gain margin and the nonlinearity is compensated using a high gain feedback controller. Enhancement in the scanning speed up to 200 Hz is observed. Imaging and tracking performance for open loop and closed loop scans up to 200 Hz line rate is compared and presented. Limitations and future work are discussed. (paper)

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos of Microcantilever-Based TM-AFMs with Squeeze Film Damping Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Yu Chen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In Atomic force microscope (AFM examination of a vibrating microcantilever, the nonlinear tip-sample interaction would greatly influence the dynamics of the cantilever. In this paper, the nonlinear dynamics and chaos of a tip-sample dynamic system being run in the tapping mode (TM were investigated by considering the effects of hydrodynamic loading and squeeze film damping. The microcantilever was modeled as a spring-mass-damping system and the interaction between the tip and the sample was described by the Lennard-Jones (LJ potential. The fundamental frequency and quality factor were calculated from the transient oscillations of the microcantilever vibrating in air. Numerical simulations were carried out to study the coupled nonlinear dynamic system using the bifurcation diagram, Poincaré maps, largest Lyapunov exponent, phase portraits and time histories. Results indicated the occurrence of periodic and chaotic motions and provided a comprehensive understanding of the hydrodynamic loading of microcantilevers. It was demonstrated that the coupled dynamic system will experience complex nonlinear oscillation as the system parameters change and the effect of squeeze film damping is not negligible on the micro-scale.

  4. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Stack, Andrew G; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-02-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) and corundum (α-Al(2)O(3)) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3±0.7nN to 0.8±0.4nN as hematite NPs increased from 26nm to 98nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed. PMID:20932723

  5. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chen, Yongsheng [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  6. Optimization of Q-factor of AFM cantilevers using genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, Angel; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Stiharu, Ion; Osornio-Rios, Roque A

    2012-04-01

    Micro cantilever beams have been intensively used in sensing applications including to scanning profiles and surfaces where there resolution and imaging speed are critical. Force resolution is related to the Q-factor. When the micro-cantilever operates in air with small separation gaps, the Q-factor is even more reduced due to the squeeze-film damping effect. Thus, the optimization of the configuration of an AFM micro-cantilever is presented in this work with the objective of improving its Q-factor. To accomplish this task, we propose the inclusion of holes as breathing chimneys in the initial design to reduce the squeeze-film damping effect. The evaluation of the Q-factor was carried out using finite element model, which is implemented to work together with the squeeze-film damping model. The methodology applied in the optimization process was genetic algorithms, which considers as constraints the maximum allowable stress, fundamental frequency and spring constant with respect to the initial design. The results show that the optimum design, which includes holes with an optimal location, increases the Q-factor almost five times compared to the initial design. PMID:22459119

  7. An in situ AFM investigation on the morphology of the (100) growth interface of ZTS crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yachao; Li, Mingwei; Cheng, Min; Song, Jie; Hu, Zhitao

    2014-02-01

    Interface morphology of the (100) face of zinc tris-thiourea sulphate (ZTS) crystals, grown under different supersaturations, at 30 °C, was investigated using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). It comes out that the (100) face exhibits stepped surface characteristics. At lower supersaturations, nucleation easily occurred at the outcrops of edge dislocations which could act as persistent sources of monomolecular growth steps, and the edge dislocation sites appeared to exhibit a “memory function”. At higher supersaturations, however, poly-nucleation becomes the primary growth mechanism. The rates of step advancement in the [010] and [001] directions of the two-dimensional nuclei were different, as it ensues from the symmetry anisotropy. The activation energy of the two-dimensional nuclei along with the step kinetic coefficients in the [010] and [001] directions, were calculated. We also found that microcrystals on the surface of the crystal could be better integrated into the crystal surface, or otherwise lead to the generation of pits by migration of the microcrystals. Pits could be gradually filled by elementary steps and thus no defect would be formed, or they might also be covered directly by macrosteps, which would result in liquid inclusions.

  8. Study of AFM-based nanometric cutting process using molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to investigate the atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanometric cutting process of copper using diamond tool. The effects of tool geometry, cutting depth, cutting velocity and bulk temperature are studied. It is found that the tool geometry has a significant effect on the cutting resistance. The friction coefficient (cutting resistance) on the nanoscale decreases with the increase of tool angle as predicted by the macroscale theory. However, the friction coefficients on the nanoscale are bigger than those on the macroscale. The simulation results show that a bigger cutting depth results in more material deformation and larger chip volume, thus leading to bigger cutting force and bigger normal force. It is also observed that a higher cutting velocity results in a larger chip volume in front of the tool and bigger cutting force and normal force. The chip volume in front of the tool increases while the cutting force and normal force decrease with the increase of bulk temperature.

  9. BOREAS AFM-1 NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ Aircraft Flux data Over the SSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Timothy L.; Baldocchi, Dennis; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Gunter, Laureen; Dumas, Ed; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains measurements from the Airborne Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-1 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration/Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (NOAA/ATDD) Long-EZ Aircraft collected during the 1994 Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) at the southern study area (SSA). These measurements were made from various instruments mounted on the aircraft. The data that were collected include aircraft altitude, wind direction, wind speed, air temperature, potential temperature, water mixing ratio, U and V components of wind velocity, static pressure, surface radiative temperature, downwelling and upwelling total radiation, downwelling and upwelling longwave radiation, net radiation, downwelling and upwelling photosynthectically active radiation (PAR), greenness index, CO2 concentration, O3 concentration, and CH4 concentration. There are also various columns that indicate the standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and trend of some of these data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ aircraft flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. Distribution and formation of molecularly thin lubricants by thermostatic high vacuum AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution and formation of molecularly thin lubricants (95% Zdol and 5% X-1P) on CHx carbon surfaces has been studied by thermostatic high vacuum atomic force microscopy (THV-AFM). Results show that Zdol or/and X-1P distribute in island-shaped aggregation independent of topography of CHx surfaces at different temperatures. At 20 deg. C, 10-7 Torr, distribution of X-1P additive can be mapped distinctly without interfering features from Zdol lubes. As temperature decreases, features from Zdol gradually present both in topographic images and in phase images. Measured heights of Zdol islands increase with temperature varying from -20 to -60 deg. C, however, the island diameters do not change significantly. At -60 deg. C and 10-7 Torr, lubricant islands have a typical height of ∼3.5 nm and a typical diameter of ∼100 nm. The area coverage ratio of lubricant islands to CHx surfaces is ∼0.59. To interpret these results, we present a lubricant distribution model involving an initial site-specific adsorption process in the solutions and a long time reorganization process after solvent evaporation

  11. FTIR, AFM and PL properties of thin SiO{sub x} films deposited by HFCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Lopez, J.A., E-mail: jalbluna@siu.buap.mx [CIDS-ICUAP, BUAP, Ciudad Universitaria, Ed. 103 D, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico); Garcia-Salgado, G.; Diaz-Becerril, T.; Lopez, J. Carrillo; Vazquez-Valerdi, D.E.; Juarez-Santiesteban, H.; Rosendo-Andres, E.; Coyopol, A. [CIDS-ICUAP, BUAP, Ciudad Universitaria, Ed. 103 D, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-10-25

    In order to have optoelectronic functions integrated in a single chip, it is very important to obtain a silicon compatible material with an optimal photoluminescence response. The non-stoichiometric silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) has shown photoluminescence response and is also compatible with silicon technology. In this work, the composition and optical properties of the SiO{sub x} films are studied using null ellipsometry, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and photoluminescence (PL). The SiO{sub x} films were growth to different temperatures. The IR absorption spectrum shows the presence of three typical Si-O-Si vibrations modes in SiO{sub 2}. However, changes in their intensity and position were observed. Also, when growth temperature decreased, the Si-H vibrations modes were observed. These changes are directly related with compositional variation in the SiO{sub x} films due to the growth temperature. A PL spectrum shows a considerable emission in the range 400-850 nm that varies with the growth temperatures.

  12. Size and orientation of the lipid II headgroup as revealed by AFM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganchev, D N; Hasper, H E; Breukink, E; de Kruijff, B

    2006-05-16

    In this study, we investigated the size and orientation of the bacterial Lipid II (L II) headgroup when the L II molecule is present in liquid-crystalline domains of DOPC in a supported DPPC bilayer. Using atomic force microscopy, we detected that L II causes the appearance of a 1.9 nm thick layer, situated over the DOPC headgroup region. With an increased scanning force, this layer can be penetrated by the AFM tip down to the level of the DOPC bilayer. Using different L II precursor molecules, we demonstrated that the detected layer consists of the headgroups of L II and that the MurNAc-pentapeptide unit of the headgroup is responsible for the measured 1.9 nm height of that layer. Monolayer experiments provided information about the in-plane dimensions of the L II headgroup. On the basis of these results and considerations of the molecular dimensions of L II headgroup constituents, we propose a model for the orientation of the L II headgroup in the membrane. In this model, the pentapeptide of the L II headgroup is rather extended and points away from the bilayer surface, which could be important for biological processes, in which L II is involved. PMID:16681392

  13. AFM and uni-axial testing of pericardium exposed to radiotherapy doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pericardium, a double-layered sac that encloses the heart, is made up of collagen and elastin fibres embedded in an amorphous matrix (forming the extracellular matrix). Collagen fibres are aligned in multidirectional orientation layers. This free arrangement of fibres gives the pericardium its viscoelastic properties and the ability to deform in all directions. This is an important mechanical property for the heart to perform its physiological functions, acknowledging the fact that the heart is attached to different ligaments and muscles in all directions. The present study aims to investigate the effect of penetrating photon ionising radiation on bovine pericardium tissue. This links to an interest in seeking to understand possible mechanisms underlying cardiac complications following treatment of the left breast in radiotherapy regimes. Pericardium samples were subjected to doses in the range 0-80 Gy. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in characterising changes in the infrastructural and mechanical properties of the tissues. Preliminary data for doses of 80 Gy shows there was no significant change in the D-spacing period of the banded structure collagen type I but a significant increase is observed in the FWHM of the fibril widths (by between 25% and 27%) over that of unirradiated pericardium tissue.

  14. Porous titania films fabricated via sol gel rout - Optical and AFM characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasiński, Paweł; Gondek, Ewa; Drewniak, Sabina; Kajzer, Anita; Waczyńska-Niemiec, Natalia; Basiaga, Marcin; Izydorczyk, Weronika; Kouari, Youssef E. L.

    2016-06-01

    Mesoporous titania films of low refractive index ∼1.72 and thickness within the range of 57-96 nm were fabricated via sol-gel rout and dip-coating technique on a soda-lime glass substrate. Tetrabutylorthotitanate Ti(OBu)4 was used as a titania precursor. High porosity and consequently low refractive index were achieved using the polyethylene glycol (PEG 1100) as a template. Based on transmittance, using Tauc's relations, the optical energy band gaps and the Urbach energy were determined. The research shows that in the fabricated titania films there are two types of optical energy band gaps, connected with direct and indirect electron transitions and brought about by the presence of amorphous and crystalline phase respectively. Based on the quantum size effect, the diameters of nanocrystals versus film thickness were determined. AFM studies of the titania films have demonstrated that there are changes of surface morphology taking place with the change of thickness. We have demonstrated that the surface morphology of titania films has influence on wettability.

  15. Growth behaviour and mechanical properties of PLL/HA multilayer films studied by AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagri Üzüm

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Scanning- and colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy were used to study the mechanical properties of poly(L-lysine/hyaluronan (PLL/HAn films as a function of indentation velocity and the number of polymer deposition steps n. The film thickness was determined by two independent AFM-based methods: scratch-and-scan and newly developed full-indentation. The advantages and disadvantages of both methods are highlighted, and error minimization techniques in elasticity measurements are addressed. It was found that the film thickness increases linearly with the bilayer number n, ranging between 400 and 7500 nm for n = 12 and 96, respectively. The apparent Young’s modulus E ranges between 15 and 40 kPa and does not depend on the indenter size or the film bilayer number n. Stress relaxation measurements show that PLL/HA films have a viscoelastic behaviour, regardless of their thickness. If indentation is performed several times at the same lateral position on the film, a viscous/plastic deformation takes place.

  16. A review of design concepts for the Advanced Fluids Module (AFM) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Myron E.; Tschen, Peter S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews preliminary fluid module design concepts for the Advanced Fluids Module (AFM) project. The objective of this effort is to provide a facility that can handle a wide variety of fluids experiments. Sample science requirements were written and conceptual designs were subsequently generated during the last year. Experiments from the following fluid physics subject areas were used as conceptual design drivers: static and dynamic interfacial phenomena; bubble/droplet thermocapillary migration; surface tension convection and instabilities; thermal/solutal convection; pool boiling; and multiphase flow. After the conceptual designs were completed, the next phase attempted to combine experiments capabilities into a multipurpose, multiuser apparatus configured for the Space Station Freedom. It was found that all the fluid subject areas considered could be accommodated by three basic types of fluids modules. These modules are the Static Fluid Cell Module, the Dynamic Fluid Cell Module, and the Multiphase Flow Module. Descriptions of these preliminary modules designs and their particular sub-systems (e.g., fluid and thermal systems) are discussed. These designs will be refined as the nature of the flight program becomes clearer over the next six to twelve months.

  17. AFM study of hydrodynamics in boundary layers around micro- and nanofibers

    CERN Document Server

    de Baubigny, Julien Dupré; Mortagne, Caroline; Devailly, Clémence; Acharige, Sébastien Kosgodagan; Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey; Salvetat, Jean-Paul; Aimé, Jean-Pierre; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The description of hydrodynamic interactions between a particle and the surrounding liquid, down to the nanometer scale, is of primary importance since confined liquids are ubiquitous in many natural and technological situations. In this paper, we combine three non-conventional atomic force microscopes to study hydrodynamics around micro- and nano-cylinders. These complementary methods allow the independent measurement of the added mass and friction terms over a large range of probe sizes, fluid viscosities and solicitation conditions. A theoretical model based on an analytical description of the velocity field around the probe shows that the friction force depends on a unique parameter, the ratio of the probe radius to the thickness of the viscous boundary layer. We demonstrate that the whole range of experimental data can be gathered in a master curve which is well reproduced by the model. This validates the use of these AFM modes for a quantitative study of nano-hydrodynamics, and opens the way to the inve...

  18. X-AFm stabilization as a mechanism of bypassing conversion phenomena in calcium aluminate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase conversion phenomena are often observed in calcium aluminate cements (CACs), when the water-rich hydrates (e.g., CAH10, C2AH8) formed at early ages, at temperatures ≤ 30 °C, expel water in time to form more compact, less water-rich structures (C3AH6). The phase conversions follow a path regulated by the thermodynamic stabilities (solubilities) of phases. Based on this premise, it is proposed that conversion phenomena in CACs can be bypassed by provoking the precipitation of phases more preferred than those typically encountered along the conversion pathway. Therefore, X-AFm formation (where in this case, X = NO3−) triggered by the sequential addition of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2 = CN) additives is identified as a new means of bypassing conversion. A multi-method approach comprising X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analytics, and evaluations of the compressive strength is applied to correlate phase balances and properties of CAC systems cured at 25 °C and 45 °C. The results highlight the absence of the C3AH6 phase across all systems and the curing conditions considered, with enhanced strengths being noted, when sufficient quantities of CN are added. The experimental outcomes are supported by insights gained from thermodynamic calculations which highlight thermodynamic selectivity as a means of regulating and controlling the evolutions of solid phase balances using inorganic salts in CACs, and more generally in cementing material systems

  19. Investigation the Al–Fe–Cr–Ti nano composites structures with using XRD and AFM techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ali Bahari; Aref Sadeghi Nik; Mandana Roodbari; Nordin Mirnia

    2012-12-01

    The performance of multilayers has been widely investigated in metal/metal systems. Shrinking this system down to less than 10 nm dislocation blocking occurs. We should thus try to find a way to get a structure with less dislocation, and/or strain because low diffusivity ultra high vacuum chamber is the basic requirements for growing ultra thin films and nano scale materials. We used William–Hall relation based on Scherr equation in X-ray powder spectrum and drawn the stress–strain diagrams. It shows that Al–Fe–Cr–Ti composites have very low diffusivity and equilibrium solubility in Al (0.05 at.% Fe, >0.02 at.% Cr, and >0.3 at.% Ti). Al–Ti– Fe–Cr composite powders have also been prepared from sol–gel method starting from elemental powders at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The obtained results from XRD (X-ray Diffraction), AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and X-ray powder techniques indicate that nano-grains with 0.03 at %Cr can cause a reduction of leakage current through the SS chamber due to its amorphous structure.

  20. Magnetotransport measurements on AFM structured two-dimensional electron gases on cleaved edges of GaAs/AlGaAs; Magnetotransportmessungen an AFM-strukturierten zweidimensionalen Elektronengasen auf GaAs/AlGaAs-Spaltkanten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinwald, Elisabeth

    2009-06-25

    In this thesis a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) on a (110) cleavage plane of a GaAs/AlGaAs(001) heterostructure was produced by means of cleaved edge overgrowth (CEO) and modulated in two dimensions. The 2DEG was modulated in one direction by a superlattice of the subjacent GaAs/AlGaAs(001) heterostructure. A second modulation, perpendicular to the first was realized by local anodic oxidation (LAO) with an atomic force microscope (AFM). For the process of LAO an electric voltage is applied between the tip of the AFM and the surface of the GaAs. The natural water film on the surface acts as electrolyte so that the GaAs surface is locally oxidized underneath the AFM tip. This oxide leads to a band bending so that the 2DEG underneath the oxide is locally depleted. On these systems magnetotransport measurements revealed that it is actually possible to modulate 2DEGs on a sufficient large area by local anodic oxidation. On the cleaved surfaces the influence of the two dimensional modulation on the electron gas has been demonstrated. (orig.)

  1. A solution for an inverse problem in liquid AFM: calculation of three-dimensional solvation structure on a sample surface

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, Ken-ich

    2013-01-01

    Recent frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) can measure three-dimensional force distribution between a probe and a sample surface in liquid. The force distribution is, in the present circumstances, assumed to be solvation structure on the sample surface, because the force distribution and solvation structure have somewhat similar shape. However, the force distribution is exactly not the solvation structure. If we would like to obtain the solvation structure by using the liquid AFM, a method for transforming the force distribution into the solvation structure is necessary. Therefore, in this letter, we present the transforming method in a brief style. We call this method as a solution for an inverse problem, because the solvation structure is obtained at first and the force distribution is obtained next in general calculation processes. The method is formulated (mainly) by statistical mechanics of liquid.

  2. AFM PeakForce QNM mode: Evidencing nanometre-scale mechanical properties of chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, G; Pruvost, S; Cardoso, L; Alonso, B; Belamie, E; Duchet-Rumeau, J

    2016-10-20

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) AFM mode was used to explore the mechanical properties of textured chitin-silica hybrid films at the nanoscale. The influence of the force applied by the tip on the sample surface was studied for standard homogeneous samples, for chitin nanorods and for chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites. Thick films of superimposed chitin nanorods showed a monotonous increase of DMT modulus (based on the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model) owing to an increase in modulus at the interface between nanorods due to geometrical constraints of the AFM acquisition. A similar variation of DMT modulus was obtained for chitin-silica hybrid thick films related to mechanical strengthening induced by the presence of silica. This work revealed the role of the organic-inorganic interface, at the nanoscale, in the mechanical behaviour of textured materials using PeakForce QNM mode, with optimized analysis conditions. PMID:27474579

  3. AFM studies of a new type of radiation defect on mica surfaces caused by highly charged ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced defects on mica caused by the impact of slow very highly charged ions (SVHCI) have been investigated with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Freshly cleaved surfaces of different types of muscovite were irradiated with SVHCI extracted from the LLNL electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at velocities of ca. 2 keV/amu. Atomic force microscopy of the surface reveals the formation of blisterlike defects associated with single ion impact. The determined defect volume which appears to increase linearly with the incident charge state and exhibits a threshold incident charge state has been determined using the AFM. These results indicate that target atoms are subjected to mutual electrostatic repulsion due to ionization through potential electron emission upon approach of the ion. If the repulsion leads to permanent atomic displacement, surface defects are formed

  4. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2004: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2005-03-01

    With the ongoing miniaturization of devices and controlled nanostructuring of materials, the importance of atomic-scale information on surfaces and surface properties is growing continuously. The astonishing progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology that took place during the last two decades was in many ways related to recent progress in high-resolution imaging techniques such as scanning tunnelling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Since the mid-1990s, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) performed in ultrahigh vacuum has evolved as an alternative technique that achieves atomic resolution, but without the restriction to conducting surfaces of the previously established techniques. Advances of the rapidly developing field of NC-AFM are discussed at annual conferences as part of a series that started in 1998 in Osaka, Japan. This special issue of Nanotechnology is a compilation of original work presented at the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy that took place in Seattle, USA, 12-15 September 2004. Over the years, the conference grew in size and scope. Atomic resolution imaging of oxides and semiconductors remains an issue. Noticeable new developments have been presented in this regard such as, e.g., the demonstrated ability to manipulate individual atoms. Additionally, the investigation of individual molecules, clusters, and organic materials gains more and more attention. In this context, considerable effort is undertaken to transfer the NC-AFM principle based on frequency modulation to applications in air and liquids with the goal of enabling high-resolution surface studies of biological material in native environments, as well as to reduce the experimental complexity, which so far involves the availability of (costly) vacuum systems. Force spectroscopy methods continue to be improved and are applied to topics such as the imaging of the three-dimensional force field as a function of the distance with

  5. Surface investigations of ZnBeMnSe mixed crystals by means of the piezoelectric spectroscopy and the AFM technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzałkowski, K.; Kulesza, S.; Zakrzewski, J.; Maliński, M.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric photoacoustic spectroscopy with a piezoelectric detection has been used for measurements of the amplitude and phase spectra of Zn1-x-yBexMnySe mixed semiconductors. The investigated crystals were grown from the melt by the modified high pressure Bridgman method under the argon overpressure. The preliminary study of the sample's surface of the investigated crystals was carried out using the AFM technique. The influence of a different surface treatment on the amplitude and phase piezoelectric spectra as well as on AFM images is presented and analyzed. The correlations between these two techniques have been found and are discussed. Piezoelectric (PZE) spectra were analyzed using an extended and modified Jackson-Amer theory.

  6. Comparative studies of thin film growth on aluminium by AFM, TEM and GDOES characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jiantao; Thompson, George E.

    2016-07-01

    In this present study, comparative studies of trivalent chromium conversion coating formation, associated with aluminium dissolution process, have been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). High-resolution electron micrographs revealed the evident and uniform coating initiation on the whole surface after conversion treatment for only 30 s, although a network of metal ridges was created by HF etching pre-treatment. In terms of conversion treatment process on electropolished aluminium, constant kinetics of coating growth, ∼0.30 ± 0.2 nm/s, were found after the prolonged conversion treatment for 600 s. The availability of electrolyte anions for coating deposition determined the growth process. Simultaneously, a proceeding process of aluminium dissolution during conversion treatment, of ∼0.11 ± 0.02 nm/s, was found for the first time, indicating constant kinetics of anodic reactions. The distinct process of aluminium consumption was assigned with loss of corrosion protection of the deposited coating material as evidenced in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Based on the present data, a new mechanism of coating growth on aluminium was proposed, and it consisted of an activation period (0-30 s), a linear growth period (0.30 nm/s, up for 600 s) and limited growth period (0.17 nm/s, 600-1200 s). In addition, the air-drying post-treatment and a high-vacuum environment in the microscope revealed a coating shrinkage, especially in the coatings after conversion treatments for longer time.

  7. Optimization of Q-factor of AFM cantilevers using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Cruz, Angel, E-mail: elapc27@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico); Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio [Faculty of Engineering, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico); Stiharu, Ion [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Concordia University, Montreal (Canada); Osornio-Rios, Roque A. [Faculty of Engineering, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2012-04-15

    Micro cantilever beams have been intensively used in sensing applications including to scanning profiles and surfaces where there resolution and imaging speed are critical. Force resolution is related to the Q-factor. When the micro-cantilever operates in air with small separation gaps, the Q-factor is even more reduced due to the squeeze-film damping effect. Thus, the optimization of the configuration of an AFM micro-cantilever is presented in this work with the objective of improving its Q-factor. To accomplish this task, we propose the inclusion of holes as breathing chimneys in the initial design to reduce the squeeze-film damping effect. The evaluation of the Q-factor was carried out using finite element model, which is implemented to work together with the squeeze-film damping model. The methodology applied in the optimization process was genetic algorithms, which considers as constraints the maximum allowable stress, fundamental frequency and spring constant with respect to the initial design. The results show that the optimum design, which includes holes with an optimal location, increases the Q-factor almost five times compared to the initial design. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was optimized the Q-factor of a cantilever, which operates near to the surface in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was proposed the inclusion of holes as breathing chimneys in the cantilever's surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genetic algorithms and finite element analysis were applied to find the optimum configuration for the Q-factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum design keeps first frequency and the spring constant very close to the original and has a better force resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Final design can be easily manufactured through a mask.

  8. Optimization of Q-factor of AFM cantilevers using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro cantilever beams have been intensively used in sensing applications including to scanning profiles and surfaces where there resolution and imaging speed are critical. Force resolution is related to the Q-factor. When the micro-cantilever operates in air with small separation gaps, the Q-factor is even more reduced due to the squeeze-film damping effect. Thus, the optimization of the configuration of an AFM micro-cantilever is presented in this work with the objective of improving its Q-factor. To accomplish this task, we propose the inclusion of holes as breathing chimneys in the initial design to reduce the squeeze-film damping effect. The evaluation of the Q-factor was carried out using finite element model, which is implemented to work together with the squeeze-film damping model. The methodology applied in the optimization process was genetic algorithms, which considers as constraints the maximum allowable stress, fundamental frequency and spring constant with respect to the initial design. The results show that the optimum design, which includes holes with an optimal location, increases the Q-factor almost five times compared to the initial design. -- Highlights: ► It was optimized the Q-factor of a cantilever, which operates near to the surface in air. ► It was proposed the inclusion of holes as breathing chimneys in the cantilever's surface. ► Genetic algorithms and finite element analysis were applied to find the optimum configuration for the Q-factor. ► Optimum design keeps first frequency and the spring constant very close to the original and has a better force resolution. ► Final design can be easily manufactured through a mask.

  9. Lipid asymmetry in DLPC/DSPC supported lipid bilayers, a combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W; Blanchette, C D; Ratto, T V; Longo, M L

    2005-06-20

    A fundamental attribute of cell membranes is transmembrane asymmetry, specifically the formation of ordered phase domains in one leaflet that are compositionally different from the opposing leaflet of the bilayer. Using model membrane systems, many previous studies have demonstrated the formation of ordered phase domains that display complete transmembrane symmetry but there have been few reports on the more biologically relevant asymmetric membrane structures. Here we report on a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy study whereby we observe three different states of transmembrane symmetry in phase-separated supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We find that if the leaflets differ in gel-phase area fraction, then the smaller domains in one leaflet are in registry with the larger domains in the other leaflet and the system is dynamic. In a presumed lipid flip-flop process similar to Ostwald Ripening, the smaller domains in one leaflet erode away while the large domains in the other leaflet grow until complete compositional asymmetry is reached and remains stable. We have quantified this evolution and determined that the lipid flip-flop event happens most frequently at the interface between symmetric and asymmetric DSPC domains. If both leaflets have nearly identical area fraction of gel-phase, gel-phase domains are in registry and are static in comparison to the first state. The stability of these three DSPC domain distributions, the degree of registry observed, and the domain immobility have direct biological significance with regards to maintenance of lipid asymmetry in living cell membranes, communication between inner leaflet and outer leaflet, membrane adhesion, and raft mobility.

  10. Amyloid-β peptides time-dependent structural modifications: AFM and voltammetric characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2016-07-01

    The human amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, structural modifications, from soluble monomers to fully formed fibrils through intermediate structures, were investigated, and the results were compared with those obtained for the inverse Aβ40-1 and Aβ42-1, mutant Aβ1-40Phe(10) and Aβ1-40Nle(35), and rat Aβ1-40Rat peptide sequences. The aggregation was followed at a slow rate, in chloride free media and room temperature, and revealed to be a sequence-structure process, dependent on the physicochemical properties of each Aβ peptide isoforms, and occurring at different rates and by different pathways. The fibrilization process was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), via changes in the adsorption morphology from: (i) initially random coiled structures of ∼0.6 nm height, corresponding to the Aβ peptide monomers in random coil or in α-helix conformations, to (ii) aggregates and protofibrils of 1.5-6.0 nm height and (iii) two types of fibrils, corresponding to the Aβ peptide in a β-sheet configuration. The reactivity of the carbon electrode surface was considered. The hydrophobic surface induced rapid changes of the Aβ peptide conformations, and differences between the adsorbed fibrils, formed at the carbon surface (beaded, thin, 2.0 nm height), were detected. Differential pulse voltammetry showed that, according to their primary structure, the Aβ peptides undergo oxidation in one or two steps, the first step corresponding to the tyrosine amino acids oxidation, and the second one to the histidine and methionine amino acids oxidation. The fibrilization process was electrochemically detected via the decrease of the Aβ peptide oxidation peak currents that occurred in a time dependent manner. PMID:27216391

  11. Characterization of deep nanoscale surface trenches with AFM using thin carbon nanotube probes in amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of deep surface trenches with atomic force microscopy (AFM) presents significant challenges due to the sharp step edges that disturb the instrument and prevent it from faithfully reproducing the sample topography. Previous authors have developed AFM methodologies to successfully characterize semiconductor surface trenches with dimensions on the order of tens of nanometers. However, the study of imaging fidelity for features with dimensions smaller than 10 nm has not yet received sufficient attention. Such a study is necessary because small features in some cases lead to apparently high-quality images that are distorted due to tip and sample mechanical deformation. This paper presents multi-scale simulations, illustrating common artifacts affecting images of nanoscale trenches taken with fine carbon nanotube probes within amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation AFM (AM-AFM and FFM-AFM, respectively). It also describes a methodology combining FFM-AFM with a step-in/step-out algorithm analogous to that developed by other groups for larger trenches, which can eliminate the observed artifacts. Finally, an overview of the AFM simulation methods is provided. These methods, based on atomistic and continuum simulation, have been previously used to study a variety of samples including silicon surfaces, carbon nanotubes and biomolecules.

  12. DNA-coated AFM cantilevers for the investigation of cell adhesion and the patterning of live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sonny C.; Crow, Ailey K.; Lam, Wilbur A.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2008-08-01

    Measurement of receptor adhesion strength requires the precise manipulation of single cells on a contact surface. To attach live cells to a moveable probe, DNA sequences complementary to strands displayed on the plasma membrane are introduced onto AFM cantilevers (see picture, bp=base pairs). The strength of the resulting linkages can be tuned by varying the length of DNA strands, allowing for controlled transport of the cells.

  13. The study of optical disk pattern based on AFM%基于AFM的光盘形貌研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大许; 刘万里; 马强; 闫勇刚

    2005-01-01

    介绍了原子力显微镜(AFM)的原理及特点.用AFM对光盘上记录信息用的凹坑结构进行了三维检测,并对测量结果进行了分析.结论表明AFM在光盘质量检测过程中具有独特的优势.

  14. Characterization and analysis of weld lines on micro-injection moulded parts using atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Gava, Alberto; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard;

    2009-01-01

    In recent years plastic moulding techniques, such as injection moulding, have been developed to fulfil the needs of micro-components fabrication. Micro-injection moulding (SLIM) is the process which enables the mass production of polymer micro-systems such as micro-mechanical parts, micro-fluidic...... injection moulding parameters on the weld lines' dimensions is presented, using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Depth and width of weld lines were chosen as parameters to be optimized....

  15. Workshop on Digital Image Processing of SPM(AFM,SEM) data using ImageJ and Gwyddion

    OpenAIRE

    Jany, Benedykt R.

    2016-01-01

    Workshop on Digital Image Processing of SPM(AFM,SEM) data using ImageJ and Gwyddion   Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics Jagiellonian University Krakow Poland 12.05.2016 Organized by Dr Benedykt R. Jany   Examples and Exercises   The free software could be downloaded from: ImageJ/FIJI  http://fiji.sc/   Gwyddion http://gwyddion.net/   LibreOffice https://www.libreoffice.org/

  16. Integrin-Specific Mechanoresponses to Compression and Extension Probed by Cylindrical Flat-Ended AFM Tips in Lung Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Acerbi; Tomás Luque; Alícia Giménez; Marta Puig; Noemi Reguart; Ramon Farré; Daniel Navajas; Jordi Alcaraz

    2012-01-01

    Cells from lung and other tissues are subjected to forces of opposing directions that are largely transmitted through integrin-mediated adhesions. How cells respond to force bidirectionality remains ill defined. To address this question, we nanofabricated flat-ended cylindrical Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) tips with ~1 µm(2) cross-section area. Tips were uncoated or coated with either integrin-specific (RGD) or non-specific (RGE/BSA) molecules, brought into contact with lung epithelial cells...

  17. Nanostrucure of Hybrid Plasmonic-Potonic Crystal Formed on Gel-Immobilized Colloidal Crystal Observer by AFM after Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Kawakami, Sho; Mori, Atsushi; Nagashima, Ken; Hashimoto, Shuuichi; Haraguchi, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at fabrication of hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals, gel-immobilized colloidal crystals made of a polystyrene colloidal suspension and an N-(Hydroxy methyl)acrylamid-based gel were immersed into an aqueous dispersion of gold nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope (AFM) observations have been performed for the gel-immobilized colloidal crystals with gold nanoparticles deposited on their surfaces. In the present study, the diameter of a colloidal sphere was c.a. 190 nm. The diameter of ...

  18. Depth prediction model of nano-grooves fabricated by AFM-based multi-passes scratching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An AFM-based depth prediction model of nano-grooves for the atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based multi-passes scratching method is given. • The effect of the tip geometry is considered in the theoretical model. • A correction factor is introduced into the two-passes scratching model and the prediction error of the correction model is less than 10%. - Abstract: This paper proposes a nano-groove depth prediction model for the atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based multi-passes scratching method in which the AFM tip is considered as a cone with a spherical apex. The relationship between the normal load applied on the sample and the depth of the machined nano-groove is systematically investigated for the multi-passes scratching process. Nano-grooves are fabricated with several normal loads and two passes scratches on a 2A12 aluminum alloy surface to verify the developed models. Results show that the hardness may become larger near the machined region after one pass scratching test and a correction factor is introduced into the two passes scratching model which is as a function of the first pass machined depths of the nano-grooves. Based on the correction model, several nano-grooves with an expected depth are machined with different normal loads for each pass in the two passes scratching tests and the difference between the experiment results and the expected values is less than 10%. Actually, to machine a nano-groove with a desired depth, this method has the potential to distribute the appropriate normal load applied for each pass to reduce the tip wear and be used for nano-groove depth correction using the multi passes scratching technique

  19. AFM and XRD characterization of silver nanoparticles films deposited on the surface of DGEBA epoxy resin by ion sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Elisandro de Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, silver atoms were deposited by ion sputtering on the surface of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA epoxy resin cured at 150 °C for 6 hours in air. The films of DGEBA and its precursors were characterized by Raman spectroscopy to identify the main functional groups and their relationship with the deposited silver atoms. Silver thin films of 5, 10, 15 and 20 nm were deposited on the epoxy resin at room temperature. Both the initial film of DGEBA and the subsequent silver thin film were analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in the non-contact mode. Silver thin films were also analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD at room temperature. The AFM results showed the formation of silver crystallites on the surface of DGEBA at very low coverage whereas XRD indicated that most of them had their main axis aligned to the normal of the surface. An increase in the coverage led to an increase in the grain size as indicated by AFM. However, XRD results indicated that the crystallite size remained almost constant while the appearance of peaks corresponding to other crystalline orientations suggests the coalescence of the original crystallites and an increase in size of the more dense planes, namely [111].

  20. AFM and XRD characterization of silver nanoparticles films deposited on the surface of DGEBA epoxy resin by ion sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, silver atoms were deposited by ion sputtering on the surface of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin cured at 150 deg C for 6 hours in air. The films of DGEBA and its precursors were characterized by Raman spectroscopy to identify the main functional groups and their relationship with the deposited silver atoms. Silver thin films of 5, 10, 15 and 20 nm were deposited on the epoxy resin at room temperature. Both the initial film of DGEBA and the subsequent silver thin film were analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in the non-contact mode. Silver thin films were also analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) at room temperature. The AFM results showed the formation of silver crystallites on the surface of DGEBA at very low coverage whereas XRD indicated that most of them had their main axis aligned to the normal of the surface. An increase in the coverage led to an increase in the grain size as indicated by AFM. However, XRD results indicated that the crystallite size remained almost constant while the appearance of peaks corresponding to other crystalline orientations suggests the coalescence of the original crystallites and an increase in size of the more dense planes, namely [111]. (author)