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Sample records for afm probe tip

  1. Modular design of AFM probe with sputtered silicon tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, Jacob; Bouwstra, Siebe

    2001-01-01

    of the thin films constituting the cantilever. The AFM probe has an integrated tip made of a thick sputtered silicon layer, which is deposited after the probe has been defined and just before the cantilevers are released. The tips are so-called rocket tips made by reactive ion etching. We present probes...

  2. Modular design of AFM probe with sputtered silicon tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, Jacob; Bouwstra, Siebe

    2001-01-01

    We present an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe with integrated piezoresistive read-out. The probe consists of a micromachined cantilever with a tip at the end. The cantilever is a multilayer structure with its thickness defined by etch-stop and the bending controlled by fitting the thicknesses...... with polysilicon resistors for demonstrating the fabrication principle. The probes have been characterised with respect to noise and deflection sensitivity and have been applied in AFM imaging....

  3. High Throughput Nanofabrication of Silicon Nanowire and Carbon Nanotube Tips on AFM Probes by Stencil-Deposited Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engstrøm, Daniel Southcott; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni

    2011-01-01

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer...

  4. Design of a micro-cartridge system for the robotic assembly of exchangeable AFM-probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenwerfer, Malte; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Fatikow, Sergej

    2013-01-01

    dimensional acquisition and visualization techniques for their metrology. Amongst others line width and sidewall roughness are the most important parameters for nanooptical components but the determination of these parameters becomes increasingly demanding, since the continuous shrinkage of these devices...... structures remains a hardly accomplishable task. Novel exchangeable and customizable scanning probe tips, so-called NanoBits, can be attached to standard AFM cantilevers offering unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of the tips to the surface topology of the specific application. The ultimate...

  5. Simulation of CNT-AFM tip based on finite element analysis for targeted probe of the biological cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh, E-mail: at.tyousefi@gmail.com; Miyake, Mikio, E-mail: miyakejaist@gmail.com; Ikeda, Shoichiro, E-mail: sho16.ikeda@gmail.com [ChECA IKohza, Dept. Environmental & Green Technology (EGT), Malaysia, Japan International Institute of Technology (MJIIT), University Technology Malaysia - UTM, Kualalumpur (Malaysia); Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop, E-mail: nano@uitm.gmail.com [NANO-SciTech Centre, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nano scale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cell’s. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis.

  6. Probing colloidal forces between a Si3N4 AFM tip and single nanoparticles of silica and alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drelich, J; Long, J; Xu, Z; Masliyah, J; White, C L

    2006-11-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to measure surface forces between silicon nitride AFM tips and individual nanoparticles deposited on substrates in 10(-4) and 10(-2) M KCl solutions. Silica nanoparticles (10 nm diameter) were deposited on an alumina substrate and alumina particles (5 to 80 nm diameter) were deposited on a mica substrate using aqueous suspensions. Ionic concentrations and pH were used to manage attractive substrate-particle electrostatic forces. The AFM tip was located on deposited nanoparticles using an operator controlled offset to achieve stepwise tip movements. Nanoparticles were found to have a negligible effect on long-range tip-substrate interactions, however, the forces between the tip and nanoparticle were detectable at small separations. Exponentially increasing short-range repulsive forces, attributed to the hydration forces, were observed for silica nanoparticles. The effective range of hydration forces was found to be 2-3 nm with the decay length of 0.8-1.3 nm. These parameters are in a good agreement with the results reported for macroscopic surfaces of silica obtained using the surface force apparatus suggesting that hydration forces for the silica nanoparticles are similar to those for flat silica surfaces. Hydration forces were not observed for either alumina substrates or alumina nanoparticles in both 10(-4) M KCl solution at pH 6.5 and 10(-2) M KCl at pH 10.2. Instead, strong attractive forces between the silicon nitride tip and the alumina (nanoparticles and substrate) were observed.

  7. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    Invention of atomic force microscopy (AFM) pioneered a novel aspect for the surface metrology concept. A range of scanning probe methods have been developed over the years based on different sorts of tip-surface interaction: electrical, optical, thermal, force. Reproducible and fast fabrication...... miniaturisation requires the scanning probes to adapt into finer geometries to provide higher lateral resolution. To meet these needs critical dimension AFM (CD-AFM) and deep trench AFM (DT-AFM) were invented, which use different types of AFM tips: high-aspect-ratio tips for DT-AFM and CD tips for CD...... replacement could greatly increase the efficiency and adaptability of a CD system. In this PhD study, NanoBits – nano-sized customisable and exchangeable scanning probe tips – were developed to meet the demands of current AFM applications. Two different methods were followed for the fabrication of Nano...

  8. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard...... or dislocation of the tips of the nanobit after several scans. This approach allows an unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of scanning probe tips to the surface topology or to the specific application....... silicon processing. Using a microgripper they were detached from an array and fixed to a standard pyramidal AFM probe or alternatively inserted into a tipless cantilever equipped with a narrow slit. The nanobit-enhanced probes were used for imaging of deep trenches, without visible deformation, wear...

  9. Automated handling and assembly of customizable AFM-tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenwerfer, M.; Eichhorn, V.; Jasper, D.

    2011-01-01

    for metrology are required. Two of the most important parameters are the line width and sidewall roughness of vertical interconnects and nanooptical structures. The measurement of these parameters becomes increasingly challenging as the continuous shrinking of dimensions requires higher lateral resolution...... and customizable scanning probe tips, so-called NanoBits, can be attached to standard AFM cantilevers offering unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of the tips to the surface topology of the specific application. In order to realize the in-situ exchange of NanoBits within the AFM environment...

  10. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R.; Barth, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system.We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04541J

  11. Sequential electrochemical oxidation and site-selective growth of nanoparticles onto AFM probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Yong; Pan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Zhongdang

    2008-08-19

    In this work, we reported an approach for the site-selective growth of nanoparticle onto the tip apex of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. The silicon AFM probe was first coated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) through a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Subsequently, COOH groups were selectively generated at the tip apex of silicon AFM probes by applying an appropriate bias voltage between the tip and a flat gold electrode. The transformation of methyl to carboxylic groups at the tip apex of the AFM probe was investigated through measuring the capillary force before and after electrochemical oxidation. To prepare the nanoparticle terminated AFM probe, the oxidized AFM probe was then immersed in an aqueous solution containing positive metal ions, for example, Ag+, to bind positive metal ions to the oxidized area (COOH terminated area), followed by chemical reduction with aqueous NaBH 4 and further development (if desired) to give a metal nanoparticle-modified AFM probe. The formation of a metal nanoparticle at the tip apex of the AFM probe was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA).

  12. AFM tip-sample convolution effects for cylinder protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Fei-Hu; Gan, Yang

    2017-11-01

    A thorough understanding about the AFM tip geometry dependent artifacts and tip-sample convolution effect is essential for reliable AFM topographic characterization and dimensional metrology. Using rigid sapphire cylinder protrusions (diameter: 2.25 μm, height: 575 nm) as the model system, a systematic and quantitative study about the imaging artifacts of four types of tips-two different pyramidal tips, one tetrahedral tip and one super sharp whisker tip-is carried out through comparing tip geometry dependent variations in AFM topography of cylinders and constructing the rigid tip-cylinder convolution models. We found that the imaging artifacts and the tip-sample convolution effect are critically related to the actual inclination of the working cantilever, the tip geometry, and the obstructive contacts between the working tip's planes/edges and the cylinder. Artifact-free images can only be obtained provided that all planes and edges of the working tip are steeper than the cylinder sidewalls. The findings reported here will contribute to reliable AFM characterization of surface features of micron or hundreds of nanometers in height that are frequently met in semiconductor, biology and materials fields.

  13. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions.

  14. Wettability of AFM tip influences the profile of interfacial nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Hideaki; Takahashi, Koji; Takata, Yasuyuki; Nishiyama, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    To accurately characterize the shape of interfacial nanobubbles using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the effect of wettability of the AFM tip while operating in the peak force tapping (PFT) mode. The AFM tips were made hydrophobic and hydrophilic by Teflon AF coating and oxygen plasma treatment, respectively. It was found that the measured base radius of nanobubbles differed between AFM height images and adhesion images, and that this difference depended on the tip wettability. The force curves obtained during the measurements were also different depending on the wettability, especially in the range of the tip/nanobubble interaction and in the magnitude of the maximum attractive force in the retraction period. The difference suggests that hydrophobic tips penetrate the gas/liquid interface of the nanobubbles, with the three phase contact line being pinned on the tip surface; hydrophilic tips on the other hand do not penetrate the interface. We then quantitatively estimated the pinning position and recalculated the true profiles of the nanobubbles by comparing the height images and adhesion images. As the AFM tip was made more hydrophilic, the penetration depth decreased and eventually approached zero. This result suggests that the PFT measurement using a hydrophilic tip is vital for the acquisition of reliable nanobubble profiles.

  15. Phase imaging quality improvement by modification of AFM probes' cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Kaczmarek, L; Wejrzanowski, T; Plocinski, T; Rozniatowski, K

    2018-03-01

    Imaging of the surface of materials by atomic force microscopy under tapping and phase imaging mode, with use of modified probes is addressed. In this study, the circularly shaped holes located in varying distance from the probe base, were cut out by focused ion beam. Such modification was a consequence of the results of the previous experiments (probe tip sharpening and cantilever thinning) where significant improvement of image quality in tapping and phase imaging mode has been revealed. The solution proposed herein gives similar results, but is much simpler from the technological point of view. Shorter exposition time of the tip onto gallium ions during FIB processing allows to reduce material degradation. The aim of this modification was to change harmonic oscillators' properties in the simplest and fastest way, to obtain stronger signal for higher resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard sample, supplied by Bruker, was used. The results have shown that the modifications performed within these studies influence the oscillation of the probes, which in some cases may result in deterioration of the imaging quality under tapping mode for one or both self-resonant frequencies. However, phase imaging results obtained using modified probes are of higher quality. The numerical simulations performed by application of finite element method were used to explain the results obtained experimentally. Phenomenon described within this study allows to apply developed modelling methodology for prediction of effects of various modifications on the probes' tip, and as a result, to predict how proposed modifications will affect AFM imaging quality. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Thermally-treated Pt-coated silicon AFM tips for wear resistance in ferroelectric data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Palacio, Manuel; Kwak, Kwang Joo

    2008-01-01

    In ferroelectric data storage, a conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe with a noble metal coating is placed in contact with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) film. The understanding and improvement of probe tip wear, particularly at high velocities, is needed for high data rate recording. A commercial Pt-coated silicon AFM probe was thermally treated in order to form platinum silicide at the near-surface. Nanoindentation, nanoscratch and wear experiments were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties and wear performance at high velocities. The thermally treated tip exhibited lower wear than the untreated tip. The tip wear mechanism is adhesive and abrasive wear with some evidence of impact wear. The enhancement in mechanical properties and wear resistance in the thermally treated film is attributed to silicide formation in the near-surface. Auger electron spectroscopy and electrical resistivity measurements confirm the formation of platinum silicide. This study advances the understanding of thin film nanoscale surface interactions

  17. Electrospray deposition from fountain pen AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, J.; Sarajlic, Edin; Berenschot, Johan W.; Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present for the first time electrospraying from fountain pen probes. By using electrospray contactless deposition in an AFM setup becomes possible. Experiments on a dedicated setup were carried out as first step towards this goal. Spraying from 8 and 2 µm apertures was observed. For

  18. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application.

  19. Characteristics of fracture during the approach process and wear mechanism of a silicon AFM tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Ha; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2005-01-01

    The wear of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is one of the crucial issues in AFM as well as in other probe-based applications. In this work, wear tests under extremely low normal load using an AFM were conducted. Also, in order to understand the nature of silicon tip wear, the wear characteristics of crystal silicon and amorphous silicon oxide layer were investigated by a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). It was found that fracture of the tip readily occurred due to impact during the approach process. Experimental results showed that the impact should be below 0.1 nN s to avoid significant fracture of the tip. Also, it was observed that wear of the amorphous layer, formed at the end of the tip, occurred at the initial stage of the silicon tip damage process. Based on Archard's wear law, the wear coefficient of the amorphous layer was in the range of 0.009-0.014. As for the wear characteristics of the silicon tip, it was shown that wear occurred gradually under light normal load and the wear rate decreased with increase in the sliding distance. As for the wear mechanism of the silicon tip, oxidation wear was identified to be the most significant. It was shown that the degree of oxidation was higher under high normal load and in a nitrogen environment, oxidation of the silicon tip was reduced

  20. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  1. Modification of AFM Tips for Facilitating Picking-up of Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Wang; Hai-Jun, Yang; Hua-Bin, Wang; Hai, Li; Xin-Yan, Wang; Ying, Wang; Jun-Hong, Lü; Bin, Li; Yi, Zhang; Jun, Hu

    2008-01-01

    The radius of atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is a key factor that influences nonspecific interactions between AFM tip and nanoparticles. Generally, a tip with larger radius contributes to a higher efficiency of picking up nanoparticles. We provide two methods for modifying the AFM tip: one is to wear a tip apex on a solid substrate and the other is to coat a tip with poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Both the approaches can enhance the adhesion force between the tip and nanoparticles by increasing tip radius. The experimental results show that a modified tip, compared to an unmodified one, achieves six-fold efficiency improvement in the capture of targeted colloidal gold nanoparticles. (general)

  2. Fabrication and buckling dynamics of nanoneedle AFM probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, J D; Gordeev, S N, E-mail: jdb28@bath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-29

    A new method for the fabrication of high-aspect-ratio probes by electron beam induced deposition is described. This technique allows the fabrication of cylindrical 'nanoneedle' structures on the atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip which can be used for accurate imaging of surfaces with high steep features. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging showed that needles with diameters in the range of 18-100 nm could be obtained by this technique. The needles were shown to undergo buckling deformation under large tip-sample forces. The deformation was observed to recover elastically under vertical deformations of up to {approx} 60% of the needle length, preventing damage to the needle. A technique of stabilizing the needle against buckling by coating it with additional electron beam deposited carbon was also investigated; it was shown that coated needles of 75 nm or greater total diameter did not buckle even under tip-sample forces of {approx} 1.5 {mu}N.

  3. Transient Tip-Sample Interactions in High-Speed AFM Imaging of 3D nano structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyvani Janbahan, A.; Sadeghian Marnani, H; Goosen, H.; Keulen, F. van

    2015-01-01

    The maximum amount of repulsive force applied to the surface plays a very important role in damage of tip or sample in Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM). So far, many investigations have focused on peak repulsive forces in tapping mode AFM in steady state conditions. However, it is known that AFM could

  4. Nanomechanical properties of polymer brushes by colloidal AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutnyanszky, E.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of end grafted polymer layers were studied by AFM based, colloidal probe compression measurements. Zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) brush was grafted from planar Si surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMAA) brush was grown on colloidal probe by

  5. Scanning diamond NV center probes compatible with conventional AFM technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tony X.; Stöhr, Rainer J.; Yacoby, Amir

    2017-10-01

    Scanning probe microscopy using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond has become a versatile tool with applications in physics, chemistry, life sciences, and earth and planetary sciences. However, the fabrication of diamond scanning probes with high photon collection efficiency, NV centers with long coherence times, and integrated radio frequency (RF) remains challenging due to the small physical dimensions of the probes and the complexity of the fabrication techniques. In this work, we present a simple and robust method to reliably fabricate probes that can be integrated with conventional quartz tuning fork based sensors as well as commercial silicon AFM cantilevers. An integrated RF micro-antenna for NV center spin manipulation is directly fabricated onto the probe making the design versatile and compatible with virtually all AFM instruments. This integration marks a complete sensor package for NV center-based magnetometry and opens up this scanning probe technique to the broader scientific community.

  6. Fabrication of tuning-fork based AFM and STM tungsten probe

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Falih, Hisham

    2011-12-01

    We compare the sharpness of tungsten probe tips produced by the single-step and two-step dynamic electrochemical etching processes. A small radius of curvature (RoC) of 25 nm or less was routinely obtained when the two-step electrochemical etching (TEE) process was adopted, while the smallest achievable RoC was ∼10 nm, rendering it suitable for atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) applications. © 2011 IEEE.

  7. In situ, controlled and reproducible attachment of carbon nanotubes onto conductive AFM tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jianxun [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafty, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No. 11, Bei yi tiao, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing 100190 (China); Shingaya, Yoshitaka [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Zhao, Yuliang [Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafty, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No. 11, Bei yi tiao, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing 100190 (China); Nakayama, Tomonobu, E-mail: NAKAYAMA.Tomonobu@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An effective and controllable method was developed to fabricate CNT AFM probes in-situ. • Individual carbon nanotube was assembled. • The alignment angle and protruding length of as-produced CNT probes are excellent. - Abstract: Owing to the small diameter, wear resistance, high aspect ratio of their cylindrical structure and outstanding young's modulus, carbon nanotubes are regarded as excellent probes for atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging and various applications. To take the best out of carbon nanotubes’ potentials as AFM probes, we present a facile and reliable method to attach a single carbon nanotube onto an AFM probe covered with conductive Au layer. The method involves the following steps: positioning the AFM probe exactly onto a designated multiple-walled carbon nanotube growing vertically on a conductive substrate, establishing physical contact of the probe apex to the carbon nanotube with an appropriate force, and finally flowing a DC current of typically 100 μA from the AFM probe to the substrate through the carbon nanotube. The current flow results in the fracture and attachment of the carbon nanotube onto the AFM probe. Our method is similar to that reported in previous studies to cut and assemble carbon nanotubes by flowing current under SEM, but by our method we succeed to achieve superior control of protruding length and reproducible attachment angle of the carbon nanotube in one step. Moreover, it is now possible to reliably prepare carbon nanotube probes in-situ during AFM experiments.

  8. Influence of the surface chemistry on the nanotribological behaviour of (AFM tip/graphite) couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jradi, Khalil [Universite du Quebec a Trois Rivieres, Centre Integre en pates et papiers, 3351 boulevard des forges, Trois Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada); Schmitt, Marjorie, E-mail: Marjorie.Schmitt@uha.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Bioorganique, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Mulhouse - CNRS, 3, rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Bistac, Sophie [Laboratoire de Photochimie et d' Ingenierie Macromoleculaires, 3, rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2012-03-01

    The development of the nanotechnology has made essential the knowledge of the tribological behaviour of carbonaceous materials, and more particularly of graphite. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is thus used to study the friction properties at this nanoscopic scale. In this work, results concerning the friction of AFM tips against graphite pins are presented, with a particular emphasis on the effect of the chemical modification of these tips on the tribological behaviour of graphite.

  9. Probing Aggrecan Interactions with Ions by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Preethi; Dimitriadis, Emilios; Basser, Peter; Horkay, Ferenc

    2010-03-01

    Aggrecan (MW 2 MDa) is a highly charged bottle-brush shape biological polymer found in the extracellular matrix of tissues. It consists of a protein backbone (400nm long), to which about 100 linear chains of negatively-charged glucosaminoglycans are attached approximately 4 nm apart. The high charge density of the aggrecan bottle-brush allows it to imbibe water, thereby maintaining tissue hydration and permeability, while also binding to cell-signaling molecules. In solution, aggrecan molecules respond differently to varying salt conditions, than other charged biological and synthetic polyelectrolytes like DNA and poly(acrylic acid) (Horkay, 2008). To probe the nature of its interactions with charged surfaces, we looked at the absorption patterns of aggrecan assemblies on controlled surfaces (polylysine, mica) under different ionic conditions, using Atomic Force Microscopy. We propose a simple model of the charge interactions, which relates the surface-adsorption patterns to the solution structures. The study may help understanding how aggrecan loss or degradation with age and joint disease affects tissue microstructure and physical properties.

  10. Thin block copolymer films : film formation and corrugation under the AFM tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Fleer, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    The tip of an atomic force microscope was used to induce nanoscale ordering in thin films of polystyrene-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) block copolymers under low force. The AFM tip produces rims on a mesoscopic scale oriented perpendicularly to the scanning direction. A wide range of molecular weights of

  11. Improving the lateral resolution of quartz tuning fork-based sensors in liquid by integrating commercial AFM tips into the fiber end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Martínez-Martín, David; Otero, Jorge; de Pablo, Pedro José; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2015-01-14

    The use of quartz tuning fork sensors as probes for scanning probe microscopy is growing in popularity. Working in shear mode, some methods achieve a lateral resolution comparable with that obtained with standard cantilevered probes, but only in experiments conducted in air or vacuum. Here, we report a method to produce and use commercial AFM tips in electrically driven quartz tuning fork sensors operating in shear mode in a liquid environment. The process is based on attaching a standard AFM tip to the end of a fiber probe which has previously been sharpened. Only the end of the probe is immersed in the buffer solution during imaging. The lateral resolution achieved is about 6 times higher than that of the etched microfiber on its own.

  12. Nanospot soldering polystyrene nanoparticles with an optical fiber probe laser irradiating a metallic AFM probe based on the near-field enhancement effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianlei; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Yang; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Hou, Chaojian

    2015-02-04

    With the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology for the bottom-up nanofabrication of nanostructures formed from polystyrene nanoparticles, joining technology is an essential step in the manufacturing and assembly of nanodevices and nanostructures in order to provide mechanical integration and connection. To study the nanospot welding of polystyrene nanoparticles, we propose a new nanospot-soldering method using the near-field enhancement effect of a metallic atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip that is irradiated by an optical fiber probe laser. On the basis of our theoretical analysis of the near-field enhancement effect, we set up an experimental system for nanospot soldering; this approach is carried out by using an optical fiber probe laser to irradiate the AFM probe tip to sinter the nanoparticles, providing a promising technical approach for the application of nanosoldering in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  13. Optimized hand fabricated AFM probes for simultaneous topographical and electrochemical tapping mode imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Raul D.; Anne, Agnes; Cambril, Edmond; Demaille, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    In this work hybrid AFM-electrochemical (SECM) probes to be used in dynamic atomic force microscopy are presented. These nanosensors are hand fabricated from gold microwires using a simple benchtop method. They display proportions close to commercially available silicon and silicon nitride cantilevers giving comparable performance in terms of resolution and imaging stability. The remarkable characteristic of these hybrid nanosensors is that they allow the coupling of 3D imaging ability and versatility of atomic force microscopy with the power of electrochemical methods. Local measurement of electrochemical-activity of a test sample consisting of gold bands functionalized by redox-labeled nanometer-sized polyethylene glycol chains has been achieved with simultaneous imaging of the 3D surface topography at high resolution. These hybrid AFM-SECM tips are capable of sensing local electrochemical currents down to ∼10 fA emphasizing the sensitivity and resolution of this technique. -- Research highlights: → A benchtop method for the convenient fabrication of combined AFM-SECM tapping mode probes from gold microwires is described. → These hybrid nanosensors allow the coupling of 3D imaging ability of atomic force microscopy with the analytical power of electrochemical microscopy. → Local measurement of electrochemical-activity of gold bands functionalized by redox-labeled nanometer-sized polyethylene glycol chains was achieved with simultaneous imaging of the 3D surface topography at high resolution.

  14. Enhancing Raman signals with an interferometrically controlled AFM tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oron-Carl, Matti; Krupke, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the upgrade of a commercial confocal Raman microscope into a tip-enhanced Raman microscope/spectroscopy system (TERS) by integrating an interferometrically controlled atomic force microscope into the base of an existing upright microscope to provide near-field detection and thus signal enhancement. The feasibility of the system is demonstrated by measuring the Raman near-field enhancement on thin PEDOT:PSS films and on carbon nanotubes within a device geometry. An enhancement factor of 2–3 and of 5–6 is observed, respectively. Moreover, on a nanotube device we show local conductivity measurement and its correlation to Raman and topography recordings. Upgrading an existing upright confocal Raman microscope in the demonstrated way is significantly cheaper than purchasing a complete commercial TERS system. (paper)

  15. Full tip imaging in atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Sichao [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Burgess, Timothy [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Tjing Loi, Shyeh [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Gao, Qiang [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bao, Peite; Li, Li [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zheng, Rongkun, E-mail: rongkun.zheng@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is capable of simultaneously revealing the chemical identities and three dimensional positions of individual atoms within a needle-shaped specimen, but suffers from a limited field-of-view (FOV), i.e., only the core of the specimen is effectively detected. Therefore, the capacity to analyze the full tip is crucial and much desired in cases that the shell of the specimen is also the region of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in the analysis of III-V nanowires epitaxially grown from a substrate, the presence of the flat substrate positioned only micrometers away from the analyzed tip apex alters the field distribution and ion trajectories, which provides extra image compression that allows for the analysis of the entire specimen. An array of experimental results, including field desorption maps, elemental distributions, and crystallographic features clearly demonstrate the fact that the whole tip has been imaged, which is confirmed by electrostatic simulations. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The full tip has been imaged by atom probe tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conductive substrate close to specimen tip introduces extra image compression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apex of the tip is far from a hemispherical shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work demonstrates a way to increase the FOV of APT.

  16. Design of cantilever probes for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    A cantilever beam used in an Atomic Force Microscope is optimized with respect to two different objectives. The first goal is to maximize the first eigenfrequency while keeping the stiffness of the probe constant. The second goal is to maximize the tip angle of the first eigenmode while again...... keeping the stiffness constant. The resulting design of the beam from the latter optimization gives almost the same result as when maximizing the first eigenfrequency. Adding a restriction on the second eigenfrequency result in a significant change of the optimal design. The beam is modelled with 12 DOF...

  17. Interactions between shape-persistent macromolecules as probed by AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Blass

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble shape-persistent cyclodextrin (CD polymers with amino-functionalized end groups were prepared starting from diacetylene-modified cyclodextrin monomers by a combined Glaser coupling/click chemistry approach. Structural perfection of the neutral CD polymers and inclusion complex formation with ditopic and monotopic guest molecules were proven by MALDI–TOF and UV–vis measurements. Small-angle neutron and X-ray (SANS/SAXS scattering experiments confirm the stiffness of the polymer chains with an apparent contour length of about 130 Å. Surface modification of planar silicon wafers as well as AFM tips was realized by covalent bound formation between the terminal amino groups of the CD polymer and a reactive isothiocyanate–silane monolayer. Atomic force measurements of CD polymer decorated surfaces show enhanced supramolecular interaction energies which can be attributed to multiple inclusion complexes based on the rigidity of the polymer backbone and the regular configuration of the CD moieties. Depending on the geometrical configuration of attachment anisotropic adhesion characteristics of the polymer system can be distinguished between a peeling and a shearing mechanism.

  18. The use of functionalized AFM tips as molecular sensors in the detection of pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deda, Daiana K.; Pereira, Barbara B.S.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Silva, Aline N. da; Ribeiro, Gabrielle A.; Amarante, Adriano M.; Leite, Fabio L., E-mail: fabioleite@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (LNN/UFSCar), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica, Quimica e Matematica. Lab. de Nanoneurobiofisica; Franca, Eduardo F. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2013-11-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy, a technique derived from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), allowed to distinguish nonspecific and specific interactions between the acetolactate synthase enzyme (ALS) and anti-atrazine antibody biomolecules and the herbicides imazaquin, metsulfuron-methyl and atrazine. The presence of specific interactions increased the adhesion force (F{sub adh}) between the AFM tip and the herbicides, which made the modified tip a powerful biosensor. Increases of approximately 132% and 145% in the F{sub adh} values were observed when a tip functionalized with ALS was used to detect imazaquin and metsulfuron-methyl, respectively. The presence of specific interactions between the atrazine and the anti-atrazine antibody also caused an increase in the F{sub adh} values (approximately 175%) compared to those observed when using an unfunctionalized tip. The molecular modeling results obtained with the ALS enzyme suggest that the orientation of the biomolecule on the tip surface could be suitable for allowing interaction with the herbicides imazaquin and metsulfuron-methyl. (author)

  19. Tuning adhesion forces between functionalized gold colloidal nanoparticles and silicon AFM tips: role of ligands and capillary forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oras, Sven; Vlassov, Sergei; Berholts, Marta; Lõhmus, Rünno; Mougin, Karine

    2018-01-01

    Adhesion forces between functionalized gold colloidal nanoparticles (Au NPs) and scanning probe microscope silicon tips were experimentally investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with PeakForce QNM (Quantitative Nanoscale Mechanics) module. Au NPs were synthesized by a seed-mediated process and then functionalized with thiols containing different functional groups: amino, hydroxy, methoxy, carboxy, methyl, and thiol. Adhesion measurements showed strong differences between NPs and silicon tip depending on the nature of the tail functional group. The dependence of the adhesion on ligand density for different thiols with identical functional tail-group was also demonstrated. The calculated contribution of the van der Waals (vdW) forces between particles was in good agreement with experimentally measured adhesive values. In addition, the adhesion forces were evaluated between flat Au films functionalized with the same molecular components and silicon tips to exclude the effect of particle shape on the adhesion values. Although adhesion values on flat substrates were higher than on their nanoparticle counterparts, the dependance on functional groups remained the same.

  20. Simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging: A method for aligning an AFM-tip with an excitation beam using a 2D galvanometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, A. N.; Cadby, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    Correlative fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is a highly attractive technique for use in biological imaging, enabling force and mechanical measurements of particular structures whose locations are known due to the specificity of fluorescence imaging. The ability to perform these two measurements simultaneously (rather than consecutively with post-processing correlation) is highly valuable because it would allow the mechanical properties of a structure to be tracked over time as changes in the sample occur. We present an instrument which allows simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging by aligning an incident fluorescence excitation beam with an AFM-tip. Alignment was performed by calibrating a 2D galvanometer present in the excitation beam path and using it to reposition the incident beam. Two programs were developed (one manual and one automated) which correlate sample features between the AFM and fluorescence images, calculating the distance required to translate the incident beam towards the AFM-tip. Using this method, we were able to obtain beam-tip alignment (and therefore field-of-view alignment) from an offset of >15 μm to within one micron in two iterations of the program. With the program running alongside data acquisition for real-time feedback between AFM and optical images, this offset was maintained over a time period of several hours. Not only does this eliminate the need to image large areas with both techniques to ensure that fields-of-view overlap, but it also raises the possibility of using this instrument for tip-enhanced fluorescence applications, a technique in which super-resolution images have previously been achieved.

  1. Direct manipulation of intracellular stress fibres using a hook-shaped AFM probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Shinichi; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Harada, Ichiro; Afrin, Rehana; Nakayama, Tomonobu; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a highly successful technique for imaging nanometre-sized samples and measuring pico- to nano-newton forces acting between atoms and molecules. When it comes to the manipulation of larger samples with forces of tens and hundreds of nano-newtons, however, the present chemistry-based modification protocols for functionalizing AFM cantilevers to achieve the formation of covalent/non-covalent linkages between the AFM probe and the sample surface do not produce strong enough bonds. For the purpose of measuring the fracture strength and other mechanical properties of stress fibres (SFs) in living as well as semi-intact fibroblast cells, we fabricated an AFM probe with a hooking function by focused ion beam technology and used the AFM probe hook to capture, pull and eventually sever a chosen SF labelled with green or red fluorescent protein.

  2. Development of a novel nanoindentation technique by utilizing a dual-probe AFM system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyup Cinar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel instrumentation approach to nanoindentation is described that exhibits improved resolution and depth sensing. The approach is based on a multi-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM tool that utilizes tuning-fork based probes for both indentation and depth sensing. Unlike nanoindentation experiments performed with conventional AFM systems using beam-bounce technology, this technique incorporates a second probe system with an ultra-high resolution for depth sensing. The additional second probe measures only the vertical movement of the straight indenter attached to a tuning-fork probe with a high spring constant and it can also be used for AFM scanning to obtain an accurate profiling. Nanoindentation results are demonstrated on silicon, fused silica, and Corning Eagle Glass. The results show that this new approach is viable in terms of accurately characterizing mechanical properties of materials through nanoindentation with high accuracy, and it opens doors to many other exciting applications in the field of nanomechanical characterization.

  3. AFM fluid delivery/liquid extraction surface sampling/electrostatic spray cantilever probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-23

    An electrospray system comprises a liquid extraction surface sampling probe. The probe comprises a probe body having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet, and having a liquid extraction tip. A solvent delivery conduit is provided for receiving solvent liquid from the liquid inlet and delivering the solvent liquid to the liquid extraction tip. An open liquid extraction channel extends across an exterior surface of the probe body from the liquid extraction tip to the liquid outlet. An electrospray emitter tip is in liquid communication with the liquid outlet of the liquid extraction surface sampling probe. A system for analyzing samples, a liquid junction surface sampling system, and a method of analyzing samples are also disclosed.

  4. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Xiong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments.

  5. A novel dog-bone oscillating AFM probe with thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-10-31

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments.

  6. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  7. Rapid tryptic mapping using enzymatically active mass spectrometer probe tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogruel, D.; Williams, P.; Nelson, R.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A method has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and accurate tryptic mapping of polypeptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass analysis. The technique utilizes mass spectrometer probe tips which have been activated through the covalent immobilization of trypsin. The enzymatically active probe tips were used for the tryptic mapping of chicken egg lysozyme and the results compared with those obtained using either free trypsin or agarose-immobilized trypsin. A significant increase in the overall sensitivity of the process was observed using the active probe tips, as well as the production of more characteristic proteolytic fragments and the elimination of background signals due to the autolysis of the trypsin. Further, probe tip digestions were found to be rapid and convenient. 19 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Combining adhesive contact mechanics with a viscoelastic material model to probe local material properties by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, Christian; Czibula, Caterina; Tscharnuter, Daniel; Schöberl, Thomas; Teichert, Christian; Hirn, Ulrich

    2017-12-20

    Viscoelastic properties are often measured using probe based techniques such as nanoindentation (NI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Rarely, however, are these methods verified. In this article, we present a method that combines contact mechanics with a viscoelastic model (VEM) composed of springs and dashpots. We further show how to use this model to determine viscoelastic properties from creep curves recorded by a probe based technique. We focus on using the standard linear solid model and the generalized Maxwell model of order 2. The method operates in the range of 0.01 Hz to 1 Hz. Our approach is suitable for rough surfaces by providing a defined contact area using plastic pre-deformation of the material. The very same procedure is used to evaluate AFM based measurements as well as NI measurements performed on polymer samples made from poly(methyl methacrylate) and polycarbonate. The results of these measurements are then compared to those obtained by tensile creep tests also performed on the same samples. It is found that the tensile test results differ considerably from the results obtained by AFM and NI methods. The similarity between the AFM results and NI results suggests that the proposed method is capable of yielding results comparable to NI but with the advantage of the imaging possibilities of AFM. Furthermore, all three methods allowed a clear distinction between PC and PMMA by means of their respective viscoelastic properties.

  9. AFM lateral force calibration for an integrated probe using a calibration grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huabin; Gee, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) friction measurements on hard and soft materials remain a challenge due to the difficulties associated with accurately calibrating the cantilever for lateral force measurement. One of the most widely accepted lateral force calibration methods is the wedge method. This method is often used in a simplified format but in so doing sacrifices accuracy. In the present work, we have further developed the wedge method to provide a lateral force calibration method for integrated AFM probes that is easy to use without compromising accuracy and reliability. Raw friction calibration data are collected from a single scan image by continuous ramping of the set point as the facets of a standard grating are scanned. These data are analysed to yield an accurate lateral force conversion/calibration factor that is not influenced by adhesion forces or load deviation. By demonstrating this new calibration method, we illustrate its reliability, speed and ease of execution. This method makes accessible reliable boundary lubrication studies on adhesive and heterogeneous surfaces that require spatial resolution of frictional forces. - Highlights: • We develop a simple and accurate method for lateral force calibration in AFM friction measurements. • We detail the basis of the method and illustrate how to use it and its reliability with example data. • Our method is easy, accurate and accounts for the affects of adhesion on friction measurements. • The method is applicable to integrated probes, as opposed to colloidal probes. • This allows accurate AFM friction measurements on spatially heterogeneous and adhesive surfaces

  10. Adhesive interaction measured between AFM probe and lung epithelial type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonenko, Zoya; Finot, Eric; Amrein, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The toxicity of inhaled nanoparticles entering the body through the lung is thought to be initially defined by the electrostatic and adhesive interaction of the particles with lung's wall. Here, we investigated the first step of the interaction of nanoparticles with lung epithelial cells using atomic force microscope (AFM) as a force apparatus. Nanoparticles were modeled by the apex of the AFM tip and the forces of interaction between the tip and the cell analyzed over time. The adhesive force and work of adhesion strongly increased for the first 100 s of contact and then leveled out. During this time, the tip was penetrating deeply into the cell. It first crossed a stiff region of the cell and then entered a much more compliant cell region. The work of adhesion and its progression over time were not dependent on the load with which the tip was brought into contact with the cell. We conclude that the initial thermodynamic aspects and the time course of the uptake of nanoparticles by lung epithelial cells can be studied using our experimental approach. It is discussed how the potential health threat posed by nanoparticles of different size and surface characteristics can be evaluated using the method presented

  11. Absorption Spectroscopy and Imaging from the Visible through Mid-IR with 20 nm Resolution Using AFM probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrone, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Correlated nanoscale composition and optical property maps are important to engineer nanomaterials in applications ranging from photovoltaics to sensing and therapeutics. Wavelengths (λs) from the visible to near-IR probe electronic transitions in materials, providing information regarding band gap and defects while light in mid-IR probes vibrational transitions and provide chemical composition. However, light diffraction limits the lateral resolution of conventional micro-spectroscopic techniques to approximately λ/2, which is insufficient to image nanomaterials. Additionally, the λ-dependent resolution impedes direct comparison of spectral maps from different spectral ranges. Photo Thermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) is a novel technique that circumvents light diffraction by employing an AFM tip as a local detector for measuring light absorption with λ-independent nanoscale resolution. Our PTIR setup combines an AFM microscope with three lasers providing λ-tunability from 500 nm to 16000 nm continuously. The AFM tip transduces locally the sample thermal expansion induced by light absorption into large cantilever oscillations. Local absorption spectra (electronic or vibrational) and maps are obtained recording the amplitude of the tip deflection as a function of λ and position, respectively. The working principles of the PTIR technique will be described first, and nano-patterned polymer samples will be used to evaluate its lateral resolution, sensitivity and linearity. Results show that the PTIR signal intensity is proportional to the local absorbed energy suggesting applicability of this technique for quantitative chemical analysis at nanoscale, at least for thin (less than 1000 nm thick) samples. Additionally, a λ-independent resolution as high as 20 nm is demonstrated across the whole spectral range. In the second part of the talk, PTIR will be applied to image the dark plasmonic resonance of gold Asymmetric Split Ring Resonators (A-SRRs) in the mid

  12. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-11-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  13. Laser heating of scanning probe tips for thermal near-field spectroscopy and imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T. O’Callahan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopy and microscopy of the thermal near-field yield valuable insight into the mechanisms of resonant near-field heat transfer and Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces, as well as providing nanoscale spatial resolution for infrared vibrational spectroscopy. A heated scanning probe tip brought close to a sample surface can excite and probe the thermal near-field. Typically, tip temperature control is provided by resistive heating of the tip cantilever. However, this requires specialized tips with limited temperature range and temporal response. By focusing laser radiation onto AFM cantilevers, we achieve heating up to ∼1800 K, with millisecond thermal response time. We demonstrate application to thermal infrared near-field spectroscopy (TINS by acquiring near-field spectra of the vibrational resonances of silicon carbide, hexagonal boron nitride, and polytetrafluoroethylene. We discuss the thermal response as a function of the incident excitation laser power and model the dominant cooling contributions. Our results provide a basis for laser heating as a viable approach for TINS, nanoscale thermal transport measurements, and thermal desorption nano-spectroscopy.

  14. Enhancing local absorption within a gold nano-sphere on a dielectric surface under an AFM probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebi Moghaddam, Sina; Ertürk, Hakan; Mengüç, M. Pınar

    2016-01-01

    This study considers enhancing localized absorption by a gold nanoparticle (NP) placed over a substrate where an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is in close proximity of the particle. The gold NP and AFM tip are interacting with a surface evanescent wave, resulting a near-field coupling between the tip and NP and consequently enhances the absorption. This concept can be used for selective heating of NPs placed over a surface that enables precise manufacturing at nanometer scales. Different tip positions are considered to identify the optimal tip location and the corresponding enhancement limits. The effects of these interactions on the absorption profiles of dielectric core/gold shell NPs are also studied. It is observed that using core–shell nanoparticles with a dielectric core leads to further enhancement of the absorption efficiency and a more uniform distribution of absorption over the shell. Discrete dipole approximation coupled with surface interactions (DDA-SI) is employed throughout the study, and it is vectorized to improve its computational efficiency. - Highlights: • Plasmonic coupling between solid or core-shell nanoparticles, dielectric surface and Si AFM tip is investigated for achieving localized heating for nano-manufacturing. • Absorption efficiency enhancement limits for core-shell and solid nanoparticles are identified using an AFM tip for surface evanescent wave heating. • The effect of tip location, relative to surface wave direction is outlined, identifying optimal locations, and heat absorption distribution over core-shell and solid nanoparticles. • While using a Si AFM tip enhances absorption, using a dielectric core result in further enhancement in absorption with a more uniform distribution. • DDA-SI-v developed by vectorizing the formulations of DDA-SI for improved computational efficiency.

  15. Probing Access Resistance of Solid-state Nanopores with a Scanning Probe Microscope Tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Rollings, Ryan; Li, Jiali

    2012-02-06

    An apparatus that integrates solid-state nanopore ionic current measurement with a Scanning Probe Microscope has been developed. When a micrometer-scale scanning probe tip is near a voltage biased nanometer-scale pore (10-100 nm), the tip partially blocks the flow of ions to the pore and increases the pore access resistance. The apparatus records the current blockage caused by the probe tip and the location of the tip simultaneously. By measuring the current blockage map near a nanopore as a function of the tip position in 3D space in salt solution, we estimate the relative pore resistance increase due to the tip, ΔR/R(0), as a function of the tip location, nanopore geometry, and salt concentration. The amplitude of ΔR/R(0) also depends on the ratio of the pore length to its radius as Ohm's law predicts. When the tip is very close to the pore surface, ~10 nm, our experiments show that ΔR/R(0) depends on salt concentration as predicted by the Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations. Furthermore, our measurements show that ΔR/R(0) goes to zero when the tip is about five times the pore diameter away from the center of the pore entrance. The results in this work not only demonstrate a way to probe the access resistance of nanopores experimentally, they also provide a way to locate the nanopore in salt solution, and open the door to future nanopore experiments for detecting single biomolecules attached to a probe tip.

  16. Probing access resistance of solid-state nanopores with a scanning-probe microscope tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Rollings, Ryan; Li, Jiali

    2012-02-06

    An apparatus that integrates solid-state nanopore ionic current measurement with a scanning-probe microscope is developed. When a micrometer-scale scanning-probe tip is near a voltage-biased nanometer-scale pore (10–100 nm), the tip partially blocks the flow of ions to the pore and increases the pore access resistance. The apparatus records the current blockage caused by the probe tip and the location of the tip simultaneously. By measuring the current blockage map near a nanopore as a function of the tip position in 3D space in salt solution, the relative pore resistance increases due to the tip and ΔR/R0 is estimated as a function of the tip location, nanopore geometry, and salt concentration. The amplitude of ΔR/R0 also depends on the ratio of the pore length to its radius as Ohm's law predicts. When the tip is very close to the pore surface, ≈10 nm, experiments show that ΔR/R0 depends on salt concentration as predicted by the Poisson and Nernst–Planck equations. Furthermore, the measurements show that ΔR/R0 goes to zero when the tip is about five times the pore diameter away from the center of the pore entrance. The results in this work not only demonstrate a way to probe the access resistance of nanopores experimentally; they also provide a way to locate the nanopore in salt solution, and open the door to future nanopore experiments for detecting single biomolecules attached to a probe tip. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Surface adhesion and its dependence on surface roughness and humidity measured with a flat AFM tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colak, A.; Wormeester, Herbert; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion force between a surface and the tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever has been determined by recording force–distance curves with an atomic force microscope. Flat tips with a diameter of 2 μm were used to mimic the adhesion between two parallel surfaces. In such a configuration,

  18. Ultra-high aspect ratio replaceable AFM tips using deformation-suppressed focused ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savenko, Alexey; Yildiz, Izzet; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2013-01-01

    in terms of defining the shape and size of the tip. Due to beam-induced deformation, it has so far not been possible to define HAR structures using lateral FIB milling. In this work we obtain aspect ratios of up to 45, with tip diameters down to 9 nm, by a deformation-suppressing writing strategy. Several...

  19. Mechanism of high-resolution STM/AFM imaging with functionalized tips

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hapala, Prokop; Kichin, G.; Wagner, C.; Tautz, F.S.; Temirov, R.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 8 (2014), "085421-1"-"085421-9" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM * STM * high resolution Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  20. AFM picking-up manipulation of the metaphase chromosome fragment by using the tweezers-type probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Saito, Masato; Shichiri, Motoharu; Sugiyama, Sigeru; Takamura, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Gen; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the development of a new procedure based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the analysis of metaphase chromosome. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information about the specific locations of genes on the metaphase chromosome. In this research, we performed the manipulation of the metaphase chromosome by using novel AFM probes to obtain chromosome fragments of a smaller size than the ones obtained using the conventional methods, such as glass microneedles. We could pick up the fragment of the metaphase chromosome dissected by the knife-edged probe by using our tweezers-type probe

  1. The extended wedge method: atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, H S; Burris, D L

    2013-05-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS2 to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS2 had friction coefficients of μ = 0.20 ± 0.04 and μ = 0.006 ± 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS2 had a friction coefficient of μ = 0.005 ± 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  2. Fabrication of Nanoscale Pits with High Throughput on Polymer Thin Film Using AFM Tip-Based Dynamic Plowing Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Geng, Yanquan; Yan, Yongda; Luo, Xichun

    2017-09-01

    We show that an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based dynamic plowing lithography (DPL) approach can be used to fabricate nanoscale pits with high throughput. The method relies on scratching with a relatively large speed over a sample surface in tapping mode, which is responsible for the separation distance of adjacent pits. Scratching tests are carried out on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin film using a diamond-like carbon coating tip. Results show that 100 μm/s is the critical value of the scratching speed. When the scratching speed is greater than 100 μm/s, pit structures can be generated. In contrast, nanogrooves can be formed with speeds less than the critical value. Because of the difficulty of breaking the molecular chain of glass-state polymer with an applied high-frequency load and low-energy dissipation in one interaction of the tip and the sample, one pit requires 65-80 penetrations to be achieved. Subsequently, the forming process of the pit is analyzed in detail, including three phases: elastic deformation, plastic deformation, and climbing over the pile-up. In particular, 4800-5800 pits can be obtained in 1 s using this proposed method. Both experiments and theoretical analysis are presented that fully determine the potential of this proposed method to fabricate pits efficiently.

  3. Measuring bacterial cells size with AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Osiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images of bacteria revealing surface details and cell integrity. During scanning however, the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane results in distortion of the images. Such distortions or artifacts are the result of geometrical effects related to bacterial cell height, specimen curvature and the AFM probe geometry. The most common artifact in imaging is surface broadening, what can lead to errors in bacterial sizing. Several methods of correction have been proposed to compensate for these artifacts and in this study we describe a simple geometric model for the interaction between the tip (a pyramidal shaped AFM probe and the bacterium (Escherichia coli JM-109 strain to minimize the enlarging effect. Approaches to bacteria immobilization and examples of AFM images analysis are also described.

  4. Quantification of tip-broadening in non-contact atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Jensen, Thomas N.; Simonsen, Soren B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have been used for the imaging of 5 nm wide surface supported Pt nanoclusters by non-contact (dynamic mode) AFM in an ultra-high vacuum. The results are compared to AFM measurements done with conventional Si-tips, as well...

  5. Atom probe, AFM and STM study on vacuum fired stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupnik, A.; Frank, P.; Leisch, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Stainless steel is one of the most commonly used structural materials for vacuum equipment. An efficient method to reduce the outgassing rate from stainless steel is a high temperature bakeout in vacuum (vacuum firing). This procedure reduces significantly the amount of dissolved hydrogen in the bulk. For the outgassing process the recombination rate of hydrogen atoms to the molecules plays the determining role and recombination is strongly related to the surface structure and composition. To get more detailed information about the surface morphology and composition AFM, STM and atom probe studies were carried out. Experiments on AISI 304L stainless steel samples show that the surface reconstructs completely during vacuum firing and large atomically flat terraces bounded by bunched steps and facets are formed. The large flat terraces can be assigned to (111) planes. The bunched steps and facets are corresponding in orientation almost to (110) planes and (100) planes. Surface inspection after vacuum firing by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) gives reason for a composition change indicated by a reduction of the chromium signal in relation to the iron and nickel signal. Since the information depth of AES covers several atomic layers not only the top atomic layer of the sample surface is probed. For this reason 3D atom probe was used as well suited tool to investigate the segregation behavior of this alloy with the goal to examine the change in local chemical composition due to the high temperature treatment. As a result of vacuum firing the atom probe experiments show a significant enrichment of nickel at the top surface layer. In the second atomic layer chromium enrichment is detected. After vacuum firing the average composition below the second atomic layer shows certain chromium depletion up to 2 nm in depth. The observed changes in surface chemistry influence recombination and desorption probability from the surface and may contribute to the present

  6. Techniques for blade tip clearance measurements with capacitive probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Alexander

    2000-07-01

    This article presents a proven but advantageous concept for blade tip clearance evaluation in turbomachinery. The system is based on heavy duty probes and a high frequency (HF) and amplifying electronic unit followed by a signal processing unit. Measurements are taken under high temperature and other severe conditions such as ionization. Every single blade can be observed. The signals are digitally filtered and linearized in real time. The electronic set-up is highly integrated. Miniaturized versions of the electronic units exist. The small and robust units can be used in turbo engines in flight. With several probes at different angles in one radial plane further information is available. Shaft eccentricity or blade oscillations can be calculated.

  7. AFM Colloidal Probe Measurements Implicate Capillary Condensation in Punch-Particle Surface Interactions during Tableting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal Tejedor, Maria; Nordgren, Niklas; Schuleit, Michael; Millqvist-Fureby, Anna; Rutland, Mark W

    2017-11-21

    Adhesion of the powders to the punches is a common issue during tableting. This phenomenon is known as sticking and affects the quality of the manufactured tablets. Defective tablets increase the cost of the manufacturing process. Thus, the ability to predict the tableting performance of the formulation blend before the process is scaled-up is important. The adhesive propensity of the powder to the tableting tools is mostly governed by the surface-surface adhesive interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is a surface characterization technique that allows the measurement of the adhesive interactions between two materials of interest. In this study, AFM steel colloidal probe measurements were performed on ibuprofen, MCC (microcrystalline cellulose), α-lactose monohydrate, and spray-dried lactose particles as an approach to modeling the punch-particle surface interactions during tableting. The excipients (lactose and MCC) showed constant, small, attractive, and adhesive forces toward the steel surface after a repeated number of contacts. In comparison, ibuprofen displayed a much larger attractive and adhesive interaction increasing over time both in magnitude and in jump-in/jump-out separation distance. The type of interaction acting on the excipient-steel interface can be related to a van der Waals force, which is relatively weak and short-ranged. By contrast, the ibuprofen-steel interaction is described by a capillary force profile. Even though ibuprofen is not highly hydrophilic, the relatively smooth surfaces of the crystals allow "contact flooding" upon contact with the steel probe. Capillary forces increase because of the "harvesting" of moisture-due to the fast condensation kinetics-leaving a residual condensate that contributes to increase the interaction force after each consecutive contact. Local asperity contacts on the more hydrophilic surface of the excipients prevent the flooding of the contact zone, and there is no such adhesive

  8. Colloid-probe AFM studies of the interaction forces of proteins adsorbed on colloidal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurvinder; Bremmell, Kristen E; Griesser, Hans J; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-04-28

    In recent years, colloid-probe AFM has been used to measure the direct interaction forces between colloidal particles of different size or surface functionality in aqueous media, as one can study different forces in symmerical systems (i.e., sphere-sphere geometry). The present study investigates the interaction between protein coatings on colloid probes and hydrophilic surfaces decorated with hexagonally close packed single particle layers that are either uncoated or coated with proteins. Controlled solvent evaporation from aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles (coated with or without lysozyme and albumin) produces single layers of close-packed colloidal crystals over large areas on a solid support. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different salt concentrations and pH values. The results show changes in the interaction forces as the surface charge of the unmodified or modified particles, and ionic strength or pH of the solution is altered. At high ionic strength or pH, electrostatic interactions are screened, and a strong repulsive force at short separation below 5 nm dominates, suggesting structural changes in the absorbed protein layer on the particles. We also study the force of adhesion, which decreases with an increment in the salt concentration, and the interaction between two different proteins indicating a repulsive interaction on approach and adhesion on retraction.

  9. Tip Enhanced Raman Scattering of Strained Silicon with Single and Multiple Probe Scanned Probe Microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an effective tool for the identification and analysis of molecular components of complex materials. The spatial resolution of Raman spectroscopy is limited by the wavelength of the light. One approach to overcome this drawback is Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). This technique uses nanometric interactions between metal structures and surfaces to effect enhancement of the Raman signals. An important mechanism for enhancement originates from an electrostatic lightning rod effect due to the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances. This is accomplished in a scanned probe microscopy context by employing an ultra-sharp metalized tip that is brought into a focused laser spot on the sample surface thereby enhancing the Raman signal. In this technique also known as Tip Enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) the electrical field is locally enhanced near the sharp metalized tip. Rastering the sample should then allow for Raman imaging with nanometric resolution. Within this context it will be shown that multiple probe scanned probe microscopes have considerable potential in such tip enhanced applications.

  10. Fabrication of nano-sized magnetic tunnel junctions using lift-off process assisted by atomic force probe tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ku Youl; Min, Byoung-Chul; Ahn, Chiyui; Choi, Gyung-Min; Shin, Il-Jae; Park, Seung-Young; Rhie, Kungwon; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    We present a fabrication method for nano-scale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), employing e-beam lithography and lift-off process assisted by the probe tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). It is challenging to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates because it is difficult to use chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. The AFM-assisted lift-off process enables us to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates (12.5 mm x 12.5 mm) without CMP process. The e-beam patterning has been done using bi-layer resist, the poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)/ hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ). The PMMA/HSQ resist patterns are used for both the etch mask for ion milling and the self-aligned mask for top contact formation after passivation. The self-aligned mask buried inside a passivation oxide layer, is readily lifted-off by the force exerted by the probe tip. The nano-MTJs (160 nm x 90 nm) fabricated by this method show clear current-induced magnetization switching with a reasonable TMR and critical switching current density.

  11. Note: Microelectrode-shielding tip for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Zhean; Xu, Chunkai; Liu, Jian; Xu, Chunye; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-04-01

    We report a novel microelectrode-shielding tip (ME tip) for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy (SPEES). The shielding effect of this tip is studied through comparing the detection efficiency with the normal tip by both experiment and simulation. The results show that the backscattering count rate detected by the SPEES instrument using the normal tip begins to decrease as the tip approaches to the sample surface within 21 μm, while that using the ME tip only starts to drop off within 1 μm. This indicates that the electron energy spectra can be measured with the ME tip at a much closer tip-sample distance. Furthermore, it is also demonstrated that the ME tip can be used to obtain topography of the sample surface in situ simultaneously.

  12. Workshop on the coupling of synchrotron radiation IR and X-rays with tip based scanning probe microscopies X-TIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comin, F.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Mundboth, K.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France); Purans, J.; Sammelselg, V. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia); Chevrier, J.; Huant, S. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, LEPES, 38 (France); Hamilton, B. [School of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Manchester (United Kingdom); Saito, A. [Osaka Univ., RIKEN/SPring8 (Japan); Dhez, O. [OGG, INFM/CNR, 38 - Grenoble (France); Brocklesby, W.S. [Southampton Univ., Optoelectronics Research Centre (United Kingdom); Alvarez-Prado, L.M. [Ovieado, Dept. de Fisica (Spain); Kuzmin, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Riga (Latvia); Pailharey, D. [CRMC-N - CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Tonneau, D. [CRMCN - Faculte des sciences de Luminy, 13 - Marseille (France); Chretien, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Cricenti, A. [ISM-CNR, Rome (Italy); DeWilde, Y. [ESPCI, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The coupling of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) with synchrotron radiation is attracting increasing attention from nano-science community. By combining these 2 tools one can visualize, for example, the sample nano-structure prior to any X-ray characterization. Coupled with focusing devices or independently, SPM can provide spatial resolution below the optical limits. Furthermore, the possibility of employing SPM to manipulate nano-objects under X-ray beams is another exciting perspective. This document gathers the transparencies of 6 of the presentations made at the workshop: 1) the combination of atomic force microscopy and X-ray beam - experimental set-up and objectives; 2) the combination of scanning probe microscope and X-rays for detection of electrons; 3) towards soft X-ray scanning microscopy using tapered capillaries and laser-based high harmonic sources; 4) near-field magneto-optical microscopy; 5) near-field scanning optical microscopy - a brief overview -; and 6) from aperture-less near-field optical microscopy to infra-red near-field night vision. 4 posters entitled: 1) development of laboratory setup for X-ray/AFM experiments, 2) towards X-ray diffraction on single islands, 3) nano-XEOL using near-field detection, and 4) local collection with a STM tip of photoelectrons emitted by a surface irradiated by visible of UV laser beam, are included in the document.

  13. Angle-tip Fiber Probe as Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabitra NATH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I present a simple fiber optic relative humidity sensor (FORHS using an angled-tip multimode optical fiber. The sensing region is fabricated by coating moisture sensitive Cobalt Chloride (CoCl2 doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA film on the surface of fiber optic tip. Light signal introducing from flat-end of the fiber is back-reflected at the fiber tip-air interface by the effect of total internal refection. The change of relative humidity (RH in the outstanding medium affects of evanescent field absorption at the fiber tip-sensing film interface thus, modulates the back-reflected signal. With the present sensing investigation, RH ranging from 5 % to 95 % can be measured with high degree of repeatability and has a fast response time of about 2 seconds.

  14. Efficient electrochemical etching method to fabricate sharp metallic tips for scanning probe microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Pilkyu; Kim, Jun Ho; Jeong, Mun Seok; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Lee, Jongmin; Jeong, Sungho

    2006-01-01

    A new technique based on electrochemical etching for the fabrication of sharp metallic tips for scanning probe microscopes is introduced. In the proposed method, a small Teflon mass is attached to the end of an immersed tungsten wire using an aluminum tape, which leads to a significant enhancement of yield rate of sharp tungsten tips with an apex size below 100 nm to over 60%. The functionality of the tungsten tips fabricated by the proposed method is verified by measuring the topography of a standard sample using a shear-force scanning probe microscope

  15. Evaluation of a new periodontal probe tip design. A clinical and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartoukian, S R; Palmer, R M; Wilson, R F

    2004-10-01

    In the search for an accurate periodontal probe which does not frequently penetrate the pocket base, a new tip has been designed which is flattened, and of 1 mm width and 0.45 mm thickness. This study aimed to evaluate the physico-mechanical and clinical properties of this probe (test) in comparison to a conventional 0.5 mm circular probe (control). Photoelastic stress analysis was undertaken for test and control probe tips at 3.15 and 5 N loads. To assess probing validity, the clinical probing depth with each probe (0.25 N force) at 125 sites on 27 teeth (27 subjects), was compared with the post-extraction connective tissue level measurement. Also evaluated were probing reproducibility (1200 sites in 25 subjects) and patient comfort (30 subjects). Using photoelastic stress analysis, the test probe demonstrated lower stresses and less local stress concentration than the control. Clinically, the test probe measured close to the post-extraction gold standard in greater frequency than the control - 26 versus 11 readings (21% versus 9%) exactly matched, and 90 versus 67 (72% versus 54%) were within +/-0.5 mm of the laboratory measurement. The test probe was, on average, 0.13 mm coronal to the connective tissue attachment level, whereas the control penetrated 0.27 mm past this level. The intraclass correlation between clinical and laboratory readings was greater for the test than the control (r=0.81 and 0.74, respectively). Although the control probe overestimated probing depth more markedly at bleeding (0.41 mm) than at non-bleeding (0.15 mm) sites, the relative position of the test probe hardly differed with inflammatory status (-0.11 and -0.14 mm, respectively). Each probe demonstrated good clinical reproducibility. However, the test probe examination was more comfortable for the patient. This new periodontal probe tip appears to have greater validity, good reproducibility and produces less patient discomfort. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004

  16. Double Layer of a Gold Electrode Probed by AFM Force Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, D.; Kleijn, J.M.; Duval, J.F.L.; Leeuwen, van H.P.; Lyklema, J.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Colloidal probe atomic force microscopy was used to determine the electric double layer interactions between a gold electrode and a spherical silica probe. The double layer properties of the gold/solution interface were varied through the pH and salt concentration of the electrolyte, as well as by

  17. Magnetoelectric versus thermal actuation characteristics of shear force AFM probes with piezoresistive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Kopiec, Daniel; Majstrzyk, Wojciech; Kunicki, Piotr; Janus, Paweł; Dobrowolski, Rafał; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2017-03-01

    In this paper the authors compare methods used for piezoresistive microcantilevers actuation for the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in the dynamic shear force mode. The piezoresistive detection is an attractive technique comparing the optical beam detection of deflection. The principal advantage is that no external alignment of optical source and detector are needed. When the microcantilever is deflected, the stress is transferred into a change of resistivity of piezoresistors. The integration of piezoresistive read-out provides a promising solution in realizing a compact non-contact AFM. Resolution of piezoresistive read-out is limited by three main noise sources: Johnson, 1/f and thermomechanical noise. In the dynamic shear force mode measurement the method used for cantilever actuation will also affect the recorded noise in the piezoresistive detection circuit. This is the result of a crosstalk between an aluminium path (current loop used for actuation) and piezoresistors located near the base of the beam. In this paper authors described an elaborated in ITE (Institute of Electron Technology) technology of fabrication cantilevers with piezoresistive detection of deflection and compared efficiency of two methods used for cantilever actuation.

  18. On the Origin of Extended Resolution in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy with a Worn Tip Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchkin, Sergey Y; Stevenson, Keith J

    2018-04-05

    In this work we analyzed the effect of the atomic force microscopy probe tip apex shape on Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) potential sensitivity and spatial resolution. It was found that modification of the apex shape from spherical to planar upon thinning of the conductive coating leads to enhanced apex contribution to the total electrostatic force between the probe and the sample. The effect results in extended potential sensitivity and spatial resolution of KPFM. Experimental results were supported by calculations.

  19. Simultaneous topographic and amperometric membrane mapping using an AFM probe integrated biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanca, Sarmiza Elena; Csaki, Andrea; Urban, Matthias; Nietzsche, Sandor; Biskup, Christoph; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2011-02-15

    The investigation of the plasma membrane with intercorrelated multiparameter techniques is a prerequisite for understanding its function. Presented here, is a simultaneous electrochemical and topographic study of the cell membrane using a miniaturized amperometric enzymatic biosensor. The fabrication of this biosensor is also reported. The biosensor combines a scanning force microscopy (AFM) gold-coated cantilever and an enzymatic transducer layer of peroxidases (PODs). When these enzymes are brought in contact with the substrate, the specific redox reaction produces an electric current. The intensity of this current is detected simultaneously with the surface imaging. For sensor characterization, hydroquinone-2-carboxylic acid (HQ) is selected as an intrinsic source of H(2)O(2). HQ has been electrochemically regenerated by the reduction of antraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ). The biosensor reaches the steady state value of the current intensity in 1 ± 0.2s. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Coating of AFM probes with aquatic humic and non-humic NOM to study their adhesion properties

    KAUST Repository

    Aubry, Cyril

    2013-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study interaction forces between four Natural Organic Matter (NOM) samples of different physicochemical characteristics and origins and mica surface at a wide range of ionic strength. All NOM samples were strongly adsorbed on positively charged iron oxide-coated silica colloidal probe. Cross-sectioning by focused ion beam milling technique and elemental mapping by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy indicated coating completeness of the NOM-coated colloidal probes. AFM-generated force-distance curves were analyzed to elucidate the nature and mechanisms of these interacting forces. Electrostatics and steric interactions were important contributors to repulsive forces during approach, although the latter became more influential with increasing ionic strength. Retracting force profiles showed a NOM adhesion behavior on mica consistent with its physicochemical characteristics. Humic-like substances, referred as the least hydrophilic NOM fraction, i.e., so called hydrophobic NOM, poorly adsorbed on hydrophilic mica due to their high content of ionized carboxyl groups and aromatic/hydrophobic character. However, adhesion force increased with increasing ionic strength, suggesting double layer compression. Conversely, polysaccharide-like substances showed high adhesion to mica. Hydrogen-bonding between hydroxyl groups on polysaccharide-like substances and highly electronegative elements on mica was suggested as the main adsorption mechanism, where the adhesion force decreased with increasing ionic strength. Results from this investigation indicated that all NOM samples retained their characteristics after the coating procedure. The experimental approach followed in this study can potentially be extended to investigate interactions between NOM and clean or fouled membranes as a function of NOM physicochemical characteristics and solution chemistry. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit by SNEM: Effects of AFM tip modifications with thiol monolayers on imaging quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Diaz, J.; Lindsay, I.D.; de Beer, Sissi; Duvigneau, Joost; Schön, Peter Manfred; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2015-01-01

    Tip-enhanced nanoscale optical imaging techniques such as apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (a-SNOM) and scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) applications can suffer from a steady degradation in performance due to adhesion of atmospheric contaminants to the metal

  2. Estimation of plasma ion saturation current and reduced tip arcing using Langmuir probe harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedo, J A; Rudakov, D L

    2017-03-01

    We present a method to calculate the ion saturation current, I sat , for Langmuir probes at high frequency (>100 kHz) using the harmonics technique and we compare that to a direct measurement of I sat . It is noted that the I sat estimation can be made directly by the ratio of harmonic amplitudes, without explicitly calculating T e . We also demonstrate that since the probe tips using the harmonic method are oscillating near the floating potential, drawing little power, this method reduces tip heating and arcing and allows plasma density measurements at a plasma power flux that would cause continuously biased tips to arc. A multi-probe array is used, with two spatially separated tips employing the harmonics technique and measuring the amplitude of at least two harmonics per tip. A third tip, located between the other two, measures the ion saturation current directly. We compare the measured and calculated ion saturation currents for a variety of plasma conditions and demonstrate the validity of the technique and its use in reducing arcs.

  3. Computational analysis of responses of a wedge-shaped-tip optical fiber probe in bubble measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, A; Saito, T

    2012-07-01

    Optical-fiber probing is widely employed in bubble/droplet measurement in gas-liquid two-phase flows. Several types of optical fiber probes with a very high S/N ratio and high performance have been developed, but further improvement in the probes' measurement accuracy and reliability for industrial applications is desired. We tried to eliminate optical noise in the probe measurements, and we found that the signals include some peak signs that have potential for advanced measurement with optical-fiber probing. We developed a ray-tracing numerical simulator and identified the mechanisms underlying the generation of the signals. In order to numerically simulate the optical probing signals, the simulator must use 3D frameworks composed of incident beams, the reflection and refraction on the surfaces of the optical elements (i.e., an optical fiber, a sensing tip, an air phase, and a water phase), and beams returning from the sensing tip to the other tip through the fiber. We used all of these in a simple rendering framework based on a ray-tracing algorithm with Fresnel's law, and we observed the mechanism of some promising signals that may be useful for extracting the hidden potential of optical-fiber probing. To verify the simulator's performance, we carried out three comparative experiments with fundamental setups using a wedge-shaped single-tip optical fiber probe, examining: (1) the beam trajectories and energy leaking out from the sensing tip into the surrounding air phase or water phase, (2) the probing signals throughout penetration of the sensing tip at the air-water free interface in light of the three-dimensional deformation, and (3) the probing signals throughout penetration of the sensing tip into a bubble in light of the three-dimensional bubble shape. As a result, (a) we found that an optical fiber probe with a wedge-shaped tip has particular characteristics of beam emissions from the tip, and the emitting angles switched depending on the phases covering

  4. Tapered optical fiber tip probes based on focused ion beam-milled Fabry-Perot microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Ricardo M.; Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; Becker, Martin; Dellith, Jan; Rothhardt, Manfred; Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Marques, Manuel B.; Bartelt, Hartmut; Frazão, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    Focused ion beam technology is combined with dynamic chemical etching to create microcavities in tapered optical fiber tips, resulting in fiber probes for temperature and refractive index sensing. Dynamic chemical etching uses hydrofluoric acid and a syringe pump to etch standard optical fibers into cone structures called tapered fiber tips where the length, shape, and cone angle can be precisely controlled. On these tips, focused ion beam is used to mill several different types of Fabry-Perot microcavities. Two main cavity types are initially compared and then combined to form a third, complex cavity structure. In the first case, a gap is milled on the tapered fiber tip which allows the external medium to penetrate the light guiding region and thus presents sensitivity to external refractive index changes. In the second, two slots that function as mirrors are milled on the tip creating a silica cavity that is only sensitive to temperature changes. Finally, both cavities are combined on a single tapered fiber tip, resulting in a multi-cavity structure capable of discriminating between temperature and refractive index variations. This dual characterization is performed with the aid of a fast Fourier transform method to separate the contributions of each cavity and thus of temperature and refractive index. Ultimately, a tapered optical fiber tip probe with sub-standard dimensions containing a multi-cavity structure is projected, fabricated, characterized and applied as a sensing element for simultaneous temperature and refractive index discrimination.

  5. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils formed by a peptide from the yeast prion protein Sup35: AFM and Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V., E-mail: akrasnos@unomaha.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja [IPHT-Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Zhang, Yuliang [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Deckert, Volker [IPHT-Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Institute for Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, University of Jena, Helmholtzweg 4, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Lyubchenko, Yuri L., E-mail: ylyubchenko@unmc.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Aggregation of prion proteins is the cause of various prion related diseases. The infectious form of prions, amyloid aggregates, exist as multiple strains. The strains are thought to represent structurally different prion protein molecules packed into amyloid aggregates, but the knowledge on the structure of different types of aggregates is limited. Here we report on the use of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and TERS (Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering) to study morphological heterogeneity and access underlying conformational features of individual amyloid aggregates. Using AFM we identified the morphology of amyloid fibrils formed by the peptide (CGNNQQNY) from the yeast prion protein Sup35 that is critically involved in the aggregation of the full protein. TERS results demonstrate that morphologically different amyloid fibrils are composed of a distinct set of conformations. Fibrils formed at pH 5.6 are composed of a mixture of peptide conformations (β-sheets, random coil and α-helix) while fibrils formed in pH~2 solution primarily have β-sheets. Additionally, peak positions in the amide III region of the TERS spectra suggested that peptides have parallel arrangement of β-sheets for pH~2 fibrils and antiparallel arrangement for fibrils formed at pH 5.6. We also developed a methodology for detailed analysis of the peptide secondary structure by correlating intensity changes of Raman bands in different regions of TERS spectra. Such correlation established that structural composition of peptides is highly localized with large contribution of unordered secondary structures on a fibrillar surface. - Highlights: • Amyloid polymorphs were characterized by AFM and TERS. • A mixture of peptide secondary structures in fibrils were identified using TERS. • TERS recognizes packing arrangement (parallel versus antiparallel) of peptides. • TERS is a powerful tool for high resolution structural analysis of fibrils.

  6. Steering the Self-Assembly of Octadecylamine Monolayers on Mica by Controlled Mechanical Energy Transfer from the AFM Tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, J.J.; Heredia-Guerrero, J.A.; Salmeron, M.

    2010-06-24

    We have studied the effect of mechanical energy transfer from the tip of an Atomic Force Microscope on the dynamics of self-assembly of monolayer films of octadecylamine on mica. The formation of the self-assembled film proceeds in two successive stages, the first being a fast adsorption from solution that follows a Langmuir isotherm. The second is a slower process of island growth by aggregation of the molecules dispersed on the surface. We found that the dynamics of aggregation can be altered substantially by the addition of mechanical energy into the system through controlled tip-surface interactions. This leads to either the creation of pinholes in existing islands as a consequence of vacancy concentration, and to the assembly of residual molecules into more compact islands.

  7. High-resolution noncontact AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy investigations of self-assembled photovoltaic donor-acceptor dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grévin, Benjamin; Schwartz, Pierre-Olivier; Biniek, Laure; Brinkmann, Martin; Leclerc, Nicolas; Zaborova, Elena; Méry, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled donor-acceptor dyads are used as model nanostructured heterojunctions for local investigations by noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). With the aim to probe the photo-induced charge carrier generation, thin films deposited on transparent indium tin oxide substrates are investigated in dark conditions and upon illumination. The topographic and contact potential difference (CPD) images taken under dark conditions are analysed in view of the results of complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments. After in situ annealing, it is shown that the dyads with longer donor blocks essentially lead to standing acceptor-donor lamellae, where the acceptor and donor groups are π-stacked in an edge-on configuration. The existence of strong CPD and surface photo-voltage (SPV) contrasts shows that structural variations occur within the bulk of the edge-on stacks. SPV images with a very high lateral resolution are achieved, which allows for the resolution of local photo-charging contrasts at the scale of single edge-on lamella. This work paves the way for local investigations of the optoelectronic properties of donor-acceptor supramolecular architectures down to the elementary building block level.

  8. Preparation of platinum/iridium scanning probe microscopy tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Hvid, U.; Mortensen, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the development of an etching setup for use in the preparation of platinum/iridium tips for atomic force microscopy and scanning electrostatic force microscopy as well as scanning tunneling microscopy. The etching process is based on a two step electrochemical procedure. The first step...... material being etched is platinum/iridium (10%) the influence of the stop phase of the ac current terminating each pulse in the second etching is found to be negligible, while in the case of second etching of tungsten wires it is important to break the pulse in a certain phase to avoid formation of a thick....... This mechanism is based on the formation of oxygen and hydrogen at the platinum/iridium electrode when the potential is above the dissociation potential of water (~ 1.23 V) and storage of these products interstitially in the outer layers of the platinum wire. This leads to "microexplosions" that detach fragments...

  9. Fabrication of micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin on aluminum by AFM probe processing and electrophoretic coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sakairi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)], E-mail: takahasi@elechem1-mc.eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2008-11-30

    Micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin were fabricated on aluminum by anodizing, atomic force microscope (AFM) probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition. Barrier type anodic oxide films of 15 nm thickness were formed on aluminum and then the specimen was scratched with an AFM probe in a solution containing acrylic acid/melamine resin nano-particles to remove the anodic oxide film locally. After scratching, the specimen was anodically polarized to deposit acrylic acid/melamine resin electrophoretically at the film-removed area. The resin deposited on the specimen was finally cured by heating. It was found that scratching with the AFM probe on open circuit leads to the contamination of the probe with resin, due to positive shifts in the potential during scratching. Scratching of the specimen under potentiostatic conditions at -1.0 V, however, resulted in successful resin deposition at the film-removed area without probe contamination. The rate of resin deposition increased as the specimen potential becomes more positive during electrophoretic deposition. Arrays of resin dots with a few to several tens {mu}m diameter and 100-1000 nm height, and resin walls with 100-1000 nm height and 1 {mu}m width were obtained on specimens by successive anodizing, probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition.

  10. Fabrication and Study of Micro Monolithic Tungsten Ball Tips for Micro/Nano-CMM Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijun Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro ball tips with high precision, small diameter, and high stiffness stems are required to measure microstructures with high aspect ratio. Existing ball tips cannot meet such demands because of their weak qualities. This study used an arc-discharge melting method to fabricate a micro monolithic tungsten ball tip on a tungsten stylus. The principles of arc discharge and surface tension phenomenon were introduced. The experimental setup was designed and established. Appropriate process parameters, such as impulse voltage, electro discharge time, and discharge gap were determined. Experimental results showed that a ball tip of approximately 60 µm in diameter with less than 0.6 µm roundness error and 0.6 µm center offset could be realized on a 100 µm-diameter tungsten wire. The fabricated micro ball tip was installed on a homemade probe, touched by high-precision gauge blocks in different directions. A repeatability of 41 nm (K = 2 was obtained. Several interesting phenomena in the ball-forming process were also discussed. The proposed method could be used to fabricate a monolithic probe ball tip, which is necessary for measuring microstructures.

  11. Pyramidal nanowire tip for atomic force microscopy and thermal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burouni, N.; Sarajlic, Edin; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel 3D nanowire pyramid as scanning microscopy probe for thermal imaging and atomic force microscopy. This probe is fabricated by standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four

  12. Field emission to control tip-sample distance in magnetic probe recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Fèbre, A.J.; Lüttge, Regina; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    An integrated method using field-emission to control the tip-sample distance for non-contact magnetic probe recording is presented, adopting the exponential relation between current and electric field as feedback. I/V characteristics that correspond well to field emission theory are measured using a

  13. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations

  14. Development of a virtual probe tip with an application to high aspect ratio microscale features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauza, Marcin B.; Hocken, Robert J.; Smith, Stuart T.; Woody, Shane C.

    2005-01-01

    Nondestructive measurement of microscale features remains a challenging metrology problem. For example, to assess a high aspect ratio small hole it is currently common to cut a cross section and measure the features of interest using an atomic force microscope, scanning probe microscope, or scanning electron microscope. Typically, these metrology tools may be suitable for surface finish measurement but often lack the capability for dimensional metrology. The aim of this article is to discuss the development of a high aspect-ratio microscale probe for measurement of microscale features. A 700:1 high aspect ratio probe shank is fabricated with a 7 μm diameter, and attached at one end to an oscillator. The oscillator produces a standing wave in the oscillating probe shank as opposed to conventional probes that use a microscale sphere on the end of a comparatively rigid shank. As a result of the standing wave formed in steady state vibration, the free end of the shank generates an amplitude of oscillation greater than the probe shank diameter. Thus, the probe does not require a spherical ball to serve as the contact point and simply uses the contact diameter of the free end of the vibrating shank. This methodology is referred to as a virtual probe tip. The virtual probe tip in conjunction with a nanopositioning scanner is used to measure surface profile measurements over traverse lengths of 130 μm. In this article, results from profiles of a 500 nm step height and a ruby sphere of diameter 1 mm are presented. Experiments in this article indicate the ability to repeatedly resolve surface features of less than 5 nm while maintaining bandwidths greater than 1 kHz. Furthermore, adhesion problems often encountered with micrometer scaled probes were not observed during profile measurements with this virtual probe

  15. Fast and reliable pre-approach for scanning probe microscopes based on tip-sample capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Voogd, J M; van Spronsen, M A; Kalff, F E; Bryant, B; Ostojić, O; den Haan, A M J; Groot, I M N; Oosterkamp, T H; Otte, A F; Rost, M J

    2017-10-01

    Within the last three decades Scanning Probe Microscopy has been developed to a powerful tool for measuring surfaces and their properties on an atomic scale such that users can be found nowadays not only in academia but also in industry. This development is still pushed further by researchers, who continuously exploit new possibilities of this technique, as well as companies that focus mainly on the usability. However, although imaging has become significantly easier, the time required for a safe approach (without unwanted tip-sample contact) can be very time consuming, especially if the microscope is not equipped or suited for the observation of the tip-sample distance with an additional optical microscope. Here we show that the measurement of the absolute tip-sample capacitance provides an ideal solution for a fast and reliable pre-approach. The absolute tip-sample capacitance shows a generic behavior as a function of the distance, even though we measured it on several completely different setups. Insight into this behavior is gained via an analytical and computational analysis, from which two additional advantages arise: the capacitance measurement can be applied for observing, analyzing, and fine-tuning of the approach motor, as well as for the determination of the (effective) tip radius. The latter provides important information about the sharpness of the measured tip and can be used not only to characterize new (freshly etched) tips but also for the determination of the degradation after a tip-sample contact/crash. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Two-step controllable electrochemical etching of tungsten scanning probe microscopy tips

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic electrochemical etching technique is optimized to produce tungsten tips with controllable shape and radius of curvature of less than 10 nm. Nascent features such as dynamic electrochemical etching and reverse biasing after drop-off are utilized, and two-step dynamic electrochemical etching is introduced to produce extremely sharp tips with controllable aspect ratio. Electronic current shut-off time for conventional dc drop-off technique is reduced to ?36 ns using high speed analog electronics. Undesirable variability in tip shape, which is innate to static dc electrochemical etching, is mitigated with novel dynamic electrochemical etching. Overall, we present a facile and robust approach, whereby using a novel etchant level adjustment mechanism, 30° variability in cone angle and 1.5 mm controllability in cone length were achieved, while routinely producing ultra-sharp probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  17. An analytical model accounting for tip shape evolution during atom probe analysis of heterogeneous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, N; Larson, D J; Geiser, B P; Duguay, S; Vurpillot, F; Blavette, D

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model describing the field evaporation dynamics of a tip made of a thin layer deposited on a substrate is presented in this paper. The difference in evaporation field between the materials is taken into account in this approach in which the tip shape is modeled at a mesoscopic scale. It was found that the non-existence of sharp edge on the surface is a sufficient condition to derive the morphological evolution during successive evaporation of the layers. This modeling gives an instantaneous and smooth analytical representation of the surface that shows good agreement with finite difference simulations results, and a specific regime of evaporation was highlighted when the substrate is a low evaporation field phase. In addition, the model makes it possible to calculate theoretically the tip analyzed volume, potentially opening up new horizons for atom probe tomographic reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation and Analysis of Atom Probe Tips by Xenon Focused Ion Beam Milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estivill, Robert; Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Grenier, Adeline; Blavette, Didier

    2016-06-01

    The damage and ion distribution induced in Si by an inductively coupled plasma Xe focused ion beam was investigated by atom probe tomography. By using predefined patterns it was possible to prepare the atom probe tips with a sub 50 nm end radius in the ion beam microscope. The atom probe reconstruction shows good agreement with simulated implantation profiles and interplanar distances extracted from spatial distribution maps. The elemental profiles of O and C indicate co-implantation during the milling process. The presence of small disc-shaped Xe clusters are also found in the three-dimensional reconstruction. These are attributed to the presence of Xe nanocrystals or bubbles that open during the evaporation process. The expected accumulated dose points to a loss of >95% of the Xe during analysis, which escapes undetected.

  19. An exchangeable-tip scanning probe instrument for the analysis of combinatorial libraries of electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Eric D.; Wang, Hongsen; Legard, Anna E.; Ritzert, Nicole L.; Bruce Van Dover, Robert; Abruña, Héctor D.

    2013-02-01

    A combined scanning differential electrochemical mass spectrometer (SDEMS)-scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) apparatus is described. The SDEMS is used to detect and spatially resolve volatile electrochemically generated species at the surface of a substrate electrode. The SECM can electrochemically probe the reactivity of the surface and also offers a convenient means of leveling the sample. It is possible to switch between these two different scanning tips and techniques without moving the sample and while maintaining potential control of the substrate electrode. A procedure for calibration of the SDEMS tip-substrate separation, based upon the transit time of electrogenerated species from the substrate to the tip is also described. This instrument can be used in the characterization of combinatorial libraries of direct alcohol fuel cell anode catalysts. The apparatus was used to analyze the products of methanol oxidation at a Pt substrate, with the SDEMS detecting carbon dioxide and methyl formate, and a PtPb-modified Pt SECM tip used for the selective detection of formic acid. As an example system, the electrocatalytic methanol oxidation activity of a sputter-deposited binary PtRu composition spread in acidic media was analyzed using the SDEMS. These results are compared with those obtained from a pH-sensitive fluorescence assay.

  20. Probing the effect of tip pressure on fungal growth: Application to Aspergillus nidulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bermúdez, Blanca; Li, Qingxuan; Guinea, Gustavo V.; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2017-08-01

    The study of fungal cells is of great interest due to their importance as pathogens and as fermenting fungi and for their appropriateness as model organisms. The differential pressure between the hyphal cytoplasm and the bordering medium is essential for the growth process, because the pressure is correlated with the growth rate. Notably, during the invasion of tissues, the external pressure at the tip of the hypha may be different from the pressure in the surrounding medium. We report the use of a method, based on the micropipette-aspiration technique, to study the influence of this external pressure at the hyphal tip. Moreover, this technique makes it possible to study hyphal growth mechanics in the case of very thin hyphae, not accessible to turgor pressure probes. We found a correlation between the local pressure at the tip and the growth rate for the species Arpergillus nidulans. Importantly, the proposed method allows one to measure the pressure at the tip required to arrest the hyphal growth. Determining that pressure could be useful to develop new medical treatments for fungal infections. Finally, we provide a mechanical model for these experiments, taking into account the cytoplasm flow and the wall deformation.

  1. Fabrication of Robust Reference Tips and Reference Electrodes for Kelvin Probe Applications in Changing Atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebel, M; Vimalanandan, A; Laaboudi, A; Evers, S; Stratmann, M; Diesing, D; Rohwerder, M

    2017-10-17

    The scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) is a versatile method for the measurement of the Volta potential difference between a sample and the SKP-tip (Δψ sample SKP-tip ). Based on suitable calibration, this technique is highly suited for the application in corrosion science due to its ability to serve as a very sensitive noncontact and nondestructive method for determining the electrode potential, even at buried interfaces beneath coatings or on surfaces covered by ultrathin electrolyte layers, which are not accessible by standard reference electrodes. However, the potential of the reference (i.e., the SKP-tip) will be influenced by variations of the surrounding atmosphere, resulting in errors of the electrode potential referred to the sample. The objective of this work is to provide a stable SKP-tip which can be used in different or changing atmosphere, e.g., within a wide range of relative humidity (approximately 0-99%-rh) or varying O 2 partial pressure, without showing a change of its potential (note that the work functions measured in non-UHV atmospheres are electrochemical in nature [Hausbrand et al. J. Electrochem. Soc. 2008, 155 (7), C369-C379], and hence in the following we will refer to the potential of the SKP-tip instead of its work function). In that regard, the SKP-tip is in a first approach modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in order to create a hydrophobic barrier between the metallic surface and the surrounding atmosphere. The changes in potential upon varying relative humidity (ΔE rh ) of different bare metallic substrates are quantified, and it is shown that these potential differences cannot be minimized by SAMs. On the contrary, the ΔE rh increases for every examined material system modified with SAMs. The major explanation for this observation is the dipole layer at the interface metal|SAM, causing an interfacial adsorption of water molecules even in a preferred orientation of their dipole moments, which leads to a changed work

  2. Self-sensing cantilevers with integrated conductive coaxial tips for high-resolution electrical scanning probe metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemmerli, Alexandre J.; Pruitt, Beth L., E-mail: pruitt@stanford.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 440 Escondido Mall, Stanford, North Carolina 94305 (United States); Harjee, Nahid [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 350 Serra Mall, Stanford, North Carolina 94305 (United States); Koenig, Markus; Garcia, Andrei G. F.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, North Carolina 94305 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The lateral resolution of many electrical scanning probe techniques is limited by the spatial extent of the electrostatic potential profiles produced by their probes. Conventional unshielded conductive atomic force microscopy probes produce broad potential profiles. Shielded probes could offer higher resolution and easier data interpretation in the study of nanostructures. Electrical scanning probe techniques require a method of locating structures of interest, often by mapping surface topography. As the samples studied with these techniques are often photosensitive, the typical laser measurement of cantilever deflection can excite the sample, causing undesirable changes electrical properties. In this work, we present the design, fabrication, and characterization of probes that integrate coaxial tips for spatially sharp potential profiles with piezoresistors for self-contained, electrical displacement sensing. With the apex 100 nm above the sample surface, the electrostatic potential profile produced by our coaxial tips is more than 2 times narrower than that of unshielded tips with no long tails. In a scan bandwidth of 1 Hz–10 kHz, our probes have a displacement resolution of 2.9 Å at 293 K and 79 Å at 2 K, where the low-temperature performance is limited by amplifier noise. We show scanning gate microscopy images of a quantum point contact obtained with our probes, highlighting the improvement to lateral resolution resulting from the coaxial tip.

  3. Surface Mapping with an AFM-CMM Integrated System and Stitching Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Marinello, Francesco; Bariani, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    In the context of micro-technology, dimensions in the order of hundreds of micrometers are often to be measured, while the detection of the finest details and the analysis of nano-roughness call for the use of highly resolving sensors. AFM probes, owing to the sharpness of their tip combined with...

  4. High spatial resolution Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M; Satzinger, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a widely used technique to measure the local contact potential difference (CPD) between an AFM probe and the sample surface via the electrostatic force. The spatial resolution of KPFM is intrinsically limited by the long range of the electrostatic interaction, which includes contributions from the macroscopic cantilever and the conical tip. Here, we present coaxial AFM probes in which the cantilever and cone are shielded by a conducting shell, confining the tip–sample electrostatic interaction to a small region near the end of the tip. We have developed a technique to measure the true CPD despite the presence of the shell electrode. We find that the behavior of these probes agrees with an electrostatic model of the force, and we observe a factor of five improvement in spatial resolution relative to unshielded probes. Our discussion centers on KPFM, but the field confinement offered by these probes may improve any variant of electrostatic force microscopy. (paper)

  5. Fabrication of Cantilevered Tip-on-Aperture Probe for Enhancing Resolution of Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won-Seok; Jeong, Mun Seok; Kim, Dae-Chul; Kim, Jeongyong

    2007-08-01

    The scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) system achieves a resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the conventional optical microscopy system by subwavelength aperture probe scanning. The problem is that the light throughput decreases very markedly with decreasing aperture diameter. Apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopes obtain a much better resolution by concentrating light field near the tip apex. However, far-field illumination by a focused laser beam generates a large background scattering signal. Both disadvantages are overcome using the tip-on-aperture (TOA) approach presented in previous works. In this study, the fabrication of a cantilevered tip for SNOM and scanning force microscopy (SFM) has been described. The nano-probes are batch-fabricated on a silicon wafer. The Si3N4 has excellent optical transparent characteristics, higher Young’s modulus and yield strength so that it should provide a better probe for SNOM and SFM. For this purpose, a Si3N4 thin film was deposited using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). To form the aperture and TOA in the probe, we applied focused ion beam (FIB) machining at the end of the sharpened tip. For verification of the efficiency of the micromachined TOA probes, numerical analysis using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurement using an inverted microscope based the SNOM system were performed.

  6. Growth of Pd-Filled Carbon Nanotubes on the Tip of Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Sakamoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized Pd-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs oriented perpendicular to Si substrates using a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD for the application of scanning probe microscopy (SPM tip. Prior to the CVD growth, Al thin film (10 nm was coated on the substrate as a buffer layer followed by depositing a 5∼40 nm-thick Pd film as a catalyst. The diameter and areal density of CNTs grown depend largely on the initial Pd thickness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM images clearly show that Pd is successfully encapsulated into the CNTs, probably leading to higher conductivity. Using optimum growth conditions, Pd-filled CNTs are successfully grown on the apex of the conventional SPM cantilever.

  7. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowthami, T; Raina, Gargi; Kurra, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84–88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns. (paper)

  8. Wet-chemical etching of atom probe tips for artefact free analyses of nanoscaled semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonyan, D; Fleischmann, C; Veloso, A; Franquet, A; Bogdanowicz, J; Morris, R J H; Vandervorst, W

    2018-03-01

    We introduce an innovative specimen preparation method employing the selectivity of a wet-chemical etching step to improve data quality and success rates in the atom probe analysis of contemporary semiconductor devices. Firstly, on the example of an SiGe fin embedded in SiO 2 we demonstrate how the selective removal of SiO 2 from the final APT specimen significantly improves accuracy and reliability of the reconstructed data. With the oxide removal, we eliminate the origin of shape artefacts, i.e. the formation of a non-hemispherical tip shape, that are typically observed in the reconstructed volume of complex systems. Secondly, using the same approach, we increase success rates to ∼90% for the damage-free, 3D site-specific localization of short (250 nm), vertical Si nanowires at the specimen apex. The impact of the abrupt emitter radius change that is introduced by this specimen preparation method is evaluated as being minor using field evaporation simulation and comparison of different reconstruction schemes. The Ge content within the SiGe fin as well as the 3D boron distribution in the Si NW as resolved by atom probe analysis are in good agreement with TEM/EDS and ToF-SIMS analysis, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation and Verification of Tip-Induced Polarization During Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Measurements on Film Capacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Achton; Popok, Vladimir; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is widely used as characterization tool on functional heterostructures and components but it often suffers from measurement artifacts on such structures because the presence of the biased cantilever tip transforms the actual surface potential. In this work we...

  10. Spatial Manipulation and Assembly of Nanoparticles by Atomic Force Microscopy Tip-Induced Dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Yang, Wenguang; Wen, Yangdong; Wang, Zhidong; Li, Wen Jung; Liu, Lianqing

    2017-05-17

    In this article, we present a novel method of spatial manipulation and assembly of nanoparticles via atomic force microscopy tip-induced dielectrophoresis (AFM-DEP). This method combines the high-accuracy positioning of AFM with the parallel manipulation of DEP. A spatially nonuniform electric field is induced by applying an alternating current (AC) voltage between the conductive AFM probe and an indium tin oxide glass substrate. The AFM probe acted as a movable DEP tweezer for nanomanipulation and assembly of nanoparticles. The mechanism of AFM-DEP was analyzed by numerical simulation. The effects of solution depth, gap distance, AC voltage, solution concentration, and duration time were experimentally studied and optimized. Arrays of 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were assembled into various nanostructures, including lines, ellipsoids, and arrays of dots. The sizes and shapes of the assembled structures were controllable. It was thus demonstrated that AFM-DEP is a flexible and powerful tool for nanomanipulation.

  11. Probing Co/Si interface behaviour by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, J.S.; Liu, R.S.; Tok, E.S.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the Co-Si reaction, the Co growth mode at room temperature, diffusion behaviour as well as morphology evolution during annealing on both H-terminated and clean Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces. From in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation, 'Co-Si' reaction appears to occur on both H-terminated and clean surfaces at room temperature (RT) and the silicide crystallinity is improved upon annealing. Co growth mode on H-terminated Si surfaces occurs in a pseudo layer-by-layer manner while small close-packed island growth mode is observed on the clean Si surface. Upon annealing at different temperatures, Co atom concentration decreases versus annealing time, which in part is attributed to Co atoms inward diffusion. The diffusion behaviour on both types of surfaces demonstrates a similar trend. Morphology study using ex-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the islands formed on Si(001) surface after annealing at 700 degree C are elongated with growth directions alternate between the two perpendicular [110] and [110] directions. Triangular islands are observed on Si(111) surface. (authors)

  12. Terahertz Nanofocusing with Cantilevered Terahertz-Resonant Antenna Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastel, Stefan; Lundeberg, Mark B; Alonso-González, Pablo; Gao, Yuanda; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hone, James; Koppens, Frank H L; Nikitin, Alexey Y; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2017-11-08

    We developed THz-resonant scanning probe tips, yielding strongly enhanced and nanoscale confined THz near fields at their tip apex. The tips with length in the order of the THz wavelength (λ = 96.5 μm) were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) machining and attached to standard atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers. Measurements of the near-field intensity at the very tip apex (25 nm radius) as a function of tip length, via graphene-based (thermoelectric) near-field detection, indicate their first and second order geometrical antenna resonances for tip length of 33 and 78 μm, respectively. On resonance, we find that the near-field intensity is enhanced by one order of magnitude compared to tips of 17 μm length (standard AFM tip length), which is corroborated by numerical simulations that further predict remarkable intensity enhancements of about 10 7 relative to the incident field. Because of the strong field enhancement and standard AFM operation of our tips, we envision manifold and straightforward future application in scattering-type THz near-field nanoscopy and THz photocurrent nanoimaging, nanoscale nonlinear THz imaging, or nanoscale control and manipulation of matter employing ultrastrong and ultrashort THz pulses.

  13. Regularization mechanism in blind tip reconstruction procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jóźwiak, G.; Henrykowski, A.; Masalska, A.; Gotszalk, T.

    2012-01-01

    In quantitative investigations of mechanical and chemical surface parameters using atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques the determination of the probe radius and shape is required. To the most favorable methods of the microprobe characterization belongs the blind tip reconstruction method (BTR). The BTR similar to many other inverse problems is sensitive to noise and needs the so-called regularization mechanism. In this article we describe and investigate two the most popular regularization schemes, which were proposed in Villarubia et al. (1997) and Tian et al. (2008) . We have shown that the procedure described in Tian et al. (2008) enables very effective probe shape reconstruction if we know the statistics of noise present in the AFM system. The increase of effectiveness with relation to the procedure described in Villarubia (1997) is so significant that makes it possible to reconstruct probes with much larger resolution. We have also noticed the fact, that probes reconstructed by means of the procedure presented in Tian et al. (2008) have flat apexes for AFM images with low signal to noise ratio (SNR). We propose procedure, which can improve the probe apex reconstruction. It uses the AFM image to estimate the initial shape of the reconstructed probe. This shape may be further improved by the BTR algorithm. We have shown that it is possible only for the procedure described in Tian et al. (2008) . -- Highlights: ► We study regularization mechanism of blind tip reconstruction. ► We propose combination of direct probe imaging with BTR to improve the reconstruction of a probe apex. ► The possibility of improving efficiency of the BTR procedure is presented. ► The possibility of improving resolution of a reconstructed probe is presented.

  14. High-speed AFM for Studying Dynamic Biomolecular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Biological molecules show their vital activities only in aqueous solutions. It had been one of dreams in biological sciences to directly observe biological macromolecules (protein, DNA) at work under a physiological condition because such observation is straightforward to understanding their dynamic behaviors and functional mechanisms. Optical microscopy has no sufficient spatial resolution and electron microscopy is not applicable to in-liquid samples. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize molecules in liquids at high resolution but its imaging rate was too low to capture dynamic biological processes. This slow imaging rate is because AFM employs mechanical probes (cantilevers) and mechanical scanners to detect the sample height at each pixel. It is quite difficult to quickly move a mechanical device of macroscopic size with sub-nanometer accuracy without producing unwanted vibrations. It is also difficult to maintain the delicate contact between a probe tip and fragile samples. Two key techniques are required to realize high-speed AFM for biological research; fast feedback control to maintain a weak tip-sample interaction force and a technique to suppress mechanical vibrations of the scanner. Various efforts have been carried out in the past decade to materialize high-speed AFM. The current high-speed AFM can capture images on video at 30-60 frames/s for a scan range of 250nm and 100 scan lines, without significantly disturbing week biomolecular interaction. Our recent studies demonstrated that this new microscope can reveal biomolecular processes such as myosin V walking along actin tracks and association/dissociation dynamics of chaperonin GroEL-GroES that occurs in a negatively cooperative manner. The capacity of nanometer-scale visualization of dynamic processes in liquids will innovate on biological research. In addition, it will open a new way to study dynamic chemical/physical processes of various phenomena that occur at the liquid-solid interfaces.

  15. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  16. Fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan Pihl; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe (tip, cantilever and support) for optical read-out, using a combination of silicon micro-machining and electroforming. The paper describes the entire fabrication process for a nickel AFM-probe. In addition...

  17. Modelling and experimental verification of tip-induced polarization in Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements on dielectric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Achton; Popok, Vladimir; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy is a widely used technique for measuring surface potential distributions on the micro- and nanometer scale. The data are, however, often analyzed qualitatively, especially for dielectrics. In many cases, the phenomenon of polarization and its influence on the measured...... signals is disregarded leading to misinterpretation of the results. In this work, we present a model that allows prediction of the surface potential on a metal/polymer heterostructure as measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy by including the tip-induced polarization of the dielectric that arises...

  18. Tuning the instability in static mode atomic force spectroscopy as obtained in an AFM by applying an electric field between the tip and the substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Soma; Raychaudhuri, A K; Sreeram, P A; Dietzel, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated experimentally the role of cantilever instabilities in determination of the static mode force-distance curves in presence of a dc electric field. The electric field has been applied between the tip and the sample in an atomic force microscope working in ultra-high vacuum. We have shown how an electric field modifies the observed force (or cantilever deflection)-vs-distance curves, commonly referred to as the static mode force spectroscopy curves, taken using an atomic force microscope. The electric field induced instabilities shift the jump-into-contact and jump-off-contact points and also the deflection at these instability points. We explained the experimental results using a model of the tip-sample interaction and quantitatively established a relation between the observed static mode force spectroscopy curves and the applied electric field which modifies the effective tip-sample interaction in a controlled manner. The investigation establishes a way to quantitatively evaluate the electrostatic force in an atomic force microscope using the static mode force spectroscopy curves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fabrication and Study of Micro Monolithic Tungsten Ball Tips for Micro/Nano-CMM Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Ruijun Li; Chen Chen; Kuangchao Fan; Zhiwei Wang; Fangfang Liu; Qiangxian Huang

    2018-01-01

    Micro ball tips with high precision, small diameter, and high stiffness stems are required to measure microstructures with high aspect ratio. Existing ball tips cannot meet such demands because of their weak qualities. This study used an arc-discharge melting method to fabricate a micro monolithic tungsten ball tip on a tungsten stylus. The principles of arc discharge and surface tension phenomenon were introduced. The experimental setup was designed and established. Appropriate process param...

  20. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron

  1. Assessing the dependence of bulk ice properties from probes with anti-shatter tips on environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert C.

    Ice clouds have significant impacts on the Earth's radiative budget. Their radiative impact highly depends on ice cloud microphysical properties. Climate and weather prediction models have to make certain assumptions about how the various processes are represented. Observations of how cloud properties vary with environmental conditions can help evaluate some parameterizations used in models. However, sufficient data are not available to characterize how ice crystal properties vary as a function of environmental conditions. Furthermore, many of these assumptions are derived from historical datasets collected by in situ probes, namely optical array probes that can be contaminated by shattered artifacts generated by large particles shattering on the probe tips and inlets. Therefore this study has two main objectives. Prior estimates of ice crystal size distributions derived from 2D Cloud Probes (2DCs) have been artificially amplified by small ice crystals generated from the shattering of large ice crystals on the probe tips. Although anti-shatter tips and algorithms exist, there is considerable uncertainty in their effectiveness. Therefore, this thesis first examines the differences in ice crystal size distributions, and bulk and optical properties from adjacent 2DCs with standard and anti-shatter tips, and processed with and without anti-shattering algorithms. The measurements were obtained from the National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 during the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 during the 2011 Instrumentation Development and Education in Airborne Science 2011 (IDEAS-2011). The 2DC size distributions are compared with those from the Holographic Detector for Clouds (HOLODEC), which has anti-shatter tips and allows for identification of shattering through spatial statistics. The ratio of the number concentration N of particles with maximum dimensions 125 to 500 mum from the 2DC with

  2. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Bilan, Stefan; Zotti, Linda A; Arroyo, Carlos R; Agraït, Nicolás; Cuevas, Juan Carlos

    2012-05-15

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron transport through single-molecule junctions formed by a single octanethiol molecule bonded by the thiol anchoring group to a gold electrode and linked to a carbon tip by the methyl group. We observe the presence of conductance plateaus during the stretching of the molecular bridge, which is the signature of the formation of a molecular junction.

  3. Batch fabrication of scanning microscopy probes for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarajlic, Edin; Vermeer, Rolf; Delalande, M.Y.; Siekman, Martin Herman; Huijink, R.; Fujita, H.; Abelmann, Leon

    2010-01-01

    We present a process for batch fabrication of a novel scanning microscopy probe for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four freestanding silicon

  4. Electrical characterization of FIB processed metal layers for reliable conductive-AFM on ZnO microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pea, M. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Roma 00156 (Italy); Maiolo, L. [Istituto per la Microelettronica e i Microsistemi - CNR, Roma 00133 (Italy); Giovine, E. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Roma 00156 (Italy); Rinaldi, A. [University of L’Aquila, International Research Center for Mathematics & Mechanics of Complex System (MEMOCS), 04012, Cisterna di Latina (Italy); ENEA, C.R. Casaccia, Santa Maria di Galeria, 00123 Rome (Italy); Araneo, R. [Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome (Italy); Notargiacomo, A., E-mail: andrea.notargiacomo@ifn.cnr.it [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Roma 00156 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Contact resistance between conductive AFM tip and different metals is investigated. • FIB processed Ti and Cr areas have larger resistance than as deposited films. • Gold displays low and ohmic tip-sample resistance even after FIB processing. • Au/Ti stack on top of ZnO pillars allows reliable I–V characterization by C-AFM. - Abstract: We report on the conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study of metallic layers in order to find the most suitable configuration for electrical characterization of individual ZnO micro-pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). The electrical resistance between the probe tip and both as deposited and FIB processed metal layers (namely, Cr, Ti, Au and Al) has been investigated. Both chromium and titanium evidenced a non homogenous and non ohmic behaviour, non negligible scanning probe induced anodic oxidation associated to electrical measurements, and after FIB milling they exhibited significantly higher tip-sample resistance. Aluminium had generally a more apparent non conductive behaviour. Conversely, gold films showed very good tip-sample conduction properties being less sensitive to FIB processing than the other investigated metals. We found that a reliable C-AFM electrical characterization of ZnO microstructures obtained by FIB machining is feasible by using a combination of metal films as top contact layer. An Au/Ti bilayer on top of ZnO was capable to sustain the FIB fabrication process and to form a suitable ohmic contact to the semiconductor, allowing for reliable C-AFM measurement. To validate the consistency of this approach, we measured the resistance of ZnO micropillars finding a linear dependence on the pillar height, as expected for an ohmic conductor, and evaluated the resistivity of the material. This procedure has the potential to be downscaled to nanometer size structures by a proper choice of metal films type and thickness.

  5. Electrical characterization of FIB processed metal layers for reliable conductive-AFM on ZnO microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pea, M.; Maiolo, L.; Giovine, E.; Rinaldi, A.; Araneo, R.; Notargiacomo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Contact resistance between conductive AFM tip and different metals is investigated. • FIB processed Ti and Cr areas have larger resistance than as deposited films. • Gold displays low and ohmic tip-sample resistance even after FIB processing. • Au/Ti stack on top of ZnO pillars allows reliable I–V characterization by C-AFM. - Abstract: We report on the conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study of metallic layers in order to find the most suitable configuration for electrical characterization of individual ZnO micro-pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). The electrical resistance between the probe tip and both as deposited and FIB processed metal layers (namely, Cr, Ti, Au and Al) has been investigated. Both chromium and titanium evidenced a non homogenous and non ohmic behaviour, non negligible scanning probe induced anodic oxidation associated to electrical measurements, and after FIB milling they exhibited significantly higher tip-sample resistance. Aluminium had generally a more apparent non conductive behaviour. Conversely, gold films showed very good tip-sample conduction properties being less sensitive to FIB processing than the other investigated metals. We found that a reliable C-AFM electrical characterization of ZnO microstructures obtained by FIB machining is feasible by using a combination of metal films as top contact layer. An Au/Ti bilayer on top of ZnO was capable to sustain the FIB fabrication process and to form a suitable ohmic contact to the semiconductor, allowing for reliable C-AFM measurement. To validate the consistency of this approach, we measured the resistance of ZnO micropillars finding a linear dependence on the pillar height, as expected for an ohmic conductor, and evaluated the resistivity of the material. This procedure has the potential to be downscaled to nanometer size structures by a proper choice of metal films type and thickness.

  6. Anisotropic excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on a metal film by a scattering-type scanning near-field microscope with a non-rotationally-symmetric probe tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walla Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on gold films with the metallized probe tip of a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM. The emission of the polaritons from the tip, illuminated by near-infrared laser radiation, was found to be anisotropic and not circularly symmetric as expected on the basis of literature data. We furthermore identified an additional excitation channel via light that was reflected off the tip and excited the plasmon polaritons at the edge of the metal film. Our results, while obtained for a non-rotationally-symmetric type of probe tip and thus specific for this situation, indicate that when an s-SNOM is employed for the investigation of plasmonic structures, the unintentional excitation of surface waves and anisotropic surface wave propagation must be considered in order to correctly interpret the signatures of plasmon polariton generation and propagation.

  7. Understanding of Capping Effects on the Tip Shape Evolution and on the Atom Probe Data of Bulk LaAlO3 Using Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Chang-Min; Kim, Young-Tae; Park, Chan-Gyung; Seol, Jae-Bok

    2017-04-01

    Two challenges exist in laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). First, a drastic decline in mass-resolving power is caused, not only by laser-induced thermal effects on the APT tips of bulk oxide materials, but also the associated asymmetric evaporation behavior; second, the field evaporation mechanisms of bulk oxide tips under laser illumination are still unclear due to the complex relations between laser pulse and oxide materials. In this study, both phenomena were investigated by depositing Ni- and Co-capping layers onto the bulk LaAlO3 tips, and using stepwise APT analysis with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of the tip shapes. By employing the metallic capping, the heating at the surface of the oxide tips during APT analysis became more symmetrical, thereby enabling a high mass-resolving power in the mass spectrum. In addition, the stepwise microscopy technique visualized tip shape evolution during APT analysis, thereby accounting for evaporation sequences at the tip surface. The combination of "capping" and "stepwise APT with TEM," is applicable to any nonconductors; it provides a direct observation of tip shape evolution, allows determination of the field evaporation strength of oxides, and facilitates understanding of the effects of ultrafast laser illumination on an oxide tip.

  8. Near-Field Imaging of Free Carriers in ZnO Nanowires with a Scanning Probe Tip Made of Heavily Doped Germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakat, Emilie; Giliberti, Valeria; Bollani, Monica; Notargiacomo, Andrea; Pea, Marialilia; Finazzi, Marco; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Melli, Mauro; Sassolini, Simone; Cabrini, Stefano; Biagioni, Paolo; Ortolani, Michele; Baldassarre, Leonetta

    2017-11-01

    A novel scanning probe tip made of heavily doped semiconductor is fabricated and used instead of standard gold-coated tips in infrared scattering-type near-field microscopy. Midinfrared near-field microscopy experiments are conducted on ZnO nanowires with a lateral resolution better than 100 nm, using tips made of heavily electron-doped germanium with a plasma frequency in the midinfrared (plasma wavelength of 9.5 μ m ). Nanowires embedded in a dielectric matrix are imaged at two wavelengths, 11.3 and 8.0 μ m , above and below the plasma wavelength of the tips. An opposite sign of the imaging contrasts between the nanowire and the dielectric matrix is observed at the two infrared wavelengths, indicating a clear role of the free-electron plasma in the heavily doped germanium tip in building the imaging contrast. Electromagnetic simulations with a multispherical dipole model accounting for the finite size of the tip are well consistent with the experiments. By comparison of the simulated and measured imaging contrasts, an estimate for the local free-carrier density in the investigated ZnO nanowires in the low 1019 cm-3 range is retrieved. The results are benchmarked against the scattering intensity and phase maps obtained on the same sample with a gold-coated probe tip in pseudoheterodyne detection mode.

  9. Wafer-scale fabrication of scanning thermal probes with integrated metal nanowire resistive elements for sensing and heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatakeyama, Kodai; Sarajlic, Edin; Siekman, Martin Herman; Jalabert, L.; Fujita, H.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Abelmann, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) and micro-thermal analysis allow the study of thermal phenomena at micro- and nanoscale. We present a novel scanning resistive probe aimed for thermal imaging and localized thermal analysis. The probe features an AFM cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip. Metal

  10. Visualization of atomic structure using AFM: theoretical description

    OpenAIRE

    Gallyamov, M. O.; Yaminsky, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    We suggest simple model of image formation in atomic force microscope (AFM) taking into account contact deformations of probe and sample during scanning. The model explains the possibility of AFM visualization of regular atomic or molecular structure when probe-sample contact area is greater than an area per atom or molecule in surface lattice. (This is usually the case when lattice to be studied has subnanometer unit cell parameters and AFM investigations are carried out in air in contact mo...

  11. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  12. Fabrication of tungsten probe for hard tapping operation in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Guebum, E-mail: hanguebum@live.co.kr [Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, 5500 Wabash Avenue, Terre Haute, Indiana 47803 (United States); Department of Mechanical Design and Robot Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyo-Sok, E-mail: hsahn@seoultech.ac.kr [Manufacturing Systems and Design Engineering Programme, Seoul National University of Science & Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We propose a method of producing a tungsten probe with high stiffness for atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to acquire enhanced phase contrast images and efficiently perform lithography. A tungsten probe with a tip radius between 20 nm and 50 nm was fabricated using electrochemical etching optimized by applying pulse waves at different voltages. The spring constant of the tungsten probe was determined by finite element analysis (FEA), and its applicability as an AFM probe was evaluated by obtaining topography and phase contrast images of a Si wafer sample partly coated with Au. Enhanced hard tapping performance of the tungsten probe compared with a commercial Si probe was confirmed by conducting hard tapping tests at five different oscillation amplitudes on single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To analyze the damaged graphene sample, the test areas were investigated using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The test results demonstrate that the tungsten probe with high stiffness was capable of inducing sufficient elastic and plastic deformation to enable obtaining enhanced phase contrast images and performing lithography, respectively. - Highlights: • We propose a method of producing highly stiff tungsten probes for hard tapping AFM. • Spring constant of tungsten probe is determined by finite element method. • Enhanced hard tapping performance is confirmed. • Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is used to identify damage to graphene.

  13. The design of a novel tip enhanced near-field scanning probe microscope for ultra-high resolution optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek Brant

    Traditional light microscopy suffers from the diffraction limit, which limits the spatial resolution to lambda/2. The current trend in optical microscopy is the development of techniques to bypass the diffraction limit. Resolutions below 40 nm will make it possible to probe biological systems by imaging the interactions between single molecules and cell membranes. These resolutions will allow for the development of improved drug delivery mechanisms by increasing our understanding of how chemical communication within a cell occurs. The materials sciences would also benefit from these high resolutions. Nanomaterials can be analyzed with Raman spectroscopy for molecular and atomic bond information, or with fluorescence response to determine bulk optical properties with tens of nanometer resolution. Near-field optical microscopy is one of the current techniques, which allows for imaging at resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. Using a combination of a shear force microscope (SFM) and an inverted optical microscope, spectroscopic resolutions below 20 nm have been demonstrated. One technique, in particular, has been named tip enhanced near-field optical microscopy (TENOM). The key to this technique is the use of solid metal probes, which are illuminated in the far field by the excitation wavelength of interest. These probes are custom-designed using finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling techniques, then fabricated with the use of a focused ion beam (FIB) microscope. The measure of the quality of probe design is based directly on the field enhancement obtainable. The greater the field enhancement of the probe, the more the ratio of near-field to far-field background contribution will increase. The elimination of the far-field signal by a decrease of illumination power will provide the best signal-to-noise ratio in the near-field images. Furthermore, a design that facilitates the delocalization of the near-field imaging from the far-field will be beneficial

  14. The reliability of the ball-tipped probe for detecting pedicle screw tract violations prior to instrumenting the thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedory, David M; Crawford, John J; Topp, Raymond F

    2011-03-15

    Cadaveric. To determine the confidence with which surgeons should rely on a flexible ball-tipped probe to detect pedicle breeches in the thoracic and lumbar spine. The reliability of a ball-tipped probe for detecting cortical violations of the pedicle tract has not been studied among fellowship-trained surgeons. A total of 134 pedicles were randomized to have pedicle screw tracts with one of six possible options: no violation, anterior, superior, inferior, medial, or lateral violations. Five fellowship-trained spine surgeons examined each pedicle, using a standard flexible ball-tipped probe on three nonsequential occasions. The percentage of correctly identified violations, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for the surgeons as a group and individually. The Cohen kappa coefficient was used to assess the accuracy of the observers and the interobserver and intraobserver agreement. Finally, we analyzed our results by spinal region to see whether this impacted the surgeons' ability to detect a pedicle violation. The surgeons were able to correctly identify 81% of intact pedicles, 39% of superior, 68% of medial, 74% of lateral, 62% of anterior, and 50% of inferior violations. The sensitivity varied considerably by breech location and surgeon with a range of 18% to 85%. Positive predictive value for each breech location ranged from 12% to 20%. The specificity was 81% and negative predictive value 98% overall. The intraobserver reliability was moderate and interobserver reliability was low in this series. The ability to detect a pedicle violation was significantly better in the lower thoracic region (T6-T12) than in other areas of the spine. The standard ball-tipped probe was much less reliable than expected. This technique can be used to confirm an intact pedicle but has an unacceptably high false-positive rate and should be used with caution. Our study suggests that overconfidence in pedicle probing might

  15. Probing the role of metal cations on the aggregation behavior of amyloid β-peptide at a single molecule level by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Jianhua, E-mail: wjh@cqu.edu.cn; Liu, Chundong [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China)

    2016-09-15

    With the development of nanotechnology, understanding of intermolecular interactions on a single molecule level by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has played an important role in molecular biology and biomedical science. In recent years, some research suggested that the presence of metal cations is an important regulator in the processes of misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which may be an important etiological factor of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the knowledge on the principle of interactions between Aβ and metal cations at the single molecule level is still poor understood. In this paper, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) was fabricated on substrate of mixed thiol-modified gold nanoparticles using self-assembled monolayer method and the adhesion force in the longitudinal direction between metal cations and Aβ42 were investigated by AFM. The role of metal ions on Aβ aggregation is discussed from the perspective of single molecular force. The force results showed that the specific adhesion force F{sub i} and the nonspecific force F{sub 0} between a single Aβ–Aβ pair in control experiment were calculated as 42 ± 3 and 80 pN, respectively. However, F{sub i} between a single Aβ–Aβ pair in the presence of Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} increased dramatically to 84 ± 6, 89 ± 3, 73 ± 5, 95 ± 5 pN successively, which indicated that unbinding between Aβ proteins is accelerated in the presence of metal cations. What is more, the imaging results showed that substoichiometric copper cations accelerate the formation of fibrils within 3 days. The combined atomic force spectroscopy and imaging analysis indicate that metal cations play a role in promoting the aggregating behavior of Aβ42.

  16. Probing the role of metal cations on the aggregation behavior of amyloid β-peptide at a single molecule level by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Chundong

    2016-09-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, understanding of intermolecular interactions on a single molecule level by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has played an important role in molecular biology and biomedical science. In recent years, some research suggested that the presence of metal cations is an important regulator in the processes of misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which may be an important etiological factor of Alzheimer's disease. However, the knowledge on the principle of interactions between Aβ and metal cations at the single molecule level is still poor understood. In this paper, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) was fabricated on substrate of mixed thiol-modified gold nanoparticles using self-assembled monolayer method and the adhesion force in the longitudinal direction between metal cations and Aβ42 were investigated by AFM. The role of metal ions on Aβ aggregation is discussed from the perspective of single molecular force. The force results showed that the specific adhesion force F i and the nonspecific force F 0 between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in control experiment were calculated as 42 ± 3 and 80 pN, respectively. However, F i between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in the presence of Cu2+, Zn2+, Ca2+ and Al3+ increased dramatically to 84 ± 6, 89 ± 3, 73 ± 5, 95 ± 5 pN successively, which indicated that unbinding between Aβ proteins is accelerated in the presence of metal cations. What is more, the imaging results showed that substoichiometric copper cations accelerate the formation of fibrils within 3 days. The combined atomic force spectroscopy and imaging analysis indicate that metal cations play a role in promoting the aggregating behavior of Aβ42.

  17. AFM lithography of aluminum for fabrication of nanomechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Zachary James; Abadal, G.; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    Nanolithography by local anodic oxidation of surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to be more reproducible when using dynamic, non-contact mode. Hereby, the tip/sample interaction forces are reduced dramatically compared to contact mode, and thus tip wear is greatly reduced. Ano...

  18. A Rotating-Tip-Based Mechanical Nano-Manufacturing Process: Nanomilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozen B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a rotating-tip-based mechanical nanomanufacturing technique, referred to here as nanomilling. An atomic force microscopy (AFM probe tip that is rotated at high speeds by out-of-phase motions of the axes of a three-axis piezoelectric actuator is used as the nanotool. By circumventing the high-compliance AFM beam and directly attaching the tip onto the piezoelectric actuator, a high-stiffness arrangement is realized. The feeding motions and depth prescription are provided by a nano-positioning stage. It is shown that nanomilling is capable of removing the material in the form of long curled chips, indicating shearing as the dominant material removal mechanism. Feature-size and shape control capabilities of the method are demonstrated.

  19. Reconstruction Algorithms in Undersampled AFM Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen

    2016-01-01

    images, our simulations reveal that using a simple raster scanning pattern in combination with conventional image interpolation performs very well. Moreover, this combination enables a reduction by a factor 10 of the scanning time while retaining an average reconstruction quality around 36 dB PSNR......This paper provides a study of spatial undersampling in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging followed by different image reconstruction techniques based on sparse approximation as well as interpolation. The main reasons for using undersampling is that it reduces the path length and thereby...... the scanning time as well as the amount of interaction between the AFM probe and the specimen. It can easily be applied on conventional AFM hardware. Due to undersampling, it is then necessary to further process the acquired image in order to reconstruct an approximation of the image. Based on real AFM cell...

  20. Percutaneous treatment of liver tumors with an adapted probe for cooled-tip, impedance-controlled radio-frequency ablation under open-magnet MR guidance: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, Alexis D.; Terraz, Sylvain; Roggan, Andre; Terrier, Francois; Majno, Pietro; Mentha, Gilles; Roth, Arnaud; Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, 24 rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2003-05-01

    Percutaneous radio-frequency (RF) ablation of liver tumors is usually performed under guidance of real-time US, but some tumor nodules in some patients cannot be adequately visualized with this technique. We report our preliminary results with an MR-compatible, internally perfused 17-G RF probe adapted to a standard RF generator for impedance-controlled RF ablation under MR guidance. Following initial testing of the probe for MR compatibility, artifacts and macroscopic effects on an ex vivo pig liver, four patients with eight neoplastic liver nodules (five metastatic and three primary), which could not be properly targeted by US, were treated with the cooled-tip technique under MRI guidance in an open 0.23-T magnet. Metallic artifacts produced by the probe were useful for accurate placement and did not interfere with MRI monitoring at the end of the procedure. Based on imaging findings, the immediate result of RF was considered adequate in all instances. Local recurrence occurred in one instance after 6 months, requiring repeat treatment. No adverse effects were noted. Initial experience suggests that the probe we used allows to perform impedance-controlled cooled-tip RF ablation of liver tumors under open-magnet MR guidance. (orig.)

  1. The substructure of immunoglobulin G resolved to 25 kDa using amplitude modulation AFM in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, Neil H.

    2005-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (or tapping-mode) atomic force microscopy (AM AFM or TM AFM) in air can reveal sub-molecular details of isolated multi-subunit proteins, such as immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, on atomically flat support surfaces such as mica [A. San Paulo, R. Garcia, Biophys. J. 78(3) (2000) 1599]. This is achieved by controlling the microscope imaging parameters (e.g. cantilever drive frequency and set-point amplitude) to keep the AFM tip predominantly in the attractive force regime. Under these conditions, the 50 kDa F c and F ab subunits can be resolved when the molecule has the appropriate orientation on the surface. The presence of a water layer on hydrophilic mica is an important factor affecting imaging contrast, a consequence of capillary neck formation between tip and surface [L. Zitzler, S. Herminghaus, F. Mugele, Phys. Rev. B 66(15) (2002) 155436]. Desiccation of samples to remove surface bound water layers can yield reproducible imaging of the IgG substructure [N.H. Thomson, J. Microsc. (Oxford) 217(3) (2004) 193]. This approach has also given higher resolution than previously achieved, down to about 25 kDa, and these data are detailed here. These subdomains are formed as two immunoglobulin folds from the light and heavy peptide chains of the IgG crossover. This result has been validated by comparing the AFM images with X-ray crystallography data from the protein data bank. These data show that the AFM can obtain 25 kDa resolution on isolated protein molecules with commercially available silicon tips, but, as expected for a local probe technique, resolution is highly dependent on the macromolecular orientation on the support surface

  2. An AFM-Based Study of Porcine OBP Film for Artificial Olfaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cai, Qiang

    2001-01-01

    .... The topograph of these films was measured using Atomic Force Micrograph (AFM). In order to evaluate the affinity of OBP and its antibody, the AFM probe was coated with the anti-OBP using the covalent method...

  3. Characterization of surface roughness of laser deposited titanium alloy and copper using AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erinosho, M. F.; Akinlabi, E. T.; Johnson, O. T.

    2018-03-01

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) is the process of using the laser beam of a nozzle to produce a melt pool on a metal surface usually the substrate and metal powder is been deposited into it thereby creating a fusion bond with the substrate to form a new material layer against the force gravity. A good metal laminate is formed when the wettability between the dropping metal powder and the substrate adheres. This paper reports the surface roughness of laser deposited titanium alloy and copper (Ti6Al4V + Cu) using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). This AFM is employed in order to sense the surface and produce different manipulated images using the micro-fabricated mechanical tip under a probe cartridge of high resolution. The process parameters employed during the deposition routine determines the output of the deposit. A careful attention is given to the laser deposited Ti6Al4V + Cu samples under the AFM probe because of their single tracked layers with semi-circular pattern of deposition. This research work can be applicable in the surface modification of laser deposited samples for the marine industry.

  4. Waveguide analysis of heat-drawn and chemically etched probe tips for scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moar, Peter N; Love, John D; Ladouceur, François; Cahill, Laurence W

    2006-09-01

    We analyze two basic aspects of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe's operation: (i) spot-size evolution of the electric field along the probe with and without a metal layer, and (ii) a modal analysis of the SNOM probe, particularly in close proximity to the aperture. A slab waveguide model is utilized to minimize the analytical complexity, yet provides useful quantitative results--including losses associated with the metal coating--which can then be used as design rules.

  5. AFM studies of the crystallization and habit modification of an excipient material, adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, T R; Thompson, C; Davies, M C; Tendler, S J B; Roberts, C J

    2004-08-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the (1 0 0) face of crystalline adipic acid, both in air and liquid environments. In air, surface reorganization occurred during scanning of the AFM probe, which has been investigated using single point force-distance analysis under a controlled relative humidity (RH) environment. We suggest such reorganization can be attributed to the influence of a network of water molecules bound to the hydrophilic (1 0 0) surface permitting local AFM tip-enhanced dissolution and reorganization of the solute. In situ imaging was also carried out on the crystals, revealing etch-pit formation during dissolution, and rapid growth at higher levels of supersaturation (sigma), both of which are direct consequences of the hydrophilic nature of the (1 0 0) face. Also presented here are nanoscale observations of the effect of octanoic acid, a structurally-related habit modifier, on crystalline adipic acid. Using AFM, we have been able to show that the presence of octanoic acid at low concentration has little observable affect on the development of the (1 0 0) face; however, as this concentration is increased, there are clear changes in step morphology and growth mode on the (1 0 0) face of the crystal. At a concentration of 1.26 mmol dm(-3) (a concentration corresponding to a molar ratio of approximately 1:175 octanoic acid:adipic acid), growth on the (1 0 0) face is inhibited, with in situ AFM imaging indicating this is a direct consequence of octanoic acid binding to the surface, and pinning the monomolecular growth steps.

  6. AFM indentation study of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Q.S.; Lee, G.Y.H.; Ong, C.N.; Lim, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical properties of individual living cells are known to be closely related to the health and function of the human body. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation using a micro-sized spherical probe was carried out to characterize the elasticity of benign (MCF-10A) and cancerous (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells. AFM imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging were also used to investigate their corresponding sub-membrane cytoskeletal structures. Malignant (MCF-7) breast cells were found to have an apparent Young's modulus significantly lower (1.4-1.8 times) than that of their non-malignant (MCF-10A) counterparts at physiological temperature (37 deg. C), and their apparent Young's modulus increase with loading rate. Both confocal and AFM images showed a significant difference in the organization of their sub-membrane actin structures which directly contribute to their difference in cell elasticity. This change may have facilitated easy migration and invasion of malignant cells during metastasis

  7. Heterobifunctional crosslinkers for tethering single ligand molecules to scanning probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Kienberger, Ferry; Hahn, Christoph D.; Buchinger, Gerhard M.; Egwim, Innocent O.C.; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Ebner, Andreas; Romanin, Christoph; Klampfl, Christian; Lackner, Bernd; Prinz, Heino; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    Single molecule recognition force microscopy (SMRFM) is a versatile atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to probe specific interactions of cognitive molecules on the single molecule level. It allows insights to be gained into interaction potentials and kinetic barriers and is capable of mapping interaction sites with nm positional accuracy. These applications require a ligand to be attached to the AFM tip, preferably by a distensible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain between the measuring tip and the ligand molecule. The PEG chain greatly facilitates specific binding of the ligand to immobile receptor sites on the sample surface. The present study contributes to tip-PEG-ligand tethering in three ways: (i) a convenient synthetic route was found to prepare NH 2 -PEG-COOH which is the key intermediate for long heterobifunctional crosslinkers; (ii) a variety of heterobifunctional PEG derivatives for tip-PEG-ligand linking were prepared from NH 2 -PEG-COOH; (iii) in particular, a new PEG crosslinker with one thiol-reactive end and one terminal nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group was synthesized and successfully used to tether His 6 -tagged protein molecules to AFM tips via noncovalent NTA-Ni 2+ -His 6 bridges. The new crosslinker was applied to link a recombinant His 6 -tagged fragment of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor to the AFM tip whereupon specific docking to the capsid of human rhinovirus particles was observed by force microscopy. In a parallel study, the specific interaction of the small GTPase Ran with the nuclear import receptor importin β1 was studied in detail by SMRFM, using the new crosslinker to link His 6 -tagged Ran to the measuring tip [Nat. Struct. Biol. (2003), 10, 553-557

  8. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotube tips allowing fabrication of new classes of nanoscale sensing and manipulation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A. (Inventor); Shapiro, Ian R. (Inventor); Collier, Charles Patrick (Inventor); Esplandiu, Maria J. (Inventor); Bittner, Jr., Vern Garrett (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Embodiments in accordance with the present invention relate to techniques for the growth and attachment of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT), facilitating their use as robust and well-characterized tools for AFM imaging and other applications. In accordance with one embodiment, SWNTs attached to an AFM tip can function as a structural scaffold for nanoscale device fabrication on a scanning probe. Such a probe can trigger, with nanometer precision, specific biochemical reactions or conformational changes in biological systems. The consequences of such triggering can be observed in real time by single-molecule fluorescence, electrical, and/or AFM sensing. Specific embodiments in accordance with the present invention utilize sensing and manipulation of individual molecules with carbon nanotubes, coupled with single-molecule fluorescence imaging, to allow observation of spectroscopic signals in response to mechanically induced molecular changes. Biological macromolecules such as proteins or DNA can be attached to nanotubes to create highly specific single-molecule probes for investigations of intermolecular dynamics, for assembling hybrid biological and nanoscale materials, or for developing molecular electronics. In one example, electrical wiring of single redox enzymes to carbon nanotube scanning probes allows observation and electrochemical control over single enzymatic reactions by monitoring fluorescence from a redox-active cofactor or the formation of fluorescent products. Enzymes ''nanowired'' to the tips of carbon nanotubes in accordance with embodiments of the present invention, may enable extremely sensitive probing of biological stimulus-response with high spatial resolution, including product-induced signal transduction.

  9. Effect of TMAH Etching Duration on the Formation of Silicon Nano wire Transistor Patterned by AFM Nano lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutagalung, S.D.; Lew, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) lithography was applied to produce nano scale pattern for silicon nano wire transistor fabrication. This technique takes advantage of imaging facility of AFM and the ability of probe movement controlling over the sample surface to create nano patterns. A conductive AFM tip was used to grow the silicon oxide nano patterns on silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer. The applied tip-sample voltage and writing speed were well controlled in order to form pre-designed silicon oxide nano wire transistor structures. The effect of tetra methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) etching duration on the oxide covered silicon nano wire transistor structure has been investigated. A completed silicon nano wire transistor was obtained by removing the oxide layer via hydrofluoric acid etching process. The fabricated silicon nano wire transistor consists of a silicon nano wire that acts as a channel with source and drain pads. A lateral gate pad with a nano wire head was fabricated very close to the channel in the formation of transistor structures. (author)

  10. Electrical characterization of FIB processed metal layers for reliable conductive-AFM on ZnO microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, M.; Maiolo, L.; Giovine, E.; Rinaldi, A.; Araneo, R.; Notargiacomo, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study of metallic layers in order to find the most suitable configuration for electrical characterization of individual ZnO micro-pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). The electrical resistance between the probe tip and both as deposited and FIB processed metal layers (namely, Cr, Ti, Au and Al) has been investigated. Both chromium and titanium evidenced a non homogenous and non ohmic behaviour, non negligible scanning probe induced anodic oxidation associated to electrical measurements, and after FIB milling they exhibited significantly higher tip-sample resistance. Aluminium had generally a more apparent non conductive behaviour. Conversely, gold films showed very good tip-sample conduction properties being less sensitive to FIB processing than the other investigated metals. We found that a reliable C-AFM electrical characterization of ZnO microstructures obtained by FIB machining is feasible by using a combination of metal films as top contact layer. An Au/Ti bilayer on top of ZnO was capable to sustain the FIB fabrication process and to form a suitable ohmic contact to the semiconductor, allowing for reliable C-AFM measurement. To validate the consistency of this approach, we measured the resistance of ZnO micropillars finding a linear dependence on the pillar height, as expected for an ohmic conductor, and evaluated the resistivity of the material. This procedure has the potential to be downscaled to nanometer size structures by a proper choice of metal films type and thickness.

  11. Sensing inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human corneal Descemet's membrane with AFM nano-indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mundo, Rosa; Recchia, Giuseppina; Parekh, Mohit; Ruzza, Alessandro; Ferrari, Stefano; Carbone, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    The paper describes a highly space-resolved characterization of the surface mechanical properties of the posterior human corneal layer (Descemet's membrane). This has been accomplished with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nano-indentation by using a probe with a sharp tip geometry. Results indicate that the contact with this biological tissue in liquid occurs with no (or very low) adhesion. More importantly, under the same operating conditions, a broad distribution of penetration depth can be measured on different x-y positions of the tissue surface, indicating a high inhomogeneity of surface stiffness, not yet clearly reported in the literature. An important contribution to such inhomogeneity should be ascribed to the discontinuous nature of the collagen/proteoglycans fibers matrix tissue, as can be imaged by AFM when the tissue is semi-dry. Using classical contact mechanics calculations adapted to the specific geometry of the tetrahedral tip it has been found that the elastic modulus E of the material in the very proximity of the surface ranges from 0.23 to 2.6 kPa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Route to Scanning Probe Hot Electron Nanoscopy (HENs) Applied to 2D Material

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2017-06-09

    This paper presents details on a new experimental apparatus implementing the hot electron nanoscopy (HENs) technique introduced for advanced spectroscopies on structure and chemistry in few molecules and interface problems. A detailed description of the architecture used for the laser excitation of surface plasmons at an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is provided. The photogenerated current from the tip to the sample is detected during the AFM scan. The technique is applied to innovative semiconductors for applications in electronics: 2D MoS2 single crystal and a p-type SnO layer. Results are supported by complementary scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, traditional conductive AFM, and Raman measurements. New features highlighted by HEN technique reveal details of local complexity in MoS2 and polycrystalline structure of SnO at nanometric scale otherwise undetected. The technique set in this paper is promising for future studies in nanojunctions and innovative multilayered materials, with new insight on interfaces.

  13. In situ probing the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyin; Hemayet Uddin, Md; Ng, Tuck Wah; Paterson, David L.; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing

    2014-10-01

    We report a novel approach to probe the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometre resolution by combining focused ion beam (FIB) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After removing layers of pre-defined thickness in the order of 100 nm on the target bacterial cells with FIB milling, AFM of different modes can be employed to probe the cellular interior under both ambient and aqueous environments. Our initial investigations focused on the surface topology induced by FIB milling and the hydration effects on AFM measurements, followed by assessment of the sample protocols. With fine-tuning of the process parameters, in situ AFM probing beneath the bacterial cell wall was achieved for the first time. We further demonstrate the proposed method by performing a spatial mapping of intracellular elasticity and chemistry of the multi-drug resistant strain Klebsiella pneumoniae cells prior to and after it was exposed to the ‘last-line’ antibiotic polymyxin B. Our results revealed increased stiffness occurring in both surface and interior regions of the treated cells, suggesting loss of integrity of the outer membrane from polymyxin treatments. In addition, the hydrophobicity measurement using a functionalized AFM tip was able to highlight the evident hydrophobic portion of the cell such as the regions containing cell membrane. We expect that the proposed FIB-AFM platform will help in gaining deeper insights of bacteria-drug interactions to develop potential strategies for combating multi-drug resistance.

  14. AFM Nanotools for Surgery of Biological Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, J D; Gordeev, S N [Department of Physics, Claverton Down, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Guy, R H, E-mail: jdb28@bath.ac.uk [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Claverton Down, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    Using a method of electron-beam induced deposition, we have been able to fabricate specialized AFM probes with application as 'nanotools' for the manipulation of biological structures ('nanosurgery'). We describe several such tools, including a 'nanoscalpel', 'nanoneedles' for probing intracellular structures, and a 'nanotome' which can separate surface layers from a biological structure. These applications are demonstrated by performing nanomanipulation on corneocyte cells from the outer layer of human skin.

  15. Structure Assisted Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Undersampled AFM Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The use of compressed sensing in atomic force microscopy (AFM) can potentially speed-up image acquisition, lower probe-specimen interaction, or enable super resolution imaging. The idea in compressed sensing for AFM is to spatially undersample the specimen, i.e. only acquire a small fraction...... of the full image of it, and then use advanced computational techniques to reconstruct the remaining part of the image whenever this is possible. Our initial experiments have shown that it is possible to leverage inherent structure in acquired AFM images to improve image reconstruction. Thus, we have studied...... structure in the discrete cosine transform coefficients of typical AFM images. Based on this study, we propose a generic support structure model that may be used to improve the quality of the reconstructed AFM images. Furthermore, we propose a modification to the established iterative thresholding...

  16. Experimental Study of the Interactions and Dynamics at Interfaces Using Newly Developed AFM Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dongshi

    using dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM). The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity, and the induced force from a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light-induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. In the third experiment, we conduct a non-contact measurement of the viscoelastic properties of nanometer-thin films in a liquid medium using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) together with a newly developed long-needle probe. The probe contains a long vertical glass fiber with one end adhered onto a cantilever beam and the other end with a sharp tip placed near the liquid-film interface. The nanoscale flow generated by the resonant oscillation of the needle tip provides a precise hydrodynamic force acting on the soft surface of the thin film. By accurately measuring the mechanical response of the thin film, we obtain the elastic and loss moduli of the thin film using the linear response theory of elasto-hydrodynamics (EHD). In addition, we apply this new technique to obtain the viscoelastic property of live cells with dual frequency modulation, which are used to simultaneously measure the cell morphology and spatial distribution of the cell's elastic modulus and their temporal evolution during different stages of cell growth and division. The experiment verifies the theory and demonstrates the applications. This thesis work thus provides new techniques and perspectives of AFM and leads to better understanding of the interactions and dynamics at interfaces.

  17. Atomic species recognition on oxide surfaces using low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zong Min, E-mail: mzmncit@163.com [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Shi, Yun Bo; Mu, Ji Liang; Qu, Zhang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Qin, Li [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: liuj@nuc.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The coexisted phase of p(2 × 1)and c(6 × 2) on Cu(110)-O surface using AFM under UHV at low temperature. • Two different c(6 × 2) phase depending on the status of the tip apex. • Electronic state of tip seriously effect the resolution and stability of the sample surface. - Abstract: In scanning probe microscopy (SPM), the chemical properties and sharpness of the tips of the cantilever greatly influence the scanning of a sample surface. Variation in the chemical properties of the sharp tip apex can induce transformation of the SPM images. In this research, we explore the relationship between the tip and the structure of a sample surface using dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a Cu(110)-O surface under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (78 K). We observed two different c(6 × 2) phase types in which super-Cu atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of O atoms and O atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of Cu atoms. We also found that the electronic state of the tip has a serious effect on the resolution and stability of the sample surface, and provide an explanation for these phenomena. This technique can be used to identify atom species on sample surfaces, and represents an important development in the SPM technique.

  18. INFLUENCE OF INTRAVENOUS DILTIAZEM ON LEFT-VENTRICULAR FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE CORONARY-ARTERY DISEASE AT REST AND DURING PACING, MONITORED BY COMPUTER-PROCESSED NUCLEAR PROBE AND TIP-MANOMETER DATA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDIJK, RB; BLANKSMA, PK; VANGILST, WH; LIE, KI

    The influence of intravenous diltiazem on hemodynamics and left ventricular function indices was studied in 14 patients with severe coronary artery disease at rest and during atrial pacing. We used a tip manometer catheter for recording left ventricular pressure tracings and a nuclear probe for

  19. AFM study of montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Torbjoern; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per

    2010-02-01

    Na-montmorillonite and Ca-montmorillonite particles have been attached to molecularly flat mica surfaces using simple evaporation of montmorillonite solutions. The particles stick to the surface by strong van der Waals forces. The homogeneity of the montmorillonite particle surfaces has been evaluated by AFM imaging and by AFM force raster measurements. As a control, molecularly smooth mica surfaces were used, and the data obtained for montmorillonite was compared with the data obtained for mica. In images of the size 100x100 nm we can identify variations on the Na-montmorillonite particle surfaces. This variation is attributed to inhomogeneities of the montmorillonite particles. The inhomogeneous nature of the montmorillonite surface is also clearly demonstrated by the force raster measurement, in particular the force raster adhesion maps show larger variations and a more patterned structure for montmorillonite than for mica. Thus, any attempt to model the interaction between montmorillonite particles using a model of ideally flat surfaces with a homogeneous charge distribution is an oversimplification. We suggest that this explains the differences between measured swelling pressures and modelling results

  20. AFM study of montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Torbjoern; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per (Dept. of Chemistry, Surface Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-02-15

    Na-montmorillonite and Ca-montmorillonite particles have been attached to molecularly flat mica surfaces using simple evaporation of montmorillonite solutions. The particles stick to the surface by strong van der Waals forces. The homogeneity of the montmorillonite particle surfaces has been evaluated by AFM imaging and by AFM force raster measurements. As a control, molecularly smooth mica surfaces were used, and the data obtained for montmorillonite was compared with the data obtained for mica. In images of the size 100x100 nm we can identify variations on the Na-montmorillonite particle surfaces. This variation is attributed to inhomogeneities of the montmorillonite particles. The inhomogeneous nature of the montmorillonite surface is also clearly demonstrated by the force raster measurement, in particular the force raster adhesion maps show larger variations and a more patterned structure for montmorillonite than for mica. Thus, any attempt to model the interaction between montmorillonite particles using a model of ideally flat surfaces with a homogeneous charge distribution is an oversimplification. We suggest that this explains the differences between measured swelling pressures and modelling results

  1. Analysis the effect of different geometries of AFM's cantilever on the dynamic behavior and the critical forces of three-dimensional manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Saraie, Maniya B.; Saraee, Mahdieh B.

    2017-01-01

    An important challenge when using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is to be able to control the force exerted by the AFM for performing various tasks. Nevertheless, the exerted force is proportional to the deflection of the AFM cantilever, which itself is affected by a cantilever's stiffness coefficient. Many papers have been published so far on the methods of obtaining the stiffness coefficients of AFM cantilevers in 2D; however, a comprehensive model is yet to be presented on 3D cantilever motion. The discrepancies between the equations of the 2D and 3D analysis are due to the number and direction of forces and moments that are applied to a cantilever. Moreover, in the 3D analysis, contrary to the 2D analysis, due to the interaction between the forces and moments applied on a cantilever, its stiffness values cannot be separately expressed for each direction; and instead, a stiffness matrix should be used to correctly derive the relevant equations. In this paper, 3D stiffness coefficient matrices have been obtained for three common cantilever geometries including the rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The obtained equations are validated by two methods. In the first approach, the Finite Element Method is combined with the cantilever deflection values computed by using the obtained stiffness matrices. In the second approach, by reducing the problem's parameters, the forces applied on a cantilever along different directions are compared with each other in 2D and 3D cases. Then the 3D manipulation of a stiff nanoparticle is modeled and simulated by using the stiffness matrices obtained for the three cantilever geometries. The obtained results indicate that during the manipulation process, the dagger-shaped and rectangular cantilevers exert the maximum and minimum amounts of forces on the stiff nanoparticle, respectively. Also, by examining the effects of different probe tip geometries, it is realized that a probe tip of cylindrical geometry

  2. Analysis the effect of different geometries of AFM's cantilever on the dynamic behavior and the critical forces of three-dimensional manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad, E-mail: hkorayem@iust.ac.ir; Saraie, Maniya B.; Saraee, Mahdieh B.

    2017-04-15

    An important challenge when using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is to be able to control the force exerted by the AFM for performing various tasks. Nevertheless, the exerted force is proportional to the deflection of the AFM cantilever, which itself is affected by a cantilever's stiffness coefficient. Many papers have been published so far on the methods of obtaining the stiffness coefficients of AFM cantilevers in 2D; however, a comprehensive model is yet to be presented on 3D cantilever motion. The discrepancies between the equations of the 2D and 3D analysis are due to the number and direction of forces and moments that are applied to a cantilever. Moreover, in the 3D analysis, contrary to the 2D analysis, due to the interaction between the forces and moments applied on a cantilever, its stiffness values cannot be separately expressed for each direction; and instead, a stiffness matrix should be used to correctly derive the relevant equations. In this paper, 3D stiffness coefficient matrices have been obtained for three common cantilever geometries including the rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The obtained equations are validated by two methods. In the first approach, the Finite Element Method is combined with the cantilever deflection values computed by using the obtained stiffness matrices. In the second approach, by reducing the problem's parameters, the forces applied on a cantilever along different directions are compared with each other in 2D and 3D cases. Then the 3D manipulation of a stiff nanoparticle is modeled and simulated by using the stiffness matrices obtained for the three cantilever geometries. The obtained results indicate that during the manipulation process, the dagger-shaped and rectangular cantilevers exert the maximum and minimum amounts of forces on the stiff nanoparticle, respectively. Also, by examining the effects of different probe tip geometries, it is realized that a probe tip of cylindrical geometry

  3. Remembering tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memory aids; Alzheimer disease - remembering tips; Early memory loss - remembering tips; Dementia - remembering tips ... active: Read a lot if you have trouble remembering words. Keep a dictionary close by. Take part ...

  4. Simultaneous AFM nano-patterning and imaging for photomask repair

    OpenAIRE

    Keyvani, A.; Tamer, M.S.; Es, M.H. van; Sadeghian Marnani, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a new AFM based nano-patterning technique that can be used for fast defect repairing of high resolution photomasks and possibly other high-speed nano-patterning applications. The proposed method works based on hammering the sample with tapping mode AFM followed by wet cleaning of the residuals. On the area where a specific pattern should be written, the tip-sample interaction force is tuned in a controlled manner by changing the excitation frequency of the cantilever ...

  5. Tips for TIPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is one of the most technically challenging procedures in interventional radiology. During the procedure, interventional radiologists (IRs) insert very thin and long instruments through a little incision in the patient’s neck. They

  6. Reconfiguration of the multiwavelength operation of optical fiber ring lasers by the modifiable intra-cavity induced losses of an in-fiber tip probe modal Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salceda-Delgado, G.; Martinez-Rios, A.; Sierra-Hernandez, J. M.; Rodríguez-Carreón, V. C.; Toral-Acosta, D.; Selvas-Aguilar, R.; Álvarez-Tamayo, R. I.; Castillo-Guzman, A. A.; Rojas-Laguna, R.

    2018-03-01

    A straightforward and versatile method for switching from single to different multiwavelength laser emission in ring cavity fiber lasers is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The method is based on using the changeable interference pattern from an optical fiber modal Michelson interferometer as a wavelength selective filter into the ring cavity laser. The interferometer is constructed using a bi-conical tapered fiber and a single-mode fiber segment, with these being spliced together to form an optical fiber tip probe. When the length of the single-mode fiber piece is modified, the phase difference between the interfering modes of the interferometer causes a change in the interferometer free spectral range. As a consequence, the laser intra-cavity losses lead to gain competition, which allows us to adjust the number of simultaneously generated laser lines. A multiwavelength reconfiguration of the laser from one up to a maximum of eight emission lines was obtained, with a maximum SNR of around 47 dBm.

  7. Nanopatterning on silicon surface using atomic force microscopy with diamond-like carbon (DLC-coated Si probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jingfang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atomic force microscope (AFM equipped with diamond-like carbon (DLC-coated Si probe has been used for scratch nanolithography on Si surfaces. The effect of scratch direction, applied tip force, scratch speed, and number of scratches on the size of the scratched geometry has been investigated. The size of the groove differs with scratch direction, which increases with the applied tip force and number of scratches but decreases slightly with scratch speed. Complex nanostructures of arrays of parallel lines and square arrays are further fabricated uniformly and precisely on Si substrates at relatively high scratch speed. DLC-coated Si probe has the potential to be an alternative in AFM-based scratch nanofabrication on hard surfaces.

  8. AFM cantilever with in situ renewable mercury microelectrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter Manfred; Geerlings, J.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Sarajlic, Edin

    2013-01-01

    We report here first results obtained on a novel, in situ renewable mercury microelectrode integrated into an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. Our approach is based on a fountain pen probe with appropriate dimensions enabling reversible filling with(nonwetting) mercury under changing the

  9. Nanofabrication of magnetic scanned-probe microscope sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, B K

    2001-01-01

    experiments were carried out under ambient conditions. The experiments required no extra preparation to be done to the specimen before imaging and measurements were carried out under ambient conditions. These probes offer the prospect of direct magnetic field measurement, non- invasiveness, very close proximity, possible local manipulation, better control over the tip- specimen interaction distance and topographic imaging. It is hoped that these magnetic microscope probes will be of great interest and general utility for academic and industrial magneticians. This thesis presents the development of novel magnetic sensor combined with Atomic Force Microscope probe (AFM) using conventional semiconductor processing techniques and Electron Beam Lithography (EBL). The fabrication of these magnetic sensors was performed on a common micromachined silicon substrate using a generic batch fabrication technique. Sub-micron Hall bar for Scanning Hall probe Microscopy (SHPM) and electromagnetic force coil magnet for Scanni...

  10. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ... tv tip-overs. The force of a large television falling from tipping furniture can be staggering. A ...

  11. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... en español Blog About OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by ... danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe ...

  12. Robust operation and performance of integrated carbon nanotubes atomic force microscopy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rius, G; Clark, I T; Yoshimura, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a complete characterization of carbon nanotubes-atomic force microscopy (CNT-AFM) probes to evaluate the cantilever operation and advanced properties originating from the CNTs. The fabrication consists of silicon probes tip-functionalized with multiwalled CNTs by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A dedicated methodology has been defined to evaluate the effect of CNT integration into the Si cantilevers. The presence of the CNTs provides enhanced capability for sensing and durability, as demonstrated using dynamic and static modes, e.g. imaging, indentation and force/current characterization.

  13. Scaling law to determine peak forces in tapping-mode AFM experiments on finite elastic soft matter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Horacio V

    2017-01-01

    Analytical equations to estimate the peak force will facilitate the interpretation and the planning of amplitude-modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) experiments. A closed-form analytical equation to estimate the tip-sample peak forces while imaging soft materials in liquid environment and within an elastic deformation regime has been deduced. We have combined a multivariate regression method with input from the virial-dissipation equations and Tatara's bidimensional deformation contact mechanics model. The equation enables to estimate the peak force based on the tapping mode observables, probe characteristics and the material properties of the sample. The accuracy of the equation has been verified by comparing it to numerical simulations for the archetypical operating conditions to image soft matter with high spatial resolution in tapping-mode AFM.

  14. Fast and controlled fabrication of porous graphene oxide: application of AFM tapping for mechano-chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Liangyong; Korobko, Alexander V.; Bus, Marcel; Boshuizen, Bart; Sudhölter, Ernst J. R.; Besseling, Nicolaas A. M.

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes a novel method to fabricate porous graphene oxide (PGO) from GO by exposure to oxygen plasma. Compared to other methods to fabricate PGO described so far, e.g. the thermal and steam etching methods, oxygen plasma etching method is much faster. We studied the development of the porosity with exposure time using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that the development of PGO upon oxygen-plasma exposure can be controlled by tapping mode AFM scanning using a Si tip. AFM tapping stalls the growth of pores upon further plasma exposure at a level that coincides with the fraction of sp2 carbons in the GO starting material. We suggest that AFM tapping procedure changes the bond structure of the intermediate PGO structure, and these stabilized PGO structures cannot be further etched by oxygen plasma. This constitutes the first report of tapping AFM as a tool for local mechano-chemistry.

  15. z calibration of the atomic force microscope by means of a pyramidal tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    A new method for imaging the probe tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever by the atomic force microscope itself (self-imaging) is presented. The self-imaging is accomplished by scanning the probe tip across a sharper tip on the surface. By using a pyramidal probe tip with a very well...

  16. AFM measurements on ferrous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ros Yáñez, T.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM has been successfully used for the characterisation of the surface topography of a very wide range of materials. The AFM is an interesting technique to study the surface of materials and specifically to study surface effects in steel, e.g. after polishing and/or after etching. This technique allows not only to study the topography of the samples, but it is also a useful tool to obtain structural details of surfaces and for the identification of different phases. In this paper, some applications are shown concerning the study of the microstructure of multiphase-steels.

    El Microcopio de Fuerza Atómica (AFM es utilizado en la caracterización topográfica de una gran variedad de materiales. El AFM es una interesante técnica para el estudio de la superficie de los aceros, ya sea con ataque químico o no. Esta técnica es también una útil herramienta para obtener detalles estructurales en las superficies y en la identificación de fases. En este trabajo algunas de estas aplicaciones son mostradas en el estudio de la microestructura de aceros multifásicos.

  17. AFM probing the mechanism of synergistic effects of the green tea polyphenol (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG with cefotaxime against extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidan Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae poses serious challenges to clinicians because of its resistance to many classes of antibiotics. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The mechanism of synergistic activity of a combination of (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG and β-lactam antibiotics cefotaxime was studied on Extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC, by visualizing the morphological alteration on the cell wall induced by the combination using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Cells at sub-MICs (sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of cefotaxime were initially filamentated but recovered to the normal shape later, whereas cells at sub-MICs of EGCG experienced temporal disturbance on the cell wall such as leakage and release of cellular debris and groove formation, but later recovered to the normal shape. In contrast, the combination of cefotaxime and EGCG at their respective sub-MICs induced permanent cellular damages as well as continuous elongation in cells and eventually killed them. Flow cytometry showed that intracellular oxidative stress levels in the cell treated with a combination of EGCG and cefotaxime at sub-MICs were higher than those in the cells treated with either cefotaxime or EGCG at sub-MICs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the synergistic effect of EGCG between EGCG and cefotaxime against ESBL-EC is related to cooperative activity of exogenous and endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by EGCG and cefotaxime, respectively.

  18. Determination of the attractive force, adhesive force, adhesion energy and Hamaker constant of soot particles generated from a premixed methane/oxygen flame by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Song, Chonglin; Lv, Gang; Chen, Nan; Zhou, Hua; Jing, Xiaojun

    2018-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the attractive force, adhesive force and adhesion energy between an AFM probe tip and nanometric soot particle generated by a premixed methane/oxygen flame. Different attractive force distributions were found when increasing the height above burner (HAB), with forces ranging from 1.1-3.5 nN. As the HAB was increased, the average attractive force initially increased, briefly decreased, and then underwent a gradual increase, with a maximum of 2.54 nN observed at HAB = 25 mm. The mean adhesive force was 6.5-7.5 times greater than the mean attractive force at the same HAB, and values were in the range of 13.5-24.5 nN. The adhesion energy was in the range of 2.0-5.6 × 10-17 J. The variations observed in the average adhesion energy with increasing HAB were different from those of the average adhesion force, implying that the stretched length of soot particles is an important factor affecting the average adhesion energy. The Hamaker constants of the soot particles generated at different HABs were determined from AFM force-separation curves. The average Hamaker constant exhibited a clear correlation with the graphitization degree of soot particles as obtained from Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  20. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food ... 395,755 views 9:28 3 Tips for Sleeping With a CPAP - Duration: 2:02. WebMD 66, ...

  1. Breaking the Time Barrier in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Fast Free Force Reconstruction Using the G-Mode Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Ahmadi, Mahshid; Wu, Ting; Hu, Bin; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2017-09-26

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers unparalleled insight into structure and material functionality across nanometer length scales. However, the spatial resolution afforded by the AFM tip is counterpoised by slow detection speeds compared to other common microscopy techniques (e.g., optical, scanning electron microscopy, etc.). In this work, we develop an ultrafast AFM imaging approach allowing direct reconstruction of the tip-sample forces with ∼3 order of magnitude higher time resolution than is achievable using standard AFM detection methods. Fast free force recovery (F 3 R) overcomes the widely viewed temporal bottleneck in AFM, that is, the mechanical bandwidth of the cantilever, enabling time-resolved imaging at sub-bandwidth speeds. We demonstrate quantitative recovery of electrostatic forces with ∼10 μs temporal resolution, free from influences of the cantilever ring-down. We further apply the F 3 R method to Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements. F 3 R-KPFM is an open loop imaging approach (i.e., no bias feedback), allowing ultrafast surface potential measurements (e.g., <20 μs) to be performed at regular KPFM scan speeds. F 3 R-KPFM is demonstrated for exploration of ion migration in organometallic halide perovskite materials and shown to allow spatiotemporal imaging of positively charged ion migration under applied electric field, as well as subsequent formation of accumulated charges at the perovskite/electrode interface. In this work, we demonstrate quantitative F 3 R-KPFM measurements-however, we fully expect the F 3 R approach to be valid for all modes of noncontact AFM operation, including noninvasive probing of ultrafast electrical and magnetic dynamics.

  2. Finite element modeling of trolling-mode AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Mohammadreza; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Vossoughi, Gholamreza

    2018-03-14

    Trolling mode atomic force microscopy (TR-AFM) has overcome many imaging problems in liquid environments by considerably reducing the liquid-resonator interaction forces. The finite element model of the TR-AFM resonator considering the effects of fluid and nanoneedle flexibility is presented in this research, for the first time. The model is verified by ABAQUS software. The effect of installation angle of the microbeam relative to the horizon and the effect of fluid on the system behavior are investigated. Using the finite element model, frequency response curve of the system is obtained and validated around the frequency of the operating mode by the available experimental results, in air and liquid. The changes in the natural frequencies in the presence of liquid are studied. The effects of tip-sample interaction on the excitation of higher order modes of the system are also investigated in air and liquid environments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. BOREAS AFM-11 Aircraft Flux Analysis Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reports from the BOREAS AFM-11 team regarding quality control and sampling analysis of data collected by other AFM personnel using the Electra, LongEZ, and Twin...

  4. Direct Probing of Polarization Charge at Nanoscale Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Owoong [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Seol, Daehee [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Lee, Dongkyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Han, Hee [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela [Univ. of Cologne (Germany). Physics Inst.; Lee, Woo [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Jesse, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Alexe, Marin [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kim, Yunseok [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering

    2017-11-14

    Ferroelectric materials possess spontaneous polarization that can be used for multiple applications. Owing to a long-term development of reducing the sizes of devices, the preparation of ferroelectric materials and devices is entering the nanometer-scale regime. In order to evaluate the ferroelectricity, there is a need to investigate the polarization charge at the nanoscale. Nonetheless, it is generally accepted that the detection of polarization charges using a conventional conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) without a top electrode is not feasible because the nanometer-scale radius of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip yields a very low signal-to-noise ratio. But, the detection is unrelated to the radius of an AFM tip and, in fact, a matter of the switched area. In this work, the direct probing of the polarization charge at the nanoscale is demonstrated using the positive-up-negative-down method based on the conventional CAFM approach without additional corrections or circuits to reduce the parasitic capacitance. The polarization charge densities of 73.7 and 119.0 µC cm-2 are successfully probed in ferroelectric nanocapacitors and thin films, respectively. The results we obtained show the feasibility of the evaluation of polarization charge at the nanoscale and provide a new guideline for evaluating the ferroelectricity at the nanoscale.

  5. Functionalization of gold and nanocrystalline diamond atomic force microscope tips for single molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Michael E.

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has fueled interest in nanotechnology because of its ability to image surfaces at the nanometer level and act as a molecular force sensor. Functionalization of the surface of an AFM tip surface in a stable, controlled manner expands the capabilities of the AFM and enables additional applications in the fields of single molecule force spectroscopy and nanolithography. Two AFM tip functionalizations are described: the assembly of tripodal molecular tips onto gold AFM tips and the photochemical attachment of terminal alkenes to nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) AFM tips. Two separate tripodal molecules with different linker lengths and a monopodal molecule terminated with biotin were synthesized to attach to a gold AFM tip for single molecule force spectroscopy. The immobilization of these molecules was examined by contact angle measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. All three molecules displayed rupture forces that agreed with previously reported values for the biotin--avidin rupture. The tripodal molecular tip displayed narrower distribution in their force histograms than the monopodal molecular tip. The performance of the tripodal molecular tip was compared to the monopodal molecular tip in single molecule force spectroscopy studies. Over repeated measurements, the distribution of forces for the monopodal molecular tip shifted to lower forces, whereas the distribution for the tripodal molecular tip remained constant throughout. Loading rate dependence and control experiments further indicated that the rupture forces of the tripod molecular tips were specific to the biotin--NeutrAvidin interaction. The second functionalization method used the photochemical attachment of undecylenic acid to NCD AFM tips. The photochemical attachment of undecylenic acid to hydrogen-terminated NCD wafer surfaces was investigated by contact angle measurements, x

  6. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  7. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... make your opinion count. Sign in Loading... Loading... Transcript The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... ... Dan Uses CPAP - Duration: 4:17. Harvard Medical School 7,950 views 4:17 Tips for building ...

  8. CPAP Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make your opinion count. Sign in Loading... Loading... Transcript The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... ... Dan Uses CPAP - Duration: 4:17. Harvard Medical School 7,950 views 4:17 Tips for building ...

  9. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash format. Almost ... accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a large television ...

  10. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. About 16,000 (mostly young children) were treated in emergency rooms for tip-over related injuries in 2006, that’s about four times more injuries ...

  11. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch ... reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of ...

  12. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... third story of a building. That kind of impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit ...

  13. A diamond-based scanning probe spin sensor operating at low temperature in ultra-high vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer-Nolte, E; Reinhard, F; Ternes, M; Wrachtrup, J; Kern, K

    2014-01-01

    We present the design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) low temperature scanning probe microscope employing the nitrogen-vacancy color center in diamond as an ultrasensitive magnetic field sensor. Using this center as an atomic-size scanning probe has enabled imaging of nanoscale magnetic fields and single spins under ambient conditions. In this article we describe an experimental setup to operate this sensor in a cryogenic UHV environment. This will extend the applicability to a variety of molecular systems due to the enhanced target spin lifetimes at low temperature and the controlled sample preparation under UHV conditions. The instrument combines a tuning-fork based atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high numeric aperture confocal microscope and the facilities for application of radio-frequency (RF) fields for spin manipulation. We verify a sample temperature of <50 K even for strong laser and RF excitation and demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging with a magnetic AFM tip.

  14. Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

    2011-07-01

    Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

  15. Multi-dimensional modelling of electrostatic force distance curve over dielectric surface: Influence of tip geometry and correlation with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boularas, A., E-mail: boularas@laplace.univ-tlse.fr; Baudoin, F.; Villeneuve-Faure, C. [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Clain, S. [Universidade do Minho, Centro de Matemática, Campus de Gualtar, 4710 - 057 Braga (Portugal); Université Paul Sabatier, Institut de Mathématiques de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse (France); Teyssedre, G. [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31071 Toulouse (France)

    2014-08-28

    Electric Force-Distance Curves (EFDC) is one of the ways whereby electrical charges trapped at the surface of dielectric materials can be probed. To reach a quantitative analysis of stored charge quantities, measurements using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) must go with an appropriate simulation of electrostatic forces at play in the method. This is the objective of this work, where simulation results for the electrostatic force between an AFM sensor and the dielectric surface are presented for different bias voltages on the tip. The aim is to analyse force-distance curves modification induced by electrostatic charges. The sensor is composed by a cantilever supporting a pyramidal tip terminated by a spherical apex. The contribution to force from cantilever is neglected here. A model of force curve has been developed using the Finite Volume Method. The scheme is based on the Polynomial Reconstruction Operator—PRO-scheme. First results of the computation of electrostatic force for different tip–sample distances (from 0 to 600 nm) and for different DC voltages applied to the tip (6 to 20 V) are shown and compared with experimental data in order to validate our approach.

  16. Magnetic scanning gate microscopy of a domain wall nanosensor using microparticle probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corte-León, H., E-mail: hector.corte@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Royal Holloway University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Gribkov, B. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Krzysteczko, P. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig D-38116 (Germany); Marchi, F.; Motte, J.-F. [University of Grenoble Alpes, Inst. NEEL, Grenoble F-38042 (France); CNRS, Inst. NEEL, Grenoble F-38042 (France); Schumacher, H.W. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig D-38116 (Germany); Antonov, V. [Royal Holloway University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Kazakova, O. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    We apply the magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM) technique to study the interaction between a magnetic bead (MB) and a domain wall (DW) trapped in an L-shaped magnetic nanostructure. Magnetic SGM is performed using a custom-made probe, comprising a hard magnetic NdFeB bead of diameter 1.6 µm attached to a standard silicon tip. The MB–DW interaction is detected by measuring changes in the electrical resistance of the device as a function of the tip position. By scanning at different heights, we create a 3D map of the MB–DW interaction and extract the sensing volume for different widths of the nanostructure's arms. It is shown that for 50 nm wide devices the sensing volume is a cone of 880 nm in diameter by 1.4 µm in height, and reduces down to 800 nm in height for 100 nm devices with almost no change in its diameter. - Highlights: • AFM tips with a magnetic bead attached used to test interaction with domain wall. • Domain wall inside a nanostructure affect the electrical resistance. • Recording electrical resistance while scanning with modified AFM probe. • Change of resistance as a function of the position of the magnetic bead. • This allows comparing different devices in a reproducible and controllable way.

  17. AFM measurements of novel solar cells. Studying electronic properties of Si-based radial junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hývl, Matěj

    -, č. 1 (2014), s. 52-53 ISSN 1439-4243 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA ČR GA13-12386S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM measurements * conductive cantilever * electronic properties * nanowires * PF TUNA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.imaging-git.com/science/ scanning - probe -microscopy/afm-measurements-novel-solar-cells

  18. Controlled AFM manipulation of small nanoparticles and assembly of hybrid nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suenne; Shafiei, Farbod; Ratchford, Daniel; Li Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controlled manipulation of semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles (NPs) with 5-15 nm diameters and assemble these NPs into hybrid structures. The manipulation is accomplished under ambient environment using a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM). There are particular difficulties associated with manipulating NPs this small. In addition to spatial drift, the shape of an asymmetric AFM tip has to be taken into account in order to understand the intended and actual manipulation results. Furthermore, small NPs often attach to the tip via electrostatic interaction and modify the effective tip shape. We suggest a method for detaching the NPs by performing a pseudo-manipulation step. Finally, we show by example the ability to assemble these small NPs into prototypical hybrid nanostructures with well-defined composition and geometry.

  19. An oligogalacturonide-derived molecular probe demonstrates the dynamics of calcium-mediated pectin complexation in cell walls of tip-growing structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Rydahl, Maja Gro

    2017-01-01

    -mediated binding of fluorescently tagged long oligogalacturonides (OGs) with endogenous de-esterified HG. We established that more than seven galacturonic acid residues in the HG chain are required to form a stable complex with endogenous HG through calcium complexation in situ, confirming a recently suggested...... thermodynamic model. Using defined carbohydrate microarrays, we show that the long OG probe binds exclusively to HG that has a very low degree of esterification and in the presence of divalent ions. We used this probe to study real-time dynamics of HG during elongation of Arabidopsis pollen tubes and root hairs...

  20. Sub-diffraction nano manipulation using STED AFM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenu Varghese Chacko

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, nano manipulation has been recognized as a potential tool of scientific interest especially in nanotechnology and nano-robotics. Contemporary optical microscopy (super resolution techniques have also reached the nanometer scale resolution to visualize this and hence a combination of super resolution aided nano manipulation ineluctably gives a new perspective to the scenario. Here we demonstrate how specificity and rapid determination of structures provided by stimulated emission depletion (STED microscope can aid another microscopic tool with capability of mechanical manoeuvring, like an atomic force microscope (AFM to get topological information or to target nano scaled materials. We also give proof of principle on how high-resolution real time visualization can improve nano manipulation capability within a dense sample, and how STED-AFM is an optimal combination for this job. With these evidences, this article points to future precise nano dissections and maybe even to a nano-snooker game with an AFM tip and fluorospheres.

  1. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software Package Gxsm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahl P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2009-08-10

    Gxsm is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected toan instrument, it is operating many different avors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy(STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) or in general two-dimensional multi channel data acquisition instruments. The Gxsm core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and oating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor (DSP) subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable Gxsm vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) or tip formation. The Gxsm software is released under the GNU general public license (GPL) and can be obtained via the Internet.

  2. Noise reduction by sparse representation in learned dictionaries for application to blind tip reconstruction problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jóźwiak, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a well known tool used for the investigation of phenomena in objects in the nanometer size range. However, quantitative results are limited by the size and the shape of the nanoprobe used in experiments. Blind tip reconstruction (BTR) is a very popular method used to reconstruct the upper boundary on the shape of the probe. This method is known to be very sensitive to all kinds of interference in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image. Due to mathematical morphology calculus, the interference makes the BTR results biased rather than randomly disrupted. For this reason, the careful choice of methods used for image enhancement and denoising, as well as the shape of a calibration sample are very important. In the paper, the results of thorough investigations on the shape of a calibration standard are shown. A novel shape is proposed and a tool for the simulation of AFM images of this calibration standard was designed. It was shown that careful choice of the initial tip allows us to use images of hole structures to blindly reconstruct the shape of a probe. The simulator was used to test the impact of modern filtration algorithms on the BTR process. These techniques are based on sparse approximation with function dictionaries learned on the basis of an image itself. Various learning algorithms and parameters were tested to determine the optimal combination for sparse representation. It was observed that the strong reduction of noise does not guarantee strong reduction in reconstruction errors. It seems that further improvements will be possible by the combination of BTR and a noise reduction procedure. (paper)

  3. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter ... Security, and Legal Notice | Accessibility Policy | Open Government @ CPSC | ...

  4. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of nanoparticle releasing in AFM nanomanipulation using high voltage electrostatic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghattan Kashani, H.; Shokrolahi, S.; Akbari Moayyer, H.; Shariat Panahi, M.; Shahmoradi Zavareh, A.

    2017-07-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) have been widely used as nanomanipulators due to their versatility to work with a broad range of materials and their controllable interaction force, among other features. While AFMs can effectively grasp, move, and position nanoscale objects in 2D environments through basic pull/push operations, they often lack the high precision required in many 3D pick and place applications, especially in non-vacuum environments. In this study, a novel method to resolve the adhesion problem between nanoscale objects and the AFM tip has been developed and tested. The method is based on the application of a high electrostatic voltage to the tip to produce the repulsive force required for the release of the nanoobject. The method is proposed for conductive nanoparticles and tips used in many nanomanipulation applications, and can be easily implemented on typical AFMs with minimal alterations. The applicability of the proposed method is investigated through a series of combined Molecular Dynamics/Finite Element simulations.

  6. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonergan, N.E.; Britt, L.D.; Sullivan, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-L-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-L-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane stabilization while

  7. Computerized automatic tip scanning operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Fukushima, T.; Nakai, H.; Yanagisawa, A.

    1984-01-01

    In BWR nuclear power stations the Traversing Incore Probe (TIP) system is one of the most important components in reactor monitoring and control. In previous TIP systems, however, operators have suffered from the complexity of operation and long operation time required. The system presented in this paper realizes the automatic operation of the TIP system by monitoring and driving it with a process computer. This system significantly reduces the burden on customer operators and improves plant efficiency by simplifying the operating procedure, augmenting the accuracy of the measured data, and shortening operating time. The process computer is one of the PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information Automation) systems. This computer transfers control signals to the TIP control panel, which in turn drives equipment by microprocessor control. The process computer contains such components as the CRT/KB unit, the printer plotter, the hard copier, and the message typers required for efficient man-machine communications. Its operation and interface properties are described

  8. Tip enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    This book discusses the recent advances in the area of near-field Raman scattering, mainly focusing on tip-enhanced and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Some of the key features covered here are the optical structuring and manipulations, single molecule sensitivity, analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, and analytic applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. This book also discusses the plasmonic materials for better enhancement, and optical antennas. Further, near-field microscopy based on second harmonic generation is also discussed. Chapters have been written by some of the leading scientists in this field, who present some of their recent work in this field.·Near-field Raman scattering·Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Nano-photonics·Nanoanalysis of Physical, chemical and biological materials beyond the diffraction limits·Single molecule detection

  9. AFM image of an entire polygene chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Minqian; Takeuchi; Ikai, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author present AFM images of an entire polygene chromosome of Drosophila for the first time. Comparing with conventional optical microscope, the AFM image of the polygene chromosomes provides much higher resolution and 3-D measurement capability which will lead to finer scale gene mapping and identification

  10. Assessing Biological Samples with Scanning Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A.

    Scanning probe microscopes raster-scan an atomic scale sensor across an object. The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) uses an electron beam focused on a few Å, and measures the electron scattering power of the irradiated column of sample matter. Not only does the STEM create dark-filed images of superb clarity, but it also delivers the mass of single protein complexes within a range of 100 kDa to 100 MDa. The STEM appears to be the tool of choice to achieve high-throughput visual proteomics of single cells. In contrast, atomically sharp tips sample the object surface in the scanning tunneling microscope as well as the atomic force microscopes (AFM). Because the AFM can be operated on samples submerged in a physiological salt solution, biomacromolecules can be observed at work. Recent experiments provided new insights into the organization of different native biological membranes, and allowed molecular interaction forces, that determine protein folds and ligand binding, to be measured.

  11. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Roder

    Full Text Available Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy.

  12. High-Resolution Magnetic Force Microscopy Using Carbon Nanotube Probes Fabricated Directly by Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Tanaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been successfully grown on the tip apex of an atomic force microscopy (AFM cantilever by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM observations reveal that the diameter of the CNTs is ∼30 nm and the magnetic particles with diameter of ∼20 nm, which was used as catalyst for the CNT growth, exist on the top. This CNT probe has been applied to magnetic force microscopy (MFM on the ultrahigh-density magnetic recording media with 1200 kilo flux change per inch (kfci.

  13. Design of cantilever probes for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    keeping the stiffness constant. The resulting design of the beam from the latter optimization gives almost the same result as when maximizing the first eigenfrequency. Adding a restriction on the second eigenfrequency result in a significant change of the optimal design. The beam is modelled with 12 DOF...

  14. Nonlinear Phenomena in the Single-Mode Dynamics in an AFM Cantilever Beam

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura

    2016-12-05

    This study deals with the nonlinear dynamics arising in an atomic force microscope cantilever beam. After analyzing the static behavior, a single degree of freedom Galerkin reduced order model is introduced, which describes the overall scenario of the structure response in a neighborhood of the primary resonance. Extensive numerical simulations are performed when both the forcing amplitude and frequency are varied, ranging from low up to elevated excitations. The coexistence of competing attractors with different characteristics is analyzed. Both the non-resonant and the resonant behavior are observed, as well as ranges of inevitable escape. Versatility of behavior is highlighted, which may be attractive in applications. Special attention is devoted to the effects of the tip-sample separation distance, since this aspect is of fundamental importance to understand the operation of an AFM. We explore the metamorphoses of the multistability region when the tip-sample separation distance is varied. To have a complete description of the AFM response, comprehensive behavior charts are introduced to detect the theoretical boundaries of appearance and disappearance of the main attractors. Also, extensive numerical simulations investigate the AFM response when both the forcing amplitude and the tip-sample separation distance are considered as control parameters. The main features are analyzed in detail and the obtained results are interpreted in terms of oscillations of the cantilever-tip ensemble. However, we note that all the aforementioned results represent the limit when disturbances are absent, which never occurs in practice. Here comes the importance of overcoming local investigations and exploring dynamics from a global perspective, by introducing dynamical integrity concepts. To extend the AFM results to the practical case where disturbances exist, we develop a dynamical integrity analysis. After performing a systematic basin of attraction analysis, integrity

  15. Refining the statistical model for quantitative immunostaining of surface-functionalized nanoparticles by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCuspie, Robert I; Gorka, Danielle E

    2013-10-01

    Recently, an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based approach for quantifying the number of biological molecules conjugated to a nanoparticle surface at low number densities was reported. The number of target molecules conjugated to the analyte nanoparticle can be determined with single nanoparticle fidelity using antibody-mediated self-assembly to decorate the analyte nanoparticles with probe nanoparticles (i.e., quantitative immunostaining). This work refines the statistical models used to quantitatively interpret the observations when AFM is used to image the resulting structures. The refinements add terms to the previous statistical models to account for the physical sizes of the analyte nanoparticles, conjugated molecules, antibodies, and probe nanoparticles. Thus, a more physically realistic statistical computation can be implemented for a given sample of known qualitative composition, using the software scripts provided. Example AFM data sets, using horseradish peroxidase conjugated to gold nanoparticles, are presented to illustrate how to implement this method successfully.

  16. Characteristics of a single-channel superconducting flux flow transistor fabricated by an AFM modification technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seokcheol; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2007-01-01

    The demand for high performance, integrity, and miniaturization in the area of electronic and mechanic devices has drawn interest in the fabrication of nanostructures. However, it is difficult to fabricate the channel with nano-scale using a conventional photography techniques. AFM anodization technique is a maskless process and effective method to overcome the difficulty in fabricating a nano-scale channel. In this paper, we first present a new fabrication of a single-channel SFFT using a selective oxidation process induced by an AFM probe. The modified channel was investigated by electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) to find the compositional variation of the transformed region. In order to confirm the operation of a single-channel SFFT, we measured the voltage-current characteristics at the temperature of liquid nitrogen by an I-V automatic measurement system. Our results indicate that the single-channel SFFT having effect as a weak link is effectively fabricated by an AFM lithography process

  17. In Situ STM and AFM of the Copper Protein Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Esben P.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Madsen, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    Scanning tunnel (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the in situ mode under potentiostatic control have opened new perspectives for mapping the two-dimensional organization of surface adsorbates in aqueous solution. In situ STM and AFM, however, also raise recognized problems. In the context...... exponentially with increasing distance with a decay constant of 0.4–0.5 Å−1. In comparison in situ AFM shows structures laterally convoluted with the tip while the vertical extension is in the same range as the structural size of azurin. The results are of interest in relation to electron tunnel mechanisms...... of redox metalloproteins and in technological contexts such as electrochemical biosensors, microbial corrosion and broadly for protein adsorption from biological liquids....

  18. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it; Milani, Paolo [CIMaINa and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  19. Surface analysis with STM and AFM

    CERN Document Server

    Magonov, Sergi N

    1996-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are powerful tools for surface examination. In the past, many STM and AFM studies led to erroneous conclusions due to lack of proper theoretical considerations and of an understanding of how image patterns are affected by measurement conditions. For this book, two world experts, one on theoretical analysis and the other on experimental characterization, have joined forces to bring together essential components of STM and AFM studies: The practical aspects of STM, the image simulation by surface electron density plot calculat

  20. Controlled AFM detachments and movement of nanoparticles: gold clusters on HOPG at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Manoj; Paolicelli, Guido; D'Addato, Sergio; Valeri, Sergio

    2012-06-22

    The effect of temperature on the onset of movement of gold nanoclusters (diameter 27 nm) deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Using the AFM with amplitude modulation (tapping mode AFM) we have stimulated and controlled the movement of individual clusters. We show how, at room temperature, controlled detachments and smooth movements can be obtained for clusters having dimensions comparable to or smaller than the tip radius. Displacement is practically visible in real time and it can be started and stopped easily by adjusting only one parameter, the tip amplitude oscillation. Analysing the energy dissipation signal at the onset of nanocluster sliding we evaluated a detachment threshold energy as a function of temperature in the range 300-413 K. We also analysed single cluster thermal induced displacement and combining this delicate procedure with AFM forced movement behaviour we conclude that detachment threshold energy is directly related to the activation energy of nanocluster diffusion and it scales linearly with temperature as expected for a single-particle thermally activated process.

  1. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  2. Electrical characterisation of semiconductor structures using AFM techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac jr, J.; Kovac, J.; Hotovy, J.; Novotny, I.; Skriniarova, J.; Dutkova, E.; Balaz, P.

    2011-01-01

    The microscopic dimensions appear to be a fundamental limitation to many common measurement techniques. The use of Current-Atomic Force Microscopy (I-AFM) bids a possibility to acquire topography image along with the current flow mappings which can be lapped over in resulting image as presented in this paper. A current distribution on the ZnO surface of p-Si/n- ZnO diode structure with CdS or ZnS nanocrystalline quantum dot clusters at the interface has been measured. The resulting images show a conductivity mapping different from topography what induces a conductive channels at the edges of the ZnO grains. We have successfully used I-AFM method where conductive AFM tip is scanning over the surface of the sample to create a topography image along with a current flow mapping of p-Si substrate covered with CdS or ZnS nanocrystalline clusters overlapped by 100 nm thick n-ZnO layer. The measured current mappings of both samples revealed a formation of conductive channels between the clusters of quantum dots when the sample is forward biased. We are able to create 3D topography images of combined with the forward biased current mapping textures which gives complex information about local conductivity and using this method it should be possible to find hidden current leaks in the samples for example defects in most semiconductor materials. A drift current generated in p-n junction was recorded when the sample was reverse biased while the sample has been exposed to light. Possible UV light source should cause a higher reverse current due to high bandgap of ZnS clusters which is a motivation to further research. The devices fabricated from these structures have the potential applications for solar cells or broadband photodetectors. (authors)

  3. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Li, Chung-Hsing; Hung, Chang-Hsiang; Li, Hsi-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  4. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Chung-Hsing [Division of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chang-Hsiang [Department of Dentistry, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China); Li, Hsi-Hsin, E-mail: mhho@mail.ntust.edu.t [Deputy Superintendent, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  5. AFM stochastic analysis of surface twisted nanograin chains of iron oxide: a kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhavan, O; Azimirad, R

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the stochastic parameters of surface iron oxide nanograin chains, 97 nm in diameter and 2.4 μm in length, prepared at different annealing temperatures, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) spectral analysis. In this regard, the roughness of the thin films including self-assembled twisted nanograin chains has been analysed and characterized using the height-height correlation function, the roughness exponent as well as the power spectrum density of the AFM profiles and their gradient, for the different annealing temperatures. The tip convolution effect on the stochastic parameters under study has also been investigated. The kinetics of the formation of nanograins on the film surface has been obtained using the AFM spectral analysis of the profiles and their gradient. The activation energy needed for the formation of surface nanograin chains was found to be 0.55 eV. It has been shown that the tip-surface interaction affects mainly the diffusion parameters obtained by using the surface roughness analysis of the profiles, while use of the surface roughness analysis of the gradient of the profiles results in a nearly independent tip convolution effect on the diffusion parameters. Hence, this work also provides a method for calculating the required activation energy for the formation of self-assembled nanostructures affecting the roughness of a surface.

  6. AFM ve farmaceutické technologii 3.

    OpenAIRE

    Ščuryová, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Charles University in Prague Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Student: Veronika Ščuryová Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Pavel Doležal, CSc. Title of thesis: AFM in Pharmaceutical Technology 3 The theoretical part deals first with the construction of AFM microscope, the principle of the method, determining the surface topography and regimes which can be used. Described therein are distinct advantages over previous traditional methods but also its pitfalls. ...

  7. Prom Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Autumn Tips Camping Tips Family Reunions Gardening Tips Halloween Tips Healthy Halloween Prom Tips Spring Break Valentine Tips Winter Holiday ... Breast Cancer Assess Your Relationships Be Safe on Halloween Be Smoke-Free Check Alarm Batteries Know Your ...

  8. AFM capabilities in characterization of particles and surfaces: from angstroms to microns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostina, N; Brodsky, M; Prikhodko, S; Hoo, C M; Mecartney, M L; West, P

    2008-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM), invented 25 years ago, is now routinely employed as a surface characterization technique. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most widely used form of SPM, since AFM can be used in ambient conditions with minimal sample preparation. Examples of applications relevant to cosmetics include, but are not limited to, hair and skin roughness measurements and powder particle and nano-emulsion characterization. AFM is well suited for individual particle characterization, especially for measurements of volume, height, size, shape, aspect ratio, and particle surface morphology. Statistical distributions for a large set of particles can be generated through single-particle analysis techniques (i.e., ensemble-like information). AFM is better capable of resolving complex particle-size distributions than dynamic light-scattering (DLS). Single-particle analysis techniques with AFM can be more cost- and time-effective than analyses using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, AFM offers resolution that is comparable to or greater than SEM or transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and routinely allows direct measurements of the particle height and volume and produces images easily displayed in a quantified 3D format.

  9. Biomechanical Properties of Murine Meniscus Surface via AFM-based Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip ≈ 5 μm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction observed on 12-week old menisci. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD, and the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1 ± 0.8 MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean ± SEM, n = 13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4 ± 0.1 MPa, n = 6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models. PMID:25817332

  10. Determination of electrostatic potential distribution by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on model silica and alumina surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelken, Gulnihal Ozek; Polat, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy was employed to quantitatively determine the surface potential on silica and alumina surfaces immersed in aqueous electrolyte solutions at various pH values using the DLVO theory. • Potential distributions could be presented in the form of a potential map by repeating the procedure on multiple locations on these surfaces. • The average potential of the distributions agreed very well with the surface potentials measured by electrophoretic techniques. • Several experimental procedures required to achieve the very sensitive force measurements were outlined and demonstrated. - Abstract: AFM was employed as a physicochemical probe to determine the electrostatic potential distribution quantitatively on selected ideal oxide surfaces (quartz 0 0 0 1 and sapphire 0 0 0 1) in aqueous media. The force of interaction between a silicon nitride tip and the oxide surface was measured at a given point under well-defined solution conditions. Relevant theories were used to isolate the electrostatic component from the total force of interaction which was then employed to estimate the surface potential at that point. Repeating the procedure on selected locations generated a potential map of the surface. Comparison of these potentials with those obtained from independent electrokinetic measurements confirmed the validity of the approach

  11. Evaluation of the safety and efficiency of novel metallic ultrasonic scaler tip on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Shon, Won-Jun; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, Woo-Cheol; Park, Young-Seok

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficiency of novel ultrasonic scaler tips, conventional stainless-steel tips, and plastic tips on titanium surfaces. Mechanical instrumentation was carried out using conventional ultrasonic scalers (EMS, Nyon, Switzerland) with novel metallic implant tip (BS), a plastic-headed tip (ES), a plastic tip (PS) and a conventional stainless-steel tip (CS) on 10 polished commercially pure titanium disks (Grade II) per group. Arithmetic mean roughness (R(a) ) and maximum height roughness (R(y) ) of titanium samples were measured and dissipated power of the scaler tip in the tip-surface junction was estimated to investigate the scaling efficiency. The instrumented surface morphology of samples was viewed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface profile of the each sample was investigated using contact mode with a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM). There were no significant differences in surface roughness (R(a) and R(y) ) among BS, ES, and PS group. However, CS group showed significant higher surface roughness (R(a) and R(y) ). The efficiency of CS tip is twice as much higher than that of BS tip, the efficiency of BS tip is 20 times higher than that of PS tip, and the efficiency of BS tip is 90 times higher than that of ES tip. Novel metallic copper alloy ultrasonic scaler tips may minimally influence the titanium surface, similar to plastic tip. Therefore, they can be a suitable instrument for implant maintenance therapy. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Tips for Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips and Gadgets for Daily Activities Dressing Tips Shopping Tips Modifying the Bathroom Driving After Stroke Medication ... and resources. Find a group in your area . Online Support If there is not a support group ...

  13. Fabrication of oriented crystals as force measurement tips via focused ion beam and microlithography methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhigang [School of Science, North University of China, Shanxi 030051 China; Chun, Jaehun [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, WA USA; Chatterjee, Sayandev [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, WA USA; Li, Dongsheng [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, WA USA

    2017-11-09

    Detailed knowledge of the forces between nanocrystals is very crucial for understanding many generic (e.g., random aggregation/assembly and rheology) and specific (e.g., oriented attachment) phenomena at macroscopic length scales, especially considering the additional complexities involved in nanocrystals such as crystal orientation and corresponding orientation-dependent physicochemical properties. Because there are a limited number of methods to directly measure the forces, little is known about the forces that drive the various emergent phenomena. Here we report on two methods of preparing crystals as force measurement tips used in an atomic force microscope (AFM): the focused ion beam method and microlithography method. The desired crystals are fabricated using these two methods and are fixed to the AFM probe using platinum deposition, ultraviolet epoxy, or resin, which allows for the orientation-dependent force measurements. These two methods can be used to attach virtually any solid particles (from the size of a few hundreds of nanometers to millimeters). We demonstrate the force measurements between aqueous media under different conditions such as pH.

  14. Nonlinear mathematical modeling of vibrating motion of nanomechanical cantilever active probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghaderi

    Full Text Available Nonlinear vibration response of nanomechanical cantilever (NMC active probes in atomic force microscope (AFM application has been studied in the amplitude mode. Piezoelectric layer is placed piecewise and as an actuator on NMC. Continuous beam model has been chosen for analysis with regard to the geometric discontinuities of piezoelectric layer attachment and NMC's cross section. The force between the tip and the sample surface is modeled using Leonard-Jones potential. Assuming that cantilever is inclined to the sample surface, the effect of nonlinear force on NMC is considered as a shearing force and the concentrated bending moment is regarded at the end. Nonlinear frequency response of NMC is obtained close to the sample surface using the dynamic modeling. It is then become clear that the distance and angle of NMC, the probe length, and the geometric dimensions of piezoelectric layer can affect frequency response bending of the curve.

  15. Subcontinuum thermal transport in tip-based thermal engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamian, Sina

    For the past two decades, tip-based thermal engineering has made remarkable advances to realize unprecedented nanoscale thermal applications, such as thermomechanical data storage, thermophysical/chemical property characterization of materials in nanometer scale, and scanning thermal imaging and analysis. All these applications involve localized heating with elevated temperature, generally in the order of mean free paths of heat carriers, thus necessitates fundamental understanding of sub-continuum thermal transport across point constrictions and within thin films. Considering the demands, this dissertation is divided into three main scopes providing: (1) a numerical model that provides insight onto nanoscale thermal transport, (2) an electrothermal characterization of a heated microcantilever as a localized heating source, and (3) qualitative measurement of tip-substrate thermal transport using high resolution nanothermometer/heater. This dissertation starts with a literature review on the three aforementioned scopes followed by a numerical model for two-dimensional transient ballistic-diffusive heat transfer combining finite element analysis with discrete ordinate method (DOM-FEA), seeking to provide insight on subcontinuum thermal transport. The phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) under grey relaxation time approximation is solved for different Knudsen numbers. Next, a thermal microcantilever, as one of the main tools in tip-based thermal engineering, is characterized under periodic heating operation in air and vacuum using 3o technique. A three-dimensional FEA simulation of a thermal microcantilever is used to model heat transfer in frequency domain resulting in good agreement with the experiment. Next, quantitative thermal transport is measured by a home-built nanothermometer fabricated using combination of electron-beam lithography and photolithography. An atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is used to scan over the sensing probe of the

  16. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-09-11

    A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

  17. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  18. The detection of hepatitis c virus core antigen using afm chips with immobolized aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleshakova, T O; Kaysheva, A L; Bayzyanova, J М; Anashkina, А S; Uchaikin, V F; Ziborov, V S; Konev, V A; Archakov, A I; Ivanov, Y D

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, the possibility of hepatitis C virus core antigen (HCVcoreAg) detection in buffer solution, using atomic force microscope chip (AFM-chip) with immobilized aptamers, has been demonstrated. The target protein was detected in 1mL of solution at concentrations from 10 -10 М to 10 -13 М. The registration of aptamer/antigen complexes on the chip surface was carried out by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The further mass-spectrometric (MS) identification of AFM-registered objects on the chip surface allowed reliable identification of HCVcoreAg target protein in the complexes. Aptamers, which were designed for therapeutic purposes, have been shown to be effective in HCVcoreAg detection as probe molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrophobic attraction as revealed by AFM force measurements and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Keqing; Nguyen, Anh V; Miller, Jan D

    2005-07-14

    Spherical calcium dioleate particles ( approximately 10 mum in diameter) were used as AFM (atomic force microscope) probes to measure interaction forces of the collector colloid with calcite and fluorite surfaces. The attractive AFM force between the calcium dioleate sphere and the fluorite surface is strong and has a longer range than the DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) prediction. The AFM force between the calcium dioleate sphere and the mineral surfaces does not agree with the DLVO prediction. Consideration of non-DLVO forces, including the attractive hydrophobic force and the repulsive hydration force, was necessary to explain the experimental results. The non-DLVO interactions considered were justified by the different interfacial water structures at calcite- and fluorite-water interfaces as revealed by the numerical computation experiments with molecular dynamics simulation.

  20. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simons Janet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM. We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV, revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution.

  1. Measuring the force of single protein molecule detachment from surfaces with AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapikouni, Theodora S; Missirlis, Yannis F

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure the non-specific detachment force of single fibrinogen molecules from glass surfaces. The identification of single unbinding events was based on the characteristics of the parabolic curves, recorded during the stretching of protein molecules. Fibrinogen molecules were covalently bound to Si(3)N(4) AFM tips, previously modified with 3-aminopropyl-dimethyl-ethoxysilane, through a homobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) linker bearing two hydroxysulfosuccinimide esters. The most probable detachment force was found to be 210 pN, when the tip was retracting with a velocity of 1400 nm/s, while the distribution of the detachment distances indicated that the fibrinogen chain can be elongated beyond the length of the physical conformation before detachment. The dependence of the most probable detachment force on the loading rate was examined and the dynamics of fibrinogen binding to the surface were found amenable to the simple expression of the Bell-Evans theory. The theory's expansion, however, by incorporating the concept of the rupture of parallel residue-surface bonds could only describe the detachment of fibrinogen for a small number of such bonds. Finally, the mathematical expression of the Worm-Like Chain model was used to fit the stretching curves before rupture and two interpretations are suggested for the description of the AFM curves with multiple detachment events.

  2. AFM plough YBCO micro bridges: substrate effects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Elkaseh, A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AFM nanolithography was used as a novel cutting technique to define micro-size YBCO superconducting constrictions. Researchers studied the substrate effects on MgO and STO substrates and showed that the observed Shapiro steps from the bridges on STO...

  3. AFM-CMM integrated instrument user manual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, Francesco; Bariani, Paolo

    This manual gives general important guidelines for a proper use of the integrated AFM-CMM instrument. More information can be collected reading: • N. Kofod Ph.D thesis [1]; • P. Bariani Ph.D thesis [2]; • Dualscope DME 95-200 operation manuals [3]; • SPIP help [4] • Stitching software user manual...

  4. Ultra-Compact Multitip Scanning Probe Microscope with an Outer Diameter of 50 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, Vasily; Zubkov, Evgeny; Junker, Hubertus; Korte, Stefan; Blab, Marcus; Coenen, Peter; Voigtländer, Bert

    We present a multitip scanning tunneling microscope (STM) where four independent STM units are integrated on a diameter of 50 mm. The coarse positioning of the tips is done under the control of an optical microscope or an SEM in vacuum. The heart of this STM is a new type of piezoelectric coarse approach called Koala Drive which can have a diameter greater than 2.5 mm and a length smaller than 10 mm. Alternating movements of springs move a central tube which holds the STM tip or AFM sensor. This new operating principle provides a smooth travel sequence and avoids shaking which is intrinsically present for nanopositioners based on inertial motion with saw tooth driving signals. Inserting the Koala Drive in a piezo tube for xyz-scanning integrates a complete STM inside a 4 mm outer diameter piezo tube of Koala Drive makes the scanning probe microscopy design ultra-compact and accordingly leads to a high mechanical stability. The drive is UHV, low temperature, and magnetic field compatible. The compactness of the Koala Drive allows building a four-tip STM as small as a single-tip STM with a drift of Koala Drive.

  5. Invited review article: A 10 mK scanning probe microscopy facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Jae; Otte, Alexander F; Shvarts, Vladimir; Zhao, Zuyu; Kuk, Young; Blankenship, Steven R; Band, Alan; Hess, Frank M; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2010-12-01

    We describe the design, development and performance of a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) facility operating at a base temperature of 10 mK in magnetic fields up to 15 T. The microscope is cooled by a custom designed, fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible dilution refrigerator (DR) and is capable of in situ tip and sample exchange. Subpicometer stability at the tip-sample junction is achieved through three independent vibration isolation stages and careful design of the dilution refrigerator. The system can be connected to, or disconnected from, a network of interconnected auxiliary UHV chambers, which include growth chambers for metal and semiconductor samples, a field-ion microscope for tip characterization, and a fully independent additional quick access low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) system. To characterize the system, we present the cooling performance of the DR, vibrational, tunneling current, and tip-sample displacement noise measurements. In addition, we show the spectral resolution capabilities with tunneling spectroscopy results obtained on an epitaxial graphene sample resolving the quantum Landau levels in a magnetic field, including the sublevels corresponding to the lifting of the electron spin and valley degeneracies.

  6. Mechanical properties of single nanostructures investigated by in-situ AFM and micro-XRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, Thomas; Scheler, Thomas; Magalhaes-Paniago, Rogerio; Metzger, Till Hartmut [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    2010-07-01

    In recent years, nanostructures attracted enormous attention due to size-effects influencing the structural, optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of materials with low dimensions. Concerning the mechanical properties mainly the plastic regime was explored showing a trend that ''smaller is stronger''. In contrast, studies of the elastic behaviour of nanowires revealed contradictory results concerning the influence of size-effects on the elasticity. To investigate single nanoobjects in the elastic regime, we combined an in-situ AFM with XRD in a microfocused beam. The AFM is used to image the sample surface, to select an individual nanostructure, and to apply pressure on a chosen object. Due to the interaction between the AFM-tip and the compressed object the resonance frequency of the AFM force sensor shifts to larger values enabling us to derive the stiffness of the contact area. Simultaneous to the pressure application, XRD images around a pre-defined Bragg peak are recorded. These images allow for the determination of the elastic lattice parameter change in-situ. From the contact stiffness and the lattice parameter change, the Young modulus of an individual nanoobject is derived. Here, we present results both for SiGe islands grown by liquid-phase epitaxy on Si wafers and GaAs nanorods created by selective-area metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaAs substrates.

  7. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  8. A fully-automated neural network analysis of AFM force-distance curves for cancer tissue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Eleonora; Ciasca, Gabriele; Sassun, Tanya Enny; Antonelli, Manila; Palmieri, Valentina; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Santoro, Antonio; Giangaspero, Felice; Delfini, Roberto; Campi, Gaetano; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has the unique capability of probing the nanoscale mechanical properties of biological systems that affect and are affected by the occurrence of many pathologies, including cancer. This capability has triggered growing interest in the translational process of AFM from physics laboratories to clinical practice. A factor still hindering the current use of AFM in diagnostics is related to the complexity of AFM data analysis, which is time-consuming and needs highly specialized personnel with a strong physical and mathematical background. In this work, we demonstrate an operator-independent neural-network approach for the analysis of surgically removed brain cancer tissues. This approach allowed us to distinguish—in a fully automated fashion—cancer from healthy tissues with high accuracy, also highlighting the presence and the location of infiltrating tumor cells.

  9. Computational local stiffness analysis of biological cell: High aspect ratio single wall carbon nanotube tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TermehYousefi, Amin, E-mail: at.tyousefi@gmail.com [Department of Human Intelligence Systems, Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology (Kyutech) (Japan); Bagheri, Samira; Shahnazar, Sheida [Nanotechnology & Catalysis Research Centre (NANOCAT), IPS Building, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rahman, Md. Habibur [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Asia Pacific, Green Road, Dhaka-1215 (Bangladesh); Kadri, Nahrizul Adib [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nanoscale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cells. The proposed software was ABAQUS 6.13 CAE/CEL provided by Dassault Systems, which is a powerful finite element (FE) tool to perform the numerical analysis and visualize the interactions between proposed tip and membrane of the cell. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). Mooney–Rivlin hyperelastic model of the cell allows the simulation to obtain a new method for estimating the stiffness and spring constant of the cell. Stress and strain curve indicates the yield stress point which defines as a vertical stress and plan stress. Spring constant of the cell and the local stiffness was measured as well as the applied force of CNT-AFM tip on the contact area of the cell. This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis. - Graphical abstract: This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cells. The proposed software was ABAQUS 6.13 CAE/CEL provided by Dassault Systems. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). Mooney–Rivlin hyperelastic model of the cell allows the simulation to obtain a new method for estimating the stiffness and spring constant of the cell. Stress and strain curve indicates the yield stress point which defines as a vertical stress and plan stress. Spring constant of the cell and the local stiffness was measured as well

  10. Dynamic of cold-atom tips in anharmonic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menold, Tobias; Federsel, Peter; Rogulj, Carola; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fortágh, József

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding the dynamics of ultracold quantum gases in an anharmonic potential is essential for applications in the new field of cold-atom scanning probe microscopy. Therein, cold atomic ensembles are used as sensitive probe tips to investigate nanostructured surfaces and surface-near potentials, which typically cause anharmonic tip motion. Results: Besides a theoretical description of this anharmonic tip motion, we introduce a novel method for detecting the cold-atom tip dynamics in situ and real time. In agreement with theory, the first measurements show that particle interactions and anharmonic motion have a significant impact on the tip dynamics. Conclusion: Our findings will be crucial for the realization of high-sensitivity force spectroscopy with cold-atom tips and could possibly allow for the development of advanced spectroscopic techniques such as Q-control. PMID:28144505

  11. Graphene layer on Rh(111): combined DFT, STM, and NC-AFM studies

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanov, Petar; Voloshina, Elena; Dedkov, Yuriy; Schmitt, Stefan; Haenke, Torben; Thissen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous combination of scanning probe methods (tunnelling and force microscopies, STM and AFM) is a unique way to get an information about crystallographic and electronic structure of the studied surface. Here we apply these methods accompanied by the state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations to shed a light on the structure and electronic properties of the strongly-corrugated graphene/Rh(111) system. The atomically resolved images are obtained for both STM and AF...

  12. AFM topographies of densely packed nanoparticles: a quick way to determine the lateral size distribution by autocorrelation function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekete, L.; Kůsová, K.; Petrák, V.; Kratochvílová, I.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of sizes is one of the basic characteristics of nanoparticles. Here, we propose a novel way to determine the lateral distribution of sizes from AFM topographies. Our algorithm is based on the autocorrelation function and can be applied both on topographies containing spatially separated and densely packed nanoparticles as well as on topographies of polycrystalline films. As no manual treatment is required, this algorithm can be easily automatable for batch processing. The algorithm works in principle with any kind of spatially mapped information (AFM current maps, optical microscope images, etc.), and as such has no size limitations. However, in the case of AFM topographies, the tip/sample convolution effects will be the factor limiting the smallest size to which the algorithm is applicable. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of this algorithm on objects with sizes ranging between 20 nm and 1.5 μm.

  13. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  14. Healthy Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Kids >> Healthy Vision Tips Listen All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  15. Dual-MWCNT Probe Thermal Sensor Assembly and Evaluation Based on Nanorobotic Manipulation inside a Field-Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a thermal sensor composed of two multiwalled carbon nano-tubes (MWCNTs inside a field-emission-scanning electron microscope. The sensor was assembled using a nanorobotic manipulation system, which was used to construct a probe tip in order to detect the local environment of a single cell. An atomic force microscopy (AFM cantilever was used as a substrate; the cantilever was composed of Si3N4 and both sides were covered with a gold layer. MWCNTs were individually assembled on both sides of the AFM cantilever by employing nanorobotic manipulation. Another AFM cantilever was subsequently used as an end effector to manipulate the MWCNTs to touch each other. Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID was then used to bond the two MWCNTs. The MWCNT probe thermal sensor was evaluated inside a thermostated container in the temperature range from 25°C to 60°C. The experimental results show the positive characteristics of the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR.

  16. Digestive Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Digestive Health Topic / Digestive Health Tips Digestive Health Tips Basics 10 Tips on Belching, Bloating, and Flatulence Belching is caused by swallowed air from: Eating or drinking too fast Poorly fitting dentures; not chewing food completely Carbonated beverages Chewing gum or sucking on ...

  17. A novel AFM-based 5-axis nanoscale machine tool for fabrication of nanostructures on a micro ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yanquan; Wang, Yuzhang; Yan, Yongda; Zhao, Xuesen

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based 5-axis nanoscale machine tool developed to fabricate nanostructures on different annuli of the micro ball. Different nanostructures can be obtained by combining the scratching trajectory of the AFM tip with the movement of the high precision air-bearing spindle. The center of the micro ball is aligned to be coincided with the gyration center of the high precision to guarantee the machining process during the rotating of the air-bearing spindle. Processing on different annuli of the micro ball is achieved by controlling the distance between the center of the micro ball and the rotation center of the AFM head. Nanostructures including square cavities, circular cavities, triangular cavities, and an annular nanochannel are machined successfully on the three different circumferences of a micro ball with a diameter of 1500 μm. Moreover, the influences of the error motions of the high precision air-bearing spindle and the eccentric between the micro ball and the gyration center of the high precision air-bearing spindle on the processing position error on the micro ball are also investigated. This proposed machining method has the potential to prepare the inertial confinement fusion target with the expected dimension defects, which would advance the application of the AFM tip-based nanomachining approach.

  18. Tip studies using CFD and comparison with tip loss models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Johansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD......The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD...

  19. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Laser terahertz emission microscopy with near-field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Using an AFM, an optical near-field image at 800 nm of a dipole antenna for THz emission is measured, and by simultaneously collecting the emitted THz radiation, the laser light confined under the AFM probe gives a THz emission resolution of less than 50 nm....

  1. The TIPS Liquidity Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Christensen, Jens H.E.; Simon Riddell, Simon

    We introduce an arbitrage-free term structure model of nominal and real yields that accounts for liquidity risk in Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS). The novel feature of our model is to identify liquidity risk from individual TIPS prices by accounting for the tendency that TIPS, like...... most fixed-income securities, go into buy-and-hold investors' portfolios as time passes. We find a sizable and countercyclical TIPS liquidity premium, which greatly helps our model in matching TIPS prices. Accounting for liquidity risk also improves the model's ability to forecast inflation and match...

  2. Arctic climate tipping points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points.

  3. High-stress study of bioinspired multifunctional PEDOT:PSS/nanoclay nanocomposites using AFM, SEM and numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Alfredo J; Noh, Hanaul; Meier, Tobias; Solares, Santiago D

    2017-01-01

    Bioinspired design has been central in the development of hierarchical nanocomposites. Particularly, the nacre-mimetic brick-and-mortar structure has shown excellent mechanical properties, as well as gas-barrier properties and optical transparency. Along with these intrinsic properties, the layered structure has also been utilized in sensing devices. Here we extend the multifunctionality of nacre-mimetics by designing an optically transparent and electron conductive coating based on PEDOT:PSS and nanoclays Laponite RD and Cloisite Na + . We carry out extensive characterization of the nanocomposite using transmittance spectra (transparency), conductive atomic force microscopy (conductivity), contact-resonance force microscopy (mechanical properties), and SEM combined with a variety of stress-strain AFM experiments and AFM numerical simulations (internal structure). We further study the nanoclay's response to the application of pressure with multifrequency AFM and conductive AFM, whereby increases and decreases in conductivity can occur for the Laponite RD composites. We offer a possible mechanism to explain the changes in conductivity by modeling the coating as a 1-dimensional multibarrier potential for electron transport, and show that conductivity can change when the separation between the barriers changes under the application of pressure, and that the direction of the change depends on the energy of the electrons. We did not observe changes in conductivity under the application of pressure with AFM for the Cloisite Na + nanocomposite, which has a large platelet size compared with the AFM probe diameter. No pressure-induced changes in conductivity were observed in the clay-free polymer either.

  4. Accurate Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation of the Normal Spring Constant of Various AFM Cantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke’s law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  5. Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces: An AFM and QCM-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Joshua; Liu, Yatao; Camesano, Terri A.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials, mineral surfaces, or other industrial surfaces is strongly controlled by the way bacteria interact with protein layers or organic matter and other biomolecules that coat the materials. Despite this knowledge, many studies of bacterial adhesion are performed under clean conditions, instead of in the presence of proteins or organic molecules. We chose fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a model protein, and prepared FBS films on quartz crystals. The thickness of the FBS layer was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging under liquid and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Next, we characterized how the model biomaterial surface would interact with the nocosomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. An AFM probe was coated with S. epidermidis cells and used to probe a gold slide that had been coated with FBS or another protein, fibronectin (FN). These experiments show that AFM and QCM-D can be used in complementary ways to study the complex interactions between bacteria, proteins, and surfaces.

  6. Toothbrush abrasion of surface softened enamel studied with tapping mode AFM and AFM nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F; Parker, D M; Jandt, K D

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to investigate the toothbrush abrasion of surface softened enamel using tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) and AFM nanoindentation. TM-AFM investigations showed that the typical prismatic pattern as observed after demineralisation was retained after toothbrushing. The exposure to artificial saliva resulted in the deposition of a 'sausage-shape' material with random orientation. Brushing of these samples did not lead to a complete removal of this deposited material. Enamel mineral loss increased with increasing demineralisation time and increased further, although only to a small extent, due to subsequent toothbrushing. Exposure to artificial saliva did not alter the amount of enamel mineral lost due to the brushing treatment. AFM nanoindentation investigations showed that the three different demineralisation treatments caused three statistically different reductions in both surface hardness and reduced elastic modulus values, with the shortest exposure time having the least effect on the nanomechanical properties of the enamel samples. Toothbrushing did result only in a small increase in hardness and reduced elastic modulus. The present study has shown that toothbrushing of surface softened enamel leads to minor changes in the surface morphology and nanomechanical properties. The amount of enamel lost due to toothbrushing was independent of the demineralisation time and was lower compared to the mineral loss caused by the demineralisation treatments. Furthermore, the exposure to artificial saliva offers minimal protective effect to the softened enamel surface against toothbrushing.

  7. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  8. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  9. STM, SECPM, AFM and Electrochemistry on Single Crystalline Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Stimming

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Scanning probe microscopy (SPM techniques have had a great impact on research fields of surface science and nanotechnology during the last decades. They are used to investigate surfaces with scanning ranges between several 100 mm down to atomic resolution. Depending on experimental conditions, and the interaction forces between probe and sample, different SPM techniques allow mapping of different surface properties. In this work, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM in air and under electrochemical conditions (EC-STM, atomic force microscopy (AFM in air and scanning electrochemical potential microscopy (SECPM under electrochemical conditions, were used to study different single crystalline surfaces in electrochemistry. Especially SECPM offers potentially new insights into the solid-liquid interface by providing the possibility to image the potential distribution of the surface, with a resolution that is comparable to STM. In electrocatalysis, nanostructured catalysts supported on different electrode materials often show behavior different from their bulk electrodes. This was experimentally and theoretically shown for several combinations and recently on Pt on Au(111 towards fuel cell relevant reactions. For these investigations single crystals often provide accurate and well defined reference and support systems. We will show heteroepitaxially grown Ru, Ir and Rh single crystalline surface films and bulk Au single crystals with different orientations under electrochemical conditions. Image studies from all three different SPM methods will be presented and compared to electrochemical data obtained by cyclic voltammetry in acidic media. The quality of the single crystalline supports will be verified by the SPM images and the cyclic voltammograms. Furthermore, an outlook will be presented on how such supports can be used in electrocatalytic studies.

  10. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations. Based on invited talk at the International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology 2006.

  12. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  13. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A; Gimzewski, James K

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations

  14. AFM 4.0: a toolbox for DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, B J; Jorgensen, P; Breitkreutz, A; Tyers, M

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a series of programs, collectively packaged as Array File Maker 4.0 (AFM), that manipulate and manage DNA microarray data. AFM 4.0 is simple to use, applicable to any organism or microarray, and operates within the familiar confines of Microsoft Excel. Given a database of expression ratios, AFM 4.0 generates input files for clustering, helps prepare colored figures and Venn diagrams, and can uncover aneuploidy in yeast microarray data. AFM 4.0 should be especially useful to laboratories that do not have access to specialized commercial or in-house software.

  15. Tips in Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Some tips can assist teachers in guiding each pupil to achieve more optimally, with respect to the ability to read well and reading comprehension. Among these 10 specific tips are: (1) teach individualized phonics in context; (2) assist the student to read in proper thought units by covering up words in sentences for clarification; (3) assist…

  16. ADHD: Tips to Try

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ADHD: Tips to Try KidsHealth / For Teens / ADHD: Tips to Try Print en español TDAH: Consejos que puedes probar ADHD , short for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , is a ...

  17. Total Telephone Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Lloyd E.; And Others

    This manual of telephone behavior tips for business and sales professionals offers ways to handle the disgruntled caller and makes suggestions on topics relevant to the telephone. The manual is divided into the following sections and subsections: (1) Common Courtesy (staff tips, answering the telephone, screening calls, transferring calls, taking…

  18. Magnetotransport measurements on AFM structured two-dimensional electron gases on cleaved edges of GaAs/AlGaAs; Magnetotransportmessungen an AFM-strukturierten zweidimensionalen Elektronengasen auf GaAs/AlGaAs-Spaltkanten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinwald, Elisabeth

    2009-06-25

    In this thesis a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) on a (110) cleavage plane of a GaAs/AlGaAs(001) heterostructure was produced by means of cleaved edge overgrowth (CEO) and modulated in two dimensions. The 2DEG was modulated in one direction by a superlattice of the subjacent GaAs/AlGaAs(001) heterostructure. A second modulation, perpendicular to the first was realized by local anodic oxidation (LAO) with an atomic force microscope (AFM). For the process of LAO an electric voltage is applied between the tip of the AFM and the surface of the GaAs. The natural water film on the surface acts as electrolyte so that the GaAs surface is locally oxidized underneath the AFM tip. This oxide leads to a band bending so that the 2DEG underneath the oxide is locally depleted. On these systems magnetotransport measurements revealed that it is actually possible to modulate 2DEGs on a sufficient large area by local anodic oxidation. On the cleaved surfaces the influence of the two dimensional modulation on the electron gas has been demonstrated. (orig.)

  19. Thermoelectric voltage at a nanometer-scale heated tip point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Patrick C.; Lee, Byeonghee; King, William P.

    2012-01-01

    We report thermoelectric voltage measurements between the platinum-coated tip of a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and a gold-coated substrate. The cantilevers have an integrated heater-thermometer element made from doped single crystal silicon, and a platinum tip. The voltage can be measured at the tip, independent from the cantilever heating. We used the thermocouple junction between the platinum tip and the gold substrate to measure thermoelectric voltage during heating. Experiments used either sample-side or tip-side heating, over the temperature range 25-275 °C. The tip-substrate contact is ˜4 nm in diameter and its average measured Seebeck coefficient is 3.4 μV K-1. The thermoelectric voltage is used to determine tip-substrate interface temperature when the substrate is either glass or quartz. When the non-dimensional cantilever heater temperature is 1, the tip-substrate interface temperature is 0.593 on glass and 0.125 on quartz. Thermal contact resistance between the tip and the substrate heavily influences the tip-substrate interface temperature. Measurements agree well with modeling when the tip-substrate interface contact resistance is 108 K W-1.

  20. Nanomanipulation, nanotribology and nanomechanics of Au nanorods in dry and liquid environments using an AFM and depth sensing nanoindenter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Dave; Bhushan, Bharat

    2014-06-07

    Nano-objects in dry and liquid conditions have shown reductions in friction and wear on the macroscale. In this research, for the first time, Au nanorods were studied on the nanoscale under dry conditions and submerged in water for their effect on friction and wear reduction. The data were compared with spherical Au nanoparticles. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on the nanoscale were performed in single-nano-object contact with an AFM tip, where nano-objects were laterally manipulated, and multiple-nano-object contact with a tip attached to a glass sphere sliding over several nano-objects. Nanoscale and macroscale wear tests with an AFM and ball-on-flat tribometer were performed to relate friction and wear reduction on both scales. Results indicate that Au nano-objects contribute to friction and wear reduction due to the reduced contact area and possible rolling and sliding on the nanoscale. Compression tests (global deformation) using a nanoindenter with a flat punch were used to investigate the mechanical behavior under load and its relation to friction and wear reduction. Repeat compression tests of nano-objects were performed which showed a strain hardening effect and increased pop-ins during subsequent loads.

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much less likely to require a TIPS. ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vs. risks? What are the limitations of TIPS? What is a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? A ... likely to require a TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS ...

  4. Four-point probe measurements using current probes with voltage feedback to measure electric potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüpke, Felix; Cuma, David; Korte, Stefan; Cherepanov, Vasily; Voigtländer, Bert

    2018-02-01

    We present a four-point probe resistance measurement technique which uses four equivalent current measuring units, resulting in minimal hardware requirements and corresponding sources of noise. Local sample potentials are measured by a software feedback loop which adjusts the corresponding tip voltage such that no current flows to the sample. The resulting tip voltage is then equivalent to the sample potential at the tip position. We implement this measurement method into a multi-tip scanning tunneling microscope setup such that potentials can also be measured in tunneling contact, allowing in principle truly non-invasive four-probe measurements. The resulting measurement capabilities are demonstrated for \

  5. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dague, E; Jauvert, E; Laplatine, L; Thibault, C [CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Viallet, B; Ressier, L, E-mail: edague@laas.fr, E-mail: laurence.ressier@insa-toulouse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, LPCNO, INSA-CNRS-UPS, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2011-09-30

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  6. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dague, E.; Jauvert, E.; Laplatine, L.; Viallet, B.; Thibault, C.; Ressier, L.

    2011-09-01

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  7. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dague, E; Jauvert, E; Laplatine, L; Thibault, C; Viallet, B; Ressier, L

    2011-01-01

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  8. Ultra thin films of nanocrystalline Ge studied by AFM and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Initial growth stages of the ultra thin films of germanium (Ge) prepared by ion beam sputter deposition have been studied using atomic force microscope (AFM) and interference enhanced Raman scattering. The growth of the films follows Volmer-Weber growth mechanism. Analysis of the AFM images shows that Ostwald ...

  9. Topotactic changes on η-Mo4O11 caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovšak, Miloš; Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2015-11-01

    We present topotactic changes on Mo4O11 crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  10. Atomic force microscopy deep trench and sidewall imaging with an optical fiber probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Hui; Hussain, Danish; Yang, Feng; Sun, Lining

    2014-01-01

    We report a method to measure critical dimensions of micro- and nanostructures using the atomic force microscope (AFM) with an optical fiber probe (OFP). This method is capable of scanning narrow and deep trenches due to the long and thin OFP tip, as well as imaging of steep sidewalls with unique profiling possibilities by laterally tilting the OFP without any modifications of the optical lever. A switch control scheme is developed to measure the sidewall angle by flexibly transferring feedback control between the Z- and Y-axis, for a serial scan of the horizontal surface (raster scan on XY-plane) and sidewall (raster scan on the YZ-plane), respectively. In experiments, a deep trench with tapered walls (243.5 μm deep) and a microhole (about 14.9 μm deep) have been imaged with the orthogonally aligned OFP, as well as a silicon sidewall (fabricated by deep reactive ion etching) has been characterized with the tilted OFP. Moreover, the sidewall angle of TGZ3 (AFM calibration grating) was accurately measured using the switchable scan method

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos of Microcantilever-Based TM-AFMs with Squeeze Film Damping Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Yu Chen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In Atomic force microscope (AFM examination of a vibrating microcantilever, the nonlinear tip-sample interaction would greatly influence the dynamics of the cantilever. In this paper, the nonlinear dynamics and chaos of a tip-sample dynamic system being run in the tapping mode (TM were investigated by considering the effects of hydrodynamic loading and squeeze film damping. The microcantilever was modeled as a spring-mass-damping system and the interaction between the tip and the sample was described by the Lennard-Jones (LJ potential. The fundamental frequency and quality factor were calculated from the transient oscillations of the microcantilever vibrating in air. Numerical simulations were carried out to study the coupled nonlinear dynamic system using the bifurcation diagram, Poincaré maps, largest Lyapunov exponent, phase portraits and time histories. Results indicated the occurrence of periodic and chaotic motions and provided a comprehensive understanding of the hydrodynamic loading of microcantilevers. It was demonstrated that the coupled dynamic system will experience complex nonlinear oscillation as the system parameters change and the effect of squeeze film damping is not negligible on the micro-scale.

  12. First Aid Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Diversity In Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home » NEI for Kids » First Aid Tips Listen All About Vision About the Eye ...

  13. Tips for Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chapter Join our online community Tips for Daily Life Coping skills will help you handle day-to- ... challenges, maximize your independence and live a meaningful life with your diagnosis. Accepting changes Creating a coping ...

  14. Toilet training tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000944.htm Toilet training tips To use the sharing features on ... and 'pee'. Teaching Your Child to Use the Toilet Once your child is comfortable sitting on the ...

  15. Iron in carbonate containing AFm phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilnesa, B.Z.; Lothenbach, B.; Le Saout, G.; Renaudin, G.; Mesbah, A.; Filinchuk, Y.; Wichser, A.; Wieland, E.

    2011-01-01

    One of the AFm phases in hydrated Portland cement is Ca 3 (Al x Fe 2 - x )O 6 .CaCO 3 .nH 2 O. It is based on hexagonal and platey structural elements and the interlayer structure incorporates CO 3 2- . The solid phases were experimentally synthesized and characterized by different techniques including X-ray techniques (XRD and EXAFS) and vibrational spectroscopy techniques (IR, Raman). Fe-monocarbonate (Fe-Mc) and Al-monocarbonate (Al-Mc) were found to be stable up to 50 o C, while Fe-hemicarbonate (Fe-Hc) was unstable with respect to Fe-Mc in the presence of calcite. Fe-Mc has a rhombohedral R3-barc symmetry which is different from the triclinic of the Al analogue. Both XRD and thermodynamic modelling of the liquid compositions indicated that Al-Mc and the Fe-Mc phases do not form solid solution. The solubility products were calculated experimentally at 20 o C and 50 o C. Under standards condition the solubility products and other thermodynamic parameters were estimated using temperature-solubility product extrapolation and found to be logK S0 (Fe-Mc) = -34.59 ± 0.50, logK S0 (Fe-Hc) = -30.83 ± 0.50 and logK S0 (Al-Mc) = -31.32 ± 0.50.

  16. Magnetic domain structure investigation of Bi: YIG-thin films by combination of AFM and cantilever-based aperture SNOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysokikh, Yu E; Shevyakov, V I; Krasnoborodko, S Yu; Shelaev, A V; Prokopov, A R

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of magnetic domain structure investigation by combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Special hollow-pyramid AFM cantilevers with aperture was used. This combination allows us use same probe for both topography and domain structure visualization of Bi -substituted ferrite garnet films of micro- and nano-meter thickness. Samples were excited through aperture by tightly focused linearly polarized laser beam. Magneto-optical effect rotates polarization of transmitted light depend on domain orientation. Visualization of magnetic domains was performed by detecting cross polarized component of transmitted light. SNOM allows to obtain high resolution magnetic domain image and prevent sample from any disturbance by magnetic probe. Same area SNOM and MFM images are presented. (paper)

  17. AFM PeakForce QNM mode: Evidencing nanometre-scale mechanical properties of chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, G; Pruvost, S; Cardoso, L; Alonso, B; Belamie, E; Duchet-Rumeau, J

    2016-10-20

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) AFM mode was used to explore the mechanical properties of textured chitin-silica hybrid films at the nanoscale. The influence of the force applied by the tip on the sample surface was studied for standard homogeneous samples, for chitin nanorods and for chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites. Thick films of superimposed chitin nanorods showed a monotonous increase of DMT modulus (based on the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model) owing to an increase in modulus at the interface between nanorods due to geometrical constraints of the AFM acquisition. A similar variation of DMT modulus was obtained for chitin-silica hybrid thick films related to mechanical strengthening induced by the presence of silica. This work revealed the role of the organic-inorganic interface, at the nanoscale, in the mechanical behaviour of textured materials using PeakForce QNM mode, with optimized analysis conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hand Controlled Manipulation of Single Molecules via a Scanning Probe Microscope with a 3D Virtual Reality Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2016-10-02

    Considering organic molecules as the functional building blocks of future nanoscale technology, the question of how to arrange and assemble such building blocks in a bottom-up approach is still open. The scanning probe microscope (SPM) could be a tool of choice; however, SPM-based manipulation was until recently limited to two dimensions (2D). Binding the SPM tip to a molecule at a well-defined position opens an opportunity of controlled manipulation in 3D space. Unfortunately, 3D manipulation is largely incompatible with the typical 2D-paradigm of viewing and generating SPM data on a computer. For intuitive and efficient manipulation we therefore couple a low-temperature non-contact atomic force/scanning tunneling microscope (LT NC-AFM/STM) to a motion capture system and fully immersive virtual reality goggles. This setup permits "hand controlled manipulation" (HCM), in which the SPM tip is moved according to the motion of the experimenter's hand, while the tip trajectories as well as the response of the SPM junction are visualized in 3D. HCM paves the way to the development of complex manipulation protocols, potentially leading to a better fundamental understanding of nanoscale interactions acting between molecules on surfaces. Here we describe the setup and the steps needed to achieve successful hand-controlled molecular manipulation within the virtual reality environment.

  19. DNA-coated AFM cantilevers for the investigation of cell adhesion and the patterning of live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sonny C.; Crow, Ailey K.; Lam, Wilbur A.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2008-08-01

    Measurement of receptor adhesion strength requires the precise manipulation of single cells on a contact surface. To attach live cells to a moveable probe, DNA sequences complementary to strands displayed on the plasma membrane are introduced onto AFM cantilevers (see picture, bp=base pairs). The strength of the resulting linkages can be tuned by varying the length of DNA strands, allowing for controlled transport of the cells.

  20. Parametric effects in nanobeams and AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claeyssen, J. C. R.; Tonetto, L.; Carvalho, J. B. [Institute of Mathematics-PPGMAp, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Copetti, R. D. [Department of Mathematics, CCNE, Federal University of Santa Maria, Av. Roraima 1000, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2014-12-10

    Vibration dynamics of forced cantilever beams that are used in nanotechnology such as atomic force microscope modeling and carbon nanotubes is considered in terms of a fundamental response within a matrix framework. The modeling equations are written as a matrix differential equation subject to tip-sample general boundary conditions. At the junctions, where there are discontinuities due to different material or beam thickness, compatibility conditions are prescribed. Forced responses are given by convolution of the input load with the time domain Green matrix function. The corresponding matrix transfer function and modes of a multispan cantilever beam are determined in terms of solution basis of the same shape generated by a fundamental solution. Simulations were performed for a three stepped beam with a piezoelectric patch subject to pulse forcing terms and with surface effects.

  1. Atom-resolved AFM imaging of calcite nanoparticles in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Hirotake; Kimura, Kenjiro; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An advanced frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM) was applied for imaging particles. ► Atom-resolved topography of nano-sized particles of calcite was observed in water. ► Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of calcite. ► A promising ability of FM-AFM was demonstrated in imaging nano-sized particles. - Abstract: The atom-resolved topography of calcite nanoparticles was observed in water using a frequency-modulation atomic force microscope. Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of crystalline calcite

  2. Probing surfaces with single-polymer atomic force microscope experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedsam, C; Gaub, H E; Netz, R R

    2006-03-01

    In the past 15 years atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy has become a versatile tool to study inter- and intramolecular interactions of single polymer molecules. Irreversible coupling of polymer molecules between the tip of an AFM cantilever and the substrate allows one to study the stretching response up to the high force regime of several nN. For polymers that glide or slip laterally over the surface with negligible friction, on the other hand, the measured force profiles exhibit plateaus which allow one to extract the polymer adsorption energies. Long-term stable polymer coatings of the AFM tips allow for the possibility of repeating desorption experiments from solid supports with individual molecules many times, yielding good sampling statistics and thus reliable estimates for adsorption energies. In combination with recent advances in theoretical modeling, a detailed picture of the conformational statistics, backbone elasticity, and the adsorption characteristics of single polymer molecules is obtained.

  3. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (small dark spots in the light microscope, that we believed to be the regions in the cell plasma where viruses are assembled; this is known from the literature on electron microscopy on pox-infected cells and referred to there as "virus factories" (e.g., Moss, B. 1986. Replication of pox viruses. In Fundamental Virology, B. N. Fields and D. M. Knape, editors. Raven Press, New York. 637-655). Therefore, we assume that the cells stay alive during imaging, in our experience for approximately 30-45 h p.i.).

  4. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  5. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  6. Simultaneous AFM topography and recognition imaging at the plasma membrane of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtcheglova, Lilia A; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Elucidation the nano-organization of membrane proteins at/within the plasma membrane is probably the most demanding and still challenging task in cell biology since requires experimental approaches with nanoscale resolution. During last decade, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) has become a powerful tool to quickly obtain local receptor nano-maps on complex heterogeneous biosurfaces such as cells and membranes. Here we emphasize the TREC technique and explain how to unravel the nano-landscape of mammalian cells. We describe the procedures for all steps of the experiment including tip functionalization with ligand molecules, sample preparation, and localization of key molecules on the cell surface. We also discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this technique. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Nano-Workbench: A Combined Hollow AFM Cantilever and Robotic Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Hugo Pérez Garza

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To manipulate liquid matter at the nanometer scale, we have developed a robotic assembly equipped with a hollow atomic force microscope (AFM cantilever that can handle femtolitre volumes of liquid. The assembly consists of four independent robots, each sugar cube sized with four degrees of freedom. All robots are placed on a single platform around the sample forming a nano-workbench (NWB. Each robot can travel the entire platform and has a minimum position resolution of 5 nm both in-plane and out-of-plane. The cantilever chip was glued to the robotic arm. Dispensing was done by the capillarity between the substrate and the cantilever tip, and was monitored visually through a microscope. To evaluate the performance of the NWB, we have performed three experiments: clamping of graphene with epoxy, mixing of femtolitre volume droplets to synthesize gold nanoparticles and accurately dispense electrolyte liquid for a nanobattery.

  8. High-stress study of bioinspired multifunctional PEDOT:PSS/nanoclay nanocomposites using AFM, SEM and numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J. Diaz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioinspired design has been central in the development of hierarchical nanocomposites. Particularly, the nacre-mimetic brick-and-mortar structure has shown excellent mechanical properties, as well as gas-barrier properties and optical transparency. Along with these intrinsic properties, the layered structure has also been utilized in sensing devices. Here we extend the multifunctionality of nacre-mimetics by designing an optically transparent and electron conductive coating based on PEDOT:PSS and nanoclays Laponite RD and Cloisite Na+. We carry out extensive characterization of the nanocomposite using transmittance spectra (transparency, conductive atomic force microscopy (conductivity, contact-resonance force microscopy (mechanical properties, and SEM combined with a variety of stress-strain AFM experiments and AFM numerical simulations (internal structure. We further study the nanoclay’s response to the application of pressure with multifrequency AFM and conductive AFM, whereby increases and decreases in conductivity can occur for the Laponite RD composites. We offer a possible mechanism to explain the changes in conductivity by modeling the coating as a 1-dimensional multibarrier potential for electron transport, and show that conductivity can change when the separation between the barriers changes under the application of pressure, and that the direction of the change depends on the energy of the electrons. We did not observe changes in conductivity under the application of pressure with AFM for the Cloisite Na+ nanocomposite, which has a large platelet size compared with the AFM probe diameter. No pressure-induced changes in conductivity were observed in the clay-free polymer either.

  9. On the molecular interaction between albumin and ibuprofen: An AFM and QCM-D study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Etxebarria, Juan; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Georgieva, Radostina; Bäumler, Hans; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of proteins on surfaces often results in a change of their structural behavior and consequently, a loss of bioactivity. One experimental method to study interactions on a molecular level is single molecular force spectroscopy that permits to measure forces down to the pico-newton range. In this work, the binding force between human serum albumin (HSA), covalently immobilized on glutaraldehyde modified gold substrates, and ibuprofen sodium salt was studied by means of single molecular force spectroscopy. First of all, a protocol was established to functionalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips with ibuprofen. The immobilization protocol was additionally tested by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and contact angle measurements. AFM was used to characterize the adsorption of HSA on gold substrates, which lead to a packed monolayer of thickness slightly lower than the reported value in solution. Finally, single molecule spectroscopy results were used to characterize the binding force between albumin and ibuprofen and calculate the distance of the transition state (0.6 nm) and the dissociation rate constant (0.055 s(-1)). The results might indicate that part of the adsorbed protein still preserves its functionality upon adsorption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ball tip method for thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kota; Matsumoto, Morio; Iizuka, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ball tip method for thoracic pedicle screw placements in idiopathic scoliosis patients. 24 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included in this study. Conventional method was performed in 12 patients. Ball tip method was performed in 12 patients. Accuracy of the pedicle screw placement was evaluated based on the postoperative CT. In the ball tip method, a probe which was consisted of ball tip with flexible shaft was used. After removing of cortical bone at a starting point, the probe was inserted manually or sometimes with gently tapping by hammer. During the maneuver, the probe will gradually progress into cancellous bone in the pedicle, without perforating cortical bone in the pedicle. Following expansion of the hole by a rigid gear shift probe, screw was placed in the pedicle. 65.1% of screws were located within pedicle in the conventional group and 86.5% in the ball tip group. 5.3% of screws were located out of pedicle within 2 mm in the conventional group and 8.2% in the ball tip group. 15.8% of screws were located out of pedicle beyond 2 mm and 1.8% in the ball tip group. The ball tip method enhanced the accuracy of thoracic pedicle screw placements in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. The ball tip method may be effective for accurate pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. (author)

  11. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaobin [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shi, Xuetao, E-mail: mrshixuetao@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ostrovidov, Serge [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Wu, Hongkai, E-mail: chhkwu@ust.hk [Department of Chemistry & Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Nakajima, Ken [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  12. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  13. Magnet pole tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  14. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Shingo [Department of Physics, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio [Department of Physics, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology of the Japan Science and Technology Agency, 7 Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner’s fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α{sub 3}β{sub 3} subcomplex of F{sub 1}-ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s.

  15. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner’s fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α 3 β 3 subcomplex of F 1 -ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s

  16. Turbine-blade tip clearance and tip timing measurements using an optical fiber bundle sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Iker; Beloki, Josu; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon

    2013-04-01

    Traditional limitations of capacitive, inductive or discharging probe sensor for tip timing and tip clearance measurements are overcome by reflective intensity modulated optical fiber sensors. This paper presents the signals and results corresponding to a one stage turbine rig which rotor has 146 blades, obtained from a transonic wind-tunnel test. The probe is based on a trifurcated bundle of optical fibers that is mounted on turbine casing. It is composed of a central illuminating fiber that guides the light from a laser to the turbine blade, and two concentric rings of receiving fibers that collect the reflected light. Two photodetectors turn this reflected light signal from the receiving rings into voltage. The electrical signals are acquired and saved by a high-sample-rate oscilloscope. In tip clearance calculations the ratio of the signals provided by each ring of receiving fibers is evaluated and translated into distance. In the case of tip timing measurements, only one of the signals is considered to get the arrival time of the blade. The differences between the real and theoretical arrival times of the blades are used to obtain the deflections amplitude. The system provides the travelling wave spectrum, which presents the average vibration amplitude of the blades at a certain nodal diameter. The reliability of the results in the turbine rig testing facilities suggests the possibility of performing these measurements in real turbines under real working conditions.

  17. Charge motion in Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) studied with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatello, Jason; Castaneda, Chloe; Aidala, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    Organic semiconductors like poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) offer the promise of solution-processable, flexible electronics, but the charge motion in these disordered films is not fully understood. We use Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) to study trapped charges in the channel of inverted field effect transistors and have developed a technique to measure real time screening. The tip of the AFM is placed at a specific location above the sample with grounded source and drain electrodes, and the potential of the surface is recorded using KPFM. When a voltage is applied to the back-gate, charges will move to screen this potential. For materials with relatively low charge density and mobility, it will take some amount of time to fully screen. The tip will initially measure the potential of the voltage applied to the back-gate, which will decrease as charges enter the film. The shape and timescales of this decrease reveal information about injection barriers and traps in the material. Our data suggest that we are observing holes entering and exiting trap states as the gate voltage is turned on and off. Other factors, such as aging, increase the timescale of the screening. Supported by NSF DMR-1207924.

  18. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926-1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface.

  19. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Leinen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926–1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111 surface.

  20. Tips from the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Kim Hughes; Leverett, Thomas; Barrett, Rob J.; Chur-Hansen, Anna; Dantas-Whitney, Maria; Zapata, Gabriela; Garcia, Juan Felix

    1998-01-01

    Five articles present tips for rallying English-as-a-Second-Language students to the enterprise of creating context, tools, and language itself. The articles focus on using original dramas created by students, teaching nonnative English-speaking medical students to comprehend their patients' colloquial language, conducting research with native…

  1. Air Travel Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator International Travel: Tips for Staying HealthyTexting and DrivingTravel Needs for ...

  2. 10 Data Visualization Tips

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    communicated through the use of design choices. (as indicated in tip 8). 8. Use colour, size, and position to help the reader see what is important. Colour adds emphasis, highlights particular data points, and draws connections between graphs. The hue, value, and intensity of the colour are significant and may have cultural ...

  3. Sports Dehydration Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sports Dehydration Safety Tips Everything you need to know to keep your kids safe from dehydration when playing sports. To keep kids in top ... to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Dehydration occurs when a body loses more water than ...

  4. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  5. Characterisation of tissue factor-bearing extracellular vesicles with AFM: comparison of air-tapping-mode AFM and liquid Peak Force AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hardij

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are shed from cells and carry markers of the parent cells. Vesicles derived from cancer cells reach the bloodstream and locally influence important physiological processes. It has been previously shown that procoagulant vesicles are circulating in patients’ fluids. These EVs are therefore considered as promising biomarkers for the thrombotic risk. Because of their small size, classical methods such as flow cytometry suffer from limitation for their characterisation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM has been proposed as a promising complementary method for the characterisation of EVs. Objectives: The objectives of this study are: (a to develop and validate AFM with specific antibodies (anti-TF and (b to compare air and liquid modes for EVs’ size and number determination as potential biomarkers of the prothrombotic risk. Methods: AFM multimode nanoscope III was used for air tapping mode (TM. AFM catalyst was used for liquid Peak Force Tapping (PFT mode. Vesicles are generated according to Davila et al.'s protocol. Substrates are coated with various concentrations of antibodies, thanks to ethanolamine and glutaraldehyde. Results: Vesicles were immobilised on antibody-coated surfaces to select tissue factor (TF-positive vesicles. The size range of vesicles observed in liquid PFT mode is 6–10 times higher than in air mode. This corresponds to the data found in the literature. Conclusion: We recommend liquid PFT mode to analyse vesicles on 5 µg/ml antibody-coated substrates.

  6. Characterisation of tissue factor-bearing extracellular vesicles with AFM: comparison of air-tapping-mode AFM and liquid Peak Force AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardij, Julie; Cecchet, Francesca; Berquand, Alexandre; Gheldof, Damien; Chatelain, Christian; Mullier, François; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are shed from cells and carry markers of the parent cells. Vesicles derived from cancer cells reach the bloodstream and locally influence important physiological processes. It has been previously shown that procoagulant vesicles are circulating in patients' fluids. These EVs are therefore considered as promising biomarkers for the thrombotic risk. Because of their small size, classical methods such as flow cytometry suffer from limitation for their characterisation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been proposed as a promising complementary method for the characterisation of EVs. THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY ARE: (a) to develop and validate AFM with specific antibodies (anti-TF) and (b) to compare air and liquid modes for EVs' size and number determination as potential biomarkers of the prothrombotic risk. AFM multimode nanoscope III was used for air tapping mode (TM). AFM catalyst was used for liquid Peak Force Tapping (PFT) mode. Vesicles are generated according to Davila et al.'s protocol. Substrates are coated with various concentrations of antibodies, thanks to ethanolamine and glutaraldehyde. Vesicles were immobilised on antibody-coated surfaces to select tissue factor (TF)-positive vesicles. The size range of vesicles observed in liquid PFT mode is 6-10 times higher than in air mode. This corresponds to the data found in the literature. We recommend liquid PFT mode to analyse vesicles on 5 µg/ml antibody-coated substrates.

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A TIPS is used to ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or bypass, without the risks that accompany open surgery. TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... then placed in this tunnel to keep the pathway open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have ... and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the portal vein ( ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and/or hydrothorax (in the chest). Budd-Chiari syndrome , a blockage in one or more veins that ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in ... TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood pressure in the veins of ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of TIPS? What is a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? A transjugular intrahepatic ... taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  13. Structural-mechanical characterization of nanoparticle exosomes in human saliva, using correlative AFM, FESEM, and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivani; Rasool, Haider I; Palanisamy, Viswanathan; Mathisen, Cliff; Schmidt, Michael; Wong, David T; Gimzewski, James K

    2010-04-27

    All living systems contain naturally occurring nanoparticles with unique structural, biochemical, and mechanical characteristics. Specifically, human saliva exosomes secreted by normal cells into saliva via exocytosis are novel biomarkers showing tumor-antigen enrichment during oral cancer. Here we show the substructure of single human saliva exosomes, using a new ultrasensitive low force atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibiting substructural organization unresolvable in electron microscopy. We correlate the data with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and AFM images to interpret the nanoscale structures of exosomes under varying forces. Single exosomes reveal reversible mechanical deformation displaying distinct elastic, 70-100 nm trilobed membrane with substructures carrying specific transmembrane receptors. Further, we imaged and investigated, using force spectroscopy with antiCD63 IgG functionalized AFM tips, highly specific and sensitive detection of antigenCD63, potentially useful cancer markers on individual exosomes. The quantitative nanoscale morphological, biomechanical, and surface biomolecular properties of single saliva exosomes are critical for the applications of exosomes for cancer diagnosis and as a model for developing new cell delivery systems.

  14. Preventing probe induced topography correlated artifacts in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Leo; Wijngaarden, Rinke J

    2016-12-01

    Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) on samples with rough surface topography can be hindered by topography correlated artifacts. We show that, with the proper experimental configuration and using homogeneously metal coated probes, we are able to obtain amplitude modulation (AM) KPFM results on a gold coated sample with rough topography that are free from such artifacts. By inducing tip inhomogeneity through contact with the sample, clear potential variations appear in the KPFM image, which correlate with the surface topography and, thus, are probe induced artifacts. We find that switching to frequency modulation (FM) KPFM with such altered probes does not remove these artifacts. We also find that the induced tip inhomogeneity causes a lift height dependence of the KPFM measurement, which can therefore be used as a check for the presence of probe induced topography correlated artifacts. We attribute the observed effects to a work function difference between the tip and the rest of the probe and describe a model for such inhomogeneous probes that predicts lift height dependence and topography correlated artifacts for both AM and FM-KPFM methods. This work demonstrates that using a probe with a homogeneous work function and preventing tip changes is essential for KPFM on non-flat samples. From the three investigated probe coatings, PtIr, Au and TiN, the latter appears to be the most suitable, because of its better resistance against coating damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of the leakage field of magnetic force microscopy thin-film tips using electron holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Lunedei, E.; Matteucci, G.; Rikkers, E.

    1996-01-01

    Electron holography is applied for the study of the leakage field of thin-film ferromagnetic tips used as probes in magnetic force microscopy. We used commercially available pyramidal tips covered o­n o­ne face with a thin NiCo film, which were then placed in a high external magnetic field directed

  16. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure after TIPS. If your liver failure is severe, a TIPS may not be the best use and a different procedure may be needed to control your symptoms. ... ordinarily filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these ...

  18. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  19. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm(2). For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm(2), yielding good statistic results.

  20. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... propeller, have efficiency increases of a reasonable magnitude in both open-water and behind-ship conditions....

  1. Investigation on tip enhanced Raman spectra of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjuan; Liu, Yanqi; Zeng, Zhuo; Wang, Peijie; Fang, Yan; Zhang, Lisheng

    2018-02-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) is a promising analytical approach for some two-dimensional materials and offers the possibility to correlate imaging and chemical data. Tip-enhanced Raman spectra of graphene are discussed in some details, including substrate, gap between tip-apex and sample surface as well as Ag-nanowire. The TERS spectra give special emphasis to the possibility of TERS tip to induce a large number of defects only while got the tip attached to sample surface. Then the dependence of the TERS spectra of graphene and gap between the probe tip and sample surface was studied, and distribution features of electromagnetic (EM) field around tip were also simulated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). The Raman signal enhancement of graphene was further discussed with respect to experimental data. Furthermore, the Ag-nanowire as a nano-antenna could significantly enhance the weak Raman signal of D-band of monolayer graphene is shown, and the TERS spectra of graphene with regard to different regions of Ag-nanowires (endpoints, body) were obtained toward investigating into the distribution of electromagnetic field.

  2. A Blade Tip Timing Method Based on a Microwave Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilong Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blade tip timing is an effective method for blade vibration measurements in turbomachinery. This method is increasing in popularity because it is non-intrusive and has several advantages over the conventional strain gauge method. Different kinds of sensors have been developed for blade tip timing, including optical, eddy current and capacitance sensors. However, these sensors are unsuitable in environments with contaminants or high temperatures. Microwave sensors offer a promising potential solution to overcome these limitations. In this article, a microwave sensor-based blade tip timing measurement system is proposed. A patch antenna probe is used to transmit and receive the microwave signals. The signal model and process method is analyzed. Zero intermediate frequency structure is employed to maintain timing accuracy and dynamic performance, and the received signal can also be used to measure tip clearance. The timing method uses the rising and falling edges of the signal and an auto-gain control circuit to reduce the effect of tip clearance change. To validate the accuracy of the system, it is compared experimentally with a fiber optic tip timing system. The results show that the microwave tip timing system achieves good accuracy.

  3. Scanning probe and micropatterning approaches for biomolecular screening applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, Lisa M

    2002-07-01

    Force mapping using atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for the simultaneous acquisition of topography and probe-sample interaction data. For example, AFM probes functionalised with an antigen can be employed to map the spatial distribution of recognition events on a substrate functionalised with the complementary specific antibody. However, this technique is currently limited to the detection of a single receptor-ligand species. Were the detection of multiple receptor-ligand interactions possible, AFM force mapping would offer greater scope as a sensitive tool for bioassay and screening applications. This thesis outlines developments in probe and substrate immobilisation methods to facilitate this process. We have developed an immobilisation strategy, which allows two antigen species, human serum albumin (HSA) and the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin ({beta}hCG) to be simultaneously present on an AFM probe. Single point force spectroscopy results have revealed the ability of such probes to discriminate between their corresponding antibodies (anti-HSA and anti-{beta}hCG lgG antibodies). In addition, these antibodies have been employed in the fabrication of a 2-D biomolecular array using microfluidic network patterning. The formed chequered pattern was visualised with fluorescence microscopy using fluorescently tagged anti-IgG antibodies. In parallel with such developments we have employed AFM force volume imaging to investigate the distribution of antigen binding sites on an antibody functionalised substrate. Highly resolved adhesion maps were obtained of surfaces functionalised with anti-HSA lgG antibodies using HSA functionalised AFM probes, adopting the sample molecular tether immobilisation strategy employed in the single point force spectroscopy investigations. The observed forces were seen to be comparable with previous investigations. The addition of free HSA into the system was found to result in a significant reduction in the number of

  4. Three-way flexible cantilever probes for static contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Jensen, Helle Vendelbo

    2011-01-01

    In micro four-point probe measurements, three-way flexible L-shaped cantilever probes show significant advantages over conventional straight cantilever probes. The L-shaped cantilever allows static contact to the sample surface which reduces the frictional wear of the cantilever tips. We analyze...

  5. Cell visco-elasticity measured with AFM and optical trapping at sub-micrometer deformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanila Nawaz

    Full Text Available The measurement of the elastic properties of cells is widely used as an indicator for cellular changes during differentiation, upon drug treatment, or resulting from the interaction with the supporting matrix. Elasticity is routinely quantified by indenting the cell with a probe of an AFM while applying nano-Newton forces. Because the resulting deformations are in the micrometer range, the measurements will be affected by the finite thickness of the cell, viscous effects and even cell damage induced by the experiment itself. Here, we have analyzed the response of single 3T3 fibroblasts that were indented with a micrometer-sized bead attached to an AFM cantilever at forces from 30-600 pN, resulting in indentations ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 micrometer. To investigate the cellular response at lower forces up to 10 pN, we developed an optical trap to indent the cell in vertical direction, normal to the plane of the coverslip. Deformations of up to two hundred nanometers achieved at forces of up to 30 pN showed a reversible, thus truly elastic response that was independent on the rate of deformation. We found that at such small deformations, the elastic modulus of 100 Pa is largely determined by the presence of the actin cortex. At higher indentations, viscous effects led to an increase of the apparent elastic modulus. This viscous contribution that followed a weak power law, increased at larger cell indentations. Both AFM and optical trapping indentation experiments give consistent results for the cell elasticity. Optical trapping has the benefit of a lower force noise, which allows a more accurate determination of the absolute indentation. The combination of both techniques allows the investigation of single cells at small and large indentations and enables the separation of their viscous and elastic components.

  6. Atomic force microscopic study of folate receptors in live cells with functionalized tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, C. M.; Binulal, N. S.; Anitha, V. C.; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, U.; Prasanth, R.

    2009-11-01

    Membrane associated folate receptors (FR) is gaining importance in cancer research. Understanding the FR density, distribution, and the strength of its interaction with ligands is crucial in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Here we reported the enhanced phase contrast image of FR by scanning with properly functionalized atomic force microscope (AFM) tips over live cell lines. The choice of the ligand was made for better interaction of tip with FR, expressed in the cell lines. The selectively enhanced force of interaction at the receptor molecule produced a considerable enhancement in the phase contrast between a receptor site and a nonreceptor site.

  7. Neutron detection using CR-39 and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez L, C.; Fragoso, R.; Felix, R.; Golzarri, J.I.; Espinosa, G.; Castillo, F.

    2007-01-01

    AFM has been applied in many CR-39 track formation analyses. In this paper, the use of AFM in the neutron detection and analysis of the track formation is reported. The irradiation was made with an 1.5 GBq (0.5 Ci) 241 Am-Be neutron source, with and without a polyethylene radiator. The surface analysis was made to the CR-39 fresh material without irradiation, after the irradiation, and after a very short etching time. The results show important differences between the irradiation, with and without polyethylene radiator, and the latent tracks of the neutron in the CR-39 polycarbonate. The development of track formation after very short etching time and pits characterization were measured too using the AFM facilities. (Author)

  8. Noise-compliant tip-shape derivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. M.; Davies, M. C.; Roberts, C. J.; Tendler, S. J. B.

    Wide use of the blind tip-derivation procedure has lead to the realization of the problem of noise in experimental image data. A modification to the algorithm by which the probe shape is extracted from image data is described. By consideration of the possible levels of noise in an image, a realistic estimate of the probe geometry can be derived from unfiltered experimental image data. The new procedure is demonstrated by its application to a test image that has been deliberately degraded through the addition of random noise. The results are compared with those from the current technique. The technique has significant application in metrology through the compensation of both lateral and vertical measurement errors.

  9. Reversible mechano-electrochemical writing of metallic nanostructures with the tip of an atomic force microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obermair

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We recently introduced a method that allows the controlled deposition of nanoscale metallic patterns at defined locations using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM as a “mechano-electrochemical pen”, locally activating a passivated substrate surface for site-selective electrochemical deposition. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility of this process and study the long-term stability of the resulting metallic structures. The remarkable stability for more than 1.5 years under ambient air without any observable changes can be attributed to self-passivation. After AFM-activated electrochemical deposition of copper nanostructures on a polycrystalline gold film and subsequent AFM imaging, the copper nanostructures could be dissolved by reversing the electrochemical potential. Subsequent AFM-tip-activated deposition of different copper nanostructures at the same location where the previous structures were deleted, shows that there is no observable memory effect, i.e., no effect of the previous writing process on the subsequent writing process. Thus, the four processes required for reversible information storage, “write”, “read”, “delete” and “re-write”, were successfully demonstrated on the nanometer scale.

  10. Two-probe atomic-force microscope manipulator and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A A; Stolyarov, V S; Kononenko, O V

    2017-06-01

    We report on a manipulator based on a two-probe atomic force microscope (AFM) with an individual feedback system for each probe. This manipulator works under an upright optical microscope with 3 mm focal distance. The design of the microscope helps us tomanipulate nanowires using the microscope probes as a two-prong fork. The AFM feedback is realized based on the dynamic full-time contact mode. The applications of the manipulator and advantages of its two-probe design are presented.

  11. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho-Baek, Seung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub l}) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T{sub l} probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions.

  12. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung-Ho-Baek

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T l ) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T l probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions

  13. Spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in Fe8 nanomagnet and in AFM rings by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Ho

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs). For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferromagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs. T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T1 probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power-law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions.

  14. An intelligent control scheme for precise tip-motion control in atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Hu, Xiaodong; Xu, Linyan

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a new intelligent control method to precisely control the tip motion of the atomic force microscopy (AFM). The tip moves up and down at a high rate along the z direction during scanning, requiring the utilization of a rapid feedback controller. The standard proportional-integral (PI) feedback controller is commonly used in commercial AFMs to enable topography measurements. The controller's response performance is determined by the set of the proportional (P) parameter and the integral (I) parameter. However, the two parameters cannot be automatically altered simultaneously according to the scanning speed and the surface topography during continuors scanning, leading to an inaccurate measurement. Thus a new intelligent controller combining the fuzzy controller and the PI controller is put forward in the paper. The new controller automatically selects the most appropriate PI parameters to achieve a fast response rate on basis of the tracking errors. In the experimental setup, the new controller is realized with a digital signal process (DSP) system, implemented in a conventional AFM system. Experiments are carried out by comparing the new method with the standard PI controller. The results demonstrate that the new method is more robust and effective for the precise tip motion control, corresponding to the achievement of a highly qualified image by shortening the response time of the controller. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Investigation of Streptococcus mutans biofilm growth on modified Au(111)-surfaces using AFM and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans constitute perhaps the most important direct cause of human dental caries formation. We have studied S. mutans biofilm formation and properties on Au(111)-surfaces modified by self-assembled molecular monolayers (SAMs) of different thiol...... (hexadecanethiol, MHD) or hydrophilic (mercapto-hexadecanoic acid, MHDA) end groups. The voltammetric reductive desorption (RD) peaks of the thiol-based SAMs in the absence and presence of biofilms and growth medium was in focus as a sensitive probe of the SAM local environment.AFM showed that S. mutans had grown...... with growth medium or of the growth medium alone. The RD peak potential of the hydrophilic MHDA surface remained, further largely unaffected but the RD peak of the hydrophobic MHD SAM is distinctly shifted compared to the MHD SAM alone. The shifts were further in different directions for the S. mutans biofilm...

  16. Quantitative multichannel NC-AFM data analysis of graphene growth on SiC(0001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Held

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Noncontact atomic force microscopy provides access to several complementary signals, such as topography, damping, and contact potential. The traditional presentation of such data sets in adjacent figures or in colour-coded pseudo-three-dimensional plots gives only a qualitative impression. We introduce two-dimensional histograms for the representation of multichannel NC-AFM data sets in a quantitative fashion. Presentation and analysis are exemplified for topography and contact-potential data for graphene grown epitaxially on 6H-SiC(0001, as recorded by Kelvin probe force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Sample preparations by thermal decomposition in ultrahigh vacuum and in an argon atmosphere are compared and the respective growth mechanisms discussed.

  17. Tipping point leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2003-04-01

    When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement agencies Bratton had turned around. In each case, he succeeded in record time despite limited resources, a demotivated staff, opposition from powerful vested interests, and an organization wedded to the status quo. Bratton's turnarounds demonstrate what the authors call tipping point leadership. The theory of tipping points hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can occur quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Bratton begins by overcoming the cognitive hurdles that block organizations from recognizing the need for change. He does this by putting managers face-to-face with operational problems. Next, he manages around limitations on funds, staff, or equipment by concentrating resources on the areas that are most in need of change and that have the biggest payoffs. He meanwhile solves the motivation problem by singling out key influencers--people with disproportionate power due to their connections or persuasive abilities. Finally, he closes off resistance from powerful opponents. Not every CEO has the personality to be a Bill Bratton, but his successes are due to much more than his personality. He relies on a remarkably consistent method that any manager looking to turn around an organization can use to overcome the forces of inertia and reach the tipping point.

  18. Nanoindentation and AFM studies of PECVD DLC and reactively ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    microscopy (TEM), nanoindentation and by AFM. The results show that the PECVD DLC film has a higher elastic modulus, hardness and roughness than the UMSD Ti/a-C : H film. It also has a lower pull off force than Ti containing amorphous carbon film. Keywords. Carbon films; nanoindentation; topography. 1. Introduction.

  19. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, J. te; Katan, A.J.; Rankl, C.; Stahl, S.W.; Buul, A.M. van; Phang, I.Y.; Gomez-Casado, A.; Schon, P.; Gerritsen, J.W.; Cambi, A.; Rowan, A.E.; Vancso, G.J.; Jonkheijm, P.; Huskens, J.; Oosterkamp, T.H.; Gaub, H.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Figdor, C.G.; Speller, S.

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are

  20. Integrated Confocal and Scanning Probe Microscopy for Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Haupt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM continues to be developed, not only in design, but also in application. The new focus of using AFM is changing from pure material to biomedical studies. More frequently, it is being used in combination with other optical imaging methods, such as confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and fluorescent imaging, to provide a more comprehensive understanding of biological systems. To date, AFM has been used increasingly as a precise micromanipulator, probing and altering the mechanobiological characteristics of living cells and tissues, in order to examine specific, receptor-ligand interactions, material properties, and cell behavior. In this review, we discuss the development of this new hybrid AFM, current research, and potential applications in diagnosis and the detection of disease.

  1. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.; Brouckaert, J.-F.

    2016-10-01

    A simultaneous blade tip timing (BTT) and blade tip clearance (BTC) measurement system enables the determination of turbomachinery blade vibrations and ensures the monitoring of the existing running gaps between the blade tip and the casing. This contactless instrumentation presents several advantages compared to the well-known telemetry system with strain gauges, at the cost of a more complex data processing procedure. The probes used can be optical, capacitive, eddy current as well as microwaves, everyone with its dedicated electronics and many existing different signal processing algorithms. Every company working in this field has developed its own processing method and sensor technology. Hence, repeating the same test with different instrumentations, the answer is often different. Moreover, rarely it is possible to achieve reliability for in-service measurements. Developments are focused on innovative instrumentations and a common standard. This paper focuses on the results achieved using a novel magnetoresistive sensor for simultaneous tip timing and tip clearance measurements. The sensor measurement principle is described. The sensitivity to gap variation is investigated. In terms of measurement of vibrations, experimental investigations were performed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (ITWL, Warsaw, Poland) in a real aeroengine and in the von Karman Institute (VKI) R2 compressor rig. The advantages and limitations of the magnetoresistive probe for turbomachinery testing are highlighted.

  2. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  3. Modified fiber tips for light application in hollow organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Armin; Beyer, Wolfgang; Krug, M.; Schaarschmidt, K.; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert G.; Unsoeld, Eberhard; Willital, G. H.

    1990-07-01

    Four ways of optimizing laser-assisted treatments in hollow organs are proposed in this paper: 1 . For coagulation in axial direction at small irradiation distances fiber tips with enhanced divergence increase the coagulation volume and reduce vaporization. 2. Circumferentially complete coagulation of cylindrical organs can be achieved by using a radially radiating probe. 3. Radiators for photodynamic therapy in cylindrical organs can be constructed and optimized by means of a theoretical scattering model. 4. Isotropic radiators based on conical fiber tips improve the radiation into the rear hemisphere.

  4. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for nanoscale strain characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Alvarado; Hayazawa, Norihiko; Kawata, Satoshi

    2009-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), which utilizes the strong localized optical field generated at the apex of a metallic tip when illuminated, has been shown to successfully probe the vibrational spectrum of today's and tomorrow's state-of-the-art silicon and next-generation semiconductor devices, such as quantum dots. Collecting and analyzing the vibrational spectrum not only aids in material identification but also provides insight into strain distributions in semiconductors. Here, the potential of TERS for nanoscale characterization of strain in silicon devices is reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on the key challenges of obtaining spectroscopic images of strain in actual strained silicon devices.

  5. Fibre-top atomic force microscope probe with optical near-field detection capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiribilli, B; Margheri, G; Baschieri, P; Menozzi, C; Chavan, D.C.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a fibre-top probe fabricated by carving a tipped cantilever on an optical fibre, with the tip machined in correspondence of the fibre core. When approached to an optical prism illuminated under total internal reflection conditions, the tip of the cantilever detects the optical tunnelling

  6. Phonon Transport through Nanoscale Contact in Tip-Based Thermal Analysis of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulhani, Jay; Lee, Bong Jae

    2017-07-28

    Nanomaterials have been actively employed in various applications for energy and sustainability, such as biosensing, gas sensing, solar thermal energy conversion, passive radiative cooling, etc. Understanding thermal transports inside such nanomaterials is crucial for optimizing their performance for different applications. In order to probe the thermal transport inside nanomaterials or nanostructures, tip-based nanoscale thermometry has often been employed. It has been well known that phonon transport in nanometer scale is fundamentally different from that occurred in macroscale. Therefore, Fourier's law that relies on the diffusion approximation is not ideally suitable for describing the phonon transport occurred in nanostructures and/or through nanoscale contact. In the present study, the gray Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is numerically solved using finite volume method. Based on the gray BTE, phonon transport through the constriction formed by a probe itself as well as the nanoscale contact between the probe tip and the specimen is investigated. The interaction of a probe and a specimen (i.e., treated as a substrate) is explored qualitatively by analyzing the temperature variation in the tip-substrate configuration. Besides, each contribution of a probe tip, tip-substrate interface, and a substrate to the thermal resistance are analyzed for wide ranges of the constriction ratio of the probe.

  7. AFM study of microbial colonization and its deleterious effect on 304 stainless steel by Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in simulated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, S.J.; Pehkonen, S.O.

    2009-01-01

    The biofilm colonization dynamics of Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 27774) on 304 stainless steels (304 SS) was evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in simulated seawater-based media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Results showed that the biofilm formed on the coupon surface by the two strains of bacteria increased in the coverage, heterogeneity and thickness with exposure time, thus resulting in the deterioration of the steel substratum underneath the biofilm in the form of pitting corrosion. The depth of pits induced by D. desulfuricans was larger than that by Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021, which was mainly attributed to the enhanced corrosion of 304 SS coupons by the biogenic sulfide ions, as revealed by the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Tafel polarization curves. AFM was also used to determine cell attachment/detachment processes of the Pseudomonas and D. desulfuricans bacteria on the coupon surface by quantifying the tip-cell interaction forces. The interactive forces between the tip and the bacterial cell surface were considerably smaller than those between the tip and the cell-cell interface due to the accumulation of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) for both strains. Furthermore, the adhesion forces over the Pseudomonas cells were verified to be more attractive than those of D. desulfuricans due to the former being a slime-producer.

  8. Combined single cell AFM manipulation and TIRFM for probing the molecular stability of multilayer fibrinogen matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christenson, W. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Center for Biological Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Yermolenko, I. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Plochberger, B. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Camacho-Alanis, F.; Ros, A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Ugarova, T.P. [School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Ros, R., E-mail: Robert.Ros@asu.edu [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Center for Biological Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on various surfaces produces a nanoscale multilayer matrix, which strongly reduces the adhesion of platelets and leukocytes with implications for hemostasis and blood compatibility of biomaterials. The nonadhesive properties of fibrinogen matrices are based on their extensibility, ensuing the inability to transduce strong mechanical forces via cellular integrins and resulting in weak intracellular signaling. In addition, reduced cell adhesion may arise from the weaker associations between fibrinogen molecules in the superficial layers of the matrix. Such reduced stability would allow integrins to pull fibrinogen molecules out of the matrix with comparable or smaller forces than required to break integrin–fibrinogen bonds. To examine this possibility, we developed a method based on the combination of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, single cell manipulation with an atomic force microscope and microcontact printing to study the transfer of fibrinogen molecules out of a matrix onto cells. We calculated the average fluorescence intensities per pixel for wild-type HEK 293 (HEK WT) and HEK 293 cells expressing leukocyte integrin Mac-1 (HEK Mac-1) before and after contact with multilayered matrices of fluorescently labeled fibrinogen. For contact times of 500 s, HEK Mac-1 cells show a median increase of 57% of the fluorescence intensity compared to 6% for HEK WT cells. The results suggest that the integrin Mac-1-fibrinogen interactions are stronger than the intermolecular fibrinogen interactions in the superficial layer of the matrix. The low mechanical stability of the multilayer fibrinogen surface may contribute to the reduced cell adhesive properties of fibrinogen-coated substrates. We anticipate that the described method can be applied to various cell types to examine their integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrices with a variable protein composition. - Highlights: • We present a method combining fluorescence imaging, single cell manipulation and surface patterning to study the transfer of fibrinogen out of matrices onto cells. • We found that α{sub M}β{sub 2} integrins can pull out fibrinogen molecules from multilayered matrices. • The low stability of fibrinogen multilayers plays a role in the reduced cell adhesive properties of the fibrinogen matrices. • The described method can be applied to other cell types to examine their integrin- mediated adhesion to extracellular matrices with a variable protein composition.

  9. UHV AFM based colloidal probe studies of adhesive properties of VAlN hard coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesing, M.; de los Arcos, T.; Grundmeier, G.

    2018-01-01

    The adhesion of polystyrene (PS) on V0.27Al0.29N0.44 and the related influence of the oxidation states of both surfaces was investigated using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Colloidal Force Spectroscopy (CFS) in Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV). Complementary, the intimate relation between the adhesion force, the chemical structure and surface polarizability was investigated by XPS valence band spectroscopy and the calculation of non-retarded Hamaker coefficients using Lifshitz theory based on optical data as derived from Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. The combined electron and force spectroscopic analysis of the interaction forces disclosed quantitatively the separation of the adhesion force in van der Waals and Lewis acid-base contributions. Further, the surface polarizability of VAlN was shown to be unaffected by oxygen incorporation due to the formation of an only gradually oxidized surface comprising a range of vanadium oxidation states. In contrast, the adhesion force analysis revealed additional Lewis acid-base interactions between the oxidized and non-oxidized VAlN surfaces and carboxyl groups present in the surface of PS after an oxidative oxygen beam treatment.

  10. Probe-based recording technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naberhuis, Steve

    2002-01-01

    The invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) prompted researchers to contemplate whether such technology could be used as the basis for the storage and retrieval of information. With magnetic data storage technology facing limits in storage density due to the thermal instability of magnetic bits, the super-paramagnetic limit, the heir-apparent for information storage at higher densities appeared to be variants of the STM or similar probe-based storage techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Among these other techniques that could provide replacement technology for magnetic storage, near-field optical scanning optical microscopy (NSOM or SNOM) has also been investigated. Another alternative probe-based storage technology called atomic resolution storage (ARS) is also currently under development. An overview of these various technologies is herein presented, with an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in each particularly with respect to reduced device dimensions. The role of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) is emphasized

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure after TIPS. If your liver failure is severe, a TIPS may not be the ... children are more likely to be performed before liver transplant in those with ascites or variceal ... 08, 2017 Send us your feedback Did you find the ...

  12. Using 2D correlation analysis to enhance spectral information available from highly spatially resolved AFM-IR spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Hu, Qichi; Kjoller, Kevin; Boskey, Adele; Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    The recent combination of atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) has led to the ability to obtain IR spectra with nanoscale spatial resolution, nearly two orders-of-magnitude better than conventional Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. This advanced methodology can lead to significantly sharper spectral features than are typically seen in conventional IR spectra of inhomogeneous materials, where a wider range of molecular environments are coaveraged by the larger sample cross section being probed. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis is used to examine position sensitive spectral variations in datasets of closely spaced AFM-IR spectra. This analysis can reveal new key insights, providing a better understanding of the new spectral information that was previously hidden under broader overlapped spectral features. Two examples of the utility of this new approach are presented. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of a set of AFM-IR spectra were collected at 200-nm increments along a line through a nucleation site generated by remelting a small spot on a thin film of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate). There are two different crystalline carbonyl band components near 1720 cm-1 that sequentially disappear before a band at 1740 cm-1 due to more disordered material appears. In the second example, 2D correlation analysis of a series of AFM-IR spectra spaced every 1 μm of a thin cross section of a bone sample measured outward from an osteon center of bone growth. There are many changes in the amide I and phosphate band contours, suggesting changes in the bone structure are occurring as the bone matures.

  13. Vacuolar structures can be identified by AFM elasticity mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riethmueller, Christoph; Schaeffer, Tilman E.; Kienberger, Ferry; Stracke, Werner; Oberleithner, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Fluid-filled organelles like vesicles, endosomes and pinosomes are inevitable parts of cellular signalling and transport. Endothelial cells, building a barrier between blood and tissue, can form vacuolar organelles. These structures are implicated in upregulated fluid transport across the endothelium under inflammatory conditions. Vacuolar organelles have been described by transmission electron microscopy so far. Here, we present a method that images and mechanically characterizes intracellular structures in whole cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). After crosslinking the cellular proteins with the fixative glutaraldehyde, plasma membrane depressions become observable, which are scattered around the cell nucleus. Nanomechanical analysis identifies them as spots of reduced stiffness. Scanning electron microscopy confirms their pit-like appearance. In addition, fluorescence microscopy detects an analogous pattern of protein-poor spots, thereby confirming mechanical rigidity to arise from crosslinked proteins. This AFM application opens up a mechanical dimension for the investigation of intracellular organelles

  14. Superparamagnetism in AFM Cr2O3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobia, D.; Winkler, E.L.; Zysler, R.D.; Granada, M.; Troiani, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report the size effects on the magnetic properties of AFM Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles. From transmission electron microscopy we determined that the system presents high crystallinity and narrow lognormal size distribution centred at = 7.8 nm with σ = 0.3. The magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied by magnetization and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments. By EPR spectroscopy we established that the AFM order temperature, T N , shifted to ∼270 K when the size is reduced (T N (Bulk) ∼ 308 K). From the zero-field-cooling and the field-cooling magnetization curves we determined the blocking temperature T B = 28 K. Below T B the system presents exchange bias effect. We discuss the results by using recent models in terms of the internal magnetic structures of the nanoparticles.

  15. Imaging and force probing RNA by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In the past 30 years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become a true enabling platform in the life sciences opening entire novel avenues for structural and dynamic studies of biological systems. It enables visualization, probing and manipulation across the length scales, from single molecules

  16. Impedimentric and microscopic probes of the integrities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical and structural integrities of Self-assembled Monolayers (SAMs) of some organosulphur-metal complexes, formed on polycrystalline gold disc electrode, were probed, using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) respectively. Values of relevant circuit elements in the ...

  17. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  18. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; De Witt, Joel M [OSU, PHYSICS; Benton, Eric R [OSU, PHYSICS; Yasuda, Nakahiro [NIRS, HIMAC; Benton, Eugene V [UNIV OF SAN FRANCISCO

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  19. Soft Synthesis and Nano -Structural Features of Highly Crystalline Asprin An AFM-Investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Morsy M.A.Sekkina; Khaled M. Elsabawy; A. El-Maghraby

    2014-01-01

    The present investigations introduce new trend of applying AFM-microscopy to visualize a real 3D-imaging of sample’s surface topography .High resolution AFM-investigations indicated that crystalline asprin has regular arrays of atomic arrangement with no violation in the bulk of asprin .TM deflection AFM- gave us good approximation to the diffusion of grain throughout the surface topology of investigated asprin . The AFM-deflection centers imaging indicated that the numbers of grains distribu...

  20. Temperature-dependent imaging of living cells by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenel, Cedric; Giocondi, Marie-Cecile; Seantier, Bastien; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of lateral organization of plasma membranes is a prerequisite to the understanding of membrane structure-function relationships in living cells. Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions are responsible for the existence of various membrane microdomains involved in cell signalization and in numerous pathologies. Developing approaches for characterizing microdomains associate identification tools like recognition imaging with high-resolution topographical imaging. Membrane properties are markedly dependent on temperature. However, mesoscopic scale topographical information of cell surface in a temperature range covering most of cell biology experimentation is still lacking. In this work we have examined the possibility of imaging the temperature-dependent behavior of eukaryotic cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results establish that the surface of living CV1 kidney cells can be imaged by AFM, between 5 and 37 deg. C, both in contact and tapping modes. These first temperature-dependent data show that large cell structures appeared essentially stable at a microscopic scale. On the other hand, as shown by contact mode AFM, the surface was highly dynamic at a mesoscopic scale, with marked changes in apparent topography, friction, and deflection signals. When keeping the scanning conditions constant, a progressive loss in the image contrast was however observed, using tapping mode, on decreasing the temperature

  1. Quantitative analysis and classification of AFM images of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurden, S P; Monteiro, V F; Longo, E; Ferreira, M M C

    2004-07-01

    The surface topography of human hair, as defined by the outer layer of cellular sheets, termed cuticles, largely determines the cosmetic properties of the hair. The condition of the cuticles is of great cosmetic importance, but also has the potential to aid diagnosis in the medical and forensic sciences. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been demonstrated to offer unique advantages for analysis of the hair surface, mainly due to the high image resolution and the ease of sample preparation. This article presents an algorithm for the automatic analysis of AFM images of human hair. The cuticular structure is characterized using a series of descriptors, such as step height, tilt angle and cuticle density, allowing quantitative analysis and comparison of different images. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated by a classification study. Thirty-eight AFM images were measured, consisting of hair samples from (a) untreated and bleached hair samples, and (b) the root and distal ends of the hair fibre. The multivariate classification technique partial least squares discriminant analysis is used to test the ability of the algorithm to characterize the images according to the properties of the hair samples. Most of the images (86%) were found to be classified correctly.

  2. Noncontact AFM Imaging of Atomic Defects on the Rutile TiO2 (110) Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jeppe Vang

    2015-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) operated in the noncontact mode (nc-AFM) offers a unique tool for real space, atomic-scale characterisation of point defects and molecules on surfaces, irrespective of the substrate being electrically conducting or non-conducting. The nc-AFM has therefore in rece...

  3. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.

    be considered. We have therefore developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion with atomic force microscopy (AFM).[1] A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface using a tipless AFM cantilever coated...... with a commercial cell adhesive CellTakTM. The method was applied to four different bacterial strains, and single-cell adhesion was measured on three surfaces (fresh glass, hydrophilic glass, mica). Attachment to the cantilever was stable during the 2 h of AFM force measurements, and viability was confirmed by Live....../Dead fluorescence staining at the end of each experiment. The adhesion force and final rupture length were dependent on bacterial strains, surfaces properties, and time of contact. The single-cell probe offers control of the cell immobilization, thus holds advantages over the commonly used multi-cell probes where...

  4. Characterizing the surface charge of clay minerals with Atomic Force Microscope (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The engineering properties of clayey soils, including fluid permeability, erosion resistance and cohesive strength, are quite different from those of non-cohesive soils. This is mainly due to their small platy particle shape and the surrounding diffuse double layer structure. By using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, the surface topography and the interaction force between the silicon dioxide tip and the kaolinite/montmorillonite clay minerals have been measured in the 1.0 mM NaCl solution at neutral pH. From this, the surface potential of the clay minerals is determined by mathematical regression analyses using the DLVO model. The length/thickness ratio of kaolinite and montmorillonite particles measured ranges from 8.0 to 15.0. The surface potential and surface charge density vary with particles. The average surface potential of montmorillonite is −62.8 ± 10.6 mV, and the average surface potential of kaolinite is −40.9 ± 15.5 mV. The measured results help to understand the clay sediment interaction, and will be used to develop interparticle force model to simulate sediment transport during erosion process.

  5. Non-classic multiscale modeling of manipulation based on AFM, in aqueous and humid ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, M. H.; Homayooni, A.; Hefzabad, R. N.

    2018-05-01

    To achieve a precise manipulation, it is important that an accurate model consisting the size effect and environmental conditions be employed. In this paper, the non-classical multiscale modeling is developed to investigate the manipulation in a vacuum, aqueous and humid ambient. The manipulation structure is considered into two parts as a macro-field (MF) and a nano-field (NF). The governing equations of the AFM components (consist of the cantilever and tip) in the MF are derived based on the modified couple stress theory. The material length scale parameter is used to study the size effect. The fluid flow in the MF is assumed as the Couette and Creeping flows. Moreover, the NF is modeled using the molecular dynamics. The Electro-Based (ELBA) model is considered to model the ambient condition in the NF. The nanoparticle in the different conditions is taken into account to study the manipulation. The results of the manipulation indicate that the predicted deflection of the non-classical model is less than the classical one. Comparison of the nanoparticle travelled distance on substrate shows that the manipulation in the submerged condition is close to the ideal manipulation. The results of humid condition illustrate that by increasing the relative humidity (RH) the manipulation force decreases. Furthermore, Root Mean Square (RMS) as a criterion of damage demonstrates that the submerged nanoparticle has the minimum damage, however, the minimum manipulation force occurs in superlative humid ambient.

  6. On the tip calibration for accurate modulus measurement by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, D., E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Rossi, M. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Centro di Ricerca per le Nanotecnologie Applicate all' Ingegneria della Sapienza (CNIS), University of Rome Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Vlassak, J.J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Accurate quantitative elastic modulus measurements using contact resonance atomic force microscopy require the calibration of geometrical and mechanical properties of the tip as well as the choice of a suitable model for describing the cantilever-tip-sample system. In this work, we demonstrate with both simulations and experiments that the choice of the model influences the results of the calibration. Neglecting lateral force results in the underestimation of the tip indentation modulus and in the overestimation of the tip-sample contact radius. We propose a new approach to the calibration and data analysis, where lateral forces and cantilever inclination are neglected (which simplifies the calculations) and the tip parameters are assumed as fictitious. - Highlights: ► A calibration procedure is proposed for quantitative contact resonance AFM. ► It allows the use of simple analytical model that neglects lateral forces. ► Tip parameters are used as fictitious parameters. ► The approach is demonstrated with simulations and experiments.

  7. Thermoelectric voltage at a nanometer-scale heated tip point contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, Patrick C; Lee, Byeonghee; King, William P

    2012-01-01

    We report thermoelectric voltage measurements between the platinum-coated tip of a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and a gold-coated substrate. The cantilevers have an integrated heater–thermometer element made from doped single crystal silicon, and a platinum tip. The voltage can be measured at the tip, independent from the cantilever heating. We used the thermocouple junction between the platinum tip and the gold substrate to measure thermoelectric voltage during heating. Experiments used either sample-side or tip-side heating, over the temperature range 25–275 °C. The tip–substrate contact is ∼4 nm in diameter and its average measured Seebeck coefficient is 3.4 μV K −1 . The thermoelectric voltage is used to determine tip–substrate interface temperature when the substrate is either glass or quartz. When the non-dimensional cantilever heater temperature is 1, the tip–substrate interface temperature is 0.593 on glass and 0.125 on quartz. Thermal contact resistance between the tip and the substrate heavily influences the tip–substrate interface temperature. Measurements agree well with modeling when the tip–substrate interface contact resistance is 10 8 K W −1 . (paper)

  8. Determining the mechanical properties of electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers using AFM and a novel fiber anchoring technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephen R; Banerjee, Soham; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Due to its low cost, biocompatibility and slow bioresorption, poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) continues to be a suitable material for select biomedical engineering applications. We used a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)/optical microscopy technique to determine key mechanical properties of individual electrospun PCL nanofibers with diameters between 440-1040nm. Compared to protein nanofibers, PCL nanofibers showed much lower adhesion, as they slipped on the substrate when mechanically manipulated. We, therefore, first developed a novel technique to anchor individual PCL nanofibers to micrometer-sized ridges on a substrate, and then mechanically tested anchored nanofibers. When held at constant strain, tensile stress relaxed with fast and slow relaxation times of 1.0±0.3s and 8.8±3.1s, respectively. The total tensile modulus was 62±26MPa, the elastic (non-relaxing) component of the tensile modulus was 53±36MPa. Individual PCL fibers could be stretched elastically (without permanent deformation) to strains of 19-23%. PCL nanofibers are rather extensible; they could be stretched to a strain of at least 98%, and a tensile strength of at least 12MPa, before they slipped off the AFM tip. PCL nanofibers that had aged for over a month at ambient conditions became stiffer and less elastic. Our technique provides accurate nanofiber mechanical data, which are needed to guide construction of scaffolds for cells and other biomedical devices. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tipping the scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters."

  10. Torsional Phacoemulsification and Tip Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fırat Helvacıoğlu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the recent advances in cataract surgery is torsional phacoemulsification. It was developed to increase the efficacy of ultrasonic emulsification. In torsional phacoemulsification, the torsional movement of the tip is translated to side-to-side cutting action with the aid of bent phaco tips. Lens material is cut in both directions, rather than only during a forward stroke. The efficiency of this technique is further enhanced by an improvement in followability provided by the inherent non-repulsive nature of the side-to-side motion. Tip selection is very important for the efficiency of torsional phacoemulsification. Theoretically, there are 2 ways to enhance the cutting efficiency of the tip. First is the stroke length; the 22-degree bent 30-degree Kelman mini-flared tip cuts longer than the 12-degree bent 30-degree mini-flared Kelman tip. Second is the angulation or bevel; the higher the degree (45 degrees, the better cutting efficiency. Retrospective analyses of the previously published clinical studies clearly demonstrated that the efficacy of the torsional phacoemulsification has positive correlation with both the aperture angles and neck angles of the tips. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 392-5

  11. Tipping solutions: emerging 3D nano-fabrication/ -imaging technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seniutinas Gediminas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of optical microscopy from an imaging technique into a tool for materials modification and fabrication is now being repeated with other characterization techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, focused ion beam (FIB milling/imaging, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Fabrication and in situ imaging of materials undergoing a three-dimensional (3D nano-structuring within a 1−100 nm resolution window is required for future manufacturing of devices. This level of precision is critically in enabling the cross-over between different device platforms (e.g. from electronics to micro-/nano-fluidics and/or photonics within future devices that will be interfacing with biological and molecular systems in a 3D fashion. Prospective trends in electron, ion, and nano-tip based fabrication techniques are presented.

  12. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamarguy David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Using an atomic force microscope (AFM at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated, individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as R tip-CNT, R CNT-substrate and R tip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  13. Improving the speed of AFM by mechatronic design and modern control methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schitter, Georg

    2009-01-01

    In Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) high-performance and high-precision control of the AFM scanner and of the imaging forces is crucial. Particularly at high imaging speeds the dynamic behaviour of the scanner may cause imaging artifacts and limit the maximum imaging rate. This contribution discusses and presents recent improvements in AFM instrumentation for faster imaging by means of mechatronic design and utilizing modern control engineering methods. Combining these improvements enables AFM imaging at more than two orders of magnitudes faster than conventional AFMs. (orig.)

  14. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  15. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Transjugular ... in the portal vein system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow backward from the liver ...

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  6. Choking and Strangulation Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Sponsors Recalls Media Center Blog Videos Newsletter facebook twitter instagram pinterest gplus youtube Search Menu Why It Matters ... Safety Sponsors Recalls Media Center Blog Videos Newsletter facebook twitter instagram pinterest gplus youtube Sign up for quick tips ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  18. Search Tips: MedlinePlus

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    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/searchtips.html Search Tips To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. How do I search MedlinePlus? The search box appears at the top ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... risks. Other possible complications of the procedure include: fever muscle stiffness in the neck bruising on the ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients with ... stomach, lower esophagus, and intestines, causing enlarged vessels, bleeding and the accumulation of fluid in the chest ...

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow backward from the liver into the veins of ... does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood ...

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    Full Text Available ... liver back to the heart. top of page How should I prepare? You should report to your ... heart beat and blood pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood ...

  4. Tips to Prevent Tick Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the right insect repellent and other preventive actions can discourage ticks, mosquitoes, and other biting insects from landing on you. Tips include avoiding tick habitats and minimizing exposed skin.

  5. Tips to Prevent Mosquito Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the right insect repellent and other preventive actions can discourage mosquitoes from landing on you. Tips include removing mosquito habitats such as standing water, minimizing exposed skin, and staying indoors while mosquitoes are most active.

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

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    Full Text Available ... deeply you are sedated. When the needle is advanced through the liver and the pathway is expanded ... are the limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A TIPS is used to treat the ... during the procedure. top of page What does the equipment look like? In this procedure, x-ray ...

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  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as "dye" or " ... the placement of the TIPS stent, a contrast material will be injected in the hepatic vein to ...

  12. An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope. Scanning probe Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1991-01-01

    An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope (EFOM) is presented, which employs frustrated total internal reflection on a highly localized scale by means of a sharp dielectric tip. The coupling of the evanescent field to the sub-micrometer probe as a function of probe-sample distance, angle of incidence

  13. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  14. AFM characterization of protein net formation on a fibrous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assis O.B.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme protein net is set on a glass fiber support using the self-assembly technique. Enzymatic film formation is followed by surface imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM. Change in roughness as a function of deposition time is used as an indirect indicator of film formation. The objective was to form a protein film that would have no effect on the permeability of the medium, aiming at its application as a bioactive membrane or reactor suitable for bacteria and chemical interactions in aqueous media.

  15. Topotactic changes on η-Mo4O11 caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovšak, Miloš; Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report influencing electronic properties of η-Mo 4 O 11 . • With the biased AFM tip we induce the surface potential changes on η-Mo 4 O 11 . • We used cw-laser to induced similar effect on surface potential on η-Mo 4 O 11 . • We do not influence the surface and topography of the samples. • No change in topography of samples indicates the topotactic transformation. - Abstract: We present topotactic changes on Mo 4 O 11 crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  16. A tip-attached tuning fork sensor for the control of DNA translocation through a nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; Huang, Tao; Li, Jiali

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that a tuning fork can be used as a force detecting sensor for manipulating DNA molecules and for controlling the DNA translocation rate through a nanopore. One prong of a tuning fork is glued with a probe tip which DNA molecules can be attached to. To control the motion and position of the tip, the tuning fork is fixed to a nanopositioning system which has sub-nanometer position control. A fluidic chamber is designed to fulfill many requirements for the experiment: for the access of a DNA-attached tip approaching to a nanopore, for housing a nanopore chip, and for measuring ionic current through a solid-state nanopore with a pair of electrodes. The location of a nanopore is first observed by transmission electron microscopy, and then is determined inside the liquid chambers with an optical microscope combined with local scanning the probe tip on the nanopore surface. When a DNA-immobilized tip approaches a membrane surface near a nanopore, free ends of the immobilized DNA strings can be pulled and trapped into the pore by an applied voltage across the nanopore chip, resulting in an ionic current reduction through the nanopore. The trapped DNA molecules can be lifted up from the nanopore at a user controlled speed. This integrated apparatus allows manipulation of biomolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) attached to a probe tip with sub-nanometer precision, and simultaneously allows measurement of the biomolecules by a nanopore device.

  17. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyedhosseini, E., E-mail: Seyedhosseini@ua.pt; Ivanov, M. [CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials and Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Bdikin, I. [TEMA and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Vasileva, D. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, A. [Moscow State Institute of Radioengineering, Electronics and Automation, 119454 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rodriguez, B. J. [Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research and School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Kholkin, A. L. [CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials and Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-21

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  18. Ball tip technique for thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota; Matsumoto, Morio; Tsuji, Takashi; Ishii, Ken; Takaishi, Hironari; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2010-08-01

    The aim in this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the ball tip technique in placing thoracic pedicle screws (TPSs), as compared with the conventional freehand technique, in both a cadaveric study and a clinical study of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Although posterior spinal surgery using TPSs has been widely applied, these screws are associated with the potential risk of vascular, pulmonary, or neurological complications. To further enhance the accuracy and safety of TPS placement, the authors developed the ball tip technique. After creating an appropriate starting point for probe insertion, a specially designed ball tip probe consisting of a ball-shaped tip with a flexible metal shaft is used to make a guide hole into the pedicle. Holding the probe with the fingertips while using an appropriate amount of pressure or by tapping it gently and continuously with a hammer, one can safely insert the ball tip probe into the cancellous channel in the pedicle. In a cadaveric study, 5 spine fellows with similar levels of experience in placing TPSs applied the ball tip or the conventional technique to place screws in 5 cadavers with no spinal deformities. The incidence of misplaced screws was evaluated by dissecting the spines. In a clinical study, 40 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis underwent posterior surgery with TPS placement via the ball tip or conventional technique (20 patients in each treatment group). The accuracy of the TPS placements was evaluated on postoperative axial CT scanning. In the cadaveric study, 100 TPSs were evaluated, and the incidence of misplaced screws was 14% in the ball tip group and 34% in the conventional group (p = 0.0192). In the clinical study, 574 TPSs were evaluated. One hundred seventy-one intrapedicular screws (67%) were recognized in the conventional group and 288 (90%) in the ball tip group (p ball tip groups, the respective numbers of TPSs with a pedicle breach of 2 mm were 32 (13%) and 9 (3%; p ball

  19. Behavior of Triple Langmuir Probes in Non-Equilibrium Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Ratcliffe, Alicia C.

    2018-01-01

    The triple Langmuir probe is an electrostatic probe in which three probe tips collect current when inserted into a plasma. The triple probe differs from a simple single Langmuir probe in the nature of the voltage applied to the probe tips. In the single probe, a swept voltage is applied to the probe tip to acquire a waveform showing the collected current as a function of applied voltage (I-V curve). In a triple probe three probe tips are electrically coupled to each other with constant voltages applied between each of the tips. The voltages are selected such that they would represent three points on the single Langmuir probe I-V curve. Elimination of the voltage sweep makes it possible to measure time-varying plasma properties in transient plasmas. Under the assumption of a Maxwellian plasma, one can determine the time-varying plasma temperature T(sub e)(t) and number density n(sub e)(t) from the applied voltage levels and the time-histories of the collected currents. In the present paper we examine the theory of triple probe operation, specifically focusing on the assumption of a Maxwellian plasma. Triple probe measurements have been widely employed for a number of pulsed and timevarying plasmas, including pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs), dense plasma focus devices, plasma flows, and fusion experiments. While the equilibrium assumption may be justified for some applications, it is unlikely that it is fully justifiable for all pulsed and time-varying plasmas or for all times during the pulse of a plasma device. To examine a simple non-equilibrium plasma case, we return to basic governing equations of probe current collection and compute the current to the probes for a distribution function consisting of two Maxwellian distributions with different temperatures (the two-temperature Maxwellian). A variation of this method is also employed, where one of the Maxwellians is offset from zero (in velocity space) to add a suprathermal beam of electrons to the tail of the

  20. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning.......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...

  1. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  2. Characterization and fabrication of fully metal-coated scanning near-field optical microscopy SiO2 tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschimann, L; Akiyama, T; Staufer, U; De Rooij, N F; Thiery, L; Eckert, R; Heinzelmann, H

    2003-03-01

    The fabrication of silicon cantilever-based scanning near-field optical microscope probes with fully aluminium-coated quartz tips was optimized to increase production yield. Different cantilever designs for dynamic- and contact-mode force feedback were implemented. Light transmission through the tips was investigated experimentally in terms of the metal coating and the tip cone-angle. We found that transmittance varies with the skin depth of the metal coating and is inverse to the cone angle, meaning that slender tips showed higher transmission. Near-field optical images of individual fluorescing molecules showed a resolution thermocouple showed no evidence of mechanical defect or orifice formation by thermal effects.

  3. Probing viscoelastic surfaces with bimodal tapping-mode atomic force microscopy: Underlying physics and observables for a standard linear solid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational simulations of single-mode and bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) with particular focus on the viscoelastic interactions occurring during tip-sample impact. The surface is modeled by using a standard linear solid model, which is the simplest system that can reproduce creep compliance and stress relaxation, which are fundamental behaviors exhibited by viscoelastic surfaces. The relaxation of the surface in combination with the complexities of bimodal tip-sample impacts gives rise to unique dynamic behaviors that have important consequences with regards to the acquisition of quantitative relationships between the sample properties and the AFM observables. The physics of the tip-sample interactions and its effect on the observables are illustrated and discussed, and a brief research outlook on viscoelasticity measurement with intermittent-contact AFM is provided.

  4. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. Influence of probe motion on laser probe temperature in circulating blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehrlein, C; Splinter, R; Littmann, L; Tuntelder, J R; Tatsis, G P; Svenson, R H

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of probe motion on laser probe temperature in various blood flow conditions. Laser probe temperatures were measured in an in vitro blood circulation model consisting of 3.2 nm-diameter plastic tubes. A 2.0 mm-diameter metal probe attached to a 300 microns optical quartz fiber was coupled to an argon laser. Continuous wave 4 watts and 8 watts of laser power were delivered to the fiber tip corresponding to a 6.7 +/- 0.5 and 13.2 +/- 0.7 watts power setting at the laser generator. The laser probe was either moved with constant velocity or kept stationary. A thermocouple inserted in the lateral portion of the probe was used to record probe temperatures. Probe temperature changes were found with the variation of laser power, probe velocity, blood flow, and duration of laser exposure. Probe motion significantly reduced probe temperatures. After 10 seconds of 4 watts laser power the probe temperature in stagnant blood decreased from 303 +/- 18 degrees C to 113 +/- 17 degrees C (63%) by moving the probe with a velocity of 5 cm/sec. Blood flow rates of 170 ml/min further decreased the probe temperature from 113 +/- 17 degrees C to 50 +/- 8 degrees C (56%). At 8 watts of laser power a probe temperature reduction from 591 +/- 25 degrees C to 534 +/- 36 degrees C (10%) due to 5 cm/sec probe velocity was noted. Probe temperatures were reduced to 130 +/- 30 degrees C (78%) under the combined influence of 5 cm/sec probe velocity and 170 ml/min blood flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. An evaluation of a combined scanning probe and optical microscope for lunar regolith studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.; Pike, W. T.; Staufer, U.; Claus, D.; Rodenburg, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The microscopic properties of the lunar regolith such as the shape, the surface texture and the size distribution are required for an understanding of both past surface processes and potential hazards for future human exploration [1]. To reveal the particle morphology at the sub micrometer scale, scanning-probe microscopy (SPM), first used on the 2008 Phoenix mission [1], is a proven approach; however, there are two main challenges for the measurement of lunar particles. Firstly, the SPM tip is liable to move particles during scanning, even when using the lower contact forces of the dynamic-mode imaging. Hence the particles need to be stabilised during imaging. Secondly, typically the AFM tip extends about 10 μm from its cantilever, so larger particles protruding more than this height above their substrates cannot be scanned completely. To immobilize particles and eliminate large particles during SPM scanning, micromachined Si substrates, which have been successfully applied in the Phoenix project for Mars investigation in 2008 [2], have been investigated for lunar analogue material. On these substrates micrometer pits are patterned and serve as traps to enhance the stability of the AFM scanning by grasping the particles. In addition, the diameter of pits can determine the size of dusts to be captured and reduce the adhesion for the larger dust and so eliminate the oversized particles. To extend the imaging range and assist in selecting scan areas for the SPM, we use a type of lensless optical imaging (LOM) which uses ptychographic diffractive imaging [3] to eliminate the restrictions and performance limitations of conventional focusing devices. As a reference, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) which minimizes particle-probe interactions and has the advantage of an extended depth of field, is employed to image the same particle fields at resolutions covering both the SPM and LOM. By comparing the differences and the similarities between SEM and LOM images, the

  7. Tip-force induced surface deformation in the layered commensurate tellurides NbA xTe 2 (A = Si, Ge) during atomic force microscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengel, H.; Cantow, H.-J.; Magonov, S. N.; Monconduit, L.; Evain, M.; Whangbo, M.-H.

    1994-12-01

    The Te-atom surfaces of commensurate layered tellurides NbA xTe 2 ( A = Si, x = {1}/{2}; A = Ge, x = {1}/{3}, {2}/{5}, {3}/{7}) were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at different applied forces. Although the bulk crystal structures show a negligible height corrugation in the surface Te-atom sheets, the AFM images exhibit dark linear patterns that become strongly pronounced at high applied forces (several hundreds nN). This feature comes about because the tip-sample force interactions induce a surface corrugation according to the local hardness variation of the surface.

  8. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  9. AFM measurements of adhesive forces between carbonaceous particles and the substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tianqi [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Peng, Wei, E-mail: pengwei@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen, Ke [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Educations, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Adhesive force of spherical carbonaceous particle MCMBs and HTR-10 graphite matrix debris were measured for the first time. • The measured equivalent works of adhesion were much smaller than the ideal values. • The shape factor and the particle morphology reduce the adhesive force. • The adhesion effect does not change directly with the asperity size. - Abstract: Graphite dust is carbonaceous particles generated during operation of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTR). Graphite dust resuspension is the key behavior associated with HTR source term analyses and environmental safety assessment. The adhesive force is the key factor that determines the resuspension rate. The present study used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the adhesive force between a single carbonaceous particle and the substrate. The measurements were performed on mica, graphite IG110 and Inconel 800H. The prepared “probe cantilevers” were mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB), fuel element debris from HTR-10 and graphite NBG18. The equivalent work of adhesion was derived from the measured adhesive force and calculated based on substrate profile approximation and the JKR theoretical model. The measured work was smaller than the ideal work of adhesion, most likely due to the rough particle morphology and the rough substrate surface. Additionally, a shape factor imposes a constraint on the lateral deformation of the particles. Furthermore, surface roughness could reduce the adhesive force some depending on the particle size. Once the particle was too small to be trapped into a trough, the adhesive force would not be further reduced.

  10. Raman, AFM and SNOM high resolution imaging of carotene crystals in a model carrot cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygula, Anna; Oleszkiewicz, Tomasz; Grzebelus, Ewa; Pacia, Marta Z; Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal

    2018-05-15

    Three non-destructive and complementary techniques, Raman imaging, Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy were used simultaneously to show for the first time chemical and structural differences of carotenoid crystals. Spectroscopic and microscopic scanning probe measurements were applied to the released crystals or to crystals accumulated in a unique, carotenoids rich callus tissue growing in vitro that is considered as a new model system for plant carotenoid research. Three distinct morphological crystal types of various carotenoid composition were identified, a needle-like, rhomboidal and helical. Raman imaging using 532 and 488 nm excitation lines provided evidence that the needle-like and rhomboidal crystals had similar carotenoid composition and that they were composed mainly of β-carotene accompanied by α-carotene. However, the presence of α-carotene was not identified in the helical crystals, which had the characteristic spatial structure. AFM measurements of crystals identified by Raman imaging revealed the crystal topography and showed the needle-like and rhomboidal crystals were planar but they differed in all three dimensions. Combining SNOM and Raman imaging enabled indication of carotenoid rich structures and visualised their distribution in the cell. The morphology of identified subcellular structures was characteristic for crystalline, membraneous and tubular chromoplasts that are plant organelles responsible for carotenoid accumulation in cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrated microcantilevers for high-resolution sensing and probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinxin; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2012-01-01

    This topical review is focused on microcantilever-based sensing and probing functions that are realized by integrating a mechanically compliant cantilever with self-sensing and self-actuating elements, specific sensing materials as well as functionalized nano-tips. Such integrated cantilever devices have shown great promise in ultra-sensitive applications such as on-the-spot portable bio/chemical detection and in situ micro/nanoscale surface analysis and manipulation. The technical details of this review will be given in a sequence of cantilever sensors and, then, cantilever-tip probes. For the integrated cantilever sensors, the frequency-output style dynamic cantilevers are described first, with the contents including optimized resonance modes, sensing-group-modified nanostructures for specific bio/chemical mass adsorption and nanoscale sensing effects, etc. Thereafter, the static cantilever sensors for surface-stress detection are described in the sequence of the sensing mechanism, surface modification of the sensitive molecule layer and the model of specific reaction-induced surface-energy variation. After technical description of the cantilever sensors, the emphasis of the review moves to functionalized nano-tip equipped cantilever-tip probing devices. The probing functions are not only integrated on the cantilever but also integrated at the sharp apex of the tip. After description of single integrated cantilever probes and their applications in surface scanning and imaging, arrayed cantilever-tip devices and their simultaneous parallel operation for high throughput imaging and nanomechanical data storage are also addressed. With cantilever-tip probes as key elements, micro-analysis instruments are introduced that can be widely used for macro/nanoscale characterizations. (topical review)

  12. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  13. ZBrush Professional Tips and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Gaboury, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Learn to work effectively and creatively with all versions of ZBrush! ZBrush is used by top artists in Hollywood to model and sculpt characters in such films as Avatar, Iron Man, and Pirates of the Caribbean. In addition, this amazing technology is also used in jewelry design, forensic science, aerospace, video games, toy creation, and the medical field. Written by Pixologic's in-house ZBrush expert Paul Gaboury, this full-color, beautifully illustrated guide provides you with the ultimate tips and tricks to maximize your use of all versions of ZBrush. Reveals numerous little-known tips and tr

  14. Office 2010 Visual Quick Tips

    CERN Document Server

    Gunter, Sherry Kinkoph

    2010-01-01

    Get more done in Office 2010 in less time with these Quick Tips!. Whether you're new to Microsoft Office or updating from older versions, this is the perfect resource to get you quickly up to speed on Office 2010. Every application is covered, including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Publisher. Full-color screenshots and numbered steps clearly explain dozens of features and functions-while quick shortcuts, tips, and tricks help you save time and boost productivity. You'll also find great new ways to access and use some Office apps right from the Web.: Walks you through dozens of new fea

  15. Turbine Blade Tip-Gap Flow Physics and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, Travis

    2005-11-01

    A linear cascade that is designed to simulate the flow around blades in the low-pressure turbine stage of turbo-jet engines is used to study the physics of the tip-gap flow and vortex. The cascade consists of three Pratt & Whitney ``PakB'' blades. The experiment investigated gap sizes of 0.5 to 5.0 percent of the blade axial chord, and Reynolds numbers from 100K to 500K that correspond to tip relative Mach numbers of 0.04 to 0.21. Static pressure ports at mid and tip spanwise locations recorded blade pressure distributions. Static end wall taps recorded pressures in the gap region. A five-hole Pitot probe that was traversed in the blade wakes was used to determine total pressure loss coefficients and local velocity vectors. Baseline measurements were analyzed across the range of Reynolds numbers and gap sizes to categorize their effects. These were then compared to flow changes produced by a passive flow control device placed at the end of a blade to locally reduce the gap height. Its effect on the tip-gap flow is presented.

  16. Optimization of functionalization conditions for protein analysis by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo-Hernández, María, E-mail: maria.arroyo@ctb.upm.es [Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, Rafael; Pérez-Rigueiro, Jose; Elices, Manuel; Nieto-Márquez, Jorge; Guinea, Gustavo V. [Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Highest fluorescence is obtained for central conditions. • Largest primary amine contribution is obtained for central conditions. • RMS roughness is smaller than 1 nm for all functional films. • Selected deposition conditions lead to proper RMS and functionality values. • LDH proteins adsorbed on AVS-films were observed by AFM. - Abstract: Activated vapor silanization (AVS) is used to functionalize silicon surfaces through deposition of amine-containing thin films. AVS combines vapor silanization and chemical vapor deposition techniques and allows the properties of the functionalized layers (thickness, amine concentration and topography) to be controlled by tuning the deposition conditions. An accurate characterization is performed to correlate the deposition conditions and functional-film properties. In particular, it is shown that smooth surfaces with a sufficient surface density of amine groups may be obtained with this technique. These surfaces are suitable for the study of proteins with atomic force microscopy.

  17. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, P J

    2015-03-06

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored.

  18. Multiple regimes of operation in bimodal AFM: understanding the energy of cantilever eigenmodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kiracofe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key goals in atomic force microscopy (AFM imaging is to enhance material property contrast with high resolution. Bimodal AFM, where two eigenmodes are simultaneously excited, confers significant advantages over conventional single-frequency tapping mode AFM due to its ability to provide contrast between regions with different material properties under gentle imaging conditions. Bimodal AFM traditionally uses the first two eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever. In this work, the authors explore the use of higher eigenmodes in bimodal AFM (e.g., exciting the first and fourth eigenmodes. It is found that such operation leads to interesting contrast reversals compared to traditional bimodal AFM. A series of experiments and numerical simulations shows that the primary cause of the contrast reversals is not the choice of eigenmode itself (e.g., second versus fourth, but rather the relative kinetic energy between the higher eigenmode and the first eigenmode. This leads to the identification of three distinct imaging regimes in bimodal AFM. This result, which is applicable even to traditional bimodal AFM, should allow researchers to choose cantilever and operating parameters in a more rational manner in order to optimize resolution and contrast during nanoscale imaging of materials.

  19. Large area scanning probe microscope in ultra-high vacuum demonstrated for electrostatic force measurements on high-voltage devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysin, Urs; Glatzel, Thilo; Schmölzer, Thomas; Schöner, Adolf; Reshanov, Sergey; Bartolf, Holger; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The resolution in electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), a descendant of atomic force microscopy (AFM), has reached nanometre dimensions, necessary to investigate integrated circuits in modern electronic devices. However, the characterization of conducting or semiconducting power devices with EFM methods requires an accurate and reliable technique from the nanometre up to the micrometre scale. For high force sensitivity it is indispensable to operate the microscope under high to ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions to suppress viscous damping of the sensor. Furthermore, UHV environment allows for the analysis of clean surfaces under controlled environmental conditions. Because of these requirements we built a large area scanning probe microscope operating under UHV conditions at room temperature allowing to perform various electrical measurements, such as Kelvin probe force microscopy, scanning capacitance force microscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy, and also electrostatic force microscopy at higher harmonics. The instrument incorporates beside a standard beam deflection detection system a closed loop scanner with a scan range of 100 μm in lateral and 25 μm in vertical direction as well as an additional fibre optics. This enables the illumination of the tip-sample interface for optically excited measurements such as local surface photo voltage detection. We present Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements before and after sputtering of a copper alloy with chromium grains used as electrical contact surface in ultra-high power switches. In addition, we discuss KPFM measurements on cross sections of cleaved silicon carbide structures: a calibration layer sample and a power rectifier. To demonstrate the benefit of surface photo voltage measurements, we analysed the contact potential difference of a silicon carbide p/n-junction under illumination.

  20. AFM and QCM-D as tools for the distinction of melanoma cells with a different metastatic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiepanek, Anna; Milner-Krawczyk, Małgorzata; Lekka, Małgorzata; Kobiela, Tomasz

    2017-07-15

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most dangerous skin cancer originating from melanocytes. Thus, an early and proper melanoma diagnosis influences significantly the therapy efficiency. The melanoma recognition is still difficult, and generally, relies on subjective assessments. In particular, there is a lack of quantitative methods used in melanoma diagnosis and in the monitoring of tumour progression. One such method can be the atomic force microscopy (AFM) working in the force spectroscopy mode combined with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), both applied to quantify the molecular interactions. In our study we have compared the recognition of mannose type glycans in melanocytes (HEMa-LP) and melanoma cells originating from the radial growth phase (WM35) and from lung metastasis (A375-P). The glycosylation level on their surfaces was probed using lectin concanavalin A (Con A) from Canavalia ensiformis. The interactions of Con A with surface glycans were quantified with both AFM and QCM techniques that revealed the presence of various glycan structural groups in a cell-dependent manner. The Con A - mannose (or glucose) type glycans present on WM35 cell surface are rather short and less ramified while in A375-P cells, Con A binds to long, branched mannose and glucose types of oligosaccharides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. The tip of the iceberg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørst, Lill Rastad

    2010-01-01

      Abstract: The tip of the iceberg: Ice as a nonhuman actor of the climate change debate   The global climate change debate has the Arctic as a core region of concern and ice has become a central aspect of discourses. This article discusses ice representations from six different contexts linked...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ... of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ... To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood pressure in the veins of the stomach, esophagus, bowel and liver, reducing the risk of bleeding from enlarged veins across the esophagus ...

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... failure is severe, a TIPS may not be the best use and a different procedure may be needed to control your symptoms. They are also at risk for encephalopathy , which is an alteration of normal brain function that can lead to confusion. This is ...

  6. Food Allergy: Tips to Remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or get better on their own. Outgrowing Food Allergies Most children outgrow their allergies to cow’s milk, egg, soy ... can help you learn when you or your child’s food allergies are resolving with time. Healthy Tips • Always ask ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

  8. Assigning Effective Homework. Classroom Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each new school year brings high hopes, great expectations and challenges for both new and seasoned educators. The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has developed a series called "Classroom Tips" to help educators start the year right and anticipate the year ahead. Over the past 40 years, most research studies on homework have found that…

  9. Scanning tip measurement for identification of point defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raineri Vito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-assembled iron-silicide nanostructures were prepared by reactive deposition epitaxy of Fe onto silicon. Capacitance-voltage, current-voltage, and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS were used to measure the electrical properties of Au/silicon Schottky junctions. Spreading resistance and scanning probe capacitance microscopy (SCM were applied to measure local electrical properties. Using a preamplifier the sensitivity of DLTS was increased satisfactorily to measure transients of the scanning tip semiconductor junction. In the Fe-deposited area, Fe-related defects dominate the surface layer in about 0.5 μm depth. These defects deteriorated the Schottky junction characteristic. Outside the Fe-deposited area, Fe-related defect concentration was identified in a thin layer near the surface. The defect transients in this area were measured both in macroscopic Schottky junctions and by scanning tip DLTS and were detected by bias modulation frequency dependence in SCM.

  10. Predicting casualties implied by TIPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendafiloski, G.; Wyss, M.; Wyss, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    When an earthquake is predicted, forecast, or expected with a higher than normal probability, losses are implied. We estimated the casualties (fatalities plus injured) that should be expected if earthquakes in TIPs (locations of Temporarily Increased Probability of earthquakes) defined by Kossobokov et al. (2009) should occur. We classified the predictions of losses into the categories red (more than 400 fatalities or more than 1,000 injured), yellow (between 100 and 400 fatalities), green (fewer than 100 fatalities), and gray (undetermined). TIPs in Central Chile, the Philippines, Papua, and Taiwan are in the red class, TIPs in Southern Sumatra, Nicaragua, Vanatu, and Honshu in the yellow class, and TIPs in Tonga, Loyalty Islands, Vanatu, S. Sandwich Islands, Banda Sea, and the Kuriles, are classified as green. TIPs where the losses depend moderately on the assumed point of major energy release were classified as yellow; TIPs such as in the Talaud Islands and in Tonga, where the losses depend very strongly on the location of the epicenter, were classified as gray. The accuracy of loss estimates after earthquakes with known hypocenter and magnitude are affected by uncertainties in transmission and soil properties, the composition of the building stock, the population present, and the method by which the numbers of casualties are calculated. In the case of TIPs, uncertainties in magnitude and location are added, thus we calculate losses for a range of these two parameters. Therefore, our calculations can only be considered order of magnitude estimates. Nevertheless, our predictions can come to within a factor of two of the observed numbers, as in the case of the M7.6 earthquake of October 2005 in Pakistan that resulted in 85,000 fatalities (Wyss, 2005). In subduction zones, the geometrical relationship between the earthquake source capable of a great earthquake and the population is clear because there is only one major fault plane available, thus the epicentral

  11. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  12. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  13. Visualized Multiprobe Electrical Impedance Measurements with STM Tips Using Shear Force Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Botaya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we devise a multiprobe electrical measurement system based on quartz tuning forks (QTFs and metallic tips capable of having full 3D control over the position of the probes. The system is based on the use of bent tungsten tips that are placed in mechanical contact (glue-free solution with a QTF sensor. Shear forces acting in the probe are measured to control the tip-sample distance in the Z direction. Moreover, the tilting of the tip allows the visualization of the experiment under the optical microscope, allowing the coordination of the probes in X and Y directions. Meanwhile, the metallic tips are connected to a current–voltage amplifier circuit to measure the currents and thus the impedance of the studied samples. We discuss here the different aspects that must be addressed when conducting these multiprobe experiments, such as the amplitude of oscillation, shear force distance control, and wire tilting. Different results obtained in the measurement of calibration samples and microparticles are presented. They demonstrate the feasibility of the system to measure the impedance of the samples with a full 3D control on the position of the nanotips.

  14. Mini-flared Kelman tip, reverse tip, and sidewinder tip with torsional phaco: a prospective randomized comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Takashi Hida

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the efficiency of surgical procedures using three phaco tip designs in torsional phacoemulsification using the bevel-down technique. Methods: In this prospective, comparative, masked study, patients were randomly assigned to have torsional coaxial microincision cataract surgery using the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip, reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip, or Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip. Clinical measurements included preoperative and 3-month postoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, endothelial cell counts (ECC, and preoperative and 1-day postoperative central corneal thickness (CCT. Intraoperative measurements included phaco time, torsional time, aspiration time, case time, cumulative dissipated energy (CDE, and balanced salt solution volume (BSS. Results: The study evaluated 150 eyes of 150 patients. Intraoperatively, there was no statistically significant difference in cumulative dissipated energy, case time, torsional time, and aspiration time between the three tip configurations. However, less phaco time was used with the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip (p=0.02 than that with the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip or reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip. The mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip and the reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip required significantly less balanced salt solution volume than that required by the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip (p=0.009. There was no statistically significant difference in corrected distance visual acuity and endothelial cell counts between tips 3 months postoperatively (p>0.05. Conclusion: All three tips were effective with no intraoperative complications. When using torsional phacoemulsification through microincisions and the prefracture technique with the bevel-down technique, the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip required a lower mean phaco time than the reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip and the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip.

  15. Superfocussing in a metal-coated tetrahedral tip by dimensional reduction of surface-to edge-plasmon modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.; Burr, G. W.; Grosjean, T.; Maletzky, T.; Fischer, U. C.

    2008-10-01

    Metal-coated dielectric tetrahedral tips (T-tip) have long been considered to be interesting structures for the confinement of light to nanoscopic dimensions, and in particular as probes for scanning near-field optical microscopy. Numerical investigations using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method are used to explore the operation of a T-tip in extraction mode. A dipole source in close proximity to the apex excites the tip, revealing the field evolution in the tip, the resulting edge and face modes on the metal-coated surfaces, and the coupling from these modes into highly directional radiation into the dielectric interior of the tip. These results are the starting point for illumination-mode numerical investigations by a Volume Integral equation method, which compute the field distribution that develops in a T-tip when a Gaussian beam is incident into the tip, and which show that a highly confined electric field is produced at the apex of the tip. The process of light confinement can be considered as a superfocussing effect, because the intensity of the tightly confined light spot is significantly higher than that of the focussed yet much wider incident beam. The mechanism of superfocussing can be considered as a dimensional reduction of surface plasmon modes, where an edge plasmon is the most important link between the waveguide-modes inside the tip and the confined near field at the apex.

  16. Technical issues of electric nanopulse contact lithotripsy as factors affecting lithotripsy effectiveness and probe resourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Ivanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the relationship of main technical issues of electric nanopulse contact lithotripsy (CLT with lithotripsy effectiveness and lithotripsy resources of probe.Electric nanopulses were transmitted by the flexible probes and the lithotripter «Urolit». The relationship between lithotripsy effectiveness and tip diameter of probes, pulse energy, pulse frequency was assessed, and resources of lithotripsy probes with different diameters of the tip were analyzed.Sufficient number of electric nanopulse to destroy stone models was less when tip diameter, nanopulse energy and frequency were greater.Effectiveness of electric nanopulse CLT can be enhanced with the increase of nanopulse energy, frequency and probe diameter. Complex correction of technical issues of electric nanopulse CLT can be a way of probe resources saving.

  17. Parenting Tips: How to Improve Toddler Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issues. To encourage listening and cooperation, follow these parenting tips. By Mayo Clinic Staff Life can be ... and a degree of routine. Consider these practical parenting tips. Make sure your displays of affection for ...

  18. Tips for Good Oral Health during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Good Oral Health During Pregnancy B elow are tips for taking care of your oral health while you are pregnant. Getting oral health care, practicing good oral hygiene, eating healthy foods, ...

  19. School Avoidance: Tips for Concerned Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print Share School Avoidance: Tips for Concerned Parents Page Content ​School avoidance – sometimes called school refusal ... school bully) Actual physical harm Tips for Concerned Parents: As a first step, the management of school ...

  20. AFM of metallic nano-particles and nano-structures in heavily irradiated NaCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaynutdinov, R; Vainshtein, DI; Hak, SJ; Tolstikhina, A; Den Hartog, HW

    2003-01-01

    AFM investigations are reported for heavily, electron irradiated NaCl crystals in ultra high vacuum (UHV) in the non-contact mode-with an UHV AFM/STM Omicron system. To avoid chemical reactions between the radiolytic Na and oxygen and water, the irradiated samples were cleaved and prepared for the

  1. Radiofrequency Wire Recanalization of Chronically Thrombosed TIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majdalany, Bill S., E-mail: bmajdala@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Elliott, Eric D., E-mail: eric.elliott@osumc.edu [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Michaels, Anthony J., E-mail: Anthony.michaels@osumc.edu; Hanje, A. James, E-mail: James.Hanje@osumc.edu [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine (United States); Saad, Wael E. A., E-mail: wsaad@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Radiofrequency (RF) guide wires have been applied to cardiac interventions, recanalization of central venous thromboses, and to cross biliary occlusions. Herein, the use of a RF wire technique to revise chronically occluded transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) is described. In both cases, conventional TIPS revision techniques failed to revise the chronically thrombosed TIPS. RF wire recanalization was successfully performed through each of the chronically thrombosed TIPS, demonstrating initial safety and feasibility in this application.

  2. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiczak, Maguy; Otubo, Larissa; Alamarguy, David; Houzé, Frédéric; Volz, Sebastian; Noël, Sophie; Bai, Jinbo

    2011-04-14

    Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated), individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as Rtip-CNT, RCNT-substrate and Rtip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  3. Probing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    Bacteria initiate attachment to surfaces with the aid of different extracellular proteins and polymeric adhesins. To quantitatively analyse the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions provided by bacterial adhesins, it is essential to go down to single cell level where cell-to-cell variation can...... be considered. We have developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion by force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface by approaching a tipless AFM...... cantilever coated with the commercial cell adhesive CellTakTM. We applied the method to study adhesion of living cells to abiotic surfaces at the single-cell level. Immobilisation of single bacterial cells to the cantilever was stable for several hours, and viability was confirmed by Live/Dead staining...

  4. Characterization of ion-irradiation-induced nanodot structures on InP surfaces by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Radny, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Surfaces of InP were bombarded by 1.9 keV Ar(+) ions under normal incidence. The total accumulated ion fluence the samples were exposed to was varied from 1 × 10(17) cm(-2) to 3 × 10(18)cm(-2) and ion flux densities f of (0.4-2) × 10(14) cm(-2) s(-1) were used. Nanodot structures were found to evolve on the surface from these ion irradiations, their dimensions however, depend on the specific bombardment conditions. The resulting surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As a function of ion fluence, the mean radius, height, and spacing of the dots can be fitted by power-law dependences. In order to determine possible local compositional changes in these nanostructures induced by ion impact, selected samples were prepared for atom probe tomography (APT). The results indicate that by APT the composition of individual InP nanodots evolving under ion bombardment could be examined with atomic spatial resolution. At the InP surface, the values of the In/P concentration ratio are distinctly higher over a distance of ~1 nm and amount to 1.3-1.8. However, several aspects critical for the analyses were identified: (i) because of the small dimensions of these nanostructures a successful tip preparation proved very challenging. (ii) The elemental compositions obtained from APT were found to be influenced pronouncedly by the laser pulse energy; typically, low energies result in the correct stoichiometry whereas high ones lead to an inhomogeneous evaporation from the tips and deviations from the nominal composition. (iii) Depending again on the laser energy, a prolific emission of Pn cluster ions was observed, with n ≤ 11. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  6. Unexplored territory in the AFM force curve contains nanomechanics information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Eppell

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the existence of a previously unknown damped oscillating signal just after the point when an atomic force microscope tip hits a sample surface. This oscillating signal is below the noise in a single force-displacement measurement. Autocorrelating 20 measurements using the snap to contact feature as the reference mark allows the oscillation to be clearly visible above the noise. We show that the amplitude of the signal’s oscillation is largely insensitive to the speed with which the sample is brought toward the tip proving that the impulse that generates the signal comes primarily from the snap-to-contact event. This speed-independence sets a lower limit on how softly a sample may be interrogated when measuring mechanical properties in the surface region. Collection and analysis of this damped oscillating signal eliminates the need for standard low bandwidth lock-in based techniques to determine time dependent surface mechanical properties. This allows conventional atomic force microscopes to make a single pass of force collection over a surface and, after post-processing, yield the full time dependent mechanical behavior of the surface. To demonstrate a practical use of the oscillations, we produce images of a polystyrene/polyethylene sample where the contrast mechanisms are stiffness and viscosity.

  7. Extending the limits of direct force measurements: colloidal probes from sub-micron particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfricht, Nicolas; Mark, Andreas; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Zambelli, Tomaso; Papastavrou, Georg

    2017-07-13

    Direct force measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with the colloidal probe technique are widely used to determine interaction forces in colloidal systems. However, a number of limitations are still preventing a more universal applicability of this technique. Currently, one of the most significant limitations is that only particles with diameters of several micrometers can be used as probe particles. Here, we present a novel approach, based on the combination of nanofluidics and AFM (also referred to as FluidFM-technique), that allows to overcome this size limit and extend the size of suitable probe particles below diameters of 500 nanometers. Moreover, by aspiration of colloidal particles with a hollow AFM-cantilever, the immobilization process is independent of the particle's surface chemistry. Furthermore, the probe particles can be exchanged in situ. The applicability of the FluidFM-technique is demonstrated with silica particles, which are also the types of particles most often used for the preparation of colloidal probes. By comparing 'classical' colloidal probes, i.e. probes from particles irreversibly attached with glue, and various particle sizes aspirated by the FluidFM-technique, we can quantitatively evaluate the instrumental limits. Evaluation of the force profiles demonstrate that even for 500 nm silica particles the diffuse layer properties can be evaluated quantitatively. Therefore, direct force measurements on the level of particle sizes used in industrial formulations will become available in the future.

  8. Optimal design of a touch trigger probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui-Jun; Xiang, Meng; Fan, Kuang-Chao; Zhou, Hao; Feng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A tungsten stylus with a ruby ball tip was screwed into a floating plate, which was supported by four leaf springs. The displacement of the tip caused by the contact force in 3D could be transferred into the tilt or vertical displacement of a plane mirror mounted on the floating plate. A quadrant photo detector (QPD) based two dimensional angle sensor was used to detect the tilt or the vertical displacement of the plane mirror. The structural parameters of the probe are optimized for equal sensitivity and equal stiffness in a displacement range of +/-5 μm, and a restricted horizontal size of less than 40 mm. Simulation results indicated that the stiffness was less than 0.6 mN/μm and equal in 3D. Experimental results indicated that the probe could be used to achieve a resolution of 1 nm.

  9. Monolithically Integrated, Mechanically Resilient Carbon-Based Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Jennings, Andrew T.; Greer, Julia R.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is an important tool for performing measurements at the nanoscale in imaging bacteria or proteins in biology, as well as in the electronics industry. An essential element of SPM is a sharp, stable tip that possesses a small radius of curvature to enhance spatial resolution. Existing techniques for forming such tips are not ideal. High-aspect-ratio, monolithically integrated, as-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have been formed that show promise for SPM applications by overcoming the limitations present in wet chemical and separate substrate etching processes.

  10. Controlled positioning of nanoparticles on graphene by noninvasive AFM lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Elena; Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Ghirri, Alberto; Alvino, Christian; Candini, Andrea; Puntes, Victor; Affronte, Marco; Domingo, Neus; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel

    2012-08-21

    Atomic force microscopy is shown to be an excellent lithographic technique to directly deposit nanoparticles on graphene by capillary transport without any previous functionalization of neither the nanoparticles nor the graphene surface while preserving its integrity and conductivity properties. Moreover this technique allows for (sub)micrometric control on the positioning thanks to a new three-step protocol that has been designed with this aim. With this methodology the exact target coordinates are registered by scanning the tip over the predetermined area previous to its coating with the ink and deposition. As a proof-of-concept, this strategy has successfully allowed the controlled deposition of few nanoparticles on 1 μm(2) preselected sites of a graphene surface with high accuracy.

  11. Method for estimating the tip geometry of scanning ion conductance microscope pipets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Matthew; Del Linz, Samantha J L; Smart, Trevor G; Moss, Guy W J

    2012-11-06

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) offers the ability to perform contact-free, high-resolution imaging of biological cells and tissues at physiological conditions. However, imaging resolution is highly dependent on the geometry of the SICM probe, which is generally not known. Small, high-resolution probes are too fine to image optically and, to date, geometry estimation has usually required electron microscopy (EM). This is time-consuming and prone to failure and cannot provide information about the crucial internal geometry of the probe. Here we demonstrate a new method for determining SICM tip geometry that overcomes the limitations of EM imaging. The method involves fitting an analytical model to current changes during quasi-controlled breakage of the pipet tip. The data can be routinely obtained using the SICM apparatus itself and our method thus opens the way for substantially better quantification in SICM imaging and measurement.

  12. Experimental determination of mode correction factors for thermal method spring constant calibration of AFM cantilevers using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Richard S; Osborn, William A; Pratt, Jon R

    2013-06-28

    Mode correction factors (MCFs) represent a significant adjustment to the spring constant values measured using the thermal cantilever calibration method. Usually, the ideal factor of 0.971 for a tipless rectangular cantilever is used, which adjusts the value by 3% for the first flexural mode. An experimental method for determining MCFs has been developed that relies on measuring the areas under the first few resonance peaks for the flexural mode type. Using this method, it has been shown that MCFs for the first flexural mode of commercially available atomic force microscope cantilevers actually vary from 0.95 to 1.0, depending on the shape and end mass of the cantilever. Triangular shaped cantilevers tend to lower MCFs with tipless versions providing the lowest values. Added masses (including tips) tend to increase the first flexural mode's MCF to higher values with large colloid probes at the high extreme. Using this understanding and applying it to the recently developed laser Doppler vibrometry thermal calibration method it is now possible to achieve very accurate and precise cantilever spring constant calibrations (uncertainties close to ±1%) with commonly available commercial cantilevers such as tipped rectangular and triangular cantilevers, and colloid probes.

  13. Measuring graphene adhesion using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhu, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Van der Waals adhesion between graphene and various substrates has an important impact on the physical properties, device applications and nanomanufacturing processes of graphene. Here we report a general, high-throughput and reliable method that can measure adhesion energies between ultraflat graphene and a broad range of materials using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip. In our experiments, only van der Waals force between the tip and a graphene flake is measured. The Maugis-Dugdale theory is employed to convert the measured adhesion force using AFM to the adhesion energy. The ultraflatness of monolayer graphene on mica eliminates the effect of graphene surface roughness on the adhesion, while roughness of the microsphere tip is addressed by the modified Rumpf model. Adhesion energies of monolayer graphene to SiO2 and Cu are obtained as 0.46 and 0.75 J m-2, respectively. This work provides valuable insight into the mechanism of graphene adhesion and can readily extend to the adhesion measurement for other 2D nanomaterials.Van der Waals adhesion between graphene and various substrates has an important impact on the physical properties, device applications and nanomanufacturing processes of graphene. Here we report a general, high-throughput and reliable method that can measure adhesion energies between ultraflat graphene and a broad range of materials using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip. In our experiments, only van der Waals force between the tip and a graphene flake is measured. The Maugis-Dugdale theory is employed to convert the measured adhesion force using AFM to the adhesion energy. The ultraflatness of monolayer graphene on mica eliminates the effect of graphene surface roughness on the adhesion, while roughness of the microsphere tip is addressed by the modified Rumpf model. Adhesion energies of monolayer graphene to SiO2 and Cu are obtained as 0.46 and 0.75 J m-2, respectively. This work provides valuable insight into the

  14. Topotactic changes on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11} caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovšak, Miloš, E-mail: milos.borovsak@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty for Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska ulica 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mihailovic, Dragan [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); International Postgraduate School Jožef Stefan, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • We report influencing electronic properties of η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • With the biased AFM tip we induce the surface potential changes on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • We used cw-laser to induced similar effect on surface potential on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • We do not influence the surface and topography of the samples. • No change in topography of samples indicates the topotactic transformation. - Abstract: We present topotactic changes on Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11} crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  15. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering of bacillus subtilis spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusciano, G.; Zito, G.; Pesce, G.; Sasso, A.; Isticato, R.; Ricca, E.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding of the complex interactions of molecules at biological interfaces is a fundamental issue in biochemistry, biotechnology as well as biomedicine. A plethora of biological processes are ruled by the molecular texture of cellular membrane: cellular communications, drug transportations and cellular recognition are just a few examples of such chemically-mediated processes. Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) is a novel, Raman-based technique which is ideally suited for this purpose. TERS relies on the combination of scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The basic idea is the use of a metalled tip as a sort of optical nano-antenna, which gives place to SERS effect close to the tip end. Herein, we present the application of TERS to analyze the surface of Bacillus subtilis spores. The choice of this biological systems is related to the fact that a number of reasons support the use of spores as a mucosal delivery system. The remarkable and well-documented resistance of spores to various environmental and toxic effects make them clear potentials as a novel, surface-display system. Our experimental outcomes demonstrate that TERS is able to provide a nano-scale chemical imaging of spore surface. Moreover, we demonstrate that TERS allows differentiation between wilde-type spore and genetically modified strains. These results hold promise for the characterization and optimization of spore surface for drug-delivery applications.

  16. SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY STUDY OF MOLECULAR NANOSTRUCTURES ON 2D MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chuanhui

    2017-01-01

    Molecules adsorbed on two-dimensional (2D) materials can show interesting physical and chemical properties. This thesis presents scanning probe microscopy (SPM) investigation of emerging 2D materials, molecular nanostructures on 2D substrates at the nanometer scale, and biophysical processes on the biological membrane. Two main techniques of nano-probing are used: scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The study particularly emphasizes on self-assembled molecul...

  17. Implementing atomic force microscopy (AFM) for studying kinetics of gold nanoparticle's growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiev, P.; Bojinova, A.; Kostova, B.

    2013-01-01

    In a novel experimental approach Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was applied as a tool for studying the kinetics of gold nanoparticle growth. The gold nanoparticles were obtained by classical Turkevich citrate synthesis at two different temperatures. From the analysis of AFM images during...... the synthesis process the nanoparticle s' sizes were obtained. To demonstrate the applicability and the reliability of the proposed experimental approach we studied the nanoparticles growth at two different temperatures by spectrophotometric measurements and compared them with the results from AFM experimental...

  18. Micromechanical Characterization of Complex Polypropylene Morphologies by HarmoniX AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liparoti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the capability of the HarmoniX Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM technique to draw accurate and reliable micromechanical characterization of complex polymer morphologies generally found in conventional thermoplastic polymers. To that purpose, injection molded polypropylene samples, containing representative morphologies, have been characterized by HarmoniX AFM. Mapping and distributions of mechanical properties of the samples surface are determined and analyzed. Effects of sample preparation and test conditions are also analyzed. Finally, the AFM determination of surface elastic moduli has been compared with that obtained by indentation tests, finding good agreement among the results.

  19. [Improvement of sonographic visualization of cannula needle tips by alignment of the needle lumen : In vitro investigation of established needle tip forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, U; Geppert, T; Steinfeldt, T; Wunder, C

    2015-10-13

    In the context of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks (regional anesthesia), clear visualization of the needle tip and the target structure are mandatory for the performance of a safe puncture and injection. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the visualization of different forms of needle tips and calibers of cannulas in a phantom simulating human tissue, with the help of a standardized image analysis system. Different depths and angles of the puncture needle in relation to the ultrasound probe were tested. Cannula needles established for use in regional anesthesia with different surfaces, diameters and needle tip form in 23 different combinations were analyzed. A gelatine-based phantom was used to simulate human tissue. The standardized visualization of the needle tip with the ultrasound probe was performed in plane at different angles (30°, 45° and 60°), depths of penetration (1 cm, 2 cm and 3 cm) and two different alignments of the cannula needle lumen to the ultrasound probe (0° and 180°). The screenshots of the ultrasound pictures were analyzed by quantifying the pixel brightness around the needle tip (region of interest) with a standardized software (score 0-255). In this study 1104 ultrasound images of cannula needles were analyzed. Diminished scores (reduced pixel brightness) of the needle tips were documented with increasing distance from the ultrasound probe. Comparison of punctures at angles of 30° and 45° showed no differences in needle tip visibility (same scores) but punctures at an angle of 60° were poorly visualized compared with 30° and 45° (mean scores 87.90 ± 11.60 vs. 78.40 ± 12.07, p cannula lumen towards the ultrasound probe (0°) was significantly more easily visualized when compared with the reverse alignment of 180° (mean scores 86.90 ± 12.74 vs. 84.80 ± 11.66, p = 0.003, respectively). No differences in visibility were detected between the different cannula needle diameters

  20. Thermally oxidized Inconel 600 and 690 nickel-based alloys characterizations by combination of global photoelectrochemistry and local near-field microscopy techniques (STM, STS, AFM, SKPFM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechehoud, F.; Benaioun, N. E.; Hakiki, N. E.; Khelil, A.; Simon, L.; Bubendorff, J. L.

    2018-03-01

    Thermally oxidized nickel-based alloys are studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) and photoelectro-chemical techniques as a function of oxidation time at a fixed temperature of 623 K. By photoelectrochemistry measurements we identify the formation of three oxides NiO, Fe2O3, Cr2O3 and determine the corresponding gap values. We use these values as parameter for imaging the surface at high bias voltage by STM allowing the spatial localization and identification of both NiO, Fe2O3 oxide phases using STS measurements. Associated to Kelvin probe measurements we show also that STS allow to distinguished NiO from Cr2O3 and confirm that the Cr2O3 is not visible at the surface and localized at the oxide/steel interface.