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Sample records for afghanistan

  1. Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    This discussion of Afghanistan covers: the people, geography, history (European influence, reform and reaction, Daoud's Republic and the April 1978 coup, and the Soviet invasion), government and political conditions, the economy (agriculture, trade and industry, transportation, economic development), foreign relations, and relations between the US and Afghanistan. In 1985, the population was estimated to be 11 million (plus about 2.7 million refugees in Pakistan and 1 million refugees in Iran and the west). The annual growth rate is negative because of the war. In 1971 the UN estimate of infant mortality was 181.6/1000 live births with life expectancy 36.6 for men and 37.3 for women. Afghanistan's ethnically and linguistically mixed population reflects its location astride historic trade and invasion routes leading from central Asia into South and Southwest Asia. The dominant ethnic group, the Pukhtuns, make up about 40% of the population. Afghanistan has had a turbulent history. All of Afghanistan's rulers until the Marxist coup of 1978 were from Durani's tribe, and, since 1818, all were members of that tribe's Mohammadzai clan. Afghanistan is primarily an agricultural country, despite the fact that only 15% of its total land area is viable. This sector employs 3/4 of the working population and accounts for more than half of the gross domestic product. The Afghan economy remains tightly tied to that of the Soviet Union, its largest trading partner. Although Afghan has no railways or navigable rivers, the Amu Darya (Oxus) River on the Soviet-Afghan border does carry barge traffic. The Soviets pledged more than $300 million in new aid in 1984 and disbursed more than $400 million in commodities and new project aid. They signed a further agreement granting additional credits in February 1985. Since the December 1979 Soviet invasion, Afghanistan's foreign policy has mirrored that of the Soviet Union. The US has never recognized the Kabul regime and strongly opposes the

  2. Afghanistan Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Poul Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Afghanistan index is a compilation of quantitative and qualitative data on the reconstruction and security effort in Afghanistan. The index aims at providing data for benchmarking of the international performance and thus provides the reader with a quick possibility to retrieve valid...... basis. The data are divided into different indicators such as security, polls, drug, social, economic, refugees etc. This represents a practical division and does not indicate that a picture as to for instance security can be obtained by solely looking at the data under security. In order to obtain...... a more valid picture on security this must incorporate an integrated look on all data meaning that for instance the economic data provides an element as to the whole picture of security....

  3. Afghanistan Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiaoqiang

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Karzai regime has made some progress over the past four years and a half in the post-war reconstruction.However, Taliban's destruction and drug economy are still having serious impacts on the security and stability of Afghanistan.Hence the settlement of the two problems has become a crux of affecting the country' s future.Moreover, the Karzai regime is yet to handle a series of hot potatoes in the fields of central government' s authority, military and police building-up and foreign relations as well.

  4. Stateless in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Kuppers

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A group of people of nomadic lifestyle in eastern Afghanistan has reportedly recently been forcibly relocated because of their lack of identity documents: yet another cause of displacement in Afghanistan that requires a just and sustainable solution.

  5. Glemmer USA Afghanistan nu?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    2015-01-01

    Hvis Obamas efterfølger kan skrue den rigtige strategiske fortælling sammen så vil USA ikke forlade Afghanistan med udgangen af 2016.......Hvis Obamas efterfølger kan skrue den rigtige strategiske fortælling sammen så vil USA ikke forlade Afghanistan med udgangen af 2016....

  6. Strategic CSR in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Sameer

    CSR is a rising phenomena in Afghanistan – but why are firms concerned about CSR in a least-developed context such as Afghanistan, and what are the strategic benefits? This paper is one of the first to explore these CSR issues in a least-developed country. It does so by focusing on CSR...... in the Afghan telecommunication sector and in particular on ‘Roshan’ as a case company. The findings of this paper are two-folded. First, it provides an overview of the CSR practices in the telecommunication sector in Afghanistan. Second, it focuses on one case and explains whether Roshan can gain strategic...... advantages through CSR in Afghanistan, and if so which and how these strategic benefits are gained. The paper shows that the developmental challenges of Afghanistan are the key explanations for why companies engage in CSR. Roshan has engaged in proactive CSR to overcome the contextual barriers for growth...

  7. Democratization of Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Afghanistan Transition Under Threat, ed. Geoffrey Hayes and Mark Sedra (Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2008), 34. 20 Charles L. Barry and...ed. Geoffrey Hayes and Mark Sedra (Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2008), 105. 25 Ibid. 26 Charles L. Barry and Samuel R. Greene, What...Priorities for the Future.” In Afghanistan Transition Under Threat, edited by Geoffrey Hayes and Mark Sedra , 89-148. Canada: Wilfrid Laurier

  8. Afghanistan's Role in Regional Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Karzai

    2006-01-01

    @@ At the invitation of Cui Liru, President of China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR), Mr.Hamid Karzai,President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, paid a visit to CICIR on June 20, 2006.In his speech before an audience of several hundred researchers, President Karzai addressed many issues Afghanistan is now facing, including the achievements of peace and reconstruction, the necessities and ways for Afghanistan to re-join in the regional affairs and the international community, the role of Afghanistan in the regional development and prosperity, and the meaning of a stable Afghanistan to China. Following are the contents of his speech.

  9. Afghanistan, state and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kværnø, Ole

    In June 2007, the RAND Corporation and the Royal Danish Defence College hosted a conference titled “Afghanistan: State and Society, Great Power Politics, and the Way Ahead”. The two-day event, held in Copenhagen, was attended by more than 100 politicians, scholars, academics, and representative...... of both governmental and nongovernmental institutions from more than 20 states. Its theme was to discuss the problems that Afghanistan faces in the wake of the U.S.-led attack on al Qaeda training camps and the Taliban government; examine the challenges confronting the NATO International Security......-encompassing, long-term strategic approach....

  10. Security Situation in Afghanistan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Jinying

    2006-01-01

    @@ Since the beginning of 2006, the Taliban has intensified its attacks in Afghanistan in various forms, especially in the south.The U.S.-led coalition forces, the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) , and the Afghan Army found themselves constantly be the victims of ambushes, suicide bombings, and roadside blasts.

  11. Terrorism, Insurgency, and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Afghanistan and Kashmir, through groups such as Lashkar e-Tayyiba (LT), Jaish-e-Mohammed (JEM), Jamiat Ulema- i-Islam’s Fazlur Rehman faction (JUI-F...British dubbed them “Mad Mullah movements.” There have been many. A similar figure to Mullah Omar, Mirza Ali Khan —a Tori KhelWaziri whowas known to

  12. Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David

    2013-01-01

    In December 2006, the US military attempted to implement a strategy change in Afghanistan, going from an enemy-centric focus to a population-centric focus. The Counterinsurgency Doctrine was described in a US military field manual where work performed by a French officer four decades earlier...

  13. Andre scener fra Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serritzlev, Jeanette

    2010-01-01

    Filmen 'Armadillo' viser, at indsatsen i Afghanistan er formålsløs. At det ikke nytter. At drengene er storforbrugere af cola og porno, og at afghanerne synes, at vi skal tage hjem. At soldaterne har sjove film på deres computere, kan ikke provokere mig. Det kan til gengæld et ensidigt og fortegnet...

  14. UNO's Afghanistan Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, M. D.

    This paper explores the background history and sources of the Afghanistan collection at the University Library, University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO). Credit for the impetus behind the development of the collection is given to Chris Jung, a former UNO geography/geology faculty member; Ronald Roskens, then UNO chancellor; and the Afghanistan…

  15. Sustainable Construction in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    described in the Szabo and Barfield book.74 These descriptions are summarized in the chart in Appendix C, Section 1. With the exception of Bamiyan , who...chubdara hut is also found in this area. It is also constructed of reeds, but has a wooden frame for roof support.79 Bamiyan is the home to the...Afghanistan currently uses caves for domestic housing, Bamiyan . It was common in the past in many regions; however, the practice has slowly disappeared as

  16. Meeting EFA: Afghanistan Community Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwanz; David

    2007-01-01

    From 1979 to 2002, Afghanistan was in a near constant state of war and exhibited some of the lowest levels of development in the world. While local conflicts and Taliban remnants continue to challenge Afghanistan's reconstruction and stabilization, significant progress has been made since the 2001 U.S. led invasion and subsequent fall of the…

  17. Barefoot in Afghanistan: solar electrification of villages in Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Bunker [Barefoot Coll., Rajasthan (India); Synnevag, Gry [Norwegian Church Aid (Norway)

    2006-05-15

    In the mountains of Afghanistan, villagers must walk long distances and pay high prices to buy fuel to survive. The authors report on an innovative solar electrification scheme that has enabled villagers to be self-reliant installers. (Author)

  18. CSR in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Sameer; Jamali, Dima

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: – The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergence of CSR in Afghanistan as a novel context in the South-Asian CSR debate. Design/methodology/approach: – The findings of the paper are based on case studies of four corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. Multiple...... space for manoeuvring for non-state actors to play a pivotal role in business-society relations. The paper highlights that the CSR practices are driven by the multi-level organisational field that through a unique blend of global coercive, mimetic and normative pressures lead to convergence around...... explicit CSR themes. Research limitations/implications: – The findings are based on CSR practices that are explicitly stated and do not include informal and/or implicit business-society practices in such contexts. Originality/value: – This paper combines the literature on areas of limited statehood...

  19. Afghanistan: Green-on-Blue Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    Afghanistan, December 2012, p 35 15 Yousafzai, Sami and Moreau , Ron, http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2012/08/26/ afghanistan-green-on-blue-killings...spike-insider-attacks- stress-ramadan-fasting, 24 August 2012 37 Yousafzai, Sami and Moreau , Ron, http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2012/08/26...afghanistan-green-on-blue-killings- explained.html, Afghanistan: ‘Green on Blue’ Killings Explained, 27 August 2012 38 Yousafzai, Sami and Moreau , Ron

  20. Securing Afghanistan’s Future Against Opium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    International Studies, 2007), 51. 38 Blanchard, Afghanistan: Narcotics and U.S. Policy, 35. 39 Geoffrey Hayes and Mark Sedra , Afghanistan Transition Under...Geoffrey and Mark Sedra . Afghanistan: Transition Under Threat. Waterloo, Ontario: Centre for International Governance Innovation and Wilfrid Laurier

  1. Myiopardalis pardalina in Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stonehouse, J. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sadeed, S.M.; Harvey, A.; Haiderzada, G.S. [Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, Mazar-i-Sharif (Afghanistan)

    2006-07-01

    The Baluchistan melon fly, Myiopardalis pardalina (Bigot), is a serious and worsening problem in Central Asia. As it survives snowy and subzero temperatures as an over wintering pupa, it constitutes a quarantine risk to temperate countries where melons are grown, including in North America and Southern Europe. It is spreading rapidly in Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan as well as Afghanistan, and present from Turkey to India. Losses without control mount as high as 80%. In spite of this, the control of the fly has been little studied, and published recommendations are largely for cover applications of chemicals. It responds to no known lures, and reports of bait responses, though mixed, indicate poor responsivity. This study addressed these problems with a crash program of research in the melon season of 2006, in Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan, with the following findings. (1) Although absence of proof of response is not proof of absence of response, adult flies responded to none of a wide suite of food baits in the field or laboratory. (2) Females laid viable eggs, with offspring completing their life cycle, having received no food as adults, adding suggestive support to a conclusion that adults may not be attracted to food baits. (3) When leaves were coated with sugar, however, flies which were on them were stimulated to remain, indicating that the addition of sugar to cover sprays (as opposed to spot sprays which might have attracted flies from a distance) may enhance their effectiveness and persistence. (4) Pupae experimentally buried to different depths led to teneral adult emergence from 50cm of soil, and thus fruit disposal by burial may need to be deeper than this. (5) Pupae in soil fully flooded for 48 hours suffered no reduction in survival, and thus field flooding for control may need to be longer than this. (6) A study of pupation found that: up to ten prepupal larvae may leave a melon through the same hole; unlike those of Bactrocera, larvae do not jump about

  2. Corporate Social Responsibility in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Sameer

    This doctoral dissertation examines the business-development relations in Afghanistan by focusing on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and other related practices from corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. More concretely, the study aims to explore the characteristics...... provides a relevant empirical focus that can enrich the theoretical debates about CSR in developing countries. The study thereby stresses on the importance of context, and integrates both the societal and corporate dimensions to study CSR by corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry...... in Afghanistan, and a study of secondary data from the corporations, Afghan state institutions, civil society and other relevant actors....

  3. Mass movement in northeast Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, John F.; Weihs, Brandon J.; Schettler, Megan Jensen

    Mass movements of nearly all types occur in Afghanistan but in the high relief, rugged Pamir and Hindu Kush mountains of northeastern Afghanistan, mass-movement threats to lives and property necessitated study to elucidate problems to development. Twenty-two different mass movements in bedrock in the Badakhshan Province of northeastern Afghanistan were studied for this paper, including large rock falls and rock slides, along with massive slope-failure complexes with many types and rates of movement. Where higher altitudes prevail in the region, ice-cemented and ice-cored rock glaciers are also common and overlie some of the other mass movements. Inasmuch as seismic energy sources in the Eastern Hindu Kush are maximal in southern Badakhshan, and relief, slope angles and precipitation all increase from west to east as well, the causes of the pervasive mass movement are plentiful enough, although direct cause and slope-failure effect are not known. Some weak sedimentary lithologies downfaulted into, or draped across crystalline rocks, also failed. Some intermixed tills also occur but are not easily differentiated, even with analysis on the ground. Using high resolution satellite imagery and digital elevation models, we assessed geomorphologic parameters to characterize spatial-organization structures related to zones of erosion, deposition and further hazard potential. Analyses indicate that many of the massive slope failures can be characterized and differentiated into various process domains and chronologic-development zones with their different impacts upon the landscape. Mass movements in Afghanistan can exhibit unique topographic signatures that can be used to better assess hazards in other mountain areas, especially where landslide-dam breakout floods threaten. Development of roads, bridges, buildings, and irrigation networks should be done with care in these regions of Afghanistan.

  4. SIGAR: Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-30

    locals while clearing villages of dangerous unexploded ordnance.145 Status The Mine Action Program of Afghanistan ( MAPA ) is the primary organization...responsible for removing land mines and other ERW, according to DoS. MAPA is made up of more than 20 humanitarian partners from Afghanistan and the...international community. The UN-assisted Mine Action Coordination Center of Afghanistan and the Afghan Department of Mine Clearance work with MAPA to

  5. Drug use and harm reduction in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strathdee Steffanie A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Opium has been cultivated in Afghanistan since 1100 A.D., although production has steadily increased since 1979. Currently, Afghanistan produces three-quarters of the global opium supply, with injection drug use and HIV currently following the opium trade route through Central Asia. Although systematic studies are lacking, heroin use appears to be on the rise in Afghanistan. The purpose of this paper is to briefly provide historical background and current statistics for drug production and use in Afghanistan, to discuss the new government's policies towards problem drug use and available rehabilitation programs, and to assess Afghan harm reduction needs with consideration of regional trends.

  6. The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan: Strategic Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    However, a U.S. presence in Afghanistan seemed likely and they feared 26Steve Coll, Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden...By the end of the year, Hekmatyr’s force killed approximately 5,000 and displaced approximately one million civilians. The shelling reduced...

  7. Indicators of NGO Security in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-14

    in Afghanistan. Goodhand argues it will take more than just military action. Hoffman, Peter and Larry Minear. ed. NGO Policy Dialogue XI...http://hwproject.tufts.edu/new/pdf/Report11.pdf. Update to proceedings NGO Policy Dialogue XI: Afghanistan Revisited, Report 11. Proc

  8. Mapping the Human Terrain in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    Michael Bhatia and Mark Sedra , Afghanistan, Arms and Conflict: Armed groups, disarmament and security in a post-war society, (New York, NY: Routledge...Bhatia, Michael and Mark Sedra . Afghanistan, Arms and Conflict: Armed groups, disarmament and security in a post-war society. New York, NY

  9. Private sector and stabilisation in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magaard, Tina

    I briefet opsummerer Tina Magaard de vigtigste konklusioner fra konferencen ”Private sector and stabilisation in Afghanistan – a neglected match?”, som blandt andet gav indsigt i udfordringerne og mulighederne for den private sektor i Afghanistan. Ved at kombinere perspektiver fra strategiske...

  10. Poetic Return in Afghanistan Persian Poem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Shafagh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poetic return movement was started by a group of poets like Moshtagh and Shole Esfehani in the second half of 12 century. Their goal was restoring Persian poem and deliverance of Hindi style decline. Esfahan’s poets initiative was considered only in Iran but in other Persian language and literature areas like India, Afghanistan and Transoxiana it was ignored. After the failure of constitutional Movement in Afghanistan, motion similar poetic return was happened that caused poetic themes, which had gone towards modernism, return to Hindi style again.The present paper attempts to analyze the poetic atmosphere in Afghanistan synchronous the poetic return movement in Iran and investigate socio- political backgrounds of return to Hindi style in Afghanistan after constitution failure.

  11. Afghanistan Narcotics: The Bigger Battle Toward Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    condition to secure Afghanistan as a training area, safe haven, and breeding ground for terrorism. Insurgent and terrorists groups utilize the...brought the United States’ focus on Afghanistan as a training area, safe haven, and breeding ground for terrorism. Since the U.S. led coalition...free, and remained that way through 2006. However, in 2007 it returned to narcotics—this time cannabis . In 2007, the province produced about 173,000

  12. Afghanistan in 2024: Muddling Through?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kilcullen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights trends in Afghan security and development, including capacities of Taliban and Al Qaeda insurgencies, national forces’ casualty and desertion rates, and citizen rage spurred by abusive authorities, profiteering elites and ethnic leaders. In coming years, the unity central government may fall apart. As in Pakistan, U.S. targeted killings by drones and raids within Afghanistan may prove counter-productive, radicalizing civilians. While little is certain, a modest degree of successful stability and reconstruction may be achieved by 2024 – most large cities and many small towns may be controlled by the Kabul government, official corruption may decline, and conceivably the country may integrate into a regional economy shared with Iran, Russia, China, and India.

  13. Counternarcotics Strategies: Effects on Afghanistan Hearts and Minds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    Hodes and, Mark Sedra , The Search for Security in Post-Taliban Afghanistan, (NY: Routledge, 2007), 40. 48 Barton, 153. 49 Blanchard, 15. so Ibid, 19... Sedra . 2007. The Search for Security in Post-Taliban Afghanistan. New York, NY: Routledge, 2007. Johnson, Chris. Afghanistan. 2nd ed. GB: Oxfam, 2004

  14. Post-2014 Afghanistan and its impact in Northeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godehardt, Nadine; Shim, David

    2014-01-01

    The economic, political, and social situation in post-2014 Afghanistan remains uncertain, particularly because the effects of the US drawback from Afghanistan on national and regional stability are rather difficult to foresee. In this article, we explore how the debates about post-2014 Afghanistan i

  15. Seismotectonic Map of Afghanistan and Adjacent Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Russell L.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This map is part of an assessment of Afghanistan's geology, natural resources, and natural hazards. One of the natural hazards is from earthquake shaking. One of the tools required to address the shaking hazard is a probabilistic seismic-hazard map, which was made separately. The information on this seismotectonic map has been used in the design and computation of the hazard map. A seismotectonic map like this one shows geological, seismological, and other information that previously had been scattered among many sources. The compilation can show spatial relations that might not have been seen by comparing the original sources, and it can suggest hypotheses that might not have occurred to persons who studied those scattered sources. The main map shows faults and earthquakes of Afghanistan. Plate convergence drives the deformations that cause the earthquakes. Accordingly, smaller maps and text explain the modern plate-tectonic setting of Afghanistan and its evolution, and relate both to patterns of faults and earthquakes.

  16. Afghanistan: Politics, Elections, and Government Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Northern Alliance Commanders ........................................................................................ 15 Abdul Rashid Dostam: Uzbek...in Afghanistan is Abdul Rashid Dostam, who was allied with Soviet occupation forces but later defected and helped bring down the Communist regime in...States banned contracts to one such firm, Watan Risk Management, as of January 6, 2011; the firm is co-owned by two Karzai second cousins— Rashid and

  17. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    AFGHANISTAN RECONSTRUCTION12 Building the Capacity To Heal An Afghan anesthesiologist applies a cast to the arm of a member of the 67th Forward Surgical Team...167 1. Dr. James Miller , Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, 3/22/2012. 2. Gen

  18. Wanat: Combat Action in Afghanistan, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    engineer squad, led by Staff Sergeant Thomas Hodge , from C Company, 62d Engineer Battalion (Heavy), a unit that had just recently deployed to Afghanistan...they are only issued one uniform and usually they are dirty. They also appeared freshly shaven with razor nicks on their faces. There were also

  19. Strategic Planning for Literacy Education in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Harrison J.; Henry, Doris A.

    1993-01-01

    After crisis conditions abated, directors of a U.S. Agency for International Development/University of Nebraska at Omaha joint project resolved to implement strategic planning for literacy education (including curriculum development, teacher education, and assessment) in Afghanistan. This article describes the rigors of educational planning in a…

  20. Pakistan’s Impact on Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    never loses CI • Baloch five insurgencies: 1948, 1958-59, 1962-63, 1973-77, and 2002+ (Talibanizing) • Suppressed 75 million Bengalis in 1970-71 with...1962-1963 sporadic infiltration • Pakistan: Lesson Learned : Local security • 1963-1973 Royal Peace with Pakistan • Afghanistan supports Pakistan

  1. Protesting War: Comparing Afghanistan to Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    Kennedy School of Government C15-80-271 (Boston, MA: Harvard University Press, 1983), 7. 4 Edwin E. Moise , ―The Domino Theory – The 1960s: high...more-us-troops-in- afghanistan-than-iraq.html, (Accessed 3 December 2010). Moise , Edwin E., ―The Domino Theory – The 1960s: High Tide of the Domino

  2. Afghanistan in the Balance: Air Politik

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Union’s. 43 David C Isby, War in a Distant Country Afghanistan: Invasion and Resistance (London: Arms and Amour , 1989), 64-65. 44 Barnett Rubin...Invasion and Resistance. London: Arms and Amour , 1989. Jervis, Robert. Perception and Misperception in International Politics. Princeton, N.J

  3. Report on Progress Toward Security and Stability in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    facilities formerly based in Afghanistan have now been moved to Pakistan, specifically in the border town of Chaman , Baluchistan Province. The...area of Chaman – while reflecting the weakness of the Taliban in Afghanistan, have the potential to have a significant political effect in Afghanistan...patronage networks. Further, several border crossing points, including Weesh Chaman and the Kandahar inland customs depot, still lack the automated

  4. War in Afghanistan: Strategy, Operations, and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    United States created the Office of Military Cooperation-Afghanistan ( OMC -A) to train the ANA. That year, to supplement German efforts...to the Department of Defense, and renaming the OMC -A the Office of Security Cooperation-Afghanistan (OSC-A).164 Early in 2007, when the U.S. three...www.defenselink.mil/pubs/ united_states_plan_for_sustaining_the_afghanistan_national_security_forces_1231.pdf. The OSC-A, like the OMC -A, reported to the

  5. L’Afghanistan, Etat failli ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalène Reynolds

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Dans un contexte où la «communauté internationale» s’inquiète – à juste titre – de la montée d’un extrémisme musulman dont elle peine à déterminer les ferments qui le nourrissent, il est utile - tout en évoquant brièvement la position ambigüe pakistanaise - de dresser un bilan de l’action de la Force internationale d'assistance à la sécurité en Afghanistan.In a context where the “international community” is - not without reason - concerned by the rise of Muslim extremism, and is struggling to grasp the factors feeding that phenomenon, it is useful to assess the impact of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan (ISAF since its establishment, referring in passing to the ambiguous position of Pakistan.

  6. Assessment of Biomass Resources in Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R.

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan is facing many challenges on its path of reconstruction and development. Among all its pressing needs, the country would benefit from the development and implementation of an energy strategy. In addition to conventional energy sources, the Afghan government is considering alternative options such as energy derived from renewable resources (wind, solar, biomass, geothermal). Biomass energy is derived from a variety of sources -- plant-based material and residues -- and can be used in various conversion processes to yield power, heat, steam, and fuel. This study provides policymakers and industry developers with information on the biomass resource potential in Afghanistan for power/heat generation and transportation fuels production. To achieve this goal, the study estimates the current biomass resources and evaluates the potential resources that could be used for energy purposes.

  7. State Capacity and Resistance in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    22 See for example: Bhabani Sen Gupta, Afghanistan: Politics, Economics and Society. (Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1986); Milan ...shura who oversaw the government’s administration and the local foot soldiers who implemented the Taliban’s harsh edicts to offer a form of local...extensive intelligence and patronage networks as a means of both keeping informed, but in also promulgating edicts that sought to direct the totality of

  8. Illicit Drugs and Insurgency in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Stepanova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It is argued that the relationship between illicit drugs and the insurgency in Afghanistan cannot be captured by the simplistic concept of “narco-terrorism”. Rather, it has to be seen in terms of linkages of various types and degrees between two distinct phenomena. Drug trafficking may generate criminal violence in both peacetime and conflict settings. In the latter case, the illicit drug business becomes a “conflict resource”, while also serving shadow economic functions (such as serving as a social-economic coping strategy to peasants in some areas and generating organized criminal violence and street delinquency. Organized crime groups play the main role in the illicit drug business, especially at the higher, internationalized levels of the drug chain. Drug profits are in fact lowest in the drug producing areas themselves. In the case of Afghanistan, only 4.3 per cent (or US $ 2,9 billion of the US $ 60 billion average annual volume of the global market for Afghan opiates remain in the country. Of the proceeds that stay in Afghanistan, the author estimates that no more than between US $ 100-150 million probably went to the Taliban in 2011. The US/NATO war on the Taliban has not significantly reduced Afghanistan’s opium economy. The prospects for achieving significant results in counter-narcotics after the US/NATO withdrawal in 2014 are dim unless major armed conflict comes to an end – a goal likely to be achieved only if Afghanistan is decentralized and regionalized and the Taliban is given a regional role in Pashtu parts of the country whereby tougher counter-narcotics provisions should be a negotiable demand/condition for any configuration of talks with the insurgents on the political settlement.

  9. Inside the Soviet Army in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    tality against the civilian population in contravention to inter- nationally accepted norms of warfare conduct are common. " Freelance " looting and...publications in Lithuania and Ukraine. Four Estonian draft- age youth who defected to Sweden cited their desire to avoid service in Afghanistan as the...punished severely, if pursued in an unau- thorized, " freelance " manner. We were given countless examples of every aspect of Soviet misconduct. Most of the

  10. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    emblematic of the U.S.-Afghan relation- ship and the historical commitment our country has made to the people of Afghanistan. Unfortunately, it is also proof...provide information on the capability of the Afghan security forces to oper- ate and maintain their infrastructure after January 1, 2015. These provisions...million for the four SIKA contracts as of March 31, 2013, none of these funds have gone to fund the “labor intensive or productive infrastructure

  11. Pre-Deployment Handbook: Afghanistan (post 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    League (Rabitat al-Alam al-Islami) and Egyptian-based Muslim Brotherhood (Jamaat al-Ikhwan al-Muslimin). TAXATION AND STATE-BUILDING...credentials and attract new recruits, Omar turned to the legend of the prophet’s cloak. The cloak was housed in Kandahar’s Khirka Sharif, one of the...holiest places in Afghanistan, and the shrine of the founder of the Durrani dynasty, Ahmad Shah Durrani. An Afghan legend held that

  12. BRIBERY CHALLENGES AND BUSINESS ETHICS IN AFGHANISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Professor Bahaudin G. Mujtaba

    2012-01-01

    A market-oriented business environment can create opportunities for efficiency as well as various forms of corruption such as acceptance and tolerance of bribery, especially when the government is not well established to enforce fair rules and policies. Various media outlets regularly cover cases of bribery in Afghanistan but not necessarily other forms of corruption. As such, most Afghans seem to have a good understanding of the negative consequences associated with bribery, yet seem to be m...

  13. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-30

    contributions and their own shortcomings in management and accountability. For donors and for Afghanistan, then, the country’s current travails and uncertain...Practical initiatives can take the form of joint donor offices, an agreed division of labour among donors, delegated cooperation arrangements...earmarked basis. The trust fund should be managed by a credible institution, with sound mechanisms for resource allocation and accountability. Un

  14. Afghanistan: Politics, Elections, and Government Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    around the personalities of their founders rather than enduring ideas. These parties include the Afghanistan Labour and Development Party, the National...Government Performance Congressional Research Service 37 In major policy addresses, President Obama has consistently stressed that more needed to be...A large proportion of the remainder work as teachers . On several occasions, the United States has funded jobs fairs that have recruited some new

  15. 48 CFR 252.225-7024 - Requirement for products or services from Iraq or Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... products or services from Iraq or Afghanistan. As prescribed in 225.7703-5(b), use the following clause: Requirement for Products or Services From Iraq or Afghanistan (SEP 2008) (a) Definitions. As used in this... shall provide only products from Iraq or Afghanistan or services from Iraq or Afghanistan under...

  16. Simulating the Afghanistan-Pakistan opium supply chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Jennifer H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacKerrow, Edward P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merritt, Terence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-04-08

    This paper outlines an opium supply chain using the Hilmand province of Afghanistan as exemplar. The opium supply chain model follows the transformation of opium poppy seed through cultivation and chemical alteration to brown heroin base. The purpose of modeling and simulating the Afghanistan-Pakistan opium supply chain is to discover and test strategies that will disrupt this criminal enterprise.

  17. Enhancing the European Union’s Development Strategy in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    REE Rare Earth Element SCA Swedish Committee for Afghanistan SIDA Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency SIGAR Special Inspector...member states such as Ireland’s Development Cooperation Ireland (DCI), Sweden’s Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency ( SIDA ), and the...Command and General Staff College, June 2008.) 71. 142 Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, “Afghanistan Sida Country Report 2005

  18. Afghanistan, history and beyond - GIS based application tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Rahul Chidananda

    The emphasis of this tool is to provide an insight into the history of Afghanistan. Afghanistan has been a warring nation for decades; this tool provides a brief account of the reasons behind the importance of Afghanistan, which led to its invasion by Britain, Russia and USA. The timeline for this thesis was set from 1879 to 1990 which ranges from Barakzai Dynasty to the soviet invasion. Maps are used judiciously to show battles during the British invasion. Maps that show roads, rivers, lakes and provinces are incorporated into the tool to provide an overview of the present situation. The user has options to filter this data by using the timeline and a filtering tool. To quench the users thirst for more information, HTML pages are used judiciously. HTML pages are embedded in key events to provide detailed insight into these events with the help of pictures and videos. An intuitive slider is used to show the people who played a significant role in Afghanistan. The user interface was made intuitive and easy to use, keeping in mind the novice user. A help menu is provided to guide the user on the tool. Spending time researching about Afghanistan has helped me again a new perspective on Afghanistan and its people. With this tool, I hope I can provide a valuable channel for people to understand Afghanistan and gain a fresh perspective into this war ridden nation.

  19. The economics of landmine clearance in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Geoff

    2002-03-01

    This paper presents an economic evaluation of landmine clearance in Afghanistan. The main benefits comprise increased agricultural output, saved transport time and running costs, saved human casualties and the saved costs of supporting refugees and displaced persons. An investment of US$100 million between 1988 and 1998 is estimated to provide annual benefits of $50.3 million per annum between 1999 and 2008. This translates into net present values of between $935 and $1,744 million, depending on the rate of discount used. This contrasts with the negative NPVs estimated for several other countries.

  20. Freedom of Expression Under Threat in Afghanistan?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Mujeeb Khalvatgar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although media outlets have proliferated in the private sector in Afghanistan, the Afghan press is hobbled by insufficient security, lack of access for their investigations, serious revenue and funding shortfalls, stalled legislation for freedom of the press, change-wary socio-cultural norms that tend to undercut the wide dissemination of news and skirt in the presentation of scientific/technological and foreign information. To do their jobs, the nation’s journalists need to overcome these and other barriers.

  1. Gas samples of Afghanistan and adjacent areas (gasafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains points that describe the location of gas samples collected in Afghanistan and adjacent areas and the results of organic geochemical analysis.

  2. Structures prospective for petroleum in northern Afghanistan (structafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains polygons that describe structures prospective for petroleum in northern Afghanistan compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey, Central Energy...

  3. Total Petroleum Systems of northern Afghanistan (tpsafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile includes polygons that describe U.S. Geological Survey delineated Total Petroleum Systems of northern Afghanistan. Each petroleum system is defined as...

  4. Assessment units of northern Afghanistan (auafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile includes polygons and regions that describe U.S. Geological Survey defined petroleum resource Assessment Units of northern Afghanistan. Each...

  5. Report on Progress Toward Security and Stability in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    assistance from ISAF. The TAA effort is now focused on developing ASI capacity to generate and sustain their forces. Advisors interact with...three Afghan domestic election observation groups: Afghanistan Youth National and Social Organization, Transparent Election Foundation of Afghanistan...approximately 40 individuals. The combined operations of the ANSF resulted in the seizures of 18,137 kg of opium, 52 kg morphine , 1,849 kg of heroin, 1,004 kg

  6. Secondary Education in Afghanistan: a portray of postconflict education reconstrution

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Manuel Moreno Olmedilla

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a preliminary account of the status of secondary education in Afghanistan. No previous references can be found which include reliable and detailed statistical information or policy analysis of any kind regarding the secondary education sub-sector in Afghanistan. Thus, more than accurate data collection and analysis, this paper can only attempt to open up the political dialogue about secondary education in the country by identifying the relevant policy issues and putting ...

  7. Opium and Afghanistan: Reassessing U.S. Counternarcotics Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    worldwide from opium for medical purposes.12 Opium is also refined for use in legal prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin.13 However...the Opium Production Challenge in Afghanistan: A License to Meet the World Shortage of Opiate-Derived Painkillers ,” The Senlis Council Drug Policy...Derived Painkillers ,” n.p. 75. Senlis Council, “Report Gives Green Light for Licensed Opium in Afghanistan to Provide Essential Medicines

  8. Female Political Participation in Afghanistan: Social Realities and Internal Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    equality at the village level. Women’s rights are further hindered by geographic factors. Thus, joining political movements or running for office to...in their day-to-day lives. 57 Joining political movements or running for office to ~ffect chang~ in Afghanistan may seem unrealistic or even...1 Constitution of Afghanistan. 2 Swanee HWlt, "Let Wom~n Rule," Foreign Affairs 86 (May 2007): 109-120. 3 Jennifer L. Fluri, " Feminist -Nation

  9. India’s Changing Afghanistan Policy: Regional and Global Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Afghanistan has also sought Indian aid in agri-technology, which would halt desertifica- tion, deforestation, and water wastage in Afghani- stan.15...Afghanistan was self-sufficient in food until the 1970s, but since then the vagaries of war, drought, the growth of the drug trade, and mismanagement have... Food Programme. India is also funding and executing the Salma Dam Power Project in Heart Province involving a commitment of around $80 mil- lion as

  10. Community integration after deployment to Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Armour, Cherie; Andersen, Søren B.

    2015-01-01

    of Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 (N = 743), we assessed community reintegration difficulties 2.5 years after home coming (study sample: N = 454). Furthermore, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed before, during, and after deployment. Trajectories of PTSD symptoms...... from a previously published latent growth mixture modeling analysis were used to address whether community reintegration difficulties differ as a result of course and level of PTSD symptoms. RESULTS: Between 3.6 and 18.0 % reported to have some, a lot, or extreme difficulties in reintegration domains...... such as interpersonal functioning, productivity, community involvement, and self-care. Mean level of reintegration difficulties differed significantly across six PTSD symptom trajectories (range 6.35-36.00); with more symptomatic trajectories experiencing greater community reintegration difficulties. CONCLUSIONS...

  11. Modeling Policy and Agricultural Decisions in Afghanistan

    CERN Document Server

    Widener, Michael J; Gros, Andreas; Metcalf, Sara; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan is responsible for the majority of the world's supply of poppy crops, which are often used to produce illegal narcotics like heroin. This paper presents an agent-based model that simulates policy scenarios to characterize how the production of poppy can be dampened and replaced with licit crops over time. The model is initialized with spatial data, including transportation network and satellite-derived land use data. Parameters representing national subsidies, insurgent influence, and trafficking blockades are varied to represent different conditions that might encourage or discourage poppy agriculture. Our model shows that boundary-level interventions, such as targeted trafficking blockades at border locations, are critical in reducing the attractiveness of growing this illicit crop. The principle of least effort implies that interventions decrease to a minimal non-regressive point, leading to the prediction that increases in insurgency or other changes are likely to lead to worsening conditions,...

  12. Ruby and sapphire from Jegdalek, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowersox, G.W.; Foord, E.E.; Laurs, B.M.; Shigley, J.E.; Smith, C.P.

    2000-01-01

    This study provides detailed mining and gemological information on the Jegdalek deposit, in east-central Afghanistan, which is hosted by elongate beds of corundum-bearing marble. Some facet-grade ruby has been recovered, but most of the material consists of semitransparent pink sapphire of cabochon or carving quality. The most common internal features are dense concentrations of healed and nonhealed fracture planes and lamellar twin planes. Color zoning is common, and calcite, apatite, zircon, mica, iron sulfide minerals, graphite, rutile, aluminum hydroxide, and other minerals are also present in some samples. Although the reserves appear to be large, future potential will depend on the establishment of a stable government and the introduction of modern mining and exploration techniques. ?? 2000 Gemological Institute of America.

  13. Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-10

    Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle East Elham Ghashghai and Rosalind Lewis Afghanistan and its...Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle

  14. 31 CFR 545.311 - Territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Territory of Afghanistan controlled...) SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 545.311 Territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban. The term territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban means the territory referred to as the...

  15. 75 FR 29466 - Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... operations below flight level (FL) 160 within the territory and airspace of Afghanistan, when approved by the... territory and airspace of Afghanistan by all U.S. air carriers; U.S. commercial operators;...

  16. 75 FR 42015 - Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan; Supplemental Regulatory Flexibility Analysis AGENCY... Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan. DATES: Comments must be received on or... Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan.\\1\\ The comment...

  17. 48 CFR 252.225-7026 - Acquisition Restricted to Products or Services from Iraq or Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Products or Services from Iraq or Afghanistan. 252.225-7026 Section 252.225-7026 Federal Acquisition... to Products or Services from Iraq or Afghanistan. As prescribed in 225.7703-5(c), use the following clause: Acquisition Restricted to Products or Services From Iraq or Afghanistan (APR 2010)...

  18. Structural violence in Afghanistan: gendered memory, narratives, and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Parin

    2013-01-01

    Afghanistan has been subject to political amnesia by the occupying powers of the United States and its North Atlantic Treaty Organization allies. Using the Taliban as a reference point, they have ensured that they are not implicated in the everyday and structural violence to which the people of Afghanistan have been subject over the past three decades. But Afghan women remember. Based on my ethnographic research in Kabul (in fall 2008 and 2009), I show how women in Afghanistan engage in memory work through narratives and food preparation within spaces of devastation. I argue that through these mediums, structural violence becomes knowable. I also argue that memory work is a politicized enterprise through which people remember to seek justice, in the process evoking the attention of a listening audience. This focus fosters a conversation on how the anthropology of violence can engage with issues of representation and engaged accountability.

  19. Principles and practice: gender relations in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Under the Taliban, which took control of Kabul in Afghanistan in October 1996, Shari's law has been interpreted strictly; women cannot work outside the home, cannot be educated, and must wear the burkha. Professional and educated women have moved to Pakistan. According to United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) 1995 figures, the literacy rate among women is 15%; among men it is 45%. This will only worsen if the education of girls is banned. International nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) report that interpretation of the law varies with district; girls under 10 years of age can attend school in some areas, and some Taliban commanders are more liberal than others. The 30,000 households headed by women will fall into poverty if the women cannot work and have no other means of support. Women's relationships outside the home will be determined entirely by men. Gender roles will change because men will now have to take over jobs women formerly performed outside the home: taking children to clinics, shopping, and collecting water. Women's support groups will collapse because visiting will be difficult and hospitality will be too expensive. International agencies have distributed food and provided work to women in their homes; men are used to communicate with the women. This has been done at risk. Oxfam UK/I, which cannot deliver quality humanitarian aid without working with both women and men, will attempt, through a witnessing and influencing strategy, to persuade the Taliban to become more moderate.

  20. Post 2014 Afghanistan: Challenges to India’s Securitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    letter day for Afghanistan as the ANSF’s assumed lead role in ensuring security for the entire country; a role so far performed by the ISAF. In a...attacks India again, either directly or indirectly - Mumbai redux. What are we going to say to the Indians this time? We admire your Gandhi -like self...ensure that Afghanistan sustains itself as a nation-state. Milestone 2013, announced by ISAF and GIRoA on June 18, 2013, marked a red letter day

  1. Anmeldelse af: Afghantsy. The Russians in Afghanistan 1979-89

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David

    2012-01-01

    Baseret på nyligt afklassificeret materiale fra arkiverne i Moskva samt fremstillinger af russiske historikere, tegnes et anderledes og mere nuanceret billede af de sovjetiske erfaringer fra Afghanistan. De første spadestik til opgøret med den amerikanske stempling af den sovjetiske ageren i jule...

  2. Success in reducing maternal and child mortality in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Mohammad Hafiz; Govindasamy, Pav; Aqil, Anwer; Rutstein, Shea; Arnold, Fred; Noormal, Bashiruddin; Way, Ann; Brock, Susan; Shadoul, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    After the collapse of the Taliban regime in 2002, Afghanistan adopted a new development path and billions of dollars were invested in rebuilding the country's economy and health systems with the help of donors. These investments have led to substantial improvements in maternal and child health in recent years and ultimately to a decrease in maternal and child mortality. The 2010 Afghanistan Mortality Survey (AMS) provides important new information on the levels and trends in these indicators. The AMS estimated that there are 327 maternal deaths for every 100,000 live births (95% confidence interval = 260-394) and 97 deaths before the age of five years for every 1000 children born. Decreases in these mortality rates are consistent with changes in key determinants of mortality, including an increasing age at marriage, higher contraceptive use, lower fertility, better immunisation coverage, improvements in the percentage of women delivering in health facilities and receiving antenatal and postnatal care, involvement of community health workers and increasing access to the Basic Package of Health Services. Despite the impressive gains in these areas, many challenges remain. Further improvements in health services in Afghanistan will require sustained efforts on the part of both the Government of Afghanistan and international donors.

  3. Heeding the warning signs: further displacement predicted for Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schmeidl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is currently much evidence pointing to another wave of displacement likely to occur in Afghanistan. Ignoring these early warning signs and failing to act may mean paying a higher price in the future, both financially and in human terms.

  4. Acclimatisatie aan de hitte in Afghanistan : inventarisatie door dagboekanalyse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Jonkman, A.; Korterink, W.; Krul, A.; Raymann, R.; Smits, B.

    2008-01-01

    Een deel van de Nederlandse krijgsmacht is in het kader van ISAF uitgezonden naar Uruzgan in Afghanistan. Om de kans op operationale problemen in de hitte te minimaliseren, is besloten 10 dagen voor acclimatisatie in te lassen in Kandahar, ook een erg warm gebied. Deze kleinschalige studie in Kandah

  5. Combating Opium in Afghanistan. Strategic Forum, Number 224, November 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    unconvincing, given the Taliban’s previous draconian crackdown on poppy production; however, desperation breeds strange bedfellows. Rampant drug...Depending on their location within Afghanistan, farmers may be able to plant two crops a year; many follow a poppy harvest with a cannabis crop. The

  6. Dilemmas facing agencies in the urban centres of Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Marsden

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available In many situations worldwide where rebel or other movements have wrested large areas of territory from the control of central government or, as in the case of Afghanistan, where the government has collapsed and control is divided between different power holders, humanitarian agencies are having to determine how they should relate to non-governmental power holders.

  7. Repatriation and Reintegration in Afghanistan: The Role of Demiliarisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    their successful repatriation will be contingent on stability, and that an important task to this end will be to demilitarise Afghanistan’s political...level of stability necessary for successful repatriation. The next section introduces militarisation as a factor negatively influencing stability. The...stabilisation of society, and in turn allowing successful repatriation of refugees and exiles while promoting regional peace and security.

  8. A District Approach to Countering Afghanistan’s Insurgency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Foust , “District Development Teams are a Go!” Registan,net, August 11, 2009, http://www.registan.net/index.php/2009/08/11/district-development-teams-are...Tribal Hierarchy and Dictionary of Afghanistan. Ft. Leavenworth, KS: Foreign Military Studies Office, February 2007. Foust , Joshua. “District

  9. Education for Demilitarizing Youth in Post-Conflict Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yukitoshi

    2008-01-01

    This article examines both the largely negative role that education has played historically in contributing to conflict in Afghanistan and the ways that education has been purposefully employed as a post-conflict strategy aimed at building peace and social cohesion. The growing attention among academics and policy makers to the role of youth in…

  10. Designing Roads and Retaining Structures for Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Transition Command–Afghanistan DOD Department of Defense (U.S.) HMA Hot Mix Asphalt IED Improvised Explosive Device IJC ISAF Joint Command...49 ERDC/CRREL TR-11-01 viii 6.3.5 Wearing surface requirements...Hardnessresistance to scratching or abrasion . Estimate this property by trying to scratch the rock with a steel knife or nails. Soft materials

  11. War in Afghanistan: Strategy, Military Operations, and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets into the theatre . …While we’ve doubled this capability in recent months, it is still not good enough...been experiencing a renaissance that has gained momentum since 2005. The West is in genuine danger of losing Afghanistan.”75 In

  12. Pediatric Surgical Care in a Dutch Military Hospital in Afghanistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idenburg, Floris J.; Van Dongen, Thijs T C F; Tan, Edward C T H; Hamming, Jaap H.; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoencamp, Rigo

    2015-01-01

    Background   From August 2006–August 2010, as part of the ISAF mission, the Armed Forces of the Netherlands deployed a role 2 enhanced Medical Treatment Facility (R2E-MTF) to Uruzgan province, Afghanistan. Although from the principle doctrine not considered a primary task, care was delivered to civi

  13. Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication - Afghanistan and Pakistan, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and Nigeria are the four remaining countries where indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission has never been interrupted. This report updates previous reports and describes polio eradication activities in Afghanistan and Pakistan during January-December 2009 and proposed activities in 2010 to address challenges. During 2009, both countries continued to conduct coordinated supplemental immunization activities (SIAs) and used multiple strategies to reach previously unreached children. These strategies included 1) use of short interval additional dose (SIAD) SIAs to administer a dose of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) within 1-2 weeks after a prior dose during negotiated periods of security; 2) systematic engagement of local leaders; 3) negotiations with conflict parties; and 4) increased engagement of nongovernmental organizations delivering basic health services. However, security problems continued to limit access by vaccination teams to large numbers of children. In Afghanistan, poliovirus transmission during 2009 predominantly occurred in 12 high-risk districts in the conflict-affected South Region; 38 WPV cases were confirmed in 2009, compared with 31 in 2008. In Pakistan, 89 WPV cases were confirmed in 2009, compared with 118 in 2008, but transmission persisted both in security-compromised areas and in accessible areas, where managerial and operational problems continued to affect immunization coverage. Continued efforts to enhance safe access of vaccination teams in insecure areas will be required for further progress toward interruption of WPV transmission in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In addition, substantial improvements in subnational accountability and oversight are needed to improve immunization activities in Pakistan.

  14. The Multidimensionality of Child Poverty: Evidence from Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Jean-Francois; Biggeri, Mario; Mauro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines multidimensional poverty among children in Afghanistan using the Alkire-Foster method. Several previous studies have underlined the need to separate children from their adult nexus when studying poverty and treat them according to their own specificities. From the capability approach, child poverty is understood to be the lack…

  15. Long Hard Road: NCO Experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    well dug into the maze of tunnels situated throughout the mountains of eastern Afghanistan. Operation Anaconda began on 1 March 2002, with the...coming in and sending messages with runners about caches and personalities. We were able to interdict some al-Qaeda operatives transporting explosives

  16. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  17. NATO in Afghanistan: A Test of the Transatlantic Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-03

    switch to alternative crops. Many crops, however, cannot compete with poppies; income from a hectare of poppies can reach $4,600 a year, while wheat ...growing prevalence, Afghanistan exemplifies conditions in which “extreme belief systems ... unstable and intolerant societies, strategic crime and

  18. Groundwater levels in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan, 2004-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Mohammad R.; Chornack, Michael P.; Mack, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The Afghanistan Geological Survey, with technical assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey, established a network of wells to measure and monitor groundwater levels to assess seasonal, areal, and potentially climatic variations in groundwater characteristics in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan, the most populous region in the country. Groundwater levels were monitored in 71 wells in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan, starting as early as July 2004 and continuing to the present (2013). The monitoring network is made up exclusively of existing production wells; therefore, both static and dynamic water levels were recorded. Seventy wells are in unconsolidated sediments, and one well is in bedrock. Water levels were measured periodically, generally monthly, using electric tape water-level meters. Water levels in well 64 on the grounds of the Afghanistan Geological Survey building were measured more frequently. This report provides a 10-year compilation of groundwater levels in the Kabul Basin prepared in cooperation with the Afghanistan Geological Survey. Depths to water below land surface range from a minimum of 1.47 meters (m) in the Shomali subbasin to a maximum of 73.34 m in the Central Kabul subbasin. The Logar subbasin had the smallest range in depth to water below land surface (1.5 to 12.4 m), whereas the Central Kabul subbasin had the largest range (2.64 to 73.34 m). Seasonal water-level fluctuations can be estimated from the hydrographs in this report for wells that have depth-to-water measurements collected under static conditions. The seasonal water-level fluctuations range from less than 1 m to a little more than 7 m during the monitoring period. In general, the hydrographs for the Deh Sabz, Logar, Paghman and Upper Kabul, and Shomali subbasins show relatively little change in the water-level trend during the period of record, whereas hydrographs for the Central Kabul subbasin show water level decreases of several meters to about 25 m.

  19. THE NEED FOR A NATIONAL DERADICALISATION PROGRAM IN AFGHANISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnnie Auld

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of deradicalisation programs in Afghanistan has potential to prolong the violence and turmoil in the country for decades. With years of conflict, multiple forms of government, high unemployment, high levels of poverty, and a constant influx of Western cultural norms and media fighting against the traditionalist Afghan culture strongly embedded in a conservative reading of Islam, Afghanistan is a breeding ground for radicalism. Youth are susceptible to an environment that causes radicalism and nurtures it, and with the ever-present national conflict, this radicalisation has an outlet in the form of insurgency and terrorism. Groups like the Taliban have easily recruited and radicalised individuals using religion as a justification for their violence. Deradicalisation in Afghanistan is an under researched topic and an underfunded pursuit. With no national deradicalisation strategy it is left to international actors and local organisations to engage in these programs. More must be done to engage with those who have become radicalised and those in high-risk zones in order to help secure the long-term future of Afghanistan. I will discuss how Afghanistan is a breeding ground for radicalisation of individuals due to Afghanistan’s violent, hostile environment with high rates of poverty, high unemployment and distrust toward the authorities. I will then discuss how religion is used a justification by extremist groups for individuals to commit violent acts and how the increasingly precarious security situation in the country means a sound national deradicalisation program is essential. I conclude that any deradicalisation efforts undertaken by the Afghan government so far are piecemeal and inadequate to deal with the on-going problems present in the country and that lessons must be learnt from programs in other Islamic countries that have successfully deradicalised violent extremist groups.

  20. Cretaceous Environments of Afghanistan:A Synthesis Based on Selected Sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul Rahman Ashraf; Ashok Sahni

    2003-01-01

    The Cretaceous of Afghanistan is marked by great facies diversity. The evolution of Cretaceous basins is part of a complex accretionary history involving three distinct tectonic units namely the Asian (Russian) Block separated from the Indian plate by a rather well defined transcurrent fault (Chaman-Nuski). The southwestern component is representedby the Iran-Afghanistan plate. The Lower Cretaceous of the Asian Block is represented by the Red-Grit Series which isconformable to the underlying Upper Jurassic sequences. The transition is marked by evaporitic facies dominated by salt,gypsum and marl deposits. In south Afghanistan volcanic rocks occur at Farah, with the emplacement of plutonics inwest-central Afghanistan. The Upper Cretaceous of north Afghanistan is marked by richly fossiliferous, lime stone-dominated sequences. The Upper Cretaceous of southern Afghanistan is marked by strong ophiolitic magrmatism.

  1. Authority, Legitimacy, and the Qawm: Historical Perspectives on Emergent Governance in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Asian expert Joshua Foust explains “When looking at Afghanistan through Afghanistan, rather than any pre-designed 38 Western conceptions of...inevitably another inhospitable location 75Joshua Foust , “What ‘Intimate Knowledge?’” Registan.com... Foust , Joshua. “In Afghanistan, Good Intentions Not Enough.” World Politics Review (March 9, 2009). http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com/article.aspx?id

  2. Counterinsurgency Scorecard Update: Afghanistan in Early 2015 Relative to Insurgencies Since World War 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    to Defeat Taliban,” USA Today, May 19, 2015. Osman, Borham, “The Shadows of ‘ Islamic State’ in Afghanistan: What Threat Does It Hold?” Afghanistan...of Iraqi security forces in the face of the Islamic State threat. Finally, these same two factors were also absent in 2013 and 2011, and both were... Islamic State.5 5 Jeff Eggers, “Afghanistan, Choose Your Enemies Wisely,” Foreign Policy, August 24, 2015. 1 Counterinsurgency Scorecard Update

  3. Repatriation and the reconstruction of Afghanistan: the role of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, S

    1994-01-01

    This update on the consequences of the 14 years of war in Afghanistan and refugee repatriation points out the possible need for humanitarian intervention. The political situation is described as lacking in platform leadership and lacking in leaders' commitment to the people. The US has reduced interests in Afghanistan. The UN and other international agencies rarely mention Afghanistan and repatriation. Pakistan is exercising its self-interests in the country. Saudi Arabia is described as opposing the rising Iranian brand of religious ideology and supplying mercenaries. The formation of the Commonwealth of Independent States has reduced USSR involvement to the increasing flow of Tajik refugees into Afghanistan. Islam is described as a historically strong and positive force in the formation of social and political values. Afghani needs are described as restoration of peace, security, and self-determination and a return to the former Islamic principles and practices. A "new imported ideology packaged as religion" is viewed as detrimental. The international community is urged to commit its resources to supporting a process aimed at creating a popularly elected platform of leadership committed to democratic values and principles and with respect for human rights and equity. Successful repatriation is considered dependent on internal security and financial resources from the international community. Repatriation is hampered by the extensive land mines (estimated to be at least 23 million) scattered across the countryside. At least 75% of the over 3 million refugees in Pakistan and the 2.5 million in Iran are estimated to be women and children. 14 years of political and economic instability resulted in little social development for refugee women and children. The UN urged donations of $45.1 million for repatriation and reconstruction. Only $13.7 million were received. These small sums in foreign aid are viewed as inconsequential when compared to the estimated US military

  4. Presidential Election in Afghanistan: Democracy in the Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahabuddin Ra’ees

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In accordance with Article 4 of the Bonn Agreement, the presidential election in Afghanistan was held on October 9, 2004. The election was a “real departure” from Afghanistan’s past and ushered in a legitimate constitutional system of governance. Hamid Karzai was elected the President and thus resulted in what can be called the “Pashtun comeback,” not “Pashtun dominance,” to the helm of power. The election, contrary to expectations, was not marred by ethnic, ideological and linguistic cleavages so characteristics of the Afghan society. Karzai’s government will be better advised to facilitate the creation of a “balanced party system” in Afghanistan.

  5. How Corruption Blunts Counternarcotic Policies in Afghanistan: A Multiagent Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Armando; Mussavi Rizi, Seyed M.; Łatek, Maciej M.

    We report the results of multiagent modeling experiments on interactions between the drug industry and corruption in Afghanistan. The model formalizes assumptions on the motivations of players in the Afghan drug industry, quantifies the tradeoffs among various choices players face and enables inspection of the time, space and level of supply chain in which one can expect positive and negative impacts of counternarcotic policies. If reducing opium exports is one measure of effectiveness for NATO operations in Afghanistan, grasping the links between corruption and the drug industry should provide a better picture of the second-order interactions between corruption and investment in improving the governance quality, in deploying security forces tasked with eradication and interdiction and in programs to enhance rural livelihoods.

  6. Afghanistan Digital Library Initiative: Revitalizing an Integrated Library System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HAN

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an Afghanistan digital library initiative of building an integrated library system (ILS for Afghanistan universities and colleges based on open-source software. As one of the goals of the Afghan eQuality Digital Libraries Alliance, the authors applied systems analysis approach, evaluated different open-source ILSs, and customized the selected software to accommodate users’ needs. Improvements include Arabic and Persian language support, user interface changes, call number label printing, and ISBN-13 support. To our knowledge, this ILS is the first at a large academic library running on open-source software.

  7. 31 CFR 545.412 - Release of goods originating in the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban from a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban from a bonded warehouse or foreign trade zone. 545.412... Interpretations § 545.412 Release of goods originating in the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban... bonded warehouse or foreign trade zone of goods originating in the territory of Afghanistan controlled...

  8. 31 CFR 545.519 - Payments and transfers authorized for goods and services exported to the territory of Afghanistan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... goods and services exported to the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban prior to the... transfers authorized for goods and services exported to the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the... the effective date, directly or indirectly to the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the...

  9. 31 CFR 545.505 - Importation of goods, software, or technology exported from the territory of Afghanistan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... technology exported from the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban prior to July 6, 1999. 545... technology exported from the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban prior to July 6, 1999. (a... technology from the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban is authorized provided that: (1)...

  10. Putting Out the Fire in Afghanistan, The Fire Model of Counterinsurgency: Focusing Efforts to Make an Insurgency Unsustainable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-30

    in Afghanistan, 2003-2005." Military Review (September-October 2007): 32-44. Beckett , Ian F. W. Modern Insurgencies and Counter-insurgencies. New...Afghanistan." Whitepaper, Fort Leavenworth, KS: Afghanistan Research Reachback Center, 2009. Huntington, Samuel P. The Clash of Civilizations and the

  11. Security Force Assistance in Afghanistan: Identifying Lessons for Future Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix, see Chapter Two. Implications of SFA in Afghanistan for the U.S. Army 113 cult. The validation training team ( VTT ) echoed these complaints.15...According to these advisors and VTT members, this type of manage- ment of the overall advisory effort hurts performance. Finally, a consistent theme...plans, including those from KMTC and CFC; and doctrine • ISAF documents • ETT and VTT documents • Congressional Research Service reports • Government

  12. Poppy Eradication in Afghanistan: Why Isn’t It Working?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-17

    Utilizing international donor support, Thailand undertook extensive road construction in order to bring these alternative crops to market . It took more...flow of drugs and chemicals before they can spread to border markets . ALTERNATIVE CROPS Saffron, which can be used for herbal medicine, food seasoning... perfume , and dye, is one replacement crop currently being grown in western provinces ofAfghanistan, for example in Herat.42 Saffron comes from the

  13. Trauma treatment in a role 1 medical facility in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Pernille Nygaard; Helsø, I; Jørgensen, H L

    2013-01-01

    Most of the emergency care delivered in Afghanistan is currently provided by the military sector and non-governmental organisations. Main Operating Base (MOB) Price in Helmand Province has a small medical centre and due to its location provides critical care to civilians and military casualties...... and this article describes the patterns in trauma patient care at the MOB Price medical centre regarding the types of patients and injuries....

  14. Rodric Braithwaite, Afgantsy: The Russians in Afghanistan 1979-1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lester W. Grau

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years, Western scholarship on the Soviet-Afghan War was limited to a small group of academics, soldiers, retired diplomats, regional specialists and journalists. With the current mission in Afghanistan, this group has grown. Sir Rodric Braithwaite is a most welcome addition. Following occupation duties as a soldier in post-war Vienna, Rodric Braithwaite studied Russian at Cambridge from 1952-1955. He then entered the Foreign Service and, among other postings, had two tours in Moscow,...

  15. Cereal Crop Farm Planning for Profit Maximization in Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadzai, Najeebullah; Nanseki, Teruaki; Chomei, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Cereal crops are the major component of agriculture sector in Afghanistan by generating income and providing food dietary of subsistence to the farm family. The sector which is dominated by small scale farmer across the country is facing numerous problems such as inefficient use of resources, poor production technology, low labor productivity and high production costs. This study was carried out to maximize farm income by optimization resource allocation and developing an optimal farm plan fo...

  16. From Hard to Harder: Iraq Retrograde Lessons for Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    the ”logistics enterprise,” international logistics providers such as Maersk Line Limited, Hapag-Lloyd, American President Lines (APL), United...equipment by air and on the Pakistan Ground Lines of Communication (PAKGLOC), which is the truck route through Pakistan.27 A forcing function to...more in line with FM 4-94’s special Note covering JTFs, because the ESC is designated Joint Sustainment Command-Afghanistan (JSC-A). Lessons learned

  17. Report on Progress Toward Security and Stability in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    marketing efforts resulted in the sale of more than 11.5 UNCLASSIFIED 169 million condoms and oral and injectable contraceptive products, with a...determined. Another key factor in this assessment will be whether a Bilateral Security Agreement (BSA) between the U.S. and Afghanistan is reached...reporting period. Thus far, these attacks have not significantly affected the strong relationship between coalition and ANSF personnel, particularly

  18. The Afghanistan National Railway: A Plan of Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    railway system for Afghanistan, as well as the regional connectivity im- peratives, to develop recommendations for large capital-investment...and most efficient railway route to seaport, the railway will lack the revenue to expand and sustain itself. Enabling regional connectivity and...purpose is to enable self-sustainability and economic inde- pendence via mineral-based traffic to provide regional connectivity and serve as a

  19. Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan, Rand Counterinsurgency Study, Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    at io n in sti tu tio ns Tr an sp or ta tio n Bu sin es se s Re lig io us fi gu re s Ut ili tie s Pr iva te ci tiz en s M ed ia Te le co m m un ica ...1983– Nicaragua 1978–1979 Afghanistan 1978–1992 Cambodia 1978–1992 El Salvador 1979–1992 Somalia (anti-Barre) 1981–1991 Senegal 1989– Peru 1981–1992

  20. Time for a Strategic and Intellectual Pause in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    difficult to discern how the Hearts-and-Minds enhances government legitimacy. The lavish provision of goods and services, the frenetic activity of...very little popular support, even in the southern region, which is considered their base . To suggest that the Taliban shadow governments compete for...down fleeing insurgents, uncovering their bases and caches, and providing a quick reaction force. In Afghanistan, the narcotics trade has to be

  1. Building Health Security in Afghanistan: A New Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    unilaterally by allied units or in partnership with Afghan forces, an emphasis now on embedded trainers would put Afghans in the lead; but with a group of...gravity, and looks for effective partnerships with allied governments and international organizations that share an interest in 18 promoting...www.history.army.mil/ brochures/Afghanistan/Operation%20Enduring%20Freedom.htm# p3 (accessed October 10, 2011). 4 Ibid. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. 21 7 Ibid. 8 Ibid. 9

  2. THE AMERICAN WAY OF WAR: AFGHANISTAN AND IRAQ

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Luisa Parraguez Kobek; Mariana Gonzalez Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of 9/11 placed the United States in a position to exercise its political objectives of securing national interests through military means. The War on Terror waged in Afghanistan and Iraq shifted the development of U.S. foreign policy, allowing for American leadership to exercise its right to sovereignty and power. The doctrine required a victory in each of the scenarios, and the inability to secure these aims resulted in civil war and insurgency in both countries. Import...

  3. CERP in Afghanistan: Refining Military Capabilities in Development Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    microfinance institutions. In Iraq, for instance, USAID already manages a microloan program in addition to three interna- tional microfinance institutions and...six indige- nous microfinance institutions that are supported by the U.S. Government.43 If these are effective in providing entrepreneurs with...pdf>. 41 Money as a Weapons System Afghanistan. 42 In recent decades, the popularity of the microfinance industry has exploded as a new tool against

  4. AFGHANISTAN: POST-MODERNIZING A PRE-MODERN SOCIETY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Bogdan Vlad

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The defined purpose of this paper is to analyse the phenomenon of post-modernizing pre-modern societies, having as example the case of Afghanistan. Assuming that political modernity implies the existence of a centralized state, we will show that there never was a modern period in the history of Afghanistan. The last part of this paper focuses on presenting the impact that the phenomenon of post-modernization has had on Afghanistan, by analysing four characteristics of the contemporary world - the world after the collapse of the Soviet Union: the critique of the fungible character of power; the privatisation of security; the new types of wars; the regionalization and fragmentation of the world. The dilemma that needs to be solved is that of surpassing the risks brought about by the co-existence of three levels of evolution: the pre-modern level (the segmented Afghan society, the modern level (the attempt to found a centralized state, the post-modern level (the attempt to anchor the new-founded state in the global system, from a political, economic and cultural point of view.

  5. Distributed power in Afghanistan: The Padisaw micro-hydro project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallett, Michael [Hallett and Associates, 4337 Coffman Blvd, Chesapeake, VA 23321 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The provision of electricity is a vital need in reconstruction and development situations, like that in Afghanistan. Indeed, according to the Afghan government's Afghan National Development Strategy (ANDS) the need for electricity featured in 80% of the Provincial Development Plans as a top priority. With the help of the International Community, the government of Afghanistan is attempting to develop a new market oriented approach to the nationwide provision of electrical power. Although the bulk of the electrification effort is directed toward large scale construction of a national grid, the ANDS explicitly mentions a role for 'micro-hydro, solar, waste and small scale diesel power and energy generating sources'. This article will describe a micro-hydro project in Padisaw village, in the Nurgaram district of Nuristan province located in Northeastern Afghanistan and the role Provincial Reconstruction Team played in working with the local community through the project planning and building processes and offer some observation on how, as the Afghan National Development Strategy is executed, the private sector can play an increasingly significant role in the Afghan distributed energy arena. (author)

  6. Who owns the peace? Aid, reconstruction, and peacebuilding in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhand, Jonathan; Sedra, Mark

    2010-01-01

    It is unclear how international donors' stated commitment to ownership and partnership 'translates' in fragile state or 'post-conflict' settings. The very notion of ownership is violently contested in Afghanistan and donors have to negotiate with, and choose between, multiple state and non-state interlocutors. The developmentalist principles outlined in the 2005 Paris Declaration may carry little meaning in such contexts and their application can have paradoxical effects that impede the emergence of broad-based ownership. The limitations of, and alternatives to, developmentalist approaches in fragile states, are explored here with reference to donor policies and practices in Afghanistan, focusing on the period following the 2001 Bonn Agreement. This paper examines how aid policies and programmes have become part of a complex bargaining game involving international actors, domestic elites, and societal groups. It argues that international donors' failure to appreciate or engage sensitively and strategically with these bargaining processes, when combined with contradictory intervention objectives, has contributed to the steady unravelling of a fragile war-to-peace transition in Afghanistan.

  7. 31 CFR 545.407 - Services performed in the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Services performed in the territory... territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban. The prohibitions on transactions involving blocked... territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban or by the Taliban, wherever located, when the benefit...

  8. Expanding the Qawm: Culturally Savvy Counterinsurgency and Nation-Building in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    the general election. 58Michael Bhatia and Mark Sedra , Afghanistan, Arms, and Conflict...threat.73 73Bhatia and Sedra , xxvi. Another punitive option is castigation. Castigation is a...Khoury and Joseph Kostiner, 153-182. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1990. Bhatia, Michael, and Mark Sedra . Afghanistan, Arms and Conflict

  9. 48 CFR 252.225-7023 - Preference for products or services from Iraq or Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7023 Preference for products or services... Products or Services from Iraq or Afghanistan (APR 2010) (a) Definitions. Product from Iraq or Afghanistan... solicitation entitled “Requirement for Products or Services from Iraq or Afghanistan” (DFARS 252.225-7024)....

  10. Small Wars 2.0: A Working Paper on Land Force Planning After Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    specific brand of small war — i.e., neo-classical COIN in the Near East and South Asia. This move relies on four questionable assumptions: 1...Afghanistan Small Wars 2.0: A Working Paper on Land Force Planning After Iraq and Afghanistan indefinitely. While the current full-spectrum mantra cham

  11. Reviving the United States' Commitment to Pakistan and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Steve Young

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As President Obama is in the midst of deciding whether additional U.S.combat forces are needed in Afghanistan in addition to the 21,000 troops recently committed, he must realize that additional armed forces are only a stopgap measure in Afghanistan's downward spiral into an 'undergoverned' failed state. Similarly, as Pakistan's fragile and fractured civilian government continues to appease the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP, an umbrella organization of Pakistani Pashtun tribesmen with Taliban cultural values led by Baitullah Mehsud and others, it comes closer to the concept of a "misgoverned" failed state, possessing a small arsenal of nuclear arms. The problem for the U.S. administration is that neither of these countries can be allowed to fall further into disrepair. At the same time each requires a different and unique approach to the threat of "Talibanization" that faces each country—the control of territory within each country by Islamic radicals seeking to impose their ultraconservative interpretation of shar'ia law onto the general populace. Generally acknowledged is the belief that what has tentatively worked in Iraq, that is, the additional U.S. troops and employment of former Sunni insurgents to help fight foreign fighters associated with al-Qaida, will not work in either Afghanistan or Pakistan. While a regional approach to the conflict in these two countries is warranted, Afghanistan and Pakistan are on two different economic, social, and political playing fields. Hence, there cannot be a one-size-fits-all solution for the two countries, especially one that draws on the Iraq playbook. In addition to its internal political problems, Pakistan also faces the issue of al-Qaida and Taliban training camps positioned in its literal back yard, the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA or Tribal Areas. Resolution of the War on Terror cannot come to fruition without addressing the problems that exist in the Tribal Areas. This largely

  12. Home sweet home! Repatriation, reintegration and land allocation in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassim Majidi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Retour sur terre: politiques de retour et d'allocation de la terre pour les réfugiés afghans.Plus de 6 millions de réfugiés afghans sont retournés dans leur pays d’origine depuis 2002, dont 4.6 millions assistés par le Haut-commissariat aux Réfugiés des Nations Unies (UNHCR. Ce retour était, en nombre et en investissement, sans précédent pour l’Afghanistan comme pour le reste du monde. Alors que l’intervention de 2002 marque le début d’une décennie du retour, en 2012, l’Afghanistan est le reflet d’un contexte humanitaire et de développement marqué par un taux très faible de retours volontaires, une croissance du nombre de déplacés internes, et un profil migratoire changeant, orienté vers une migration mixte – volontaire et forcée – avec nombre d’individus, de familles et de mineurs non accompagnés qui tentent de quitter leur pays, légalement ou irrégulièrement. En 2012, l’espoir se tourne de nouveau vers les pays voisins et vers l’Occident, c’est à dire vers une vie en dehors de l’Afghanistan. Malgré cette évolution, les politiques migratoires et les états qui les dirigent restent encore focalisées sur des initiatives de retour et de réinsertion en Afghanistan. Une pièce centrale de ces politiques est la question de l’accès à la terre, et des ressources disponibles sur ces terres. Ce papier s’interroge sur la relation entre les réfugiés rentrés « chez eux », communément appelés «returnees », l’accès à la terre et les politiques d’aide au retour au travers de recherches menées en Afghanistan entre 2007 et 2012.

  13. A balanced scorecard for health services in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, David H; Noor, Ayan Ahmed; Singh, Lakhwinder P; Kakar, Faizullah K; Hansen, Peter M; Burnham, Gilbert

    2007-02-01

    The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) in Afghanistan has developed a balanced scorecard (BSC) to regularly monitor the progress of its strategy to deliver a basic package of health services. Although frequently used in other health-care settings, this represents the first time that the BSC has been employed in a developing country. The BSC was designed via a collaborative process focusing on translating the vision and mission of the MOPH into 29 core indicators and benchmarks representing six different domains of health services, together with two composite measures of performance. In the absence of a routine health information system, the 2004 BSC for Afghanistan was derived from a stratified random sample of 617 health facilities, 5719 observations of patient-provider interactions, and interviews with 5597 patients, 1553 health workers, and 13,843 households. Nationally, health services were found to be reaching more of the poor than the less-poor population, and providing for more women than men, both key concerns of the government. However, serious deficiencies were found in five domains, and particularly in counselling patients, providing delivery care during childbirth, monitoring tuberculosis treatment, placing staff and equipment, and establishing functional village health councils. The BSC also identified wide variations in performance across provinces; no province performed better than the others across all domains. The innovative adaptation of the BSC in Afghanistan has provided a useful tool to summarize the multidimensional nature of health-services performance, and is enabling managers to benchmark performance and identify strengths and weaknesses in the Afghan context.

  14. Measuring equity in disability and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Jean-Francois; Barbou-des-Courieres, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses equity in health and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan based on a representative national household survey. Equitable access is a cornerstone of the Afghan health policy. We measured socioeconomic-related equity in access to public health care, using disability--because people with disabilities are poorer and more likely to use health care--and a concentration index (CI) and its decomposition. The socioeconomic-related equity in healthcare utilization was measured using a probit model and compared with an OLS model providing the horizontal inequity index (HI). We found a low rate of healthcare facilities utilization (25%). Disabled persons are using more healthcare facilities and have higher medical expenses. Disability is more frequently associated with older age, unemployed heads of household and lower education. The Cl of disability is 0.0221 indicating a pro-rich distribution of health. This pro-rich effect is higher in small households (CI decreases with size of the household, -0.0048) and safe (0.0059) areas. The CI of healthcare utilization is -0.0159 indicating a slightly pro-poor distribution of healthcare utilization but, overall, there is no difference in healthcare utilization by wealth status. Our study does not show major socioeconomic related inequity in disability and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan. This is due to the extreme and pervasive poverty found in Afghanistan. The absence of inequity in health access is explained by the uniform poverty of the population and the difficulty of accessing BPHS facilities (a basic package of health services), despite alarming health indicators.

  15. Occupational Lung Diseases among Soldiers Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szema, Anthony M

    2013-01-01

    Military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, from 2004 to the present, has served in a setting of unique environmental conditions. Among these are exposures to burning trash in open air "burn pits" lit on fire with jet fuel JP-8. Depending on trash burned--water bottles, styrofoam trays, medical waste, unexploded munitions, and computers--toxins may be released such as dioxins and n-hexane and benzene. Particulate matter air pollution culminates from these fires and fumes. Additional environmental exposures entail sandstorms (Haboob, Shamal, and Sharqi) which differ in direction and relationship to rain. These wars saw the first use of improvised explosive devices (roadside phosphate bombs),as well as vehicle improvised explosive devices (car bombs), which not only potentially aerosolize metals, but also create shock waves to induce lung injury via blast overpressure. Conventional mortar rounds are also used by Al Qaeda in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Outdoor aeroallergens from date palm trees are prevalent in southern Iraq by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, while indoor aeroallergen aspergillus predominates during the rainy season. High altitude lung disease may also compound the problem, particularly in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Clinically, soldiers may present with new-onset asthma or fixed airway obstruction. Some have constrictive bronchiolitis and vascular remodeling on open lung biopsy - despite having normal spirometry and chest xrays and CT scans of the chest. Others have been found to have titanium and other metals in the lung (rare in nature). Still others have fulminant biopsy-proven sarcoidiosis. We found DNA probe-positive Mycobacterium Avium Complex in lung from a soldier who had pneumonia, while serving near stagnant water and camels and goats outside Abu Gharib. This review highlights potential exposures, clinical syndromes, and the Denver Working Group recommendations on post-deployment health.

  16. A Sociolinguistic Assessment of the Darwazi Speech Variety in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Beck

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a sociolinguistic assessment of the Darwāzi speech varieties (including Tangshewi based on data collected during a survey conducted between August 31st and September 19th 2008 in the Darwāz area. The research was carried out under the auspices of the International Assistance Mission, a Non-Governmental Organization working in Afghanistan. The goal was to determine whether Dari, one of the two national languages, is adequate to be used in literature and primary school education, or whether the Darwāzi people would benefit from language development, including literature development and primary school education in the vernacular.

  17. Trends in Student Radicalization across University Campuses in Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Robert; Mohammadi, Abdul Ahad

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine the trends in student radicalization across eight university campuses\\ud in Afghanistan. We conclude from our survey of student and staff views and an analysis of the\\ud character of protests across campuses that the extent of student radicalization varies. In\\ud particular, we come to three noteworthy findings. First, most university students are more\\ud concerned over prospects of post-graduation follow-on careers than ideological ambition.\\ud Second, while we fin...

  18. Report on Progress Toward Security and Stability in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    and medical kits so soldiers can give self-aid and buddy-aid at the point of injury; the use of Mi-17 helicopters for casualty evacuation; and...is well suited for Afghanistan’s environment. The number of Mi-17s accounts for all operational helicopters (including 10 on loan to the SMW) and...the ANSF’s only night-vision goggle qualified ( NVG ) air assault and fixed-wing ISR capability. The SMW is the only air mobility asset in Afghanistan

  19. Lineament analysis of mineral areas of interest in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Bernard E.; Mack, Thomas J.; Thompson, Allyson L.

    2012-01-01

    During a preliminary mineral resource assessment of Afghanistan (Peters and others, 2007), 24 mineralized areas of interest (AOIs) were highlighted as the focus for future economic development throughout various parts of the country. In addition to located mineral resources of value, development of a viable mining industry in Afghanistan will require the location of suitable groundwater resources for drinking, processing of mineral ores for use or for export, and for agriculture and food production in areas surrounding and supporting future mining enterprises. This report and accompanying GIS datasets describe the results of both automated and manual mapping of lineaments throughout the 24 mineral occurrence AOIs described in detail by Peters and others (2007; 2011). For this study, we define lineaments as "mappable linear or curvilinear features of a surface whose parts align in a straight or slightly curving relationship that may be the expression of a fault or other linear zones of weakness" as derived from remote sensing sources such as optical imagery, radar imagery or digital elevation models (DEMs) (Sabins, 2007).

  20. Sustaining Rural Afghanistan under Limited Central Government Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John William Groninger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Land and water access insecurity, land grabbing, and unstable common property status of critical local resources continue to drive conflicts, rural landlessness and environmental problems throughout many areas of Afghanistan where formal government is weak or entirely absent.  In contrast to traditional development strategies that favor infrastructure enhancement and backed by enforced national policies, we offer Afghan-specific strategies based on resource conservation and increased capacity of local resource management institutions that can function when and where central government cannot be relied upon to assume or maintain a supportive role. Resource conservation and building local capacity are key components of existing and proposed future efforts to increase stability. However, support for these efforts, whether government or community-based, has been limited in portions of rural Afghanistan , apparently due to low stakeholder confidence in retaining access to improved land, water and other critical resources when international forces withdraw. Powerful individuals and groups, operating outside local community structures, are increasingly impacting land use practices. We suggest a thorough assessment of the present and likely future social environment, including awareness of likely conflicts resulting from agricultural or natural resource improvements, before any tangible actions are taken.

  1. Afghanistan: A Study in Internal Conflict and National Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Conflicts are caused by various reasons. When competing groups’ goals, objectives, needs or values clash the aggression and violence is a result. Afghanistan as multi ethnic state enjoyed internal flexibility till socialist revolution (1978 that changed its social fabric due to ideological clash. In bipolar world this conflict invited the involvement of external actors (USSR & USA. Even after the withdrawal of Soviet troops this conflict sustained till 1992. The Mujahidin who had become new masters of the war torn country added fuel to the fire by converting an ideological clash into an ethnic one. Taliban replaced the Mujahidin but their religious orthodoxy also failed to bring national cohesion. The long sustained conflict has direct bearings on national and individual life of people of Afghanistan who have lost their ability to work together. All attempts made on national cohesion and integration so far have failed. People do not rely and trust each other and they have lost their motivation to work together and to rebuild their institutions and economy. It is the legacy of the long war that is still going on. A closer look at the last 35 years traumatic history of the country clearly illustrates the complexity of the problem due to clash of divergent aims and objectives of several parties.

  2. Institutional and Policy Assessment of Renewable Energy Sector in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Murtaza Ershad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy resources could play a vital role in the sustainable economic, social, and environmental development of Afghanistan. Heavy reliance of rural households on firewood, rising costs of fossil fuels, outdoor and indoor air pollution, and climate change are some of the challenges that can be addressed by diversifying our power production fuel inputs and adopting renewable energy technologies. In order to deploy and scale up renewable energy technologies and improve access to sustainable energy, clear policies and targets and dedicated institutions are crucial. Fortunately, Afghan government with the support of international community is setting ambitious targets for the renewable energy sector and is encouraging national and international investors to take part in the generation, transmission, and distribution of renewable energy especially electricity through Power Purchase Agreements or very cheap land leases. Thus, the objectives of this report are (I to review the existing institutions in the field of renewable energy, (II to review renewable energy policies and targets in Afghanistan, and (III to identify institutional and policy gaps and recommend solutions.

  3. Reforestation Strategies Amid Social Instability: Lessons from Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groninger, John W.

    2012-04-01

    Foreign and domestic government agencies and other international organizations pursue reforestation programs in rural upper watershed areas of Afghanistan over the past decade to alleviate poverty, combat the insurgency and rehabilitate a depleted forest resource base. Popular programs incorporate cash-for-work to conduct hillside terracing, check dam construction and tree-planting for nut production, fuel wood, timber, dune stabilization, and erosion abatement. Programmatic approaches have varied as a function of accessibility, security and local objectives. Uncertain land tenure and use rights, weak local environmental management capacity, and a focus on agricultural production to meet immediate needs limit interest, nationally and locally. Unreliable security, a lack of high quality tree planting stock, limited technical knowledge and coordination among government agencies, and poor security hamper program expansion. Reforestation success would be most likely where these issues are least acute. The Afghan government should focus on supporting community based natural resource management, developing and disseminating improved conservation tree nursery strategies, and promoting watershed management schemes that incorporate forestry, range management and agronomic production. Reforestation practitioners could benefit from the human and material resources now present as part of the international war effort. Successes and failures encountered in Afghanistan should be considered in order to address similar problems in insecure regions elsewhere when reforestation may help reverse environmental degradation and contribute to broader social stabilization efforts.

  4. Law in Afghanistan: A Critique of Post-2001 Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio de Lauri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a critical reflection on the efforts at legal reconstruction initiated in 2001 by the international community and the Afghan government. Its aim is to highlight some of the more controversial factors that accompany the implementation of a foreign model of justice inspired by the ideology of the rule of law. Following Operation Enduring Freedom and the consequent arrival of various international agencies on Afghan soil, the international community (led by the United States has attempted to bring political stability and democracy to Afghanistan. This endeavor has evolved into a more extensive, and rather controversial, process of reconstruction, which has called into question the mantra of democratization and modernization used to ideologically justify the US-led coalition control of a pro-Western Afghan government. By introducing a reflection on restorative justice and judicial mediation, I argue that the standardization and global circulation of specific models of justice present a series of problems often hidden behind legalistic interpretations. While in Western countries jurists and legal practitioners promote the industry of ‘alternative dispute resolution’ (ADR and emphasize the recourse to mediation and conciliation, in Afghanistan governments and international agencies implement the rule of law, thus condemning and marginalizing customary practices in the resolution of disputes. Once taken away from the rules of the judicial order, judicial mediation becomes caught in a logic of compromise and deteriorates.

  5. How security problem of Afghanistan threatens the global world: Afghan police reform case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrfan Çiftçi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is a fact that both the political and the security problems in Afghanistan have directly affected the stability of the region since Afghanistan is in the strategic position of Asia. The article presents an in-depth examination into the current situations of Afghanistan, particularly in regards to the nation's security dynamics. The U.S., the CSTC-A, GPPT, UNAMA, EUPOL, NATO and a lot of individual countries are interested in the reorganizing of the Afghan National Police (ANP force with the aim of providing stability in the nation. The main problem is that each country or international organizations want to implement their own strategies and political purpose to rebuild the ANP. Therefore, Afghanistan faces enormous challenge in terms of security reform. After examining the security training efforts by international communities along with Turkey’ contributions, recommendations are made to develop applicable, effective, and sustainable security reform that could be internalized by the Afghan officials.

  6. Rock samples and geochemical analyses of Afghanistan and adjacent areas (rockafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains points that describe the location of rock samples (core samples and outcrop samples) collected in Afghanistan and adjacent areas, and the...

  7. Oil samples and geochemical analyses of Afghanistan and adjacent areas (oilafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains points that describe the location of oil samples collected in Afghanistan and adjacent areas, and the results of organic geochemical analysis.

  8. Structural contours of the Hauterivian Qezeltash formation of northern Afghanistan (qezeldpafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains polylines that describe structural contours (subsea elevation) of the Hauterivian Qezeltash formation in northern Afghanistan. Hauterivian...

  9. Oil and gas wells of Afghanistan with well logs (welllogafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains points that describe the location of hydrocarbon exploration and production wells drilled in Afghanistan; and hyperlinks to scanned images of...

  10. Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan and Counterterrorism in Pakistan (post-seminar Report)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David; Syed, Mahroona Hussain

    The war on terror has left Afghanistan and the whole of the Central Asian region in a state of turmoil. The increase in militant and terrorist activities has had a major impact in Afghanistan as well as in Pakistan. As a result regional actors have been forced to adapt and evolve new strategies t...... of antigovernment forces has engaged both nations for a comprehensive period, and has compelled them to attempt new approaches. The new lessons learned should be equated and analyzed in order to find a system or best-practice for future engagements.......The war on terror has left Afghanistan and the whole of the Central Asian region in a state of turmoil. The increase in militant and terrorist activities has had a major impact in Afghanistan as well as in Pakistan. As a result regional actors have been forced to adapt and evolve new strategies...

  11. Thickness of the Hauterivian Qezeltash formation in northern Afghanistan (qezelisafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains polylines that describe isopachs of the Hauterivian Qezeltash formation in northern Afghanistan. Hauterivian sandstones are a reservoir rock...

  12. Indian Involvement in Afghanistan in the Context of the South Asian Security System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Hanif

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the regional requirements for a pacification of Afghanistan. For this purpose, Afghanistan is analytically "reframed" as part of South Asia. The hypothesis is that India is the only regional actor that might possess both the incentives and the capabilities to deal with the negative security externalities emanating from Afghanistan.In South Asia, material characteristics such as the delineation of the region and its power polarity are unclear. India's role within the region is even more controversial. By examining India's role within its security environment, this paper will suggest how this lack of clarity could be remedied. In light of the disputes between India and Pakistan and between Pakistan and Afghanistan, India's involvement in the Afghan conflict is probably the most critical test case for India's leadership potential. The following section elaborates a theoretical framework based on Regional Security Complex Theory (RSCT and the concept of regional hegemony as one form of regional order.

  13. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Quarterly Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    reports form a point of reference for the international community and could affect Afghan government receptivity toward greater anticorruption efforts...Afghan migrants residing in Pakistan; ensuring expeditious voluntary returns to Afghanistan; engag- ing the international community and the Afghan

  14. Seismic lines with digital seg-y profiles, northern Afghanistan (segyafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains polylines that describe the location of seismic lines in northern Afghanistan for which digital seismic profiles in seg-y format are...

  15. USGS Map Service Showing Petroleum Resource Potential GIS of Northern Afghanistan

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service includes energy related datasets presenting the results of a petroleum resource assessment of Northern Afghanistan, and other data used in the...

  16. Nation Building in Afghanistan - A Disconnect Between Security Means and Political Ends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    171. 15 Anna Lindh , "Challenges of Peace Operations: Into the 21st Century," Challenges Project Concluding Report 1997 - 2002, (Sweden, 2002), 5...Peace Policy Brief, (12 January 2002): 2-4. 25 IBID, 3. 26 IBID, 3-4. 27 Lindh , 257. 28 "Afghanistan and the United Nations," UN News Service, available...reports/peace_operations/>; Internet; accessed 17 February 2003. 33 Lindh , 260. 34 United Nations Secretary-General, "The Situation in Afghanistan

  17. Trends in traumatic limb amputation in Allied Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Background: Limb amputation has been a common injury occurring in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Compared to other injuries, less attention has been given to this serious, disabling wound. Purpose: The article describes the Allied military experience of traumatic limb amputation in Iraq and Afghanistan. It intends to inform health care personnel involved in the care of serving military personnel and veterans about the scale of these casualties. Methods: A literature se...

  18. In the shadow of the Durand Line security, stability, and the future of Pakistan and Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Janjua, Muhammad Qaiser.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited The Durand Line (Pak-Afghan border) gained international attention during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. The government of Afghanistan's refusal to acknowledge the Durand Line as the official border with Pakistan has serious implications in relation to Global War on Terror (GWOT), especially in Pakistan's Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). The atmosphere of misunderstanding and mistrust in relation to the border between the ...

  19. Rough Neighbors: Afghanistan and Pakistan; Strategic Insights: v.2, issue 1 (January 2003)

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Feroz Hassan

    2003-01-01

    This article appeared in Strategic Insights (January 2003), v.2 no.1 Focus on South Asia over the past fifty years has primarily remained on the India-Pakistan rivalry and tensions over Kashmir. This dimension overshadowed the effect of Pakistan-Afghanistan relations on the security dynamics of the South-Central Asian region. The historical and cultural dimension of the Afghanistan-Pakistan relation has been and will remain critical in the evolving regional dynamics. Since the events of Se...

  20. China’s Interests in Afghanistan: Current Projects and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    92 Ibid., 51. 93 Ibid 50–3. 94 Millward. “Does the 2009 Urumchi Violence,” 349. 95 Stephanie Sy . “Terrorism and the...Shura Majilis (executive council). When he was killed, Abdul Shakoor Turkistani took his place until his rumored death by U.S. drone strike in 2012...Afghanistan. This agreement held until Afghan independence after WWI. The leader of Afghanistan at the time, Amir Abdul Rahman

  1. Scrutinizing and Assessing the Performance of the German and U.S.-Led Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Gardez, Paktia province against Taliban and Al-Qaeda forces. 58 Ibid.; Cyrus Hodes and Mark Sedra , The Search for Security in Post-Taliban...Council, Resolution 1386 (2001), 2. 65 Hodes and Sedra , The Search for Security in Post-Taliban Afghanistan, 43. 66 NATO, ISAF Key Figures: Factsheet, 1...67 Hodes and Sedra , The Search for Security in Post-Taliban Afghanistan, 45. 68 NATO, NATO Briefing: Helping Secure Afghanistan, 5-6. 69 Katzmann

  2. "Education Is as Important for Me as Water Is to Sustaining Life": Perspectives on the Higher Education of Women in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Nina; Payne, Anne Maree; Rahmani, Nasima

    2016-01-01

    Progress in education in Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban has been described as "fragile, limited in reach, depth and uncertainty of sustainability" [UNICEF. 2013. "Basic Education and Gender Equality: Afghanistan." United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund.…

  3. War, Peace and Stabilisation: Critically Reconceptualising Stability in Southern Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Robert Carter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article critically treats stabilisation theory and programming through a perspective of peace and conflict, and argues for stabilisation’s reconceptualisation. Through tracking the concept’s emergence, it outlines that stabilisation is theoretically rooted in an insecurity-underdevelopment problematic and relies on the Liberal Peace thesis as a solution. When this concept was operationalised in southern Afghanistan, however, it was translated into a praxis informed by state-building and counterinsurgency imperatives. This approach ultimately produced confused, sometimes counterproductive, effects: simultaneously engendering a liberal, negative, rented and victor’s peace. The article concludes by arguing that stabilisation should be reconceptualised so that it pursues a positive and hybrid peace if it is to be a more effective source of guidance for policy and practice. The first step is to denaturalise the ‘formal’ state in conflict and fragile environments as being seen as a panacea to all ills of instability.

  4. Strengthening Environmental Engineering Education in Afghanistan through Cooperating Military Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, J. A.; Mahbob, M.; Seely, G. E.; Ressler, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    Many developing countries suffer from substandard employment of environmental engineering and science principles, which leads to poor management of natural and cultural resources, increased public health concerns, and limitations on economic investment and growth. Thus, prior to the implementation of well-intentioned programs designed to promote development, methods for sustaining basic needs, which are the focus of most environmental engineering disciplines, must be designed into the social fabric of the developing culture. Education is a promising method for fostering this development across cultures. Recently, the US Air Force Academy (USAFA) partnered with the US Military Academy (USMA) to implement a Civil Engineering Program at the National Military Academy of Afghanistan (NMAA), Kabul, Afghanistan. This work will outline the process followed during course development, deployment, and implementation, paying particular attention to challenges and benefits at each stage in the process. This cooperation may serve as a model for future implementation of science, technology, engineering and mathematics education programs in developing countries. Consistent with US Civil Engineering programs, the NMAA Civil Engineering program introduces students to a broad range of introductory-level civil engineering subjects--environmental, hydraulic, geotechnical, structural, construction, and transportation engineering. Basic environmental engineering and science principles are addressed through the implementation of an introductory environmental engineering course. Course development followed a three-stage process: (1) course development by US faculty at their home institution, (2) imbedding of US Faculty at the NMAA, and (3) implementation of the course within the NMAA Civil Engineering curriculum using adjunct Afghan faculty hired from Kabul University. An existing environmental engineering course taught at USAFA was used as a model for course development. Although this

  5. 31 CFR 545.520 - Noncommercial personal remittances to or from the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or from the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban. 545.520 Section 545.520 Money and... Statements of Licensing Policy § 545.520 Noncommercial personal remittances to or from the territory of... authorized to process transfers of funds to or from the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban...

  6. Anti-histamine effect of Rubia tibetica, used to treat anaphylaxis caused by tick bites in the Pamir Mountains, Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Anne S.; Kristiansen, Uffe; Soelberg, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    The roots of Rubia tibetica are chewed as an antidote to anaphylaxis caused by bites of the tick Ornithodoros lahorensis by the Wakhi people in Afghanistan.......The roots of Rubia tibetica are chewed as an antidote to anaphylaxis caused by bites of the tick Ornithodoros lahorensis by the Wakhi people in Afghanistan....

  7. A Bid for Success in Operation Enduring Freedom: Applying Strategic Lessons from Past and Current Afghanistan Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    Austin, http://www .lib. utexas.edu/maps/middle east and asia/txu- oclc -310605662- afghanistan rel 2008.jpg (accessed January 29, 2011). 134 The...University of Texas at Austin, http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/middle east and asia/txu- oclc -309296021- afghanistan admin 2008.jpg (accessed January 29

  8. The INSPIRE Project: Using the "Unknown" to Co-Construct a Training Course on Humanistic Counselling in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Grieve, Sandra; Kaveh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This article details a collaborative project between the University of Strathclyde (UK) and the University of Herat (Afghanistan). The aim was to co-construct a model of training, based on humanistic approaches, in order to enhance counselling services in Afghanistan and to establish counselling training at the University of Herat. Two groups of…

  9. Water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Afghanistan from 2004 through 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Thomas J.; Chornack, Michael P.; Vining, Kevin C.; Amer, Saud A.; Zaheer, Mohammad F.; Medlin, Jack H.

    2014-01-01

    Safe and reliable supply of water, for irrigation and domestic consumption, is one of Afghanistan’s critical needs for the country’s growing population. Water is also needed for mining and mineral processing and the associated business and community development, all of which contribute to the country’s economic growth and stability. Beginning in 2004, U.S. Geological Survey scientists have aided efforts to rebuild Afghanistan’s capacity to monitor water resources, working largely with scientists in the Afghanistan Geological Survey of the Ministry of Mines and Petroleum as well as with scientists in the Afghanistan Ministry of Energy and Water, the Afghanistan Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation, and Livestock, and nongovernmental organizations in Afghanistan. Considerable efforts were undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey to compile or recover hydrologic data on Afghanistan’s water resources. These collaborative efforts have assisted Afghan scientists in developing the data collection networks necessary for improved understanding, managing these resources, and monitoring critical changes that may affect future water supplies and conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey, together with Afghan scientists, developed a regional groundwater flow model to assist with water resource planning in the Kabul Basin. Afghan scientists are now independently developing the datasets and conducting studies needed to assess water resources in other population centers of Afghanistan.

  10. Y-chromosomal STR analysis in the Pashtun population of Southern Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achakzai, Niaz M; Rahman, Z; Shahzad, M S; Daud, S; Zar, M S; Israr, M; Husnain, T; Willuweit, Sascha; Roewer, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    Afghanistan is a landlocked country in the heart of Asia and since the dawn of humankind Afghanistan has faced centuries of turmoil, strife, conflict, warfare, distress, social unrest, difficult climate, harsh terrain and due to its unique geostrategic position in Eurasia which has historically attracted commerce and conflict. It is an important stop along the Silk Road, connecting the far eastern civilizations to the western world. A 5000-year history of constant invasion. Afghanistan has been repeatedly invaded and conquered by rulers and super powers, neighboring interference in this conflict-tattered land for centuries yet rarely leading to the conquest of this rugged and challenging terrain nation. Afghans are not only shepherds, farmers and nomads but also intense fighters and fierce warriors. Currently very limited genetic studies have been performed in Afghan populations. 17 Y chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) were analyzed in 125 unrelated Pashtun (in hindi: Pathan) males residing in the Kandahar region of Southern Afghanistan. A total of 92 unique haplotypes were observed. The predominant haplotype reached a frequency of 9.6%. The haplotype diversity was 0.987 and the discrimination capacity 73.6%. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) reveals a considerable regional stratification within the country as well as between different Pashtun (Pathan) groups from Afghanistan, Pakistan and India.

  11. Summaries of important areas for mineral investment and production opportunities of nonfuel minerals in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stephen G.; King, Trude V.V.; Mack, Thomas J.; Chornack, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations (TFBSO) entered into an agreement with the Afghanistan Geological Survey to study and assess the fuel and nonfuel mineral resources of Afghanistan from October 2009 to September 2011 so that these resources could be economically extracted to expand the economy of Afghanistan. This report summarizes the results of joint studies on 24 important areas of interest (AOIs) of nonfuel mineral resources that were identified for mineral investment and production opportunities in Afghanistan. This report is supported by digital data and archival and non-USGS reports on each AOI, and these data are available from the Afghanistan Geological Survey Data Center in Kabul (http://mom.gov.af/en/ and http://www.bgs.ac.uk/afghanminerals/) and for viewing and download on the USGS public Web site and in a separate viewer at http://mapdss2.er.usgs.gov/.

  12. Conceptual Model of Water Resources in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Thomas J.; Akbari, M. Amin; Ashoor, M. Hanif; Chornack, Michael P.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Emerson, Douglas G.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Litke, David W.; Michel, Robert L.; Plummer, L. Niel; Rezai, M. Taher; Senay, Gabriel B.; Verdin, James P.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Geological Survey has been working with the Afghanistan Geological Survey and the Afghanistan Ministry of Energy and Water on water-resources investigations in the Kabul Basin under an agreement supported by the United States Agency for International Development. This collaborative investigation compiled, to the extent possible in a war-stricken country, a varied hydrogeologic data set and developed limited data-collection networks to assist with the management of water resources in the Kabul Basin. This report presents the results of a multidisciplinary water-resources assessment conducted between 2005 and 2007 to address questions of future water availability for a growing population and of the potential effects of climate change. Most hydrologic and climatic data-collection activities in Afghanistan were interrupted in the early 1980s as a consequence of war and civil strife and did not resume until 2003 or later. Because of the gap of more than 20 years in the record of hydrologic and climatic observations, this investigation has made considerable use of remotely sensed data and, where available, historical records to investigate the water resources of the Kabul Basin. Specifically, this investigation integrated recently acquired remotely sensed data and satellite imagery, including glacier and climatic data; recent climate-change analyses; recent geologic investigations; analysis of streamflow data; groundwater-level analysis; surface-water- and groundwater-quality data, including data on chemical and isotopic environmental tracers; and estimates of public-supply and agricultural water uses. The data and analyses were integrated by using a simplified groundwater-flow model to test the conceptual model of the hydrologic system and to assess current (2007) and future (2057) water availability. Recharge in the basin is spatially and temporally variable and generally occurs near streams and irrigated areas in the late winter and early

  13. Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication--Afghanistan and Pakistan, January 2010-September 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Indigenous transmission of wild poliovirus (WPV) has never been interrupted in Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and Nigeria. Among those countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan represent a common epidemiologic reservoir. This report updates previous reports (1,4) and describes polio eradication activities and progress in Afghanistan and Pakistan during January 2010--September 2011, as of October 31, 2011, and planned activities during 2011--2012 to address challenges to polio eradication. In Afghanistan, WPV transmission during 2010--2011 predominantly occurred in the conflict-affected South Region and the adjacent Farah Province of the West Region. During 2010, 25 WPV cases were confirmed in Afghanistan, compared with 38 in 2009; 42 WPV cases were confirmed during January--September 2011, compared with 19 for the same period in 2010. In Pakistan, WPV transmission during 2010--2011occurred both in conflict-affected, inaccessible areas along the common border with Afghanistan and in accessible areas; 144 WPV cases were confirmed in 2010, compared with 89 in 2009, and 120 WPV cases were confirmed during January--September 2011, compared with 93 during the same period in 2010. In Pakistan, the president launched a National Emergency Action Plan for polio eradication in January 2011, emphasizing the key role and responsibility of political and health-care leaders at the district and subdistrict (union council) levels. Enhanced commitment, management, and oversight by provincial and district authorities will be needed to achieve further progress toward interruption of WPV transmission in Pakistan. Continued efforts also will be needed to enhance the safety of vaccination teams within insecure areas of both countries.

  14. Democratising Afghanistan: An Analysis of the 2005 Parliamentary Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahabuddin Ra’ees

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-MY X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Abstract: The interviews and observation of the September 2005 elections for the lower house of parliament and provincial councils in Afghanistan disclose that despite shortcomings, the elections were relatively free. The elections, conducted in the absence of party politics, created a divided legislature struggling to unite. Women members, equally divided by region and ethnicity, may exert a moderating influence on the legislature, which is dominated by the “Islamist right.”

  15. [Health system in Afghanistan: problems and institutional perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejars, M

    2008-10-01

    Afghanistan has been ravaged by years of conflict. To provide emergency services and restore access health services, the Public Health Ministry with the assistance of partners developed first a package of basic health services delivered by NGO contractors and second a package of essential hospital services. The Ministry's role consists of providing guidance. To reduce the many issues and problems affecting this role, reforms are now being undertaken and a new national health care strategy is being developed within the framework of the National Development Strategy. An institution-building project has been initiated with European Union funding to allow the Health Ministry to carry out its stewardship and management functions with greater effectiveness and transparency. This project is essential for the successful outcome of all future strategies and programs planned by the Health Ministry to enhance its institutional effectiveness. The objectives of this project are to strengthen planning and auditing activities, promote quality assurance, implement funding mechanisms for health-related activities, organize management of human resources, maintain ongoing efforts to reform the administration and fight against corruption, and lay the foundations for managing finances and procurement. The scope of this project underlines the importance of its outcome. However the institution-building process will be long and constantly threatened by political instability and insecurity.

  16. "Dislocation", shelter, and crisis: Afghanistan's refugees and notions of home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmott, S

    1996-02-01

    Millions of people have become refugees or been displaced within Afghanistan during 17 years of war within the country. Conversations with women in a camp for the displaced reveal what it means for women to lose their homes, especially in the context of ongoing instability and conflict. Sections discuss homelessness in Kabul, linking psycho-social and practical needs, coping with dislocation, stability and land ownership, mobility and security, family breakdown, temporary and permanent settlements, and meeting needs versus creating dependency. The author concludes that among people displaced from their homes for so many years, their physical and spiritual homes nonetheless remain inseparable from their lives. It is important to maintain the individual notion of home if life is to be worth living and hope retained. Relief agencies must help in an appropriate manner and to an appropriate extent. Oxfam has been working beyond the refugee camps, in a return to the city of Kabul, since July 1995. When this article was written, the NGO was involved in a joint venture to restore the piped water supply which, like the electricity supply, was looted and damaged. It also plans to distribute plastic sheeting for use as roofs and floor covering during the winter. Oxfam currently plans discreet activities rather than an integrated approach.

  17. Preliminary Mineral Resource Assessment of Selected Mineral Deposit Types in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Steve; Orris, Greta J.; Bolm, Karen S.; Peters, Stephen G.; ,

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Wise decision-making and management of natural resources depend upon credible and reliable scientific information about the occurrence, distribution, quantity and quality of a country's resource base. Economic development decisions by governments require such information to be part of a Mineral Resource Assessment. Such Mineral Assessments are also useful to private citizens and international investors, consultants, and companies prior to entry and investment in a country. Assessments can also be used to help evaluate the economic risks and impact on the natural environment associated with development of resources. In February 2002, at the request of the Department of State and the then U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan (Robert P. Finn), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) prepared a detailed proposal addressing natural resources issues critical to the reconstruction of Afghanistan. The proposal was refined and updated in December 2003 and was presented as a 5-year work plan to USAID-Kabul in February 2004. USAID-Kabul currently funds this plan and this report presents a part of the preliminary results obligated for fiscal year 2006. A final Preliminary Assessment of the Non Fuel Mineral Resource of Afghanistan will be completed and delivered at the end of fiscal year 2007. Afghanistan has abundant metallic and non-metallic resources, but the potential resources have never been systematically assessed using modern methods. Much of the existing mineral information for Afghanistan was gathered during the 1950s and continued in the late 1980s until the departure of the geologic advisors from the Soviet Union. During this period, there were many mineral-related activities centered on systematic geologic mapping of the country, collection of geochemical and rock samples, implementation of airborne geophysical surveys, and exploration focused on the discovery of large mineral deposits. Many reports, maps, charts, and tables were produced at that time. Some of

  18. Why the United States will stay engaged in Afghanistan and Pakistan beyond 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    consensus is the key to sustain the US engagement in Afghanistan beyond 2017, and why a successful strategic narrative is required to create it. It provides an analytic framework specifying the requirements for success that a strategic narrative must meet in order to convince its intended audience. Part two...... proof to Congress and the American people that his strategy was working. Part three discusses the implications of these findings for sustaining the American engagement in Afghanistan beyond 2017. They suggest it possible to do so provided that the US President can craft a new strategic narrative...

  19. Use of Oral Miltefosine for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Canadian Soldiers Returning from Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Keynan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Old world cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is caused by Leishmania major and Leishmania tropica, and is endemic to several Asian and Middle-Eastern countries where the rates of infection can be substantial. CL is one of the most common vector-transmitted parasitic infections in Afghanistan. Six cases of CL in Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan are reported in the present study. Their lesions did not improve with fluconazole therapy, and the organism demonstrated in vitro resistance. Oral miltefosine seemed effective.

  20. Combating Corruption: How the Rule of Law Can Defeat a Culture of Impunity in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Afghanistan,” Report to Congress, November 2010. 2 Michael Hastings, The Operators (Blue Rider Press: New York, New York, 2012) 176. 3 Nathan Hodge and...Kalashnikov, and the Laptop: The Neo-Taliban Insurgency in Afghanistan. Columbia University Press: New York, 2008. Grono, Nick . “Rule of Law and the...Rage at Young Lover.” The New York Times, July 30, 2011: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/31/world/asia/31herat.thml_r=1&em=&pagewanted=al Hodge

  1. What Democracy for Afghanistan? An Analysis Utilizing Established Norms and Five Non-Western Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    James Risen, “Reports Link Karzai’s Brother to Afghanistan Heroin Trade” New York Times October 4, 2008. 117 “Afghanistan ‘holds Pakistani spy’” BBC ...Corruption in Nicaragua . For current information in Spanish see Revista Envío, www.envio.org.ni 161 “Informe Latinobarómetro 2008,” 44. 38...Caudillismo (Lanham: Lexington, 2004). 163 Revista Envío “Sin ningún borrón y con muchas cuentas nuevas” January 2009. 164 Michel Cahen, “Mozambique

  2. Beyond 2014: India’s Security Concerns and Indo-U.S. Strategic Partnership in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    Defence and Security Alert 2, no.11 (August 2011): 88-89. 47. Tej Pratap Singh , Endgame in Afghanistan, 75. 48 Steve Coll, “U.S. Interests and...the withdrawal of international forces in 2014.1 ―Manmohan Singh Prime Minister of India 04 October 11 NATO’s decision in 2010 and President...Pratap Singh , “Endgame in Afghanistan: India’s Stakes and Options,” Defence and Security Alert 2, no.11 (August 2011): 73. 27 41 Will Fulton, Ariel

  3. The Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan - A Model for Future Nation Building Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Angela Merkel , on the other hand, sees Afghanistan still on a promising path. In a keynote speech she gave on Afghanistan in mid-November, Merkel ...command, which is structured along interagency lines and conducted an interview with an USAID agent.9 The author also posted his experience as a former...ist für den Erfolg von Einsätzen außerordentlich w ichtig! Interview with GM Treche, DepCom ArmedForcesSupportCommand, Buedel 2006 http

  4. Secondary Education in Afghanistan: a portray of postconflict education reconstrution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Moreno Olmedilla

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a preliminary account of the status of secondary education in Afghanistan. No previous references can be found which include reliable and detailed statistical information or policy analysis of any kind regarding the secondary education sub-sector in Afghanistan. Thus, more than accurate data collection and analysis, this paper can only attempt to open up the political dialogue about secondary education in the country by identifying the relevant policy issues and putting them into the context of secondary education policies in post-conflict developing countries. Considering the increase of the demand for education over the last three years,together with present birth rates in Afghanistan, it is easy to anticipate a huge increase of demand for secondary education starting in 2007 (even if high repetitionand drop-out rates persist at current levels. Adding to that is the fact that the recently approved Constitution has extended compulsory education until the end oflower secondary school, that is, the 9th grade. It will certainly take more than the formal adjustments to the secondary school curriculum now being undertaken to beable to cope with the rapidly approaching new secondary education scenario in Afghanistan. This article reviews the different sub-sectors of the secondary education system, including vocational training and the public maddrassahs, and concludes with specific recommendations focusing on the critical role of the secondary school sector in the construction of a balanced and forward-lookingeducation system in Afghanistan.Este artículo presenta una visión preliminar de la situación de la educación secundaria en Afganistán en los años inmediatamente posteriores al cambio de régimen de 2001-2002. No existen todavía referencias previas (al menos en inglés o en español con información estadística fiable y detallada o con análisis político de ningún tipo en relación con el sector de la secundaria

  5. Phosphate occurrence and potential in the region of Afghanistan, including parts of China, Iran, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orris, Greta J.; Dunlap, Pamela; Wallis, John; Wynn, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    As part of a larger study, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook a study to identify the potential for phosphate deposits in Afghanistan. As part of this study, a geographic information system was constructed containing a database of phosphate occurrences in Afghanistan and adjacent countries, and a database of potential host lithologies compiled from 1:1,000,000 scale maps. Within Afghanistan, a handful of known occurrences and reports indicate the presence of phosphate in Permian, Cretaceous, and Paleogene sediments and in carbonatite. With the exception of the Khanneshin carbonatite, very little is known about these occurrences. In the countries surrounding Afghanistan, economic phosphate is known to occur in Cambrian, Devonian, and Paleogene sediments and in Kiruna-type Fe-apatite deposits. Many of the host units may extend into Afghanistan or equivalent units may be present. Although the possibility of economic phosphate deposits exist for Afghanistan, the need for detailed exploration for phosphate, the remoteness of some locations, and the probability that a deposit would not be exposed at the surface mean that one or more deposits are not likely to be identified in the near future. Even if a phosphate-bearing deposit is identified in Afghanistan, it is not clear if the probable size, thickness, and grade ranges would allow economic development of the hypothesized resource.

  6. Lessons Learned from the Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan: Examples for U.S. Policy Concerning Central Asia and Afghanistan after 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Afghanistan_northern_route_2012_web.pdf 95 Ibid., 45–46. 96 Ibid., 14. 97 Ibid., 46. 25 rings and state power institutions. Of particularly concern is the fact that no...to establish a new government. Only three major opposition parties were recognized in 1991.107 However, the opposition parties were given merely token ...and New Technologies , and speaker of the lower house of parliament.242 Members from the RRS and GBAO were appointed to positions of lesser

  7. Epidemiology and Control of Plasmodium vivax in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Toby; Nahzat, Sami; Sediqi, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Around half of the population of Afghanistan resides in areas at risk of malaria transmission. Two species of malaria (Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum) account for a high burden of disease—in 2011, there were more than 300,000 confirmed cases. Around 80–95% of malaria is P. vivax. Transmission is seasonal and focal, below 2,000 m in altitude, and in irrigated areas which allow breeding of anopheline mosquito vectors. Malaria risk is stratified to improve targeting of interventions. Sixty-three of 400 districts account for ∼85% of cases, and are the target of more intense control efforts. Pressure on the disease is maintained through case management, surveillance, and use of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets. Plasmodium vivax treatment is hampered by the inability to safely treat latent hypnozoites with primaquine because G6PD deficiency affects up to 10% of males in some ethnic groups. The risk of vivax malaria recurrence (which may be as a result of reinfection or relapse) is around 30–45% in groups not treated with primaquine but 3–20% in those given 14-day or 8-week courses of primaquine. Greater access to G6PD testing and radical treatment would reduce the number of incident cases, reduce the infectious reservoir in the population, and has the potential to reduce transmission as a result. Alongside the lack of G6PD testing, under-resourcing and poor security hamper the control of malaria. Recent gains in reducing the burden of disease are fragile and at risk of reversal if pressure on the disease is not maintained. PMID:27708189

  8. A new plan for the 800-pound Gorilla (Guerrilla): perinatal mortality in Afghanistan: a 21st century counterinsurgency model for Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas C

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan has the highest perinatal mortality rate in the entire world. One Afghani woman dies every 30 minutes from perinatal- related event. One of eight Afghani women will die from perinatal events. Maternal mortality is (use percentage, not fractions) 1600/100,000 vs 13 /100,000 in the United States. Afghanistan is one of the only countries in the world in which the average woman?s life expectancy is shorter than a males- despite the active, nationwide combat fought primarily by Afghani males. Meaning, women in Afghanistan are not routinely involved in combat, yet are more likely to die than a man of the same age. This article presents an alternative model Medical Seminar (MEDSEM) for a successful Special Forces (SF) medical counterinsurgency (COIN) plan that can obtain real results by addressing the mission of the Afghan Ministry of Health versus clinging to old notions. This model forms around the medical capabilities of the SF Operational Detachment (ODA)- Alpha (A) and preventinmaternal-infant complications.

  9. Treating Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans with PTSD Who Are at High Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakupcak, Matthew; Varra, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans diagnosed with psychiatric disorders commit suicide at a higher rate than the general population (Kang & Bullman, 2008). Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been identified as a risk factor for suicide in veterans (Bullman & Kang, 1994) and is the most common mental disorder among Iraq and Afghanistan…

  10. U.S. Military Information Operations in Afghanistan: Effectiveness of Psychological Operations 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    International Security Assis- tance Force Afghanistan, December 26, 2010; and “Villagers Seek Medical Help from ISAF Camp,” Sada -e Azadi Radio, May...PM:WORLD “Villagers Seek Medical Help from ISAF Camp,” Sada -e Azadi Radio, May 23, 2010. As of January 18, 2011: http://www.sada-e-azadi.net/Joomla

  11. Leveraging Observations of Security Force Assistance in Afghanistan for Global Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Operations Leslie Adrienne Payne, Jan Osburg Research Report Leveraging Observations of Security Force Assistance in Afghanistan for Global...Operations Leslie Adrienne Payne, Jan Osburg Prepared for the United States Army Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The RAND...C-0001. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Payne, Leslie Adrienne . Leveraging observations of Security Force Assistance in

  12. Afghanistan 2001-2011 : gewapende interventie en staatsvorming in een fragiele staat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemaker, Allard Jacobus Emile

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the use of the military instrument for initiating a state-building process in fragile states as a foundation for stability and basic security. This is done by analysing the position of the armed intervening parties in Afghanistan in the 2001-2011 period as an empirical and

  13. For peace and pain: the medical legitimisation of Afghanistan's poppy crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaran, Amir; Boozary, Andrew

    2011-05-01

    Since the overthrow of the Taliban in 2001, there has been an overall increase in illicit opium production in Afghanistan and mounting human losses. The United Nations has attributed 1 million human deaths to Afghan opiates over the past decade. As the war in Afghanistan nears a crucial mark, the NATO coalition forces and Afghan people can no longer afford the same ineffective counternarcotics strategy. This commentary proposes a strategic revision that reframes Afghanistan's poppy problem as an opportunity for global public health. Specifically, The Afghan poppy crop could be repurposed away from illicit drug production, and towards manufacturing licit opioid analgesics to address unmet needs for pain palliation, particularly for diseases such as HIV/AIDS and cancer in the developing world--that is, illegal opium could be converted into legal pain medicine, solving two problems at once. We present a supply-and-demand that illustrates how this useful exchange could be made, and discuss the political opposition that now stands in the way and perpetuates the unsatisfactory status quo in Afghanistan.

  14. River Basin Muti-Stakeholder Platforms: the practice of 'good water governance' in Afghanistan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, V.; Warner, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes local realities and contextual circumstances in Afghanistan which are infuencing cooperation on water sharing during dry years. The contribution assesses the performance of multi-stakeholder platforms for water management as a ‘good' water governance model promoted by the Europ

  15. Maps of geoelectric sections of Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Korea, and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Bashkuev

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Results of geoelectric mapping of some Asian countries with high seismic activity are presented. The methodology of the geoelectric mapping is considered, and the corresponding maps of geoelectric sections of Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Korea, and Japan are constructed on a scale of 1:5 000 000.

  16. Wielding the Military Shield and the Civilian Sword: Norwegian Civil-Military Interagency Cooperation in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    and Mads A. Andersen, “SV: Vi boer sette dato for uttrekning fra Afghanistan” [SV: We should set a date for pulling out of Afghanistan], Verdens Gang......Norwegian context, the research had to be based on other sources. The obvious solution to the problem was to interview professionals with practical

  17. Slip-Sliding on a Yellow Brick Road: Stabilization Efforts in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Felbab-Brown

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing transition process in Afghanistan will deliver three shocks in the coming few years: foreign forces will complete the handover of security responsibility to their Afghan counterparts, aid volumes and international spending in the country will decrease and, lastly, the political dispensation will be upended by presidential elections in which President Hamid Karzai is not supposed to run again. These challenges are mounting at a time when, due to inconsistent international approaches and a lack of appreciation for the Afghan context, Afghanistan is dealing with rising insecurity, dysfunctional governance, rampant corruption, and ethnic factionalization within the society and the domestic security forces. Based upon a review of the security sector, governance, social and economic conditions, regional relations and negotiation efforts with the insurgents, this article finds that fundamental questions about the efficacy of stabilization efforts in Afghanistan continue to lack clear answers. Regardless, significant room for improvement – both in policy and execution – appears to exist. It remains to be seen whether, as many Afghans fear, a civil war will engulf Afghanistan once again in the post-transition period or whether the international community will take those steps – re-energizing governance reform efforts, maintaining financial support and continuing to strengthen the Afghan army and police – which could help to bolster stability.

  18. Localizing OER in Afghanistan: Developing a Multilingual Digital Library for Afghan Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Lauryn; Hashimi, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    The Darakht-e Danesh ("knowledge tree") Online Library is the first open educational resource (OER) initiative in Afghanistan, established to enhance teacher subject-area knowledge, access and use of learning materials, and to foster more diverse teaching methodologies in order to improve learning outcomes in Afghan classrooms. This…

  19. Using bio- and neurofeedback to enhance psychological recuperation in Afghanistan veterans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallen, V.L.; Wouwe, N.C. van; Dekker, M.; Denissen, A.; Boxtel, G. van; Vermetten, E.

    2012-01-01

    Both bio- and neurofeedback (training) protocols are hypothesized to be beneficial in the management of arousal states and psychological recuperation after aversive and potentially traumatic experiences. As military deployments in theatres like Iraq or Afghanistan imply an significant risk for poten

  20. Management Improvements Needed in Commander’s Emergency Response Program in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    Afghanistan ODS Operational Data Store PPO Project Purchasing Officer RM Resource Manager RMT Resource Management Tool STANFINS Standard...were tracked using five systems: the Combined Information Data Network Exchange (CIDNE), CERP Checkbook, the Resource Management Tool ( RMT ), the Army...status, including the projected completion date. CERP Checkbook, RMT , and STANFINS were financial systems used by USFOR-A to document CERP financial

  1. Aiding Education in Conflict: The Role of International Education Providers Operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Adele; Stoddard, Abby; DiDomenico, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Amid rising violence against civilian aid operations in insecure environments, attacks on the education sector pose a unique set of challenges for international aid actors. In recent years incidents of violence targeting the education sector in Afghanistan and the conflict-affected areas of Pakistan have increased. This article synthesizes recent…

  2. 76 FR 67416 - Executive-led Business Development Mission to Kabul, Afghanistan, September 2011 (Dates Are...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... productivity and greater technical skills for Afghan citizens. International donors continue to support..., Arrive in Kabul, Afghanistan (afternoon), Evening Event. Day Four Security Briefing, Market Briefing, One... in U.S. (morning). Participation Requirements This business development mission is designed for...

  3. Value Focused Thinking for Nation Building in Afghanistan: A Regional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    in vogue for the SSTRO in Afghanistan and a new hierarchy and mathematical model may be developed. • The same model can be used as an assessment tool...Thinking and The Study of Values. Decison Making:Descriptive, Normative and Prescriptive Interactions . Great Britain : Cambridge University Press

  4. Cross-sectional analysis of Dutch repatriated service members from Southern Afghanistan (2003–2014)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, Eelco; Hoencamp, Rigo; Van Dongen, Thijs; Leenen, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Background: A systematic analysis of the complete medical support organization of the Dutch Armed Forces regarding repatriated service members from Afghanistan has not been performed so far. Methods: All information were collated in a specifically designed electronic database and gathered from the a

  5. War and wildlife: a post-conflict assessment of Afghanistan's Wakhan Corridor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mishra, C.; Fitzherbert, A.

    2004-01-01

    Prior to the last two decades of conflict, Afghanistan¿s Wakhan Corridor was considered an important area for conservation of the wildlife of high altitudes. We conducted an assessment of the status of large mammals in Wakhan after 22 years of conflict, and also made a preliminary assessment of wild

  6. Trends in traumatic limb amputation in Allied Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Wallace

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limb amputation has been a common injury occurring in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Compared to other injuries, less attention has been given to this serious, disabling wound. Purpose: The article describes the Allied military experience of traumatic limb amputation in Iraq and Afghanistan. It intends to inform health care personnel involved in the care of serving military personnel and veterans about the scale of these casualties. Methods: A literature search of both civilian and military academic databases was conducted. Results: Both the US and UK have incurred very significant numbers of casualties involving traumatic limb amputation, many of whom have suffered multiple limb loss. The rate of blast injuries causing traumatic limb amputation among US forces has increased since the surge of troops in Afghanistan. Dismounted Complex Blast Injury (DCBI consisting of multiple limb amputations with pelvic, abdominal or genito-urinary injuries has been reported as increasing in frequency among US troops in Afghanistan since 2010. Australian Defence Force casualties suffering traumatic limb amputation remain low. Conclusions: Significant casualties involving traumatic limb amputation are likely to continue among Allied troops while current counter-insurgency tactics are continued. Planned troop withdrawals should eventually result in fewer casualties, including reduced numbers of traumatic limb amputation.

  7. Afghanistan's ethnic groups share a Y-chromosomal heritage structured by historical events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Haber

    Full Text Available Afghanistan has held a strategic position throughout history. It has been inhabited since the Paleolithic and later became a crossroad for expanding civilizations and empires. Afghanistan's location, history, and diverse ethnic groups present a unique opportunity to explore how nations and ethnic groups emerged, and how major cultural evolutions and technological developments in human history have influenced modern population structures. In this study we have analyzed, for the first time, the four major ethnic groups in present-day Afghanistan: Hazara, Pashtun, Tajik, and Uzbek, using 52 binary markers and 19 short tandem repeats on the non-recombinant segment of the Y-chromosome. A total of 204 Afghan samples were investigated along with more than 8,500 samples from surrounding populations important to Afghanistan's history through migrations and conquests, including Iranians, Greeks, Indians, Middle Easterners, East Europeans, and East Asians. Our results suggest that all current Afghans largely share a heritage derived from a common unstructured ancestral population that could have emerged during the Neolithic revolution and the formation of the first farming communities. Our results also indicate that inter-Afghan differentiation started during the Bronze Age, probably driven by the formation of the first civilizations in the region. Later migrations and invasions into the region have been assimilated differentially among the ethnic groups, increasing inter-population genetic differences, and giving the Afghans a unique genetic diversity in Central Asia.

  8. If You Believe in Faith: An Interview with Afghanistan's Minister of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Angie

    2004-01-01

    New construction springs up like hope in Afghanistan's capital: rampant, haphazard, and, too often, quick to deteriorate in Kabul's harsh climate. But one closely watched building project has come to symbolize so much--the renovation of the bombed-out, abandoned women's dormitories at Kabul University. When completed, they will house two thousand…

  9. The Cost of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Global War on Terror Operations Since 9/11

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-08

    military help to counter rising threats from internal insurgencies and spillover from the Syrian civil war, Senators John McCain, Carl Levin, James...www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/09/04/fact-sheet-wales-summit-nato-s- changing-role-afghanistan. 211 Mark Mazzetti and Eric Schmitt , “In a

  10. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. Quarterly Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-30

    quarter, Citibank announced that its Global Transaction Services division had entered into an agreement with the privately owned Afghanistan...fund transfers, according to Citibank .259 More than half of all Afghan civil servants now receive their salaries through electronic fund trans- fers

  11. Approaching Gender Parity: Women in Computer Science at Afghanistan's Kabul University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, Jandelyn

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the representation of women in computer science at the tertiary level through data collected about undergraduate computer science education at Kabul University in Afghanistan. Previous studies have theorized reasons for underrepresentation of women in computer science, and while many of these reasons are indeed present in…

  12. Drug Treatment Centers in Afghanistan: Creating a Participatory Approach to Tackling the Drug Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    of risky behaviors.105 Refugees are often linked to other high-risk groups (e.g., as: sex workers, prisoners, homeless, and mentally ill) because...html (accessed September 5, 2012). UNHCR : The UN Refugee Agency. “Conflict- Induced Internally Displaced Persons in Afghanistan.” Internal...40 b. Refugees ...................................................................................42 c. Patients with Multiple

  13. Genetic Characterization of Soybean Rhizobia Isolated from Different Ecological Zones in North-Eastern Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Safiullah; Ayubi, Abdul Ghani; Ohkama-Ohtsu, Naoko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Tadashi

    2017-03-31

    Seventy rhizobial isolates were obtained from the root nodules of two soybean (Glycine max) cultivars: Japanese cultivar Enrei and USA cultivar Stine3300, which were inoculated with different soil samples from Afghanistan. In order to study the genetic properties of the isolates, the DNA sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and symbiotic genes (nodD1 and nifD) were elucidated. Furthermore, the isolates were inoculated into the roots of two soybean cultivars, and root nodule numbers and nitrogen fixation abilities were subsequently evaluated in order to assess symbiotic performance. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the Afghanistan isolates obtained from soybean root nodules were classified into two genera, Bradyrhizobium and Ensifer. Bradyrhizobium isolates accounted for 54.3% (38) of the isolates, and these isolates had a close relationship with Bradyrhizobium liaoningense and B. yuanmingense. Five out of the 38 Bradyrhizobium isolates showed a novel lineage for B. liaoningense and B. yuanmingense. Thirty-two out of the 70 isolates were identified as Ensifer fredii. An Ensifer isolate had identical nodD1 and nifD sequences to those in B. yuanmingense. This result indicated that the horizontal gene transfer of symbiotic genes occurred from Bradyrhizobium to Ensifer in Afghanistan soil. The symbiotic performance of the 14 tested isolates from the root nodules of the two soybean cultivars indicated that Bradyrhizobium isolates exhibited stronger acetylene reduction activities than Ensifer isolates. This is the first study to genetically characterize soybean-nodulating rhizobia in Afghanistan soil.

  14. Assessing post-abortion care in health facilities in Afghanistan : a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, Nasratullah; Zainullah, Partamin; Kim, Young Mi; Tappis, Hannah; Kols, Adrienne; Currie, Sheena; Haver, Jaime; van Roosmalen, Jos; Broerse, Jacqueline E. W.; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complications of abortion are one of the leading causes of maternal mortality worldwide, along with hemorrhage, sepsis, and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy. In Afghanistan little data exist on the capacity of the health system to provide post-abortion care (PAC). This paper presents f

  15. Communication Management Guidelines for Software Organizations in Pakistan with clients from Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif Shah, Muhammad; Hashim, Rathiah; Shah, Adil Ali; Farooq Khattak, Umar

    2016-11-01

    Developing software through Global Software Development (GSD) became very common now days in the software industry. Pakistan is one of the countries where projects are taken and designed from different countries including Afghanistan. The purpose of this paper is to identify and provide an analysis on several communication barriers that can have a negative impact on the project and to provide management guidelines for medium size software organizations working in Pakistan with clients from Afghanistan and to overcome these communication barriers and challenges organizations face when coordinating with client. Initially we performed a literature review to identify different communication barriers and to check if there are any standardized communications management guidelines for medium size software houses provided in the past. The second stage of the research paper involves guidelines with vendor's perspective that include interviews and focus group discussions with different stakeholders and employees of software houses with clients from Afghanistan. Based on those interviews and discussions we established communication management guidelines in order to overcome the communication problems and barriers working with clients from Afghanistan. As a result of the literature review, we have identified that barriers such as cultural barriers and language barrier were one of the main reasons behind the project failure and suggested that software organizations working in Pakistan should follow certain defined communication guidelines in order to overcome communication barriers that affect the project directly.

  16. Integrating Learning, Leadership, and Crisis in Management Education: Lessons from Army Officers in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayes, D. Christopher; Allen, Nate; Self, Nate

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model and case study used to teach crisis leadership as a management education topic. The materials emerge from studies of U.S. Army leaders (company commanders and platoon leaders) working in Iraq and Afghanistan. The authors explain how examples and cases from military combat provide tools to teach about crisis…

  17. Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication--Afghanistan, January 2014‒August 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Saatcioglu, Akif; Tangermann, Rudolf H; Hadler, Stephen; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2015-10-23

    Despite recent progress toward global polio eradication, endemic transmission of wild poliovirus (WPV) continues to be reported in Afghanistan and Pakistan. The Afghanistan program must overcome many challenges to remain on track toward achieving the objectives set in the 2013–2018 strategic plan of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI). Cross-border transmission of WPV type 1 (WPV1) continues to occur among children traveling to and from Pakistan. The country's routine immunization system remains weak and unable to reach recommended benchmarks in most regions; hence, the national Polio Eradication Initiative (PEI) relies mainly on providing children aged <5 years with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), administered during supplementary immunization activities (SIAs). Because of ongoing conflict and insecurity, some children continue to be missed during SIAs in areas not under government control; however, the majority of missed children live in accessible areas and are often unreached because of a failure to plan, implement, and supervise SIAs efficiently. This report describes polio eradication activities and progress in Afghanistan during January 2014‒August 2015 and updates previous reports. During 2014, a total of 28 WPV1 cases were reported in Afghanistan, compared with 14 cases in 2013; nine cases were reported during January‒August 2015, the same number as during the same period in 2014. To eliminate poliovirus transmission in Afghanistan, emergency operations centers (EOCs) need to be established at the national level and in critical regions without delay to improve overall coordination and oversight of polio eradication activities. The recently revised National Emergency Action Plan for polio eradication needs to be fully implemented, including detailed microplanning and enhanced monitoring and supervision of SIAs, as well as improved cross-border coordination with Pakistan.

  18. Notes on the Cosmopterigidae (Lepidoptera) of Afghanistan and Jammu & Kashmir, India with descriptions of two new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Information on the Cosmopterigidae of Afghanistan and Jammu & Kashmir, India is presented. Two species: Labdia caroli spec. nov. and Vulcaniella kabulensis spec. nov. are described, and Eteobalea sumptuosella (Lederer, 1855), Hodgesiella quagella (Christoph, 1887) and a Vulcaniella species are descr

  19. Natural Resource Assessments in Afghanistan Through High Resolution Digital Elevation Modeling and Multi-spectral Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides USGS/USAID natural resource assessments in Afghanistan through the mapping of coal, oil and natural gas, minerals, hydrologic resources and earthquake and flood hazards.

  20. US Presence and Grounds for Cooperation between the Islamic Republic of Iran and United States in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Javadikouchaksaraei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To date, USA has not designed a policy to deal with Afghanistan and Iraq without Iran. One of the fundamental strategies of USA is to cooperate with the European Union, the Pacific, Russia, the Balkan Area, as well as the Caucasus the Middle East, North Africa, and Middle Asia. All of the countries relate to Iran in saving the Pacific. Iran is the most influential country in the area surrounding Afghanistan, the Middle East, and Northern Africa and Middle Asia. USA has to face Iran in the Middle East to meet the benefits of this relation. Therefore, such situation leads to the main question: does the attendance of USA in Afghanistan create the grounds for cooperation with Iran? Despite the existing disputes between the two governments, the attendance of USA in Afghanistan seems to have created new security, political, economic, and cultural fields for the cooperation of both countries.

  1. The Narcotics Emirate of Afghanistan: Armed Polities and Their Roles in Illicit Drug Production and Conflict 1980-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    its Relationship to the Narcoterror Nexus,’ 203–214; Alain Labrousse, Afghanistan: Opium de Guerre, Opium de Paix (Paris: Mille et une Nuits , 2005...Labrousse, Alain. Afghanistan: Opium de Guerre, Opium de Paix. Paris: Mille et une Nuits , 2005. Lal, Dee Pak. “Endangering the War on Terror by the...institutions is a far more dangerous outcome than criminal collusion with rebellion or terrorist groups. Mills labels this merger an underground empire that

  2. A Case Study in Security Sector Reform: Learning from Security Sector Reform/Building in Afghanistan (October 2002-September 2003)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    NATO Public Diplomacy Division, 2008. Rashid, Ahmed. Descent Into Chaos, New York, Viking, 2008. Sedra , Mark. “Confronting Afghanistan’s Security... Sedra , “Confronting Afghanistan’s Security Dilemma,” e conference, June 4-11, 2003, www.bicc.de/publications/ briefs/brief28/content.php, accessed April...Progress in Afghanistan, Bucharest Summit 2-4 April 2008, Brussels: NATO Public Diplomacy Division, 2008, www.nato.int; Sedra ; Thier, Afghanistan

  3. Implementing harm reduction for heroin users in Afghanistan, the worldwide opium supplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguet, Olivier; Majeed, Murtaza

    2010-03-01

    Afghanistan has suffered decades of war, occupation and unrest. It is also the world's greatest producer of opium and drug production and trafficking account for a third of the total Afghan economy. Currently alongside the "War on Terrorism", the control and eradication of opium production and related trafficking is a main concern of the international community. However, this focus on supply reduction has meant scant attention has been paid to increasing drug use problems within the country; it is estimated there are up to 25,000 opium users and 20,000 heroin users in Kabul city. Drug use is often a response to war, poverty and under-development, however, street opium and heroin manufactured in the country are widely available, affordable and of high purity. This paper documents the efforts of non-governmental organisations to promote and develop harm reduction and treatment services for problem drug users in Afghanistan in this difficult context.

  4. After the parade: military nurses' reintegration experiences from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Mary Ellen; Scannell-Desch, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe reintegration experiences of U.S. military nurses returning from deployments in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. A qualitative study using a phenomenological method was conducted. The population comprised nurses who served in the U.S. Army, Navy, or Air Force in Iraq or Afghanistan during 2003-2013, including Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve nurses. Purposive sampling with Veteran and professional nursing organizations yielded a sample of 35 nurses. Nine themes emerged from analysis: (a) homecoming; (b) renegotiating roles; (c) painful memories of trauma; (d) getting help; (e) needing a clinical change of scenery; (f) petty complaints and trivial whining; (g) military unit or civilian job: support versus lack of support; (h) family and social networks: support versus lack of support; and (i) reintegration: a new normal.

  5. Afghanistan: Post-Taliban Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    Congressional Research Service 4 Rashid Dostam—who joined prominent mujahedin commander Ahmad Shah Masoud of the Islamic Society, a largely Tajik party...Northern Alliance was the Uzbek militia (the Junbush-Melli, or National Islamic Movement of Afghanistan) of General Abdul Rashid Dostam. Frequently...reconstituting militia forces are Balkh Province governor Atta Mohammad Noor, Herat leader Ismail Khan, and first Vice President Abdul Rashid Dostam

  6. Electrification Using Decentralized Micro-Hydro Power Plants in Northern Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ramchandra Bhandari; Anita Richter; Andre Möller; Rolf.-P. Oswianoski

    2015-01-01

    Electricity supply database from the Afghan national authority for electricity supply shows that about only 20% of the population in Afghanistan had access to grid electricity by 2010. The national utility has a total capacity of about 842 MW, out of which about 696 MW was operational. Additionally, many decentralized units (microhydro power (MHP) plants, diesel generators and solar home systems) supply electricity to about 7% of the population. The donors supported National Solidarity Progra...

  7. Stabilization Operations Beyond Government: Joint Venture Public-Private Partnerships in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Defense Intelligence Agency. This article won the inaugural young Professionals in Foreign Policy Essay competition. Joint Venture Public-Private...Beyond Government: Joint Venture Public-Private Partnerships in Iraq and Afghanistan 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER... joint venture public-private partnerships hold the best possibility to achieve the goals of A Unique Private Sector Methodology Eurasia Group brings

  8. Comparative ethnobotany of the Wakhi agropastoralist and the Kyrgyz nomads of Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Soelberg, Jens; Jäger, Anna K

    2016-01-01

    Background The mountainous Wakhan and Pamir in northeastern Afghanistan is one of the most isolated yet inhabited places in Asia. It is home to the agropastoralist Wakhi and the last Afghan semi-nomadic Kyrgyz. We present a study of plant names and uses, along with comparisons of plant name etymology, origins of plant resources, intra- and intercultural exchanges and relations, and the relative availability of the known and used plants. Methods The fieldwork was conducted as an expedition in ...

  9. Afghanistan: Post-Taliban Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    www.defense.gov/news/1230_1231Report.pdf. 18 Ibid.; Moreau, Ron . “New Leaders for the Taliban.” Newsweek, January 24, 2011. Afghanistan: Post-Taliban Governance...revive oil and gas facilities in the north. Cellphones/ Tourism About 18 million cellphone subscribers, up from neglibile amounts during Taliban era... Tourism : National park opened in Bamiyan June 2009. Increasing tourist visits. Sources: CIA, The World Factbook; various press and U.S. government

  10. China Metallurgical Group and Jiangxi Copper Having Signed Agreement on Copper Mines with Afghanistan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>On May 25,the joint investment combo formed by China Metallurgical Group Corp.(MCC) and Jiangxi Copper Co.has formally signed agreement with Afghan government in Kabul on the exploitation of Aynak copper mine.The mine is situated in the north of Loghar in the middle east of Afghanistan,which is about 35km from the Capital City of Kabul.The ex- tra-large copper mine was found at the begin-

  11. Policing in Afghanistan-Reform that Respects Tradition: Need for a Strategic Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    118. 35 Nathan Hodge , “Army Researchers: Why the Kandahar Offensive Could Backfire,” Danger Room (16 April 2010), www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/04...can win the war and lose the battle at home.38 Nick Grono, the Deputy President for Operations of the International Crisis Group, Brussels, has also...graduates re- 40 Nick Grono, “Policing in Conflict Studies – Lessons from Afghanistan,” International

  12. Advising the Command: Best Practices from the Special Operations Advisory Experience in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Among U.S. advisors, the AFPAK Hands and Ministry of Defense Advisors ( MODAs ) enter the SOAGs with the most robust training. The AFPAK Hands program is...second tour. The MODA program recruits civilian advisors for ministerial-level capacity-building assignments in Afghanistan. The program provides seven...participate in these training pro- grams. Only a select few of the individuals within the SOAGs are AFPAK Hands or MODAs . SOJTF-B training seems more

  13. The Rule of Law Effort in Afghanistan: A Success Story in the Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    political will, and programs funded by international donor nations were not fully implemented.7 The contributions and limitations of international ...strategic goals, and intertwined with military, political , economic, and diplomatic efforts. In El Salvador and Afghanistan, the governments did not...following 15 years of international security force presence in the country. A long-term commitment by the United States is required to establish

  14. TeachingEnglishin large classes in Afghanistan : Obstacles in Upper Secondary Schools Rohullah Rohin

    OpenAIRE

    Rohin, Rohullah

    2013-01-01

    Teaching in schools of Afghanistan experience varied challenges. One of them is teaching in large classes. Large Class (LC) is relating to the number of the students per teacher not the size of the classroom. The large classes (overcrowded classes) are discovered in developing countries. Many studies proved that large class has negative impact on teaching and learning. Although, it is difficult for teachers to control and manage LCs and also students are not comfortable in such classes. Howev...

  15. Perspectives on Sexual Health and Function of Recent Male Combat Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew A. Helmer, MD, MS

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Sexual dysfunction in recent combat veterans can have important negative effects on their health and relationships. Our findings elucidate perceived contributory factors and preferred solutions, which can be applied by health‐care providers to improve the management of sexual dysfunction in these patients. Helmer DA, Beaulieu G, Powers C, Houlette C, Latini D, and Kauth M. Perspectives on sexual health and function of recent male combat veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. Sex Med 2015;3:137–146.

  16. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Afghanistan’s Highways 1960-1967

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    was being done. The Ken R. White Company, an American firm under contract to the International Cooperation Administration, was responsible for the...crossings. The roadbed followed a gradual rise from Kandahar to the border, crossing minor ridges on gentle slopes {History 1965; Wilber 1962). This...Walters, R. S. (1970). American and Soviet Aid: A comparative analysis. University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pa. Wilber , D. N. (1962). Afghanistan

  17. Opium and Afghanistan: Reassessing U.S. Counter-Narcotics Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    Opium is also refined for use in legal prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin.14 However, Australia and France currently produce about...Shortage of Opiate-Derived Painkillers ,” The Senlis Council Drug Policy Advisory Forum, available from http://www.senliscouncil.net/documents...Counter-Narcotics, v. 75 “Rising to the Opium Production Challenge in Afghanistan: A License to Meet the World Shortage of Opiate-Derived Painkillers

  18. Firm Fixed Price and Cost Plus Fixed Fee Construction Contracts in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    relationships (S. G. Arditi 2005). The attainment of feedback on the benefits and risks experienced by both the government and contractors in the...impact of key performance indicators on measuring project success (A. A. Chan 2004, A. P. Chan 2002, A. A. Chan 2004, A. P. Chan 2004, S. G. Arditi ... Arditi 2005). In order to determine the most appropriate measures of performance for Iraq and Afghanistan, it may be beneficial to determine what

  19. Posttraumatic stress disorder among Danish soldiers 2.5 years after military deployment in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellerup, Janne; Andersen, Søren Bo; Høgh (Hogh), Annie

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) implicates research regarding factors besides the preceding traumatic event. This study investigated the influence of predisposing personality traits on development of PTSD in a group of Danish Soldiers deployed to Afghanistan ......, and Spearman¡'s rho significant relationships were identified between pre-existing personality traits of neuroticism and agreeableness with development of PTSD symptoms 2.5 years after homecoming, however, a number of additional cofounders were identified....

  20. The Nature of Insurgency in Afghanistan and the Regional Power Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    authorized a PA to refer all criminal and civil cases to the Jirgah—in vogue even today in the FATA. Not only have successive governments in Pakistan been...decided to place the borders where they are today, as this allowed Britain to retain control of the strategic passes connecting India with Afghanistan...much in vogue even today.65 This one agreement between both countries is a major hurdle in regulating the border security, which is being exploited by

  1. The UK Military Experience of Thoracic Injury in the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    advances in surgical technique.4 Haemorrhage and sepsis have remained the main causes of mortality throughout twentieth century warfare.1,6 In the...severe head or abdominal injury and cardiac arrest as independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: Blast is the main mechanism of thoracic wounding...in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Thoracic trauma in association with severe head or abdominal injuries are predictors of mortality

  2. Ahmad Shah Massoud: A Case Study in the Challenges of Leading Modern Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    operation would be perceived as a failure by the government and the ISI discredited.65 Bhutto wanted Major General Nasrullah Babar to try a parallel track... Babar realized that there was significant disillusionment within the Afghan refugee community concerning the inter Mujihadeen civil war in Afghanistan...The Pakistani Madrassas or religious schools were predominantly filled with Afghan refugees and provided General Babar a steady supply of

  3. New-onset asthma among soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szema, Anthony M; Peters, Michael C; Weissinger, Kristen M; Gagliano, Christy A; Chen, John J

    2010-01-01

    Since June 4, 2004, asthma diagnosed and symptomatic after the age of 12 years has been an exclusion criterion for military enlistment unless exempted via medical waiver. The Department of Defense determined that 13% of U.S. Army Medic visits in Iraq are for new-onset acute respiratory illness; case reports of veterans with asthma that began in Iraq and Afghanistan War zones have surfaced. This prompted our study to determine whether new asthma is diagnosed more frequently among Iraq/Afghanistan War troops versus stateside-based troops. Retrospective review of asthma diagnoses among computerized charts for military personnel discharged from active duty and examined between March 1, 2004 and May 1, 2007, at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), Northport, NY, classified soldiers by (1) deployment status-whether they were stationed in Iraq/Afghanistan for a 1-year tour of duty or stationed in the United States, and (2) VA diagnosis of asthma per International Classification of Disease codes. Associations between deployment and asthma statuses were evaluated/stratified by gender/age group. Eligibility criteria entailed (1) residence in Long Island, (2) aged 18-45 years, and (3) both U.S. military service and discharge dates between March 1, 2004 and May 1, 2007. Out of 6233 patients who served between 2004 and 2007 and were followed at the Northport VAMC, 290 new-onset/prevalent asthma cases were identified. Deployment to Iraq was associated with a significantly higher risk of asthma compared with stateside soldiers (6.6% versus 4.3%; with a crude odds ratio, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.18, 2.11). These associations persist when stratified by gender and age group. Deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan is associated with new-onset asthma. Etiologic studies, surveillance, incidence, epidemiology, and assessing response to therapy are recommended.

  4. A Contemporary "Blueprint" for North Atlantic Treaty Organization Provisional Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-25

    means of keeping a lid on the situation in Afghanistan, while coalition forces and resources moved to Iraq. 13 Mark Sedra . May/June 2005. “The...58 Mark Sedra . May/June 2005. “The Provincial Reconstruction Team: The Future of Civil- Military Relations?” Article in SITREP, A Publication of the...challenge. 105 Mark Sedra . May/June 2005. “The Provincial Reconstruction Team: The Future of

  5. The Impact of Resource Wealth On Economic Growth, Governance, and Conflict in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    volatility or political instability.15 The conditions listed above are particularly relevant to this case study as it can be argued that Afghanistan...revenues, a further upshot that resource-based revenues enjoy over aid are the “ spillover effects” associated with developing an economy grounded in a...tangible good. The idea of the spillover effect comes from leveraging an industry, in Afghanistan’s case large-scale extraction operations, to form

  6. Support for Afghanistan’s Justice Sector: State Department Programs Need Better Management and Stronger Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    component from the contractor that previously implemented the JSSP— PAE Incorporated ( PAE )—to IDLO. This audit assesses (1) INL’s management of...from PAE to IDLO affects INL’ s oversight of the program, and (3) State’s efforts to coordinate justice sector programs in Afghanistan across...management and oversight of the Justice Sector Support Program (JSSP) contract with PAE Incorporated ( PAE ) limited its ability to assess the

  7. The Rule of Law Effort in Afghanistan: A Success Story in the Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    USA 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND...Pashtun, Islamic fundamentalist group that ruled Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when a United States led invasion toppled the regime for providing...volunteered as the lead nation for a rule of law program. The Afghan legal system was historically a mix of civil, customary, and Islamic law. In

  8. U.S. Policy in Pakistan as U.S. Begins to Transition Afghanistan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized...Army War College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street...the most significant efforts associated with Afghanistan and Pakistan Regional Stabilization Strategy is the Kerry- Lugar -Berman (KLB) legislation.32

  9. Responding to Strategic and Organizational Uncertainty: Developing Army Leaders after Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    they gained in Desert Storm, Bosnia, Kosovo, Macedonia , and Somalia as essential to meeting the challenges in Iraq and Afghanistan. They also valued...there are also positive benefits to neuroplasticity. For example, over 30 years of empirical scientific research has documented the positive...goals and a plan to reach those goals.”115 This lack of accountability on the part of the soldier, combined with lack of empirical evidence

  10. Wartime vascular injuries in the pediatric population of Iraq and Afghanistan: 2002-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Vascular trauma in infants and children. J Trauma 1979;19(7):532–6. [14] Cox C, Black C, Duke J, et al. Operative treatment of truncal vascular...Accepted 4 October 2013 Key words: Vascular injury Trauma Children Pediatric Wartime Reconstruction Background: Contemporary war-related studies focus...vascular trauma at US military hospitals in wartime Iraq and Afghanistan. Methods: Review of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) (2002

  11. Afghanistan: Post-Taliban Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    2010 Afghanistan-Pakistan trade agreement may increase these exports. Vast untapped minerals affirmed by U.S. experts (June 2010). Oil Proven...Reserves 3.6 billion barrels of oil , 36.5 trillion cubic feet of gas. Current oil production negligible. USAID funding project to revive oil and gas...development programs are implemented. On the other hand, an April 2010 UNODC expresses concern over cannabis cultivation and trafficking—which is present

  12. Village Stability Operations in Afghanistan: Comparing Past Counterinsurgencies for Future Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    Afghanistan program has drawn criticism for human rights violations committed by the Afghan Local Police and poor reception by much of the Afghan...rights violations committed by the Afghan Local Police and poor reception by much of the Afghan population. Despite setbacks in the VSO, areas in rural... migrants . Prior to World War II, Malaysia was considerably stable and peaceful as a British-ruled colony. World War II was a pivotal time in the

  13. In the Shadow of the Durand Line: Security, Stability, and the Future of Pakistan and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Afghanistan and Pakistan when the British partitioned the sub-continent and drew another line on a map between Pakistan and India further to the East). The...Gandhi. Like Gandhi, he was against British rule in India and opposed to the partition of the Indian sub-continent. When he realized that partition ...stand on its own and rejected the proposal. Mohammad Ali Jinnah (leader of the Pakistan Muslim League and the first Governor-General (1947–48) of

  14. The Silent Revolution within NATO Logistics: A Study in Afghanistan Fuel and Future Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    have put it over again. We got no gas because, to suit Monty, the First Army must get most of it…31 Much like the war in Afghanistan, fuel supply and...closure. With the exception of unleaded gasoline (F-67), ISAFs data reveals that fuel quantities actually increased during the Pakistan blockade. Even with...effectiveness of the contracts used to provide fuel to their fielded forces. DLA Energy can provide a gallon of gas to its customers for less than any

  15. Afghanistan Reveals the Source of Atmospheric Nitrogen during North Western Monsoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozlem Goral

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analysis of soil samples collected from Afghanistan have shown that those regions having capability of generating wind-induced dust at northern and south western territories have the capability of supplying nitrates and nitrites in addition to crustal materials. Together with all the other essential elements Afghan soil samples has the potential of controlling so far unexplained phytoplankton bloom and excess nitrate and nitrites during the course of NWM (North Western Monsoons over the surface waters of Arabian Sea

  16. Zwischen Information und Mission. Journalisten in Afghanistan: Berufliche Einstellungen und Leistungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefa Hamidi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In diesem Beitrag werden der Journalismus und insbesondere die beruflichen Einstellungen und Leistungen von Journalisten und Journalistinnen in Afghanistan untersucht. Diese Studie ist bisher die erste umfassende empirische Studie, die sich des aktuellen afghanischen Journalismus annimmt. Sie wurde auf der Grundlage einer der neuesten theoretischen Konzepte der Kommunikationswissenschaft vorgenommen und darauf basierend wurde ein mehrdimensionales empirisches Analyse-Modell entwickelt, um die Gegebenheiten zu untersuchen. Die Ermittlung der beruflichen Einstellungen geschah mittels eine vollstandardisierten Befragung, an der 195 Journalisten in Afghanistan teilnahmen. Eine Inhaltsanalyse in den drei wichtigsten afghanischen Zeitungen erbrachte eine Zusammen-stellung der Leistungen von Journalisten. Der wichtigste Befund lautet, dass die befragten Journalisten ein berufliches Rollenselbstverständnis im Sinne des Informationsjournalismus haben. Auch hinsichtlich der journalistischen Berichterstattungsmuster nahm der Informations-journalismus eine dominante Position ein. Aus dieser Dominanz ist zu schließen, dass dieses ermittelte berufliche Rollenselbstverständnis für Journalisten Priorität besitzt und in die Berichterstattung diffundiert. Als zweitwichtigstes Kommunikationsziel gaben die Befragten den missionarischen Journalismus an. Dies ist der Tatsache geschuldet, dass in Afghanistan Religion (Islam und Tradition die wichtigsten gesellschaftlichen „Identitäts- und Handlungsfaktoren“ bilden.

  17. Karez (qanat) irrigation in the Helmand River Basin, Afghanistan: a vanishing indigenous legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, B. J. M.; Parajuli, U. N.; Haq, Mohammad; Wardlaw, R. B.

    2017-03-01

    A karez is a gently sloping tunnel into a hillside with a series of vertical shafts. At the upstream end, the karez depresses the water table such that groundwater enters the tunnel. Farmers all over Afghanistan have built and managed karezes for centuries using indigenous knowledge. This report focuses on karezes in the Helmand River Basin in southern Afghanistan, and describes the location of karezes in relation to geology, technological and managerial aspects of karez irrigation, and their current status. Karez irrigation has declined in recent decades due to the following: a prolonged reduction in precipitation, increase in number of boreholes that lower the water table below the karez tunnel, breakdown in community-based management, and reduced maintenance. Systematic field measurements are a challenge in the Helmand Basin due to security constraints. The current condition and management of the karezes have been assessed through short field visits and structured focus-group discussions with karez farmers and staff from provincial departments. The surveys indicate that over half of the karezes in the Helmand Basin have gone dry. Furthermore, the flow in karezes that are still operational has also declined significantly. The report demonstrates the value of using data from the US National Centres for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Reanalysis 1 project, to estimate historic precipitation for various karez zones in this data-poor basin. Strategies for rehabilitating karezes are discussed. Rehabilitation is financially expensive in comparison to drilling new boreholes, but karezes are part of the national heritage of Afghanistan and can facilitate social cohesion.

  18. Localizing OER in Afghanistan: Developing a Multilingual Digital Library for Afghan Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauryn Oates

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Darakht-e Danesh (‘knowledge tree’ Online Library is the first open educational resource (OER initiative in Afghanistan, established to enhance teacher subject-area knowledge, access and use of learning materials, and to foster more diverse teaching methodologies in order to improve learning outcomes in Afghan classrooms. This paper describes our experience developing this local language digital library, buildings its responsiveness to our audience of users as we progressed, customizing both the interface and the resources for Afghanistan’s education environment. We innovated methods to devise relevant local content, localized usability, developed different access models to reach different populations of users, integrated impact measurement, and opted to openly license material in the library’s collection. By making digital educational content open from the first introduction of digital repositories of learning objects in Afghan languages, we have an opportunity to establish the principle of openness and to promote open practices in teacher professional development in Afghanistan. The paper aims to share lessons on how OER can be customized for multilingual, resource-scarce contexts drawing from our experience to date in Afghanistan, and seeking to contribute to the literature on localization and multilingual OER.

  19. Preliminary Assessment of Non-Fuel Mineral Resources of Afghanistan, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Afghanistan has abundant mineral resources, including known deposits of copper, iron, barite, sulfur, talc, chromium, magnesium, salt, mica, marble, rubies, emeralds, lapis lazuli, asbestos, nickel, mercury, gold and silver, lead, zinc, fluorspar, bauxite, beryllium, and lithium (fig. 1). Between 2005 and 2007, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funded a cooperative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Afghanistan Geological Survey (AGS) to assess the non-fuel mineral resources of Afghanistan as part of the effort to aid in the reconstruction of that country. An assessment is an estimation or evaluation, in this instance of undiscovered non-fuel mineral resources. Mineral resources are materials that are in such form that economic extraction of a commodity is currently or potentially feasible. In this assessment, teams of scientists from the USGS and the AGS compiled information about known mineral deposits and then evaluated the possible occurrence of undiscovered deposits of all types. Quantitative probabilistic estimates were made for undiscovered deposits of copper, mercury, rare-earth elements, sulfur, chromite, asbestos, potash, graphite, and sand and gravel. These estimates were made for undiscovered deposits at depths less than a kilometer. Other deposit types were considered and discussed in the assessment, but quantitative estimates of numbers of undiscovered deposits were not made. In addition, the assessment resulted in the delineation of 20 mineralized areas for further study, of which several may contain resources amenable to rapid development.

  20. Karez (qanat) irrigation in the Helmand River Basin, Afghanistan: a vanishing indigenous legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, B. J. M.; Parajuli, U. N.; Haq, Mohammad; Wardlaw, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    A karez is a gently sloping tunnel into a hillside with a series of vertical shafts. At the upstream end, the karez depresses the water table such that groundwater enters the tunnel. Farmers all over Afghanistan have built and managed karezes for centuries using indigenous knowledge. This report focuses on karezes in the Helmand River Basin in southern Afghanistan, and describes the location of karezes in relation to geology, technological and managerial aspects of karez irrigation, and their current status. Karez irrigation has declined in recent decades due to the following: a prolonged reduction in precipitation, increase in number of boreholes that lower the water table below the karez tunnel, breakdown in community-based management, and reduced maintenance. Systematic field measurements are a challenge in the Helmand Basin due to security constraints. The current condition and management of the karezes have been assessed through short field visits and structured focus-group discussions with karez farmers and staff from provincial departments. The surveys indicate that over half of the karezes in the Helmand Basin have gone dry. Furthermore, the flow in karezes that are still operational has also declined significantly. The report demonstrates the value of using data from the US National Centres for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Reanalysis 1 project, to estimate historic precipitation for various karez zones in this data-poor basin. Strategies for rehabilitating karezes are discussed. Rehabilitation is financially expensive in comparison to drilling new boreholes, but karezes are part of the national heritage of Afghanistan and can facilitate social cohesion.

  1. 31 CFR 545.521 - Transactions related to U.S. citizens residing in the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... residing in the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban. 545.521 Section 545.521 Money and... Statements of Licensing Policy § 545.521 Transactions related to U.S. citizens residing in the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban. U.S. citizens who reside on a permanent basis in the territory...

  2. Ethics at War: Review of Elizabeth Scannell-Desch and Mary Ellen Doherty, Nurses in War: Voices from Iraq and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillespie, Leigh-Anne

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In Nurses in War: Voices from Iraq and Afghanistan, Elizabeth Scannell-Desch and Mary Ellen Doherty take a journey through the lived experiences of 37 United States military nurses who served in Iraq or Afghanistan during the war years 2003 through 2010.

  3. Social Sciences in Asia II: Afghanistan, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Nepal. Reports and Papers in the Social Sciences, No. 33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    The document focuses on social science teaching and research in Afghanistan, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, and Nepal. One chapter is devoted to each of the five nations. The first chapter suggests that social science has not played a major role in the socioeconomic development of Afghanistan because most Afghans favor traditional ways of thinking. The…

  4. Strategies for flood hazard adaptation in drought affected regions of Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleupner, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The development and management of water resources in Afghanistan are critically important for the economic development of the country. But Afghanistan presents a number of specific challenges in terms of water resource management and climate change impact assessment. Political instability and war has caused widespread devastation, insecurity, displacement, poverty and severe environmental degradation. Recent droughts have led to the collapse of many livelihoods, and poor national security restricts structured fieldwork. The recent restructuring and rebuilding of the state can be seen as opportunity to integrate climate change mitigation and adaptation measures into national, regional, and local planning. Governmental organizations are responsible to integrate climate change related issues and pro-active planning processes in water management and environmental considerations into relevant legislations, ministry and sector strategies. Integrated water resource management has been practically nonexistent during the last decades and consideration of climate change impacts are widely ignored in regional planning processes. However, flooding, landslides, drought, and extreme heat and freezing weather are already threatening the population. Climate models suggest that Afghanistan will be confronted by an increase of these events. Desertification and land degradation but also floods due to untimely rainfall are expected to broaden. Studies show that the impact of increasingly frequent flash floods may be amplified due to more rapid spring snow melt as a result of higher temperatures, combined with the downstream effects of land degradation, loss of vegetative cover and land mismanagement. It is further exacerbated by drought, which has the effect of hardening soils and reducing their permeability. In 2007 heavy floods already destroyed fields and harvests, killed livestock, damaged buildings, and claimed many lives. The intensified climatic conditions in Afghanistan will

  5. SWOT analysis of program design and implementation: a case study on the reduction of maternal mortality in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Qudratullah; Danesh, Homayoon; Makharashvili, Vasil; Mishkin, Kathryn; Mupfukura, Lovemore; Teed, Hillary; Huff-Rousselle, Maggie

    2016-07-01

    This case study analyzes the design and implementation of the Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS) in Afghanistan by synthesizing the literature with a focus on maternal health services. The authors are a group of graduate students in the Brandeis University International Health Policy and Management Program and Sustainable International Development Program who used the experience in Afghanistan to analyze an example of successfully implementing policy; two of the authors are Afghan physicians with direct experience in implementing the BPHS. Data is drawn from a literature review, and a unique aspect of the case study is the application of the business-oriented SWOT analysis to the design and implementation of the program that successfully targeted lowering maternal mortality in Afghanistan. It provides a useful example of how SWOT analysis can be used to consider the reasons for, or likelihood of, successful or unsuccessful design and implementation of a policy or program. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Large-Scale Digital Geologic Map Databases and Reports of the North Coal District in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Trent M.; Davis, Philip A.; Nigh, Devon; Skinner, James A.; SanFilipo, John R.; Bolm, Karen S.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Galuszka, Donna; Stettner, William R.; Sultani, Shafiqullah; Nader, Billal

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the Afghanistan coal resource maps and associated databases that have been digitally captured and maps that have been thus far converted to GIS databases. Several maps by V/O Technoexport, USSR (VOTU) and Bundesanstalt fur Bodenforschung (BGR), Hannover, Germany, are captured here. Most of the historical coal exploration is concentrated in north-central Afghanistan, a region referred to as the 'North Coal District', and almost all of the coal-related maps found Afghanistan Geological Survey (AGS) archives to date cover various locations within that district as shown in the index map. Most of the maps included herein were originally scanned during U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) site visits to Kabul in November 2004 and February 2006. The scanning was performed using equipment purchased by U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and U.S. Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) and installed at the AGS by USGS. Many of these maps and associated reports exist as single unpublished copies in the AGS archives, so these efforts served not only to provide a basis for digital capturing, but also as a means for preserving these rare geologic maps and reports. The data included herein represent most of the coal-related reports and maps that are available in the AGS archives. This report excludes the limited cases when a significant portion of a report's text could not be located, but it does not exclude reports with missing plates. The vector files are released using the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) Personal Geodatabase, ESRI shapefile vector format, and the open Geography Markup Language (GML) format. Scanned images are available in JPEG and, when rectified, GeoTIFF format. The authors wish to acknowledge the contributions made by the staff of the AGS Records and Coal Departments whose valuable assistance made it possible to locate and catalogue the data provided herein. We especially acknowledge the efforts of particular

  7. The Norwegian media image of the war in Afghanistan: Peacekeeping or aggression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Ottosen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the framing of Norwegian media coverage of the war against terror in Afghanistan with special emphasis of the coverage of the Norwegian military presence in Afghanistan. Norwegian forces became involved in a military intervention for the first time since the Second World War when ex-Yugoslavia was attacked in April 1999. At that time, Norway provided military support for the invasion and placed fighter planes and Norwegian pilots at the disposal of NATO. The war in Afghanistan represented an additional dimension, with Norwegian ground forces taking part in the hunt for al-Qaida fighters in the mountains of Afghanistan. The purpose of this article is to give a picture of Norwegian media coverage of the war in Afghanistan, with a special emphasis on the coverage of Norway's role in the conflict. As a small country with traditionally close relations to US, Norway had to balance, like many other small countries, between the need uphold its traditional policy of complying with international law, and the desire to avoid provoking the USA with criticism and actions that could be regarded as disloyal and thus harm the bilateral relationship. This dilemma must also be seen as a problem for the mainstream media, which traditionally has been loyal to Norwegian security policy. Two main issues are discussed: 1. How was the start of the war covered in the media in October 2001? 2. In what context was the Norwegian military presence covered? The two newspapers analyzed are Aftenposten and VG. The choice of these two newspapers was made to include Norway's largest and potentially most influential morning paper (Aftenposten and its largest tabloid, as well as largest newspaper (VG. Quantitative as well as qualitative methods are used to analyze the coverage. Both Aftenposten's and VG's coverage on the first day of the war in Afghanistan are dominated by pro-US framing and the use of Western sources. The pro-US framing is more obvious in

  8. Current Activities of the Ministry of Mines, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, M.

    2008-12-01

    Beginning in late 2001, the Afghanistan government started developing plans for the revitalization of the Natural Resources sector. This revitalization included the rebuilding and reorganization of the capabilities of the Ministry of Mines and Industries (now the Ministry of Mines) and the Afghan Geological Survey and several other Afghan ministries. The initial focus was on the development of new mining and hydrocarbon laws, which were supported by the World Bank. Concurrent with these activities was the recognized need to identify, organize and compile existing data and information on the natural resources of the country. This has been followed by the use of these data and information to provide preliminary assessments of the oil and gas resources, mineral resources, water resources, coal resources, and earthquake hazards, all based on existing data. A large part of these assessment efforts required the development of a geospatial infrastructure through the use of satellite imagery and other remote sensing technologies. Institutional and capacity building were integral parts of all efforts. With the assessment and law activities ongoing, the Ministry of Mine has now turned to the development of a leasing framework, which address the critical need of transparency of leasing, lease management, and royalty collection. This new leasing system was implemented in spring 2008 with the leasing of the Aynak Copper Deposit, which is located about 25 miles south of Kabul. At the moment, a second world class mineral deposit is being considered for leasing within the next year. Oil and gas lease tracts are also under development in the northern oil and gas basins of Afghanistan. With the support of the Afghan government, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has recently completed the gathering of new data and information in support of the Natural Resources Sector. These data gathering missions include gravity, magnetics, radar, and hyperspectral data, which were gathered through

  9. Posttraumatic stress disorder post Iraq and Afghanistan: prevalence among military subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Lindsey A; Sundin, Josefin; Rona, Roberto J; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T

    2014-09-01

    A large body of research has been produced in recent years investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in apparent differences in PTSD prevalence. We compare prevalence estimates for current PTSD between military subgroups, providing insight into how groups may be differentially affected by deployment. Systematic literature searches using the terms PTSD, stress disorder, and acute stress, combined with terms relating to military personnel, identified 49 relevant papers. Studies with a sample size of less than 100 and studies based on data for treatment seeking or injured populations were excluded. Studies were categorized according to theatre of deployment (Iraq or Afghanistan), combat and noncombat deployed samples, sex, enlistment type (regular or reserve and [or] National Guard), and service branch (for example, army, navy, and air force). Meta-analysis was used to assess PTSD prevalence across subgroups. There was large variability in PTSD prevalence between studies, but, regardless of heterogeneity, prevalence rates of PTSD were higher among studies of Iraq-deployed personnel (12.9%; 95% CI 11.3% to 14.4%), compared with personnel deployed to Afghanistan (7.1%; 95% CI 4.6% to 9.6%), combat deployed personnel, and personnel serving in the Canadian, US, or UK army or the navy or marines (12.4%; 95% CI 10.9% to 13.4%), compared with the other services (4.9%; 95% CI 1.4% to 8.4%). Contrary to findings from within-study comparisons, we did not find a difference in PTSD prevalence for regular active-duty and reserve or National Guard personnel. Categorizing studies according to deployment location and branch of service identified differences among subgroups that provide further support for factors underlying the development of PTSD.

  10. Impact of conflict on infant immunisation coverage in Afghanistan: a countrywide study 2000–2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seino Kaoruko

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant immunisation is an effective public health intervention to reduce the morbidity and mortality of vaccine preventable diseases. However, some developing countries fail to achieve desirable vaccination coverage; Afghanistan is one such country. The present study was performed to evaluate the progress and variation in infant immunisation coverage by district and region in Afghanistan and to assess the impact of conflict and resource availability on immunisation coverage. Results This study analysed reports of infant immunisation from 331 districts across 7 regions of Afghanistan between 2000 and 2003. Geographic information system (GIS analysis was used to visualise the distribution of immunisation coverage in districts and to identify geographic inequalities in the process of improvement of infant immunisation coverage. The number of districts reporting immunisation coverage increased substantially during the four years of the study. Progress in Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG immunisation coverage was observed in all 7 regions, although satisfactory coverage of 80% remained unequally distributed. Progress in the third dose of Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT3 immunisation differed among regions, in addition to the unequal distribution of immunisation coverage in 2000. The results of multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated a significant negative association between lack of security in the region and achievement of 80% coverage of immunisation regardless of available resources for immunisation, while resource availability showed no relation to immunisation coverage. Conclusion Although progress was observed in all 7 regions, geographic inequalities in these improvements remain a cause for concern. The results of the present study indicated that security within a country is an important factor for affecting the delivery of immunisation services.

  11. Misoprostol for Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage at Home Birth in Afghanistan: Program Expansion Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Nasratullah; Zainullah, Partamin; Kim, Young‐Mi; Tappis, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Afghanistan has a maternal mortality ratio of 400 per 100,000 live births. Hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal death. Two‐thirds of births occur at home. A pilot program conducted from 2005 to 2007 demonstrated the effectiveness of using community health workers for advance distribution of misoprostol to pregnant women for self‐administration immediately following birth to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. The Ministry of Public Health requested an expansion of the pilot to study implementation on a larger scale before adopting the intervention as national policy. The purpose of this before‐and‐after study was to determine the effectiveness of advance distribution of misoprostol for self‐administration across 20 districts in Afghanistan and identify any adverse events that occurred during expansion. Methods Cross‐sectional household surveys were conducted pre‐ (n = 408) and postintervention (n = 408) to assess the effect of the program on uterotonic use among women who had recently given birth. Maternal death audits and verbal autopsies were conducted to investigate peripartum maternal deaths that occurred during implementation in the 20 districts. Results Uterotonic use among women in the sample increased from 50.3% preintervention to 74.3% postintervention. Because of a large‐scale investment in Afghanistan in training and deployment of community midwives, it was assumed that all women who gave birth in facilities received a uterotonic. A significant difference in uterotonic use at home births was observed among women who lived farthest from a health facility (> 90 minutes self‐reported travel time) compared to women who lived closer (88.5% vs 38.9%; P maternal deaths were identified among those women who used misoprostol. Discussion The results of this study build on the findings of the pilot program and provide evidence on the effectiveness, primarily measured by uterotonic use, of an expansion of advance distribution of

  12. Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans with Reintegration Problems: Differences by Veterans Affairs Healthcare User Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Orazem, Robert J; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Gravely, Amy; Frazier, Patricia; Carlson, Kathleen F; Schnurr, Paula P; Oleson, Heather

    2015-07-01

    We studied 1,292 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who participated in a clinical trial of expressive writing to estimate the prevalence of perceived reintegration difficulty and compare Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare users to nonusers in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics. About half of participants perceived reintegration difficulty. VA users and nonusers differed in age and military background. Levels of mental and physical problems were higher in VA users. In multivariate analysis, military service variables and probable traumatic brain injury independently predicted VA use. Findings demonstrate the importance of research comparing VA users to nonusers to understand veteran healthcare needs.

  13. US Military Nurses: Experience of Coming Home after Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    BSN 36 40 10 14 CPT MAJ Critical Care NA NA 3 1991 2005 Iraq Iraq 6 12 MSN 25 41 11 MAJ FNP NA 13,15 4 2002 2005 Iraq Iraq 6...MAJ MAJ LTC LTC LTC COL Behavioral Health ** 7 2007 Iraq 6 MSN 33 12 MAJ Med/Surg NA 8 2006 Iraq 12 MSN 46 21 LTC FNP 10 9 2009 Afghanistan...1LT Med/Surg NA 13 2004 Iraq 8 MSN 39 11 MAJ FNP 7, 9, 11 14 2004 2008 Iraq Iraq 7 12 MSN MSN 43 47 20 24 LTC COL Critical Care 13

  14. U.S. Military Nurses’ Experience of Coming Home after Iraq & Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    CPT MAJ Critical Care NA NA 3 1991 2005 Iraq Iraq 6 12 MSN 25 41 11 MAJ FNP NA 13,15 4 2002 2005 Iraq Iraq 6 12 MSN MSN 44 47...LTC COL Behavioral Health ** 7 2007 Iraq 6 MSN 33 12 MAJ Med/Surg NA 8 2006 Iraq 12 MSN 46 21 LTC FNP 10 9 2009 Afghanistan 6 BSN 28 5.5 ILT...2004 Iraq 8 MSN 39 11 MAJ FNP 7, 9, 11 14 2004 2008 Iraq Iraq 7 12 MSN MSN 43 47 20 24 LTC COL Critical Care 13, 15, 17, 19 15 2003

  15. Geologic Map of Quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-E-Pur-Chaman (422) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidke, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Geologic data and the international boundary of Afghanistan were taken directly from Abdullah and Chmyriov (1977). It is the primary intent of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to present the geologic data in a useful format while making them publicly available. These data represent the state of geologic mapping in Afghanistan as of 2005, although the original map was released in the late 1970s (Abdullah and Chmyriov, 1977). The USGS has made no attempt to modify original geologic map-unit boundaries and faults; however, modifications to map-unit symbology, and minor modifications to map-unit descriptions, have been made to clarify lithostratigraphy and to modernize terminology. The generation of a Correlation of Map Units (CMU) diagram required interpretation of the original data, because no CMU diagram was presented by Abdullah and Chmyriov (1977). This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles shown on the index map. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file report (OFR) number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The

  16. NATO i krigen mot terror : En analyse av NATOs rolle i Afghanistan etter 11. september

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Hansen, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Denne oppgaven studerer NATOs rolle i den USA-ledede Operation Enduring Freedom i Afghanistan. Noen timer etter terrorangrepet mot USA 11. september 2001, påkalte NATO for første gang i historien sin grunnpilar, Artikkel 5 i NATO-traktaten, som fastslår at et angrep på ett av medlemmene er et angrep på alle NATO-landene. Til tross for alliansens påkallelse av Artikkel 5, ble NATO stående på sidelinjen i hovedfasen av "Operation Enduring Freedom". USA valgte å gjennomføre mesteparten av kamp...

  17. A land untouched by dentistry - singapore brings dental care to afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peng Hui; Chew, Bertrand; Wee, Wee Chee; Tan, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the Singapore Armed Forces deployed a Dental Project Team (DPT) to the capital city of the Bamiyan Province in Afghanistan. The team set up the province's first modern dental facility. Besides providing primary dental care to the 60,000 population there, the Singaporeans also trained and prepared a team of Afghan dentist and dental assistants. The Afghan dental team took over the dental clinic and continued to provide care when it was time for the DPT to depart for home. Braving challenging security and austere living conditions, the DPT completed its mission successfully.

  18. A Tale of Two Design Efforts (and why they both failed in Afghanistan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    today from Washington, D.C. to Kabul, Afghanistan. " Okay , everybody, we’ve got a directive from the Chief of Staff to come up with ideas on how to...Case A Outbrief,” Presentation to Exercise Unified Quest, Carlisle, PA, May 6, 2005. 2 U.S. Army Joint Publication 5-0, Joint Operation Planning...in Leavenworth, Kansas. It could be a conventional division‟s planners attempting to address obesity in military families of the division. The key

  19. Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication - Afghanistan, January 2015‒August 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Shukla, Hemant; Smith, Philip; Tangermann, Rudolf H; Martinez, Maureen; Jorba, Jaume C; Hadler, Stephen; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-11-04

    Only 74 cases of wild poliovirus (WPV) were reported globally in 2015, the lowest number of cases ever reported worldwide (1,2). All of the reported cases were WPV type 1 (WPV1), the only known WPV type still circulating; WPV type 2 has been eradicated, and WPV type 3 has not been detected since November 2012 (1). In 2015 in Afghanistan, WPV detection also declined from 2014, and trends observed in 2016 suggest that circulation of the virus is limited to a few localized areas. Despite the progress, there are concerns about the ability of the country's Polio Eradication Initiative (PEI) to meet the goal of interrupting endemic WPV transmission by the end of 2016 (3). The deteriorating security situation in the Eastern and Northeastern regions of the country considerably limits the ability to reach and vaccinate children in these regions. Furthermore, because of frequent population movements to and from Pakistan, cross-border transmission of WPV1 continues (4). Although the national PEI has taken steps to improve the quality of supplementary immunization activities (SIAs),* significant numbers of children living in accessible areas are still being missed during SIAs, and routine immunization services remain suboptimal in many parts of the country. This report describes polio eradication activities and progress in Afghanistan during January 2015‒August 2016 and updates previous reports (5,6). During 2015, a total of 20 WPV1 cases were reported in Afghanistan, compared with 28 cases in 2014; eight cases were reported during January‒August 2016, compared with nine cases reported during the same period in 2015. To achieve interruption of poliovirus transmission in Afghanistan, it is important that the 2016-2017 National Emergency Action Plan(†) for polio eradication be systematically implemented, including 1) improving the quality of SIAs and routine immunization services, 2) ensuring ongoing dialogue between PEI leaders and local authorities, 3) adopting

  20. Corruption in Conflict: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    and, on occasion, plastic shopping bags” and dropped off at the offices of President Karzai.428 Mr. Karzai described the money as “nothing unusual...the Taliban,” Yale Global Online , October 8, 2013; see also Karen DeYoung, “U.S. Speeds Up Direct Talks with Taliban,” Washington Post, May 16, 2011...Statebuilding in Afghanistan. Saferworld. January 2016. Grossman, Marc. “Lessons from Negotiating with the Taliban.” Yale Global Online . October 2013. Gutcher

  1. Structural Investigations of Afghanistan Deduced from Remote Sensing and Potential Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saibi Hakim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study integrates potential gravity and magnetic field data with remotely sensed images and geological data in an effort to understand the subsurface major geological structures in Afghanistan. Integrated analysis of Landsat SRTM data was applied for extraction of geological lineaments. The potential field data were analyzed using gradient interpretation techniques, such as analytic signal (AS, tilt derivative (TDR, horizontal gradient of the tilt derivative (HG-TDR, Euler Deconvolution (ED and power spectrum methods, and results were correlated with known geological structures.

  2. Adits, Caves, Karizi-Qanats, and Tunnels in Afghanistan: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-30

    Economy in 1982.” Industries et Travaux d’Outre-Mer. Volume 30; 343, pages 370-376. Moreux et Cie. Paris, France. ISSN: 0019-9362; GeoRef Number: 1984...cave fishes from Afghanistan. Coiffait, H. 1959. “Sǔr les Catopides du Sud-ouest de l’Asie. Uber Catopiden Sudwestasiens. (Betr. Höhlenfunde in...institutions in Baluchistan and synchronizes with the local economies . Archaeology indicates that the idea of karez irrigation originated in the Indus Valley

  3. Mapping irrigated areas in Afghanistan over the past decade using MODIS NDVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Md Shahriar; Budde, Michael; Rowland, James

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural production capacity contributes to food security in Afghanistan and is largely dependent on irrigated farming, mostly utilizing surface water fed by snowmelt. Because of the high contribution of irrigated crops (> 80%) to total agricultural production, knowing the spatial distribution and year-to-year variability in irrigated areas is imperative to monitoring food security for the country. We used 16-day composites of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor to create 23-point time series for each year from 2000 through 2013. Seasonal peak values and time series were used in a threshold-dependent decision tree algorithm to map irrigated areas in Afghanistan for the last 14 years. In the absence of ground reference irrigated area information, we evaluated these maps with the irrigated areas classified from multiple snapshots of the landscape during the growing season from Landsat 5 optical and thermal sensor images. We were able to identify irrigated areas using Landsat imagery by selecting as irrigated those areas with Landsat-derived NDVI greater than 0.30–0.45, depending on the date of the Landsat image and surface temperature less than or equal to 310 Kelvin (36.9 ° C). Due to the availability of Landsat images, we were able to compare with the MODIS-derived maps for four years: 2000, 2009, 2010, and 2011. The irrigated areas derived from Landsat agreed well r2 = 0.91 with the irrigated areas derived from MODIS, providing confidence in the MODIS NDVI threshold approach. The maps portrayed a highly dynamic irrigated agriculture practice in Afghanistan, where the amount of irrigated area was largely determined by the availability of surface water, especially snowmelt, and varied by as much as 30% between water surplus and water deficit years. During the past 14 years, 2001, 2004, and 2008 showed the lowest levels of irrigated area (~ 1.5 million hectares), attesting to

  4. 77 FR 76864 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Afghanistan and Change to Policy on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... exemptions for proscribed destinations. DATES: Effective Date: This rule is effective December 31, 2012. FOR...: Regulatory Change, Afghanistan and 126.1. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On July 6, 2012, President Obama..., Kuwait, Morocco, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Thailand, and Republic of Korea. Taiwan shall...

  5. Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic, Malaysia (West), People's Democratic Republic of Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in eight foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic (Madagascar), Malaysia (West), and People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. Information is provided under two topics, general background and…

  6. War Bonds in the Second World War: A Model for a New Iraq/Afghanistan War Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Afghanistan War Bond? James M. Bickley Specialist in Public Finance March 1, 2010 Congressional Research Service 7-5700 www.crs.gov R41087 Report...James M. Bickley Specialist in Public Finance jbickley@crs.loc.gov, 7-7794 11 U.S

  7. Borderlands of mental health: Explorations in medical anthropology, psychiatric epidemiology and health systems research in Afghanistan and Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventevogel, P.

    2016-01-01

    Many areas of the globe today face continuous armed conflict, with more and more populations caught in the crossfire. This has been true in both Afghanistan and Burundi where populations have to cope with the psychological and social effects of ongoing collective violence. While living and working i

  8. Certified Rehabilitation Counselors Role in the Acceptance of Disability of Returning Afghanistan and Iraq Military Veterans with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frain, Michael; Torres, Ayse; Bishop, Malachy; Sakala, Kelly; Khan-Jordan, Cindy; Schoen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To understand the level of acceptance of disability by veterans and rehabilitation counselor's role in that acceptance. Method: The Acceptance of Disability Scale-Revised was given to 117 veterans from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq who acquired disabilities. Their experiences working with certified rehabilitation counselors was also…

  9. Genetic diversity of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O in Pakistan and Afghanistan, 1997–2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal, Syed Muhammad; Ferrari, Giancarlo; Ahmed, Safia;

    2011-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Pakistan and Afghanistan; serotypes O, A and Asia-1 of the virus are responsible for the outbreaks in these countries with FMDV type O usually being the most common. In the present study, the nucleotide sequences encoding the FMDV capsid protein VP1 from...

  10. An excess of corruption and a deficit of toilets: american and Karzai’s ‘successes’ in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc W. Herold

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Afghanistan might be characterized as having a paucity of toilets and an excess of corruption. These two aspects capture the post-Taliban essence of the country. The “achievements” of Hamid Karzai the de facto mayor of Kabul, the United States and NATO in Afghanistan after more than eight years of U.S. occupation and approximately $25 billion in disbursed (2001-9 non-military aid, include Afghanistan being ranked as the worst place in the world for sanitation (per UNICEF data and in 2009 posting 179th (out of 180 countries in Transparency International’s corruption-perceptions index. The latter figure for 2005 showed Afghanistan ranking 117th out of 159 countries.

  11. The Process of Organizational Capacity Development in Action in Post-Conflict Setting of the Literacy Department of Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajdi, Habibullah

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a model of capacity development for public organizations in post-conflict settings. The paper reveals the challenges faced by the author as a "change agent" who tried to understand and develop the basic capacity of the Literacy Department of the Ministry of Education in Afghanistan. The author used an action-research…

  12. 48 CFR 225.401-71 - Products or services in support of operations in Iraq or Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Products or services in... FOREIGN ACQUISITION Trade Agreements 225.401-71 Products or services in support of operations in Iraq or Afghanistan. When acquiring products or services, other than small arms, in support of operations in Iraq...

  13. Identity Adjustment Among Afghanistan and Iraq War Veterans With Reintegration Difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazem, Robert J; Frazier, Patricia A; Schnurr, Paula P; Oleson, Heather E; Carlson, Kathleen F; Litz, Brett T; Sayer, Nina A

    2016-11-28

    Objective: To examine perceptions of identity adjustment in a diverse, national sample of U.S. veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Method: The authors conducted a planned thematic analysis of text written by Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans when they were asked to describe their reintegration difficulties as part of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of online expressive writing (Sayer et al., 2015). Participants were 100 randomly selected veterans from the larger study (42 women and 58 men, 60 active duty and 38 reserves or National Guard). Results: Nearly 2/3s of participants wrote about their identity adjustment. The 5 interrelated areas of identity adjustment difficulty were (a) feeling like one does not belong in civilian society, (b) missing the military's culture and structured lifestyle, (c) holding negative views of civilian society, (d) feeling left behind compared to civilian counterparts due to military service, and (e) having difficulty finding meaning in the civilian world. The authors did not observe differences by gender. However, those deployed from active duty were particularly likely to feel as if they did not belong in civilian society and that they had not acquired needed skills, whereas those deployed from the reserves or National Guard experienced difficulty in reestablishing former civilian identities. Conclusions: Identity adjustment is a critical yet understudied aspect of veteran reintegration into community life following combat deployment. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Pain experience of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans with comorbid chronic pain and posttraumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outcalt, Samantha D; Ang, Dennis C; Wu, Jingwei; Sargent, Christy; Yu, Zhangsheng; Bair, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) co-occur at high rates, and Veterans from recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan may be particularly vulnerable to both conditions. The objective of this study was to identify key aspects of chronic pain, cognitions, and psychological distress associated with comorbid PTSD among this sample of Veterans. Baseline data were analyzed from a randomized controlled trial testing a stepped-care intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) Veterans with chronic pain only (n = 173) were compared with those with chronic pain and clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms (n = 68). Group differences on pain characteristics, pain cognitions, and psychological distress were evaluated. Results demonstrated that OIF/OEF Veterans with comorbid chronic musculoskeletal pain and PTSD experienced higher pain severity, greater pain-related disability and increased pain interference, more maladaptive pain cognitions (e.g., catastrophizing, self-efficacy, pain centrality), and higher affective distress than those with chronic pain alone. Veterans of recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan may be particularly vulnerable to the compounded adverse effects of chronic pain and PTSD. These results highlight a more intense and disabling pain and psychological experience for those with chronic pain and PTSD than for those without PTSD.

  15. Impact of simple conventional and Telehealth solutions on improving mental health in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Shariq; Scott, Richard; Husyin, Nida; Durrani, Hammad; Arif, Maria; Faqiri, Faqir; Hedayat, Ebadullah; Yousufzai, Wahab

    2016-12-01

    For more than a century Afghanistan has been unstable, facing decades of war, social problems, and intense poverty. As a result, many of the population suffer from a variety of mental health problems. The Government recognises the situation and has prioritised mental health, but progress is slow and services outside of Kabul remain poor. An international collaborative implemented a project in Badakshan province of Afghanistan using conventional and simple low-cost e-Health solutions to address the four most common issues: depression, psychosis, post-traumatic stress disorder, and substance abuse. Conventional town hall meetings informed community members to raise awareness and knowledge. In addition, an android-based mobile application used the World Health Organization's Mental Health Gap Action Programme guidelines and protocols to: collect information from community healthcare workers; provide referral services to patients; provide blended learning to improve providers' mental health knowledge, skills, and practice; and to provide store-and-forward and live consultations. Preliminary evaluation of the intervention shows enhanced access to care for remote communities, decreased stigma, and improved quality of health services. Primary care workers are also able to bridge the gap in consultations for rural and remote communities, connecting them with specialists and providing better access to care.

  16. Towards sustainable delivery of health services in Afghanistan: options for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, B; Siddiqi, S; Ahmed, A M; Kakar, F K; Perrot, J

    2007-09-01

    Disruption caused by decades of war and civil strife in Afghanistan has led many international and national nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to assume responsibility for the delivery of health services through contracts with donor agencies. Recently the Afghan Government has pursued the policy of contracting for a basic package of health services (BPHS) supported by funds from three major donors - the World Bank, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the European Commission. With the gradual strengthening of the public health ministry, options for the future include pursuing the contracting option or increasing public provision of health services. Should contracting with NGOs be pursued, a clear strategy is required that includes developing accreditation instruments, better contracting mechanisms and a system for monitoring and evaluating the entire process. Should the government opt for an increasing role, problems to be solved include securing the transition to public provision, obtaining guarantees that appropriate financing will be provided and reconfiguration of the public health delivery system. Large-scale contracting with the private for-profit sector cannot be recommended at this stage, although this option could be explored via subcontracting by larger NGOs or small-scale trial contracts initiated by the public health ministry. Irrespective of the option chosen, an important challenge remaining is the recalcitrant problem of high out-of-pocket payments. Sustainable delivery of health services in Afghanistan can only be achieved with a clear national strategy in which all stakeholders have roles to play in the financing, regulation and delivery of services.

  17. Sustainability of water-supply at military installations, Kabul Basin, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Thomas J.; Chornack, Michael P.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Linkov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The Kabul Basin, including the city of Kabul, Afghanistan, is host to several military installations of Afghanistan, the United States, and other nations that depend on groundwater resources for water supply. These installations are within or close to the city of Kabul. Groundwater also is the potable supply for the approximately four million residents of Kabul. The sustainability of water resources in the Kabul Basin is a concern to military operations, and Afghan water-resource managers, owing to increased water demands from a growing population and potential mining activities. This study illustrates the use of chemical and isotopic analysis, groundwater flow modeling, and hydrogeologic investigations to assess the sustainability of groundwater resources in the Kabul Basin.Water supplies for military installations in the southern Kabul Basin were found to be subject to sustainability concerns, such as the potential drying of shallow-water supply wells as a result of declining water levels. Model simulations indicate that new withdrawals from deep aquifers may have less of an impact on surrounding community water supply wells than increased withdrawals from near- surface aquifers. Higher rates of recharge in the northern Kabul Basin indicate that military installations in that part of the basin may have fewer issues with long-term water sustainability. Simulations of groundwater withdrawals may be used to evaluate different withdrawal scenarios in an effort to manage water resources in a sustainable manner in the Kabul Basin.

  18. Concurrent Brucellosis and Q Fever Infection: a Case Control Study in Bamyan Province, Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwaja Mir Islam Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 500,000 people are affected by brucellosis each year while the incidence of Q fever is poorly recorded. Consistent outbreaks of brucellosis have been reported in Afghanistan, affecting social and economic life. This study aimed to determine the means of propagation of brucellosis and Q-fever and establish appropriate control measures for both. Methods and Materials: An outbreak of 1,317 cases of brucellosis and Q fever was investigated from May 2011 to the end of 2012 in Bamyan province of Afghanistan. A total of 100 cases were selected by random sampling with equal number of neighbor controls. Data were collected through structured questionnaire.Results: The average age was 30 years ±14 years. Of those sampled, 62% were female, 38% were male, and resided in three districts: Punjab, Yakawlang and Waras. Using multivariate analysis, being a housewife (OR=7.36, being within proximity of kitchens to barns (OR= 2.98, drinking un-boiled milk (OR= 5.26, butchering (OR= 3.53 and purchasing new animals in the last six months (OR= 3.53 were significantly associated with contraction of brucellosis and Q fever. Conclusion: Health educators should focus on families dealing with animals, especially on females. Pasturing, healthy milking, dunging, and slaughtering practices, along with use of safe dairy products should be the focus of preventive measures.

  19. Supracrustal suite of the Precambrian crystalline crust in the Ghor Province of Central Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Motuza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Proterozoic pre-Ediacaran metamorphic basement of the southern Tajik (North Afghanistan continental block and the adjacent Band-e-Bayan zone is exposed in the Ghor Province of Central Afghanistan. It is predominantly composed of the EW-striking supracrustal succession consisting of interbedded felsic schists and gneisses (metapsammites, amphibolites (metabasalts, calcite and dolomite marbles. The metamorphic facies changes from greenschist in the Band-e-Bayan zone to amphibolite facies in the Tajik block. The supracrustal rocks of the Band-e-Bayan zone and Tajik block possess common features suggesting that the former represents a tectonized part of the latter. The geochemical characteristics of metapsammites indicate derivation of the clastic material from a continental arc and, partly from a passive continental margin, whereas the composition of metabasalts suggests their possible formation in a continental rift basin. The tectonic setting of supracrustal unit could be interpreted as a back-arc type basin. We presume that the Tajik microcontinent split off the Gondwana supercontinent along an ancient rift zone during the late Paleozoic.

  20. Epidemiology of intestinal parasitic infections in school children in Ghazni Province, eastern Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Augustynowicz, Alina; Smoleń, Agata; Lass, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of intestinal parasites and their species in Afghan school children and to establish appropriate treatment methods for detected pathogens. Methods: Parasitological examination of stool samples collected from 1369 children aged 8-18, students of the Jahan Malika High School in Ghazni Province in eastern Afghanistan, was conducted in the period November 2013-April 2014. Three stool samples were collected from each patient every second day; the samples were fixed in 10% formalin and tested by light microscopy using the methods of direct smear in Lugol’s solution, decantation in distilled water, and Fülleborn’s flotation. Results: Of 535 examined children (39.1% of the study group) were infected with nematodes (n=324), cestodes (n=118), trematodes (n=12), and protozoa (n=228), 132 were diagnosed with co-infections (mainly ascariasis+giardiasis, ascariasis+hymenolepiasis) and received single or combined therapy. Conclusions: The Afghan community is an example of population characterized by a high rate of parasitic infections. Owing to high prevalence of multiple infections among inhabitants of Afghanistan, it seems that a mass deworming campaign with a single-dose chemotherapy may prove ineffective in eradicating intestinal parasites in the local population. PMID:26870108

  1. Surface mineral maps of Afghanistan derived from HyMap imaging spectrometer data, version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a new version of surface mineral maps derived from HyMap imaging spectrometer data collected over Afghanistan in the fall of 2007. This report also describes the processing steps applied to the imaging spectrometer data. The 218 individual flight lines composing the Afghanistan dataset, covering more than 438,000 square kilometers, were georeferenced to a mosaic of orthorectified Landsat images. The HyMap data were converted from radiance to reflectance using a radiative transfer program in combination with ground-calibration sites and a network of cross-cutting calibration flight lines. The U.S. Geological Survey Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm (MICA) was used to generate two thematic maps of surface minerals: a map of iron-bearing minerals and other materials, which have their primary absorption features at the shorter wavelengths of the reflected solar wavelength range, and a map of carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials, which have their primary absorption features at the longer wavelengths of the reflected solar wavelength range. In contrast to the original version, version 2 of these maps is provided at full resolution of 23-meter pixel size. The thematic maps, MICA summary images, and the material fit and depth images are distributed in digital files linked to this report, in a format readable by remote sensing software and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The digital files can be downloaded from http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/787/downloads/.

  2. A Needs Assessment of Health Issues Related to Maternal Mortality Rates in Afghanistan: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naim, Ali; Feldman, Robert; Sawyer, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Maternal death rates in Afghanistan were among the highest in the world during the reign of the Taliban. Although these figures have improved, current rates are still alarming. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a needs assessment of the major health issues related to the high maternal mortality rates in Afghanistan. In-depth interviews were conducted with managerial midwives, clinical midwives, and mothers. Results of the interviews indicate that the improvement in the maternal mortality rate may be attributed to the increase in the involvement of midwives in the birthing process. However, barriers to decreasing maternal mortality still exist. These include transportation, access to care, and sociocultural factors such as the influence of the husband and mother-in-law in preventing access to midwives. Therefore, any programs to decrease maternal mortality need to address infrastructure issues (making health care more accessible) and sociocultural factors (including husbands and mother-in-laws in maternal health education). However, it should be noted that these findings are based on a small pilot study to help develop a larger scale need assessment.

  3. Afghanistan’s High office of Oversight: Personal Asset Declarations of High Ranking Afghan Government Officials Are Not Consistently Registered and Verified

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Development Programme (UNDP) and United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC). We provided a draft of this report to the Department of Defense...international organizations, including the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC). We conducted this...Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in Afghanistan Reconstruction Programs Public Affairs The mission of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan

  4. "We Have Not Learned How to Wage War There": The Soviet Approach in Afghanistan 1979-1989 (Occasional Paper, Number 36)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    shocked by the whole affair. A report by the Politburo painted Amin as, “an ambitious, cruel, treacherous person . . . insincere and two-faced.” When the...Harper Collins , 2002), 143. 14. Stephen Tanner, Afghanistan: A Military History from Alexander the Great to the War against the Taliban (Revised...Columbia University Press, 2005), 91. 17. Gregory Feifer, The Great Gamble: The Soviet War in Afghanistan (New York, NY: Harper Collins , 2009), 31

  5. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3670, Jam-Kashem (223) and Zebak (224) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  6. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-E-Pur-Chaman (422) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  7. More of the same: Danish foreign and security policy after Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    2016-01-01

    The deployment of ground forces to Helmand (2006-2014) resulted in the worst fighting experienced by the Danish army since its defeat to Prussia in 1864 and more casualties (43 fatalities and 214 wounded) than all other international operations conducted by the Danish armed forces since World War...... the financial and human costs, the disappointing outcome of the ISAF mission has triggered remarkably little domestic debate and soul-searching and left little discernible impact on Danish foreign and security policy....... Two. The financial costs were also unprecedented as the total civilian and military expenditures on Afghanistan came to approximately €2.68 billion by the end of 2014. Although some politicians now regard the Afghan war as a mistake and more than half of the Danish population do not consider it worth...

  8. Lessons Learned in Afghanistan: A Multi-national Military Mental Health Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall C. Nedegaard

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available America has been at war for almost 10 years. Because of this, continuing missions in the Middle East require the support and cooperation of our allied North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO forces from around the world. In this paper we provide an overview of the mission at Kandahar Air Field (KAF and the Multi-National Role 3 hospital located at KAF. Next, we explain the mental health capabilities and unique perspectives among our teammates from Canada, Great Britain, and the United States to include a discussion of the relevant cross-cultural differences between us. Within this framework we also provide an overview of the mental health clientele seen at KAF during the period of April 2009 through September 2009. Finally, we discuss the successes, limitations, and lessons learned during our deployment to Kandahar, Afghanistan.

  9. Molecular surveillance of Plasmodium vivax dhfr and dhps mutations in isolates from Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt Waqar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps mutations in Plasmodium vivax wild isolates has been considered to be a valuable molecular approach for mapping resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP. The present study investigates the frequency of SNPs-haplotypes in the dhfr and dhps genes in P. vivax clinical isolates circulating in two malaria endemic areas in Afghanistan. Methods P. vivax clinical isolates (n = 171 were collected in two different malaria endemic regions in north-west (Herat and east (Nangarhar Afghanistan in 2008. All collected isolates were analysed for SNP-haplotypes at positions 13, 33, 57, 58, 61, 117 and 173 of the pvdhfr and 383 and 553 of the pvdhps genes using PCR-RFLP methods. Results All 171 examined isolates were found to carry wild-type amino acids at positions 13, 33, 57, 61 and 173, while 58R and 117N mutations were detected among 4.1% and 12.3% of Afghan isolates, respectively. Based on the size polymorphism of pvdhfr genes at repeat region, type B was the most prevalent variant among Herat (86% and Nangarhar (88.4% isolates. Mixed genotype infections (type A/B and A/B/C were detected in only 2.3% (2/86 of Herat and 1.2% (1/86 of Nangarhar isolates, respectively. The combination of pvdhfr and pvdhps haplotypes among all 171 samples demonstrated six distinct haplotypes. The two most prevalent haplotypes among all examined samples were wild-type (86% and single mutant haplotype I13P33F57S58T61N 117I173/A383A553 (6.4%. Double (I13P33S57R58T61N117I173/A383A553 and triple mutant haplotypes (I13P33S57R 58T61N117I173/G383A553 were found in 1.7% and 1.2% of Afghan isolates, respectively. This triple mutant haplotype was only detected in isolates from Herat, but in none of the Nangarhar isolates. Conclusion The present study shows a limited polymorphism in pvdhfr from Afghan isolates and provides important basic information to establish an epidemiological map of

  10. Image-based reconstruction of the Great Buddha of Bamiyan, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Armin; Remondino, Fabio; Zhang, Li

    2003-01-01

    In the great valley of Bamiyan, north-west of Kabul, Afghanistan, two big standing Buddha statues were carved out of the sedimentary rock of the region around the second to fourth centuries AD. The larger statue was 53 meters high while the smaller Buddha measured 35 m. The two colossal statues were demolished on March 2001 by the Taleban, using mortars, dynamite, anti-aircraft weapons and rockets. After the destruction, a consortium was founded to rebuild the Great Buddha at original shape, size and place. Our group performed the required computer reconstruction, which serves as a basis for the physical reconstruction. The work has been done using three different types of imagery in parallel and in this paper we present our results of the 3D computer reconstruction of the statue.

  11. Geology, Water, and Wind in the Lower Helmand Basin, Southern Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, John W.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the geology, hydrology, and climate of the lower Helmand Basin, a large, closed, arid basin in southern Afghanistan. The basin is drained by the Helmand River, the only perennial desert stream between the Indus and Tigris-Euphrates Rivers. The Helmand River is the lifeblood of southern Afghanistan and has supported desert civilizations in the Sistan depression for over 6,000 years. The Helmand Basin is a structurally closed basin that began to form during the middle Tertiary as a consequence of the collision of several Gondwanaland fragments. Aeromagnetic studies indicate the basin is 3-5 kilometers deep over basement rocks. Continued subsidence along basin-bounding faults in Iran and Pakistan throughout the Neogene has formed the Sistan depression in the southwest corner of the basin. Lacustrine, eolian, and fluvial deposits are commonly exposed in the basin and were intruded by latest Miocene-middle Quaternary volcanoes, which indicates that depositional environments in the lower Helmand Basin have not substantially changed for nearly 10 million years. Lakes expanded in the Sistan depression during the Quaternary; however, the size and extent of these pluvial lakes are unknown. Climate conditions in the lower Helmand Basin likely mirrored climate changes in the Rajasthan Desert to the east and in Middle Eastern deserts to the west: greater aridity during global episodes of colder temperatures and increased available moisture during episodes of warmer temperatures. Eolian processes are unusually dominant in shaping the landscape in the basin. A strong wind blows for 120 days each summer, scouring dry lakebeds and creating dune fields from annual flood deposits. Nearly one-third of the basin is mantled with active or stabilized dunes. Blowing winds combined with summer temperatures over 50? Celsius and voluminous insect populations hatched from the deltaic wetlands create an environment referred to as the 'most odious place on

  12. The medical care rendering to the infective patients in Afghanistan (1979 – 1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Ivanov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the author’s own experience of medical care rendered to the infective patients of the limited contingent of the Soviet troops in Afghanistan is generalized (1979 – 1989. According to factual evidence it is clear that during different periods of time, the percentage of the infective patients averages till 45,2 up to 67, 8% from the general number of the sanitary detachments. The most actual illnesses were typhoid fever, amebiasis, viral hepatitis, malaria and mixt-infections. In the article also covered the main steps of the formation and organization of the hospital base for the infective patients. Special attention is paid to the emergency aid implementation during so-called pre-admission period, realization of the medical grading and prevention of the intensive therapy in the hospitals.  

  13. Effect of Weather on the Predicted PMN Landmine Chemical Signature for Kabul, Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEBB, STEPHEN W.; PHELAN, JAMES M.

    2002-11-01

    Buried landmines are often detected through the chemical signature in the air above the soil surface by mine detection dogs. Environmental processes play a significant role in the chemical signature available for detection. Due to the shallow burial depth of landmines, the weather influences the release of chemicals from the landmine, transport through the soil to the surface, and degradation processes in the soil. The effect of weather on the landmine chemical signature from a PMN landmine was evaluated with the T2TNT code for Kabul, Afghanistan. Results for TNT and DNT gas-phase and soil solid-phase concentrations are presented as a function of time of the day and time of the year.

  14. Seroconversion for infectious pathogens among UK military personnel deployed to Afghanistan, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Edmund N C; Johnstone, Penelope; Bridge, Hannah; Wright, Deborah; Jameson, Lisa; Bosworth, Andrew; Hatch, Rebecca; Hayward-Karlsson, Jenny; Osborne, Jane; Bailey, Mark S; Green, Andrew; Ross, David; Brooks, Tim; Hewson, Roger

    2014-12-01

    Military personnel are at high risk of contracting vector-borne and zoonotic infections, particularly during overseas deployments, when they may be exposed to endemic or emerging infections not prevalent in their native countries. We conducted seroprevalence testing of 467 UK military personnel deployed to Helmand Province, Afghanistan, during 2008-2011 and found that up to 3.1% showed seroconversion for infection with Rickettsia spp., Coxiella burnetii, sandfly fever virus, or hantavirus; none showed seroconversion for infection with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. Most seroconversions occurred in personnel who did not report illness, except for those with hantavirus (70% symptomatic). These results indicate that many exposures to infectious pathogens, and potentially infections resulting from those exposures, may go unreported. Our findings reinforce the need for continued surveillance of military personnel and for education of health care providers to help recognize and prevent illnesses and transmission of pathogens during and after overseas deployments.

  15. Seroconversion for Infectious Pathogens among UK Military Personnel Deployed to Afghanistan, 2008–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Penelope; Bridge, Hannah; Wright, Deborah; Jameson, Lisa; Bosworth, Andrew; Hatch, Rebecca; Hayward-Karlsson, Jenny; Osborne, Jane; Bailey, Mark S.; Green, Andrew; Ross, David; Brooks, Tim; Hewson, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Military personnel are at high risk of contracting vector-borne and zoonotic infections, particularly during overseas deployments, when they may be exposed to endemic or emerging infections not prevalent in their native countries. We conducted seroprevalence testing of 467 UK military personnel deployed to Helmand Province, Afghanistan, during 2008–2011 and found that up to 3.1% showed seroconversion for infection with Rickettsia spp., Coxiella burnetii, sandfly fever virus, or hantavirus; none showed seroconversion for infection with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. Most seroconversions occurred in personnel who did not report illness, except for those with hantavirus (70% symptomatic). These results indicate that many exposures to infectious pathogens, and potentially infections resulting from those exposures, may go unreported. Our findings reinforce the need for continued surveillance of military personnel and for education of health care providers to help recognize and prevent illnesses and transmission of pathogens during and after overseas deployments. PMID:25418685

  16. Airborne Hyperspectral Survey of Afghanistan 2007: Flight Line Planning and HyMap Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, K. Eric

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data were acquired over Afghanistan with the HyMap imaging spectrometer (Cocks and others, 1998) operating on the WB-57 high altitude NASA research aircraft (http://jsc-aircraft-ops.jsc.nasa.gov/wb57/index.html). These data were acquired during the interval of August 22, 2007 to October 2, 2007, as part of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) project 'Oil and Gas Resources Assessment of the Katawaz and Helmand Basins'. A total of 218 flight lines of hyperspectral remote sensing data were collected over the country. This report describes the planning of the airborne survey and the flight lines that were flown. Included with this report are digital files of the nadir tracks of the flight lines, including a map of the labeled flight lines and corresponding vector shape files for geographic information systems (GIS).

  17. Heuristic economic assessment of the Afghanistan construction materials sector: cement and dimension stone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossotti, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the U.S. Government has invested more than $106 billion for physical, societal, and governmental reconstruction assistance to Afghanistan (Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, 2012a). This funding, along with private investment, has stimulated a growing demand for particular industrial minerals and construction materials. In support of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey released a preliminary mineral assessment in 2007 on selected Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2007). More recently, the 2007 mineral assessment was updated with the inclusion of a more extensive array of Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2011). As a follow-up on the 2011 assessment, this report provides an analysis of the current use and prospects of the following Afghan industrial minerals required to manufacture construction materials: clays of various types, bauxite, gypsum, cement-grade limestone, aggregate (sand and gravel), and dimension stone (sandstone, quartzite, granite, slate, limestone, travertine, marble). The intention of this paper is to assess the: Use of Afghan industrial minerals to manufacture construction materials, Prospects for growth in domestic construction materials production sectors, Factors controlling the competitiveness of domestic production relative to foreign imports of construction materials, and Feasibility of using natural gas as the prime source of thermal energy and for generating electrical energy for cement production. The discussion here is based on classical principles of supply and demand. Imbedded in these principles is an understanding that the attributes of supply and demand are highly variable. For construction materials, demand for a given product may depend on seasons of the year, location of construction sites, product delivery time, political factors, governmental regulations, cultural issues, price, and how essential a given product might be to the buyer. Moreover, failure on the

  18. Further results of serological examination of domestic animals for leptospirosis in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebek, Z; Blazek, K; Valová, M; Amin, A

    1978-01-01

    The authors examined serologically 329 specimens of domestic animals from 8 provinces of Afghanistan for the incidence of leptospirosis. They detected in 15.8% of the animals examined antibodies against Leptospira in titres of 1 : 800 and higher: in 6.4% with serotypes of the serogroup Hebdomadis, 5.5%--Tarassovi, 2.7%--Grippotyphosa, 2.4%--Pomona, 2.1% Javanica, 1.5%--Icterohaemorrhagiae, 0.6% each--Canicola, Ballum, Bataviae, 0.3%--Pyrogenes. Positivity was highest in the buffalo--55.0%, camel--10 of the 18 animals examined, and cattle--25.5%. It was considerably lower in sheep--2.3% and goat--3.2%; also positive was one of the 6 zebus examined.

  19. Examining human rights and mental health among women in drug abuse treatment centers in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadi MH

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Melissa Harris Abadi1, Stephen R Shamblen1, Knowlton Johnson1, Kirsten Thompson1, Linda Young1, Matthew Courser1, Jude Vanderhoff1, Thom Browne21Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation – Louisville Center, Louisville, KY, USA; 2United States Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Denial of human rights, gender disparities, and living in a war zone can be associated with severe depression and poor social functioning, especially for female drug abusers. This study of Afghan women in drug abuse treatment (DAT centers assesses (a the extent to which these women have experienced human rights violations and mental health problems prior to entering the DAT centers, and (b whether there are specific risk factors for human rights violations among this population. A total of 176 in-person interviews were conducted with female patients admitted to three drug abuse treatment centers in Afghanistan in 2010. Nearly all women (91% reported limitations with social functioning. Further, 41% of the women indicated they had suicide ideation and 27% of the women had attempted suicide at least once 30 days prior to entering the DAT centers due to feelings of sadness or hopelessness. Half of the women (50% experienced at least one human rights violation in the past year prior to entering the DAT centers. Risk factors for human rights violations among this population include marital status, ethnicity, literacy, employment status, entering treatment based on one’s own desire, limited social functioning, and suicide attempts. Conclusions stemming from the results are discussed.Keywords: Afghanistan, women, human rights, mental health, drug abuse treatment

  20. Critical concerns in Iraq/Afghanistan war veteran-forensic interface: veterans treatment court as diversion in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Daniel E; McGuire, James; Garrick, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Shoba; Dow, Daniel; Woehl, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The veteran-forensic interface is an emerging area of relevance to forensic clinicians assessing or treating returning Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans facing criminal sanctions. Veterans' Treatment Court (VTC) represents a recent diversion mechanism for low-level offenses that is based on a collaborative justice model. Thirty-nine percent of veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan and receiving VA services reside in rural areas. Rural veterans facing criminal justice charges may be at a disadvantage due to limited access to forensic psychiatrists with relevant expertise in providing veterans services for diversion. Therefore, widening the pool of forensic clinicians who have such expertise, as well as knowledge of the signature wounds of the wars as related to aggression and reckless behavior is necessary. This article presents an overview of VTCs and discusses the role of forensic clinicians as stakeholders in this process.

  1. From holy war to opium war? A case study of the opium economy in north-eastern Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhand, J

    2000-06-01

    This paper examines the recent growth of the opium economy in north-eastern Afghanistan. A detailed analysis of one village in Badakshan Province reveals profound changes in the local economy and social institutions. The paper describes two major shifts in the local economy: first, the switch from wheat to poppy cultivation; and second, the shift from the livestock trade to the opium trade. It then examines the underlying causes and impacts of the opium economy on social relations in the village. Although a case study of a community living on the margins of the global economy, it is argued that these changes have important implications for international policymakers. The emergence of the opium economy in north-eastern Afghanistan is symptomatic of new and expanding forms of trans-border trade associated with the restructuring of the global political economy.

  2. Warfighter Support: Preliminary Observations on DOD’s Progress and Challenges in Distributing Supplies and Equipment to Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    at Bagram, while materiel that crosses the southern border at Chaman is destined for the Kandahar logistics hub. The distances from the port of...crosses into Afghanistan at the border town of Torkham, and the southern, which crosses at the border town of Chaman . While Pakistan does not limit...the number of trucks that cross the border at Torkham, it does limit Page 10 GAO-10-842T the number allowed to cross at Chaman to 100

  3. Natural-Color-Image Map of Quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-E-Pur-Chaman (422) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip A.; Turner, Kenzie J.

    2007-01-01

    This map is a natural-color rendition created from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery collected between 1999 and 2002. The natural colors were generated using calibrated red-, green-, and blue-wavelength Landsat image data, which were correlated with red, green, and blue values of corresponding picture elements in MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) 'true color' mosaics of Afghanistan. These mosaics have been published on http://www.truecolorearth.com and modified to match more closely the Munsell colors of sampled surfaces. Peak elevations are derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital data, averaged over a pixel representing an area of 85 m2, and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding local point. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Cultural features were not derived from the Landsat base and consequently do not match it precisely. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (U.S. Geological Survey/Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file report (OFR) number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The OFR numbers range in sequence from 1092 to 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS in cooperation with the AGS and AGCHO.

  4. The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan: Three Key Decisions that Shaped the 40th Army’s Operational Withdrawal Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    Tsagolov, in a letter to the Politburo in August 1987, called the state of reporting on events in Afghanistan “dangerous.” He said that it was...important to remain objective and report what occurred, not what party officials desired to occur. He also said in the same letter that the PDPA was...Mikhail Gorbachev, “Gorbachev visits India, talk with Gandhi ,” eds. Robert S. Ehlers and Frederick C. Schulze, trans. Bruce Collins, Deborah

  5. Afghanistan’s Road Infrastructure: Sustainment Challenges and Lack of Repairs Put U.S. Investment at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    and found that 19 segments had road damage ranging from deep surface cracks to roads and bridges destroyed by weather or insurgents. Moreover, 17...advance U.S. interests in reconstructing Afghanistan. To obtain copies of SIGAR documents at no cost, go to SIGAR’s Web site (www.sigar.mil). SIGAR...posts all publicly released reports, testimonies, and correspondence on its Web site. To help prevent fraud, waste, and abuse by reporting

  6. Does Evidence-Based PTS Treatment Reduce PTS Symptoms and Suicide in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans Seeking VA Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0038 TITLE: Does Evidence-Based PTS Treatment Reduce PTS Symptoms and Suicide in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans...2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Apr 2015-14 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Does Evidence-Based PTS Treatment Reduce PTS Symptoms and...health problems among Service Members and Veterans returning from recent deployments, and despite the availability of evidence-based treatments (EBT

  7. What Is the Magnitude and Long-term Economic Cost of Care of the British Military Afghanistan Amputee Cohort?

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, D. S.; Phillip, Rhodri D.; Bosanquet, Nick; Anthony M J Bull; Clasper, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal protection equipment, improved early medical care, and rapid extraction of the casualty have resulted in more injured service members who served in Afghanistan surviving after severe military trauma. Many of those who survive the initial trauma are faced with complex wounds such as multiple amputations. Although costs of care can be high, they have not been well quantified before. This is required to budget for the needs of the injured beyond their service in the armed for...

  8. Peace and War: Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder symptoms before, during, and after military deployment in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Johannessen, Kim Berg; Thomsen, Yvonne D.;

    2012-01-01

    In the study reported here, we examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 746 Danish soldiers measured on five occasions before, during, and after deployment to Afghanistan. Using latent class growth analysis, we identified six trajectories of change in PTSD symptoms. Two resilient......, they show that factors other than immediately preceding stressors are critical for PTSD development, with childhood adversities being central. Second, they demonstrate that the development of PTSD symptoms shows heterogeneity, which indicates the need for multiple measurements to understand PTSD...

  9. The Integration of Information and Communications Technology in Full Spectrum Operations: A Case Study of CJTF-101 in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    enable Afghanistan to benefit further from Information and Communication Technologies by becoming part of the global information society while... information society . This meeting was named the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) and presented a forum for emerging technologies. In 2007 the...2Ibid. 3Ibid. 4International Telecommunications Union, “World Summit on The Information Society Forum 2009,” Brochure, May 2009. 32 5Global

  10. Afghanistan and Iraq: DOD Should Improve Adherence to Its Guidance on Open Pit Burning and Solid Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Chloropropane, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, Hexachlorobutadiene, Hexane, Naphthalene, nickel, and Vinyl acetate . Figures 8 and...that both Afghanistan and Iraq lacked markets for plastic and other recyclable materials, and military officers at one base we visited in Iraq said...plastic materials from some U.S. bases in Iraq were transported to Kuwait and Lebanon for recycling. However, our review found that such markets may

  11. After Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Gorm Rye

    2015-01-01

    by the radicalisation taking place among Muslims in some African countries. Thereby, the Muslim immigrant communities may contribute to breeding “home-grown” terrorists. The article concludes that the perception of a threat stemming from “Somaliasation” in Africa, the impact of French and US security priorities...... states that EU decision-makers are so strongly influenced by French and US security priorities that fighting terrorism becomes a remarkably high priority of the Union's Africa policy. Third, EU decision-makers share a common notion that immigrant communities in Europe might be inspired...

  12. Developing Capacity or a Culture of Dependency: Are Humanitarian Assistance Projects Initiated by the Provincial Reconstruction Teams Reinforcing Dependency or True Capacity in the Paktia-Khost Provinces of Afghanistan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    negative condition that does not produce lasting results and does not improve the capacity to the host nation partner to conduct competent and...schools, midwives , or civil engineers. USAID traditionally utilizes capacity building programs through implementing NGO partners in Afghanistan. This...illiteracy and the lack of education of an entire generation in Afghanistan further exacerbated the challenges in developing competence in

  13. Assessing the Accuracy of Passive Microwave Estimates of Snow Water Equivalent in Data-Scarce Regions for Use in Water Resource Applications: A Case Study in the Upper Helmand Watershed, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Afghanistan: Working document for planners, 1st Edition. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations ( FAO ) Afghanistan Information...user’s manual. WSRM, Version 1.11. New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM. Matzler, C., and A. Standley. 2000. Relief effects for passive microwave

  14. Reducing Anemia Prevalence in Afghanistan: Socioeconomic Correlates and the Particular Role of Agricultural Assets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemisa Flores-Martinez

    Full Text Available This research aims to examine the socio-economic correlates of anemia in women, and potential sources of iron in household diets in Afghanistan. It also examines whether ownership of agricultural (particularly livestock assets and their use in food production has a role in alleviating anaemia, especially where local markets may be inadequate. We analyse data from the 2010/11 Afghanistan Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, estimating a logistic regression to examine how anemia status of women is associated with socio-economic covariates. A key result found is that sheep ownership has a protective effect in reducing anemia (prevalence odds ratio of sheep ownership on anemia of 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.73-0.94 after controlling for wealth and other covariates. This association is found to be robust to alternative model specifications. Given the central role of red meat in heme iron provision and absorption of non-heme iron, we hypothesise that sheep ownership promotes mutton consumption from own-production in a setting where market-sourced provision of nutritious food is a challenge. We then use the 2011/12 National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment household data to understand the Afghan diet from the perspective of dietary iron provision, and to understand interactions between own-production, market sourcing and mutton consumption. Sheep ownership is found to increase the likelihood that a household consumed mutton (odds ratio of 1.27, 95% CI: 1.15-1.42, the number of days in the week that mutton was consumed (prevalence rate ratio of 1.24. 95% CI: 1.12-1.37 and the quantity of mutton consumed (7 grams/person/week. In the subsample of mutton consumers, households sourcing mutton mostly from own production consumed mutton 1.5 days more frequently on average than households relying on market purchase, resulting in 100 grams per person per week higher mutton intake. Thus this analysis lends support to the notion that the linkage between

  15. Genetic relationships and epidemiological links between wild type 1 poliovirus isolates in Pakistan and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angez Mehar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim Efforts have been made to eliminate wild poliovirus transmission since 1988 when the World Health Organization began its global eradication campaign. Since then, the incidence of polio has decreased significantly. However, serotype 1 and serotype 3 still circulate endemically in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Both countries constitute a single epidemiologic block representing one of the three remaining major global reservoirs of poliovirus transmission. In this study we used genetic sequence data to investigate transmission links among viruses from diverse locations during 2005-2007. Methods In order to find the origins and routes of wild type 1 poliovirus circulation, polioviruses were isolated from faecal samples of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP patients. We used viral cultures, two intratypic differentiation methods PCR, ELISA to characterize as vaccine or wild type 1 and nucleic acid sequencing of entire VP1 region of poliovirus genome to determine the genetic relatedness. Results One hundred eleven wild type 1 poliovirus isolates were subjected to nucleotide sequencing for genetic variation study. Considering the 15% divergence of the sequences from Sabin 1, Phylogenetic analysis by MEGA software revealed that active inter and intra country transmission of many genetically distinct strains of wild poliovirus type 1 belonged to genotype SOAS which is indigenous in this region. By grouping wild type 1 polioviruses according to nucleotide sequence homology, three distinct clusters A, B and C were obtained with multiple chains of transmission together with some silent circulations represented by orphan lineages. Conclusion Our results emphasize that there was a persistent transmission of wild type1 polioviruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan during 2005-2007. The epidemiologic information provided by the sequence data can contribute to the formulation of better strategies for poliomyelitis control to those critical areas

  16. Does contracting of health care in Afghanistan work? Public and service-users' perceptions and experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockcroft Anne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rebuilding devastated health services, the government of Afghanistan has provided access to basic services mainly by contracting with non-government organisations (NGOs, and more recently the Strengthening Mechanism (SM of contracting with Provincial Health Offices. Community-based information about the public's views and experience of health services is scarce. Methods Field teams visited households in a stratified random sample of 30 communities in two districts in Kabul province, with health services mainly provided either by an NGO or through the SM and administered a questionnaire about household views, use, and experience of health services, including payments for services and corruption. They later discussed the findings with separate community focus groups of men and women. We calculated weighted frequencies of views and experience of services and multivariate analysis examined the related factors. Results The survey covered 3283 households including 2845 recent health service users. Some 42% of households in the SM district and 57% in the NGO district rated available health services as good. Some 63% of households in the SM district (adjacent to Kabul and 93% in the NGO district ordinarily used government health facilities. Service users rated private facilities more positively than government facilities. Government service users were more satisfied in urban facilities, if the household head was not educated, if they had enough food in the last week, and if they waited less than 30 minutes. Many households were unwilling to comment on corruption in health services; 15% in the SM district and 26% in the NGO district reported having been asked for an unofficial payment. Despite a policy of free services, one in seven users paid for treatment in government facilities, and three in four paid for medicine outside the facilities. Focus groups confirmed people knew payments were unofficial; they were afraid to talk about

  17. Antibiotic use in a district hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan: are we overprescribing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajis, S; Van den Bergh, R; De Bruycker, M; Mahama, G; Van Overloop, C; Satyanarayana, S; Bernardo, R S; Esmati, S; Reid, A J

    2014-12-21

    Contexte : Un hôpital de district à Kaboul, Afghanistan, soutenu par Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).Objectifs : Evaluer les pratiques en matière de prescription d'antibiotiques en consultation externe en été (août 2013) et en hiver (janvier 2014).Schema : Etude transversale basée sur les données hospitalières recueillies en routine et la méthode de dose thérapeutique quotidienne (DDD) de l'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS).Resultats : L'analyse de 4857 prescriptions (été) et de 4821 prescriptions (hiver) a montré que respectivement 62% et 50% de tous les consultants externes se voyaient prescrire au moins un antibiotique. Les prescriptions non accompagnées d'un diagnostic établi représentaient une proportion importante de l'ensemble des antibiotiques prescrits. En ce qui concerne les infections respiratoires hautes (URTI), les problèmes dentaires, les infections urinaires (UTI) et la diarrhée, on notait une bonne adhésion aux doses recommandées dans les directives standard de traitement de MSF quand on les mesurait en fonction des DDD. Cependant, certains médicaments, ne figurant pas dans les directives, étaient néanmoins prescrits comme par exemple l'amoxicilline et la métronidazole dans les UTI et l'azithromycine dans les URTI.Conclusion : Les taux de prescriptions d'antibiotiques en consultation externe dans un hôpital de district d'Afghanistan étaient très élevés, atteignant le double des recommandations de l'OMS de 30%. Même s'il n'a pas été observé de non adhésion aux doses recommandées, il semble y avoir eu des prescriptions inappropriées pour certaines pathologies. Cette étude suggère que la connaissance des déterminants de la prescription d'antibiotiques en fonction du contexte est une première étape dans la rationalisation des pratiques de prescription dans ce type de situation.

  18. Contribution of the Mission in Afghanistan to the Burden of Past-Year Mental Disorders in Canadian Armed Forces Personnel, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the contribution of the mission in Afghanistan to the burden of mental health problems in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). Methods: Data were obtained from the 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey, which assessed mental disorders using the World Health Organization’s Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The sample consisted of 6696 Regular Force (RegF) personnel, 3384 of whom had deployed in support of the mission. We estimated the association of past-year mental health problems with Afghanistan deployment status, adjusting for covariates using logistic regression; population attributable fractions (PAFs) were also calculated. Results: Indication of a past-year mental disorder was identified in 18.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.0% to 19.7%) of Afghanistan deployers compared with 14.6% (95% CI, 13.3% to 15.8%) in others. Afghanistan-related deployments contributed to the burden of a past-year disorder (PAF = 8.7%; 95% CI, 3.0% to 14.2%), with the highest PAFs being seen for panic disorder (34.7%) and posttraumatic stress disorder (32.1%). The PAFs for individual alcohol use disorders and suicide ideation were not different from zero. Child abuse, however, had a much greater PAF for any past-year disorder (28.7%; 95% CI, 23.4% to 33.7%) than did the Afghanistan mission. Conclusions: The mission in Afghanistan contributed significantly to the burden of mental disorders in the CAF RegF in 2013. However, the much stronger contribution of child abuse highlights the need for strong military mental health systems, even in peacetime, and the need to target the full range of determinants of mental health in prevention and control efforts. PMID:27270744

  19. Stigma of persons with disabilities in Afghanistan: Examining the pathways from stereotyping to mental distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Jean-Francois; Ballard, Ellis; Peña, Juan B

    2016-03-01

    Despite evidence that stigma of disability is frequently reflected through stereotyping and often results in mental distress, very limited literature demonstrates the pathways through which stereotyping has an impact on mental health. Drawing from a large sample of 1449 participants interviewed between December 2012 and September 2013 from an Afghan community-based rehabilitation program, we examined the structure of stigma associated with disability in Afghanistan. Labeling and negative stereotypes, associated with a specific cause of disability, result in social exclusion that in turn impacts mental health. Using structural equation modeling with latent variables, we examined the mediation effect of stereotypes associated with disability on mental distress and anxiety. We found a mediating role of social exclusion between stereotypes and mental distress but only in the case of persons with disabilities from birth. Comparing the total effect of 'disabled at birth' and mental distress 0.195 (95% CI: 0.018-0.367) the effect size of this mediation effect was 0.293 (95% CI: 0.173-0.415). There was no significant direct effect between 'disabled at birth' and mental distress once mediation effect was accounted for in our model. These findings suggest that a multipronged policy approach that recognizes the driving forces of stigma and promotes social participation directly alongside psychosocial interventions on mental distress of persons with disabilities is necessary to achieve wellbeing for a group that has been historically and systematically excluded from development interventions.

  20. Prevalence of contraindications to mefloquine use among USA military personnel deployed to Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrusiak Paul P

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine has historically been considered safe and well-tolerated for long-term malaria chemoprophylaxis, but its prescribing requires careful attention to rule out contraindications to its use, including a history of certain psychiatric and neurological disorders. The prevalence of these disorders has not been defined in cohorts of U.S. military personnel deployed to areas where long-term malaria chemoprophylaxis is indicated. Methods Military medical surveillance and pharmacosurveillance databases were utilized to identify contraindications to mefloquine use among a cohort of 11,725 active duty U.S. military personnel recently deployed to Afghanistan. Results A total of 9.6% of the cohort had evidence of a contraindication. Females were more than twice as likely as males to have a contraindication (OR = 2.48, P Conclusion These findings underscore the importance of proper systematic screening prior to prescribing and dispensing mefloquine, and the need to provide alternatives to mefloquine suitable for long-term administration among deployed U.S. military personnel.

  1. Blurred Lines? Provincial Reconstruction Teams and NGO Insecurity in Afghanistan, 2010–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Mitchell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Members of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs have been critical of the Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT initiative in Afghanistan since its inception, claiming that the mixture of military and humanitarian operations has resulted in ‘blurred lines’ that inhibit insurgents from identifying who is and is not a combatant. Certain organizations have hypothesized that aid workers are more likely to come under attack as a result of this mixture. Although this claim has surfaced in multiple outlets over the years, there was a lack of empirical evidence to support it. This study tests this hypothesis using a panel-corrected standard error regression model of all 34 Afghan provinces in 2010 and 2011. Preliminary results show that NGOs were likely to encounter a greater number of security incidents in provinces with PRTs; however, further analysis reveals this was only the case in provinces with teams not led by the US. This calls into question the validity of a general ‘blurred lines’ explanation for decreased aid worker security.

  2. Measurement and Analysis of Quality of Service of Mobile Networks in Afghanistan – End User Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced Quality of Service (QoS and satisfaction of mobile phone user are major concerns of a service provider. In order to manage network efficiently and to provide enhanced end – to – end Quality of Experience (QoE, operator is expected to measure and analyze QoS from various perspectives and at different relevant points of network. The scope of this paper is measurement and statistically analysis of QoS of mobile networks from end user perspective in Afghanistan. The study is based on primary data collected on random basis from 1,515 mobile phone users of five cellular operators. The paper furthermore proposes adequate technical solutions to mobile operators in order to address existing challenges in the area of QoS and to remain competitive in the market. Based on the result of processed data, considering geographical locations, population and telecom regulations of the government, authors recommend deployment of small cells (SCs, increasing number of regular performance tests, optimal placement of base stations, increasing number of carriers, and high order sectorization as proposed technical solutions.

  3. Antibacterial and COX-1 Inhibitory Effect of Medicinal Plants from the Pamir Mountains, Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne S. Jeppesen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants used to treat inflammatory ailments, pain, fever and infections in the Pamir Mountains in northeastern Afghanistan, were tested for antibacterial and COX-1 inhibitory activity. Water and ethanol extracts of 20 species were tested for antibacterial activity against two gram positive and two gram negative bacteria. The ethanol extract of Arnebia guttata inhibited Staphylococcus aureus with a MIC of 6 µg/mL. Water and ethanol extracts of Ephedra intermedia and the ethanol extracts of Lagochilus cabulicus and Peganum harmala inhibited Staphylococcus aureus at 0.5 mg/mL, and the P. harmala extract further inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis and E. coli, also with MICs of 0.5 mg/mL. Ethanol extracts of Artemisia persica (IC50: 0.5 µg/mL, Dragocephalum paulsenii (IC50: 0.5 µg/mL, Ephedra intermedia (IC50: 3.8 µg/mL, Hyoscyamus pusillus, Nepeta parmiriensis (IC50: 0.7 µg/mL and Rumex patientia subsp. pamiricus (IC50: 3.5 µg/mL exhibited COX-1 inhibitory activity. The observed in vitro activities support the use of some of the plant species in the traditional medicine systems of the Pamir Mountains.

  4. Examining human rights and mental health among women in drug abuse treatment centers in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Melissa Harris; Shamblen, Stephen R; Johnson, Knowlton; Thompson, Kirsten; Young, Linda; Courser, Matthew; Vanderhoff, Jude; Browne, Thom

    2012-01-01

    Denial of human rights, gender disparities, and living in a war zone can be associated with severe depression and poor social functioning, especially for female drug abusers. This study of Afghan women in drug abuse treatment (DAT) centers assesses (a) the extent to which these women have experienced human rights violations and mental health problems prior to entering the DAT centers, and (b) whether there are specific risk factors for human rights violations among this population. A total of 176 in-person interviews were conducted with female patients admitted to three drug abuse treatment centers in Afghanistan in 2010. Nearly all women (91%) reported limitations with social functioning. Further, 41% of the women indicated they had suicide ideation and 27% of the women had attempted suicide at least once 30 days prior to entering the DAT centers due to feelings of sadness or hopelessness. Half of the women (50%) experienced at least one human rights violation in the past year prior to entering the DAT centers. Risk factors for human rights violations among this population include marital status, ethnicity, literacy, employment status, entering treatment based on one's own desire, limited social functioning, and suicide attempts. Conclusions stemming from the results are discussed.

  5. Easing reintegration: telephone support groups for spouses of returning Iraq and Afghanistan service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda Olivia; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Graney, Marshall J; Zuber, Jeffrey; Burns, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Spouses of returning Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF) military service members report increased depression and anxiety post deployment as they work to reintegrate the family and service member. Reconnecting the family, renegotiating roles that have shifted, reestablishing communication patterns, and dealing with mental health concerns are all tasks that spouses must undertake as part of reintegration. We tested telephone support groups focusing on helping spouses with these basic reintegration tasks. Year-long telephone support groups focused on education, skills building (communication skills, problem solving training, cognitive behavioral techniques, stress management), and support. Spouse depression and anxiety were decreased and perceived social support was increased during the course of the study. In subgroup analyses, spouses with husbands whose injuries caused care difficulties had a positive response to the intervention. However, they were more likely to be depressed, be anxious, and have less social support compared to participants who had husbands who had no injury or whose injury did not cause care difficulty. Study findings suggest that this well-established, high-access intervention can help improve quality of life for military spouses who are struggling with reintegration of the service member and family.

  6. Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Lung Disease in Veterans of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Mary Jo; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Leung, Kar-Wei; Faverio, Paola; Fleming, Nicholas; Mortensen, Eric; Amuan, Megan E; Wang, Chen-Pin; Eapen, Blessen; Restrepo, Marcos; Morris, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Research from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have focused on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mental health conditions; however, it is becoming clear that other health concerns, such as respiratory illnesses, warrant further scientific inquiry. Early reports from theater and postdeployment health assessments suggested an association with deployment-related exposures (e.g., sand, burn pits, chemical, etc.) and new-onset respiratory symptoms. We used data from Veterans Affairs medical encounters between fiscal years 2003 and 2011 to identify trends in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and interstitial lung disease in veterans. We used data from Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense sources to identify sociodemographic (age, sex, race), military (e.g., service branch, multiple deployments) and clinical characteristics (TBI, smoking) of individuals with and without chronic lung diseases. Generalized estimating equations found significant increases over time for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Trends for interstitial lung disease were significant only in adjusted analyses. Age, smoking, and TBI were also significantly associated with chronic lung diseases; however, multiple deployments were not associated. Research is needed to identify which characteristics of deployment-related exposures are linked with chronic lung disease.

  7. An Analysis of the Published Mineral Resource Estimates of the Haji-Gak Iron Deposit, Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutphin, David M., E-mail: dsutphin@usgs.gov; Renaud, Karine M.; Drew, Lawrence J. [U.S. Geological Survey (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The Haji-Gak iron deposit of eastern Bamyan Province, eastern Afghanistan, was studied extensively and resource calculations were made in the 1960s by Afghan and Russian geologists. Recalculation of the resource estimates verifies the original estimates for categories A (in-place resources known in detail), B (in-place resources known in moderate detail), and C{sub 1} (in-place resources estimated on sparse data), totaling 110.8 Mt, or about 6% of the resources as being supportable for the methods used in the 1960s. C{sub 2} (based on a loose exploration grid with little data) resources are based on one ore grade from one drill hole, and P{sub 2} (prognosis) resources are based on field observations, field measurements, and an ore grade derived from averaging grades from three better sampled ore bodies. C{sub 2} and P{sub 2} resources are 1,659.1 Mt or about 94% of the total resources in the deposit. The vast P{sub 2} resources have not been drilled or sampled to confirm their extent or quality. The purpose of this article is to independently evaluate the resources of the Haji-Gak iron deposit by using the available geologic and mineral resource information including geologic maps and cross sections, sampling data, and the analog-estimating techniques of the 1960s to determine the size and tenor of the deposit.

  8. From Goya to Afghanistan--an essay on the ratio and ethics of medical war pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, Leo; de Mare, Heidi; Meijman, Frans J

    2010-01-01

    For centuries pictures of the dead and wounded have been part and parcel of war communications. Often the intentions were clear, ranging from medical instructions to anti-war protests. The public's response could coincide with or diverge from the publisher's intention. Following the invention of photography in the nineteenth century, and the subsequent claim of realism, the veracity of medical war images became more complex. Analysing and understanding such photographs have become an ethical obligation with democratic implications. We performed a multidisciplinary analysis of War Surgery (2008), a book containing harsh, full-colour photographs of mutilated soldiers from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Our analysis shows that, within the medical context, this book is a major step forward in medical war communication and documentation. In the military context the book can be conceived as an attempt to put matters right given the enormous sacrifice some individuals have suffered. For the public, the relationship between the 'reality' and 'truth' of such photographs is ambiguous, because only looking at the photographs without reading the medical context is limiting. If the observer is not familiar with medical practice, it is difficult for him to fully assess, signify and acknowledge the value and relevance of this book. We therefore assert the importance of the role of professionals and those in the humanities in particular in educating the public and initiating debate.

  9. Heuristic economic assessment of the Afghanistan construction materials sector: cement and dimension stone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossotti, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the U.S. Government has invested more than $106 billion for physical, societal, and governmental reconstruction assistance to Afghanistan (Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, 2012a). This funding, along with private investment, has stimulated a growing demand for particular industrial minerals and construction materials. In support of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey released a preliminary mineral assessment in 2007 on selected Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2007). More recently, the 2007 mineral assessment was updated with the inclusion of a more extensive array of Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2011). As a follow-up on the 2011 assessment, this report provides an analysis of the current use and prospects of the following Afghan industrial minerals required to manufacture construction materials: clays of various types, bauxite, gypsum, cement-grade limestone, aggregate (sand and gravel), and dimension stone (sandstone, quartzite, granite, slate, limestone, travertine, marble). The intention of this paper is to assess the: Use of Afghan industrial minerals to manufacture construction materials, Prospects for growth in domestic construction materials production sectors, Factors controlling the competitiveness of domestic production relative to foreign imports of construction materials, and Feasibility of using natural gas as the prime source of thermal energy and for generating electrical energy for cement production. The discussion here is based on classical principles of supply and demand. Imbedded in these principles is an understanding that the attributes of supply and demand are highly variable. For construction materials, demand for a given product may depend on seasons of the year, location of construction sites, product delivery time, political factors, governmental regulations, cultural issues, price, and how essential a given product might be to the buyer. Moreover, failure on the

  10. Characterization of potential mineralization in Afghanistan: four permissive areas identified using imaging spectroscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Berger, Byron R.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey and Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations natural resources revitalization activities in Afghanistan, four permissive areas for mineralization, Bamyan 1, Farah 1, Ghazni 1, and Ghazni 2, have been identified using imaging spectroscopy data. To support economic development, the areas of potential mineralization were selected on the occurrence of selected mineral assemblages mapped using the HyMap™ data (kaolinite, jarosite, hydrated silica, chlorite, epidote, iron-bearing carbonate, buddingtonite, dickite, and alunite) that may be indicative of past mineralization processes in areas with limited or no previous mineral resource studies. Approximately 30 sites were initially determined to be candidates for areas of potential mineralization. Additional criteria and material used to refine the selection and prioritization process included existing geologic maps, Landsat Thematic Mapper data, and published literature. The HyMapTM data were interpreted in the context of the regional geologic and tectonic setting and used the presence of alteration mineral assemblages to identify areas with the potential for undiscovered mineral resources. Further field-sampling, mapping, and supporting geochemical analyses are necessary to fully substantiate and verify the specific deposit types in the four areas of potential mineralization.

  11. THE EFFECTS OF SWINGS IN GLOBAL WHEAT PRICES ON THE DOMESTIC MARKETS IN AFGHANISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najibullah Hassanzoy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent shocks in global prices of cereals and the spillover effects of trade restrictive policies adversely affected domestic markets, particularly in the net food importing countries such as Afghanistan. This paper investigates the effects of 2007–2008 spikes in global wheat prices on the dynamics of price transmission and long-run equilibrium relationship between global and domestic wheat markets. The findings indicate that domestic and global wheat markets may be cointegrated in Regime-I (pre-break, Regime-II (post-break and the overall sample period. Moreover, the elasticity of price transmission and speed of adjustment towards the long-run equilibrium are substantially different between the two regimes, i.e., they appear to be larger in Regime-I as compared to Regime-II. Similarly, the effect of a shock in global wheat prices on domestic wheat markets might be long-lasting in Regime-I but transitory in Regime-II. This research underlines the need for mitigating the adverse effect of spikes in global wheat prices on domestic wheat markets in the context of a landlocked net food importing country.

  12. Spatially Correlated Time Series and Ecological Niche Analysis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Afghanistan

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    Oyelola A. Adegboye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is the third most common vector-borne disease and a very important protozoan infection. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most common types of leishmaniasis infectious diseases with up to 1.2 million occurrences of new cases each year worldwide. A dynamic transmission multivariate time series model was applied to the data to account for overdispersion and evaluate the effects of three environmental layers as well as seasonality in the data. Furthermore, ecological niche modeling was used to study the geographically suitable conditions for cutaneous leishmaniasis using temperature, precipitation and altitude as environmental layers, together with the leishmaniasis presence data. A retrospective analysis of the cutaneous leishmaniasis spatial data in Afghanistan between 2003 and 2009 indicates a steady increase from 2003 to 2007, a small decrease in 2008, and then another increase in 2009. An upward trend and regularly repeating patterns of highs and lows were observed related to the months of the year, which suggests seasonality effect in the data. Two peaks were observed in the disease occurrence—January to March and September to December—which coincide with the cold period. Ecological niche modelling indicates that precipitation has the greatest contribution to the potential distribution of leishmaniasis.

  13. Epidemiological geomatics in evaluation of mine risk education in Afghanistan: introducing population weighted raster maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Neil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evaluation of mine risk education in Afghanistan used population weighted raster maps as an evaluation tool to assess mine education performance, coverage and costs. A stratified last-stage random cluster sample produced representative data on mine risk and exposure to education. Clusters were weighted by the population they represented, rather than the land area. A "friction surface" hooked the population weight into interpolation of cluster-specific indicators. The resulting population weighted raster contours offer a model of the population effects of landmine risks and risk education. Five indicator levels ordered the evidence from simple description of the population-weighted indicators (level 0, through risk analysis (levels 1–3 to modelling programme investment and local variations (level 4. Using graphic overlay techniques, it was possible to metamorphose the map, portraying the prediction of what might happen over time, based on the causality models developed in the epidemiological analysis. Based on a lattice of local site-specific predictions, each cluster being a small universe, the "average" prediction was immediately interpretable without losing the spatial complexity.

  14. Configuring Balanced Scorecards for Measuring Health System Performance: Evidence from 5 Years' Evaluation in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Anbrasi; Kumar, Binay; Kakar, Faizullah; Salehi, Ahmad Shah; Burnham, Gilbert; Peters, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2004, Afghanistan pioneered a balanced scorecard (BSC) performance system to manage the delivery of primary health care services. This study examines the trends of 29 key performance indicators over a 5-year period between 2004 and 2008. Methods and Findings Independent evaluations of performance in six domains were conducted annually through 5,500 patient observations and exit interviews and 1,500 provider interviews in >600 facilities selected by stratified random sampling in each province. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to assess trends in BSC parameters. There was a progressive improvement in the national median scores scaled from 0–100 between 2004 and 2008 in all six domains: patient and community satisfaction of services (65.3–84.5, pperformance benchmarking during the 5-year period. However, scorecard reconfigurations are needed to integrate effectiveness and efficiency measures and accommodate changes in health systems policy and strategy architecture to ensure its continued relevance and effectiveness as a comprehensive health system performance measure. The process of BSC design and implementation can serve as a valuable prototype for health policy planners managing performance in similar health care contexts. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21814499

  15. Geological investigations at a high altitude, remote coal mine on the Northwest Pakistan and Afghanistan frontier, Karakoram Himalaya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Laurance J. [Chartered Geologist, Halcrow Group Ltd., Deanway Technology Centre, Wilmslow Road, Handforth, Cheshire, SK9 3FB (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-03

    The Northwest Pakistan and Afghanistan frontier is located one of the most remote, inaccessible, and inhospitable part of the Himalayan orogenic belt. In this region, two of the world's largest and most distinct mountain belts intersect; the Karakoram Himalaya (mainly in Pakistan) and the Hindu Kush (mainly in Afghanistan). Located at high altitude, in a remote part of Northwest Pakistan, close to the border with Afghanistan, tribal villagers began excavating a series of audits into the steep mountain slopes, beneath glaciers, to extract valuable coal and carbonaceous shale resources. These were discovered in 1996, by the villagers, whilst hunting, and may represent some of the highest mine workings in the world. Small-scale mining operations subsequently developed using rudimentary mining methods and the mine became known as the Reshit or Pamir Coal Mine.The coal deposits are sedimentary, highly disturbed and tectonised, having been subjected to multiple phases of orogenic crustal deformation. The coal occurs as discrete lenses, several tens of metres in their lateral dimension, between steeply dipping, overturned and thrusted limestone beds of Jurassic age. The coal provided a vital, alternative source of fuel for the villagers since the local, traditional fuel supply was wood, which had become severely depleted, and imports of kerosene from neighbouring China and Afghanistan were too expensive. The mining operations experienced severe problems. These included several collapses of mine entrances, the failure of the adits to intersect the coal-bearing zones, the potential threat of geological hazards, mining-induced hazards and harsh high-altitude operating conditions, particularly during the winter months. International aid was provided to assist the villagers and a geological investigation was commissioned to investigate the problems at the mine. The geology of Karakoram Himalaya is relatively poorly understood. Until recently the region was restricted to

  16. Seroprevalence and correlates of HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B and C virus among intrapartum patients in Kabul, Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazanfar Syed

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little current information is available for prevalence of vertically-transmitted infections among the Afghan population. The purpose of this study is to determine prevalence and correlates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B and C infection among obstetric patients and model hepatitis B vaccination approaches in Kabul, Afghanistan. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at three government maternity hospitals in Kabul, Afghanistan from June through September, 2006. Consecutively-enrolled participants completed an interviewer-administered survey and whole blood rapid testing with serum confirmation for antibodies to HIV, T. pallidum, and HCV, and HBsAg. Descriptive data and prevalence of infection were calculated, with logistic regression used to identify correlates of HBV infection. Modeling was performed to determine impact of current and birth dose vaccination strategies on HBV morbidity and mortality. Results Among 4452 women, prevalence of HBsAg was 1.53% (95% CI: 1.18 – 1.94 and anti-HCV was 0.31% (95% CI: 0.17 – 0.53. No cases of HIV or syphilis were detected. In univariate analysis, HBsAg was associated with husband's level of education (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.01 – 1.26. Modeling indicated that introduction of birth dose vaccination would not significantly reduce hepatitis-related morbidity or mortality for the measured HBsAg prevalence. Conclusion Intrapartum whole blood rapid testing for HIV, syphilis, HBV, and HCV was acceptable to patients in Afghanistan. Though HBsAg prevalence is relatively low, periodic assessments should be performed to determine birth dose vaccination recommendations for this setting.

  17. False-Color-Image Map of Quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-E-Pur-Chaman (422) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip A.; Turner, Kenzie J.

    2007-01-01

    This map is a false-color rendition created from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery collected between 1999 and 2002. The false colors were generated by applying an adaptive histogram equalization stretch to Landsat bands 7 (displayed in red), 4 (displayed in green), and 2 (displayed in blue). These three bands contain most of the spectral differences provided by Landsat imagery and, therefore, provide the most discrimination between surface materials. Landsat bands 4 and 7 are in the near-infrared and short-wave-infrared regions, respectively, where differences in absorption of sunlight by different surface materials are more pronounced than in visible wavelengths. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Cultural features were not derived from the Landsat base and consequently do not match it precisely. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (U.S. Geological Survey/Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file report (OFR) number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The OFR numbers range in sequence from 1092 to 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS in cooperation with the AGS and AGCHO.

  18. Does body mass index moderate the association between posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and suicidal ideation in Iraq/Afghanistan veterans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Julie A; DeBeer, Bryann B; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Matthieu, Monica M; Meyer, Eric C; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Morissette, Sandra B

    2016-10-30

    Suicide, PTSD, and obesity co-occur at high rates among returning veterans, yet limited research exists regarding the relationship among these variables. Self-report and diagnostic interview data from a longitudinal study of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans (N=130) enrolled in VA healthcare examined these inter-relations. As hypothesized, body mass index (BMI) significantly moderated the association between PTSD and suicidal ideation such that the association between PTSD and suicidal ideation was strongest among individuals with a high BMI. Programs that focus on health promotion, trauma treatment, and weight management should continue to monitor suicide risk.

  19. Configuring balanced scorecards for measuring health system performance: evidence from 5 years' evaluation in Afghanistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbrasi Edward

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2004, Afghanistan pioneered a balanced scorecard (BSC performance system to manage the delivery of primary health care services. This study examines the trends of 29 key performance indicators over a 5-year period between 2004 and 2008. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Independent evaluations of performance in six domains were conducted annually through 5,500 patient observations and exit interviews and 1,500 provider interviews in >600 facilities selected by stratified random sampling in each province. Generalized estimating equation (GEE models were used to assess trends in BSC parameters. There was a progressive improvement in the national median scores scaled from 0-100 between 2004 and 2008 in all six domains: patient and community satisfaction of services (65.3-84.5, p<0.0001; provider satisfaction (65.4-79.2, p<0.01; capacity for service provision (47.4-76.4, p<0.0001; quality of services (40.5-67.4, p<0.0001; and overall vision for pro-poor and pro-female health services (52.0-52.6. The financial domain also showed improvement until 2007 (84.4-95.7, p<0.01, after which user fees were eliminated. By 2008, all provinces achieved the upper benchmark of national median set in 2004. CONCLUSIONS: The BSC has been successfully employed to assess and improve health service capacity and service delivery using performance benchmarking during the 5-year period. However, scorecard reconfigurations are needed to integrate effectiveness and efficiency measures and accommodate changes in health systems policy and strategy architecture to ensure its continued relevance and effectiveness as a comprehensive health system performance measure. The process of BSC design and implementation can serve as a valuable prototype for health policy planners managing performance in similar health care contexts. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  20. Heavy metal and microbial loads in sewage irrigated vegetables of Kabul, Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Buerkert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the heavy metal and microbial contamination of vegetables produced in Central Asian cities. We therefore measured the concentration of cadmium (Cd, copper (Cu, lead (Pb, and zinc (Zn and of faecal pathogens (Coliform bacteria, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., Ascaris lubricoides, Entamoeba sp. and pinworms [Oxyuris vermicularis syn. Enterobius vermicularis] in soil, irrigation water, and marketed vegetables of Kabul City, Afghanistan. Leaf Pb and Zn concentrations of leafy vegetables were with 1–5 and 33–160 mg kg^{-1} dry weight (DW several-fold above respective international thresholds of 0.3 mg Pb kg^{-1} and 50 mg Zn kg^{-1}. The tissue concentration of Cu was below threshold limits in all samples except for spinach in one farm. Above-threshold loads of microbes and parasites on vegetables were found in five out of six gardens with coliforms ranging from 0.5–2 × 10^7 cells 100g^{-1} fresh weight (FW, but no Salmonella and Shigella were found. Contamination with 0.2 × 10^7 eggs 100g^{-1} FW of Ascaris was detected on produce of three farms and critical concentrations of Entamoeba in a single case, while Oxyuris vermicularis, and Enterobius vermicularis were found on produce of three and four farms, respectively. Irrigation water had Ascaris, Coliforms, Salmonella, Shigella, Entamoeba, and Oxyuris vermicularis syn. Enterobius vermicularis ranging from 0.35 × 10^7 to 2 × 10^7 cells l^{-1}. The heavy metal and microbial loads on fresh UPA vegetables are likely the result of contamination from rising traffic, residues of the past decades of war and lacking treatment of sewage which needs urgent attention.

  1. A major light rare-earth element (LREE) resource in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, southern Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Horton, Forrest; Buttleman, Kim; Scott, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise in world demand for the rare-earth elements (REEs) has expanded the search for new REE resources. We document two types of light rare-earth element (LREE)-enriched rocks in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of southern Afghanistan: type 1 concordant seams of khanneshite-(Ce), synchysite-(Ce), and parisite-(Ce) within banded barite-strontianite alvikite, and type 2 igneous dikes of coarse-grained carbonatite, enriched in fluorine or phosphorus, containing idiomorphic crystals of khanneshite-(Ce) or carbocernaite. Type 1 mineralized barite-strontianite alvikite averages 22.25 wt % BaO, 4.27 wt % SrO, and 3.25 wt % ∑ LREE2O3 (sum of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd oxides). Type 2 igneous dikes average 14.51 wt % BaO, 5.96 wt % SrO, and 3.77 wt % ∑ LREE2O3. A magmatic origin is clearly indicated for the type 2 LREE-enriched dikes, and type 1 LREE mineralization probably formed in the presence of LREE-rich hydrothermal fluid. Both types of LREE mineralization may be penecontemporaneous, having formed in a carbonate-rich magma in the marginal zone of the central vent, highly charged with volatile constituents (i.e., CO2, F, P2O5), and strongly enriched in Ba, Sr, and the LREE. Based on several assumptions, and employing simple geometry for the zone of LREE enrichment, we estimate that at least 1.29 Mt (million metric tonnes) of LREE2O3 is present in this part of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex.

  2. The Department of Defense’s Use of Private Security Contractors in Afghanistan and Iraq: Background, Analysis, and Options for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    distinction between government contractors and the U.S. military. 35 Bruce Alpert , “Killing in Afghanistan hits very close to home; N.O. man is...Security Contractor Cleared in Two Firings,” Washington Post, August 2, 2007. p. A-15. 40 Blackwater has since changed its name to Xe. 41 Tony Harris

  3. The Department of Defense’s Use of Private Security Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan: Background, Analysis, and Options for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    always draw a distinction between government contractors and the U.S. military. 48 Bruce Alpert , “Killing in Afghanistan hits very close to home...54 Tony Harris , Jill Dougherty, and Chris Lawrence, et al., “U.S. Embassy Hazing & Humiliation,” CNN: CNN

  4. Afghanistans Oil, Gas, and Minerals Industries: $488 Million in U.S. Efforts Show Limited Progress Overall, and Challenges Prevent Further Investment and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended; and in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards . John F. Sopko Special...26 SIGAR 16-11-AR/Afghanistan’s Extractive Industries Page vi ABBREVIATIONS AGS Afghanistan Geological Survey APA ...auditing standards . Details regarding our objectives, scope and methodology are in appendix I. BACKGROUND Afghanistan’s mountainous environment is

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF GEOLOGY ON BATTLEFIELD TERRAIN AND IT’S AFFECTS ON MILITARY OPERATIONS IN MOUNTAINS AND KARST REGIONS: EXAMPLES FROM WW1 AND AFGHANISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Zečević

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available During the World War I conflict between the Austrian and Italian army, Austrian engineer units constructed hallways in the karst region of Soča river. Those hallways, karst phenomena (caverns, caves and other fortifications, gave the Austrian army a tactical advantage. The construction principle of caverns is the consequence of the geological structure of the terrain. We are watching another military conflict in Afghanistan. In country where many armies in history have been defeated, where the terrain morphology condition a guerilla tactic, where the function effect of modern military technology is limited by battlefield configuration and with low military value of individual target, we are creating a "picture" of the possible view of the future battlefield. Al-Qai'da operatives in east Afghanistan take advantage of the opportunity of geological structure of the terrain and construct tunnel network across natural caves. Although the tunnel network in Afghanistan is constructed mostly in sandstones and metamorphic rocks, we may partly compare it with Austrian hallways. In that sense this work shows the influence of geological structure of the terrain on the effect of military operations in mountains and karst regions, and the analogy between military operations on the Soča river and military operations in Afghanistan.

  6. The War from Afghanistan (1979–1989 in the Memory of Participants from the Republic of Moldova. Official and Oral Speech

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    Ion XENOFONTOV

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the consequences caused by the war in Afghanistan (1979-1989 upon the participants from Republic of Moldova. A number of evidence are offered through biographies, interviews etc.. They highlight the impact that this event had both economic, and social as well, upon the active participants in this war.

  7. It’s the Strategic Narrative Stupid! How the United States May Overcome the Challenge of Continued Engagement in Afghanistan Beyond 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    2017-01-01

    This chapter argues that US staying power in Afghanistan primarily will be determined by the ability of the US President to craft a strategic narrative that can convince most members of Congress that it is necessary to stay engaged, that it is the right thing to do, and that the United States, Af...

  8. The Illusion of Governance: The Challenges of Providing Effective Governance as a Tool of Counterinsurgency in Eastern Afghanistan’s Paktika Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    actions was premature . The community council was able to meet; however, these meetings were of no consequence and no decisions were made on behalf of...An Iranic ethnic group belonging to Afghanistan and Pakistan. Pashtunwali. A non-written ethical code and traditional lifestyle which the

  9. Numbing and Dysphoria Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans: A Review of Findings and Implications for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassija, Christina M.; Jakupcak, Matthew; Gray, Matt J.

    2012-01-01

    Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans experience significant rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma-related mental health conditions. Understanding how specific PTSD symptomatology affects physical health and psychosocial functioning may be useful in improving the conceptualization of PTSD nosology and informing treatment…

  10. Genetic polymorphisms and drug susceptibility in four isolates of Leishmania tropica obtained from Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan.

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    Marie Plourde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is a vector-borne parasitic disease characterized by the presence of one or more lesions on the skin that usually heal spontaneously after a few months. Most cases of CL worldwide occur in Southwest Asia, Africa and South America, and a number of cases have been reported among troops deployed to Afghanistan. No vaccines are available against this disease, and its treatment relies on chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to characterize parasites isolated from Canadian soldiers at the molecular level and to determine their susceptibility profile against a panel of antileishmanials to identify appropriate therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Parasites were isolated from skin lesions and characterized as Leishmania tropica based on their pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles and pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1 sequences. Unusually high allelic polymorphisms were observed at several genetic loci for the L. tropica isolates that were characterized. The drug susceptibility profile of intracellular amastigote parasites was determined using an established macrophage assay. All isolates were sensitive to miltefosine, amphotericin B, sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam and paromomycin, but were not susceptible to fluconazole. Variable levels of susceptibility were observed for the antimalarial agent atovaquone/proguanil (Malarone. Three Canadian soldiers from this study were successfully treated with miltefosine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows high heterogeneity between the two L. tropica allelic versions of a gene but despite this, L. tropica isolated from Afghanistan are susceptible to several of the antileishmanial drugs available.

  11. Burden of Hypertension in the Capital of Afghanistan: A Cross-Sectional Study in Kabul City, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study had the objective to assess the prevalence and associated factors of hypertension in an urban setting, Kabul city, Afghanistan. Materials and Methods. The World Health Organization's STEP-wise approach was adopted and used in Kabul in November 2015. The study analyzed a sample of 1172 adults in the age group of 25–70 years. Demographic, socioeconomic, and behavior data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Fasting venous blood sample was collected to assess the lipid profile and fasting blood sugar. Results. The study showed that the prevalence of hypertension among adult Kabul citizens was 32.3%. From this figure, 599 (51.1%) were females and 573 (48.9%) males with a mean age of 38.6 ± 12.2 years. Illiteracy rate was 49.6% and 77.5% were married. Smoking in adults were 8.1% and mouth snuff users were 9.8%. More than half (57.6%) of the study respondents were overweight and obese and 9.1% were recorded having raised blood sugar. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, age, general obesity, central obesity, smoking, moderate physical activity, and taking fruits 3 days or less weekly were statistically significant predictors of hypertension. Conclusions. Burden of hypertension is increasing in main urban settings in Afghanistan. Integrated intervention focusing in main modifiable risk factors is needed to detect and prevent hypertension. PMID:28127468

  12. Measuring and managing progress in the establishment of basic health services: the Afghanistan health sector balanced scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Peter M; Peters, David H; Niayesh, Haseebullah; Singh, Lakhwinder P; Dwivedi, Vikas; Burnham, Gilbert

    2008-01-01

    The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) of Afghanistan has adopted the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) as a tool to measure and manage performance in delivery of a Basic Package of Health Services. Based on results from the 2004 baseline round, the MOPH identified eight of the 29 indicators on the BSC as priority areas for improvement. Like the 2004 round, the 2005 and 2006 BSCs involved a random selection of more than 600 health facilities, 1700 health workers and 5800 patient-provider interactions. The 2005 and 2006 BSCs demonstrated substantial improvements in all eight of the priority areas compared to 2004 baseline levels, with increases in median provincial scores for presence of active village health councils, availability of essential drugs, functional laboratories, provider knowledge, health worker training, use of clinical guidelines, monitoring of tuberculosis treatment, and provision of delivery care. For three of the priority indicators-drug availability, health worker training and provider knowledge-scores remained unchanged or decreased between 2005 and 2006. This highlights the need to ensure that early gains achieved in establishment of health services in Afghanistan are maintained over time. The use of a coherent and balanced monitoring framework to identify priority areas for improvement and measure performance over time reflects an objectives-based approach to management of health services that is proving to be effective in a difficult environment.

  13. Pre-design and life cycle cost analysis of a hybrid power system for rural and remote communities in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Sayed Shah Danish

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In view of the present situation of the Afghanistan electricity sector, the photovoltaic and diesel generator stand-alone hybrid power system is increasingly attractive for application in rural and remote communities. Thousands of rural communities in Afghanistan depend solely on traditional kerosene for illumination and rarely have access to electricity sources such as DC battery for radio and other small appliances. This study is conducted to offer real-life solution to this problem. The hybrid system is investigated to meet the domestic load demand that is estimated based on the communities’ electricity consumption culture. At first, customary pre-design is pursued. Afterwards, the break-even point and net present value algorithms are applied for economic analysis. That makes this study differ from the previous academic literature. The concepts developed in this study are targeted for a cost-effective hybrid system, which is appropriate for rural and remote residents’ lifestyle change and improvement. Based on the academic research methods, overall analysis procedures can fit as an analogy, especially for developing countries.

  14. Institutional Framework for Collaborative Urban Planning in Afghanistan in view of the Transferring Process of International Urban Planning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Ahmad Javid

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of Afghanistan’s urban planning institutional change in certain historical periods, particular dilemmas within the current urban planning system and its gradual shift from totalitarian urban planning approaches practiced during 1960s - 1980s to a different form of planning being practiced by the current government. In addition, it will seek to analyze the ease and tension caused by the three recent phenomena that have emerged after the establishment of a new democratic government in Afghanistan since 2001, such as private sector-led urban development, international funding community’s and NGOs’ role in planning and the delegation of certain roles given to different tires of the government. Another purpose of this work is to analyze the collaboration among urban planning institutions, private sector, international funding community, NGOs and civil society within the current urban planning arena of Afghanistan and to identify the roles, responsibilities and functions of urban planning institutions in different levels of urban governance. Finally find out what possible and necessary institutional changes and framework are needed in order to foster grassroots based inter-institutional collaboration and partnership among various tires of government. The methodological approach to the research is based on qualitative data analysis. For the analysis purpose, government urban planning data and in-depth, semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with Afghanistan’s urban planning officials were thematically used, which provided in-depth information about involved actors in urban planning and their roles and relationships.

  15. The impact of the military mission in Afghanistan on mental health in the Canadian Armed Forces: a summary of research findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Zamorski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: As Canada's mission in Afghanistan winds down, the Canadian Forces (CF are reflecting on the psychological impact of the mission on more than 40,000 deployed personnel. Methods: All major CF studies of mental health outcomes done before and during the Afghanistan era are summarized, with an eye toward getting the most complete picture of the mental health impact of the mission. Studies on traumatic brain injury (TBI, high-risk drinking, and suicidality are included given their conceptual link to mental health. Results: CF studies on the mental health impact of pre-Afghanistan deployments are few, and they have inadequate detail on deployment experiences. Afghanistan era findings confirm service-related mental health problems (MHPs in an important minority. The findings of the studies cohere, both as a group and in the context of data from our Allies. Combat exposure is the most important driver of deployment-related MHPs, but meaningful rates will be found in those in low-threat areas. Reserve service and cumulative effects of multiple deployments are not major risk factors in the CF. Many deployed personnel will seek care, but further efforts to decrease the delay are needed. Only a fraction of the overall burden of mental illness is likely deployment attributable. Deployment-related mental disorders do not translate into an overall increase in in-service suicidal behavior in the CF, but there is concerning evidence of increased suicide risk after release. TBI occurred in a distinct minority on this deployment, but severe forms were rare. Most TBI cases do not have persistent “post-concussive” symptoms; such symptoms are closely associated with MHPs. Conclusion: The mental health impact of the mission in Afghanistan is commensurate with its difficult nature. While ongoing and planned studies will provide additional detail on its impacts, greater research attention is needed on preventive and therapeutic interventions.

  16. Genetic diversity of Leishmania tropica strains isolated from clinical forms of cutaneous leishmaniasis in rural districts of Herat province, Western Afghanistan, based on ITS1-rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar, Mahdi; Pazoki Ghohe, Hossein; Rasooli, Sayed Abobakar; Karamian, Mehdi; Mohib, Abdul Satar; Ziaei Hezarjaribi, Hajar; Pagheh, Abdol Sattar; Ghatee, Mohammad Amin

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Afghanistan, there is a little information concerning epidemiological status of the disease and phylogenetic relationship and population structure of causative agents. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and distribution of CL cases and investigate the Leishmania tropica population structure in rural districts of Heart province in the West of Afghanistan in comparison to neighboring foci. Overall, 4189 clinically suspected CL cases from 177 villages (including 12 districts) in Herat province were enrolled in the referral laboratory of WHO sub-office in Herat city from January 2012 to December 2013. 3861 cases were confirmed as CL by microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained slides. ITS1 PCR-RFLP analysis showed dominance of L. tropica (more than 98%) among 127 randomly chosen samples. Analysis of the ITS1 sequences revealed 4 sequence types among the 21 L. tropica isolates. Comparison of sequence types from Herat rural districts with the representatives of L. tropica from Iran, India, and Herat city showed two main population groups (cluster A and B). All isolates from Herat province, India and Southeast, East, and Central Iran were found exclusively in cluster A. The close proximity of West Afghanistan focus and Birjand county as the capital of Southern Khorasan province in East Iran can explain relatively equal to the genetic composition of L. tropica in these two neighboring regions. In addition, two populations were found among L. tropica isolates from Herat rural districts. Main population showed more similarity to some isolates from Birjand county in East Iran while minor population probably originated from the Southeast and East Iranian L. tropica. Recent study provided valuable information concerning the population structure of L. tropica and epidemiology of ACL in the West of Afghanistan, which could be the basis for molecular epidemiology studies in other regions of Afghanistan.

  17. Afghanistan - Debris Covered Glaciers, Supraglacial Lakes, and the Potential for Catastrophic Flooding (Jökulhlaups)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, B. F.

    2009-12-01

    Included in the U.S. Geological Survey’s investigation of glaciers and the water resources of Afghanistan is a component focused on determining the potential for catastrophic flooding (jökulhlaups). In glacier environments, jökulhlaups are usually caused by: (1) drainage of ice-dammed lakes; (2) drainage of ice-marginal lakes (typically moraine-dammed lakes); (3) release of water stored subglacially, englacially, or supraglacially, sometimes through surge-related processes; or (4) through melting of glaciers located around the summit craters of erupting volcanoes. All but the last potential cause may lead to significant flooding from Himalayan Mountain glaciers. The primary data sets being investigated are: (1) VNIR (visible and near-infrared) digital images collected between 2001 and 2006 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on the Terra spacecraft; (2) Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper (ETM+) multispectral data collected between 1998 and 2004; and (3) Google Earth space photography subscenes imaged between 2006 and 2008. GIS analysis, an automated supervised classification, a manual visual image analysis, and a remote sensing assessment were performed on these data to determine the number, location, size, area, aspect, distribution of ice-surface and ice-marginal lakes, and many other parameters of about 1,000 glaciers in Afghanistan’s Wakhan Pamir. There, all of the glaciers analyzed are thinning and/or retreating. In this type of environment, it is not unusual for a significant amount of the meltwater thus produced to be temporarily stored within the glacier system. Many Wakhan Pamir valley glaciers are debris covered. Often significant parts of the ablation zone surface of these glaciers host supraglacial lakes. Typically, these supraglacial lakes develop on stagnant or slowly moving ice through thermokarst processes. Many of these valley glaciers are also characterized by the presence of empty thermokarst pits

  18. Risk factors associated with recurrent diarrheal illnesses among children in Kabul, Afghanistan: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Aluisio

    Full Text Available Childhood diarrheal illnesses are a major public health problem. In low-income settings data on disease burden and factors associated with diarrheal illnesses are poorly defined, precluding effective prevention programs. This study explores factors associated with recurrent diarrheal illnesses among children in Kabul, Afghanistan.A cohort of 1-11 month old infants was followed for 18 months from 2007-2009. Data on diarrheal episodes were gathered through active and passive surveillance. Information on child health, socioeconomics, water and sanitation, and hygiene behaviors was collected. Factors associated with recurrent diarrheal illnesses were analyzed using random effects recurrent events regression models.3,045 children were enrolled and 2,511 (82% completed 18-month follow-up. There were 14,998 episodes of diarrheal disease over 4,200 child-years (3.51 episodes/child-year, 95%CI 3.40-3.62. Risk of diarrheal illness during the winter season was 63% lower than the summer season (HR = 0.37, 95%CI 0.35-0.39, P<0.001. Soap for hand washing was available in 72% of households and 11.9% had toilets with septic/canalization. Half of all mothers reported using soap for hand washing. In multivariate analysis diarrheal illness was lower among children born to mothers with post-primary education (aHR = 0.79, 95%CI 0.69-0.91, p = 0.001, from households where maternal hand washing with soap was reported (aHR = 0.83, 95%CI 0.74-0.92, p<0.001 and with improved sanitation facilities (aHR = 0.76, 95%CI 0.63-0.93, p = 0.006. Malnourished children from impoverished households had significantly increased risks for recurrent disease [(aHR = 1.15, 95%CI 1.03-1.29, p = 0.016 and (aHR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.05-1.37, p = 0.006 respectively].Maternal hand washing and improved sanitation facilities were protective, and represent important prevention points among public health endeavors. The discrepancy between soap availability and utilization suggests barriers to access and

  19. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan – a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled “the worst country in which to be a mom” in Save the Children’s World’s Mothers’ Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Methods Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi’s phenomenological analysis. Results Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. Conclusion This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and

  20. 4 July 2016 - S. Dalil Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Director-General F. Gianotti. P. Fassnacht present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Dr Suraya Dalil Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  1. Five months of surgery in the multinational field hospital in Afghanistan with an emphasis on oral and maxillofacial injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, J; Monaghan, A M; Williams, M D; Clark, R N W; Gibbons, A J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the workload of theatres in the role 3 Multinational Field Hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan and to identify what period of day most emergency admissions arrived. During the period 05 August 2006 to 21 December 2006, 288 operations were performed on 259 patients and comprised 393 individually quantifiable procedures. 98% of these operations were to treat acute injuries. Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons were involved in 24% of operations. 63% of procedures done at these operations involved upper or lower limbs, 19% the head and neck and 18% involved the torso. An analysis of emergency admissions in November 2006 showed that most occurred between 18.00 and midnight. Although theatre timetabling made provision for this, whenever possible, elective surgery was scheduled for the following morning when emergency injury admissions were at their lowest.

  2. Rates and predictors of referral for individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, and medications among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Juliette M; Barrera, Terri L; Hernandez, Caitlin; Graham, David P; Teng, Ellen J

    2014-04-01

    This study examined rates of referral for medication, individual psychotherapy, and group psychotherapy within a Veterans Affairs (VA) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specialty mental health clinic. Participants were 388 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who were referred for PTSD treatment following a mental health evaluation required for all new VA enrollees. The majority of the sample was referred for medication (79 %), with comparatively fewer referrals for individual (39 %) or group psychotherapy (24 %). Forty percent of participants were referred for combined medication and psychotherapy. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics were examined to determine whether these variables predicted referral type. Female veterans and those with lower clinician ratings of overall functioning were more likely to be referred for individual therapy. Group psychotherapy referrals were more common in veterans who were older, unemployed, identified as an ethnic minority, and had a comorbid anxiety disorder. There were no significant predictors of medication referral.

  3. InSAR observations of strain accumulation and fault creep along the Chaman Fault system, Pakistan and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Heresh; Amelung, Falk

    2016-08-01

    We use 2004-2011 Envisat synthetic aperture radar imagery and InSAR time series methods to estimate the contemporary rates of strain accumulation in the Chaman Fault system in Pakistan and Afghanistan. At 29 N we find long-term slip rates of 16 ± 2.3 mm/yr for the Ghazaband Fault and of 8 ± 3.1 mm/yr for the Chaman Fault. This makes the Ghazaband Fault one of the most hazardous faults of the plate boundary zone. We further identify a 340 km long segment displaying aseismic surface creep along the Chaman Fault, with maximum surface creep rate of 8.1 ± 2 mm/yr. The observation that the Chaman Fault accommodates only 30% of the relative plate motion between India and Eurasia implies that the remainder is accommodated south and east of the Katawaz block microplate.

  4. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases in the Adult Population of Urban Areas in Kabul City, Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwaja Mir Islam Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-Communicable diseases (NCDs are a major global problem. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of common risk factors for NCDs among the adult population in urban areas of Kabul city, Afghanistan. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted from December 2011 through March 2012 and involved a survey of 1169 respondents, aged 40 years and above. Multistage cluster sampling was used for participant selection, followed by random sampling of the participants. The World Health Organization STEPwise approachfor Surveillance (STEPS was modified and used for this study. Results: The overall prevalence of smoking was 5.1% (14.7% men versus 0.3% women and using mouth snuff was 24.4% in men and 1.3% in women. The prevalence of obesity and hypertension were 19.1% and 45.2 % in men and 37.3% and 46.5% in women. Prevalence of diabetes was 16.1% in men and 12% in women. The overall prevalence of obesity, hypertension and diabetes mellitus was 31.2%, 46% and 13.3%, respectively. On average, subjects consumed 3.37 servings of fruit and 2.96 servings of leafy vegetables per week. Mean walking and sitting hours per week (as proxies for physical activity were 19.4 and 20.5, respectively. A multivariate model demonstrated that age was a significant risk factor for obesity (OR=1.86, diabetes (OR=2/09 and hypertension (OR=4.1. Obesity was significantly associated with sex (OR=1.65. Conclusion: These results highlight the need for interventions to reduce and prevent risk factors of non-communicable diseases in urban areas of Kabul City, Afghanistan.

  5. The Effect of Accessibility on Language Vitality: The Ishkashimi and the Sanglechi Speech Varieties in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Beck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a sociolinguistic assessment of the Ishkashimi and Sanglechi speech varieties based on data collected during a survey conducted between July 21st and July 29th 2007 in the Ishkashim area and the Sanglech valley. The research was carried out under the auspices of the International Assistance Mission, a Non-Government Organization working in Afghanistan. The goal was to determine whether Dari, one of the two national languages, is adequate to be used in literature and primary school education, or whether the Ishkashimi and the Sanglechi people would benefit from language development, including literature development and primary school education in the vernacular. It was important to find out how closely the two speech varieties, Ishkashimi and Sanglechi, are related to determine whether one written form would suffice for both varieties, in case language development is deemed to be necessary. The researchers administered sociolinguistic and village elder questionnaires, elicited word lists, tested mutual intelligibility of Ishkashimi and Sanglechi, and observed and asked about bilingualism in Dari. In this way they aimed to determine the domains of language use, the attitude towards the other speech variety and Dari, to investigate bilingualism in Dari, and intelligibility between Ishkashimi and Sanglechi. Sanglechi was found to be unintelligible to the Ishkashimi speakers. However, Ishkashimi is more intelligible to Sanglechi speakers. The Ishkashimi speak Dari and their vernacular at home and in the community; in all other domains they primarily speak Dari. All Sanglechi speak only their vernacular in their homes and in the community. They speak Dari and some Sanglechi with guests, when travelling outside the area, with government officials, in school and in the religious domain. School is the only domain that exposes girls and young women to Dari; older women have virtually no contact with Dari. In both places, people display

  6. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic relationship of wild type 1 poliovirus strains circulating across Pakistan and Afghanistan bordering areas during 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Shahzad; Angez, Mehar; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Sharif, Salmaan; Khurshid, Adnan; Malik, Farzana; Rehman, Lubna; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2014-01-01

    Pakistan and Afghanistan share a long uncontrolled border with extensive population movement on both sides. Wild poliovirus transmission has never been interrupted in this block due to war against terrorism, poor public health infrastructure, misconceptions about polio vaccines and inadequate immunization activities. All these issues complicate the eradication operations and reinforce the complexity of wiping out poliomyelitis from this region. This study illustrates the origins and routes of cross-border wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) transmission during 2010-2012 between Pakistan and Afghanistan. Sequence analyses were conducted based on complete VP1 capsid protein sequences for WPV1 study strains to determine the origin of poliovirus genetic lineages and their evolutionary relationships. Phylogenetic tree was constructed from VP1 gene sequences applying Maximum Likelihood method using Kimura 2- parameter model in MEGA program v 5.0. A total of 72 (14.3%) out of 502 wild-type 1 polioviruses were found circulating in border areas of both countries during 2010-2012. Molecular phylogenetic analysis classified these strains in to two sub-genotypes with four clusters and 18 lineages. Genetic data confirmed that the most of WPV1 lineages (12; 66.6%) were transmitted from Pakistan to Afghanistan. However, the genetic diversity was significantly reduced during 2012 as most of the lineages were completely eliminated. In conclusion, Pakistan-Afghanistan block has emerged as a single poliovirus reservoir sharing the multiple poliovirus lineages due to uncontrolled movement of people across the borders between two countries. If it is neglected, it can jeopardize the extensive global efforts done so-far to eradicate the poliovirus infection. Our data will be helpful to devise the preventive strategies for effective control of wild poliovirus transmission in this region.

  7. This Afghanistan War in the Light of America’s Post Vietnam Military Culture: The Logic of Asymmetrical Death and Commemoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Meigs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article, Mark Meigs explique les ressorts profonds des choix stratégiques américains dans la conduite de la guerre en Afghanistan. Il montre en particulier comment ceux-ci sont basés sur l'expérience américaine au Vietnam, qui a conduit à une profonde restructuration de la doctrine, et font l'originalité de la culture militaire américaine.

  8. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Danish Soldiers 2.5 Years after Military Deployment in Afghanistan: The Role of Personality Traits as Predisposing Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) implicates research regarding factors besides the preceding traumatic event. This study investigated the influence of predisposing personality traits on development of PTSD in a group of Danish Soldiers deployed to Afghanistan (N = 445). Using a prospective design data was collected using questionnaires including the NEO Five Factor Inventory and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. The results showed a PTSD-prevale...

  9. Afghan Customs: U.S. Programs Have Had Some Successes, but Challenges Will Limit Customs Revenue as a Sustainable Source of Income for Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    officials, border crossings needed for the retrograde of U.S. military equipment from Afghanistan are the most important crossings; however, as a result...Target Result Target Result Target Result Value of export sales increased by project-supported firms TAFA II N/A Not reported 0 5... firms to be included in specific activities. In the end, these firms were willing to share the value of resulting export sales, but not the size of

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-e-pur-Chaman (422) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-e-pur-Chaman (422) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Geologic map of Kundelan ore deposits and prospects, Zabul Province, Afghanistan; modified from the 1971 original map compilations of K.I. Litvinenko and others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Robert D.; Peters, Stephen G.; Stettner, Will R.; Masonic, Linda M.; Moran, Thomas W.

    2015-10-26

    This map and cross sections are redrafted modified versions of the Geological map of the Kundelan ore deposit area, scale 1:10,000 (graphical supplement no. 18) and the Geological map of the Kundelan deposits, scale 1:2,000 (graphical supplement no. 3) both contained in an unpublished Soviet report by Litvinenko and others (1971) (report no. 0540). The unpublished Soviet report was prepared in cooperation with the Ministry of Mines and Industries of the Royal Government of Afghanistan in Kabul during 1971. This redrafted map and cross sections illustrate the geology of the main Kundelan copper-gold skarn deposit, located within the Kundelan copper and gold area of interest (AOI), Zabul Province, Afghanistan. Areas of interest (AOIs) of non-fuel mineral resources within Afghanistan were first described and defined by Peters and others (2007) and later by the work of Peters and others (2011a). The location of the main Kundelan copper-gold skarn deposit (area of this map) and the Kundelan copper and gold AOI is shown on the index map provided on this map sheet.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3260, Dasht-e-Chah-e-Mazar (419) and Anar Darah (420) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chishti Sharif (410) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3564, Jowand (405) and Gurziwan (406) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3266, Uruzgan (519) and Moqur (520) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3164, Lashkar Gah (605) and Kandahar (606) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3264, Naw Zad-Musa Qala (423) and Dihrawud (424) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3570, Tagab-e-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3562, Khawja-Jir (403) and Murghab (404) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3466, La`l wa Sar Jangal (507) and Bamyan (508) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3266, Uruzgan (519) and Moqur (520) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3362, Shindand (415) and Tulak (416) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3566, Sangcharak (501) and Sayghan-o-Kamard (502) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other material

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3670, Jurm-Kishim (223) and Zebak (224) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3562, Khawja-Jir (403) and Murghab (404) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3568, Pul-e Khumri (503) and Charikar (504) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3268, Khayr Kot (521) and Urgun (522) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral Surface Materials Map of Quadrangle 3268, Khayr Kot (521) and Urgun (522) Quadrangles, Afghanistan, Showing Iron-bearing Minerals and Other Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3468, Chak-e Wardak-Siyahgird (509) and Kabul (510) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3564, Jowand (405) and Gurziwan (406) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3164, Lashkar Gah (605) and Kandahar (606) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3362, Shindand (415) and Tulak (416) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3568, Pul-e Khumri (503) and Charikar (504) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3670, Jurm-Kishim (223) and Zebak (224) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3470, Jalalabad (511) and Chaghasaray (512) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3770, Faizabad (217) and Parkhaw (218) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3368, Ghazni (515) and Gardez (516) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3364, Pasaband (417) and Markaz-e Kajiran (418) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3770, Faizabad (217) and Parkhaw (218) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chishti Sharif (410) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3368, Ghazni (515) and Gardez (516) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3470, Jalalabad (511) and Chaghasaray (512) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3466, La`l wa Sar Jangal (507) and Bamyan (508) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Self-Compassion as a prospective predictor of PTSD symptom severity among trauma-exposed U.S. Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Regina; Meyer, Eric C; Kimbrel, Nathan A; DeBeer, Bryann B; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Morissette, Sandra B

    2015-04-01

    U.S. combat veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have elevated rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to the general population. Self-compassion, characterized by self-kindness, a sense of common humanity when faced with suffering, and mindful awareness of suffering, is a potentially modifiable factor implicated in the development and maintenance of PTSD. We examined the concurrent and prospective relationship between self-compassion and PTSD symptom severity after accounting for level of combat exposure and baseline PTSD severity in 115 Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans exposed to 1 or more traumatic events during deployment. PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV (CAPS-IV) at baseline and 12 months (n =101). Self-compassion and combat exposure were assessed at baseline via self-report. Self-compassion was associated with baseline PTSD symptoms after accounting for combat exposure (β = -.59; p self-compassion may be beneficial for treating chronic PTSD symptoms among some Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3264, Naw Zad-Musa Qala (423) and Dihrawud (424) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3364, Pasaband (417) and Markaz-e Kajiran (418) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral Surface Materials Map of Quadrangle 3566, Sangcharak (501) and Sayghan-o-Kamard (502) Quadrangles, Afghanistan, Showing Carbonates, Phyllosilicates, Sulfates, Altered Minerals, and Other Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3468, Chak-e Wardak-Siyahgird (509) and Kabul (510) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3570, Tagab-e-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. A summary of data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at Dasht-e-Nawar, Afghanistan, in support of lithium exploration, June-September 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillings, Lisa L.; Mack, Thomas J.; Chornack, Michael P.; Kalaly, Siddiq S.; Ahmadi, M. Idrees; Akbar, A. Qasim

    2015-01-01

    The playa of the Dasht-e-Nawar basin, east-central Afghanistan, has historically been investigated for potential evaporate mineral deposits. In 2014, the U.S. Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations contracted Centar American and SRK Consulting, Inc. to assess a potential lithium (Li) brine resource, conduct a basin gravity survey, and collect subsurface brines and sediments. The U.S. Geological Survey collaborated with this effort by providing analysis of Landsat imagery prior to, and during, field data collection; measurements of specific gravity of sediment and rock samples; oversight of passive seismic data collection and subsequent analysis; and an independent analysis of the chemistry and mineralogy of the subsurface samples. The Afghanistan Geological Survey collaborated by providing lithologic descriptions of subsurface sediment cores. This report presents the data collected and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey from June–September 2014, and the lithologic descriptions of sediment cores collected by the Afghanistan Geological Survey.

  20. Counting Lives in a Theater of Terror - an Analysis of Media-oriented Hostage Takings in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Tinnes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes key findings of a quantitative and qualitative analysis of media-oriented hostage takings involving local people and foreigners in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia during a five-year period (01-01-2004 to 12-31-2008. Based on a long-term tracking of Islamist online publications, the chosen approach did not only allow to identify static values, but also granted insights into developments over time. Characteristic patterns regarding responsible organizations, nationalities of victims, distribution channels for hostage media, etc. could in this way be identified.  The kidnappers' organizational affiliation turned out to be the most significant variable. It decisively affected other factors like number of abductions, likelihood of fatal outcome or duration of a kidnapping. As a consequence, the highest attention should be given to  this parameter when dealing with hostage situations. Another key finding is that insurgents have been increasingly refraining from broadcasting visual representations of extreme violence. This article is based on the German-language dissertation J. Tinnes. “Internetnutzung islamistischer Terror- und Insurgentengruppen unter besonderer Berücksichtigung von medialen Geiselnahmen im Irak, Afghanistan, Pakistan und Saudi-Arabien” -  in English: “Internet Usage of Islamist Terrorist and Insurgent Groups with Special Regard for Media-oriented Hostage Takings in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia”.[1] In the following I shall summarize key findings in order to make them accessible to non-German speaking readers.

  1. Informing education policy in Afghanistan: Using design of experiments and data envelopment analysis to provide transparency in complex simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, Benjamin

    Education planning provides the policy maker and the decision maker a logical framework in which to develop and implement education policy. At the international level, education planning is often confounded by both internal and external complexities, making the development of education policy difficult. This research presents a discrete event simulation in which individual students and teachers flow through the system across a variable time horizon. This simulation is then used with advancements in design of experiments, multivariate statistical analysis, and data envelopment analysis, to provide a methodology designed to assist the international education planning community. We propose that this methodology will provide the education planner with insights into the complexity of the education system, the effects of both endogenous and exogenous factors upon the system, and the implications of policies as they pertain to potential futures of the system. We do this recognizing that there are multiple actors and stochastic events in play, which although cannot be accurately forecasted, must be accounted for within the education model. To both test the implementation and usefulness of such a model and to prove its relevance, we chose the Afghan education system as the focal point of this research. The Afghan education system is a complex, real world system with competing actors, dynamic requirements, and ambiguous states. At the time of this writing, Afghanistan is at a pivotal point as a nation, and has been the recipient of a tremendous amount of international support and attention. Finally, Afghanistan is a fragile state, and the proliferation of the current disparity in education across gender, districts, and ethnicity could provide the catalyst to drive the country into hostility. In order to prevent the failure of the current government, it is essential that the education system is able to meet the demands of the Afghan people. This work provides insights into

  2. Quality of caesarean delivery services and documentation in first-line referral facilities in Afghanistan: a chart review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Young-Mi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing appropriate use and documentation of caesarean section (CS has the potential to decrease maternal and perinatal mortality in settings with low CS rates. We analyzed data collected as part of a comprehensive needs assessment of emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC facilities in Afghanistan to gain a greater understanding of the clinical indications, timeliness, and outcomes of CS deliveries. Methods Records were reviewed at 78 government health facilities expected to function as EmONC providers that were located in secure areas of the country. Information was collected on the three most recent CS deliveries in the preceding 12 months at facilities with at least one CS delivery in the preceding three months. After excluding 16 facilities with no recent CS deliveries, the sample includes 173 CS deliveries at 62 facilities. Results No CS deliveries were performed in the previous three months at 21% of facilities surveyed; all of these were lower-level facilities. Most CS deliveries (88% were classified as emergencies, and only 12% were referrals from another facility. General anesthesia was used in 62% of cases, and spinal or epidural anesthesia in 34%. Only 28% of cases were managed with a partograph. Surgery began less than one hour after the decision for a CS delivery in just 30% of emergency cases. Among the 173 cases, 27 maternal deaths, 28 stillbirths, and 3 early neonatal deaths were documented. In cases of maternal and fetal death, the most common indications for CS delivery were placenta praevia or abruption and malpresentation. In 62% of maternal deaths, the fetus was stillborn or died shortly after birth. In 48% of stillbirths, the fetus had a normal heart rate at the last check. Information on partograph use was missing in 38% of cases, information on parity missing in 23% of cases and indications for cesareans missing in 9%. Conclusions Timely referral within and to EmONC facilities would decrease

  3. First cases of severe congenital factor XIII deficiency in Southwestern Afghanistan in the vicinity of southeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Dorgalaleh, Akbar; Bamedi, Taregh; Tavakol, Khanagha; Tabibian, Shadi; Naderi, Majid; Alizadeh, Shaban; Varmaghani, Bijan; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Rahimizadeh, Aziz; Ebrahimi, Sharif

    2015-12-01

    Factor XIII deficiency (FXIIID) is an extremely rare bleeding disorder with the highest global incidence in southeast of Iran. Southwestern Afghanistan (Nimruz Province) is located near the border with Iran in the vicinity of Sistan and Baluchestan Province in southeast Iran, and there seems to be a high prevalence of FXIIID in Nimruz. Thus, this cross-sectional study was designed to assess the prevalence of FXIIID, molecular basis as well as clinical manifestations of FXIIID in Southwestern Afghanistan. During the course of the study, all patients suspected of FXIIID were clinically examined and assessed by routine coagulation tests, including bleeding time, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, as well as platelet count and clot solubility test. Patients with normal routine coagulation tests, but abnormal clot solubility test, underwent further investigations by FXIII activity, as well as molecular analysis for FXIII-A gene mutation (Trp187Arg) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism that confirmed by sequencing. Patients with confirmed FXIIID deficiency were registered to receive prophylaxis treatment. All data including demographic information, clinical manifestations, as well as therapeutic response and type and duration of treatment, were recorded, and the data were analyzed by SPSS software. In this cross-sectional study, we found five patients with abnormal clot solubility test, among whom two patients abandoned the study, whereas three patients remained for a more precise study. All the patients were residents of Zaranj city, the capital of Nimruz Province. All these patients had undetectable activity of FXIII, which indicates a severe deficiency. Molecular analysis of patients showed mutation of Trp187Arg in all of them. Hematoma was the most common clinical presentation leading to diagnosis of FXIIID in these patients (100%). Epistaxis (67%), gum bleeding (33%), and hematuria (33%) were other recurrent clinical presentations of

  4. Difficulties leaving home: a cross-sectional study of delays in seeking emergency obstetric care in Herat, Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Atsumi; Borchert, Matthias; Niksear, Homa; Alkozai, Ahmad Shah; Cox, Jonathan; Gardiner, Julian; Osmani, Khadija Ruina; Filippi, Véronique

    2011-10-01

    This study used an analytical cross-sectional design to identify risk factors associated with delays in care-seeking among women admitted in life-threatening conditions to a maternity hospital in Herat, Afghanistan, from February 2007 to January 2008. Disease-specific criteria of 'near-miss' were used to identify women in life-threatening conditions. Among 472 eligible women and their husbands, 411 paired interviews were conducted, and information on socio-demographic factors; the woman's status and social resources; the husband's social networks; health care accessibility and utilisation; care-seeking costs; and community characteristics were obtained. Decision and departure delays were assessed quantitatively from reported timings of symptom recognition, care-seeking decision, and departure for health facilities. Censored normal regression analyses suggest that although determinants of decision delay were influenced by the nature and symptoms of complications, uptake of antenatal care (ANC) and the birth plan reduced decision delay at the time of the obstetric emergency. Access to care and social networks reduced departure delay. Programmatic efforts may be directed towards exploiting the roles of ANC and social resources in facilitating access to emergency obstetric care.

  5. Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Andra Teten; Sherman, Michelle D; Bowling, Ursula; Townsend, Bradford J

    2016-03-01

    The current study has three aims: (1) to describe the frequency, gender differences, and agreement in couples' reports of male-to-female and female-to-male intimate partner violence (IPV) reported by male veterans and their female partners who were seeking couples therapy; (2) to describe the pattern of violence reported by these couples (e.g., one-sided, mutual) and determine if frequency of violence varied based on patterns; and (3) to examine whether frequency of violence or pattern of violence were associated with veteran diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One hundred heterosexual couples (male Iraq/Afghanistan veteran, female civilian) seeking couples therapy at a Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic completed self-report measures of violence in their relationship. Almost all couples reported verbal aggression. Men reported perpetrating more frequent sexual coercion, and women reported perpetrating more frequent physical aggression. Correspondence in partners' reports of violence varied based on type of violence from high correspondence on verbal aggression to low correspondence on sexual coercion. Three patterns of violence were identified: verbally aggressive (n = 45), one-sided physically aggressive (n = 27), and mutually physically aggressive (n = 26). Mutually physically aggressive couples generally reported the most frequent violence. Frequency and pattern of violence were not associated with veteran diagnosis of PTSD. Findings underscore the need for clinicians to assess both partners for violence perpetration and the need for effective prevention strategies and treatments for IPV among veterans.

  6. Randomized Controlled Trial of Online Expressive Writing to Address Readjustment Difficulties Among U.S. Afghanistan and Iraq War Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Frazier, Patricia A; Pennebaker, James W; Orazem, Robert J; Schnurr, Paula P; Murdoch, Maureen; Carlson, Kathleen F; Gravely, Amy; Litz, Brett T

    2015-10-01

    We examined the efficacy of a brief, accessible, nonstigmatizing online intervention-writing expressively about transitioning to civilian life. U.S. Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans with self-reported reintegration difficulty (N = 1,292, 39.3% female, M = 36.87, SD = 9.78 years) were randomly assigned to expressive writing (n = 508), factual control writing (n = 507), or no writing (n = 277). Using intention to treat, generalized linear mixed models demonstrated that 6-months postintervention, veterans who wrote expressively experienced greater reductions in physical complaints, anger, and distress compared with veterans who wrote factually (ds = 0.13 to 0.20; ps reintegration difficulty compared with veterans who did not write at all (ds = 0.22 to 0.35; ps ≤ .001). Veterans who wrote expressively also experienced greater improvement in social support compared to those who did not write (d = 0.17). Relative to both control conditions, expressive writing did not lead to improved life satisfaction. Secondary analyses also found beneficial effects of expressive writing on clinically significant distress, PTSD screening, and employment status. Online expressive writing holds promise for improving health and functioning among veterans experiencing reintegration difficulty, albeit with small effect sizes.

  7. Mindfulness, Self-Compassion, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and Functional Disability in U.S. Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Katherine A; Meyer, Eric C; Neff, Kristin D; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Morissette, Sandra B

    2015-10-01

    Mindfulness and self-compassion are overlapping, but distinct constructs that characterize how people relate to emotional distress. Both are associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and may be related to functional disability. Although self-compassion includes mindful awareness of emotional distress, it is a broader construct that also includes being kind and supportive to oneself and viewing suffering as part of the shared human experience--a potentially powerful way of dealing with distressing situations. We examined the association of mindfulness and self-compassion with PTSD symptom severity and functional disability in 115 trauma-exposed U.S. Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans. Mindfulness and self-compassion were each uniquely, negatively associated with PTSD symptom severity. After accounting for mindfulness, self-compassion accounted for unique variance in PTSD symptom severity (f(2) = .25; medium ES). After accounting for PTSD symptom severity, mindfulness and self-compassion were each uniquely negatively associated with functional disability. The combined association of mindfulness and self-compassion with disability over and above PTSD was large (f(2) = .41). After accounting for mindfulness, self-compassion accounted for unique variance in disability (f(2) = .13; small ES). These findings suggest that interventions aimed at increasing mindfulness and self-compassion could potentially decrease functional disability in returning veterans with PTSD symptoms.

  8. Molecular characterization of serotype Asia-1 foot-and-mouth disease viruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan; emergence of a new genetic Group and evidence for a novel recombinant virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal, Syed Muhammad; Ferrari, Giancarlo; Ahmed, Safia;

    2011-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The FMD virus serotypes O, A and Asia-1 are responsible for the outbreaks in these countries. Diverse strains of FMDV, even within the same serotype, co-circulate. Characterization of the viruses in circulation can facilitate...... appropriate vaccine selection and tracing of outbreaks.The present study characterized foot-and-mouth disease serotype Asia-1 viruses circulating in Pakistan and Afghanistan during the period 1998–2009. Phylogenetic analysis of FMDV type Asia-1 revealed that three different genetic Groups of serotype Asia-1...

  9. Non-suicidal self-injury as a predictor of active and passive suicidal ideation among Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrel, Nathan A; Gratz, Kim L; Tull, Matthew T; Morissette, Sandra B; Meyer, Eric C; DeBeer, Bryann B; Silvia, Paul J; Calhoun, Patrick C; Beckham, Jean C

    2015-06-30

    The present study examined the association between lifetime non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and current suicidal ideation among Iraq/Afghanistan veterans. NSSI was positively associated with passive, active, and concurrent active-passive suicidal ideation at the bivariate level. NSSI remained a predictor of active, OR=5.15, and concurrent active-passive suicidal ideation, OR=7.01, when other risk factors were considered. These findings suggest that NSSI may be a particularly useful marker of active suicidal ideation among veterans.

  10. La guerre en Afghanistan : portée, forces et faiblesses du concept de culture de guerre appliqué aux guerres modernes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aycha Fleury

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available L'objectif de cet article est d’analyser la portée, les forces et les faiblesses du concept de « culture de guerre » appliqué à la guerre en Afghanistan. La théorie constructiviste, utilisée en sciences sociales, permet de comprendre les constructions sociales que sous-tend une culture de guerre ainsi que les quatre dimensions autour desquelles elle s’articule : violence, haine, consentement à la guerre et ferveur religieuse. La guerre en Afghanistan est un nouveau type d'affrontement, symptomatique des changements qui surviennent dans les stratégies de maintien de la paix. Le concept de culture de guerre permet de comprendre certains aspects bien spécifiques des problèmes qui entourent ces nouvelles guerres. Le conflit en Afghanistan nous montre cependant les limites de cette approche, notamment le manque d’un facteur « temporel » et l'absence de prise en considération de la construction historique de la guerre. Le concept de culture de guerre ne permet donc pas de comprendre et d'analyser toute la complexité d’un conflit comme celui qui se déroule en Afghanistan, mais il permet de faire émerger de nouvelles perspectives et remet en question certains faits tenus pour acquis.The aim of this article is to analyze the range, the strengths and weaknesses of the concept of «war culture» as it is applied to the war in Afghanistan. The constructivist theory used in social sciences permits to comprehend the social constructions behind a culture of war and its four dimensions: violence, hatred, consent to warfare and religious zeal. The war in Afghanistan is a new war, typical of changes that occur in peace keeping missions. This concept of «war culture» permits us to comprehend certain quite specific aspects of the problems that surround this new warfare. The conflict in Afghanistan also demonstrates the limits of this approach, notably the lack of a «temporal» factor and the absence of consideration of the

  11. Self reported incidence and morbidity of acute respiratory illness among deployed U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony W Soltis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historically, respiratory infections have had a significant impact on U.S. military missions. Deployed troops are particularly at high risk due to close living conditions, stressful work environments and increased exposure to pathogens. To date, there are limited data available on acute respiratory illness (ARI among troops deployed in support of ongoing military operations, specifically Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF. METHODS: Using self-report data from two sources collected from troops deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and the surrounding region, we analyzed incidence and risk factors for ARI. Military personnel on mid-deployment Rest & Recuperation (R&R or during redeployment were eligible to participate in the voluntary self-report survey. RESULTS: Overall, 39.5% reported having at least one ARI. Of these, 18.5% sought medical care and 33.8% reported having decreased job performance. The rate of self-reported ARI was 15 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the voluntary survey, and 24.7 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the clinic health questionnaire. Negative binomial regression analysis found female sex, Navy branch of service and lack of flush toilets to be independently associated with increased rates of ARI. Deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank were also positively associated with ARI risk. CONCLUSIONS: The overall percentage of deployed military personnel reporting at least one acute respiratory illness decreased since earlier parts of OIF/OEF. However, the reported effect on job performance increased tremendously. The most important factors associated with increased respiratory infection are female sex, Navy branch of service, lack of improved latrine facilities, deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank.

  12. Initiation of pharmacotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder among veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan: a dimensional, symptom cluster approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheck, Robert; Mohamed, Somaia; Pietrzak, Robert; Hoff, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Background The pharmacological treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is extremely challenging, as no specific agent has been developed exclusively to treat this disorder. Thus, there are growing concerns among the public, providers and consumers associated with its use as the efficacy of some agents is still in question. Aims We applied a dimensional and symptom cluster-based approach to better understand how the heterogeneous phenotypic presentation of PTSD may relate to the initiation of pharmacotherapy for PTSD initial episode. Method US veterans who served in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and received an initial PTSD diagnosis at the US Veterans Health Administration between 2008 and 2011 were included in this study. Veterans were followed for 365 days from initial PTSD diagnosis to identify initiation for antidepressants, anxiolytics/sedatives/hypnotics, antipsychotics and prazosin. Multivariable analyses were used to assess the relationship between the severity of unique PTSD symptom clusters and receiving prescriptions from each medication class, as well as the time from diagnosis to first prescription. Results Increased severity of emotional numbing symptoms was independently associated with the prescription of antidepressants, and they were prescribed after a substantially shorter period of time than other medications. Anxiolytics/sedatives/hypnotics prescription was associated with heightened re-experiencing symptoms and sleep difficulties. Antipsychotics were associated with elevated re-experiencing and numbing symptoms and prazosin with reported nightmares. Conclusions Prescribing practices for military-related PTSD appear to follow US VA/DoD clinical guidelines. Results of this study suggest that a novel dimensional and symptom cluster-based approach to classifying the phenotypic presentation of military-related PTSD symptoms may help inform prescribing patterns for PTSD. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The

  13. 北约从阿富汗撤军对中亚地区安全的影响∗%The Impacts of NATO Army Withdrawal from Afghanistan on Central Asian Regional Security

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨恕; 张玉艳

    2014-01-01

    北约从阿富汗撤军和撤军后阿富汗的局势都影响着中亚地区的安全,但它们对中亚各个国家的影响在程度和具体内容上明显不同。面对北约从阿富汗撤军的影响,中亚国家难以通过向阿富汗政府提供有效的军事和政治支持来防范威胁进入,只能更多地向俄罗斯或美国寻求安全保障。与此同时,中亚国家不同的安全战略选择也使北约从阿富汗撤军的影响有所扩大。%NATO army withdrawal from Afghanistan and the Afghanistan situation after the withdrawal will influence Central Asian security, but the influence varies in degree and concrete issues in different countries in this area. Facing the influences, Central Asian countries can only turn to Russia or USA for security guarantee instead of providing effective military and political support to Afghanistan to keep away threats. Meanwhile, their choices of different security strategies help enlarge the influence of NATO army withdrawal from Afghanistan.

  14. Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, Yemen Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in 17 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, and…

  15. Identification of mineral resources in Afghanistan-Detecting and mapping resource anomalies in prioritized areas using geophysical and remote sensing (ASTER and HyMap) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    : King, Trude V. V.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations (TFBSO) natural resources revitalization activities in Afghanistan (Peters and others, 2011), three new datasets have been collected, compiled, and analyzed. These data have been used to more fully evaluate the areas of interest (AOIs; fig. 1 ) where, on the basis of previous U.S.S.R. and Afghanistan studies, the opportunity for early economic development of a number of different mineral, commodity, and deposit types had been identified (Peters and others, 2007; Peters and others, 2011). The new data compilations include (1) regional magnetic and gravity data for use in the characterization of subsurface composition and structure (Sweeney and others, 2006a,b; Ashan and others, 2007; Sweeney and others, 2007; Ashan and others, 2008; Shenwary and others, 2011), (2) Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data to identify and evaluate surficial alteration patterns related to industrial minerals and other selected targets, and (3) HyMap imaging spectrometer data for characterization and mapping of surficial mineralogy (Cocks and others, 1998; Kokaly and others, 2008; Peters and others, 2011). These datasets have served as fundamental building blocks for the resource evaluation by Peters and others (2011).

  16. Reporting Military Sexual Trauma: A Mixed-Methods Study of Women Veterans' Experiences Who Served From World War II to the War in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kristina B; Mills, Peter D

    2016-08-01

    Since 2004, there has been increased effort to reduce military sexual trauma (MST) in the U.S. military. Although MST covers a range of inappropriate behaviors, the majority of research, treatment, and outreach are focused on sexual assault and the experiences of individuals serving in Afghanistan and Iraq. During a study on veterans' involvement in a national peace organization, participants were asked about their military experiences. Veterans served from World War II to current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Emerging out of the responses were descriptions of women's experiences with MST, barriers to reporting incidents of sexual misconduct and sexual assault, and the challenges they faced when seeking care. Data were gathered using anonymous questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Out of 52 female veterans, the majority (90%) was subjected to at least one form of MST, and 15% (8) attempted to report the incident(s). Over half of the assailants were of a higher rank than the survivors. The majority of veterans remained silent due to lack of options to report, the status of perpetrators, and fear of retaliation. These data provide a glimpse into the challenges many women veterans faced when seeking assistance reporting incidents or obtaining health care for their MST.

  17. Understanding sequelae of injury mechanisms and mild traumatic brain injury incurred during the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan: persistent postconcussive symptoms and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Aaron I; Braver, Elisa R; Kang, Han K

    2008-06-15

    A cross-sectional study of military personnel following deployment to conflicts in Iraq or Afghanistan ascertained histories of combat theater injury mechanisms and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and current prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and postconcussive symptoms. Associations among injuries, PTSD, and postconcussive symptoms were explored. In February 2005, a postal survey was sent to Iraq/Afghanistan veterans who had left combat theaters by September 2004 and lived in Maryland; Washington, DC; northern Virginia; and eastern West Virginia. Immediate neurologic symptoms postinjury were used to identify mild TBI. Adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed by using Poisson regression. About 12% of 2,235 respondents reported a history consistent with mild TBI, and 11% screened positive for PTSD. Mild TBI history was common among veterans injured by bullets/shrapnel, blasts, motor vehicle crashes, air/water transport, and falls. Factors associated with PTSD included reporting multiple injury mechanisms (prevalence ratio = 3.71 for three or more mechanisms, 95% confidence interval: 2.23, 6.19) and combat mild TBI (prevalence ratio = 2.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.72, 3.28). The strongest factor associated with postconcussive symptoms was PTSD, even after overlapping symptoms were removed from the PTSD score (prevalence ratio = 3.79, 95% confidence interval: 2.57, 5.59).

  18. 'This place isn't worth the left boot of one of our boys': Geopolitics, militarism and memoirs of the Afghanistan war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Rachel; Jenkings, K Neil

    2012-11-01

    This paper argues for the continued significance of the text as a source and focus in critical geopolitical inquiry. It establishes the utility of the military memoir in explorations of popular contemporary geopolitical imaginaries, and considers the memoir as a vector of militarism. The paper examines the memoirs written by military personnel about service in Afghanistan with the British armed forces, specifically about deployments to Helmand province between 2006 and 2012. The paper explores how Afghanistan is scripted through these texts, focussing on the explanations for deployment articulated by their authors, on the representations they contain and promote about other combatants and about civilian non-combatants, and the constitution and expression of danger in the spaces and places of military action which these texts construct and convey. The paper then turns to consider how a reading of the military memoir with reference to the genre of testimonio might extend and inform our understanding and use of these texts as a source for exploring popular geopolitics and militarism.

  19. Organic petrology of subbituminous carbonaceous shale samples from Chalaw, Kabul Province, Afghanistan: Considerations for paleoenvironment and energy resource potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, P.C.; SanFilipo, J.R.; Azizi, G.P.; Davis, P.A.; Starratt, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    Neogene (?) subbituminous carbonaceous shale deposits from Chalaw, Afghanistan, were investigated through organic petrology techniques and standard coal analyses to determine paleoenvironment and potential for resource utilization. The Chalaw deposit, approximately 30. km southeast of Kabul, currently is exploited for brick making and domestic heating and cooking. Three multiple-bench channel samples of the mined bed at Chalaw were collected and evaluated. The presence of significant huminite (ranging from 0.2 to 59.0. vol.%, mineral-inclusive basis) is suggestive of a terrestrial lignin-rich precursor plant material. Measured reflectance values of 0.38-0.55% indicate subbituminous rank. This rank suggests burial depths of approximately 1500. m and maximum temperatures of approximately 50. ??C. Structured liptinite macerals generally are absent except for some fluorescing morphologies interpreted to be poorly-preserved root cork suberinite. Sponge spicule bioliths including gemmoscleres and megascleres are common. These petrographic observations, in addition to high mineral matter content (33 to >95 vol%), medium to high sulfur content (2.1-11.5. wt.%, dry basis; db), and the presence of common gastropod? shell fragments and an aragonite-needle chalk bed are consistent with, but not directly indicative of, a marginal marine or estuarine mangrove depositional environment. However, additional data are necessary to confirm this hypothesis and deposition in a freshwater environment cannot be ruled out at this time.Commercial-scale development and utilization of the Chalaw deposit as a thermal fuel resource may be possible using a fluidized bed combustion system which could accept the low-quality mine product currently produced. Samples examined herein contain high-ash yield (45-90. wt.%, db), high total moisture content (17-39. wt.%), low calorific value (980-6860. Btu/lb, m,mmf), and have poor agglomerating properties (FSI=0), consistent with fuels utilized in

  20. The conservation of the Shahr-e-Zohak archaeological site (central Afghanistan): Geomorphological processes and ecosystem-based mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margottini, Claudio; Fidolini, Francesco; Iadanza, Carla; Trigila, Alessandro; Ubelmann, Yves

    2015-06-01

    The archaeological remains of Shahr-e Zohak are part of the Bamiyan valley, which has been recognized by UNESCO as World Heritage and is famous for hosting the main heritage of the Buddhist culture in Afghanistan. The site comprises the remains of the Zohak fortress, which is placed on a steep hill at the confluence of the Bamiyan and Kalu rivers. The fortress is protected by ramparts, built along the steep cliffs bounding the site, which are equipped with several watchtowers. The citadel is protected by three more orders of walls and is located on the topmost part of the hill. All the structures are made of mudbricks placed on top of stony foundations. Due to the prolonged exposure to weathering, the lack of conservation measures and the misuse during war periods, many constructions collapsed or are prone to collapse. A new topography (1 m contour lines) of the site was produced using drone-derived 3D photogrammetry combined with GPS data. Then a detailed geomorphological survey of the whole site was carried out in order to identify the main geomorphic processes acting on the land surface and structures. GIS analysis allowed defining the internal drainage system of the studied area. The site is affected by incised erosional phenomena on the eastern side, while the hilltop is mainly hit by diffuse erosion and soil mobilization during snowmelt. Monument deterioration is coupled with the lack of an adequate drainage system to collect runoff. Ramparts located on the steep hillslopes are severely affected by gully erosion and siphoning, which cause depressions infilled by eroded and weathered building material. The access path is locally eroded or buried by debris cones. The western margin of the plateau has been rapidly retreating due to collapses, while the citadel is in danger due to diffuse or gully erosional processes developed on all its sides. A mitigation strategy with low environmental impact (ecosystem-based approach) is proposed in order to adopt sustainable

  1. Organic petrology of subbituminous carbonaceous shale samples from Chalaw, Kabul Province, Afghanistan: Considerations for paleoenvironment and energy resource potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackley, Paul C.; SanFilipo, John R. [U.S. Geological Survey, MS 956 National Center, Reston VA, 20192 (United States); Azizi, Gul Pacha [Afghanistan Geological Survey, Macroryan Square, Kabul (Afghanistan); Davis, Philip A. [U.S. Geological Survey, 520 N. Park Avenue, Tucson AZ, 85719 (United States); Starratt, Scott W. [U.S. Geological Survey, MS 910, 345 Middlefield Rd, Menlo Park CA, 94025 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Neogene (?) subbituminous carbonaceous shale deposits from Chalaw, Afghanistan, were investigated through organic petrology techniques and standard coal analyses to determine paleoenvironment and potential for resource utilization. The Chalaw deposit, approximately 30 km southeast of Kabul, currently is exploited for brick making and domestic heating and cooking. Three multiple-bench channel samples of the mined bed at Chalaw were collected and evaluated. The presence of significant huminite (ranging from 0.2 to 59.0 vol.%, mineral-inclusive basis) is suggestive of a terrestrial lignin-rich precursor plant material. Measured reflectance values of 0.38-0.55% indicate subbituminous rank. This rank suggests burial depths of approximately 1500 m and maximum temperatures of approximately 50 C. Structured liptinite macerals generally are absent except for some fluorescing morphologies interpreted to be poorly-preserved root cork suberinite. Sponge spicule bioliths including gemmoscleres and megascleres are common. These petrographic observations, in addition to high mineral matter content (33 to > 95 vol.%), medium to high sulfur content (2.1-11.5 wt.%, dry basis; db), and the presence of common gastropod? shell fragments and an aragonite-needle chalk bed are consistent with, but not directly indicative of, a marginal marine or estuarine mangrove depositional environment. However, additional data are necessary to confirm this hypothesis and deposition in a freshwater environment cannot be ruled out at this time. Commercial-scale development and utilization of the Chalaw deposit as a thermal fuel resource may be possible using a fluidized bed combustion system which could accept the low-quality mine product currently produced. Samples examined herein contain high-ash yield (45-90 wt.%, db), high total moisture content (17-39 wt.%), low calorific value (980-6860 Btu/lb, m,mmf), and have poor agglomerating properties (FSI = 0), consistent with fuels utilized in fluidized

  2. Do soldiers seek more mental health care after deployment? Analysis of mental health consultations in the Netherlands Armed Forces following deployment to Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth (Liesbeth M. Taal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Military deployment to combat zones puts military personnel to a number of physical and mental challenges that may adversely affect mental health. Until now, few studies have been performed in Europe on mental health utilization after military deployment. Objective: We compared the incidence of mental health consultations with the Military Mental Health Service (MMHS of military deployed to Afghanistan to that of non-deployed military personnel. Method: We assessed utilization of the MMHS by the full cohort of the Netherlands Armed Forces enlisted between 2008 and 2010 through linkage of mental health and human resource information systems. Results: The total population consisted of 50,508 military (18,233 deployed, 32,275 non-deployed, who accounted for 1,906 new consultations with the MMHS. The follow-up was limited to the first 2 years following deployment. We observed higher mental health care utilization in deployed vs. non-deployed military personnel; hazard ratio (HR, adjusted for sex, military branch and time in service, 1.84 [95% CI 1.61–2.11] in the first and 1.28 [1.09–1.49] in the second year after deployment. An increased risk of adjustment disorders (HR 2.59 [2.02–3.32] and 1.74 [1.30–2.32] and of anxiety disorders (2.22 [1.52–3.25] and 2.28 [1.50–3.45] including posttraumatic stress disorder (5.15 [2.55–10.40] and 5.28 [2.42–11.50], but not of mood disorders (1.33 [0.90–1.97] and 1.11 [0.68–1.82], was observed in deployed personnel in the first- and second-year post-deployment, respectively. Military personnel deployed in a unit with a higher risk of confrontation with potentially traumatic events had a higher HR (2.13 [1.84–2.47] and 1.40 [1.18–1.67]. Conclusions: Though absolute risk was low, in the first and second year following deployment to Afghanistan there was an 80 and 30% higher risk for mental health problems resulting in a consultation with the Dutch MMHS compared to military never

  3. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Danish Soldiers 2.5 Years after Military Deployment in Afghanistan: The Role of Personality Traits as Predisposing Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Hellerup Nielsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD implicates research regarding factors besides the preceding traumatic event. This study investigated the influence of predisposing personality traits on development of PTSD in a group of Danish Soldiers deployed to Afghanistan (N = 445. Using a prospective design data was collected using questionnaires including the NEO Five Factor Inventory and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. The results showed a PTSD-prevalence of 9.2% in the total sample 2.5 years after homecoming. Using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Spearman¡'s rho significant relationships were identified between pre-existing personality traits of neuroticism and agreeableness with development of PTSD symptoms 2.5 years after homecoming, however, a number of additional cofounders were identified.

  4. Copper deposit resource potential and prospecting targets in Afghanistan%阿富汗铜矿资源潜力与找矿方向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高辉; 梅燕雄; 王浩琳; 范世家

    2012-01-01

    Afghanistan is located in the convergence of Ancient India subcontinent and Asia plate, and it is sure to be a preferable regional prospecting area where Tethys - Himalaya metallogenic belt and magmatic arc running through. There are good conditions for mineralization and extremely metal - rich mineral resources in the region. About more than 300 documented copper deposits (occurrences) have been discovered in Afghanistan, which are composed of sediment - hosted, skarn, porphyry and vein -hosted type, including the world - class sedimentary stratabound Aynak deposit. The research indicates that Tethys - Himalaya metallogenic belt has undergone alternative deposition and uplift during the old and new Tethys Ocean's expansion and closure, and two large - scale phases of subduction and collision of tectonic plate as well, and then folded and formed the youngest Mesozoic and Cenozoic Orogenic Belts on Earth. Afghanistan has also undergone a complicated tectonic evolution of long history with regional metallogenic background environment' s conversion from the former Cambrian inner continent to convergent orogenic environment. The pre Neo - proterozoic and Meso - proterozoic ore - sourced terranes and the magma reactivated, and the magmatism and derivative mineralization/process occurred, and the mineralization had the favorable conditions such as the mineralization preferentiality and the best coupling. The porphyry copper deposits and sand shale copper deposits developed broadly in Afghanistan with huge copper resources potential. The sand shale copper deposits and the porphyry copper deposits are significant exploration targets. The skarn copper deposits and vein copper deposits, which developed broadly, are the symbols and favorable zones for deep exploration of porphyry copper/gold deposit.%阿富汗位于远古印度次大陆同亚洲大陆板块碰撞的交汇处,也是全球性成矿带——特提斯—喜马拉雅造山带(岩浆弧)成矿有利区段,金属

  5. Geology and undiscovered resource assessment of the potash-bearing Central Asia Salt Basin, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Afghanistan: Chapter AA in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Jeff; Orris, Greta J.; Dunlap, Pamela; Cocker, Mark D.; Bliss, James D.

    2016-03-23

    Undiscovered potash resources in the Central Asia Salt Basin (CASB) of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Afghanistan were assessed as part of a global mineral resource assessment led by the U.S. Geological Survey. The term “potash” refers to potassium-bearing, water-soluble salts derived from evaporite basins, where seawater dried up and precipitated various salt compounds; the word for the element “potassium” is derived from potash. Potash is produced worldwide at amounts exceeding 30 million metric tons per year, mostly for use in fertilizers. The term “potash” is used by industry to refer to potassium chloride, as well as potassium in sulfate, nitrate, and oxide forms. For the purposes of this assessment, the term “potash” refers to potassium ores and minerals and potash ore grades. Resource and production values are usually expressed by industry in terms of K2O (potassium oxide) or muriate of potash (KCl, potassium chloride).

  6. La violación de los Derechos de la mujer en Afganistán/The violation of the rights of women in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Anguiano (México

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available De acuerdo con su propia cultura, en Afganistán se practican determinadas costumbres que infringen un severo sufrimiento a las mujeres y niñas, al no respetarse la integridad del cuerpo femenino; su sexualidad, dignidad o identidad ni las libertades de movimiento, asociación y expresión. Todos estos aspectos serán vistos en las siguientes líneas. In accordance with their own culture, Afghanistan practice certain customs that infringe a severe suffering to women and girls, to not respect the integrity of the female body; their sexuality, dignity or identity or freedom of movement, association and expression. All these situations are going to be seen in the following lines.

  7. Topographic and Hydrographic GIS Datasets for the Afghanistan Geological Survey and U.S. Geological Survey 2014 Mineral Areas of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, Jessica D.; Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.

    2015-11-18

    Mineral extraction and associated industries play an important role in the Afghan economy, particularly in the “transitional era” of declining foreign aid and withdrawal of foreign troops post 2014. In addition to providing a substantial source of government revenue, other potential benefits of natural resource development include boosted exports, employment opportunities, and strengthened industrialization (Joya, 2012). Continued exploration and investment in these industries has resulted in large economic improvements since 2007, when this series of studies was initiated. At that time, the “Preliminary Non-Fuel Mineral Resource Assessment of Afghanistan” was completed by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and Afghanistan Geological Survey (Peters and others, 2007). The assessment published a series of country-wide datasets, including a digital elevation model (DEM), elevation contours, hydrography, transportation routes, geophysics, and cultural datasets (Peters and others, 2007). It also delineated 20 mineralized areas for further study using a geologic-based methodology. A second data product, “Summaries of Important Areas for Mineral Investment and Production Opportunities of Nonfuel Minerals in Afghanistan,” was released by Peters and others in 2011. This work highlighted geologic, geohydrologic, and hyperspectral studies that were carried out in specific Areas of Interest (AOIs) to assess the location and characteristics of mineral resources. Also included in the 2011 publication is a collection of appendixes and inventories of Geographic Information System (GIS) datasets for each of the 24 identified AOIs. A third data product was released in 2013 (Casey and Chirico, 2013), publishing datasets for five different AOIs, two subareas, and one AOI extension. Each dataset contains vector shapefiles of the AOI boundary, streams, roads, and contours at 25-, 50-, and 100-meter (m) intervals, as well as raster files of the AOI’s DEM and hillshade.

  8. Uranium in well drinking water of Kabul, Afghanistan and its effective, low-cost depuration using Mg-Fe based hydrotalcite-like compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masashi; Azimi, Mohammad Daud; Fayaz, Said Hafizullah; Shah, Muhammad Dawood; Hoque, Md Zahirul; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Ohnuma, Shoko; Ohtsuka, Tomomi; Maeda, Masao; Yoshinaga, Masafumi

    2016-12-01

    Toxic elements in drinking water have great effects on human health. However, there is very limited information about toxic elements in drinking water in Afghanistan. In this study, levels of 10 elements (chromium, nickel, copper, arsenic, cadmium, antimony, barium, mercury, lead and uranium) in 227 well drinking water samples in Kabul, Afghanistan were examined for the first time. Chromium (in 0.9% of the 227 samples), arsenic (7.0%) and uranium (19.4%) exceeded the values in WHO health-based guidelines for drinking-water quality. Maximum chromium, arsenic and uranium levels in the water samples were 1.3-, 10.4- and 17.2-fold higher than the values in the guidelines, respectively. We next focused on uranium, which is the most seriously polluted element among the 10 elements. Mean ± SD (138.0 ± 1.4) of the (238)U/(235)U isotopic ratio in the water samples was in the range of previously reported ratios for natural source uranium. We then examined the effect of our originally developed magnesium (Mg)-iron (Fe)-based hydrotalcite-like compounds (MF-HT) on adsorption for uranium. All of the uranium-polluted well water samples from Kabul (mean ± SD = 190.4 ± 113.9 μg/L; n = 11) could be remediated up to 1.2 ± 1.7 μg/L by 1% weight of our MF-HT within 60 s at very low cost (water from Kabul. Since our depurative is effective for remediation of arsenic as shown in our previous studies, its practical use in Kabul may be encouraged.

  9. Estimated monthly streamflows for selected locations on the Kabul and Logar Rivers, Aynak copper, cobalt, and chromium area of interest, Afghanistan, 1951-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Kevin C.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations, used the stochastic monthly water-balance model and existing climate data to estimate monthly streamflows for 1951–2010 for selected streamgaging stations located within the Aynak copper, cobalt, and chromium area of interest in Afghanistan. The model used physically based, nondeterministic methods to estimate the monthly volumetric water-balance components of a watershed. A comparison of estimated and recorded monthly streamflows for the streamgaging stations Kabul River at Maidan and Kabul River at Tangi-Saidan indicated that the stochastic water-balance model was able to provide satisfactory estimates of monthly streamflows for high-flow months and low-flow months even though withdrawals for irrigation likely occurred. A comparison of estimated and recorded monthly streamflows for the streamgaging stations Logar River at Shekhabad and Logar River at Sangi-Naweshta also indicated that the stochastic water-balance model was able to provide reasonable estimates of monthly streamflows for the high-flow months; however, for the upstream streamgaging station, the model overestimated monthly streamflows during periods when summer irrigation withdrawals likely occurred. Results from the stochastic water-balance model indicate that the model should be able to produce satisfactory estimates of monthly streamflows for locations along the Kabul and Logar Rivers. This information could be used by Afghanistan authorities to make decisions about surface-water resources for the Aynak copper, cobalt, and chromium area of interest.

  10. Organic petrology and geochemistry of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl, north-central Afghanistan: Depositional environment and source rock potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Sanfilipo, John

    2016-01-01

    Organic geochemistry and petrology of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl outcrop samples from Madr village in north-central Afghanistan were characterized via an integrated analytical approach to evaluate depositional environment and source rock potential. Multiple proxies suggest the organic-rich (TOC ∼6 wt.%) bituminous marls are ‘immature’ for oil generation (e.g., vitrinite Ro rock sulfur content is ∼2.3 wt.% whereas sulfur content is ∼5.0–5.6 wt.% in whole rock extracts with high polar components, consistent with extraction from S-rich Type IIs organic matter which could generate hydrocarbons at low thermal maturity. Low Fe-sulfide mineral abundance and comparison of Pr/Ph ratios between saturate and whole extracts suggest limited Fe concentration resulted in sulfurization of organic matter during early diagenesis. From these observations, we infer that a Type IIs kerogen in ‘immature’ bituminous marl at Madr could be generating high sulfur viscous oil which is seeping from outcrop. However, oil-seep samples were not collected for correlation studies. Aluminum-normalized trace element concentrations indicate enrichment of redox sensitive trace elements Mo, U and V and suggest anoxic-euxinic conditions during sediment deposition. The bulk of organic matter observed via optical microscopy is strongly fluorescent amorphous bituminite grading to lamalginite, possibly representing microbial mat facies. Short chain n-alkanes peak at C14–C16 (n-C17/n-C29 > 1) indicating organic input from marine algae and/or bacterial biomass, and sterane/hopane ratios are low (0.12–0.14). Monoaromatic steroids are dominated by C28clearly indicating a marine setting. High gammacerane index values (∼0.9) are consistent with anoxia stratification and may indicate intermittent saline-hypersaline conditions. Stable C isotope ratios also suggest a marine depositional scenario for the Suzak samples, consistent with the presence of marine foraminifera including

  11. Afghanistans Information and Communications Technology Sector: U.S. Agencies Obligated Over $2.6 Billion to the Sector, but the Full Scope of U.S. Efforts is Unknown

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    promote transparency, and improve the business - enabling environment in Afghanistan $3.9 Mobile Moneya Ongoing 2011–2016 Promote the use of mobile ...mainstream use of mobile applications in strategic sectors in the government; funded several local, regional, and international consultancies to...in revenues to the Afghan government in 2013, employs about 130,000 Afghans, and provides mobile phone services to roughly 90 percent of the

  12. Limited Interagency Coordination and Insufficient Controls over U.S. Funds in Afghanistan Hamper U.S. Efforts to Develop the Afghan Financial Sector and Safeguard U.S. Cash

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    via Citibank to either DAB, Alfalah Bank (a Pakistani bank with a Kabul branch), or Afghanistan International Bank (AIB), which then transfers the...partnership was formed between Citibank and AIB in September 2010, which established AIB as the predominant intermediary Afghan commercial bank to transfer...TFBSO has also facilitated the partnership signed between Citibank and AIB. The agreement established AIB as the primary Afghan commercial bank for DOD

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3668 and 3768, Baghlan (221), Taluqan (222), Imam Sahib (215), and Rustaq (216) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3664 and 3764, Char Shengo (123), Shibirghan (124), Jalajin (117), and Kham-Ab (118) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3666 and 3766, Balkh (219), Mazar-e Sharif (220), Qarqin (213), and Hazara Toghai (214) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2962 and 3062, Gawdezereh (615), Galachah (616), Chahar Burjak (609), and Khan Neshin (610) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; King, Trude V.V.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3360 and 3460, Kawir-e Naizar (413), Kohe-Mahmudo-Esmailjan (414), Kol-e Namaksar (407), and Ghoriyan (408) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3666 and 3766, Balkh (219), Mazar-e Sharif (220), Qarqin (213), and Hazara Toghai (214) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3360 and 3460, Kawir-e Naizar (413), Kohe-Mahmudo-Esmailjan (414), Kol-e Namaksar (407), and Ghoriyan (408) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2962 and 3062, Gawdezereh (615), Galachah (616), Chahar Burjak (609), and Khan Neshin (610) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3668 and 3768, Baghlan (221), Taluqan (222), Imam Sahib (215), and Rustaq (216) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3664 and 3764, Char Shengo (123), Shibirghan (124), Jalajin (117), and Kham-Ab (118) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3260, Dasht-e-Chah-e-Mazar (419) and Anar Darah (420) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Afghanistan after NATO Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojor Laviniu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The conclusion of a conflict, called by some American analysts as “America’s Longest War”, after the withdrawal of the majority of NATO military forces, requires a careful analysis of the conditions and security environment that ISAF mission, International Security Afghan Forces, leaves as legacy to the Afghan military forces. The transfer of authority towards a strong government, recognized by most Afghan provinces, and benefiting from the support of national military forces able to cope with terrorist and insurgent threats on its own, are the minimum and necessary conditions leading the country towards a stable and secure environment and towards a sustainable development. Given these realities, any approach on the consequences of the transition towards self-sustainable governance becomes interesting and timely for any military political study. These are the prospects that we propose in our paper.

  5. Subnational Government in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Intelligence Policy Center, see http://www.rand .org/nsrd/about/intel.html or contact the director (contact information is provided on the web page). v...Cultural and Political History, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2010, pp. 8, 277–280; Bernt Glatzer, “Afghanistan—Un État en Profonde ...Religions, Vol. 115, 2001, pp. 63–79. Glatzer, Bernt, “Afghanistan—Un État en Profonde Mutation,” Agriculture and Développement Rural, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2006

  6. Afghanistan / Pakistan Information Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID Info is a dynamic, web-based information management application designed to organize, monitor, and store OAPA Missions? implementation- and performance-level...

  7. Understanding War in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    must lead. We cannot navigate the maze of Afghani- stan’s ethnic politics. Only the Afghan leadership can do that, and it has 109 A Current...with traditional family life as experienced by a progressive Kabuli. The popular novels by Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid

  8. 2014年阿富汗总统选举评析∗%An Analysis of Afghanistan Presidential Election in 2014

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李诗隽; 韩隽

    2015-01-01

    2014年9月21日,加尼击败热门总统候选人阿卜杜拉成功当选第三任阿富汗总统。与2009年总统大选相比,此次选举虽然依旧充斥着舞弊现象,但舞弊行为多为“选票填充”并集中发生在选举官员身上;选举参与率尚未恢复2004年的水平但有所提高;尽管总统竞选团队有一半的少数民族,但此次选举仍然是普什图族之间的较量;选举过程充满波折但较为稳定、完整,塔利班未能破坏选举;美国暗中主导选举进程。总的来说,此次总统大选进程虽几次陷入僵局但最终成立联合政府。然而,后撤军时代,大选后尚未解决的诸多纷争、较低程度的多民族政治参与以及新政府“亲美”的姿态等问题,使得阿富汗的局势充满不确定性。%On September 21, 2014, the Afghanistan presidential election finally came to an end. Through two rounds of voting, Ghani was elected the third Afghan President, while Abdullah, another popular presidential candidate, acted as ”Chief Executive Officer”. Compared with the 2009 presidential election, this election was still full of frauds. However, the frauds were sometimes ”stuffed votes”, more by election officials. Though less than the electoral participation rate of the 2004 presidential election, the rate increased this time. Half of the presidential campaign members were ethnic minorities, but the election was still a battle between Pushtuns. Election process met with deadlocks, but eventually came to be stable and integrated, while the Taliban failed to subvert the election. What’s more, the United States dominated the electoral process secretly. In general, the presidential election process was stalled several times but finally a coalition government formed. However, Afghanistan was still in uncertainty for there were many unresolved disputes, lower political participation and the government’s”pro-American”attitude.

  9. Prevalence of and factors influencing posttraumatic stress disorder among mothers of children under five in Kabul, Afghanistan, after decades of armed conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemat Shafiqullah

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the period following wars and other forms of armed conflict, health and quality of life of mothers is a major concern as they have the closest contact with children. The present study was performed to examine the impact of exposure to events related to armed conflicts on post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD among women raising children, and to identify factors that alleviate the negative consequences of exposure to traumatic events. Methods A structured interview survey was conducted in Kabul Province, Afghanistan, in 2006. The subjects were the mothers of children less than 5 years old randomly selected from 1400 households in Kabul Province, Afghanistan. Symptoms of PTSD were assessed according to the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV. Exposure to traumatic events related to armed conflict, experience of hardship with regard to basic needs, resources that the subjects seek for mental health support, and socioeconomic variables were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between PTSD symptoms and predictor variables. Results The prevalence rate of PTSD among 1172 women participated in this study was 29.8%. The most prevalent symptom was arousal (74.8%, followed by re-experiencing (54.9% and avoidance (33.7%. The prevalence rate of PTSD symptoms among subjects who reported having experienced at least one event related to armed conflict (52.7% was significantly higher than that among those who reported no such experiences (9.6%. Experience of food shortage was independently associated with PTSD. Seeking support for mental health was related to lower prevalence of PTSD symptoms among those who reported no direct experience of events related to armed conflict. However, no such relationship was observed with PTSD symptoms among those who reported having direct experience of events related to armed conflict. Conclusion Direct

  10. An Outbreak of Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease in Western Afghanistan Associated with Exposure to Wheat Flour Contaminated with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizullah Kakar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolizidine alakloids (PAs are known to cause hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD. Outbreaks have occurred in Western Afghanistan since 1974, the latest in February 2008. We conducted an outbreak investigation using a case-control design. Sixty-seven cases of VOD were compared with 199 community controls. Consumption of bread was strongly associated with disease (adjusted odds ratio: 35.8 [95%CI: 7.6–168.2]. Toxic doses of PA were found in plant extracts and in samples of wheat flour taken from the study area. Compared to wheat flour there was 1000 times less PA in milk and whey and in water samples the PA content was zero. Although direct analysis was not possible, contaminated wheat flour used to make bread was the likely source of PA causing the outbreak. Eating a more varied diet including meat and fruit may be protective. Prevention and control measures will rely on community awareness and agricultural interventions to ensure safety of the food supply.

  11. L’échec mondial de la lutte antidrogue : quelles leçonspour l’Afghanistan ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Arnaud Chouvy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available L’Afghanistan a vu sa production d’opium doubler entre 2002 et 2008, malgré un changement de régime à Kaboul, le soutien politique et l’aide politique et économique de la communauté internationale, et l’adoption de diverses mesures antidrogue. L’histoire du contrôle international des drogues en Asie est riche d’autres nombreux échecs de la lutte antidrogue et témoigne aussi de quelques succès. Autant de leçons dont les autorités afghanes et la communauté internationale pourraient s’inspirer à l’avenir.Afghan opium production doubled between 2002 and 2008 in spite of a regime change in Kabul, the political support and military and economic aid of the international community, as well as counternarcotics measures. The history of international drugs in Asia is rich in counternarcotics failures, despite a few successes. Such past experiences are lessons to be learned for the Afghan authorities and the international community.

  12. Heterotopic ossification in combat amputees from Afghanistan and Iraq wars: Five case histories and results from a small series of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Melcer, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic ossification (HO is excess bone growth in soft tissues that frequently occurs in the residual limbs of combat amputees injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, or Iraq and Afghanistan wars, respectively. HO can interfere with prosthetic use and walking and delay patient rehabilitation. This article describes symptomatic and/or radiographic evidence of HO in a patient series of combat amputees rehabilitating at a military amputee care clinic (27 patients/33 limbs. We conducted a retrospective review of patient records and physician interviews to document evidence of HO symptoms in these limbs (e.g., pain during prosthetic use, skin breakdown. Results showed HO-related symptoms in 10 of the 33 residual limbs. Radiographs were available for 25 of the 33 limbs, and a physician identified at least moderate HO in 15 of the radiographs. However, 5 of the 15 patients who showed at least moderate radiographic HO did not report adverse symptoms. Five individual patient histories described HO onset, symptoms, treatments, and outcomes. These case histories illustrated how HO location relative to pressure-sensitive/pressure-tolerant areas of the residual limb may determine whether patients experienced symptoms. These histories revealed the uncommon but novel finding of potential benefits of HO for prosthetic suspension.

  13. Provision of mental health services in resource-poor settings: a randomised trial comparing counselling with routine medical treatment in North Afghanistan (Mazar-e-Sharif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoughi Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychosocial stress caused by war, ongoing conflict, lack of security, and restricted access to resources promotes mental suffering and diseases in many resource-poor countries. In an exemplary setting, the present study compares the efficacy of psychosocial counselling with routine pharmacological treatment in a randomised trial in Mazar-e-Sharif (Afghanistan. Methods Help seeking Afghan women (N = 61, who were diagnosed with mental health symptoms by local physicians either received routine medical treatment(treatment as usual or psychosocial counselling (5-8 sessions following a specifically developed manualised treatment protocol. Primary outcome measures were symptoms of depression and anxiety assessed before treatment and at follow-up using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Secondary outcome measures were psychosocial stressors and coping mechanisms. Results At 3-month follow-up, psychosocial counselling patients showed high improvements with respect to the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety. In addition, they reported a reduction of psychosocial stressors and showed an enhancement of coping strategies. At the same time, the severity of symptoms, the quantity of psychosocial stressors and coping mechanisms did not improve in patients receiving routine medical treatment. Conclusion These results indicate that psychosocial counselling can be an effective treatment for mental illnesses even for those living in ongoing unsafe environments. Trial registration NCT01155687

  14. Diligenza dovuta e responsabilità degli Stati di eliminare la violenza sulle donne: elementi di riflessione su alcuni casi Paese (Nepal, India, Afghanistan, Italia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Lanzoni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Questo articolo nasce dalle osservazioni fatte in 12 anni in diversi Paesi del mondo sul fenomeno della violenza maschile sulle donne e le bambine, e sulle risposte politiche e legislative di contrasto date nei diversi Stati. Tale analisi nasce dall’esperienza maturata durante il lavoro svolto con Fondazione Pangea (www.pangeaonlus.org, in Nepal, in India, in Afghanistan e in Italia, dove realizziamo programmi volti al contrasto della violenza, la promozione dei diritti umani e dell’autodeterminazione delle donne, per favorire il loro l’empowerment personale ed economico, la loro partecipazione e il rafforzamento del loro ruolo decisionale nella famiglia come nella comunità in cui vivono. In tutti i Paesi di cui si parlerà, a nord o a sud dell’equatore, sono i comportamenti, le tradizioni, gli stereotipi e gli assunti culturali che determinano le relazioni e il linguaggio tra le persone e che “giustificano” discriminazioni e violenze, mantenendo di fatto uno sbilanciamento dei rapporti di potere tra il genere maschile e quello femminile.

  15. Family stressors and postdeployment mental health in single versus partnered parents deployed in support of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn-Coaxum, Rachel; Smith, Brian N; Iverson, Katherine M; Vogt, Dawne

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the family-related stress and postdeployment adjustment of single versus partnered parents deployed in support of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This study examined exposure to family-related stressors during and after deployment, as well as postdeployment psychological symptoms in a national sample of 318 single (n = 74) and partnered (n = 244) parent veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Results demonstrated that single parents experienced higher levels of concern about life and family disruptions during deployment, lower levels of social support during and after deployment, and poorer postdeployment family functioning than partnered parents. Single parents also reported higher posttraumatic stress symptom severity, but not depression or anxiety symptom severity, compared with partnered parents. Family-related stressors demonstrated different associations with mental health for single and partnered parents, suggesting that some stressor-symptom relations may be more salient for single parents, and others may be more salient for partnered parents. Findings suggest that the deployment and postdeployment experiences of parents differ based on their partnered status, which has implications for the design and provision of services to single and partnered parents.

  16. An Analysis of Chinese enterprises to invest in Afghanistan mining industry risks and preventive measures%阿富汗矿业投资风险分析及防范策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭彤荔

    2013-01-01

    随着我国综合国力的提升,中国企业境外矿产投资规模不断扩大。阿富汗作为我国邻国,其矿产资源开发潜力巨大,绝大部分处于未开发状态。长期的动荡局势制约了阿国矿业的发展,为吸引外国投资,阿富汗致力改善本国投资环境。从事阿矿业投资存在安全形势严峻、法律不健全、人才短缺、基础设施落后等风险因素,安全风险尤为突出。投资者需谨慎决策、制定应急方案、尊重当地传统、密切与政府关系、合法经营并热心公益事业,有助于规避风险。%With the upgrading of China's comprehensive national strength ,the scale of investment of Chinese enterprises overseas mineral expanding .Afghanistan is our neighbor ,the development of mineral resources has great potential ,most of the undeveloped state .The long-term unrest restricted the development of the Argentine Mining ,Afghanistan is committed to improve its investment environment to attract foreign investment .Engaged in mining investment in Afghanistan security situation is grim ,the law is not perfect ,talent shortage ,poor infrastructure and other risk factors ,especially security risk .Investors need to be cautious decision-making ,development of contingency plans ,respectful of local traditions and close relations with the government ,legitimate business and public-spirited undertakings ,helps to avoid risks .

  17. Potential field studies of the central San Luis Basin and San Juan Mountains, Colorado and New Mexico, and southern and western Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenth, Benjamin John

    This dissertation includes three separate chapters, each demonstrating the interpretive utility of potential field (gravity and magnetic) geophysical datasets at various scales and in various geologic environments. The locations of these studies are the central San Luis Basin of Colorado and New Mexico, the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, and southern and western Afghanistan. The San Luis Basin is the northernmost of the major basins that make up the Rio Grande rift, and interpretation of gravity and aeromagnetic data reveals patterns of rifting, rift-sediment thicknesses, distribution of pre-rift volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and distribution of syn-rift volcanic rocks. Syn-rift Santa Fe Group sediments have a maximum thickness of ˜2 km in the Sanchez graben near the eastern margin of the basin along the central Sangre de Cristo fault zone. Under the Costilla Plains, thickness of these sediments is estimated to reach ˜1.3 km. The Santa Fe Group sediments also reach a thickness of nearly 1 km within the Monte Vista graben near the western basin margin along the San Juan Mountains. A narrow, north-south-trending structural high beneath San Pedro Mesa separates the graben from the structural depression beneath the Costilla Plains. Aeromagnetic anomalies are interpreted to mainly reflect variations of remanent magnetic polarity and burial depth of the 5.3-3.7 Ma Servilleta basalt of the Taos Plateau volcanic field. Magnetic-source depth estimates indicate patterns of subsidence following eruption of the basalt and show that the Sanchez graben has been the site of maximum subsidence. One of the largest and most pronounced gravity lows in North America lies over the rugged San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado. A buried, low-density silicic batholith related to an Oligocene volcanic field coincident with the San Juan Mountains has been the accepted interpretation of the source of the gravity low since the 1970s. However, this interpretation was

  18. Geologic map of the Shaida deposit and Misgaran prospect, Herat Province, Afghanistan, modified from the 1973 original map compilation of V.I. Tarasenko and others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Robert D.; Stettner, Will R.; Masonic, Linda M.; Moran, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    This map is a modified version of Geological map and map of useful minerals, Shaida area, scale 1:50,000, which was compiled by V.I. Tarasenko, N.I. Borozenets, and others in 1973. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Afghan Geological Survey and the Task Force for Business and Stability Operations of the U.S. Department of Defense, studied the original document and related reports and also visited the field area in August 2010. This modified map illustrates the geological structure of the Shaida copper-lead-zinc deposit and Misgaran copper-lead-zinc prospect in western Afghanistan and includes cross sections of the same area. The map reproduces the topology (contacts, faults, and so forth) of the original Soviet map and cross sections and includes modifications based on our examination of these documents and on observations made during our field visit. Elevations on the cross sections are derived from the original Soviet topography and might not match the newer topography used on the current map. We have attempted to translate the original Russian terminology and rock classification into modern English geologic usage as literally as possible without changing any genetic or process-oriented implications in the original descriptions. We also use the age designations from the original map. The unit colors on the map and cross sections differ from the colors shown on the original version. The units are colored according to the color and pattern scheme of the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW) (http://www.ccgm.org).

  19. Sexual Health in Male and Female Iraq and Afghanistan U. S. War Veterans With and Without PTSD: Findings From the VALOR Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Benjamin N; Fang, Shona C; Seal, Karen H; Ranganathan, Gayatri; Marx, Brian P; Keane, Terence M; Rosen, Raymond C

    2016-06-01

    We sought to determine whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was associated with sexual health in returned warzone-deployed veterans from the recent Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. We studied 1,581 males and females from the Veterans After-Discharge Longitudinal Registry, a gender-balanced U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs registry of health care-seeking veterans with and without PTSD. Approximately one quarter (25.1%) of males (n = 198) and 12.7% of females (n = 101) had a sexual dysfunction diagnosis and/or prescription treatment for sexual dysfunction. Both genders were more likely to have a sexual dysfunction diagnosis and/or prescription treatment if they had PTSD compared with those without PTSD (male: 27.3% vs. 21.1%, p = .054; female: 14.9% vs. 9.4%, p = .022). Among the 1,557 subjects analyzed here, males with PTSD had similar levels of sexual activity compared to those without PTSD (71.2% vs. 75.4%, p = .22), whereas females with PTSD were less likely to be sexually active compared to females without PTSD (58.7% vs. 72.1%, p < .001). Participants with PTSD were also less likely to report sex-life satisfaction (male: 27.6% vs. 46.0%, p < .001; female: 23.0% vs. 45.7%, p < .001) compared with those without PTSD. Although PTSD was not associated with sexual dysfunction after adjusting for confounding factors, it was significantly negatively associated with sex-life satisfaction in female veterans with a prevalence ratio of .71, 95% confidence interval [.57, .90].

  20. Energy drink consumption and its association with sleep problems among U.S. service members on a combat deployment - Afghanistan, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Beverages marketed as energy drinks have become a popular form of caffeine consumption targeted at young males, with some brands containing the caffeine equivalent of 1-3 cups of coffee or cans of soda. Energy drinks also include other ingredients intended to boost physical energy or mental alertness, such as herbal substances, amino acids, sugars, and sugar derivatives; however, caffeine is the main active ingredient. Approximately 6% of adolescent and young adult males in U.S. civilian and military populations consume energy drinks daily. These products generally are unregulated and can have negative side effects (e.g., caffeine intoxication, overdose, withdrawal, and poor interactions with alcohol). Paradoxically, excess consumption also can increase sleep problems and daytime sleepiness, which can impair performance. To determine the extent of energy drink use and the association with sleep problems and sleepiness during combat operations, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research analyzed data collected by Joint Mental Health Advisory Team 7 (J-MHAT 7) to Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in 2010. The analysis showed that 44.8% of deployed service members consumed at least one energy drink daily, with 13.9% drinking three or more a day. No differences by age or rank were found. Service members drinking three or more energy drinks a day were significantly more likely to report sleeping ≤4 hours a night on average than those consuming two drinks or fewer. Those who drank three or more drinks a day also were more likely to report sleep disruption related to stress and illness and were more likely to fall asleep during briefings or on guard duty. Service members should be educated regarding the potential adverse effects of excessive energy drink consumption on sleep and mission performance and should be encouraged to moderate their energy drink consumption in combat environments.