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Sample records for afghan national army

  1. Mentoring the Afghan Army at the Officer Academy in Kabul

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster Christensen, Maya

    Capacity building of host nation militaries is a central component of current multinational military operations, which is likely to become increasingly vital to future military interventions in conflict settings. Focusing on the mentoring of the Afghan National Army at the British-led officer...... academy in Kabul, this policy brief stresses the urgency with which Western militaries should improve military capacity building efforts. Based on qualitative data collected at the British Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the Afghan National Army Officer Academy, the brief outlines five clusters...... of military-specific recommendations on ‘measurements of success’, ‘local ownership’, ‘mentoring’, ‘coalition cultures’ and ‘Afghan values and visions’, which may be helpful in generating sustainable security solutions in Afghanistan and beyond....

  2. Afghan National Army: DOD Has Taken Steps to Remedy Poor Management of Vehicle Maintenance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    assurance and property audits and functions at the sites in Afghanistan covered by the ANA A-TEMP contract. On January 6, 2016, contract oversight...Incurred by Afghan Integrated Support Services , SIGAR Financial Audit 13-7, December 2, 2013. 14 Federal Acquisition Regulation Subpart 16.2. SIGAR...2015, DCMA-A announced that it no longer had the ability to perform quality assurance and property audits and functions at the ANA A-TEMP sites in

  3. Assessment of U.S. and Coalition Efforts to Develop Leaders in the Afghan National Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    records. An addition to the ir Military Personnel Records Jacket (MPRJ) simi lar to the U.S. Army DA Form 2-1 would be benefic ia l until computerized ...by the individual soldier through payroll deductions; or third, a combination of the first two options. In the ANA, there are currently over 300

  4. Afghanistan Security: U.S. Programs to Further Reform Ministry of Interior and National Police Challenged by Lack of Military Personnel and Afghan Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Afghan army training rogram. However, the army program’s demand for personnel is likely to ncrease as the Afghan army grows from 80,000 to 134,000...increasing competition for these personnel from CSTC-A’s program to fully train the Afghan National Army. In the past, FDD and other ANP training

  5. Cross-sectional assessment of prevalence and correlates of blood-borne and sexually-transmitted infections among Afghan National Army recruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Catherine S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few data are available in Afghanistan to shape national military force health practices, particularly with regard to sexually-transmitted infections (STIs. We measured prevalence and correlates of HIV, syphilis, herpes simplex 2 virus (HSV-2, and hepatitis C virus (HCV among Afghan National Army (ANA recruits. Methods A cross-sectional sample of male ANA recruits aged 18–35 years were randomly selected at the Kabul Military Training Center between February 2010 and January 2011. Participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and serum-based rapid testing for syphilis and hepatitis C virus antibody on-site; HIV and HSV-2 screening, and confirmatory testing were performed off-site. Prevalence of each infection was calculated and logistic regression analysis performed to identify correlates. Results Of 5313 recruits approached, 4750 consented to participation. Participants had a mean age of 21.8 years (SD±3.8, 65.5% had lived outside Afghanistan, and 44.3% had no formal education. Few reported prior marijuana (16.3%, alcohol (5.3%, or opiate (3.4% use. Of sexually active recruits (58.7%, N = 2786, 21.3% reported paying women for sex and 21.3% reported sex with males. Prevalence of HIV (0.063%, 95% CI: 0.013- 0.19, syphilis (0.65%, 95% CI: 0.44 – 0.93, and HCV (0.82%, 95% CI: 0.58 – 1.12 were quite low. Prevalence of HSV-2 was 3.03% (95% CI: 2.56 - 3.57, which was independently associated with age (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR = 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00 - 1.09 and having a television (socioeconomic marker (AOR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.03 – 2.05. Conclusion Though prevalence of HIV, HCV, syphilis, and HSV-2 was low, sexual risk behaviors and intoxicant use were present among a substantial minority, indicating need for prevention programming. Formative work is needed to determine a culturally appropriate approach for prevention programming to reduce STI risk among Afghan National Army troops.

  6. Cultural Frictions: Mentoring the Afghan Army at 'Sandhurst in the Sand'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster Christensen, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The Afghan National Army Officer Academy (ANAOA) is a significant indicator of the success of the NATO-led mission in Afghanistan. This success relies on the local ownership and sustainability of an academy modelled on the British Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Based on qualitative research...... conducted amongst the coalition forces deployed as mentors to the ANAOA, Christensen and Jakobsen discuss how the relationship between the promotion of British military values and Afghan ownership is communicated, practised and negotiated through the exercise of mentoring. Cultural frictions between mentors...

  7. Afghan National Security Forces: Closing the Gap Before 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    National Army (ANA) would become an ethnically diverse entity of 70,000 personnel.11 The Office of Military Coorperation-Afgansitan ( OMC -A) was...for educating and training all new ANA recruits, while OMC -A, [which would be renamed Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan (CSTC-A...now be responsible for conducting SFA with Afghan GPF. In April of 2006, NATO-ISAF established CSTC-A in Kabul to succeed OMC -A in the training

  8. Assessment of U.S. Government and Coalition Efforts to Develop the Logistics Sustainment Capability of the Afghan National Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    parent brigades. Organization of ANA Unit Logistics Support The ANA used a system of supply points constituting a supply chain from the national depots...administration, but their parent organizations completed their performance evaluations. Command officials we interviewed were unaware of a formal...Command – South used “ Tiger Teams,” including a train the trainer component, to improve logistics processes and procedures that they believed were

  9. The Operational Mentoring and Liaison Team Program as a Model for Assisting the Development of an Effective Afghan National Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-12

    worked very hard for! First, I would especially like to thank my family: my wife Ranveig and our three children Malene, Mathias and Markus for...disabilities caused by some of the millions of land mines still scattered in almost all areas of the country” (Jane`s Sentenial Country Risk Assesment ...Introduction If anyone has to die for Afghanistan, it must not be the children of foreign nations. It must be our sons, and they are ready to do

  10. Afghan Sub-National Governance: Enabling Success by 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Illegitimacy – Historical Context Governmental ―legitimacy‖ is rooted in a population’s belief that their government possesses the ability...prevention and punishment of wrongs.‖23 A lack of justice is an important element that defines Afghan government weakness, promotes corrupt activities...GIRoA to establish sub-national governance , justice, and corruption accountability. The importance of the first pillar was highlighted in 2010 when

  11. A Retrospective Review of Clinical Admissions to Afghan National Security Forces Health Care Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Christian W; Royal, David; Espinosa, Jairo

    2017-07-01

    Few published reports have examined the numbers of civilian injuries treated at Military Treatment Facilities in the Afghan Theater of Operations. However, review of Department of Defense Trauma Registry revealed a persistent percentage of civilians treated by NATO, and this study compares the proportion of civilians served by Afghan and Coalition military hospitals between 2009 and 2013. A retrospective review of records from Department of Defense trauma Registry for Coalition data, and Afghan data from the Office of the Inspector General. We assessed changes in the proportion of civilians served between 2009 and 2013 at Afghan and Coalition hospitals. There was a significant percentage (≥21.55%) of civilians served at both Afghan and Coalition hospitals. Although the total population of Afghan Nationals treated remained steady, the number of total civilians decreased over this time period. To account for this, the percentage of military personnel increased at Afghan military hospitals. In Coalition hospitals, the civilian population increased between 2009 and 2011 and then decreased between 2011 and 2013. For all hospitals, whether Afghan or Coalition hospitals, there was a persistent level of civilian admissions. A downward trend for civilian patients in the Coalition hospitals and a similar increase in Afghan hospitals was expected. However, the numbers for Afghan hospitals instead showed a downward trend, potentially from the loss of logistical assistance provided by Coalition forces in transferring patients to Afghan hospitals. As evidenced by our data, future missions should plan to provide care for this civilian population, by allocating funding and appropriately training personnel. Additionally, logistical concerns of transferring to host-nation facilities and training host-nation providers will require foresight, planning, and diplomatic overtures, not always included in tactical decision-making. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military

  12. The Afghan Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David

    After more than ten years of war, the Afghan security forces have taken over most of the security responsibilities in Helmand. In the wake of the Danish withdrawal the evaluation of the total Danish contribution in Afghanistan since 2001 has started. Crucial to the future security situation will ...... will be sustainability, which means that the Afghan army and the Afghan police are not to be measured by Western standards, but rather from a scale based on the Afghan way of doing things....

  13. Afghanistan Security: Afghan Army Growing, but Additional Trainers Needed; Long-term Costs Not Determined

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    establishes training schools and academies • runs training for soldiers in institutional training • mentors Afghan ministries • conducts military...166 Canteen Duffel bag Elbow pads Entrenching tool First aid kit Knee pads Poncho Rucksack and frame Sleeping bag Sleeping mat Other Interceptor Body...In January 2010, NTM-A/CSTC-A and the Ministry of Defense began implementation of a new, accelerated program to recruit high school graduates with

  14. Afghan National Engineer Brigade: Despite U.S. Training Efforts, the Brigade is Incapable of Operating Independently

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    training—army staff on leave for holidays, political events, low literacy levels, and security concerns—also delayed NEB training. In addition, a Joint...due to holidays, political events, low literacy levels, and security concerns, which were beyond USFOR-A’s control. Although USFOR-A had 1 year... literacy and language barriers were a challenge to training NEB personnel. The problem of low literacy rates among Afghan soldiers is not new. In

  15. Independent Assessment of the Afghan National Security Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    coalition nations exclusive jurisdiction over ISAF and supporting personnel. 2015 Yes Strategic Partnership Agreement ( SPA ) A framework for the...militarized border in the world (behind that between North and South Korea ). Pakistani civilian and military leaders have consistently called for peace...Lawrence Farrell became President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Defense Industrial Association in 2001. Prior to his retirement from

  16. Would-be places for displaced Afghans – The UNHCR, landless returnees and the enforcement of the national order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Scalettaris

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of the UNHCR in the launch of a scheme fostering the creation of new settlements across Afghanistan in order to accommodate landless returnees. This project entails substantial engineering, aimed at making life possible in inhospitable areas. It thus involves a battle against nature, as well as engaging with the transformation of the Afghan state. The uncertain future of these would-be towns questions the representations about the relationship between people, space and states implied by the ‘national order of things’, that is, a set of normative representations which naturalize the isomorphism between the members of national polities and the territory of their state of citizenship. The nation-state hardly describes the historical process of the formation of the Afghan state, nor Afghan livelihood strategies based on migration. The difficulty experienced in founding these settlements reveals the power relations at work in the way landless Afghan returnees are made ‘dwellers of the world’, and brings into question the role and capacity of an international agency to challenge those relations.

  17. Conscription in the Afghan Army. Compulsory Service Versus an All Volunteer Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Enlightenment in Erance, 1763-1815 (University of Chicago Press, 2010), p. 117. * Panu Poutvaara and Andreas Wagener , "The Political Economy of Conscription...4, Spring 2004. 6 Poutvaara and Wagener 2009. the development of modern nation-states.7 According to the sociologist Charles Tilly, "war made the...Chapter 1. 11 Margaret Levi, "The Institution of Conscription", Social Science History, 20:1, Spring 199(5. a Poutvaara and Wagener , 2009 Anna

  18. Disjointed Ways, Disunified Means: Learning From America’s Struggle to Build an Afghan Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    different factions in Afghan society view each other as enemies and in some cases as “ infidels .” Some observers have argued that the cases of Swit...Afghan women complained of violence against them, half of it sexual in nature.6 Additionally, he discov- ered that drug abuse, tuberculosis, and

  19. Varicella outbreak among Afghan National Civil Order Police recruits-Herat Regional Military Training Center, Herat, Afghanistan, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, James B; Davis, Theodore S

    2012-08-01

    In December 2010, an outbreak of varicella was reported among student recruits enrolled at the Afghan National Civil Order Police Herat Regional Military Training Center. The outbreak had an overall attack rate of 9.8% (31 of 316 recruits) with primary, secondary, and tertiary attack rates of 6.3% (20 of 316), 3.4% (10 of 296), and 0.35% (1 of 286). Fortunately, the outbreak did not lead to any deaths or serious complications. However, it significantly interfered with Afghan National Civil Order Police training by causing a loss of 378 person-days of training. Medical personnel from the Afghan National Police, DynCorp International, Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Ministry of Public Health, and NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan Herat Joint Medical Operation Cell joined together to control and characterize the outbreak and prepare and disseminate recommendations for preventing future outbreaks. Control measures were quickly implemented, but less than ideal. Varicella vaccine was not available in Afghanistan to immunize exposed recruits. The outbreak was reported to medical authorities through a slow and convoluted process. And the majority of varicella cases did not self-report for care. Rather, medical personnel diagnosed most cases only after recruits were directed to report for a physical examination.

  20. The Army's Distribution of Labor: New Force Structure and Missions for the Army National Guard

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberson, Melvin

    1997-01-01

    This Strategy Research Project recommends a new Army National Guard (ARNG) force structure which will successfully accomplish current missions and serve the Total Army's requirements for the future...

  1. 77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open committee meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the...), the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National...

  2. Afghan refugees in Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, M.

    2003-01-01

    Against the background of the changing situation in Afghanistan, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) requested NIDI in the beginning of 2002 to conduct a rapid survey among Afghan refugees living in Pakistan. It's purpose was to assess the demographic and socio-economic

  3. The Army's Role in Nation Building

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edmonds, Mark L

    2009-01-01

    ... should be and how to execute this task. The tasks associated with nation building are part of the Army's core competencies under the auspices of 'Stability Operations', and are now cited in doctrine in the recently published Field Manual 3-07...

  4. Sexual Assault: Better Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    the commanding officer of an accused servicemember. 21Army Regulation 600-20 defines sexual harassment as a form of gender discrimination that...SEXUAL ASSAULT Better Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army...Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve What GAO Found The Army National Guard

  5. The Future Army National Guard: Easing Contemporary Challenges of Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fuhr, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    .... However, deliberate efforts can bring about timely, positive adaptation. This paper explores the factors bearing on cultural changes that will speed effective transformation in the Army National Guard...

  6. Afghan Refugees: Current Status and Future Prospects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Margesson, Rhoda

    2007-01-01

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has helped 3.69 million Afghan refugees return to Afghanistan since March 2002, marking the largest assisted return operation in its history...

  7. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite layout plans for Army...

  8. Military Personnel Strengths in the Army National Guard

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stewart, Derek

    2002-01-01

    The accuracy of reported personnel strength and training participation rates has a direct impact on the reliability of the Army National Guard's budget and the allocation of funds to individual states...

  9. Construction and Reconstruction Efforts in Nation Building: Planning for Everything in Afghanistan Except the Afghans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    or earth bricks , rammed earth, and sometimes a cement binder. Adobe type construction has been around for thousands of years. It has many benefits...and AU/ACSC/COOPER, A/AY15 8 apply them to future operations. Trends and issues that continue to defeat military and civilian construction ...AU/ACSC/COOPER, A/AY15 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY CONSTRUCTION AND RECONSTRUCTION EFFORTS IN NATION BUILDING

  10. Would-be places for displaced Afghans – The UNHCR, landless returnees and the enforcement of the national order

    OpenAIRE

    Scalettaris, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the role of the UNHCR in the launch of a scheme fostering the creation of new settlements across Afghanistan in order to accommodate landless returnees. This project entails substantial engineering, aimed at making life possible in inhospitable areas. It thus involves a battle against nature, as well as engaging with the transformation of the Afghan state. The uncertain future of these would-be towns questions the representations about the relationship between people, sp...

  11. Assessment of U.S. and Coalition Plans to Train, Equip, and Field the Afghan National Security Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    to master their duties and achieve an in-depth knowledge of Afghan society . The report observed that in such a complex operating environment, it is... cashless salary payments across remote areas where banking facilities are not readily available. He stated that the MoD, Ministry of Finance, and banks...building partnership capacity across all levels of society . Today the program encompasses all geographic Combatant Commands and includes 61 SPP

  12. Value Focused Thinking for Nation Building in Afghanistan: A Regional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Analytical Hierarchy Process ANA Afghan National Army ANP Afghan National Police DA Decision Analysis MCDA Multicriteria ...the decision maker ability to understand the culture and values in subtle and more insightful ways thus making the model as realistic as possible...whole process more beneficent and fruitful to the masses in Afghanistan. 2.1 Decision Analysis Overview and Value Focused Thinking Decision making is

  13. The Army National Guard: Meeting the Needs of The National Military Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-13

    AD-A274 443 "The Army National Guard: Meeting the Needs of The National Military Strategy A Monograph by Lieutenant Colonel John P. Lewis Infantry...Leave bldnk) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD: MEETING THE NEEDS OF...NATIONAL GUARD: MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE NATIONAL MILITARY STRATEGY by LTC John P. Lewis, USA 67 pages. The strategic environment significantly changed

  14. Managing the Army National Guard Full-Time Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wampler, Bryan

    2003-01-01

    .... With the increased operational tempo and deployment of the Army National Guard (ARNG), and the impact that the full-time Guard person has upon both recruiting and retention, it is crucial to hire and retain only the best full-time employees...

  15. Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

  16. CHDS Launches Army National Guard Certificate Program

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2007-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES The Naval Postgraduate School’s (NPS) Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS) has launched a certificate program in Homeland Defense and Security (HD/S) specifically for the National Guard (NG). The...

  17. THE CHILEAN ARMY AND THE NATIONAL IDENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTURO CONTRERAS POLGATI

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The military and civilian glories of the republic are melted through the history since the founding of the Chilean nation and the subsequent development of its culture and national identity. In that process the military dimension of its defense, as well as the civilian part of development, are inseparable constants in the building of its republican institutionalism. This is a consequence of the long war of Arauco; the isolation of the country of the main centers of world attraction and their migratory flows; the austerity of colonial life and the particularities of its political and social process until the 19th century. From the melting of the mapuche and Hispanic races arises a new nation that takes its own life in the person of Creole. Being he, the Creole, the one who consolidates, with the sword, the forge and the plough, a free, independent and sovereign Republican State that, after two centuries, remains the political expression of a society with a unique culture and identity.

  18. Sustaining the Afghan Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    budget. Agriculture and pastoralism accounted for 60 percent of GDP in the 1970s and about 85 percent of the population depended on rural economy ...for its livelihood.1 The Soviet war devastated the rural economy and most of the population fled to Pakistan and Iran, where it depended largely on...AU/ACSC/YADAV/AY10 i AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY SUSTAINING THE AFGHAN ECONOMY By Mukesh Kumar Yadav, Wg Cdr

  19. CTC Sentinel. Volume 1, Issue 4, March 2008. Jihad After Iraq: Lessons from the Arab Afghans Phenomenon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hafez, Mohammed M

    2008-01-01

    ...: jihad in the path of God. Known as "Arab Afghans," these veterans participated in national insurgencies and civil wars, facilitated international terrorism and became ideologues of global jihad...

  20. Using Profiles in GOSSIP to Examine Concepts Associated with the Afghan National Police in Open Source Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Scientist © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2011 © Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du...Prime Minister Stephen Harper is to the concepts of LEADERSHIP, FAMILY, MUSIC and CORRUPTION in the collection of documents that discusses him. It is

  1. DOD Obligations and Expenditures of Funds Provided to the Department of State for the Training and Mentoring of the Afghan National Police

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    Section-Kabul QASP Quality Assurance Surveillance Plan RTC Regional Training Center SOW Statement of Work WPC Women’s Police Corps...capacity to train an adequate number of Women’s Police Corps ( WPC ) members. The lack of a sufficient number of trained WPC members impairs the...security tasks at airports and border crossing check points. 30B30BAfghan Culture The Afghan WPC training program has not reached its full

  2. Assessing the Ability of the Afghan Ministry of Interior Affairs to Support the Afghan Local Police

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    development and prosperity. • Receive an original, valid national identification document ( Tazkera). • Meet physical and mental health criteria and not be...consider simpler alternatives that account for the partner’s level of resources, literacy , technical compe- tence, communications, and data...Village Stability Operations and the Afghan Local Police, Joint Spe- cial Operations University , October 2104, p. 47). If anything, the ALP casualties

  3. The Army National Guard Unit Mobilization Process Transforming to Meet the Needs of the Future Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-18

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD UNIT MOBILIZATION PROCESS: TRANSFORMING TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE FUTURE FORCE by Colonel...SUBTITLE The Army National Guard Unit Mobilization Process Transforming to Meet the Needs of the Future Force 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...National Guard Unit Mobilization Process: Transforming to meet the needs of the future force. FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 18 March 2005

  4. Regional Alignment of Army National Guard Brigades: Employing the Guard for Success in Building Partner Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    12 42 GEN Ray Odierno blog 43 GEN Craig R. McKinley, The National Guard: A Great Value for America, July 2010, 7. 44 An Agribusiness Development...Team (ADT) composed of Army National Guard soldiers with backgrounds and expertise in various sectors of the agribusiness field has been formed to...The ARNG has employed the Agribusiness Development Team (ADT) concept successfully in Central America for approximately 20 years. (2008 Army Posture

  5. Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil

  6. Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

  7. Mobilization of the Army National Guard and Army Reserve: Historical Perspective and the Vietnam War

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-07

    31st, 37th, 40th, 43rd 44th, 45th, and 47th) and three of the 20 RCT’s (196th, 278th, and 296th). The induction strength of the eight divisions, as a...Department Hob Plan, 1923; War Department Mob Plan, 1924; War Department General Mob Plan, 1928; War Department Mob Plan, 1933; Protective Mob Plan, 1938...Guard and Army Reserve in any operation AS large as Vietnam. The Regular Army was not organized to .: induct a war without mobilization of the

  8. Army National Guard (ARNG) Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) end-user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelath, R.P. [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States); Rasch, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) project is designed to identify and develop programs which automate requirements not included in standard army systems. This includes providing automated interfaces between standard army systems at the National Guard Bureau (NGB) level and at the state/territory level. As part of the OSCAR project, custom software has been installed at NGB to streamline management of major end items. This software allows item managers to provide automated disposition on excess equipment to states operating the Standard Army Retail Supply System Objective (SARSS-O). It also accelerates movement of excess assets to improve the readiness of the Army National Guard (ARNG)--while reducing excess on hand. The purpose of the End-User Manual is to provide direction and guidance to the customer for implementing the ARNG Excess Management Program.

  9. Health issues of Afghan refugees in California.

    OpenAIRE

    Lipson, J G; Omidian, P A

    1992-01-01

    Since the 1979 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, more than 6 million Afghan refugees have become the world's largest refugee population. Although refugees in Pakistan and Iran are now beginning to repatriate, continuing political turmoil in Afghanistan and children's acculturation and educational opportunities will keep many Afghans in the United States permanently. Although there are no accurate statistics, local resettlement agencies and Afghan community leaders estimate that there are 10,000...

  10. Afghan hydrocarbons: a source for development or for conflict? A risk assessment of Norwegian involvement in development of the Afghan oil and gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, Arne; Hakim, Mohammad; Newrozi, Sediqa; Sarwari, Akbar; Williams, Aled

    2010-10-22

    Norad has been engaged in capacity building and provision of technical support to the Afghan Ministry of Mines since 2007. A part of this engagement relates to the development of the Afghan Hydrocarbons Law, and commercialization of gas and oil reserves through an international bidding process. The Afghan oil and gas industry has been in production since the mid 1980s, but is in need of major investments. Afghans interviewed are of the opinion that oil and gas reserves are national property, to be used for the benefit of all Afghans. The review has identified a range of risks and challenges to the further process, and Norad is advised to consider: To await further engagement on policy matters until there is further clarity as to how the Government of Afghanistan aims to develop and utilize these resources. But consider to provide: 1) Advice on the political/diplomatic process of negotiating agreements for utilization and division of underground natural resources; 2) Assist in training and development of Afghan technical expertise in oil and gas exploration, production and management; 3) Assist in the further development of the hydro power and alternative energy sector. (AG)

  11. The Future of Afghan Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Seward Smith

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The 2014 Afghan presidential and provincial council elections will have a critical effect on the future of Afghan democracy. At a minimum, they must be sufficiently credible to prevent severe division among elite political actors and ensure the survival of the current constitutional order. Yet there are growing expectations that the election might not merely be an elite pact between powerful figures from Afghanistan’s recent past, but more fully represent popular aspirations, particularly those of the growing urban and youth population. In order for this to happen, they must also be held in accordance with the legal rules that guide them, rather than be characterized by manipulation of these rules and government interference. Despite the problems of fraud in the 2009 election, where government figures and the electoral institutions themselves were partly responsible for the significant fraud that took place, there are a number of reasons to expect that the 2014 election will be an improvement on 2009, both in terms of participation and organization. If the elections held in Afghanistan since 2001 have diminished hopes for Afghan democracy, it is partly because an electoral formalism was introduced in Afghanistan before other elements crucial to a functioning democracy—the rule of law, political parties, institutionalized governance—really existed. The 2014 elections may reveal the boundaries of an emerging democratic space in which these features are beginning to emerge and, more importantly, where their value is increasingly recognized by Afghans. If, in every political transition, the future grapples with the past, the 2014 elections in Afghanistan may be a decisive arena of that struggle.

  12. Strategies to Combat Afghan Opium

    OpenAIRE

    Looney, Robert

    2009-01-01

    As everyone who pays attention to the news already knows, the war in Afghanistan is not going well. Long overshadowed by the conflict in Iraq, Afghanistan’s trials drew little attention in the years after the deceptively easy overthrow of the Taliban in 2001. Afghans are paying the price: violence has been escalating since 2006, and insurgents operate freely in much of the country.

  13. 77 FR 59021 - License Amendment Request for the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 03032042; NRC-2012-0219] License Amendment Request for the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence Center, Charlottesville, VA AGENCY... held by the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence Center (the licensee), for...

  14. Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart

  15. Cutting the Army’s Umbilical Cord: A Study of Emerging Fuel Technologies and Their Impact on National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Cutting the Army’s Umbilical Cord A Study of Emerging Fuel Technologies and their Impact on National Security A Monograph by MAJ Matthew A...blank) 15 July 2011 SAMS Monograph, June 2010 - March 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Cutting the Army’s Umbilical Cord A Study of...APPROVAL Major Matthew A. Price Title of Monograph: Cutting the Army’s Umbilical Cord Approved by: :r~z__J:W Bruce E. Stanley G. Scott Gorman, Ph

  16. United States Army Annual Financial Statement FY00. The Army in Transformation Responsive to the Needs of the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    United States Army Annual Financial Statement “The Army in Transformation—Responsive to the Needs of the Nation” The picture of the digitized soldier...mailing the postage paid comment card enclosed at the back of this report. “The Army in Transformation —Responsive to the Needs of the Nation” “The...Army in Transformation —Responsive to the Needs of the Nation” “The Army in Transformation—Responsive to the Needs of the Nation” Table of Contents FY00

  17. Assessment of the U.S. Department of Defense Efforts to Develop an Effective Medical Logistics System within the Afghan National Security Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ANA and ANP health care system that is the appropriate blend of the Force Health Protection and Combat Health Support system concepts found in existing...Chief Financial Officer to learn how this facility is funded and how Class VIII is provided to the hospital. The 210-bed WAKH is funded, primarily...the supply chain.” U.S. Army Regulation 40-3 “Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care,” February 22, 2008 The regulation provides guidance on policies and

  18. Sociopolitical adjustment among Afghan refugees in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centlivres, P; Centlivres-demont, M

    1987-01-01

    Although international organizations and Pakistanis expect Afghans to act like true refugees--dependent, obedient, and grateful--Afghans consider themselves as temporary exiles who, in protest against an anti-Islamic government, found temporary refuge in Pakistan; or as soldiers in the holy wars who temporarily use their Islamic neighbor as a base before returning to fight in Afghanistan. Conforming to this concept and to these objectives, the refugees seek to preserve a certain autonomy and to lean towards forms of organization which are derived either from their traditional social structure, or as is more common now, from the ideology of the Islamic movements. One can understand that this situation may cause many misunderstandings, especially with international organizations which finance and supervise aid to the Afghan refugees in Pakistan. As for anthropologists, it is necessary to go beyond known concepts, to relativize familiar models and to act on changes which have come about in the structures and ideology of the Afghan people.

  19. Army Sustainment. Volume 44, Issue 3. May-June 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Clark W. LeMasters, Jr. The History of Ordnance in America—Karl Rubis Logistics Movements in a Changing Afghan Environment —Captain Owen A. Rose What...relevance of individual learning and deliv- ers multiple learning stimuli to reach audio, visual, and kinesthetic learners. It maximizes opportunities to...supports operations during the Vietnam War. May–June 2012 1716 Army Sustainment Logistics Movements in a Changing Afghan Environment by

  20. The Future Role of Army National Guard Special Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    also possess a working knowledge of dentistry , veterinary care, public sanitation, water quality and optometry. Finally, there is one senior and one...prevent violence but when combat is needed, it is best done by the Partner Nation personnel with appropriate external support. One recent and important

  1. The Army National Guard Annual Financial Report, Fiscal Year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    from Fresno , California , left for their mobilization station, in sequence with the last elements departing during November 2010. Aviation...assets and expertise of land-grant universities and cooperative oPeRations Review Members of the California National Guard’s Agribusiness...Development Team watch as water from a new cistern fills the demonstration farm during a test of the system in Chowkay District. Photo by Staff Sgt. Nathan

  2. 32 CFR 621.1 - Loan of Army/Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) owned property for use at national and State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Loan of Army/Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) owned property for use at national and State conventions. 621.1 Section 621.1 National Defense Department of... of Army/Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) owned property for use at national and State conventions. (a...

  3. Lessons from the Profile of Kidney Diseases Among Afghan Refugees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoukesh, Salman; Mojtahedzadeh, Mona; Cooper, Chad J.; Tolouian, Ramin; Said, Sarmad; Ortega, Lauro; Didia, S. Claudia; Behazin, Arash; Sherzai, Dean; Blandon, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to a paucity of research on the profile of kidney diseases among refugee populations, specifically Afghan refugees in Iran, this study aimed to illustrate the pattern of kidney disease among Afghan refugees in Iran and create a database for evaluating the performance of future health services. Material/Methods This was a retrospective cross sectional study, in which we collected the demographics and profile of kidney diseases among Afghan refugees between 2005 and 2010 from referrals to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) offices in Iran. Results The total number of referrals in this group of diseases was 3193 out of 23 152 with 41.5% female and 58.5% male. Regarding age distribution, 10.5% were 0–14 years of age, 78% were 15–59, and 11.5% were ≥60. The most common health referral for females and males (0–14) was end-stage renal disease (ESRD), accounting for 34.6%. This was also the main reason of referrals for females and males aged 15–59, accounting for 73.5% and 66.6%, respectively, and in both sexes in the ≥60 age range it was 63.1%. Conclusions The pattern of our renal clinic referrals may gradually change to ESRD, which is associated with a huge economic burden. The need to provide health insurance to everyone or reform the health care system to provide coverage for more of the population can be justified and would improve cost effectiveness. PMID:25208585

  4. Discovering the Army's Core Competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudesheim, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    This paper seeks to answer the question, "Has the Army correctly identified its core competencies to ensure the Army can adequately respond to the national military strategy?" FM 1, The Army (Prototype Draft...

  5. Building Afghan Research Capability | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program will be managed by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development on behalf of the Hindu Kush Himalayan University Consortium. The idea is to prepare Afghan researchers, public administrators and development practitioners to operationalize a sustainable mountain development agenda in ...

  6. Mission Accomplished Rebuilding the Iraqi and Afghan Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This stood in stark contrast to the presidencies of Karzai and Ghani, who labeled the Taliban as political opponents and brothers , rather than as...David McKiernan, interview by Margaret Warner , PBS News Hour, PBS, March 17, 2009. 156 Stanley A. McChrystal, COMISAF’s Initial Assessment...issued yet another arrest warrant for Sunni parliamentarian, Ahmad al- Alwani, that ultimately ended in the ISF killing al-Alwani’s brother and a

  7. Preliminary assessment report for Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana Army National Guard, Helena, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuWaldt, J.; Meyer, T.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at a Montana Army National Guard (MTARNG) property near Helena, Montana. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort William Henry Harrison property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program

  8. Major infectious diseases affecting the Afghan immigrant population of Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Pourhossein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: As Afghans make up the largest group of foreign nationals in Iran, the aim of this study was to assess the proportion of Afghan immigrants among those afflicted by the most prevalent infectious diseases in Iran. METHODS: National and international online scientific databases were searched through November 2013. The reference lists of included studies were also searched. All descriptive studies concerning the most common infectious diseases in Iran, including tuberculosis, multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria, cholera, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, leishmaniasis, and hepatitis B were retrieved. The nationality of patients was not considered. The selection of studies and data extraction was performed separately by two authors. Results were reported using a random effect model with a 95% confidence interval (CI. RESULTS: The overall proportion of Afghan immigrants with the aforementioned infectious diseases was 29% (95% CI, 21 to 37. According to a stratified analysis, the proportion of Afghan immigrants afflicted with tuberculosis was (29%, multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (56%, malaria (40%, cholera (8%, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (25%, leishmaniasis (7%, and hepatitis B (14%. CONCLUSIONS: It is highly recommended to monitor the health status of the Afghan immigrants when entering Iran, to reduce the spread of communicable diseases, which are viewed as serious in international health regulations.

  9. The U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues. Volume 1: Theory of War and Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    of suspected German sympathizers and war dissenters. The attorney general enlisted volunteer “loyalty enforcers” who carried official looking badges...liberalization of agricultural trade. Uruguay also tackled trade in services, such as banking, telecommunications, tourism , and profes- sional services...battlefield, volunteer militaries (that tend to be more expensive than conscript armies), recon- struction of battle ravaged nations, and other considerations

  10. [Medico-legal study on crashes of fighter planes of the National People's Army].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignitz, Eberhard; Kopetz, Bernd; Wirth, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    In the years 1974 to 1990, 39 pilots died in 34 crashes of fighter planes of the National People's Army; 32 victims were examined forensically. For the present study all autopsy protocols and examination reports available in the German Federal Military Archives in Freiburg could be evaluated. Both officer cadets and experienced pilots of high military ranks were among the victims. The majority of the crashes (24 out of 34) was caused by human failure. Health problems or the use of alcohol and medications did not play a role in the aircraft accidents. All killed pilots were identified. The injury patterns after fatal ejection are different from the patterns seen after impact with a plane. Such patterns of findings are meaningful in the reconstruction of unknown sequences of events leading to the accidents and for the assessment of the pilots' capacity to act at the moment of the incident

  11. Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI): A successful start to a national program in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, Erin; Jung, Robin E.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Adams, Michael J.; Corn, P. Stephen; Dodd, C. Kenneth; Fellers, Gary M.; Sadinski, Walter J.; Schwalbe, Cecil R.; Walls, Susan C.; Fisher, Robert N.; Gallant, Alisa L.; Battaglin, William A.; Green, D. Earl

    2005-01-01

    Most research to assess amphibian declines has focused on local-scale projects on one or a few species. The Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) is a national program in the United States mandated by congressional directive and implemented by the U.S. Department of the Interior (specifically the U.S. Geological Survey, USGS). Program goals are to monitor changes in populations of amphibians across U.S. Department of the Interior lands and to address research questions related to amphibian declines using a hierarchical framework of base-, mid- and apex-level monitoring sites. ARMI is currently monitoring 83 amphibian species (29% of species in the U.S.) at mid- and apex-level areas. We chart the progress of this 5-year-old program and provide an example of mid-level monitoring from 1 of the 7 ARMI regions.

  12. Preliminary assessment report for Redmond Army National Guard Facility, Installation 53120, Redmond, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard (WAARNG) property in Redmond, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Redmond ARNG property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) supply/storage of hazardous materials, (2) weapons cleaning, (3) the underground storage tanks (USTs), and (4) the use of herbicides. These ESOs are no longer active because of the closure of OMS 10 activities in 1988

  13. Prevalence of Giardia intestinalis and Hymenolepis nana in Afghan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Present study aimed to investigate prevalence of Giardia intestinalis and Hymenolepis nana in Afghan refugees visiting Central Health Unit (CHU), Kot ... are common among Afghan refugees and serious preventive measures should be implemented to promote the safety and healthy lifestyle of these people.

  14. Afghan journalists tour Canada to share "Afghanistan's Story" | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... ... 2006 where they spoke about the status of women in Afghan society and the state of the Afghan media. The public events included the screening of Afghanistan Unveiled, a documentary shot in 2003 by the first team of women video journalists trained in Afghanistan. The 14 young women, including Azizi, ...

  15. Blood pressure in Afghan male immigrants to Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Bülow, Jens; Simonsen, Lene

    2013-01-01

    ) and (ii) blunted renin response to a change in salt intake. METHODS: Twenty-four-hour ABP was measured in 40 men of Afghan (Afghans) and 40 men of Danish (Danes) origin. Each group was divided into young (20-30 years, n = 20) and middle aged (40-60 years, n = 20). A 3-day low (70 mmol per 24-h) and a 3......-day high (250 mmol per 24-h) salt intake were in addition instituted in subgroups of the young groups (n = 18). RESULTS: Young and middle-aged Afghans exhibited a lower 24-h mean arterial pressure (24-h MAP) than the same respective age groups of Danes (83 ± 1 versus 90 ± 1 mm Hg, P... versus 100 ± 1 mm Hg, Pyoung groups during increased salt intake, whereas the Danes exhibited a greater decrease in plasma renin activity (PRA) (Pyoung Afghans. CONCLUSIONS: Afghan...

  16. Impact response of US Army and National Football League helmet pad systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J

    2011-02-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL] was tasked to compare the impact response of NFL helmet pad systems and U.S. Army pad systems compatible with an Advanced Combat Helmet [ACH] at impact velocities up to 20 ft/s. This was a one-year study funded by the U.S. Army and JIEDDO. The Army/JIEDDO point of contact is COL R. Todd Dombroski, DO, JIEDDO Surgeon. LLNL was chosen by committee to perform the research based on prior published computational studies of the mechanical response of helmets and skulls to blast. Our collaborators include the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory [USAARL] (a DoD laboratory responsible for impact testing helmets), Team Wendy and Oregon Aero (current and former ACH pad manufacturers), Riddell and Xenith (NFL pad manufacturers), and d3o (general purpose sports pad manufacturer). The manufacturer-supplied pad systems that were studied are shown in the figure below. The first two are the Army systems, which are bilayer foam pads with both hard and soft foam and a water-resistant airtight wrapper (Team Wendy) or a water-resistant airtight coating (Oregon Aero). The next two are NFL pad systems. The Xenith system consists of a thin foam pad and a hollow air-filled cylinder that elastically buckles under load. The Riddell system is a bilayer foam pad that is encased in an inflatable airbag with relief channels to neighboring pads in the helmet. The inflatable airbag is for comfort and provides no enhancement to impact mitigation. The d3o system consists of a rate-sensitive homogeneous dense foam. LLNL performed experiments to characterize the material properties of the individual foam materials and the response of the complete pad systems, to obtain parameters needed for the simulations. LLNL also performed X-ray CT scans of an ACH helmet shell that were used to construct a geometrically accurate computational model of the helmet. Two complementary sets of simulations were performed. The first set of simulations reproduced the

  17. The Alaska Army National Guard Contributions to U.S. National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-19

    Alaska militia: the Alaska National Guard, the Alaska State Defense Force ( ASDF ), and the Alaska Naval Militia.44 By law, the militia can be ordered...and control of the AG when mobilized on state active duty. The ASDF and the Naval Militia cannot exceed the combined authorized strength of 254.45...The ASDF and Naval Militia serve only for training 13 and in time of State emergency or crisis and are funded solely by the State of Alaska. Their

  18. Keep Driving -- An Assessment of the Afghan Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    built Turkmen-Afghan- Pakistan- India (TAPI) and Iran-Pakistan- India (IPI) gas pipelines. These projects are delayed due to security concerns, and may...Target for Afghan Military Lead <http://query.nytimes.com/ gst /fullpage.html?res=9802E7DE113EF932A15754C0A9669D8B63&scp=1&sq =Afghanistan economic...Sets 2014 as Target for Afghan Military Lead <http://query.nytimes.com/ gst /fullpage.html?res=9802E7DE113EF932A15754C0 A9669D8B63&scp=1&sq=Afghanistan

  19. The Italian Army Medical Corps in the United Nations "peace-keeping" operations: Somalia and Mozambique, December 1992-December 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, G

    1996-01-01

    The Italian Army took part in the United Nations peace keeping operations in Somalia from December 1992 to March 1994 and in Mozambique from April 1993 to December 1994. These two missions involving a total of 16,358 men were very different technically, logistically, and epidemiologically. In Somalia the main pathology observed was traveler's diarrhea which affected 55% of the personnel. In Mozambique the main problem was malaria. A combination of chloroquine and proguanil was poorly effective but replacement with mefloquine gave good results. These two missions which were the first undertaken by the Italian Army outside the Mediterranean basin since the Second World War allowed testing of the readiness of materials, equipment, and personnel. Other missions in Lebanon, Turkey, Kurdistan, and Albania greatly benefited from the information obtained in these two initial operations.

  20. Public-academic partnerships: working together to meet the needs of Army National Guard soldiers: an academic-military partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalack, Gregory W; Blow, Adrian J; Valenstein, Marcia; Gorman, Lisa; Spinner, Jane; Marcus, Sheila; Kees, Michelle; McDonough, Susan; Greden, John F; Ames, Barbara; Francisco, Burton; Anderson, James R; Bartolacci, James; Lagrou, Robert

    2010-11-01

    The conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq have greatly increased the number of veterans returning home with combat exposure, reintegration issues, and psychiatric symptoms. National Guard soldiers face additional challenges. Unlike active duty soldiers, they do not return to military installations with access to military health services or peers. The authors describe the formation and activities of a partnership among two large state universities in Michigan and the Michigan Army National Guard, established to assess and develop programming to meet the needs of returning soldiers. The process of forming the partnership and the challenges, opportunities, and benefits arising from it are described.

  1. Predictors of Army National Guard and Reserve members' use of Veteran Health Administration health care after demobilizing from OEF/OIF deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2014-10-01

    This study described rates and predictors of Army National Guard and Army Reserve members' enrollment in and utilization of Veteran Health Administration (VHA) services in the 365 days following demobilization from an index deployment. We also explored regional and VHA facility variation in serving eligible members in their catchment areas. The sample included 125,434 Army National Guard and 48,423 Army Reserve members who demobilized after a deployment ending between FY 2008 and FY 2011. Demographic, geographic, deployment, and Military Health System eligibility were derived from Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System and "Contingency Tracking System" data. The VHA National Patient Care Databases were used to ascertain VHA utilization and status (e.g., enrollee, TRICARE). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate predictors of VHA utilization as an enrollee in the year following demobilization. Of the study members demobilizing during the observation period, 56.9% of Army National Guard members and 45.7% of Army Reserve members utilized VHA as an enrollee within 12 months. Demographic, regional, health coverage, and deployment-related factors were associated with VHA enrollment and utilization, and significant variation by VHA facility was found. These findings can be useful in the design of specific outreach efforts to improve linkage from the Military Health System to the VHA. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Status of Developing Afghan Governance and Lessons for Future Endeavors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven H Sternlieb

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Building the capacity of and reforming Afghan governance is widely viewed as the key to success in Afghanistan. Assessing progress, however, is hampered by limited data outside the Afghan security ministries – the Ministries of Defense and Interior – and by the lack of a common definition of governance. Available reporting suggests building governance capacity is far from complete. Varying definitions of governance, coupled with the use of the term by numerous organizations without defining it, results in addressing too broad a range of issues. It would be more useful to concentrate on the core of governance – providing the services the Afghan government has committed to provide to its citizens. This, in turn, requires that Afghan ministries have the functional capacity to carry out their responsibilities, including financial management, budget formulation and execution, policy and strategic planning, and service delivery. However, time is growing short. The Afghan experience provides some important lessons that could guide future endeavors for the international community. First, this paper discusses progress in building ministerial capacity. Second, it discusses recent efforts to link continued financial assistance to Afghanistan with improved governance. Third, it describes how the lack of a commonly accepted definition of governance complicates assessing progress. Finally, it offers conclusions and observations about the failure to establish an autonomous Afghan governance capacity. For more than a decade, improving governance has been recognized as the most difficult and critical challenge involving Afghan reconstruction. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR reports that U.S. policymakers have consistently identified building the capacity of and reforming Afghan governance as the key to success in Afghanistan (SIGAR 2012, 22.

  3. When Teams Break Down: A Study of the Active Army/National Guard Feud of 1997

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    Teamwork is at the heart of all that is good and successful about the U.S. Army. Because it is so critical to warfighting and to all other missions, peacetime and wartime, we are taught not to expect anything good when teams break down...

  4. Commentary - The Early Days of Central Asian Military Integration: the Kyrgyz National Division of the Red Army in 1927-1928

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Ohayon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the sociology of a national division of the Red Army in the early days of its formation in Kyrgyzstan, as described in two documents about soldiers of Kyrgyz nationality in 1927 and 1928. At that time the Soviet Army was not seeking to substantially increase its numbers but rather recruiting in line with the intentions of the nationality policy, by integrating ethnic groups and regions that had been ignored by the high command. Kyrgyzstan is a striking exampl...

  5. A retrospective study of demographic parameters and major health referrals among Afghan refugees in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otoukesh Salman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction For nearly three decades, the two neighboring countries of Iran and Pakistan hosted millions of Afghans. Today, Afghans still represent the largest group of refugees in the world. This feature has greatly influenced provision of health care for this population. Due to a paucity of research on the health status of Afghan refugees in Iran, this study aim to make a vista on the pattern of different common diseases among Afghan refugees in Iran and use it as an index for performance evaluation of future health services to them. Methods This is a retrospective cross sectional study, in which we collected the demographic and medical data between 2005 and 2010 from referrals to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR offices in Iran. We also considered a comparative review of the burden of disease estimates by the World Health Organization (WHO for Afghanistan and Iran. Results Total numbers of referrals were 23,152 with 52.6% Female and 47.66% male. 29% were 0–14 years of age, 54% were 15–59, and 17% were 60+. The most common health referral for females and males (0–14 was perinatal diseases (15.16%, 15.2%, respectively. In the females (15–59 it was ophthalmic diseases (13.65%, and for males it was nephropathies (21.4%, and in both sexes (60+ age range it was ophthalmic diseases (21.3%, 19.9%, respectively. The largest ethnic group of afghan refugees in this study was Hazara (55% followed by Tajik (14%, Fars (12%, Sadat (9%, and 10% others. Ophthalmic diseases were the major cause of referrals by Hazara, Tajik, Fars, and Sadat groups with 26%, 20%, 26%, and 27% respectively. Referrals by pashtun group were mostly for neoplasms (17%, among Uzbek group it was nephropathies (26%, and in Baluch group Hematopoietic disorders (25%. Conclusion These data indicate higher referral rate for women 15–59 years of old and people in 60+ with ophthalmic diseases, neoplasms, and nephropathies. Even given certain

  6. Preliminary assessment report for Wayland Army National Guard Armory (former Boston Defense Area Nike Battery 73), Installation 23295, Wayland, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard property near Wayland, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in respond to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining sites activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Wayland Army National Guard Army property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  7. Transforming for Multinational Operations: A Study of the National Army of Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    Rezumat Informativ Pentru Jurnalisti Politica de Securitate a Republicii Moldova,” http://www.ipp.md/public/files/Proiecte/ Info_Brief_no._4_...Proiect de Politica Publica, “Sporirea Atractivitatii Serviciului Militar prin Contract,” November 2012, www.army.md/inf/ppp_doc_1641.doc (accessed May...1,5 Total revenue (maximum option) 6,71 Source. Ministerul Apărării al Republicii Moldova, Proiect de Politica Publica, “Sporirea Atractivitatii

  8. Preliminary assessment report for Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana Army National Guard, Helena, Montana. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuWaldt, J.; Meyer, T.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at a Montana Army National Guard (MTARNG) property near Helena, Montana. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort William Henry Harrison property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  9. Service to the Nation, Strength for the Future. Fiscal Year 2013 United States Army Annual Financial Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Warrior Transition Command ( WTC ) ensures focused and effective management across all aspects of the WCTP. In FY 2013, the Army dedicated $321...the WTC leading the way, the Army cares for over 25,500 Soldiers and veterans annually. Under WTC’s direction, the Army Wounded Warrior Program

  10. Afghan Religion in US Army Pre-Deployment Schooling : And the Meeting between US Soldiers and Afghans in War

    OpenAIRE

    Tuvik, Julie Elise

    2011-01-01

    Denne masteroppgaven setter søkelys på undervisningen som amerikanske soldater mottar før de blir stasjonert I Afghanistan. Lærer de noe om religion i landet de skal tjenestegjøre i? Hva lærer de? Afghanistan er et muslimsk land og nesten hele befolkningen er muslimer. Islam er meget viktig på alle nivåer i det afghanske samfunnet; helt fra familien og opp til regjeringsnivå. Soldatene i den amerikanske hæren skal kunne samarbeide med både afghanske sivile og soldater. De snakker som ...

  11. A Description of Suicides in the Army National Guard During 2007-2014 and Associated Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James

    2017-06-01

    Suicide, due to its increased occurrence in recent years, has been a chief concern of the U.S. military. While there have been many published studies on the topic, conspicuously absent are studies that have included reserve military personnel. To fill this gap, this study reports descriptive statistics of personnel information and events surrounding 706 Army National Guard suicides that had occurred from 2007 through 2014. Comparative personnel information for random samples of nonsuicides for similar years (8 years, 1,000 cases per year) allowed examining factors associated most with suicide. Findings were very similar to those observed in the active duty Army and civilian populations. Primary risk factors for suicide were as follows: age (young), gender (male), and race/ethnicity (White). Most suicides occurred in nonmilitary status (86%) involving personal firearms (72%). Most frequent events surrounding the suicide were as follows: poor military performance (36% of all suicides), parent-family relationship problems (28%), substance abuse (27%), past behavioral health problem (20%), current behavioral health problems (10%), income problems (22%), and full-time employment problems (18%). Implications of findings for suicide prevention are discussed. © 2016 The American Association of Suicidology.

  12. The Afghan Mission: The Other Side of the COIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luděk MORAVEC

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article called “The Afghan Mission: The Other Side of the COIN” brings an evaluation of NATO and the Taliban strategies in contemporary Afghanistan. The strategic choice of both actors is researched using the concept of the “centers of gravity” and confronted with a specific situation on the ground. Furthermore, additional attention is paid to the struggle for hearts and minds and its role in NATO’s strategy. The paper is concluded with the determination of a single center of gravity of the NATO-Taliban confrontation which is offered as the evaluation criterion for further steps to be used in the Afghan war.

  13. Debt and poppy cultivation : driving factors behind Afghan opium production

    OpenAIRE

    Willumsen, Fredrik Haldorsen

    2006-01-01

    In this master thesis I intend to study opium production in Afghanistan, and identify important drivers behind the opium production. The main aim is to test whether or not Afghan opium production is debt-induced. A claim often found in the literature on Afghan opium production is that the production of opium is debt–induced. In the first part of the thesis I provide a theoretical rationale for why this is the case, using a dynamic model of the cropping choice of a utility maximizing hou...

  14. Afghan refugees in Iran: the needs of women and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Squire

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Since at least the 1970s Afghans have been coming to Iran, some insearch of work, others to seek protection. The political dominance by the Taliban since 1995 has been a significant factor in the acceleration in the flow of refugees. The International Consortium for Refugees in Iran (ICRI started trying to gather more systematic information on the needs and situation of Afghan refugees. As the coordinating body for local and international NGOs working withrefugees, ICRI tries to raise awareness of the problems facing refugees in Iran, by disseminating detailed informationon their situation.

  15. Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.

    1992-10-01

    Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual foxes were trapped 463 times. The number of individuals trapped and minimum population size calculations showed a decline over time. The highest minimum population (109) was observed in winter 1988. Summer 1991 had the lowest minimum population size (45). No evidence was found to indicate that the apparent population decline was a result of military-authorized activities.

  16. The Strategic Lessons Unlearned from Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan: Why the Afghan National Security Forces Will Not Hold, and the Implications for the U.S. Army in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    authority in this category. “Reli- gious” leadership is self-explanatory, but would obvi- ously include, for example, as archetypes the former...the sub- jects of ongoing debates and semantic arguments, and the topic has generated a large volume of academic literature .65 As Carolyn Stephenson

  17. Cultural Awareness in Afghan Helicopter Dispute - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    stoicism ” are the admired traits of the community. 5 Raymond Cohen, author of Negotiating Across Cultures, notes that in such a community, “Actions...themselves within the community. The Afghans, on the other hand, viewed such an aggressive tactic as a loss of piety and stoicism . To them, the

  18. Building Afghan Research Capability | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program will be managed by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development on behalf of the Hindu Kush Himalayan University Consortium. The idea is to prepare Afghan researchers, public administrators and development practitioners to operationalize a sustainable mountain development agenda in ...

  19. Prevalence of Giardia intestinalis and Hymenolepis nana in Afghan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Present study aimed to investigate prevalence of Giardia intestinalis and Hymenolepis nana in Afghan refugees visiting Central Health Unit (CHU), Kot Chandana (Mianwali, Northern Punjab) during two years period (February 2007 to December 2009). Methods: A total of 687 stool samples were collected from ...

  20. L’impasse de la guerre afghane : Une perspective du réalisme structurel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscyll Anctil Avoine

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available L’engagement des États-Unis en sol afghan découle des prétentions de ce pays à réaffirmer sa puissance hégémonique; cependant, les raisons du maintien des troupes de l’otan, plus de quinze ans après l’invasion sont beaucoup moins évidentes. Les États-Unis n’ont effectivement pas réussi à éliminer, ni même diminuer, les actions des insurgés et le panorama politique s’est complexifié. L’objectif de cet article est donc d’analyser l’occupation afghan par les troupes l’otan à la lumière des postulats et concepts avancés par les réalistes structurels afin de faire une critique de la persistance de l’intervention militaire et de ses effets néfastes sur l’intérêt national des États-Unis. Pour répondre à l’objectif, j’analyse l’engagement des troupes en Afghanistan à la suite des attentats du 11 septembre 2001 et je critique de leur permanence dans ce pays à partir des postulats théoriques de Mearsheimer soutenant l’irrationalité de la poursuite de l’intervention militaire.

  1. Army Public Service Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    publicists who are ever searching for economical forums through which to communicate Army viewpoints. The majority of interview and information programs...Guard to obtain public service time on stations which normally 48 reject regular Army requests. There is evidence that National Guard publicists have... Audiovisual Agency at Norton Air Force Base where it is dubbed on a C-type audio cassette and mailed directly to eighty-four radio stations. The cost of

  2. Relevance of Army National Guard Infantry Units in the Force Structure and Their Role in Combat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harris, Brian

    2004-01-01

    ...% of a total force of 346,848 assigned. Such large numbers are staggering considering that National Guard infantry units are not being utilized according to their organization training and equipment...

  3. Army Transformation: Its Long-Term Ability to Support the National Security Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Limberg, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    ..., interconnected and risky than ever before". The Cold War containment strategy is no longer effective in an environment of rogue nations, strong nationalistic sentiments, international criminal and terrorist organizations, and the proliferation...

  4. Resilience as a moderating factor between stress and alcohol-related consequences in the Army National Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica Kelley; Brown, Janice; Bray, Robert M

    2018-05-01

    Due to the current prolonged conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, members of the United States National Guard and Reserve have shifted from a historically support-based role to an integral segment of combat efforts. Clinical and epidemiological research studies conducted on both civilian and military populations have documented high rates of comorbidity of stress disorders and substance use disorders. It is widely understood that excessive alcohol use is an issue among military personnel. The aim of this paper is to describe risk factors for alcohol-related serious consequences in a study of Army National Guard service members, as well as the role of resilience in protecting against these risks. Members of the National Guard (N=320) participated in the survey. We conducted a multiple regression to predict alcohol-related serious consequences and a simple moderation analysis was performed. After controlling for race, education, and deployment history, several variables emerged as significant predictors of alcohol-related consequences. Higher stressors, lower resilience, younger age, being unmarried and not living as married, being male, and identifying as non-Hispanic were associated with higher levels of serious alcohol-related consequences. Results revealed that resilience significantly moderated the relationship between stress and alcohol-related consequences. This study furthers our understanding of the alcohol-stress relationship by contextualizing it in terms of behaviors related to alcohol, as opposed to measuring consumption only. Most importantly, our work extends prior research in its examination of resilience as a moderator of the relationship between stress and serious alcohol-related consequences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fertility and Family Planning Among Immigrant Afghan Women in an Iranian City: A Research Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajede Vaezzade

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent estimates of fertility level of women in Afghanistan suggest that Afghan women have a very high fertility level as they marry young and continue to have children through the end of reproductive period. However, when Afghan women move to Iran as immigrants, they quickly adopt the fertility patterns of Iran. On the average the Afghan immigrant women in Iran has three children fewer than the average number of children ever born to women in Afghanistan.

  6. Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, K A; Berry, W H; Standley, W G; O`Farrell, T P

    1992-09-01

    The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb be reproductively active. The mean litter size during 1989 - 1991 was 3.0 (n = 21, SE = 0.28) and ranged from one to six pups. Both the proportion of vixens successfully raising pups and the mean litter size observed at Camp Roberts during this study were lower than those reported at other locations. Sex ratios of kit fox pups were male biased two of the three years, but did not differ statistically from 1:1 throughout the study. Whelping was estimated to occur between February 15 and March 5. Results of this study support previous reports that kit foxes are primarily monogamous, although one case of polygamy may have occurred. Both the proportion of dispersing radiocollared juveniles (26%) and the mean dispersal distance (5.9 km) of juveniles at Camp Roberts appeared low compared to other locations.

  7. Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standley, W.G.; McCue, P.M.

    1992-09-01

    Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values were all within the normal ranges reported for kit foxes in other locations. Three hematology parameters had significant differences between male and female values; males had higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower lymphocyte counts. There were no significant differences between serum chemistry values from male and female foxes. Prevalence of antibodies was determined from serum samples from 47 (26 female, 21 male) adult kit foxes and eight (4 female, 4 male) juveniles. Antibodies were detected against five of the eight pathogens tested: canine parvovirus, Toxoplasma gondii Leptospira interrogans, canine distemper virus, and canine hepatitis virus. Antibodies were not detected against Brucella, canis, Coccidioides immitis, or Yersinia pestis.

  8. Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, K.A.; Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1992-09-01

    The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb be reproductively active. The mean litter size during 1989 - 1991 was 3.0 (n = 21, SE = 0.28) and ranged from one to six pups. Both the proportion of vixens successfully raising pups and the mean litter size observed at Camp Roberts during this study were lower than those reported at other locations. Sex ratios of kit fox pups were male biased two of the three years, but did not differ statistically from 1:1 throughout the study. Whelping was estimated to occur between February 15 and March 5. Results of this study support previous reports that kit foxes are primarily monogamous, although one case of polygamy may have occurred. Both the proportion of dispersing radiocollared juveniles (26%) and the mean dispersal distance (5.9 km) of juveniles at Camp Roberts appeared low compared to other locations

  9. Village Stability Operations and the Afghan Local Police

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Islam in its struggle against foreign infidels . For USSOF, the focus of VSO and ALP on population security, governance, and development has improved...road checkpoints or acts of sexual abuse against the citizenry, it would draw the condemnation of the population. Historically, SOF have achieved...enemy narrative that the insurgents were waging a war against foreign infidels , which sapped the enthusiasm of Afghans and foreign Islamists who had

  10. Switching Sides: Coalition Warfare in Recent Afghan History

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    in the Afghan and Bosnian Civil Wars, the doctoral dissertation of Fotini Christia submitted to Harvard University in May 2008.1 Her work documented... Christia , in her research, defines an alliance as “a formal or informal relationship of security cooperation between two or more groups, which...changed over time often finding combatants who were once allied with each other fighting against one another. Fotini Christia found that coalitions

  11. National Service and Its Effect on the Army’s Ability to Acquire Quality Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-03

    national service was a way to address three problems: American young people who lacked a sense of civic obligation, high youth unemployment , and...of 1993 became law. The stated purpose of the Act was to instill a sense of civic pride into American youth, allieviate high youth unemployment and...military as an asset available for meeting the social goals of civic obligation, training of youth, and reducing youth unemployment . The second argument is

  12. Solving the Army National Guard Forward Support Battalion Staff Training Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-12

    34nTIC 0 S_. - CTE AD-A265 39S8 1993JU The vim upiuwd ia wis pqs im don of Sie mwd am do not -hm-.. mi2ct Os ,wm of Os Duimamt of Ddini or O of its qm...members would be in the individual student learning mode. The operation could be "rewound" and played back like a National Football League instant

  13. U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues. Third Edition, Volume 2. National Security Policy and Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    to Buddhist monks and nuns.7 Similarly, a sacred Jain text says, “One may not kill, ill-use, insult, torment, or persecute any kind of living being...While this power struggle illustrates direct conflict, how does the Congress routinely influence policy and strategy formulation in the national...logically flows from its appropriations role.7 The leaders of the foreign policy agencies routinely go to Capitol Hill to testify before various committees

  14. From Kabul to the Academy: Narratives of Afghan Women's Journeys to and through U.S. Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Bushra

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the experiences of seven Afghan women pursuing doctoral degrees in a variety of disciplines and programs across the United States. The guiding question for this study was: What factors influence Afghan women's journeys to and experiences in doctoral programs? In an attempt to understand Afghan women doctoral students, I…

  15. It’s Just Not Cricket - The Anglo-Afghan Wars and Their Relevance to Current Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    Afghan region. 1398: Timur led a Mongol invasion ofthe Afghan region. 1525: Babur the Tiger , an Afghan warlord, descends on India. 1600: (British...letters from Lieutenant Arthur Conolly (6 Bengal Native Light Cavalry) who conducted the first covert reconnaissance missions beyond the Khyber. It

  16. Summary of Independent Assessment of the Afghan National Security Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    six institutional enablers are important for ministerial success: anti-corruption; gender integration; local owner- ship; information technology...continued relationship with elements of the Taliban; and Afghanistan’s growing security relationship with India . However, we also find that there...since a reduction could create an imbalance in the current power-sharing relationships across regional and ethnic lines. In addi- tion, reducing the

  17. Examining Life Goals and School Attendance Rates of Afghan Students Receiving Higher Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Hafiz

    2016-01-01

    This research is a descriptive study carried out to examine the relations between life goals and school attendance levels among Afghan students receiving higher education in Turkey. In total there were 198 Afghan students that participated in the study. Among which 159 were male and 39 female. All of these students were studying in 16 Turkish…

  18. Transnational Links of Afghan Madrasas: Implications for the Reform of Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchgrevink, Kaja

    2013-01-01

    Described as "terrorist factories", the South Asian madrasas have become the subject of great controversy since September 11, 2001. In Afghanistan, people commonly blame Pakistani madrasas for recruiting Afghan youth into militant groups. In response, the Afghan government has initiated a comprehensive reform of the Islamic education…

  19. The Journey to Develop Educated Entrepreneurs: Prospects and Problems of Afghan Businessmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Ali; Akbar, Saeed; Dalziel, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to examine self-perceived entrepreneurial problems and prospects in a post-war scenario. It aims to present a holistic and historical account of Afghan graduates and their ability to transform into educated entrepreneurs. The study further aims to highlight entrepreneurial characteristics of the Afghans and link them to…

  20. Selecting instruments for assessing psychological wellbeing in Afghan and Kurdish refugee groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman-Hill Cheryl MR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Afghan and Iraqi refugees comprise nearly half of all those currently under United Nations protection. As many of them will eventually be resettled in countries outside the region of origin, their long term health and settlement concerns are of relevance to host societies, and will be a likely focus for future research. Since Australia and New Zealand have both accepted refugees for many years and have dedicated, but different settlement and immigration policies, a study comparing the resettlement of two different refugee groups in these countries was undertaken. The purpose of this article is to describe the instrument selection for this study assessing mental health and psychological well being with Afghan and Kurdish former refugees, in particular to address linguistic considerations and translated instrument availability. A summary of instruments previously used with refugee and migrant groups from the Middle East region is presented to assist other researchers, before describing the three instruments ultimately selected for the quantitative component of our study. Findings The Kessler-10 Psychological Distress Scale (K10, General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale (GPSE, and Personal Well-Being Index (PWI all showed good reliability (Cronbach's alphas of 0.86, 0.89 and 0.83 respectively for combined language versions and ease of use even for pre-literate participants, with the sample of 193 refugees, although some concepts in the GPSE proved problematic for a small number of respondents. Farsi was the language of choice for the majority of Afghan participants, while most of the Kurds chose to complete English versions in addition to Farsi. No one used Arabic or Turkish translations. Participants settled less than ten years were more likely to complete questionnaires in Farsi. Descriptive summary statistics are presented for each instrument with results split by gender, refugee group and language version completed. Conclusion

  1. Loss of Culture, Loss of Language: An Afghan-American Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Saydee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study voices the concerns of Afghan-American parents about the disappearance of the Dari language among youth and provides data for policymakers to consider, particularly as the United States is deeply involved in Afghanistan. In this quantitative study, the researcher argues that when it comes to the decline of their heritage language and the inexorable shift towards mainstream culture, Afghan families experience similar forces of assimilation as other immigrants in the United States. The 27 Afghan parents from different households who participated in the study attribute the decline of their heritage language to Afghan-American children becoming accustomed to speaking English at home and in public, and wanting to fit into the mainstream culture. This study uses a Reversing Language Shift (RLS perspective to identify factors that have contributed to the slow erosion of Dari within the Afghan community in San Diego.

  2. Army Sustainability Report 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Antonio. The buffer objectives are to protect endangered species, primarily the Golden Cheeked Warbler , through off-site mitigation, and to acquire...water projects, including solar powered and standalone water filtration systems. In 2009, the Army worked with East African Community partner nations

  3. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    provides summary information regarding the prevalence of hearing injury experienced by U.S. Army Soldiers in 2016. Soldiers who completed a DD Form...broken out by Service component and will be updated annually. TOTAL ARMY STATISTICS FOR CY16 24% of Soldiers have some degree of hearing...loss: 21% Active Duty 27% Army National Guard 28% Army Reserve 5% of Soldiers have a clinically significant hearing loss: 4% Active Duty 8% Army

  4. Eliminate the Army and Air Force Reserves: Building a Robust National Guard to Meet 21st Century Operational Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    CENTURY REFORM Militia Reform and the Creation of the Army Reserve The Spanish -American War of 1898 is often cited as providing the impetus for...substantial gain in 1908 when Congress established a Medical Reserve Corps to address medical inadequacies identified during Spanish -American War.6...study the matter.26 Lack of transparency in the reserve components bureaucracies prevented the GAO from providing members of Congress a definitive

  5. Weekend Warriors for Water: Combating Water Scarcity in West Africa with United States Army National Guard and Reserve Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...personal goals. To the former members of 3d Platoon, 92d Chemical Company , 3d Infantry Division, thank you for giving me faith in myself and the Army...solutions (U.S. Water Partnership 2017). Other Organizations There are a plethora of private and public companies , agencies, and governments that strive to

  6. Dismantling the Afghan Opiate Economy: A Cultural and Historical Policy Assessment, with Policy Recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byrom, Christopher L

    2005-01-01

    .... Specific lessons are taken from a chapter dedicated to Afghan culture, history, and rural power structures, and applied in chapters analyzing the opiate economy and current counter-narcotics policies...

  7. Afghanistan's Constitutions: A Comparative Study and their Implications for Afghan Democratic Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Zoe B

    2006-01-01

    .... Instead, past Afghan constitutions have explicitly supported regimes rather than address the problem of the fragmentation of Afghanistan into small ethnic, linguistic, familial, and in some cases, religious, elements...

  8. Afghanistan's Constitutions: A Comparative Study and their Implications for Afghan Democratic Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Zoe B

    2006-01-01

    .... While Afghanistan's current constitution accommodates the multi-ethnic pattern of Afghan society, it provides only a partial solution to the challenges of state-building created by multi-ethnic societies...

  9. Afghan Women and the Taliban: An Exploratory Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seran de Leede

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen an increase in visible and sometimes even prominent roles for women in terrorist organisations. Both academics and organisations involved in counter-terrorism have paid increasing attention to he role of women not only as supporters of, but also as opponents to political violence. This Policy Brief examines the position of women in Afghanistan vis-à-vis the Taliban. Research Fellow Seran de Leede explores if Afghan women have been involved in the armed struggle of the Taliban as either active or passive supporters. She also considers the resilience women have shown towards political violence in Afghanistan and the possible role women can play in countering violent extremism in the country. Ultimately, this Policy Brief aims to contribute to a better understanding of the role of women in (countering political violence in Afghanistan.

  10. After the Spring: Reforming Arab Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Arab region, and intercultural communication . She was previously assigned to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Defence College and the...and provides solutions to strategic Army issues affecting the national security community . The Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute...concern topics having strategic implications for the Army, the Department of Defense, and the larger national security community . In addition to its

  11. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  12. Correlates and Predictors of Psychological Distress among Afghan Refugees in San Diego County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Qais; James, Sigrid; Siddiq, Hafifa; Montgomery, Susanne

    2015-07-01

    The psychological effects of war and resulting displacement continue to negatively impact Afghan refugees. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that are associated with and predict psychological distress symptoms among Afghan refugees. We analyzed data from a diverse sample of 130 Afghan refugees recruited through non-random sampling in the San Diego area. Participants completed self-report questionnaires consisting of a culturally validated measure of psychological distress, the Afghan Symptom Checklist [ ASCL ] alongside standardized measures of acculturation, social support, and perceived stress. In bivariate analyses, older age, older age at migration, female gender, being widowed, having lower education, being unemployed, unable to comfortably pay monthly bills, lower acculturation and social support, and higher levels of perceived stress were associated with psychological distress. However, only few variables - female gender, being widowed, unable to comfortably pay monthly bills, and perceived stress - remained significant in multivariate analysis. The findings from this study contribute to understanding the social determinants of distress that affect Afghans in exile even after long-term resettlement in the US. These reported outcomes support the need for continued research with Afghans, alongside the implementation of culturally relevant psychosocial interventions that emphasize prevention of post-resettlement stressors immediately upon resettlement.

  13. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  14. Assessment of U.S. Government and Coalition Efforts to Train, Equip, and Advise the Afghan Border Police

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    security providers for Afghanistan. Widespread corruption continues to limit the effectiveness and legitimacy of the Afghan government ...times the amount of customs revenue actually collected for the Afghan government was probably lost to corruption . The government garners almost...Report No. DODIG-2013-081 May 24, 2013 Special Plans and Operations Assessment of U.S. Government and

  15. Counterinsurgency on the Ground in Afghanistan. How Different Units Adapted to Local Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ABP Afghan Border Police ADT agribusiness development team AMF Afghan Militia Forces ANA Afghan National Army ANCOP Afghan National Civil Order...Vignette 3: US Marine Advisors in the Tagab Valley, Kapisa Counterinsurgency on the Ground in Afghanistan residents had a reputation for cooperating with...toward the insur- gents during earlier years of the war. The battalion, which acquired a reputation as an honest broker through repeated meetings with

  16. Frequency and risk factors of hepatitis b and c in afghan patients presenting to tertiary care hospital in peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To document the frequency and risk factors of Hepatits B and C in Afghan patients presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Peshawar. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Rehman Medical Institute (RMI), Peshawar from 1st January, 2012 to 31st December, 2012. Patients and Methods: A total of 2166 Afghan national were included in the study who underwent surgery in RMI through consecutive, non-probability sampling. Hepatits B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV antibody tests were performed by ELISA method. All patients who were positive for either of the two or both were investigated by a researcher-administered questionnaire to find the risk factors for seropositivity of hepatitis. Results: Out of a total of 2166 patients, 104 patients (4.8%) were found to be positive. Seventy-eight patients (75%) were HepBsAg positive while 24 patients (23%) were anti-HCV antibodies positive while 2 patients were positive for both viruses. Re-use of unsterilized syringes (23%) and history of previous surgery (19.2%) were the most common risk factors whereas no risk factor could be identified in 15 patients (14%). Seventy nine patients (76%) were newly diagnosed at time of test while 25 patients (24%) were known cases of either HBV or HCV. Only one patient had clinical/laboratory features of chronic liver disease while no patient had underwent Hep B vaccination or had hepatocellular carcinoma. Conclusion: A high seroprevalance of HBV and HCV was found in this study. Reuse of unsterilized syringes, history of previous surgery and tattoos piercing were found to be the most common risk factors. (author)

  17. China’s Emerging National Security Interests and Their Impact on the People’s Liberation Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    strengthen national defence, resist aggres- sion, defend the motherland, safeguard the people’s peaceful labour , participate in national reconstruc...sides to respect and protect each other’s core interests. In meetings with these part- ners, China often signals either its satisfaction or its...Hezuo he Touzi Zixun Yewu Tongji” [Statistics on Our Country’s External Contracted Construction Projects, Labour Cooperation, and Design Consultation

  18. Army Medical Imaging System - ARMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-08

    Melvin P. Siedband Frank C. Grenzow Craig A. Heilman James R. Gray Huilian Zhang A ... NTtS CFA?•I " U ; J C l A t j. University of Wisconsin _. I e...Medical Imaging System - ARMIS Contract # 6.AUTHOR(S) Melvin P. Siedband James R. Gray DAMDI7-88C-8058 Frank C. Grenzow Huilian Zhang 63807A Craig A...its use is inconsistent to the people who must manage it. The consistency of the Macin- tosh operating system permits easier staff training as imaging

  19. Administration: Army Congressional Fellowship Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    This printing publishes a new Army Regulation. This regulation presents the policies and procedures under which the Army manages the Army Congressional Fellowship Program and supplements applicable Department...

  20. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  1. Army medical imaging system: ARMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siedband, M.P.; Kramp, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances of stimulable phosphor screens, data cards using optical storage means, and new personal computers with image processing capability have made possible the design of economical filmless medical imaging systems. The addition of communication links means that remote interpretation of images is also possible. The Army Medical Imaging System uses stimulable phosphor screens, digital readout, a small computer, an optical digital data card device, and a DIN/PACS link. Up to 200 images can be stored in the computer hard disk for rapid recall and reading by the radiologist. The computer permits image processing, annotation, insertion of text, and control of the system. Each device contains an image storage RAM and communicates with the computer via the small computer systems interface. Data compression is used to reduce the required storage capacity and transmission times of the 1-mB images. The credit card-size optical data cards replace film and can store 12 or more images. The data cards can be read on an independent viewer. The research is supported by the U.S. Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory

  2. Improvement of Coordination in the Multi-National Military Coordination Center of the Nepal Army in Respond to Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    protected by more restrictions in their home countries, in which case further publication or sale of copyrighted images is not permissible...Humanitarian Assistance on Disaster Management.” Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School , Monterey, CA, March. Mininistry of Home Affairs. 2013. National Disaster...effective coordinating mechanism. The research follows the case study method utilizing the Capability Based Analysis (CBA) approach to scrutinize the

  3. INEE Minimum Standards: A Tool for Education Quality Assessment in Afghan Refugee Schools in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qahir, Katayon

    2007-01-01

    This article details a pilot Minimum Standards assessment in Afghan refugee schools supported by the International Rescue Committee's Female Education Program in the North West Frontier Province of Pakistan. A set of specifically selected, contextualized indicators, based on the global INEE Minimum Standards, served as a tool for teachers and…

  4. Circulatory responses to lower body negative pressure in young Afghans and Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Bülow, Jens; Simonsen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously shown that Afghans residing in Denmark for at least 12 years exhibit a lower 24-h ambulatory blood pressure compared to Danes. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the lower blood pressure reflects attenuated compensatory baroreflex responses...

  5. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply. © 2015 AABB.

  6. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level.

  7. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC's Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON

  8. High occurrence of food insecurity among urban Afghan refugees in Pakdasht, Iran 2008: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Morteza; Abdollahi, Zahra; Sheikholeslam, Robabeh; Kalantari, Nasser; Kavehi, Ziba; Neyestani, Tirang R

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to evaluate food security and its association with anthropometric measures among Afghan refugees living in Pakdasht, one of the main harbors of Afghan refugees in the neighborhood of Tehran. A total of 414 registered Afghan refugee households were recruited in a cross-sectional study. About 88% of households were food insecure. Unemployment and socioeconomic status were the major determinants of food insecurity among the refugee households. While about 58% of women were overweight/obese, the prevalence of underweight and wasting were remarkable in children (11.0% and 12.7%, respectively), indicating a recent malnutrition. Government and organizations working for refugees must focus their activities on empowering Afghan refugees.

  9. 32 CFR 516.14 - Service of process on DA or Secretary of Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Service of process on DA or Secretary of Army. 516.14 Section 516.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF... or Secretary of Army. The Chief, Litigation Division, shall accept service of process for Department...

  10. Prevalence of Giardia intestinalis and Hymenolepis nana in Afghan refugee population of Mianwali district, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrar Ul Haq, Khan; Gul, Naz Asma; Hammad, Hussain Muhammad; Bibi, Yasmeen; Bibi, Asma; Mohsan, Javed

    2015-06-01

    Present study aimed to investigate prevalence of Giardia intestinalis and Hymenolepis nana in Afghan refugees visiting Central Health Unit (CHU), Kot Chandana (Mianwali, Northern Punjab) during two years period (February 2007 to December 2009). A total of 687 stool samples were collected from different age groups of both genders. Samples were processed under sterile conditions after gross examination. Microscopic examination was done on same day along with eggs (H. nana), cyst and trophozoites (G. intestinalis) detection after staining. The prevalence of G. intestinalis was significantly higher (x2=59.54, pintestinal clinical symptoms observed in G. intestinalis. Whereas, bloody diarrhea (OR: 1.56, 95%CI=1.00-2.43) and rectal prolapse (OR: 5.79, 95%CI=1.87-17.91) were associated with H. nana infections. Intestinal parasitic infections are common among Afghan refugees and serious preventive measures should be implemented to promote the safety and healthy lifestyle of these people.

  11. The Afghan symptom checklist: a culturally grounded approach to mental health assessment in a conflict zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth E; Omidian, Patricia; Quraishy, Abdul Samad; Quraishy, Naseema; Nasiry, Mohammed Nader; Nasiry, Seema; Karyar, Nazar Mohammed; Yaqubi, Abdul Aziz

    2006-10-01

    This article describes a methodology for developing culturally grounded assessment measures in conflict and postconflict situations. A mixed-method design was used in Kabul, Afghanistan, to identify local indicators of distress and develop the 22-item Afghan Symptom Checklist (ASCL). The ASCL contains several indigenous items and items familiar to Western mental health professionals. The ASCL was pilot tested and subsequently administered to 324 adults in 8 districts of Kabul. It demonstrated excellent reliability (alpha=.93) and good construct validity, correlating strongly with a measure of exposure to war-related violence and loss (r=.70). Results of the survey indicate moderate levels of distress among Afghan men and markedly higher levels of distress and impaired functioning among women (and widows in particular). (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  12. Pakistan and Saudi Arabia: Towards Greater Independence in their Afghan Foreign Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Vandamme, Dorothée

    2014-01-01

    The following paper aims at studying the cases of Pakistani and Saudi’s Afghan policies, highlighting the development of their foreign policy as middle powers’ foreign policies. After explaining the limits of the constitutive approach to middle powers, we underline Islamabad’s and Riyadh’s interests and objectives in Afghanistan, by developing the perspectives of offensive realism as applied to Saudi Arabia, and defensive realism as applied to Pakistan. The third and final part of the analysi...

  13. No Retreat: The Failure of Soviet Decision-Making in the Afghan War, 1979-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    using negotiations to buy time for the much awaited development of a military advantage. Any agreement acceptable to the Soviet Union would have to...political struggle for funding.295 Gorbachev felt no compulsion to follow the Party tradition, established under Brezhnev, of preferentially...proved no exception---except that he was buying time to engineer a withdrawal. Part of that effort included addressing the weak Afghan political

  14. We are both diplomats and traders: Afghan transregional traders across the former Soviet Union

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Building on fieldwork with Afghan traders in the former Soviet Union, this article uses the idea of diplomacy to explore the skills and capacities that are central to the traders’ self-understandings and working lives. Of central concern is the way in which the traders often identify themselves as being ‘diplomats’. The expressions of the traders’ diplomatic skills take various forms including an ability to speak multiple languages, form intimate personal relationships across the boundaries o...

  15. U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cerami, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    For more than 3 decades, the Army War College Department of National Security and Strategy has faced the challenge of educating future strategic leaders on the subject of national security, or grand strategy...

  16. Acceptability of general practice services for Afghan refugees in south-eastern Melbourne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Prashanti; Cheng, I-Hao; Advocat, Jenny; Russell, Grant

    2017-04-01

    Over 750000 refugees have resettled in Australia since 1945. Despite complex health needs related to prior traumatic experiences and the challenges of resettlement in a foreign country, refugees experience poor access to primary care. Health and settlement service providers describe numerous cultural, communication, financial and health literacy barriers. This study aimed to investigate the acceptability of general practitioner (GP) services and understand what aspects of acceptability are relevant for Afghan refugees in south-eastern Melbourne. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two Afghan community leaders and 16 Dari- or English-speaking Afghan refugees who accessed GP services. Two distinct narratives emerged - those of recently arrived refugees and established refugees (living in Australia for 3 years or longer). Transecting these narratives, participants indicated the importance of: (1) a preference for detailed clinical assessments, diagnostic investigations and the provision of prescriptions at the first consultation; (2) 'refugee-friendly' staff; and (3) integrated, 'one-stop-shop' GP clinic features. The value of acceptable personal characteristics evolved over time - GP acceptability was less a consideration for recently arrived, compared with more, established refugees. The findings reinforce the importance of tailoring healthcare delivery to the evolving needs and healthcare expectations of newly arrived and established refugees respectively.

  17. Infectious diseases of afghan immigrants in the united states: review of published reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilsczek, F.H.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases of immigrants may differ from patients born and resident in the same country, especially if immigrants from Africa or Asia live in Europe or North America. Because the available information is limited published reports of infections of Afghan immigrants in the United States and other countries were analysed. Four reports from the US and 15 reports from other countries were identified [7, (46.7%) Pakistan, 5 (33.3%) Iran, 1 (6.7%) United Kingdom, 1 (6.7%) Germany, 1 (6.7%) Israel)]. Reports from the US were case reports or case series of infections with gastro-intestinal parasites and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (1, 25%), Echinococcus species (2, 50%), and Plasmodium vivax (1, 25%). Reports from other countries were case reports, case series, or surveys and investigated infections with Echinococcus species (2, 13%), Hepatitis B virus (HBV) (1, 6.7%), M. tuberculosis (6, 40%), P. falciparum (1, 6.7%), Leishmania tropica (3, 20%), Fasciola hepatica (1, 6.7%), and M. leprae (1, 6.7%). The reports suggest that Echinococcus species and L. tropica infections can be encountered in Afghan immigrants in the US, and the frequency of a positive PPD (purified protein derivative) response or HBsAg test was increased. An infectious diseases database specific for the country of residence readily available to clinicians treating Afghan patients outside of Afghanistan may be useful. (author)

  18. Literature Review and Profile of Cancer Diseases Among Afghan Refugees in Iran: Referrals in Six Years of Displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoukesh, Salman; Mojtahedzadeh, Mona; Figlin, Robert A; Rosenfelt, Fred P; Behazin, Arash; Sherzai, Dean; Cooper, Chad J; Nahleh, Zeina A

    2015-11-23

    There is a paucity of research on the profile of cancers among displaced populations, specifically Afghan refugees in Iran. This study illustrates the pattern of cancers in this population, and highlights the challenges of cancer care in displaced people with the intent that this data will facilitate appropriate allocation of resources to improve care in this population. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study, in which we collected the demographics and profile of cancers among Afghan refugees from 2005 to 2010 from referrals to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) offices in Iran. Accrued evidence by other studies published between January 1993 and July 2014 pertaining to cancer diagnoses in refugees from Afghanistan, Tibet, Syria, Jordan, and Iraq was reviewed. Cancer diagnoses accounted for 3083 of 23 152 total referrals, with 49% female and 51% male cases; 23.3% were 0-17 years of age, 61.2% were 18-59, and 15.5% were above 60. The most common health referral for females and males (0-17) was malignant neoplasms of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue, accounting for 34.2%. In the age groups 18-59 and above 60 for both male and females it was malignant neoplasm of the digestive system, occurring in 26.3% and 48.7%, respectively. In the setting of humanitarian crises especially war, cancer diagnoses among refugees is a major health burden both on the host countries and the international community with serious implications considering the recent growing trend in the Middle Eastern countries. The prevalence of certain cancer diagnoses among refugees, like gastrointestinal, respiratory, breast, and genitourinary cancers necessitates a multidirectional approach, primarily aimed at prevention and early detection. International partnerships are essential for improvement in cancer surveillance service availability, and delivery of the standard of care, in an overall effort to reduce the human cost, monetary, and resource associated burdens of

  19. Hepatitis B virus DNA level Among the Seropositive Afghan Immigrants, Southern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar; Asaei, Sadaf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis and control programs for infectious diseases among immigrants are the most important aspects of epidemiological studies for both origin and destination countries. Data about hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among the Afghan immigrants in Iran is limited. Objectives: To the best of HBV treatment and prevention in Afghan immigrants in Iran, the present study was conducted to determine the virus DNA level, and the frequency of respective hepatitis B risk factors among the respective seropositive patients in Fars province, southern Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 64 HBsAg positive Afghan immigrants including 47 (73.4%) men and 17 (26.6%) women, with ages ranging between 15 and 74 years (mean ± standard deviation: 37.69 ± 15.02 years) participated in this study. From those, whole blood sample were collected and DNAs were extracted from the sera and analyzed by TaqMan real-time PCR assay with a set of primers and probe amplified core protein region of HBV genome. Results: HBV DNA was detected in a total of 51/64 (79.7 %) serum samples; 37 (72.5%) male and 14 (27.5%) female. The copy number of HBV DNA ranged from 5 × 102 to 8.49 × 108 copies/mL in the serum samples; median 3.8 × 104 copies/mL. Demographic data and risk factors were also evaluated. The comparison of viral loads between the age groups and sex indicated no significant correlation (P > 0.05). However, the serum HBV DNA level significantly decreased in the treated patient group (P = 0.03). There was no significant difference in medicine usage between the two sexes in the study population (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Considering the results, determining the HBV DNA load and evaluation of treatment response can help to reduce the costs of diagnosis and treatment procedures in such patients, as well as, decreasing the risk of HBV transmission in immigrant Afghan population. Moreover, HBV screening strategies in country border entrances among immigrant should be performed. Moreover

  20. Complexity and Army Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Mark T.

    On 12 Octther 1999, the U.S. Army began a journey down a new path to innovation, when General Eric Shinseki presented his vision of Army Transformation at the 45th annual meeting of the Association of the United States Army. In this speech, General Shinseki described the Army as an organization consisting of heavy forces with excellent staying power but poor strategic responsiveness, light forces with excellent responsiveness but poor staying power, and a logistics system with an excessively large footprint. His proposed solution, a comprehensive change of the Army resulting in full-spectrum dominance and strategic responsiveness, would occur so quickly as to "be unnerving to some." [Shinseki. 1999] While this prediction has turned out in some ways to be true, it is not necessarily the speed of change that is unnerving to many of the people studying Army Transformation.

  1. Assessment of soil and water contaminants from selected locations in and near the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area, Ada County, Idaho, 2001-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliman, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001, the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey began a project to compile hydrogeologic data and determine presence or absence of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area in southwestern Idaho. Between June 2002 and April 2003, a total of 114 soil, surface-water, ground-water, precipitation, or dust samples were collected from 68 sample sites (65 different locations) in the Orchard Training Area (OTA) or along the vehicle corridor to the OTA. Soil and water samples were analyzed for concentrations of selected total trace metals, major ions, nutrients, explosive compounds, semivolatile organics, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Water samples also were analyzed for concentrations of selected dissolved trace metals and major ions. Distinguishing naturally occurring large concentrations of trace metals, major ions, and nutrients from contamination related to land and water uses at the OTA was difficult. There were no historical analyses for this area to compare with modern data, and although samples were collected from 65 locations in and near the OTA, sampled areas represented only a small part of the complex OTA land-use areas and soil types. For naturally occurring compounds, several assumptions were made?anomalously large concentrations, when tied to known land uses, may indicate presence of contamination; naturally occurring concentrations cannot be separated from contamination concentrations in mid- and lower ranges of data; and smallest concentrations may represent the lowest naturally occurring range of concentrations and (or) the absence of contaminants related to land and water uses. Presence of explosive, semivolatile organic (SVOC), and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in samples indicates contamination from land and water uses. In areas along the vehicle corridor and major access roads within the OTA, most trace metal, major ion, and nutrient concentrations in soil samples were

  2. Army Maintenance System Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilbertson, Frank V

    2006-01-01

    .... Used in conjunction with pertinent historical data and developed with Army transformation goals in mind, General Systems thinking can provide the framework for guiding maintenance transformation...

  3. 32 CFR 643.25 - Policy-Grants which may embarrass the Department of the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the Army. 643.25 Section 643.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.25 Policy—Grants which may embarrass the Department of the Army. The use of property under DA control will not be authorized for any purpose when the...

  4. Department of the Army Installation Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP) was established in 1975 in response to regulatory action at several installations where past disposal practices had caused contamination of streams and groundwater. The need to decontaminate excess Army-owned real estate also was considered in early IRP activities. A variety of site types have been discovered on Army installations. The major site types evaluated to date include: contaminated soil areas, landfills, lagoons, buildings, burning grounds, sumps, pits, storage tanks, sewage treatment plants, storage pads, industrial wastewater treatment plants, and salvage yards. Twenty Army installations have been proposed for or listed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The need for taking action at hazardous waste sites, however, is based on threats they pose to human health, welfare or the environment. Sites do not have to be on the SPL in order to be cleaned up through IRP activities. All of the sites that caused Army installations to be proposed for the NPL are being evaluated and cleaned up. In addition, all Army properties have been or will be assessed and where needed they will be addressed by the IRP

  5. Hydrogeologic framework and water quality of the Vermont Army National Guard Ethan Allen Firing Range, northern Vermont, October 2002 through December 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stewart F.; Chalmers, Ann; Mack, Thomas J.; Denner, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    The Ethan Allen Firing Range of the Vermont Army National Guard is a weapons-testing and training facility in a mountainous region of Vermont that has been in operation for about 80 years. The hydrologic framework and water quality of the facility were assessed between October 2002 and December 2003. As part of the study, streamflow was continuously measured in the Lee River and 24 observation wells were installed at 19 locations in the stratified drift and bedrock aquifers to examine the hydrogeology. Chemical analyses of surface water, ground water, streambed sediment, and fish tissue were collected to assess major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and volatile and semivolatile compounds. Sampling included 5 surface-water sites sampled during moderate and low-flow conditions; streambed-sediment samples collected at the 5 surface-water sites; fish-tissue samples collected at 3 of the 5 surface-water sites; macroinvertebrates collected at 4 of the 5 surface-water sites; and ground-water samples collected from 10 observation wells, and samples collected at all surface- and ground-water sites. The hydrogeologic framework at the Ethan Allen Firing Range is dominated by the upland mountain and valley setting of the site. Bedrock wells yield low to moderate amounts of water (0 to 23 liters per minute). In the narrow river valleys, layered stratified-drift deposits of sand and gravel of up to 18 meters thick fill the Lee River and Mill Brook Valleys. In these deposits, the water table is generally within 3 meters below the land surface and overall ground-water flow is from east to west. Streamflow in the Lee River averaged 0.72 cubic meters per second (25.4 cubic feet per second) between December 2002 and December 2003. Streams are highly responsive to precipitation events in this mountainous environment and a comparison with other nearby watersheds shows that Lee River maintains relatively high streamflow during dry periods. Concentrations of trace elements and nutrients

  6. Leadership and Logistics Meeting the Army’s Expeditionary Requirements of Today and 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    LMP), the General Funds Enterprise Business System (GFEBS), and the Global Combat Support System – Army (GCSS-Army). GCSS-Army provides three... today . The Army set a process to Define, Measure, and Improve (DMI) business operations from the national level to the tactical level. The ultimate...3 AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP AND LOGISTICS MEETING THE ARMY’S EXPEDITIONARY REQUIREMENTS OF TODAY AND 2025 By Robert

  7. La population de l'Iran en 1986, entre les conflits irakien et afghan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard HOURCADE

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available Entre 1976 et 1986, l'Iran a gagné 16 millions d'habitants, en raison d'un taux de croissance démographique élevé. Des faits nouveaux apparaissent: l'apport des réfugiés afghans, la croissance périphérique accélérée des villes sur le modèle de Téhéran, une alphabétisation en progrès. Enfin, pour la première fois, la population urbaine dépasse la population rurale.

  8. Uptake and predictors of contraceptive use in Afghan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Mohammad H; Ali, Mohamed M; Brown, Nick J W; Noormal, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Afghanistan has one of the world's highest fertility rates and, related to this, an infant mortality rate far higher than its South Asian neighbors. Contraception enhances family spacing, improves women's safety in child birth and, as a result, reduces infant and child mortality. Until recently, there has been a paucity of information on the comparative rates of contraceptive practices in the country and socioeconomic correlates of uptake. We aimed to elucidate the factors influencing the use of contraception in Afghanistan using recent, robust national data. Using Afghanistan Mortality Survey (AMS) 2010 data, the distribution of Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (CPR) and correlates of contraceptive use among currently married women aged 15-49 years were explored. We initially summarised descriptive data on 25,743 married women and then derived predictors of the use of any form of contraception using a multiple logistic regression model. The prevalence of self-reported current use of any contraceptive method was 21.8% (95% CI: 20.4-23.4) at the national level though there was a wide variation in practice between provinces. Herat province in the West region had a highest contraceptive prevalence rate of 49.4% while Paktika in the Southeast region had the lowest CPR of 2%. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a family size of greater than 6 living children strongly predicted contraceptive use (AOR 7.4 (95% CI:6.1-9.0)). Other independent predictors included: secondary or high level of education (AOR 2.1 (95% CI: 1.8-2.5)) and being in the wealthiest stratum (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.5-3.0)). Rural residence predicted a lower use of contraception (AOR, 0.72; 95% CI: 0.56-0.92). Contraceptive uptake rate was low overall with wide inter provincial variation. Strengthening female education, targeting married women in rural area and women with no education may enhance the effectiveness of National Family planning program in Afghanistan.

  9. US Army Corps of Engineers Reachback Operations Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Providing Relevant Solutions to the Armed Forces and the NationThe USACE Reachback Operation Center at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC)...

  10. Localizing OER in Afghanistan: Developing a Multilingual Digital Library for Afghan Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauryn Oates

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Darakht-e Danesh (‘knowledge tree’ Online Library is the first open educational resource (OER initiative in Afghanistan, established to enhance teacher subject-area knowledge, access and use of learning materials, and to foster more diverse teaching methodologies in order to improve learning outcomes in Afghan classrooms. This paper describes our experience developing this local language digital library, buildings its responsiveness to our audience of users as we progressed, customizing both the interface and the resources for Afghanistan’s education environment. We innovated methods to devise relevant local content, localized usability, developed different access models to reach different populations of users, integrated impact measurement, and opted to openly license material in the library’s collection. By making digital educational content open from the first introduction of digital repositories of learning objects in Afghan languages, we have an opportunity to establish the principle of openness and to promote open practices in teacher professional development in Afghanistan. The paper aims to share lessons on how OER can be customized for multilingual, resource-scarce contexts drawing from our experience to date in Afghanistan, and seeking to contribute to the literature on localization and multilingual OER.

  11. Contextualizing Afghan refugee views of depression through narratives of trauma, resettlement stress, and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Qais; James, Sigrid; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    This qualitative study explored how Afghan refugees conceptualize frames of mind that may reflect depression in general and as it relates to trauma they experienced. We performed in-depth interviews with 18 Afghans residing in the San Diego area. Views regarding the causes, symptoms, and perceived treatments of depression were gathered through free-listing techniques, and supplemented with narratives relating to pre- and post-resettlement stressors and coping mechanisms. Data were analyzed with standard qualitative content analysis methods. Items endorsed with relation to depression causality included pre-migration war traumas, notably separation from family, and post-migration stressors including status dissonance and cultural conflicts that ranged from linguistic challenges to intergenerational problems. Depressive symptoms were viewed as highly debilitating, and included changes in temperament, altered cognitions, avoidance and dissociative behaviors, and somatic complaints. Relief was sought through family reunification and community support, reliance on prayer, and the academic success of their children in the US. The findings underscore the need for practitioners to take into account situational stressors, cultural aspects of mourning and symptomatology, and existing coping mechanisms in developing interventions that are based on refugees' articulated needs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Welfare Impacts of Afghan Trade on the Pakistani Provinces of Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Shabbir

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amidst all the concerns of uncertainty over the future of Afghanistan, recent developments have given hope to the world, specifically south and central Asia. A coalition government has now been established following the deadlock that came after the May 2014 elections. President Ashraf Ghani and Chief Executive Officer Abdullah have already signed a Bilateral Security Agreement (BSA between Kabul and Washington, according to which 9800 troops will remain in Afghanistan beyond 2015. Furthermore, the government of Afghanistan seeks the support of the neighbouring countries to keep peace in the region. Despite all these concrete steps, there has been an increased number of terror attacks and drone operations which has put a big question mark on the stability of the country. How Afghanistan tackles these rising problems will be crucial in defining its future, the trickle-down effects of which will determine the stability of the Afghan-Pakistan region. Concerns about what the future holds for this region with a long history of violence and insurgency are currently being voiced at many levels of society, including on talk shows, at government meetings, within NGOs, and at business forums. Unlike most of the studies done on the Afghan-Pakistan region that focus on the security of the region, this article focuses on the welfare and economic impacts of post-2014 Afghanistan on the neighbouring Pakistani provinces of Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, at the household level.

  13. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated

  14. Afghan Opium, the Global Consensus and Regional Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afsah, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    The international counter-narcotics consensus laid down in a comprehensive set of international treaties stipulates that there is a confluence of interest in suppression of illicit trade between consumer, transit and producer states. This article presents the outcome of legal sub-component of a m......The international counter-narcotics consensus laid down in a comprehensive set of international treaties stipulates that there is a confluence of interest in suppression of illicit trade between consumer, transit and producer states. This article presents the outcome of legal sub...... that the relatively modest degree of cooperation between the law enforcement and counter-narcotics agencies of the region was caused by a plethora of legal obstacles in the respective national penal and administrative codes, as well as an insufficient legal basis for regional collaboration. These premises turned out...... member states, as well as entrenched corporate cultures inimical to the sharing of information and operational practices are the main reasons regional counter-narcotic cooperation remains anaemic....

  15. IMPLEMENTASI ASAS-ASAS UMUM PEMERINTAHAN YANG BAIK TERHADAP KEPUTUSAN BERSIFAT BESCHIKKING DALAM TATA USAHA TENTARA NASIONAL INDONESIA / THE IMPLEMENTATION OF GOOD GOVERNANCE GENERAL ESTABLISHMENT AND APPLICATION IN THE FORMATION OF GOOD GOVERNANCE IMPLEMENTATION IN INDONESIAN NATIONAL ARMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djodi Suranto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Implementasi dan pemberlakuan Asas-Asas Umum Pemerintahan Yang Baik (AAUPB menjelmakan penyelenggaraan pemerintahan yang baik dalam Tata Usaha TNI di Pusat dan di Mabes TNI serta peranannya dalam melengkapi kekurangan, ketidakjelasan dan kekosongan peraturan perundang-undangan sebagai penemuan hukum. Implementasi beberapa asas bersifat formil yaitu asas kecermatan, motivasi dan larangan penyalahgunaan prosedur. Sedangkan asas bersifat materiil yaitu kepastian hukum, kepercayaan, larangan penyalahgunaan wewenang dan asas persamaan. Asas-asas tersebut berlaku karena implementasi sesuai dengan hukum kebiasaan yang hidup, tumbuh dan berkembang dalam praktik penyelenggaraan pemerintahan, juga sesuai dengan kaidah hukum yang lebih tinggi serta adanya hubungan antara suatu kondisi faktual dengan akibat-akibat yang ditimbulkannya dan memiliki peranan yang mengisi ketidaklengkapan dan ketidakjelasan, serta kekosongan peraturan perundang-undangan sebagai penemuan hukum demi terjelmanya penyelenggaraan pemerintahan yang baik (good governance dalam Tata Usaha TNI.  Implementation of good governance general establishment and application in the formation of good governance implementation in Indonesian National Army (TNI Administration in the Central Office and Base Office (Mabes TNI, and also its roles in equipping the weakness, ambiguities and lack of ordinance as a law finding. Results of this study find and reveal the implementation of several principles, having formal in character, they are: prudent preparation principle, motivation and prohibition in procedural abuse, and matrial character are: law certainty, trust and expectation, prohibition on authority abuse and equality principles. The principles are applied due to its formation is in accordance with prevailed, developed and grown custom law in governance implementation practice, and also because it is according to the higher law norms and also the existing relationship between factual conditions

  16. Understanding Afghan healthcare providers: a qualitative study of the culture of care in a Kabul maternity hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, R; van Teijlingen, E; Ryan, K; Holloway, I

    2015-01-01

    To analyse the culture of a Kabul maternity hospital to understand the perspectives of healthcare providers on their roles, experiences, values and motivations and the impact of these determinants on the care of perinatal women and their babies. Qualitative ethnographic study. A maternity hospital, Afghanistan. Doctors, midwives and care assistants. Six weeks of observation followed by 22 semi-structured interviews and four informal group discussions with staff, two focus group discussions with women and 41 background interviews with Afghan and non-Afghan medical and cultural experts. The culture of care in an Afghan maternity hospital. A large workload, high proportion of complicated cases and poor staff organisation affected the quality of care. Cultural values, social and family pressures influenced the motivation and priorities of healthcare providers. Nepotism and cronyism created inequality in clinical training and support and undermined the authority of management to improve standards of care. Staff without powerful connections were vulnerable in a punitive inequitable environment-fearing humiliation, blame and the loss of employment. Suboptimal care put the lives of women and babies at risk and was, in part, the result of conflicting priorities. The underlying motivation of staff appeared to be the socio-economic survival of their own families. The hospital culture closely mirrored the culture and core values of Afghan society. In setting priorities for women's health post-2015 Millennium Development Goals, understanding the context-specific pressures on staff is key to more effective programme interventions and sustainability. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. Toward Army Maneuver Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Charles B

    2006-01-01

    ..., can be satisfied to form the nucleus of land domain Force Application formations. This branch will be responsive to the needs of the joint force in Unified Action by adjusting the institutional inputs to force development of Army Maneuver Forces...

  18. The Institutional Army, FY1975-FY2002

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brinkerhoff, John

    2002-01-01

    This report examines the Army's mission and functions to determine a useful way to report and analyze the Institutional Army-that part of the Army that supports the Title 10 responsibilities of the Army...

  19. Index to Army Times 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    shortages. Army Times; June 1, 1992; 52("): p. 22. CHEMICAL WARFARE--CLOTHING Overprotective . Army Times; July 27, 1992; 52(53): p. 49. CHEMICAL WARFARE...Army Times; Nov. 30, 1992; 53(18): p. 26. CHILD ABUSE Allowance would help keep victimized families afloat. Army Times; May 18, 1992; 52(42): p. 11... CHILD ABUSE--COMPENSATION Benefits for abuse victims OK’d. Army Times; Oct. 19, 1992; 53(12): p. 26. CHILD ABUSE--GERMANY Germany: More child abuse? Army

  20. Prevalence and Correlates of Suicidal Behavior Among New Soldiers in the U.S. Army: Results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    or Catholic , and a race/ethnicity other than non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, or Hispanic. 1Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Department...Rating Scale (C-SSRS)[10] that inquired about the lifetime occur- rence and AOO separately for suicide ideation (“Did you ever in your life have thoughts...timing of marriage ormarital disruption.We also controlled for Army component (Regular Army, National Guard, or Army Reserve). ANALYSIS METHODS

  1. Army aeromedical crash rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, R A; Freid, R L; Villarin, A R

    1999-02-01

    Safety is a principal concern for everyone in aviation, including those in military and civilian aeromedical programs. The U.S. Army flies thousands of helicopter missions each year, including many aeromedical flights. The comparison between Army general and aeromedical aviation crash data provides a benchmark for establishing patterns in aeromedical safety and may be useful for similar programs examining safety profiles. To determine the crash rates of Army aeromedical rotary-wing (helicopter) programs and compare them with crash rates in Army general aviation. Retrospective review of safety data from 1987 to 1995. Crashes or mishaps are categorized into three classes: A, B, and C. Class A reflects the most serious mishap and involves loss of life or aircraft destruction, whereas classes B and C represent lesser but still significant mishaps. Crash rates are compared on a year-by-year basis and are reported as events per 100,000 flight hours. Statistical analysis was performed by the z test with Yates' correction, with significance set at p crash rate was 1.86 compared with the aeromedical rate of 2.02. The mean general class A to C crash rate was 7.37 compared with the aeromedical rate of 7.44. Between 1992 and 1995, there were 3 years when the Army aeromedical program suffered no class A mishaps. Differences between study groups are statistically significant, but they are interpreted conservatively given the very low incidence of mishaps in both groups. Both rates are comparable with published civilian mishap rates. There is a very low overall incidence of crashes in both groups. There may be no practical difference between Army general and aeromedical aviation mishap rates. Furthermore, Army crash rates are comparable with published civilian mishap rates.

  2. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a) DEs...

  3. 32 CFR 643.35 - Policy-Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of the Army. 643.35 Section 643.35 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.35 Policy—Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army. (a) Acquired lands—(1) General. The Coal Leasing Amendments Act of...

  4. Afghan National Security Forces Facilities: Concerns with Funding, Oversight, and Sustainability for Operation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Balkh ANP Camp Shaheen, Balkh ANA Camp Pamir, Kunduz ANA Gamberi Garrison, Nangarhar ANA Jalalabad Garrison, Nangarhar ANA Camp Thunder ...Erosion control; clean up of debris, drains, and ditches; and snow removal. Force protection maintenance Maintenance and repair of T-walls, security...Estimated Total O&M Costs for Facilities Visited (as of June 30, 2012) $8.0 million Gardez Garrison/Camp Thunder , Gardez, Paktya Province

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF A PESTE DES PETITS RUMINANTS (PPR OUTBREAK IN AFGHAN SHEEP IN PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. ZAHUR, A. ULLAH, H. IRSHAD, M. S. FAROOQ, M. HUSSAIN AND M. JAHANGIR

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and virological investigations were carried out during an outbreak of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR in Afghan (Bulkhi sheep in Pakistan. The overall morbidity, mortality and case fatality rates were 41.0, 1.2 and 3.0%, respectively. The epidemic curve was plotted and the values for basic reproductive number (R0 and herd immunity threshold (HIT for the affected flock were estimated to be 6.85 and 85.4%, respectively. The morbid material analysis by immuno-capture ELISA (Ic-ELISA and haemagglutination assay (HA revealed the presence of PPR virus. The PPR virus was isolated and identified through cytopathic effects, Ic-ELISA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM.

  6. The Enduring Health Challenges of Afghan Immigrants and Refugees in Iran: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Divkolaye, Nasim Sadat; Burkle, Frederick M

    2017-07-21

    Iran is the third country in the world with the highest number of registered refugees with the majority coming from Afghanistan. They suffer major health and social risks yet their health status has never been comprehensively determined. This systematic review of the literature highlights major disparities among documented immigrants in health access, communicable and non-communicable diseases and the increasingly desperate plight of undocumented immigrants. Comparing with Iranian population, the findings suggest the higher prevalence of most diseases among Afghan immigrants and refugees. This highlights the importance of increasing the migrants' access to health services from both public health as well as human rights perspectives. Although the Iranian government has taken new initiatives to overcome this challenge, certain issues have still remained unaddressed. Potential solutions to improve this process are discussed.

  7. Multisectorial Afghan perspectives on girl child marriage: foundations for change do exist in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anita; Gomez, Charlemagne S; Silverman, Jay G

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify Afghan perspectives on the causes of and potential solutions to child and forced marriage in the country. Open-ended interviews (N = 102 interviews) were conducted with religious leaders, police, teachers, and nongovernmental organizations (NGO) and government officials in Kabul, Jalalabad, and Mazar. Informants reported recognition of the poor social and health consequences of these practices for mothers and infants, citing poverty, tradition, conflict-related insecurity, low status of women, and ignorance of religious and civil laws as causes of these practices. Recommended solutions centered on child marriage prevention; most informants felt little can be done for married girls. © The Author(s) 2011.

  8. Lifetime Suicidal Behaviors and Career Characteristics Among U.S. Army Soldiers: Results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner, Alexander J; Ursano, Robert J; Hwang, Irving; King, Andrew J; Naifeh, James A; Sampson, Nancy A; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Kessler, Ronald C; Nock, Matthew K

    2018-04-01

    The current report presents data on lifetime prevalence of suicide ideation and nonfatal attempts as reported by the large representative sample of U.S. Army soldiers who participated in the Consolidated All-Army Survey of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (N = 29,982). We also examine associations of key Army career characteristics with these outcomes. Prevalence estimates for lifetime suicide ideation are 12.7% among men and 20.1% among women, and for lifetime suicide attempts are 2.5% and 5.1%, respectively. Retrospective age-of-onset reports suggest that 53.4%-70% of these outcomes had preenlistment onsets. Results revealed that, for both men and women, being in the Regular Army, compared with being in the National Guard or Army Reserve, and being in an enlisted rank, compared with being an officer, is associated with increased risk of suicidal behaviors and that this elevated risk is present both before and after joining the Army. © 2017 The American Association of Suicidology.

  9. Afghan apartheid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The Women's Watch is published by the International Women's Rights Action Watch (IWRAW), a global network that monitors implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). This September 1997 issue focuses on the Taliban discrimination of women in Kabul, Afghanistan, ever since they took over in 1996. IWRAW announced that they would maintain pressure to withhold recognition of the Taliban government in any forum until the Taliban authorities recognize the human rights of women. IWRAW will also continue to monitor developments in Afghanistan and the UN. Furthermore, this issue presents policy changes and developments in countries all over the world in accordance with the convention articles of the CEDAW. The reports were outlined under human rights and discrimination; violence against women; political and public life; health and reproductive rights; employment; and marriage and family law. Lastly, this issue briefly discussed the 17th session of the CEDAW.

  10. The mental health and help-seeking behaviour of resettled Afghan refugees in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slewa-Younan, Shameran; Yaser, Anisa; Guajardo, Maria Gabriela Uribe; Mannan, Haider; Smith, Caroline A; Mond, Jonathan M

    2017-01-01

    Psychological trauma, in particular, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, are highly prevalent among resettled refugees. However, little is known regarding the mental health status and associated help-seeking behaviour of resettled Afghan refugees in Australia. A sample of 150 resettled Afghan refugees (74 males; mean age 32.8 years, SD = 12.2) living in Adelaide, South Australia were recruited. Self-reported measures of PTSD, depression, exposure to traumatic events, functional impairment, self-recognition of PTSD symptomatology and help-seeking behaviours were completed. Multivariate analysis of variables associated with help-seeking was conducted. Forty-four percent of participants met criteria for clinically significant PTSD symptoms and all but one participant reported being exposed to 1 or more traumatic and/or conflict related events, such as 'losing your property and wealth'. Moreover, 14.7% of participants had symptoms suggestive of clinically significant depression. General practitioners were the most common source of help in relation to mental health problems, with very few participants (4.6%) seeking help from specialist trauma and torture mental health services. Self-recognition of having a PTSD related mental health problem and functional impairment levels were both found to be independent predictors of help-seeking ( p  ≤ .05). The findings provide further evidence for high rates of PTSD symptomatology and low uptake of mental care among resettled refugees. Poor self-recognition of the presence and/or adverse impact of PTSD symptoms may need to be targeted in mental health promotion programs designed to improve "mental health literacy" and thereby promote early and appropriate help-seeking where this is needed.

  11. Transformation of the Romanian Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rus, Cristian

    2006-01-01

    .... By employing the Army Force Management and the Universal Joint Task List the study examines the development of the Romanian Army's current and programmed capabilities and identifies capability gaps...

  12. The Army's Occupational Analysis Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    .... The OA Program is to be the Army's center of excellence for job analysis and design. The program is in a transition period, adapting its procedures and methods to meet the needs of today's fast-paced Army...

  13. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  14. Index to Army Times 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    COMPETITIONS Those winning Golden Knights. Army Times; Sept. 4, 1989; 50(4): p. 2. GOVERNMENT RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM ( GRHP ) New housing scheme. Army...Army Times; Apr. 3, 1989; 49(34): p. 17. GRHP SEE GOVERNMENT RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM ( GRHP ) GUIDED MISSILES Countries try to keep Leaks from going

  15. Strategy for the Long Haul: An Army at the Crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Liberation Army ( PLA ) is working to streamline, professionalize and modernize it- self, to include developing and fielding new tanks and infantry fighting...vehicles. It is also working to improve its marine infantry and amphibious assault capabilities. However, to the extent the PLA is developing the...transformation has occurred at the Army’s National Training Center ( NTC ) at Fort Irwin, California. Not long ago the NTC was optimized for training Army

  16. Konflikt ved Durand-linjen - En undersøgelse af suverænitetsprocesser ved Khyber Passet: Conflict at the Durand Line - A research studie on sovereignty at the Afghan/Pakistani border

    OpenAIRE

    Frederiksen, Maria Kronberg

    2009-01-01

    Since 9/11, the reorganizing of the Afghan government by the Bush-administration and the War on Terror has developed into a complicated and exhausting affair for the Coalition and the Afghan allied factions. Although the Taliban was overthrown by the end of 2001, they have reorganized and persistently attacked the Coalition's troops and Afghan regulars all over the country from their exile camps along the Pakistani border. According to Mark Charleton-Smith, England's earlier commanding genera...

  17. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of contraception among Afghan refugee women in Pakistan: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Raheel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the 1980s, approximately three million people migrated from Afghanistan to Pakistan and sought refuge in several cities including the city of Karachi. After the initial settlement of the refugees, the international organizations transitioned the health care of these refugees to the two local non-profit service agencies in Karachi. One of these agencies subsidized health care to the refugees under their care and the other agency encouraged the refugees under their care to utilize governmental and non-governmental private health resources at the disposal of general public. Our objective was to measure the effect of health subsidy on the uptake of contraception among Afghan refugee women and compare them to the group of Afghan women without such a subsidy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A randomly selected group of 650 married Afghan women--325 women in each group--participated in a detailed survey regarding the knowledge, attitude and practices of family planning and contraceptive use. 90 percent of the women in the health subsidy group had had heard of family planning, compared to the 45 percent in the non-subsidized group. The use of contraceptives was greater than two-fold in the former versus the latter. Results of logistic regression analysis revealed that the refugee women who had had access to subsidized healthcare were significantly more likely to use the contraceptive methods with advancing age as compared to the women in the non-health subsidy group. The difference remained significant after adjusting for other variables. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Refugee women who are provided subsidized healthcare are more inclined to use contraceptives. It is therefore important that Afghan refugee women living elsewhere in Pakistan be provided healthcare subsidy, whereby their reproductive health indicators could improve with reduced fertility. We strongly encourage facilities introducing such subsidies to refugees in resource

  18. Commentary on "The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)": Army STARRS: a Framingham-like study of psychological health risk factors in soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Kerry J; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Although historically the Army suicide rate has been significantly lower than the civilian rate, in 2004, the suicide and accidental death rates began trending upward. By 2008, the Army suicide rate had risen above the national average (20.2 per 100,000). In 2009, 160 active duty Soldiers took their lives, making suicide the third leading cause of death among the Army population. If accidental death, frequently the result of high-risk behavior, is included, then more Soldiers died by their own actions than in combat in 2009. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) was thus created in 2009 to begin to address these problems. The Army STARRS project is a large consortium of seven different studies to develop data-driven methods for mitigating or preventing suicide behaviors and improving the overall mental health and behavioral functioning of Army Soldiers during and after their Army service. The first research articles from the Army STARRS project were published in late 2013 and early 2014. This work has already begun to outline important facets of risk in the military, and it is helping to drive an empirically derived approach to improvements in understanding mental disorders and risk behavior and to improve prevention and support of mental health and resilience. The Framingham Heart Study, started in the 1940s, marked a watershed event in utilizing large cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal collaborative research to identify and understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The Army STARRS project, through its collaborative, prospective, and robust innovative design and implementation, may provide the beginning of a similar scientific cohort in mental disorders. The work of this project will help understand biological and psychological aspects of military service, including those leading to suicide. When coupled with timely feedback to Army leadership, it permits near real-time steps to diagnose, mitigate, and

  19. Integration of the Army National Guard into the Total Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stohla, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    .... Recently, however, the "rift" has escalated. Much of this "rift" has come on the heels of the Reagan Administration military buildup and from the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) panel findings...

  20. 1998 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    System (APKWS) guided munition (to complement the Hydra -70 family of rockets and supplement HELLFIRE) to provide a lower cost, more capable means of...and confirmation of biological and chemical warfare agents and toxins . Veterinary Services The Army Veterinary Corps is the DoD executive agent for

  1. Developing the Army Pentathlete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McElroy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    .... How will they do it, and where will they find the personnel to fill the job?. The Army is forced to deal with insurgency in Iraq, a type of engagement they have not dedicated training to since the end of Vietnam...

  2. Fatherhood in a New Country: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Experiences of Afghan Men and Implications for Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Elisha; Yelland, Jane; Szwarc, Josef; Wahidi, Sayed; Casey, Sue; Chesters, Donna; Fouladi, Fatema; Duell-Piening, Philippa; Giallo, Rebecca; Brown, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    Fathers of refugee background are dealing with multiple, interrelated stressors associated with forced migration and establishing their lives in a new country. This has implications for the role of men in promoting the health and well-being of their families. Afghan community researchers conducted interviews with 30 Afghan women and men who had recently had a baby in Australia. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with health professionals working with families of refugee background. Fourteen men, 16 women, and 34 health professionals participated. Afghan men reported playing a major role in supporting their wives during pregnancy and postnatal care, accompanying their wives to appointments, and providing language and transport support. Although men embraced these roles, they were rarely asked by health professionals about their own concerns related to their wife's pregnancy, or about their social circumstances. Perinatal health professionals queried whether it was their role to meet the needs of men. There are many challenges for families of refugee background navigating maternity services while dealing with the challenges of settlement. There is a need to move beyond a narrow conceptualization of antenatal and postnatal care to encompass a broader preventive and primary care approach to supporting refugee families through the period of pregnancy and early years of parenting. Pregnancy and postnatal care needs to be tailored to the social and psychological needs of families of refugee background, including men, and incorporate appropriate language support, in order to improve child and family health outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Association of anthropometric indices in Iranian and Afghan infants with maternal indices in the Eqbaliyeh health center, Qazvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Asefzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometric indices are of the best indicators for growth monitoring during neonatal period. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the association ofanthropometric indices in Iranian and Afghan infants with maternal indices. The study was conducted in 230 mothers who had health profiles in the Eqbaliyeh health center, Qazvin during 2013. Data were collected through the records in mothers’ health profiles. Data were analyzed using T-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Of 230 infants, 119 (51.7% were male. Mean weight and head circumference were significantly different between Iranian and Afghan infants.The Iranian mothers were older and had higher weight and height during pregnancy compared to the Afghan mothers and the difference was statistically significant. There was positive significant correlation between mothers’ age, weight, hemoglobin, and hematocrit and infants’ birth weight. There was also positive significant correlation between mothers’ hemoglobin and hematocrit and infants’ height. With regards to the results, proper nutrition, maternal health, and providing appropriate health services during pregnancy can be beneficial for improving infants’ health.

  4. United Nations - Divided States: Peacekeeping in the 1990S

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    National Army of Independent Kampuchea ( ANKI ), formerly called the Sihanouk National Army (ANS). ANKI was largely viewed as an ineffective fighting...members inhibits the effective execution of large military operations. 216 GLOSSARY ANKI National Army of Independent Kampuchea (formerly the Sihanouk

  5. Suicide and War: The Mediating Effects of Negative Mood, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and Social Support among Army National Guard Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    The mediating effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, negative mood, and social support on the relationship of war experiences to suicidality were examined. The research literature suggested a sequence among study scales representing these constructs, which was then tested on survey data obtained from a sample of National Guard…

  6. Prior Mental Disorders and Lifetime Suicidal Behaviors Among US Army Soldiers in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner, Alexander J; Ursano, Robert J; Hwang, Irving; J King, Andrew; Naifeh, James A; Sampson, Nancy A; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Kessler, Ronald C; Nock, Matthew K

    2017-09-19

    We report on associations of retrospectively reported temporally prior mental disorders and Army career characteristics with subsequent first onset of suicidal behaviors in a large, representative sample of US Army soldiers who participated in the Consolidated All-Army Survey of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (N = 29,982). Results reveal that among men and women, all self-reported lifetime disorders measured (some assessed with screening scales) are associated with subsequent onset of suicide ideation. Among men, three disorders characterized by agitation and impulsiveness (intermittent explosive disorder, panic disorder, and substance disorders) predict the transition from suicide ideation to attempt. For both men and women, being in the Regular Army (vs. National Guard or Army Reserve) predicts suicide attempts in the total sample. For men, a history of deployment and junior rank are predictors of suicide attempts after adjusting for preenlistment disorders but not accounting for pre- and postenlistment disorders, suggesting that postenlistment disorders account for some of the increased suicide risk among these career characteristics. Overall, these results highlight associations between mental disorders and suicidal behaviors, but underscore limitations predicting which people with ideation attempt suicide. © 2017 The American Association of Suicidology.

  7. Army Programs: Army Finance and Accounting Quality Assurance Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    This regulation discusses the primary responsibilities of commanders and staff officers at installation and higher levels for execution of the Army Finance and Accounting Quality Assurance (QA) Program...

  8. Occurrence of acute respiratory infection, diarrhea and jaundice among Afghan pilgrims, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Khwaja Mir Islam; Mofleh, Jawad; Rasooly, M Hafiz; Aman, M Iabal

    2012-12-01

    Annually 30,000 Afghans attend the Hajj in Saudi Arabia that is one of the largest mass gathering events in the world. We aimed to determine the prevalence of three syndromes of interest diarrhea, acute respiratory infections (ARI) and jaundice-among Hajjis gathering at the four transit sites in Afghanistan before, during, and after their voyage. A total of 1659 Hajjis at four transit sites were selected and included a cross-sectional study. Information was collected prior Hajjis departure and upon their return from Saudi Arabia regarding demographics and experience of diarrhea, ARI and jaundice. Standardized case definitions were used for the three health outcomes of interest. The occurrence of diarrhea and jaundice remained constant over time. However, ARI increased from 1.4% at pre-transit to 4% at transit area and 37% during the Hajj. ARI rates among residents from the Central and Northern regions of Afghanistan were significantly higher at the post-Hajj stage, at 50% and 69%, respectively. There was no difference in ARI by sex among Hajjis. There is a need to review the quality and effectiveness of the flu vaccine. Authorities should come up with the sound strategies to overcome ARI problems during Hajj. Copyright © 2012 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Occurrence of acute respiratory infection, diarrhea and jaundice among Afghan pilgrims, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwaja Mir Islam Saeed

    2012-12-01

    Background: Annually 30,000 Afghans attend the Hajj in Saudi Arabia that is one of the largest mass gathering events in the world. We aimed to determine the prevalence of three syndromes of interest diarrhea, acute respiratory infections (ARI and jaundice-among Hajjis gathering at the four transit sites in Afghanistan before, during, and after their voyage. Methods: A total of 1659 Hajjis at four transit sites were selected and included a cross-sectional study. Information was collected prior Hajjis departure and upon their return from Saudi Arabia regarding demographics and experience of diarrhea, ARI and jaundice. Standardized case definitions were used for the three health outcomes of interest. Results: The occurrence of diarrhea and jaundice remained constant over time. However, ARI increased from 1.4% at pre-transit to 4% at transit area and 37% during the Hajj. ARI rates among residents from the Central and Northern regions of Afghanistan were significantly higher at the post-Hajj stage, at 50% and 69%, respectively. There was no difference in ARI by sex among Hajjis. Conclusions: There is a need to review the quality and effectiveness of the flu vaccine. Authorities should come up with the sound strategies to overcome ARI problems during Hajj.

  10. Human papilloma virus in the tonsillar microbiota of an Afghan population group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, F; Carbone, D; Mugavero, R; Cura, F; Baggi, L; Arcuri, C; Nardone, M; Gaudio, R M; Gatto, R; Scapoli, L; Carinci, F

    2018-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is known to have a diverse aetiology that includes infectious agents. Human papilloma virus has been found to be associated with several types of human cancer, inclusive of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and cancer of tonsil. The aim of this manuscript is to investigate the presence of human papilloma virus in tonsillar microbiota of an Afghan population group. A sample of the tonsillar microbiota was collected by oral swab paper stick from 80 healthy donors. The sample was investigated for the presence of high-risk human papillomavirus types 16, 18, 31 and 45 by real time PCR. Eight samples produced some positive endpoint signals for human papillomaviruses. The human papillomavirus 31 was the unique papillomavirus detected; its calculated prevalence rate was 0.10 (C.I. 0.05-0.19). However, the viral load was always very low, in the order of 10-3 viral genomes per cell. The high prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus in healthy population suggest a need for further investigation on virus spreading and supports the development of vaccination strategies.

  11. Army Efficiency Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    Service College Fellows. The views expressed in this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy...this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army...for procrastination . Nothing worries rational human beings more than the great unknown or even an element of uncertainty regarding the future. To

  12. Army Equipment Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle (LEMV). Provides sustainment to LEMV Airship 1 operations achieving Initial Operating Capability and fully mission capable status in OEF and...builds additional airships and configurable ISR / communications payloads. • Funded $163M in FY12 for 350 of the Gen3 Electronic Control Units for...Intelligence Package High Altitude Long Endurance ( airship ) High Band COMINT Table of Contents 59 www.g8.army.mil HBCT HCCC HEMTT HEMTT-LHS HET HF HIIDE

  13. The Army Profession: A Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    profile cases of alleged misconduct” were symptomatic of “a much larger issue affecting the armed forces.”9 In the Associated Press, Lolita Baldor ...of-misconduct-among-high-level-military-leaders?lite (accessed January 02, 2013). 10Lolita C. Baldor , "US Army Brigadier General Jeffrey Sinclair to...Science: An Academic Discipline." Army Magazine, no. 5 (May 2005): 14-15. Baldor , Lolita C. and Michael Biesecker. "US Army Brigadier General

  14. The Soviet - Afghan War, 1979-1989: Failures in Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    in countering the new threats or the mountainous terrain. One of the few exceptions was the SPETSNAZ , the Soviet Special Forces, which were trained...for unconventional operations. While the elite SPETSNAZ provided an inegular capability to the Red Army, their strengths were in insurgent operations

  15. Index to Army Times, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    13): p. 37. AH-64 (HELICOPTER)--COCKPIT CANOPY Plastic covers to shield Apaches. Army Times; Aug. 16, 1993; 54(3): p. 35. AH-64 (HELICOPTER...prepares for radical surgery . Army Times; Jan. 4, 1993; 53(23): p. 26. Reform could sound death knell for CHAMPUS. Army Times; Aug. 2, 1993; 54(1): p...p. 6. FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Court upholds malpractice ban. Army Times; Mar. 8, 1993; 53(32): p. 17. FERES DOCTRINE Court upholds malpractice ban

  16. Index to Army Times 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    p. 7. Teams will strike at child abuse problems . Army Times; Mar. 21, 1988; 48(31): p. 27. CHILD CARE CENTERS SEE DAY CARE CENTERS CHILD MOLESTING ...COMPUTER PROGRAM LANGUAGE) Ada works well in hellfire tests. Army Times; Ju 6󈨜 48(43): p. 34. ADATS SEE AIR DEFENSE ANTITANK SYSTEM (ADATS) O3 ADOPT ...A-SCHOOL PROGRAM Adopt -a-school. Army Times; May 9, 1988; 48(39): p. 27. ADOPTION AID PROGRAM Adoption reimbursement under way. Army Times; Aug. 8

  17. Air gamma spectrometry in the radiation monitoring situation of Army of the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlik, J.; Sladek, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this poster authors deal with aerial radiation monitoring of territory of the Czech Republic. Army Radiation Monitoring Network (ARMS) are selected folder whirlwind Army of the Czech Republic (ACR), that are destined for the tasks of the National Radiation Monitoring Network (CRMS).

  18. 32 CFR 552.25 - Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in Hawaii. 552.25 Section 552.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE... Regulations for Certain Army Training Areas in Hawaii § 552.25 Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii. (a) Purpose. (1) This regulation establishes procedures governing the entry onto...

  19. The Army's Search for Tomorrow--Why Not a Domestic Service Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Carl M.

    The document reviews the basic question whether the Army could administer a modern day version of the Civilian conservation Corps (Domestic Service Corps) without reducing its contribution to the national defense effort. The Domestic Service Corps (DSC) would combine unemployed youth and Army managerial talent to resolve the urban and…

  20. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process medical malpractice claims arising at Army medical centers under the Commander's control. In... investigate and process medical malpractice claims and affirmative claims and will be provided with the... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command...

  1. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report of...

  2. Prevalence, predictors and correlates of insomnia in US army soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingaman, Elizabeth A; Brownlow, Janeese A; Boland, Elaine M; Mosti, Caterina; Gehrman, Philip R

    2017-10-11

    The objective of this study was to investigate the rates, predictors and correlates of insomnia in a national sample of US Army soldiers. Data were gathered from the cross-sectional survey responses of the All-Army Study, of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Service members. Participants were a representative sample of 21 499 US Army soldiers who responded to the All-Army Study self-administered questionnaire between 2011 and 2013. Insomnia was defined by selected DSM-5 criteria using the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire. The results highlight significant functional difficulties associated with insomnia among US soldiers, as well as insights into predictors of insomnia specific to this population. Insomnia was present in 22.76% of the sample. Predictors of insomnia status in logistic regression included greater number of current mental health disorders, less perceived open lines of communication with leadership, less unit member support and less education. Insomnia had global, negative associations with health, social functioning, support, morale, work performance and Army career intentions. The results provide the strongest evidence to-date that insomnia is common in a military population, and is associated with a wide array of negative factors in the domains of health, military readiness and intentions to remain in military careers. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Prevalence of dyslipidaemia and micronutrient deficiencies among newly arrived Afghan refugees in rural Australia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanati Pour, Mehdi; Kumble, Surabhi; Hanieh, Sarah; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2014-09-01

    Afghanistan is the 15th least developed country in the world, with poor sanitation and high rates of infectious diseases and malnutrition. However, little is known about the health of young Afghan refugees resettling in Western countries. We used a cross-sectional study design to examine the health profile of newly arrived Afghan refugees presenting to a General Practice between 20th April 2010 and 22nd March 2013 in rural Australia. Data collected included information on nutritional status and prevalence of infectious diseases. Challenges associated with health screening in a General Practice setting in this population were also documented. Data were available on 92 patients. Mean age of presentation was 22.6 years [SD 11.9], and the majority of patients were male (88%). Mean total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were 4.4 mmol/L (95% CI, 2.9-7.3), 2.6 mmol/L (95% CI, 1.3-4.4), 1.24 mmol/L (95% CI, 0.7-2.0) and 1.19 mmol/L (95% CI, 0.4-4.7) respectively, and dyslipidaemia (defined as elevated total or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, or low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol) was seen in 27.5% of patients. There was also a high prevalence of vitamin D and B12 deficiency (50% and 18%, respectively) in this cohort. Issues that impacted on provision and access to health care for refugees included cost, language barriers, patient mobility and mental health issues. Dyslipidaemia and micronutrient deficiencies are significant health issues in young recently settled Afghan refugees, and routine screening should be considered for this population.

  5. Trauma memories, mental health, and resilience: a prospective study of Afghan youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter-Brick, Catherine; Grimon, Marie-Pascale; Kalin, Michael; Eggerman, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Studies of war-affected youth have not yet examined how trauma memories relate to prospective changes in mental health and to subjective or social experiences. We interviewed a gender-balanced, randomly selected sample of Afghan child-caregiver dyads (n = 331, two waves, 1 year apart). We assessed lifetime trauma with a Traumatic Event Checklist, past-year events with a checklist of risk and protective events, and several child mental health outcomes including posttraumatic distress (Child Revised Impact of Events Scale, CRIES) and depression. We examined the consistency of trauma recall over time, identified mental health trajectories with latent transition modeling, and assessed the predictors of posttraumatic distress and depression trajectories with multinomial logistic regressions. From baseline to follow-up, reports of lifetime trauma significantly changed (p ≤ 0.01). A third of the cohort reported no trauma exposure; only 10% identified the same event as their most distressing experience. We identified four CRIES trajectories: low or no distress (52%), rising distress (15%), declining distress (21%), and sustained high distress (12%). Youth with chronic posttraumatic distress were more likely to be girls (OR = 5.78, p ≤ 0.01), report more trauma exposure at baseline (OR = 1.55, p ≤ 0.05) and follow-up (OR = 5.96, p ≤ 0.01), and experience ongoing domestic violence (OR = 4.84, p ≤ 0.01). The risks of rising distress and sustained distress showed a steady increase for youth recalling up to four traumatic experiences. Depression and CRIES trajectories showed weak comorbidity. Memories of violent events are malleable, embedded in social experiences, and present heterogeneous associations with posttraumatic distress. Our study provides insights on resilience and vulnerability to multiple adverse childhood experiences, highlighting research and clinical implications for understanding trauma in conflict-affected youth. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of

  6. The Army Selected Reserve Dental Readiness System: overview, assessment, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, James R

    2013-06-01

    The Army Selected Reserve Dental Readiness System (ASDRS) is a key dental program directed by the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower & Reserve Affairs) starting in fiscal year 09. The Army National Guard and Army Reserve have steadily implemented ASDRS over the past 3 years as a means to improve the historically abysmal dental readiness of the Army Reserve Component (RC). Dental readiness is essential for sustaining an Army RC Operational Force. ASDRS is a tool for RC commanders to provide contract dental readiness care in support of over 558 thousand nonmobilized Selected Reserve Citizen-Soldiers dispersed throughout the 54 states and U.S. territories, at home station before alert, and if necessary after alert (throughout the Army force generation cycle). This article examines the status of ASDRS implementation, assesses its effectiveness in improving Army RC Dental Readiness, and provides Army leadership recommendations regarding the following focus areas: (1) command emphasis, (2) program execution, and (3) synergy with the Military Health System and Department of Veterans Affairs. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: November 15, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... issues and matters related to the continued growth and development of the United States Army War College...

  8. 76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: December 14, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... issues and matters related to the continued growth and development of the United States Army War College...

  9. 2005 United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Post-Hurricane Katrina Levee Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These topographic data were collected for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by a helicopter-mounted LiDAR sensor over the New Orleans Hurricane Protection Levee...

  10. 2010 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Portland District Columbia River Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Columbia River Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) survey project was a collaborative effort to develop detailed high density LiDAR terrain data for the US Army...

  11. Assessment of Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARS) for Alabama Army Ammunition Plant, Alabama

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Etnier, E. L

    1990-01-01

    .... Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) has asked the support of the Chemical Effects Information Task Croup in the Chemical Hazard Evaluation Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL...

  12. Barriers to Accessing Testing and Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis B in Afghan, Rohingyan, and South Sudanese Populations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Katherine; O'Neill, Paul; Koh, Youlin; Lee, Jia-Hui; Dev, Anouk; Le, Suong

    2018-02-01

    The burden of chronic Hepatitis B (CHB) infection and associated complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma is growing significantly in Australia due to increased migration from countries with a high prevalence of CHB. Significant barriers to screening and engagement with healthcare persist due to stigma and perceptions associated with CHB within these communities. Our study was a pilot intervention aimed at engaging Afghan, Rohingyan, and Sudanese populations into CHB care through an initial needs assessment. Twenty six patients from Afghan, Rohingyan, and Sudanese communities, identified in the Monash Health CHB database, participated in a combination of survey questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Language and cultural barriers, lack of HBV knowledge, housing and family reunification priorities associated with new settlement, as well as previous experiences of healthcare engagement were all identified as obstacles to accessing CHB care. Healthcare and health promotion workers should be sensitive to the additional health barriers associated with seeking asylum, as these barriers can take priority over the often asymptomatic and chronic nature of CHB. Communities with high prevalence of CHB require culturally relevant education tools delivered at a community level in order to improve their knowledge.

  13. Gender differences in Afghan drug-abuse treatment: an assessment of treatment entry characteristics, dropout, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Melissa Harris; Shamblen, Stephen R; Courser, Matthew; Johnson, Knowlton W; Thompson, Kirsten; Young, Linda; Browne, Thom

    2015-01-01

    The current study examines gender differences in drug-abuse treatment (DAT) entry, dropout, and outcomes in seven DAT centers in Afghanistan. This is the first study to examine gender differences in DAT programming in Afghanistan. A prospective cohort design of 504 women and men in seven DAT centers in Afghanistan was used in this study and the analyses examined whether gender differences exist for patients (1) at treatment entry, (2) at treatment dropout, and (3) for treatment outcomes. Gender differences were found at baseline for patient characteristics, drug use, crime, and social and occupational functioning. Results showed a trend that women remained in treatment longer than men. Looking at gender differences in treatment success, results showed greater reductions in drug use and crime, and greater social functioning among women. Results provide preliminary evidence for potential treatment success of women-tailored DAT programming in Afghanistan. Results also indicate that DAT appears to be successful among Afghan men; however, lower positive outcomes for men when compared to women suggest that more efforts should focus on tailoring DAT programming to the specific needs of Afghan men as well. Study limitations are addressed, and important policy implications are discussed.

  14. Special Operations Forces’ Turn: Recommendations for Leading the Way in Governance and Development in the Afghan Districts Post-DSTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Terrones

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The work of the Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs and District Support Teams (DSTs in Afghanistan emphasized building the district government structures, improving their capacity, and mobilizing economic development. With the completion of the mandate of the PRTs and DSTs, the Special Operations Forces (SOF will take a greater role in governance and development activities in districts and communities throughout the country. In 2014, security responsibility will fall under the Afghan security forces, but the war is not over. SOF will remain in the districts through the early fall of 2014. This practice note examines the role of the DSTs and how SOF should engage in governance and development in the districts. It provides recommendations from the field despite the challenging and minimal resources available in a district. With the right strategic approaches, SOF should be able to maximize the impact of their stability operations; however, it must not be forgotten that achieving stability will depend on whether Afghans are willing to take the lead.

  15. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank... Berry, U. S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), 6501 East 11...

  16. "Building the Bench" - Army National Guard Mentoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jahnke, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    ... Mentoring is a potent personal and professional development technique that is considered by many to be a key component in developing strategic leaders, civilian and military Because of the unique aspects...

  17. Energy Behavior Change and Army Net Zero Energy; Gaps in the Army’s Approach to Changing Energy Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    messenger approach provides only self-reinforcing information. Related is the eighth problem, which is human nature that supports complacency by only...Sustainability, and energy conservation programs. For example, the Army National Guard maintains a sustainability Facebook page as does the Assistant 67

  18. Scattered Families : Transnational family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands in the light of the human rights based protection of the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, P.H.A.M

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands, within and across borders. While family life constitutes a foundation in the lives of human beings, the disruption of the family through external causes has a huge impact on the people involved. In the case of refugees, many of

  19. Christian Contributions to Army Values

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Emma, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    .... The Army trains the soldier's body through physical training and combining arms training events designed to build physical strength and endurance so that the soldier will be physically capable...

  20. Social Structures Affecting Army Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Segal, David R

    2007-01-01

    The Center for Research on Military Organization undertook a multi-year research program on the impact of social change on the performance of Army units and of Soldiers after the end of the Cold War...

  1. Lessons from Army System Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, William A; Rhoades, Richard G

    2007-01-01

    This paper documents the results of a multi-year Army Materiel Command-sponsored research project which employed a structured case study approach to examine the history and processes that had resulted...

  2. Racial Extremism in the Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hudson, Walter M

    1998-01-01

    ... modem phenomenon of "skinheads." I then discuss the history of white supremacist extremism in the Army, culminating in the December, 1995 murders of two black civilians by soldiers assigned to the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina...

  3. Transforming the Army Sustaining Base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nobles, Danny

    2000-01-01

    The Army has embarked on its transformation venture. The goal is to provide an agile, but lethal force that is capable of rapid deployment to any area of the world where America's interests are threatened...

  4. National Security Challenges: Insights from Social, Neurobiological, and Complexity Sciences. Topical Strategic Multi-Layer Assessment (SMA) and U.S. Army ERDC Multi-Agency/Multi-Disciplinary White Papers in Support of National Security Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    facing the infidel ” or “the life of a martyr.” Remember that norms are social constructions of shared beliefs, and as such are meaningless until a...other tribal section; my tribe against the other tribe; Muslims against infidels .” See also, for example, Montgomery McFate’s, “The “Memory of War...visual image, and this tendency emerges across four distinct domains: sexual , disgust, defense, National Security Challenges Approved for Public

  5. How to Build Democratic Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    influence is also considerable in the postcolonial and post–civil war settings, but in the others the project of building demo- cratic armies is usually...Germany, yemen, South Africa table. external influence is considerable in postcolonial and post–civil war settings, but in the others building...Most often, postcolonial armies are not built from scratch but are built on the foundations of the armed forces left behind by the colonial power

  6. Prevalence of mental health disorders and its associated demographic factors in resettled Afghan refugees of Dalakee Refugee Camp in Bushehr Province 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Azizi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iran has received Afghan refugees for many years. Few studies have been done to assess psychiatric morbidity among Afghan refugees in Iran, especially those who are resettled in camps. This study has been designed to determine the prevalence of mental health problems and the associated demographic factors, in Afghan refugees resettled in Dalakee refugee camp of Bushehr Province, in 2005. Methods: In this cross-sectional survey, a Persian version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 was administered to 321 resettled Afghan refugees with the minimum age of 15 years old who were randomly selected among 2200 residents of Dalakee refugee camp in Bushehr Province. Results: Among mental health subscales, the prevalence of social dysfunction, psychosomatic problem, anxiety and depression in the studied population were 80.1%, 48.9%, 39.3% and 22.1%, respectively. The total prevalence of mental health disorders in this camp was 88.5%. Male gender, living with more than eight persons per house, and being age ten or under at migration time were associated with higher level of social dysfunction. Higher rate of psychosomatic problem was associated with unemployment, being born in Iran, being age ten or under at migration time, and having no entertaining programs. Having 1-3 children, living with more than eight persons per house, and positive history of chronic disease were associated with higher level of anxiety. Having no entertaining programs, and family members' death during migration were associated with higher level of depression. Conclusion: Mental health problems related to immigration and living in camps, are common among Afghan refugees.

  7. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  8. Gender Disparities Within US Army Orthopedic Surgery: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher M; Dworak, Theodora C; Anderson, Ashley B; Brelin, Alaina M; Nesti, Leon J; McKay, Patricia L; Gwinn, David E

    2018-01-01

    Women account for approximately 15% of the active duty US Army, and studies show that women may be at an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury during sport and military training. Nationally, the field of orthopedic surgery comprises 14% women, lagging behind other surgical fields. Demographics for US Military orthopedic surgeons are not readily available. Similarly, demographic data of graduating medical students entering Military Medicine are not reported. We hypothesize that a gender disparity within military orthopedics will be apparent. We will compare the demographic profile of providers to our patients and hypothesize that the two groups are dissimilar. Secondarily, we examine the demographics of military medical students potentially entering orthopedics from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) or the Health Professions Scholarship Program. A census was formed of all US Army active duty orthopedic surgeons to include staff surgeons and residents, as well as US Army medical student graduates and orthopedic patients. There are 252 Army orthopedic surgeons and trainees; 26 (10.3%) are women and 226 (89.7%) are men. There were no significant demographic differences between residents and staff. Between 2014 and 2017, the 672 members of the USUHS graduating classes included 246 Army graduates. Of those, 62 (25%) were female. Army Health Professions Scholarship Program graduated 1,072 medical students, with women comprising 300 (28%) of the group. No statistical trends were seen over the 4 yr at USUHS or in Health Professions Scholarship Program. In total, 2,993 orthopedic clinic visits during the study period were by Army service members, 23.6% were women. There exists a gender disparity among US Army orthopedic surgeons, similar to that seen in civilian orthopedics. Gender equity is also lacking among medical students who feed into Army graduate medical education programs. The gender profile of our patient population is not

  9. Diversity Issues in the Army as Perceived by Army Students at the United States Army War College

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webster, Cecil

    1997-01-01

    ..., welfare, and other related programs. In recognizing this diversity, this paper identifies some diversity issues within the Army, analyzes the perception of those diversity issues by the resident Army students in the USAWC Class of 1997...

  10. Comparative analysis of field ration for military personnel of the ukrainian army and armies of other countries worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mardar; M. Hkrupalo; M. Stateva

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of improvement of the Ukrainian nutritional standards this Article provides comparative analysis of field rations of different countries worldwide to make a proposal on improvement of food-stuff assortment in food ration for military personnel in the Armed Forces of Ukraine, Army of USA, the British Army, Army of Germany, Army of Italy, Army of Canada, Army of France, Army of Belarus, Army of Armenia. In accordance with the comparative analysis it was established that ration c...

  11. A new mutation in MC1R explains a coat color phenotype in 2 "old" breeds: Saluki and Afghan hound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Dayna L; Schmutz, Sheila M

    2010-01-01

    Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) has been studied in a wide variety of domestic animals (Klungland et al. 1995; Marklund et al. 1996; Våge et al. 1997; Kijas et al. 1998; Newton et al. 2000; Våge et al. 2003), and also several wild animals (Robbins et al. 1993; Ritland et al. 2001; Eizirik et al. 2003; Nachman et al. 2003; McRobie et al. 2009) in relation to coat color variation. A variety of phenotypic changes have been reported including coat colors from pure black to pure red, as well as some phenotypes with hairs with red and black bands. One phenotype, called grizzle in Salukis and domino in Afghan Hounds, appears to be unique to these 2 old dog breeds. This pattern is characterized by a pale face with a widow's peak above the eyes. The body hairs on the dorsal surface of Salukis and Afghan Hounds have both phaeomelanin and eumelanin portions, even though they had an a(t)/a(t) genotype at ASIP. In addition, all had at least one copy of a newly identified mutation in MC1R, g.233G>T, resulting in p.Gly78Val. This new allele, that we suggest be designated as E(G), is dominant to the E and e (p.Arg306ter) alleles at MC1R but recessive to the E(M) (p.Met264Val) allele. The K(B) allele (p.Gly23del) at DEFB103 and the a(y) allele (p.Ala82Ser and p.Arg83His) of ASIP are epistatic to grizzle and domino.

  12. Reproductive health in Afghanistan: results of a knowledge, attitudes and practices survey among Afghan women in Kabul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, Kathia; Naeem, Ahmad Jan; Verstraelen, Hans; Bosmans, Marleen; Claeys, Patricia; Temmerman, Marleen

    2004-09-01

    A reproductive-health knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) survey was carried out among 468 Afghan women of reproductive age. A convenience sample of women was selected from attendees in the outpatient departments of four health facilities in Kabul. Seventy-nine per cent of respondents had attended at least one antenatal consultation during their last pregnancy. Two-thirds (67 per cent) delivered their first child between 13 and 19 years. The Caesarean-section rate was low (1.6 per cent). Two-thirds (67 per cent) of deliveries occurred in the home. The contraceptive prevalence rate was 23 per cent (16 per cent modern and 7 per cent natural methods). Twenty-four per cent had knowledge of any STIs, although most of these women did not know correctly how to prevent them. Most of the women (93 per cent) needed authorization from their husband or a male relative before seeking professional health-care. In multivariate analysis, women's schooling was significantly associated with antenatal-care attendance (AOR 4.78), institutional delivery (AOR 2.29), skilled attendance at birth (AOR 2.07) and use of family planning (AOR 4.59). Reproductive-health indicators were noted to be poor even among these women living in Kabul, a group often considered to be the most privileged. To meet the reproductive-health needs of Afghan women, the socio-cultural aspects of their situation--especially their decision-making abilities -- will need to be addressed. A long-standing commitment from agencies and donors is required, in which the education of women should be placed as a cornerstone of the reconstruction process of Afghanistan.

  13. Give us back our field army! The Dutch army leadership and the operational planning during the interwar years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, H.; Amersfoort, H.; Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    The 1922 Army Reform Bill reduced the Dutch army to a militia. During the period between the two World Wars Dutch army leadership sought to rebuild an army that in several repects (organization, armement, doctrine) could be compared to the armies of great powers like France and Germany. The army

  14. Internal Controls over Army Selective Reenlistment Bonuses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul J; Marsh, Patricia; Neville, Douglas P; Powell, Joseph A; Penn, Lusk; Ward, Brett; Quimby, Donovan; Vega, Lisa; James, Jason; Matthews, Henry

    2008-01-01

    ...) is the Army's computerized retention system for enlisted personnel. It contains all the reenlistment data required to document the retention of Army Service members, including tracking selective reenlistment bonuses (SRBs...

  15. Army Forces for Operations Other Than War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sortor, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    ... contingencies influence the readiness and availability of Army forces to deploy to an MRC? We examine OOTW missions performed by the Army since 1975 and plans for possible future operations in order to define force requirements for OOTW...

  16. The Army study to assess risk and resilience in servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursano, Robert J; Colpe, Lisa J; Heeringa, Steven G; Kessler, Ronald C; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B

    2014-01-01

    creates strengths going well beyond those in conventional applications of the same individual study designs. These design features create a strong methodological foundation from which Army STARRS can pursue its substantive research goals. The early findings reported here illustrate the importance of the study and its approach as a model of studying rare events particularly of national security concern. Continuing analyses of the data will inform suicide prevention for the U.S. Army.

  17. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... defense. The Army is expected to manage those aspects of the environment affected by Army activities... important environmental resources, and the capacity of Army decisions to influence those effects in a... project planning and decision-making. Efficiency will be promoted through the following: (1) Awareness and...

  18. 76 FR 12087 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: March 24, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... faculty; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self...

  19. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command...; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study...

  20. United States Army Officer Personnel Reforms and the Decline of Rank Flexibility, 1890s-1920s

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-04

    United States” in The Armies of Today: A Description of the Armies of the Leading Nations at the Present Time (New York: Harper & Brothers , 1893), 3...Washington Monthly, December 2007, accessed October 1, 2014, http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/features/2007/0712.tilghman.html. 213 Volney Warner , General...Present Time. New York: Harper & Brothers , 1893. Millett, Allan Reed, Peter Maslowski, and William B. Feis. For the Common Defense: A Military

  1. United States Army’s Current Capability to Conduct Combined Arms Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    result, the Army established the training centers. In the United States, the dirt training centers were the National Training Center ( NTC ) at Fort...and highly dangerous levels of military conflict.”72 The project explores the challenges of a CAM operation against the People’s Liberation Army ( PLA ...The PLA doctrine is becoming more global and not just for internal security. China’s Defense Review states that the PLA “ensures that it is well

  2. ‘Close enough’ – The link between the Syrian Electronic Army and the Bashar al-Assad regime, and implications for the future development of nation-state cyber counter-insurgency strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Kenton Bertram

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The case of the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA offers the chance to study a counter response to the cyber activism of the Arab Spring. Research methods featured an adapted method of snowball sampling. The main technical finding of the study placed the SEA within two degrees of separation from a senior politician within the Assad regime. The core conclusion of the paper is the definition of a ‘close enough’ relationship between the SEA and the Assad regime, defined as distant enough to preserve plausible deniability but close enough to ensure the strategic alignment of the SEA to state policy goals.

  3. Afghan National Engineer Brigade: Despite U.S. Training Efforts, the Brigade is Incapable of Operating Independently

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Trailblazer, JTF Sapper, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 25, and NMCB 28, trained the NEB in such areas as plumbing, electrical work...JTF Sapper, NMCB 25, and NMCB 28, had responsibility for training the NEB in such areas as plumbing, electrical work, carpentry, masonry, and...SIGAR-090A. Obtaining Copies of SIGAR Reports and Testimonies To Report Fraud , Waste, and Abuse in Afghanistan Reconstruction Programs

  4. The Army word recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  5. The Army and Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    synthesis of the knowledge, skills and experiences gained through the synergy of the three domains of the Army Leader...Inventory Article by MAJ 1 1 CPT Letter Response to Grant Log Art. 0 "Logistocrat" Article Asymetric Sustainment Article 1 1 Response Letter to Nov 02 Art

  6. Army Transformation to Expeditionary Formations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bryson, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the path of transformation in the U.S. Army from its inception in the late 1990s by then Chief of Staff GEN Eric Shinseki to the Interim Brigade Combat Team and through Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom...

  7. Drug Abuse in the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essay discusses the growth of drug abuse in the Army, actions that have been taken to control the problem, and planned or proposed actions to...and supervisory personnel of the Drug Abuse Control Division in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Headquarters, Department of

  8. Inverting the Army Intelligence Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    Counterinsurgency, Company Intelligence Support Team, COIST, HUMINT, SIGINT, MASINT, OSINT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: (U) 17. LIMITATION OF...intelligence ( OSINT ), signals intelligence (SIGINT), and technical intelligence (TECHINT).14 11...new ways to support the needs of commanders, especially company-level commanders. The slow-moving and complex framework of the Army acquisition system

  9. Programmatic Environmental Assessment for Army 2020 Force Structure Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    There would be less combustion and generation of air pollutants for which there are National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) (e.g., ozone, sulfur... byproducts , lead) and Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) associated with military training. Construction-related impacts and impacts of facilities...gas, fuel oil, 24 propane, and to a much lesser extent, solid fuels, such as coal and wood. Army installations 25 use all of these forms of energy

  10. U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-01

    and to protect better a national infrastructure which was recognized to be vulnerable to both conventional and cyber attacks. The 1998 report also...the ex tent that it is or derly, ra tio nal, ob jec tive, in clu - sive, dis crim i na tory, and per cep tive. 3 All that notwithstanding, the...edited by Charles F. Hermann, pp. 225-237. New York: Lexington Books, 1994. Bunker, Robert J. Five-Dimensional ( Cyber ) Warfighting: Can the Army

  11. The Lord’s Resistance Army Wicked Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    which had been grabbed from them. The Lango and Acholi leaders made no effort to reconcile the country or build a national army with a fair...all the affected countries in terms of the destruction of the social infrastructure, loss of life or livelihoods of the affected populations and...since counter-insurgency operations are by their very nature “Joint Air- Land Operations”. Although air power has shortcomings in a densely forested

  12. Doctrinal Imbalance: A Study of Swedish Army Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    patience with endless grammar and spelling corrections. Furthermore, Dr. Sterrett also involved his wife, military historian Dr. Corinne Mahaffey, and his...provocative statement of the Swedish supreme commander. The Swedish Army teaches that doctrine derives from a balance between resources, national...it comes to writing a new doctrine, but none of them evaluates doctrine against a specific scenario using the actual forces the doctrine is supposed

  13. Improving the Leader Development Experience in Army Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    senior leaders must influence the behavior of those leaders seen as not adequately contributing to the development of their subordinates. Jack Welch ...will draw down by nearly 15% over the next four years while the Nation concurrently makes difficult strategic choices defining the Army of 2020 and...recognize their role not only in managing human capital to accomplish the mission (the transactional component), but also in cultivating and enriching

  14. Limiting Regret: Building the Army We Will Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management & Comptroller, 2015 Washington-ASMC National Capital Region PDI, Honorable Robert M. Speer, 3...the 1st Marine Division and the British 1st (UK) Armoured Division – which would imply a lower support-to-division ratio. On the other hand, the...missions like WMD consequence management and other homeland defense missions. Comparing the Demand and Supply of Ground Forces The total ground

  15. Leveraging National Healthcare Reform to Improve Army National Guard Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    savings account.86 Safeway has had the most measurable success with VBD. Their health care costs remained flat from 2005 to 2009 when industry costs...November 5, 2009). 86 Regina Herzlinger, Who Killed Health Care (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2007), 202. 87 Rick Wartzman, “Which Safeway can Workers Count...Habits Spur Debate; Safeway CEO Calls it Smart Incentive, Some Medical Groups Say it’s a Way to Discriminate,” Los Angeles Times, November 4, 2009, A12

  16. 2012 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 23-05-2013 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED...VDAS_ArmyPostureStatement/2011/information_p apers /PostedDocument.asp?id=210 United States Office of Personnel Management (2012). Federal employee viewpoint survey

  17. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  18. Army Net Zero: Energy Roadmap and Program Summary, Fiscal Year 2013 (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Army (Army) partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through improved energy efficiency and optimized renewable energy strategies at nine installations across the Army's portfolio. Referred to as Net Zero Energy Installations (NZEIs), these projects demonstrate and validate energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies with approaches that can be replicated across DOD and other Federal agencies, setting the stage for broad market adoption. This report summarizes the results of the energy project roadmaps developed by NREL, shows the progress each installation could make in achieving Net Zero Energy by 2020, and presents lessons learned and unique challenges from each installation.

  19. [Intersecting images: the army and the hinterlands in the First Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rogério Rosa

    2012-12-01

    The article analyzes the Army's political and social proposal for the Brazilian nation in the 1910s. It considers the Army's climate of modernization in conjunction with the prevailing context of critical evaluation of the republican regime and greater recognition of the role of the armed forces in power games. The analytical method was to cross-reference photographs from the Contestado campaign with militarist discourses found in books authored by Army officers, in articles published in the Rio de Janeiro press, and in Olavo Bilac's speeches in favor of a draft lottery. It was found that the Army wanted to link the hinterlands to the coast and to adopt the barracks as a prime space for forming citizens.

  20. The Total Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    of disaster response and recovery. The response to the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami provide...seldom smooth, and many nations endure extended periods of turmoil when transitioning to a democratic system. Yet countries such as Colombia and Chile ...American countries on counter-terrorism, counter-illicit trafficking, peacekeeping, and disaster relief. In the wake of post- earthquake Haiti

  1. The American Armies: 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Liberation Front) in El Salvador has evaporated, paving the way for resolution of El Salvador’s civil conflict. A minor "reverse domino" effect is...being felt throughout Latin America. As the conflict in El Salvador subsided, Honduran fears about the size of El Salvadoran forces have eased, resulting...30 American nations, especially since US. participation in the overthrow of Allende in 1973.21 Bolivia’s aspirations for direct access to the Pacific

  2. Trapped in the Past or Empowered for the Future? Afghan Women’s Prospects in the Decade to Come

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepi Azarbaijani-Moghaddam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent presidential election in Afghanistan saw larger numbers of women defying the Taliban by questioning candidates and turning out to vote. This paper argues that Afghan women now need to further revolutionize skewed gender relations within the private sphere of the family. Already a growing number of men are lobbying on behalf of female relatives who have experienced sexual abuse; the result is that notions of women’s rights are being inserted into public consciousness. A genuine women’s movement could extend well beyond the past decade’s cosmetic ‘modernization’ that has benefited only a few elite women. To gain independent bargaining power for such a groundswell, different female constituencies should unite, rallying behind a vision that appropriates and deploys liberating and peaceadvocating versions of Islam. At home – where they customarily have been bartered into marriages – girls should be expected to gain skills in literacy and numeracy that can lead to a salary and professional status. Then, instead of adhering to traditional gender roles and identities based on the number of sons they have borne, women could start to be recognized for their formal labor. As one symbolic step to reverse women’s precarious status in the decade ahead, the government and international donors should set the example of employing members of both sexes to work on projects of economic development.

  3. Gendered Sources of Distress and Resilience among Afghan Refugees in Northern California: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Stempel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have emphasized the influence of resettlement factors on the mental health of refugees resettling in developed countries. However, little research has addressed gender differences in the nature and influence of resettlement stressors and sources of resilience. We address this gap in knowledge by investigating how gender moderates and mediates the influence of several sources of distress and resilience among 259 Afghan refugees residing in Northern California (USA. Gender moderated the effects of four factors on levels of distress. Intimate and extended family ties have little correlation with men’s distress levels, but are strongly associated with lower distress for women. English ability is positively associated with lower distress for women, but not men. In terms of gender ideology, traditionally oriented women and egalitarian men have lower levels of distress. And experiencing greater dissonant acculturation increases distress for men, but not women. The influence of gender interaction terms is substantial and patterns may reflect difficulty adapting to a different gender order. Future studies of similar populations should investigate gender differences in sources of distress and resilience, and efforts to assist new arrivals might inform them of changes in gender roles they may experience, and facilitate opportunities to renegotiate gender roles.

  4. Afghan and Kurdish refugees, 8-20 years after resettlement, still experience psychological distress and challenges to well being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman-Hill, Cheryl M R; Thompson, Sandra C

    2012-04-01

    To examine the resettlement experiences and provide data of well being and psychological distress for Afghan and Kurdish refugees settled between eight and 20 years in New Zealand and Australia. Participants completed the Kessler-10 Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and Personal Well Being Index (PWI) for subjective well being. A mixed methods approach was used, with participants also discussing during interview resettlement difficulties, quality of life (QOL) and sources of stress. Data from 81 Muslim participants is reported; all spoke English, were generally well educated with 88% having secondary or tertiary level education, and the majority of those resettled before 2001 lived in Perth. Although psychological distress levels were mostly within the low-moderate risk range, significant differences were observed by gender and employment status. Participants identified a range of ongoing stressors with unemployment of particular concern. Social isolation and a sense that they would never really 'fit in' was also reported by some. Participants particularly valued the safety and improved quality of life in their host communities. Despite their appreciation of the overall resettlement experience, too much time to introspect, separation from family, status dissonance and still occasionally feeling overwhelmed by resettlement challenges is a long-term ongoing reality for some former refugees. Former refugees continue to struggle with unemployment, possible discrimination and loss of status long-term. © 2012 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2012 Public Health Association of Australia.

  5. Gendered Sources of Distress and Resilience among Afghan Refugees in Northern California: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempel, Carl; Sami, Nilofar; Koga, Patrick Marius; Alemi, Qais; Smith, Valerie; Shirazi, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the influence of resettlement factors on the mental health of refugees resettling in developed countries. However, little research has addressed gender differences in the nature and influence of resettlement stressors and sources of resilience. We address this gap in knowledge by investigating how gender moderates and mediates the influence of several sources of distress and resilience among 259 Afghan refugees residing in Northern California (USA). Gender moderated the effects of four factors on levels of distress. Intimate and extended family ties have little correlation with men’s distress levels, but are strongly associated with lower distress for women. English ability is positively associated with lower distress for women, but not men. In terms of gender ideology, traditionally oriented women and egalitarian men have lower levels of distress. And experiencing greater dissonant acculturation increases distress for men, but not women. The influence of gender interaction terms is substantial and patterns may reflect difficulty adapting to a different gender order. Future studies of similar populations should investigate gender differences in sources of distress and resilience, and efforts to assist new arrivals might inform them of changes in gender roles they may experience, and facilitate opportunities to renegotiate gender roles. PMID:28036054

  6. To the Question of Influence of Amanulla's Reforms to Ethnopolitical Processes in the Afghan Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Хомид Саидов

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article are considered some aspects of the deep social and economic reform initiated by emir Amanulla-khan that affect the public and political development of the country, in particular ethnic national processes in Afghanistan.

  7. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Military Construction MS - Milestone N/A - Not Applicable O&S - Operating and Support OSD - Office of the Secretary of Defense PB - President’s...Budget RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAE - Service Acquisition Executive TBD - To Be Determined TY - Then Year U.S.C- United

  8. The Marketability of Army Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-14

    capital ( Nussbaum , 1988).I I I I 1 19 I Governmental measures at the state level which foster job training include the California Employment Training I...Plight. Business Month, 133 (1) : 50-51. Nussbaum , B. 1988. Needed: Human Capital. Business Week, 3070: 100-103. Novack, J. 1991. Back to civy street...The second son of Howell J. and Martha Malham, he graduated from Memorial High School, Houston, I Texas, in May 1976 and entered the United States Army

  9. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  10. Acquisition: Army Claims Service Military Interdepartmental Purchase Requests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... The Army Claims Service supports the Army and the Judge Advocate General Corps by managing the Army claims system, which includes processing tort and personnel claims, and recovering funds owed...

  11. Issues and Insights from the Army Technology Seminar Game

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darilek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    ...). The AAN goals were to link Army XXI to a long-term vision of the Army extending well into the 21st century and to ensure that this vision informed evolving Army research and development requirements...

  12. Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-28

    Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting Report No. D-2008-072 March 28, 2008 Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...DIRECTOR, DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE SUBJECT: Report on Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting ( Report No. D-2008-072

  13. 2013 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): MAIN FINDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Leadership Requirements Model and Leader Effectiveness Implicit leadership theory (Eden & Leviatan, 1975; Yukl, 2002) indicates followers’ perceptions...Department of the Army. Eden, D. & Leviatan, U. (1975). Implicit leadership theory as a determinant of the factor structure underlying supervisory...2013 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): MAIN FINDINGS TECHNICAL REPORT 2014-01 Ryan

  14. Addressing Deficiencies in Army Civilian Leader Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keller, Jonathan S

    2008-01-01

    .... A well managed, comparable, and integrated Army leader training, education, and development framework, designed to create shared and combined developmental experiences, is essential for growing...

  15. Drug Control in Fragile States: Regional Cooperation and Differing Legal Responses to the Afghan Opiate Epidemic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afsah, Ebrahim

    -narcotic collaboration. Drastically different national policy choices regarding the penalisation of consumption and drug-demand strategies have furthermore yielded dramatically different social outcomes, further complicating regional efforts. Work on legal harmonisation is, therefore, deemed at best a relatively......-narcotics agencies of the region as caused by a plethora of legal obstacles in the respective national penal and administrative codes, as well as an insufficient legal basis for regional collaboration. These premises could not be validated on the ground. The legal framework in the region is adequate and no legal...

  16. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  17. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA

  18. Optimization-Based Selection of Influential Agents in a Rural Afghan Social Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Awakens: The Tipping Point," Military Review, pp. 41-52, March-April 2008. [54] Fotini Christia , "Flipping the Taliban," Foreign Affairs, vol. 88, no. 4...183 [92] Andrew Beath, Fotini Christia , and Ruben Enikolopov, "Baseline Survey Report," Randomized Impact Evaluation of Afghanistan’s National

  19. Suicide Attempts in the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Stein, Murray B.; Naifeh, James A.; Aliaga, Pablo A.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Colpe, Lisa J.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Cox, Kenneth L.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The U.S. Army suicide attempt rate increased sharply during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Comprehensive research on this important health outcome has been hampered by a lack of integration among Army administrative data systems. Objective To identify risk factors for Regular Army suicide attempts during the years 2004–2009 using data from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). Design, Setting, and Participants There were 9,791 medically documented suicide attempts among Regular Army soldiers during the study period. Individual-level person-month records from Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems were analyzed to identify socio-demographic, service-related, and mental health risk factors distinguishing suicide attempt cases from an equal-probability control sample of 183,826 person-months. Main Outcome and Measures Suicide attempts were identified using Department of Defense Suicide Event Report records and ICD-9 E95x diagnostic codes. Predictor variables were constructed from Army personnel and medical records. Results Enlisted soldiers accounted for 98.6% of all suicide attempts, with an overall rate of 377/100,000 person-years, versus 27.9/100,000 person-years for officers. Significant multivariate predictors among enlisted soldiers included socio-demographic characteristics (female gender, older age at Army entry, younger current age, low education, non-hispanic white), short length of service, never or previously deployed, and the presence and recency of mental health diagnoses. Among officers, only socio-demographic characteristics (female gender, older age at Army entry, younger current age, and low education) and the presence and recency of mental health diagnoses were significant. Conclusions and Relevance Results represent the most comprehensive accounting of U.S. Army suicide attempts to date and reveal unique risk profiles for enlisted soldiers and officers, and highlighting the

  20. For our own security and for the sake of the Afghans. How the Danish public was persuaded to support an unprecedented costly military endeavor in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo; Ringsmose, Jens

    2015-01-01

    To explain how the Danish government succeeded in mobilizing and sustaining public support for the operation, we develop a novel analytical framework that incorporates insights from the two bodies of thought above as well as the emerging literature on strategic narratives. We identify six...... conditions for success from these literatures that governments must be able to meet in order to mobilize and sustain public support for military operations and demonstrate empirically that these conditions apply in the Danish case. The secret Danish recipe for maintaining support for the Afghan war thus came...

  1. Implications of hepatitis C viremia vs. antibody alone on transmission among male injecting drug users in three Afghan cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Abdul; Todd, Catherine S; Stanekzai, Mohammad R; Bautista, Christian T; Botros, Boulos A; Scott, Paul T; Kim, Jerome H; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Tjaden, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    To assess differences between injecting drug users (IDUs) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) viremia and IDUs with HCV antibody (Ab) or no evidence of prior infection in three Afghan cities. IDUs in Hirat, Jalalabad, and Mazar-i-Sharif completed questionnaires and rapid testing for blood-borne infections including HCV Ab. HCV Ab was confirmed with a recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA); RIBA-positive specimens underwent reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for HCV. Risk behaviors associated with viremia were assessed with site-controlled ordinal regression analysis. Of 609 participants, 223 (36.6%) had confirmed HCV Ab. Of 221 with serum available for PCR evaluation, 127 (57.5%) were viremic. HCV viremia prevalence did not differ by site (range 41.7-59.1%; p=0.52). Among all IDUs, in age and site-controlled ordinal regression analysis, HCV was independently associated with HIV co-infection (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 7.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.41-11.64), prior addiction treatment (AOR 1.95, 95% CI 1.57-2.42), ever aspirating and re-injecting blood (AOR 1.62, 95% CI 1.18-2.23), prior incarceration (AOR 1.60, 95% CI 1.04-2.45), and sharing injecting equipment in the last 6 months (AOR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02-1.80). HCV viremia was present in many participants with prior HCV infection and was associated with some injecting risk behaviors, indicating a substantial risk for transmission. Current harm reduction programs should aim to improve HCV awareness and prevention among IDUs in Afghanistan as a matter of urgency. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence and correlates of syphilis and condom use among male injection drug users in four Afghan cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Catherine S; Nasir, Abdul; Raza Stanekzai, Mohammad; Abed, Abdullah M S; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Bautista, Christian T; Scott, Paul T; Botros, Boulos A; Tjaden, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    : Injecting drug use is increasing in Afghanistan but little is known about sexual risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence among injection drug users (IDU). The purpose of this study is to assess prevalence and correlates of syphilis and condom use with female sex workers (FSWs) among male IDUs in Hirat, Jalalabad, Kabul, and Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan. : Participants in this cross-sectional study completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and serologic testing for syphilis between June 2005 and January 2008. Factors associated with syphilis condom use with FSWs were assessed with site-controlled logistic regression analysis. : Of 1078 male IDUs, most (90.3%) reported prior sexual experience, of whom 27.6% reported any condom use. Sexual experiences with FSWs (58.1%) and men or boys (25.7%) were common, although prior condom use with FSWs (32.6%) or male partners (10.8%) was relatively rare. Few reported having a lifetime STI diagnosis (6.3%, n = 68) or symptoms (10.4%, n = 110) in the last 6 months. Prevalence of syphilis was 3.72% (95% CI: 2.66%-5.06%) and varied significantly between sites ranging from 0% (Jalalabad) to 13.9% (Mazar-i-Sharif) (P Afghanistan in the last decade (AOR = 5.52, 95% CI: 1.83-16.71), higher income (AOR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.17-3.51), greater number of lifetime partners (AOR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.32-2.45), and younger age (AOR = 0.985, 95% CI: 0.973-0.998). : Although prevalence of syphilis and condom use varied significantly by site, high levels of risky sexual behavior were common, and consistent condom use was rare among IDUs in Afghanistan. Harm reduction programming should incorporate sexual risk reduction and condom promotion and distribution in Afghan cities.

  3. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Soldiers, military and/or Department of the Army Civilian (DAC) police performing off-installation... areas OCONUS. (b) Military and/or DAC police assigned to off-installation operations have the sole... under the command of, U.S. Army superiors. Military and DAC police may come to the aid of civilian law...

  4. Why the Combined Field Army?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-31

    COMBINED FIELD ARMY A September 1988 article in the Wall Street Journal points out the arenas of change underway on the Korean peninsula.16 Many important...with superior results. ENDNOTES 16. Susan Moffat, "Koreans Demanding Equality on Defense", The Wall Street Journal ., 28 September 1988,p20. 17. This...p46. 20. Roh Address, p6. 21. Susan Moffat, " In Korea, Reunification is a Family Matter", The Wall Street Journal , 23 January 1989, pAl0. 22. Bunge

  5. The Afghan War and 'postmodern' memory: commemoration and the dead of Helmand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Since 2006, Britain has been fighting an intense military campaign in Helmand in which over 200 soldiers have been killed. The article examines the way in which twentieth-century commemorative rituals, which mourned the sacrifice of anonymous individual soldiers for the nation, have been superseded by new lapidary conventions which fundamentally revise the status of the soldier in public imagination. In acts of remembrance today, soldiers are personalized and domesticated, remembered as fathers, husbands, wives, sons and daughters. The article concludes by considering the political implications of this revision of public understanding.

  6. Talk to the Hand: U.S. Army Biophysical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, William R; Potter, Adam W; Friedl, Karl E

    2017-07-01

    Many people are unaware of the science underlying the biophysical properties of Soldier clothing and personal protective equipment, yet there is a well-refined biomedical methodology initiated by Army physiologists in World War II. This involves a methodical progression of systematic material testing technologies, computer modeling, and human testing that enables more efficient development and rapid evaluation of new concepts for Soldier health and performance. Sophisticated manikins that sweat and move are a central part of this testing continuum. This report briefly summarizes the evolution and use of one specialized form of the manikin technologies, the thermal hand model, and its use in research on Soldier hand-wear items that sustain dexterity and protect the hand in extreme environments. Thermal manikin testing methodologies were developed to provide an efficient and consistent analytical tool for the rapid evaluation of new clothing concepts. These methods have been upgraded since the original World War II and Korean War eras to include articulation and sweating capabilities, as characterized and illustrated in this article. The earlier "retired" versions of thermal hand models have now been transferred to the National Museum of Health and Science. The biophysical values from manikin testing are critical inputs to the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine mathematical models that provide predictions of soldier comfort, duration of exposure before loss of manual dexterity, and time to significant risk of freezing (skin temperature Army has been on the forefront of the biophysical analysis of clothing including gloves since environmental research was established at the Armored Medical Research Laboratory and Climatic Research Laboratory during World War II. U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine does not make the equipment but works with their Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center partners to make the

  7. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... studies: Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology and Small Unit Data to Decisions. Proposed Agenda: Thursday 26 July 2012: 1530-1630--The study results for Strategic Direction for Army Science and... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY...

  8. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 [Docket No. USA-2008-0001] Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army proposes to revise its regulations concerning...

  9. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 [Docket No. USA-2008-0001] RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is finalizing revisions to its regulation concerning radiation sources on...

  10. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice... Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle...

  11. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice...: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle...

  12. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice... Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle Barracks...

  13. Types of injuries among Polish soldiers and civilian staff in the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th rotation of the Afghan stabilization mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Radosław

    2012-03-01

    The Afghan military theatre is specifically marked by guerilla operations and massive use of IEDs (improvised explosive devices) that pose new types of threats for their victims. At the same time, the relevant literature contains only a single, fragmentary analysis on injuries suffered by soldiers serving in the Afghan mission. This is a review of medical reports of the Polish Military Contingent deployed within Operation Enduring Freedom, from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2011; the analysis includes all cases of combat and non-combat injuries in terms of their causes. In the period under analysis, 380 Polish soldiers were reported injured; 87.1% of cases were combat and 12.9% non-combat injuries. The structure of injuries caused as a result of IED explosions was dominated by multiple limb injuries, associated most frequently with severe body cavities/spine injuries. In the case of other incidents, both combat and non-combat, the predominant consequences were single and, most commonly, less severe injuries. The average number of injuries suffered from IED attacks (3.37) was significantly higher than the number of injuries from other attacks (1.16), and higher than the number of non-combat injuries (1.43). IED attacks pose a serious medical problem, considering their high number and the severity of injuries they cause.

  14. Baseline Marine Biological Survey ROI-NAMUR Outfall United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1997(NODC Accession 0000630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll(USAKA) central command post on...

  15. 1996 Inventory of Endangered Species and Wildlife Resources on US Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (NODC Accession 0000251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report summarizes the results of the first United States Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Activities in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (UES) inventory of...

  16. Wave and current data collected by the US Army Corps of Engineers in Kuhio Bay, Hawaii, from March 2007 to June 2007 (NODC Accession 0050188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field data collection was conducted for the U.S. Army Engineer District, Pacific Ocean, Honolulu (POH), during 21 March through 7 June 2007, in Kuhio Bay of Hilo,...

  17. Inventory of endangered species and wildlife resources at the US Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1988 (NODC Accession 0000631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An inventory of endangered species and the wildlife resources at the US Army Kwajelein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Island were conducted from 30 October 1998 to...

  18. Baseline marine biological survey at Roi-Namur sewage outfall, United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1997 (NODC Accession 0000630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) central command post on...

  19. Marine biological survey of ROI-NAMUR outfall at the United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, May 2000 (NODC Accession 0000653)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) central command post on...

  20. 1998 Inventory of Endangered Species and Wildlife Resources at the US Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (NODC Accession 0000631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report summarizes the results of the second United States Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Activities in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (UES) inventory of...

  1. The U.S. Army in the 21st Century and the Conflict Between Training for War and Keeping the Peace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phelps, William

    2001-01-01

    .... The purpose of this paper is to address the conflict the Army faces in the 21st Century between its charter to fight and win our Nation's wars and the ever-increasing requirements to execute peace...

  2. Charges Assessed the Army by the Defense Logistics Agency for Deployable Medical Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... Deployable medical systems are standardized modular field hospitals that can be prepositioned in the event of a contingency, national emergency, or war operations. In FY 1994, the Defense Personnel Support Center billed the Army $25 million for acquiring and assembling deployable medical systems.

  3. Where Might the U.S. Army Budget Go, and How Might It Get There?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    587-A, 2010, p. 7. 7 N. G. Mankiw , Principles of Microeconomics , Fort Worth, Tex.: Dryden Press, 2008, pp. 270–276. 8 Assistant Secretary of the Army...Security_.pdf Mankiw , N. G., Principles of Microeconomics , Fort Worth, Tex.: Dryden Press, 2008. National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform

  4. Кавказские национальные формирования Красной Армии в период обороны Кавказа в 1942 г. Caucasian National Formations of the Red Army during the Defense of the Caucasus in 1942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    АлексейБезугольный / Aleksei Bezugol’nyi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns issues in the recruitment of ethnic Caucasians into Red Army units and the military’s use of national (ethnic units during the defense of the Caucasus (July – December 1942. Particular attention is paid to the political and historical context of Caucasian national divisions as well as to discussions among the country's and the Caucasian national republics' military commanders and political leaders regarding the level of military preparedness and political loyalty of ethnically Caucasian troops.Pipss.org is grateful to Rebecca Gordan who translated this abstract from Russian into English

  5. Radon Monitoring in Army Stand-Alone Housing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    Y cm a cc 0000 0003 000 000 :: - -@-I.00 cmjinu mooc . 0J~CJ~ TTTT J !8 2 T WWWW WW.000 coo 0~~ 80 Im - v ;o e I3 ec ;: C -1,4 04. -c mco : - a c W" 1 .1...Chamber ....................... 25 V U I I I viI Final Report, April 1990 Radon Monitoring in Army Stand-alone Housing Units Summary Argonne National...and analysis. The quality control protocols appli- cable to detector analysis are contained in Chapter V of the procedures manual developed by Tech

  6. Between Scylla and Charybdis: Constructing the Nicaraguan Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-18

    Politicos En Uniforme: Un Balance del Poder del EPS (Managua: Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Socio-Politicos, 1992), 19. 37 Republic of Nicaragua...remaining 1,051 missiles – consisting of the most modern and lethal types – were stored in a USG built, state-of-the- art storage 30 facility. Despite this...this national and apolitical Army may be in jeopardy. Endnotes 1 Colonel Francisco Barbosa Miranda, “Fundamentos del Ejército de Nicaragua

  7. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army ...Hearing Division General Medical: 500A July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q2FY17...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health

  8. Water Sample Points, Navajo Nation, 2000, USACE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This point shapefile presents the locations and results for water samples collected on the Navajo Nation by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for the US...

  9. Improving Army Basic Research: Report of an Expert Panel on the Future of Army Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    university-affiliated research center UCLA University of California, Los Angeles USACE U.S. Army Corps of Engineers VCSA Vice Chief of Staff of the Army WTC ...Capabilities Development, who provides recommendations to the one-star Warfighter Techni- cal Council ( WTC ). The WTC is co-chaired by the HQDA Director for...Service]-level members from Army laboratories, RDECs, and TRADOC Force Operating Capability leads. Results of both TD and WTC reviews are provided

  10. Atomic Army: the roles of the U.S. Army in America's nuclear endeavors

    OpenAIRE

    Womack, Seth M.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the roles of the U.S. Army in America’s nuclear undertakings. Since 1942, when the Army took responsibility for managing the Manhattan Project, the Army has made many important contributions to America’s nuclear endeavors. Its earliest nuclear roles included developing and employing America’s first nuclear weapons, executing nuclear counterproliferation missions, investigating the effects of nuclear weapons, and su...

  11. Developing an Army Market Research Index in Support of Army Recruiting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morath, Ray

    2001-01-01

    .... Generating appropriate market research for the Army requires first cataloguing the existing market research databases and identifying the critical questions that are not answered by current research...

  12. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... Through a survey of the literature of published corporate business plans and models, military reports, Army depot case studies, and comparative analysis of emerging computer software technology...

  13. Army's drinking water surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneeringer, P.V.; Belkin, F.; Straffon, N.; Costick, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    In 1976 a total of 827 water sources from Army installations throughout the world were sampled and analyzed for 53 chemical constituents and physical parameters. Medically significant contaminants included radiation measurements, heavy metals, fluoride, nitrate, and pesticides. Radiological activity appeared to vary with geographic location; a majority being from water sources in the western part of the U.S. No results for tritium were found to exceed the health-reference limit. Confirmatory analyses for radium-226 identified 3 groundwater sources as exceeding the limit; one was attributed to natural activity and the other sources are currently being investigated. Of the metals considered to be medically significant, mercury, chromium, lead, cadmium, silver, barium and arsenic were found in amounts within health level limits. Nitrate levels exceeding the health limit were confirmed for 2 drinking water sources

  14. Operational Army Reserve Implications for Organizational Health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dahms, Jonathan A

    2007-01-01

    The Army Reserve has been in a constant state of mobilization since 1995 with the advent of the Bosnia crisis and the pace of mobilization increased exponentially after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001...

  15. Trust and Dialogue in the Army Profession

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, III, James M

    2008-01-01

    .... Trust binds the Army together as a cohesive unit. Unfortunately, in the Officer Corps there is the perception of a serious erosion of trust that may be reaching dangerously dysfunctional levels...

  16. US Army Cultural Obstacles to Transformational Leadership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Combs, Peggy C

    2007-01-01

    ...." Although these words sound like a direct lift of the current 2007 Army Posture statement, which discusses the "pentathlete" leader, they were written by the 33rd CSA, General Dennis Reimer, in 1999...

  17. Characterizing Extreme Environments for Army Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harmon, R. S; King, W. C; Palka, Eugene J; Gilewitch, Daniel A

    2004-01-01

    Army Regulation (AR) 70-38 publishes standards for temperature and humidity in different environments, but there are other important environmental features such as general climate, terrain character, and biological...

  18. Evaluation of Sierra Army Depot Groundwater Contamination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1997-01-01

    ...), September 28, 1996. The Congressional conferees were concerned about allegations from a group of investors that the Army precipitously and abruptly changed its position on permits and applications to develop water...

  19. Accelerated Logistics: Streamlining the Army's Supply Chain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Mark

    2000-01-01

    ...) initiative, the Army has dramatically streamlined its supply chain, cutting order and ship times for repair parts by nearly two-thirds nationwide and over 75 percent at several of the major Forces Command (FORSCOM) installations...

  20. A Pilotless Army in the Megalopolis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wegner, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This monograph answers the question, "Can unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) supplant manned United States Army attack and reconnaissance helicopters in the conduct of future urban operations" and the answer is, "not completely...

  1. Transformation and the Army School System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shanley, Michael G; Crowley, James C; Lewis, Matthew W; Masi, Ralph; Straus, Susan G; Leuschner, Kristin J; Hartman, Steven; Stockly, Sue

    2005-01-01

    .... The study recommends that the Army adopt private-sector models in developing interactive media instruction, develop a more effective local school system to better meet future unit training needs...

  2. Mortality surveillance in the U.S. Army, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancha, Brent E; Watkins, Eren Youmans; Nichols, Jerrica N; Seguin, Peter G; Bell, Amy Millikan

    2014-12-01

    Mortality rates in the U.S. Army from 2005 to 2011 were examined over time and compared to the U.S. general population. Cases were U.S. Army Soldiers (active duty or activated National Guard/Reserve) with dates of death between 2005 and 2011 and between 18 and 64 years of age in the Department of Defense Medical Mortality Registry. Age- and sex-adjusted annual mortality rates (AR) were calculated for each category of death and examined via linear regression. Proportions of underlying causes of death were also examined. The trend in AR in the U.S. Army significantly decreased for combat deaths, the average annual percent change (AAPC) = 15.2% decrease in the log of the rate (LAR); p = 0.04 and accident deaths, AAPC = 5.4% decrease in the LAR; p = 0.002 and significantly increased for suicides, AAPC = 10.6% increase in the LAR; p = 0.001. The trend in AR for suicides for the Army was significantly different compared to the U.S. general population, AAPC = 11.0% increase in the LAR; p Army suicide rate increased in comparison to the United States. 70% of accident deaths were transportation related. Almost 70% of suicides and homicides were firearm related. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. 77 FR 74870 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army, Fort Sill Museum, Fort Sill, OK...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ..., Fort Sill, OK, and Museum of the Great Plains, Lawton, OK AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Sill National Historic Landmark and Museum, U.S. Army Fires Center of Excellence, Fort Sill, OK 73503... Great Plains. The human remains were removed from Fort Sill, Comanche County, OK. This notice is...

  4. The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-10

    34 Ada " for Ada Lovelace (1815-1851), a mathematician who worked with Charles Babbage on his difference and analytic engines.9 Later in 1979, the HOLWG...OF ADA FOR ARMY MODELING BY COLONEL MICHAEL L. YOCOM DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for publie releases distribution is unlimited. 1% LF-, EC TE...TITLE (ad Subtitle) a. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling Individual Study Project 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER

  5. Making Weapons for the Terracotta Army

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Martinón-Torres; Xiuzhen Janice Li; Andrew Bevan; Yin Xia; Zhao Kun; Thilo Rehren

    2011-01-01

    The Terracotta Army of the First Emperor of China is one of the most emblematic archaeological sites in the world. Many questions remain about the logistics of technology, standardisation and labour organisation behind the creation of such a colossal construction in just a few decades over 2,000 years ago. An ongoing research project co-ordinated between the UCL Institute of Archaeology and the Emperor Qin Shihang's Terracotta Army Museum is beginning to address some of these questions. This ...

  6. Decisive Army Strategic and Expeditionary Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Committee organized under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the study was to help update the Army’s strategy and doctrine around the...acquisition systems ( SCADA ), a new security paradigm will be needed for access control. To illustrate these points, in large commercial enterprise...Lift Update ,” PowerPoint Presentation, 5 December 2013. 6. Army Capabilities Integration Center (ARCIC), Unified Quest 2013: Deep Future Wargame

  7. Increasing Responsiveness of the Army Rapid Acquisition Process: The Army Rapid Equipping Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    74 Rodney Spann , REF Logistics Management Division Brief, 29 March 2010, Slide 2. 75 Dickson, U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force 2002-2007 Booklet, 82...speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, April 23, 1910. Spann , Rodney, REF Logistics Management Division Brief, Slide 2, 29 March 2010. U.S. Army 20 th

  8. Atomic Army: The Roles of the U.S. Army in America’s Nuclear Endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    ROAD Reorganization Objectives Army Division ROK Republic of Korea SACEUR Supreme Allied Commander, Europe SADM Special Atomic Demolition Munitions...been able to construct a nuclear bomb without the contributions of dedicated and ingenious civilian scientists, engineers, and technicians or the...Reorganization Objectives Army Division ( ROAD ).369 ROADs typically consisted of three brigades armed with both nuclear and conventional weapons, and they

  9. A Dutch mass army? Dutch liberal ideas and practices to enlarge the army, 1914-1922

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    In August 1914, the Dutch government called up its citizens to enlist voluntarily in the army. This call-up failed. In 1915, the government tried to enlarge the army significantly by law. This attempt succeeded partially. At the end of the war, under threat of a leftwing revolution, the Netherlands

  10. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Military Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-22

    quality of military leadership . Implicit leadership theory (Eden & Leviatan, 1975; Yukl, 7 The...Eden, D., & Leviatan, U. (1975). Implicit leadership theory as a determinant of the factor structure underlying supervisory behavior scales. Journal...2014 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): MILITARY LEADER FINDINGS TECHNICAL REPORT 2015-01

  11. Major Harvey Cushing's difficulties with the British and American armies during World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    This historical review explores Harvey Cushing's difficulties with both the British and American armies during his World War I service to definitively examine the rumor of his possible court martial. It also provides a further understanding of Cushing the man. While in France during World War I, Cushing was initially assigned to British hospital units. This service began in May 1917 and ended abruptly in May 1918 when the British cashiered him for repeated censorship violations. Returning to American command, he feared court martial. The army file on this matter (retrieved from the United States National Archives) indicates that US Army authorities recommended that Cushing be reprimanded and returned to the US for his violations. The army carried out neither recommendation, and no evidence exists that a court martial was considered. Cushing's army career and possible future academic life were protected by the actions of his surgical peers and Merritte Ireland, Chief Surgeon of the US Army in France. After this censorship episode, Cushing was made a neurosurgical consultant but was also sternly warned that further rule violations would not be tolerated by the US Army. Thereafter, despite the onset of a severe peripheral neuropathy, probably Guillian Barré's syndrome, Cushing was indefatigable in ministering to neurosurgical needs in the US sector in France. Cushing's repeated defying of censorship regulations reveals poor judgment plus an initial inability to be a "team player." The explanations he offered for his censorship violations showed an ability to bend the truth. Cushing's war journal is unclear as to exactly what transpired between him and the British and US armies. It also shows no recognition of the help he received from others who were instrumental in preventing his ignominious removal from service in France. Had that happened, his academic future and ability to train future neurosurgical leaders may have been seriously threatened. Cushing's foibles

  12. The Afghan Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David

    Efter mere en ti års krig skal afghanske sikkerhedsstyrker inden for de kommende år overtage ansvaret for sikkerheden i landet. Opbygningen og uddannelsen af både hæren og politiet er en af de udsendte danske soldaters primære arbejdsopgaver. Ophold ved den nu nedlagte danske TMLT -enhed i Camp B...

  13. Ilves enters Afghan conflict

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    Presidendi kantselei sõnul ei üritanud president Toomas Hendrik Ilves tsenseerida Toby Harndeni raamatut "Dead Men Risen: The Welsh Guards and the Real Story of Britain's War in Afghanistan", nagu seda oli väitnud Briti ajaleht The Telegraph

  14. Afghan mission deemed 'crucial'

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    4. oktoobril külastas Leedu kaitseväe juhataja kindralmajor Arvydas Pocius Afganistani, kus kohtus Leedu rahukaitseväelaste, Ghori provintsi ja NATO esindajatega. 5.-6. oktoobril Brüsselis toimunud ja Afganistani missioonile pühendatud NATO kaitseministrite kohtumisest võttis osa ka Leedu minister Rasa Jukneviciene

  15. Independent Auditor’s Report on the FY 2014 DoD Performance Summary Report of the Funds Obligated for National Drug Control Program Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-30

    MDP ) for each of the respective Afghan National Police and Ministry of Interior components, including the Counternarcotics Police of Afghanistan...review eventually identified seventy-two strategic tasks that would become the focus of the CNPA MDP . As of 30 June 2014, when the MDP came to a...conclusion, a total of 51 MDP projects involving more than 260 activities had been successfully completed. This equals a measurable success rate of 70

  16. Assessing Army Professional Forums Metrics for Effectiveness and Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cianciolo, Anna T; Heiden, Charles G; Prevou, Michael I

    2006-01-01

    ... meet the challenges brought on by Army transformation. Army professional forums (APFs), powered by advances in collaborative toolsets and multimedia presentation software, provide a means for leader self-development and professional growth...

  17. The Impact of Artillery Precision Munitions on Army Strategic Objectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kays, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    ... the past. The Army Strategic Planning Guidance, 2005, describes why and how the Army must change. It outlines the nature of future threats, with particular emphasis on the asymmetrical threats of today...

  18. An Identification of Interpersonal Skills for Building Army Civilian Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Kari A; Erickson, Michael D; Fowler, Edward T; Gieseking, John K; Weiss, Mary P

    2006-01-01

    ... by Army civilian leaders. Thirty-eight (38) Army civilian managers from four leadership levels completed questionnaires and participated in face-to-face interviews describing the important interpersonal skills that were necessary...

  19. 2007 Posture Statement, Army Reserve: An Operational Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stultz, Jack C

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Army Reserve Posture Statement describes how the Army Reserve continues to transform from a strategic reserve to an operational force, meeting today's challenges as it better prepares for future uncertainties...

  20. Role Of The Army In Modern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Viktorovich Vorobiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the political development of the country in the modern period. Special attention is paid to the position of the army and its role in the Pakistani society. The article explores in detail the processes of gradual distancing of the army from politics and strengthening of civil society institutions. It is the first time in the Pakistani history that the civilian government managed to complete its full five-year constitutional term. Meanwhile, the country has been advancing on the path to democracy even after the elections 2013: a new civilian government has been formed in Pakistan. As compared with the previous phases of the country's development, the status of the army has considerably changed, evolved from "guiding force" to "shadow" guarantee of democratic development. The process has been largely encouraged by popular among officers feeling of tiredness: many of them are not ready to take power into their own hands and committed to their strictly constitutional duties. Despite this recent positive trend, the army continues to enjoy great authority in the society, often brokers political crisis and helps civilian authorities in settling such pressing problems as, for example, fight against extremism. The military will exert influence on government unless civil authorities are able to resist the current challenges and settle the actual problems. The role of "power broker" fully serves the interests of the top army brass.

  1. ROLE OF THE ARMY IN MODERN PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Viktorovich Vorobiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the political development of the country in the modern period. Special attention is paid to the position of the army and its role in the Pakistani society. The article explores in detail the processes of gradual distancing of the army from politics and strengthening of civil society institutions. It is the first time in the Pakistani history that the civilian government managed to complete its full five-year constitutional term. Meanwhile, the country has been advancing on the path to democracy even after the elections 2013: a new civilian government has been formed in Pakistan. As compared with the previous phases of the country's development, the status of the army has considerably changed, evolved from "guiding force" to "shadow" guarantee of democratic development. The process has been largely encouraged by popular among officers feeling of tiredness: many of them are not ready to take power into their own hands and committed to their strictly constitutional duties. Despite this recent positive trend, the army continues to enjoy great authority in the society, often brokers political crisis and helps civilian authorities in settling such pressing problems as, for example, fight against extremism. The military will exert influence on government unless civil authorities are able to resist the current challenges and settle the actual problems. The role of "power broker" fully serves the interests of the top army brass.

  2. Active Component Rapid Response Force; The Answer to the Military’s Issues with Efficient and Effective Support during Response to and Recovery from Incidents of National Significance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    28 United States. Department of the Army. Historical Summary Fiscal Year 1992. http://www.army.mil/ cmh ...Carroll, Susan, ed., Department of the Army, Historical Summary: FY 1992, CMH Pub 101-23- 1, http://www.army.mil/ cmh /books/DAHSUM/1992/index.htm#TOC, p...the Atlantic Ocean the National Hurricane Center (NHC) named it Tropical Depression Andrew and began to track its potential much more closely. It

  3. Evaluation of the US Army fallout prediction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernick, A.; Levanon, I.

    1987-01-01

    The US Army fallout prediction method was evaluated against an advanced fallout prediction model--SIMFIC (Simplified Fallout Interpretive Code). The danger zone areas of the US Army method were found to be significantly greater (up to a factor of 8) than the areas of corresponding radiation hazard as predicted by SIMFIC. Nonetheless, because the US Army's method predicts danger zone lengths that are commonly shorter than the corresponding hot line distances of SIMFIC, the US Army's method is not reliably conservative

  4. Predictors of suicide and accident death in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS): results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbaum, Michael; Kessler, Ronald C; Gilman, Stephen E; Colpe, Lisa J; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Cox, Kenneth L

    2014-05-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge of risk and resilience factors for suicidality. To present data on prevalence, trends, and basic sociodemographic and Army experience correlates of suicides and accident deaths among active duty Regular Army soldiers between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, and thereby establish a foundation for future Army STARRS investigations. Analysis of trends and predictors of suicide and accident deaths using Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems. Participants were all members of the US Regular Army serving at any time between 2004 and 2009. Death by suicide or accident during active Army service. The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army's increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides. Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view that exposure to combat-related trauma is the exclusive cause of the increase in Army suicides.

  5. 30 Brigade Combat Teams: Is the Army too Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    the cost of inflation (Belasco 2015). Figure 1 depicts the impact of the BCA on the Army. The dark blue line shows funding...ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The purpose of this thesis is to determine the impact of a contingency operation on Army dwell time. The Department of... impact of a contingency operation on Army dwell time. The Department of Defense (DOD) goal for the active Army is for every one year a unit

  6. Human Capital Analytics to Manage the Army Officer Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    HUMAN CAPITAL ANALYTICS TO MANAGE THE ARMY OFFICER POPULATION A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and...From - To) AUG 2016 – JUNE 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human Capital Analytics to Manage the Army Officer Population 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Analytics to manage the Army’s officer population . Human Capital Analytics has reduced the uncertanty associated with civilian sector HR polices and

  7. The Army Budget: FY 00/01 President's Budget. Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management and Comptroller

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    ...) 697-6241, DSN 227- 6241. Its purpose is to provide the Army leadership, OSD and members of Congress and their staffs a reference to the Army's FY2000/2001 biennial Budget Request (President's Budget...

  8. U.S. Army Research Laboratory Annual Review 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Specialty Dr. Jan W. Andzelm ...................................... Multiscale Modeling of Macromolecules and Polymers Dr. Howard E. Brandt ...Gurganus brief Maj. Gen. Nick Justice on ARL’s new experimental technique using DIC during the 2010 Army Science Conference. U.S. Army Research Laboratory 2800 Powder Mill Road • Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 www.arl.army.mil

  9. Prime Power: Filling the Army’s Electric Power Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    standards throughout the world. 3-5 The Army’s prime power requirements of necessity include frequency conversion equipment, transformers, and...ManuaL l01-10-1, pp. 1-43. 2 Electric Load Data Seven U.S. Army Bases, Office of the Chief of Engineers, Department of Army Contract No. DACA -73-68-C

  10. Climate Assessment for Army Enterprise Planning Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-30

    or private organizations . Outcomes of DOD SERDP program climate change investments are being leveraged and adapted to Army enterprise process...Software Estimating Resistance and Resilience of Military Lands Using Vegetation Indices Tech report Climate Change Vulnerability of Army...TITLE: Climate Assessment for Army Enterprise Planning SUBMITTING ORGANIZATION : ERDC STO START YEAR / END YEAR: FY14-FY17 1. NARRATIVE

  11. Russian Army Mat as a Code System Controlling Behaviour in the Russian army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Mikhailin

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This text is to be a shortened, restructured and based on somewhat another factological foundation version of my article “Russkii mat kak muzhskoi obstsennyi kod: problema proiskhozhdeniia i evoliutsiia statusa”, published in # 43 of Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie. Tracing the genesis of mat to the specific modes of behaviour, peculiar to the archaic male warrior bands, I’m going to show that the military milieu (and some other, structurally close to it social strata, has always been – and remain – absolutely adequate for the mat speaking. Moreover, mat has always carried on within these strata rather specific function connected with creating of one’s identity as a military, and its use offers various and sometimes the only possible means of impact at one’s equal or subordinate (or even superior. As a matter of fact, mat is a basis for a whole code system, controlling different military behaviour practices. The problems of the freshers’ adaptation and of the national specificities in the late Soviet and modern Russian army are to be considered with special respect.

  12. Drug abuse control and the Salvation Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauntlett, S L

    1991-01-01

    The Salvation Army has been involved in the control of drug abuse since it was founded over 120 years ago, when alcohol was the predominant concern. Today, alcohol is still the most commonly abused substance, but the Salvation Army is increasingly tackling other forms of substance abuse as well. High priority is given to prevention of all levels and by all means through a network of over 200 specialized rehabilitation centres throughout the world, in addition to programmes within hostels for the homeless, where there is a high proportion of alcohol and other substance abusers. The Salvation Army endeavours to help drug-dependent persons to abstain from using drugs and achieve a healthy and happy life. It is of the view that, as drug dependence is usually a manifestation of deeper needs, the spiritual component is vital in dealing with drug abuse of all types.

  13. Exploiting social media for Army operations: Syrian crisis use case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Sue E.; Bowman, Elizabeth K.; Al Amin, Tanvir; Abdelzaher, Tarek

    2014-05-01

    Millions of people exchange user-generated information through online social media (SM) services. The prevalence of SM use globally and its growing significance to the evolution of events has attracted the attention of the Army and other agencies charged with protecting national security interests. The information exchanged in SM sites and the networks of people who interact with these online communities can provide value to Army intelligence efforts. SM could facilitate the Military Decision Making Process by providing ongoing assessment of military actions from a local citizen perspective. Despite potential value, there are significant technological barriers to leveraging SM. SM collection and analysis are difficult in the dynamic SM environment and deception is a real concern. This paper introduces a credibility analysis approach and prototype fact-finding technology called the "Apollo Fact-finder" that mitigates the problem of inaccurate or falsified SM data. Apollo groups data into sets (or claims), corroborating specific observations, then iteratively assesses both claim and source credibility resulting in a ranking of claims by likelihood of occurrence. These credibility analysis approaches are discussed in the context of a conflict event, the Syrian civil war, and applied to tweets collected in the aftermath of the Syrian chemical weapons crisis.

  14. Home Army in the Poetry of Jerzy Ficowski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kandziora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the evolution of the theme of Armia Krajowa (Home Army and the Warsaw Uprising, in Ficowski’s poetry. The theme, engaged by the poet in the late 1940s (Ołowiani żołnierze, 1948, was quickly abandoned as incompatible with the imaginary, magical direction in the development of young Ficowski’s poetry. Neither was the theme fostered by the general political background of the “dead season” of Communist Poland, by censorship, and by Ficowski’s fear of settling for the post-Romantic stereotype and patriotic myth-making. The theme returned in the 1970s (Gryps, 1979; Errata, 1981, which was related to Ficowski’s decision to liberate himself from self-censorship, and his readiness to express the once repressed content in his own, mature poetic idiom. The present study presents two aspects of historical narration in the Home-Army poems from the 1970s: the fabulous quality, which positions history in Ficowski’s private topics and intimate memory, and the scientific, naturalistic quality, which relates history to physical and cosmic categories. Both aspects redeem the poetry from the narrow specificity of Polish national myth, and make it possible to reconcile individual truth of the experience of death and suffering with the discourse of concepts and historiosophy, which also touches upon the cosmic order.

  15. The Army National Guard Division Headquarters in the Army of 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-26

    14 HISTORIOGRAPHY ...basis for further analysis of the future role of the ARNG division HQ. 15 HISTORIOGRAPHY The past is an uncertain guide to the future, but it...the ARNG division HQ over the course of the nation’s history in the context of the American military system. This historiography does not attempt a

  16. Postdeployment Behavioral Health Screens and Linkage to the Veterans Health Administration for Army Reserve Component Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneman, Megan E; Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2017-08-01

    Approximately three to six months after returning from deployment, military service members complete the Post-Deployment Health Reassessment (PDHRA), which includes screens for alcohol misuse, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To determine whether Army Reserve Component (RC) members (Army National Guard and Army Reserve) with positive screening scores on the PDHRA receive needed care, the investigators examined the association between positive scores and enrollment and utilization of care ("linkage") in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), as well as rescreening scores, diagnosis, and behavioral treatment in VHA. Mixed-effects regression models were used to predict linkage to VHA within six months after RC members (N=73,164) completed the PDHRA, with alcohol misuse, depression, and PTSD screen scores as key independent variables. Regression models were stratified by gender and National Guard versus Reserve status. Among those who linked to VHA (N=25,168), screening scores and subsequent diagnosis and treatment in VHA were also examined. Army RC members with positive PTSD and depression screening scores were more likely than those with negative screens to link to VHA, and most (54%-84%) received VHA treatment once diagnosed. Positive screens for alcohol misuse were associated with linkage to VHA for men but not for women, and treatment rates for alcohol use disorders were relatively low (0%-25%) for both men and women diagnosed as having an alcohol use disorder. The finding that Army RC members with greater indications of behavioral health problems linked to VHA is encouraging. However, more outreach and treatment engagement strategies could be directed to those with alcohol use disorder, particularly women.

  17. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  18. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... This study finds that working corporate models, such as Lean Six Sigma (LSS), are available which are already enabling the transformation of a very specific aspect within the institutional Army...

  19. External Collaboration in Army Science and Technology: The Army’s Research Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    to execute and link neuroscience based research from multiple levels to produce advances in fundamental science and technology, demonstrate and...network science, and cognitive neuroscience .”19 The ICT, first funded in 1999, was first established “with a multi-year contract from the U.S. Army...frontiers of knowledge. In 2011 the Army Research Office awarded eight MURIs. The topics included quantum science, biologics, nanotechnology and atomic

  20. Army Strong: Equipped, Trained and Ready. Final Report of the 2010 Army Acquisition Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Army, Executive Officer John R. Cason , Senior Acquisition Policy Advisor Hye Sun Miller, Executive Assistant The panel also received support...Panel Executive Officer • John Cason , Acquisition Policy Advisor, ASA(ALT) • Hye Sun Miller, Executive Assistant The Panel also received support...34Service Contracting," Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army, Acquisition, Logistics and Technology, email to John R. Cason , 26 October 2010

  1. Evaluating Mobile Device Ownership and Usage in the U.S. Army: Implications for Army Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Mercado University of Central Florida Randall D. Spain U.S. Army Research Institute July 2014 United States Army...NUMBER 633007 6. AUTHOR(S) Joseph E. Mercado ; Randall D. Spain 5c. PROJECT NUMBER A792 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Subject Matter POC and Subject Matter Expert: Joseph E. Mercado 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words): As the U.S

  2. Predictors of Suicide and Accident Death in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbaum, Michael; Kessler, Ronald C.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Cox, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge of risk and resilience factors for suicidality. OBJECTIVES To present data on prevalence, trends, and basic sociodemographic and Army experience correlates of suicides and accident deaths among active duty Regular Army soldiers between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, and thereby establish a foundation for future Army STARRS investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Analysis of trends and predictors of suicide and accident deaths using Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems. Participants were all members of the US Regular Army serving at any time between 2004 and 2009. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Death by suicide or accident during active Army service. RESULTS The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army’s increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view

  3. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six components of the Army STARRS. These include: an integrated analysis of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004-2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e. those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQs] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. Department of Defense/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Exploring the Complexities of Army Civilians and the Army Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    professional members. Occupations Occupations relate to the principle activities or sets of skills that a person does or uses at the workplace to earn...source of values and action.122 Diverse cultures exist at several levels: (a) macroculture and multicultural entities at the national and multinational

  6. Transforming the Army with Mission Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    inevitable change that is the dominant factor in society today. No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the...commitment that are hallmarks of an Army Professional. Build the comprehensive physical, mental, emotional , and spiritual resiliency of our Soldiers

  7. The Army Wants More Family Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-23

    Pfieffer , U.S. Office of the Surgeon General of the Army, Washington D.C., 8 February 1988. 3. American Medical Association, The Directory of...unit surgeon did not prepare him for the myriad skin deseases, diarrheal syndromes , fevers, and other problems. Despite the excellent efforts in the

  8. The all Volunteer Army: Impact on Readines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-08

    directing traffic at busy installations to flying UH-l helicopters. Of the 377 enlisted military occupational specialties in the Army today, about... childish and unimportant. Military sanitation reasons for shorter hair are the normal responses to the question of longer hair. Rarely, if ever, are the

  9. The Army Ethic-Inchoate but Sufficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    Army really cares why a Soldier does the right thing and whether the decision came from compulsion or fear or by accident. An aspirational ethic must...its approach, Soldiers will respond negatively. It takes time to introduce, train, and see the profession buy in to something new, especially an

  10. Reuse of Waste Oil at Army Installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Thousands of gallons ot used crankcase oil are The Toxic Substance Control Act (PL 94-4,0) bulned each year ii Army boilers. Before an instal- regulates...ATTN: Chief. SwGAS-L ATTN: ATZLCA-SA ATTN: Chief. SWGCO-M Los Angeles 90053 Ft. Lee, VA 23801 ATTN: Chief. SPLED-E ATTN: DRXMC-U (2) San Francisco

  11. Public Reporting and a More Sustainable Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    CorporateRegister.com maintains on its website a global directory of corporate social responsibility (CSR), sustainability, and environmental reports. The...CSR corporate social responsibility CW Civil Works CWA Clean Water Act DA Department of the Army DLA Defense Logistics Agency DoD Department of

  12. Trailer Removal Mitigation and Archeological Investigation, 1996-1997, Brown's Sheep Camp (5LA5824), U. S. Army Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, Las Animas County, Colorado (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bringelson, Dawn; Hunt, William J., Jr; Bozell, John R

    2005-01-01

    ... (.XLS). PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: 1 hard copy document and 1 CD-ROM; 4 3/4 in.; 10.1 MB. ABSTRACT: In 1996, the Army removed a trailer from the National Register eligible site of Brown's Sheep Camp...

  13. 76 FR 17841 - Record of Decision (ROD) for the Realignment, Growth, and Stationing of Army Aviation Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ...) 436-1693, during normal business hours; or e-mail [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY... national security requirements and will allow the Army better to organize existing aviation units to..., both Fort Carson and JBLM are world-class military installations that have modernized range and...

  14. Unfolding the Future of the Long War: Motivations, Prospects, and Implications for the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    summer of 2007 as internal opposition to President Musharraf increased. See Barbara Starr, “Sources: U.S. Assessing Pakistan Nukes If Mushar- raf ...2006), National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (2004) p. 374, and Ahmed (2007). 13 Army Brigadier General John Custer

  15. Case Study of the U.S. Army’s Should-Cost Management Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    proved vital to our navigation of the Army’s implementation of Should-Cost Management. We also would like to thank our wives and children for...and Pelvic Protection Systems (PPS). After graduating from the Naval Postgraduate School, Major Choi will be assigned to the U.S. Army...model; and 9) stabilizing production rates and achieving learning curve and EOQ savings through sales to international allies and partner nations

  16. Sexy is what you make it: organizational culture and U.S. Army Special Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Hawk, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The U.S. Army Special Forces (SF) are the most highly trained, best equipped, and most seasoned soldiers to which the United States can turn to achieve national security objectives. The future, however, will require more indirect application of SF, through special warfare operations (e.g., UW, FID, etc.), in a host of hostile and undefined areas around the globe. This manner of employment is a change in emphasis from the direct combat ...

  17. Challenging the Sacred Assumption: A Call for a Systemic Review of Army Aviation Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    expensive, but maintaining an aging fleet is even more so. While the purchase of a $30 million helicopter is a significant cost , this accounts for only...process, which accounts for the largest proportion of Army Aviation’s budget, could provide more efficient logistics and garner more of the needed cost ... Accounting Office, Comanche Helicopter: Program Needs Reassessment Due to Increased Unit Cost , by GAO National Security and International Affairs Division

  18. U.S. Army War College Key Strategic Issues List, 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    soldier services . Soldiers are now used to deploying to environments with large dining facilities, expansive gyms , movie theaters, education centers...improved the quality of planning at combatant commands and Army Service Component Commands? Is operational design a fundamentally new concept or simply...2025 and beyond will continue to meet the needs of the nation. I strongly encourage those conducting research through our Senior Service Colleges and

  19. Security Cooperation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    Force. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army constructed a Defense College in Dar es Salaam and handed this facility over to the Tanzanian...sales in furtherance of national policies and objectives.‖5 Although these programs are approved by Congress we can infer from the wordy definition...8 Depending on the nature of the equipment provided, notification of or authorization by Congress may be required for FMS cases. This notification

  20. Remote Sensing for Inland Water Quality Monitoring: A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    programs, such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP), which uses the Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid...watershed assessments, Digital Elevation Models ( DEMs ) are used to calculate slope and identify erosion potential. When combined with LULC, DEMs can also...Ohio River basin . In Proc. First Interagency Conf. on Research in the Watersheds, ed. K.G. Renard, S.A. McElroy, W.J. Gburek, H.E. Canfield, and

  1. Army Command and Control Study - 82 (ACCS-82). Volume I. Executive Summary and Study Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    August 1940, Congress authorized the induction of the National Guard into Federal Service and the call-up of members of the Organized Reserve Corps (ORC...supervising Army mobilization training plans, but not the organization of new units or the induction of selectees and reservists. OCAFF was responsible for the...ooTng Supervision OPCOM Io ~G5~ FORSCOM Tng Eval G Hob Plan--------------------- --- --- --- ’ .. (-OPOON)T FORS COM M CORPS STATIONS USAR1 1i USAR K I I

  2. The U.S. Army in Asia: Opportunities and Challenges Report of a Workshop of Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    the staff of a member of the National Diet . Dr. Green received his master’s and doctoral degrees from SAIS and did additional graduate and...operational assignment was as an AV-8A Harrier Pilot, in which he completed numerous deployments to both the Mediterranean Sea and Okinawa. Major... The U.S. Army in Asia: Opportunities and Challenges Report of a Workshop of Experts Joel Wuthnow Tamara Hemphill David Finkelstein Albert

  3. Perspectives on Suicide in the Army National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    emphasis on individual perceptions in rela- tion to social groups, this perspective is labeled ‘‘social cognitive.’’ Joiner’s interper- sonal theory of...egoism and anomie -generated suicide. At the same time, the risk of altruistic suicide is potentially higher, although the US military arguably lacks the...intentions after deployment. The connection between such a loss and Joiner’s46 interpersonal theory of suicide is clear, in particular among men who

  4. The US Army and the New National Security Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Engagement, a strong advertisement for air power, which announced among other things an Air Expeditionary Force that could "launch and be ready to fight...Strong, Selika Ducksworth, and Reginald Ray, Minority and Gender Differences in Officer Career Progression, Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND, MR-1184-OSD...capabilities, and the Navy is just completing the pro- curement of 19 Large Medium-Speed Roil-On/ Rol -Off ships. 22 These issues are still being debated in

  5. Army National Guard Brigade Combat Teams: Future Structure and Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    Operational Mentor and Liaison Teams (OMLT) and the Agribusiness Development Teams (ADT). The OMLTs are international advisory teams deployed to...teams, Agribusiness Development Teams, and Provincial Reconstruction Teams from within its BCTs.74 The IBCTs would be available for rotational...Bureau, “ Agribusiness Development Team,” March 2011, http://www.ng.mil/media/default.aspx#factsheets (accessed November 8, 2011); Peter Geren and

  6. The Nigerian Army and National Development Since the Civil War ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    colonial era, expectations were high with respect to the positive roles that the Military can play towards the economic and socio-political transformation of the country. To say that the Military had undertaken very active roles in the constructive ...

  7. Total Army Analysis Supporting Maximization of National Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    systems and equipment that was characterized as “worn-out leftovers from World War II.” Atrophied personnel and equipment readiness levels in 1950...transition. Thanks to the extraordinary sacrifices of our men and women in uniform, we have responsibly ended the war in Iraq, put al-Qaida on the

  8. Environmental Compliance Assessment System Army National Guard (ECAS- ARNG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    facility generate ash residues or sludges? YES/NO If YES see ECAS-ARNG items 5-23 to 5-24 and 5-87 to 5-101. 52. Is there any generation of medical waste...brochures, pamphlets, catalogue sheets, circular folders , and announcements; newspapers; periodicals; and telephone and other directories (40 CFR 60.431). 0...applications Asphalt production Graphic Arts Wastewater treatment plants -letterpress Controlled forest and agricultural -rotogravure burning -offset

  9. Army National Guard Medical Readiness Training Exercises in Southern Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-03

    decay, other pathology). (3) Report number of deciduous , mixed vs. permanent dentition in the patient population. (4) Report any observable dental...who have input on the selection of locations and scheduling of individual MEDRETES, thereby creating another channel for communication between the US...taxpayer because he does not have all the costs involved 8 in maintaining a large permanent party force with the associated costs of dependents and

  10. Architectural Survey of Ohio Army National Guard Properties: Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    reports published by ERDC, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CERL TR-15-38, Vol. I December 2015...unknown) -Tarlton Training Site (1968) with two structures (latrine and storage building) 11495 Lancaster -Chillicothe Road, Tarlton, Ohio...ERDC-CERL, 2014). 3.2.5.3 Tarlton OHARNG Armory (1968) The Tarlton OHARNG site is located northeast of downtown Tarlton at 11495 Lancaster

  11. Wildlife Baseline Survey: Illinois Army National Guard, Sparta, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    system for vertebrate recruitment and DNA diversity. The lakes are independent as well, but could well be polluted by inappropriate application of...individual was not observed. Scat can sometimes be used as adequate sign, but without DNA test (which was not performed in this survey) errors are pos... Grasshopper Sparrow X US Ammodramus henslowii Henslow’s Sparrow* RS Ammospiza leconteii LeConte’s Sparrow RT Melospiza lincolnii Lincoln’s

  12. Risk Prioritization: National Trends, Forecasts and Options for the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    that not all environmental and helth risks can be resolved simultaneously with available resources comes growing demands for workable approaches to the...recent EPA, Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) study on a sample of DOE nuclear weapons facilities located nationwide, reported generation and storage...extent of contamination at the site; Non-availability of suitable clean-up technology for contamination problems specific to DOE, and DOD sites

  13. Draft or Volunteer Army: Our Nation’s Best Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-20

    rite of passage for all ‘normal’ males, and the draft objectors were subjected not only to prison sentences and harsh treatment in the hand of police...period 1800 to 1807: Table 1. French Conscription FRENCH CONSCRIPTION (1800 – 1807) PERIOD NUMBER CONSCRIPTED NUMBER EXCUSED ( MARRIAGE , ILLNESS

  14. Architectural Survey of Laramie Armory, Wyoming Army National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-30

    6 2.3 Spanish American War ...................................................................................... 7 2.4 World War I...experience in military architectural history; Megan W. Tooker, Master of Landscape Architecture, as historian with 18 years of experience in military...historic landscapes and contexts; and Sunny E. Adams, Master of Architecture, as architectural historian with 13 years of experience. 1.4 Site

  15. Army Officer Development: Historical Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    asked to take an increasingly active role in solving some of the nation’s "serious domestic problems." Riots, crime, juvenile delinquency , poverty...affairs and scientific factors. Consequently , an officer corps which only understood purely ―army‖ matters was insufficient. Those designated for

  16. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  17. Role of non-governmental organizations in the daily lives of the Afghan and Pathan children and youth working on the streets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Khalid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to investigate the role and effectiveness of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs in the daily lives of the Afghan and Pathan children and youth working on the streets. In this ethnographic research, 30 girls and boys, aged 12 to 16, were involved in the data generation. Three NGOs were selected in Rawalpindi and Islamabad. In this research, children and youth discussed that one of the NGOs is meeting the needs of education and other two NGOs are putting their efforts but to a limited extent. This investigation also revealed that none of the studied NGOs have focused on the work based learning and skills development, however contributing to a very limited scope. The studied group has valued the NGOs’ consideration of respect and dignity aspects in their operations. It is concluded that NGOs need to plan comprehensively to play an effective role to improve the daily lives of their target groups such as children and youth working on the streets.

  18. “LOVE IS WAR” METAPHOR IN GHAZALS OF AFGHAN POET ‘ABD AL-HAMID MOHMAND (DIED APPROX.1732/33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pischurnikova, E.P.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the conceptual metaphor ‘love is war’ in the ghazals of ‘Abd al-Hamid Mohmand, an Afghan classical poet of the late 17th-early 18th century, and showcases its versatile manifestations. In poetic tradition this metaphor is utilized to map the source domain of ‘war’ to the sensual and non-empiric target domain of ‘love’, which means that the relationship between the lyric hero and his Beloved is conceptualized in terms of war or a battle. This conceptual pattern relies on associations to produce a myriad of metaphors where military and love concepts are amazingly intertwined. In Hamid's ghazals ‘love is war’ pattern would imply that it is the lyric hero who is suffering from love. His suffering is meticulously displayed by various situation metaphors. The investigation into the conceptual metaphor ‘love is war’ and its use in Hamid Mohmand's ghazals yields the conclusion that the poet did not develop this metaphoric pattern without any purpose. Jointly, numerous poetic images create Hamid Mohmand's impressive poetic landscape that emerges through metaphorical mapping of the source domain of ‘war’ to the target domain of ‘love’.

  19. The contribution of unimproved water and toilet facilities to pregnancy-related mortality in Afghanistan: analysis of the Afghan Mortality Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon, Giorgia; Monzon-Llamas, Laura; Benova, Lenka; Willey, Barbara; Campbell, Oona M R

    2014-12-01

    To estimate the effect of unimproved household water and toilet facilities on pregnancy-related mortality in Afghanistan. The data source was a population-based cross-sectional study, the Afghan Mortality Survey 2010. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out, comparing 69 pregnancy-related deaths (cases) and 15386 surviving women (non-cases) who had a live birth or stillbirth between 2007 and 2010. After adjusting for confounders, households with unimproved water access had 1.91 the odds of pregnancy-related mortality [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-3.30] compared to households with improved water access. We also found an association between unimproved toilet facilities and pregnancy-related mortality (OR = 2.25; 95% CI 0.71-7.19; P-value = 0.169), but it was not statistically significant. Unimproved household water access was an important risk factor for pregnancy-related mortality in Afghanistan. However, we were unable to discern whether unimproved water source is a marker of unhygienic environments or socio-economic position. There was weak evidence for the association between unimproved toilet facilities and pregnancy-related mortality; this association requires confirmation from larger studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Making Weapons for the Terracotta Army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Martinón-Torres

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Terracotta Army of the First Emperor of China is one of the most emblematic archaeological sites in the world. Many questions remain about the logistics of technology, standardisation and labour organisation behind the creation of such a colossal construction in just a few decades over 2,000 years ago. An ongoing research project co-ordinated between the UCL Institute of Archaeology and the Emperor Qin Shihang's Terracotta Army Museum is beginning to address some of these questions. This paper outlines some results of the typological, metric, microscopic, chemical and spatial analyses of the 40,000 bronze weapons recovered with the Terracotta Warriors. Thanks to a holistic approach developed specifically for this project, it is possible to reveal remarkable aspects of the organisation of the Qin workforce in production cells, of the standardisation, efficiency and quality-control procedures employed, and of the sophisticated technical knowledge of the weapon-makers.

  1. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  2. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs

  3. Electronic Warfare in Army Models - A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    CCM) PROVING GROUND TENIAS SAMJAM EIEM SPREAD SPECTRUM US ARMY ELECTRONIC FOREIGN SCIENCE & OFFICE OF MISSILE WARFARE LAB (EWL) TECHNOLOGY CENTER...IPAR MULTIRADAR SPREAD SPECTRUM ECMFUZ IRSS OTOALOC TAC ZINGERS EIEM ITF PATCOM TAM EOCM SIM FAC MGM-H4D RFSS TENIAS GTSF MG(-H4H ROLJAM ZAP I HMSM MSL...USAFAS TRASANA USAPAS TCF ASD WPAFU TENIAS ______ ___ ECAC _________ WAR EAGLE _________CATRADA WARRANT am________ 3DBDM ZAP 1 ____________ MEW EWL ZAP 2

  4. Enhancing Army Joint Force Headquarters Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    insights, advice, and support. We also would like to thank Colonel James Dickens , Army Forces Command, and Lieutenant Colonel Ted Crisco, Combined Arms... Dickens (2004a, 2004b). 17 An important point is that the individual ground and air commanders change over time (because of duty shifts or...Division G3, 1st Cavalry Division, “Task Force Baghdad: Operation Iraq Freedom II,” undated briefing. Arnas, Neyla, Charles Barry, and Robert B. Oakley

  5. Assessing the Assignment Policy for Army Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense PST private security team PSYOP psychological operations ROE rules of engagement RPG rocket-propelled grenade...were snipers, RPGs [rocket-propelled grenades], and all at one time. So the convoy commander goes up the road to the box. The special- ist is in the...The Impact of Pregnancy on U.S. Army Readiness, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.: Air Command and Staff College, April 1999. As of February 11, 2007

  6. Should there be an Australian Army Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-15

    of the United States Army BAFF British Armed Forces Federation BCOF British Commonwealth Occupation Forces CAD Canadian Dollars CDA Conference of...Federation ( BAFF ) 7. The Canadian Infantry Association 23 8. The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps Association 9. The Canadian Association of Veterans in...surprising that these associations and the focus of their objects have high degrees of similarity.2 The British Armed Forces Federation ( BAFF ) is a

  7. The Army’s Local Economic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Cole Sutera, Christopher Skeels The Army’s Local Economic Effects C O R P O R A T I O N Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This...these components would also be reduced. Decreasing Army spending, soldiers, and government civilian positions will produce broad economic effects in...and the ripple effects , or “backward linkages,” that it supports. This report presents findings from RAND Arroyo Center research on the economic

  8. Counter - Drug: Mandate for the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    active and reserve forces, and restart the Military Assistance Training Advisor ( MATA ) course at Fort Bragg. (5) Provide positive examples of CONUS...reduced or no charge, and at either US or host country sites. Develop a CONUS-based training course for source country security forces (El Salvador ...JAG Judge Advocate General JRTC Joint Readiness Training Center JTF joint task force LEA law enforcement agency MACOM major Army command MATA Military

  9. PEOPLE’S LIBERATION ARMY AFTER NEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Zhu Rongji Says Joint Stock System is not Panacea for Rescuing State-Owned Enterprises,” Sing Tao Jih Pao, Hong Kong, December 23, 1997, p. A2. 135...Yang, “Jiang Zemin, Zhu Rongji Issue New Army Regulation,” China Daily (Internet version), July 13, 1999, FBIS OW1307033099. 33. Pei Fang. 34. Rocket...ocean monitoring ( haiyang jianshi) network for detecting and tracking naval activities, to include carrier battle groups and submarines. Development of

  10. Getting It Right: Revamping Army Talent Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    CEO Ralph Cordiner stressed the importance of decentralization and management development throughout the organization. During his reign, GE started...innovative company with impressive workforce productivity. Sullivan also stresses in the case study that each of Facebook’s unique talent management...professionals, the millennials . A. RETENTION The Army uses two robust training and college education pipelines to create its officer supply between the

  11. Army Communicator. Volume 35, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    quenched-spark transmitters. The SCR-49 pack radio set could be disassembled into several components and transported by two or three Army mules . The...Although signaling meth - ods have changed radically since Myer’s day, he would be enormously proud that the Signal Corps he founded one hundred and...Wireless telegraph saw limited use, but radio sets were very bulky, heavy, and thus less mobile than wire-based meth - ods. Moreover, their signals

  12. Tactics of the Soviet Army Regiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-14

    brasis for such a non- specific Threat. The US Army Combined Arms Combat Develop- ments Activity (CACDA) has made plans to augment this effort with...withdrawal can occur when: 0 Conducting economy of force measures. . To gain time. * To realign or "tidy-up" the battlefield. . To make available...combat power in that narrowed area. The remainder of the division would conduct economy of force measures in the rest of the zone. The attacking forces

  13. Army Reserve Capabilities-Based Prioritization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-15

    journal databases such as JSTOR , ABI Inform, Proquest, and Emerald; syllabi for courses in strategic management and planning at Harvard, MIT, Wharton, and...methodology for prioritization. • Secure, database repository of appropriate bins, criteria or metrics for prioritization. • Reproducible...Prioritization PPBC/SRG Initial POM Database turned over to Army Budget TGM Issued ARB Final POM/BES Decisions Price/Rate Changes Other Fact-of-Life Changes

  14. Readiness Reporting for an Adaptive Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    bring clarity and fixity to the “‘denominator,”’ i.e., the standards against which readiness is compared, particularly with regard to the meaning of FSO...definition, institutionalization, and fixity , and linking those emerging needs from the next demand signal more formally to the documents...recommendation, the Army above all would have to do the following: • Modify the readiness reporting system and AR 220-1 so as to bring clarity and fixity

  15. Fostering Creative Thinking in the Institutional Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    leadership, more specifically the US Army, identified developing creative thinkers as an essential component to the concept of winning in a complex world...Director, Graduate Degree Programs Robert F. Baumann, Ph.D. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student author and do not...concept of winning in a complex world. This is the case because the complexity of the security environment requires agile and adaptive leaders. In order

  16. Operational, Social, and Religious Influences upon the Army Chaplain Field Manual, 1926-1952

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nay, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The early formulation of the Army Chaplain Field Manual reveals the Army Chaplaincy struggling with individuals using the Army Chaplain Field Manual to further their social and religious beliefs upon other chaplains...

  17. Army Drawdown and Restructuring: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    worn-out leftovers from World War II.”9 The low personnel and equipment readiness levels in 1950 became apparent during the initially weak U.S. military...the Vietnam War in 1968, the Army grew to over 1,570,000 men and women . The conscripted Army of the Vietnam War had a disproportionate...these numbers. Characterizing the Pacific region, the Army notes three of the world’s largest economies (United States, China , Japan); four of the

  18. Army Communicator. Volume 33, Number 4, Fall 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Wein, SPC Evan D. Marcy, SPC Kevin Doheny 10 MG Stevenson explains operational capabilities for the future Paul Wein 12 Project Mananger Mobile...DOD 314) at Augusta, Ga. 30901 and add~ional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Army Communicator, U.S. Army Signal Center, Fort...elements. The content does not necessarily reflect the official U.S. Army position and does not change or supersede any information in other offi:ial

  19. Army General Fund Adjustments Not Adequately Documented or Supported

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    audit of the FY 1991 Army financial statements.6 The Army indicated in its FY 2008 Statement of Assurance on Internal Controls7 that this material...Accounting Service Indianapolis (DFAS Indianapolis) did not adequately support $2.8 trillion in third quarter journal voucher (JV) adjustments and...statements were unreliable and lacked an adequate audit trail. Furthermore, DoD and Army managers could not rely on the data in their accounting

  20. Closing the Candor Chasm: The Missing Element of Army Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Don M. Snider, Major Paul Oh, and Major Kevin Toner , October 2009. 2. The Army Officers’ Professional Ethic—Past, Present, and Fu- ture, by Colonel...Government Printing Office, October 2006. ____________. Army Mentorship Handbook. Roslyn, VA: Head- quarters Department of the Army Printing Office, January...Washington, DC: Head- quarters Department of the Navy Printing Office, June 1986. ____________. Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), The

  1. How Big Should the Army Be Considerations for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-02

    How Big Should the Army Be? Considerations for Congress Lawrence Kapp, Coordinator Specialist in Military Manpower Policy Andrew Feickert... the Army Be? Considerations for Congress Congressional Research Service 2 Figure 1. Army End Strength, FY1989-2016 Source: Defense Manpower Data...strength increase—as well as what component—it is difficult to ascertain the impact on readiness. An important factor is that of operational tempo. If the

  2. Army Logistician. Volume 40, Issue 1, January-February 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    published in Army Logistician or similar venues both inside and outside the Depart- ment of Defense. Enlightened members and stew - ards of the...Army does business at its depots. Gold Prize recipients were— • The Joint Manufacturing and Technology Cen- ter at Rock Island, Illinois, for...avoidance of almost $4 million. • Tobyhanna Army Depot, Pennsylvania, for work on the AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder radar antenna. Silver Prize recipients were

  3. Afghan National Police: More than $300 Million in Annual, U.S.-funded Salary Payments Is Based on Partially Verified or Reconciled Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    cards  Reportedly as many as double the number of identification cards in circulation as there are active ANP personnel AHRIMS CSTC-A Storage...after two key CSTC-A payroll positions were eliminated . One CSTC-A official reported that the banks paying ANP salaries reconcile payroll...and noncommissioned officers, late ANP salary payments, inadequate payroll taxation , improperly deducted pension contributions, and a cooperative

  4. The Financing and Personnel of the Lithuanian Army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokubauskas Vytautas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, at the beginning of the crisis in Ukraine and Russia‘s aggression against this neighboring country, Lithuania became concerned about the strengthening of its military capabilities, augmenting the National Defense System (NDS budget by almost 50% in two years. This may be considered unprecedented, if seen against the background of the presidential elections and those to the European Parliament, the fiscal discipline, the introduction of euro, as well as Russia‘s economic sanctions, the political decision in the course of 2014 on increasing the defense assignation by 130 million litas and in 2015 the increase by planned additional 356 million litas. This article analyzes two closely related problems of the Lithuanian NDS capabilities. First of all, changes in the NDS financing are explored in the context of permanent agreements of Lithuanian political parties concerning the allocation of 2% of the GDP for defense. This is followed by the discussion of the issues of military personnel staffing and training of the reserve as well as future challenges. This research contributes to the assessment of the critical NDS financing and staffing not only within academic circles but particularly among politicians and society in general. Additionally, it contributes to the awareness of the problems the army encountered in seeking to implement the objective set for it: to ensure the military security of the state. In the presence of the emerging threats in the region, this is of particularly great significance to the demilitarized and pacifist society of Lithuania. The article aims at identifying financing and personnel planning problems throughout a quarter of the century, ranging from the restoration of the Army of the Republic of Lithuania to 2014 inclusively. At the same time, the study encourages a discussion by the academic community on issues of the military security of the Lithuanian State and provides analyses as well as possible

  5. Speaking With One Voice: Army Relations With Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ellis, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    .... By formally incorporating its strategic communications efforts with Congressional liaison offices, the Army will not only speak with one voice on appropriations and authorization issues, but it will...

  6. Management: The Missing Link to Army Leadership Doctrine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flemming, Lee

    2003-01-01

    .... There are numerous applications for management in today's Army to include the developing Operational Career Fields, budget and procurement management, garrison activities, logistics sustainment, and acquisitions...

  7. Army ASSIP System of Systems Test Metrics Task

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sledge, Carol A

    2006-01-01

    The Army Strategic Software Improvement Program goal is to dramatically improve the acquisition of software- intensive systems by focusing on acquisition programs, people, and production/sustainment...

  8. Army Secure Operating System: Information Security for Real Time Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Eric

    1984-01-01

    .... ASOS will support real time applications software coded in Ada. In addition, ASOS will incorporate information security technology to protect classified data processed by Army tactical systems...

  9. An Identification of Interpersonal Skills for Building Army Civilian Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Kari A; Erickson, Michael D; Fowler, Edward T; Gieseking, John K; Weiss, Mary P

    2006-01-01

    .... This project expands the findings from the 2003 Army Training and Leadership Development Panel, Communication Task Force initiative, which identified a perceived gap in interpersonal skills exhibited...

  10. Integrating Bill of Materials Data Into the Armys Enterprise Resource Planning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    57 Army Sustainment November–December 2015 As the Army moves to an en-terprise resource planning ... Resource Planning Systems  By LeQuan M. Hylton TOOLS The fielding of Global Combat Support System–Army has changed the way the Army manages bill...Army), and the Army Enterprise System Integration Program (AE- SIP), BOM data is enterprise -level master data designed to be used to- gether and

  11. Prepare the Army for War. A Historical Overview of the Army Training and Doctrine Command, 1973 - 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Italy and the United States. Upon approval by the U.S. Army Chief of Staff, planning began immediately, and the first discussions were held in Rome in...4-11. Romjue, John L. The Army of Excellence: The Development of the 1980s Army. TRADOC Historical Monograph Series. Office of the Command Historia ...45, 46, 76, 80bilateral exchange with, 88, 89 Poland, 115, 118, 120, 121 Rome , Italy, 86 Post-conflict operations, 142, 146 Roundout brigades, 128

  12. Force Structure: Capabilities and Cost of Army Modular Force Remain Uncertain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... The Army's goals for increasing combat power while introducing predictability in deployments for its soldiers are important, and the Army leadership in headquarters, military and civilian staffs...

  13. Comparative analysis of field ration for military personnel of the ukrainian army and armies of other countries worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mardar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improvement of the Ukrainian nutritional standards this Article provides comparative analysis of field rations of different countries worldwide to make a proposal on improvement of food-stuff assortment in food ration for military personnel in the Armed Forces of Ukraine, Army of USA, the British Army, Army of Germany, Army of Italy, Army of Canada, Army of France, Army of Belarus, Army of Armenia. In accordance with the comparative analysis it was established that ration composition used for the Armed Forces of Ukraine military personnel lags behind developed countries of the world both in nutrition arrangement and in nutrient composition, especially in relation to assortment and variety of ration food-stuff. Moreover, a field ration is strictly unified and doesn’t consider individual needs of military personnel in calories, proteins, fats, carbohydrates, food fibers. Selection of individual field ration takes to account only age of military personnel, i. e. individual needs related to nutrition composition such as physical abilities, level of physical activity, gender, type of occupation before military conscription and etc. are not consideredThe obtained results confirms practicability of assortment products assortment included to field rations for the purpose to correct nutrition rations towards optimal balance for military efficiency of army, adaptation of military personnel to physical and psychological loads.

  14. Nonfatal Suicidal Behaviors in U.S. Army Administrative Records, 2004-2009: Results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursano, Robert J; Kessler, Ronald C; Heeringa, Steven G; Cox, Kenneth L; Naifeh, James A; Fullerton, Carol S; Sampson, Nancy A; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Aliaga, Pablo A; Vegella, Patti; Mash, Holly Herberman; Buckley, Christina; Colpe, Lisa J; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    Although the U.S. Army suicide rate is known to have risen sharply over the past decade, information about medically documented, nonfatal suicidal behaviors is far more limited. Here we examine trends and sociodemographic correlates of suicide attempts, suspicious injuries, and suicide ideation among regular Army soldiers. Data come from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS), which integrates administrative records for all soldiers on active duty during the years 2004 through 2009 (n = 1.66 million). We identified 21,740 unique regular Army soldiers with a nonfatal suicidal event documented at some point during the HADS study period. There were substantial increases in the annual incidence rates of suicide attempts (179-400/100,000 person-years) and suicide ideation (557-830/100,000 person-years), but not suspicious injuries. Using hierarchical classification rules to identify the first instance of each soldier's most severe behavior, we found increased risk of all outcomes among those who were female, non-Hispanic White, never married, lower-ranking enlisted, less educated, and of younger age when entering Army service. These sociodemographic associations significantly differed across outcomes, despite some patterns that appear similar. Results provide a broad overview of nonfatal suicidal trends in the U.S. Army during 2004 through 2009 and demonstrate that integration of multiple administrative data systems enriches analysis of the predictors of such events.

  15. Nonfatal Suicidal Behaviors in U.S. Army Administrative Records, 2004–2009: Results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Naifeh, James A.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Aliaga, Pablo A.; Vegella, Patti; Mash, Holly Herberman; Buckley, Christina; Colpe, Lisa J.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the U.S. Army suicide rate is known to have risen sharply over the past decade, information about medically documented, nonfatal suicidal behaviors is far more limited. Here we examine trends and sociodemographic correlates of suicide attempts, suspicious injuries, and suicide ideation among regular Army soldiers. Methods Data come from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS), which integrates administrative records for all soldiers on active duty during the years 2004 through 2009 (n = 1.66 million). Results We identified 21,740 unique regular Army soldiers with a nonfatal suicidal event documented at some point during the HADS study period. There were substantial increases in the annual incidence rates of suicide attempts (179–400/100,000 person-years) and suicide ideation (557–830/100,000 person-years), but not suspicious injuries. Using hierarchical classification rules to identify the first instance of each soldier's most severe behavior, we found increased risk of all outcomes among those who were female, non-Hispanic White, never married, lower-ranking enlisted, less educated, and of younger age when entering Army service. These sociodemographic associations significantly differed across outcomes, despite some patterns that appear similar. Conclusion Results provide a broad overview of nonfatal suicidal trends in the U.S. Army during 2004 through 2009 and demonstrate that integration of multiple administrative data systems enriches analysis of the predictors of such events. PMID:26168022

  16. Topographic and hydrographic GIS datasets for the Afghan Geological Survey and U.S. Geological Survey 2013 mineral areas of interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Brittany N.; Chirico, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Afghanistan is endowed with a vast amount of mineral resources, and it is believed that the current economic state of the country could be greatly improved through investment in the extraction and production of these resources. In 2007, the “Preliminary Non-Fuel Resource Assessment of Afghanistan 2007” was completed by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and Afghan Geological Survey (Peters and others, 2007). The assessment delineated 20 mineralized areas for further study using a geologic-based methodology. In 2011, a follow-on data product, “Summaries and Data Packages of Important Areas for Mineral Investment and Production Opportunities of Nonfuel Minerals in Afghanistan,” was released (Peters and others, 2011). As part of this more recent work, geologic, geohydrologic, and hyperspectral studies were carried out in the areas of interest (AOIs) to assess the location and characteristics of the mineral resources. The 2011 publication included a dataset of 24 identified AOIs containing subareas, a corresponding digital elevation model (DEM), elevation contours, areal extent, and hydrography for each AOI. In 2012, project scientists identified five new AOIs and two subareas in Afghanistan. These new areas are Ahankashan, Kandahar, Parwan, North Bamyan, and South Bamyan. The two identified subareas include Obatu-Shela and Sekhab-ZamtoKalay, both located within the larger Kandahar AOI. In addition, an extended Kandahar AOI is included in the project for water resource modeling purposes. The dataset presented in this publication consists of the areal extent of the five new AOIs, two subareas, and the extended Kandahar AOI, elevation contours at 100-, 50-, and 25-meter intervals, an enhanced DEM, and a hydrographic dataset covering the extent of the new study area. The resulting raster and vector layers are intended for use by government agencies, developmental organizations, and private companies in Afghanistan to assist with mineral assessments, monitoring

  17. 2015 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Military Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    sports , and competitions; and recognition, awards, and incentives to motivate subordinates. Ineffective Mitigation of Workload Stress. The themes for the...Assignment Practices The assignment process is a mechanism by which the Army can utilize leadership talent and deliberately develop leadership skills...Commissioned Officer Professional Development and Career Management). Assignments are one of several aspects of how organizations employ talent

  18. Child Abuse and Neglect United States Army U.S. Army Central Registry (1989-1996)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-31

    This report is an analysis of the child abuse and neglect cases that have been recorded in the Army Central Registry between 1989-1996. The following...were 30,551 initial substantiated cases of child abuse and neglect, or an average of about 3,80 cases per year. There were 2,336 subsequent incidents

  19. A quantification of the physiological demands of the army emergency responder in the Australian army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofari, Paul J; Laing Treloar, Alison K; Silk, Aaron J

    2013-05-01

    The Australian Defence Force is reviewing the physical demands of all employment categories in the Australian Army to establish valid and legally defensible assessments. The current assessments, performed in physical training attire, are not specific to job demands. Moreover, the fitness standards decrease based on age and are lower for females, and as job requirements are constant, these assessments are counterintuitive. With regard to the Army Emergency Responder employment category, tasks of physical demand in the present study were selected through consultation with subject-matter experts. Participants consisted of 10 qualified Army Emergency Responder soldiers and three noncareer firefighters under instruction. Real-life firefighting scenarios were witnessed by researchers and helped form task simulations allowing measurement of heart rate and oxygen consumption. Peak oxygen consumption ranged from 21.8 ± 3.8 to 40.0 ± 3.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1) during cutting activities and a search and rescue task, respectively, representing values similar to or higher than the current entry standards. Manual handling tasks were also assessed, with the heaviest measured being two soldiers lifting a 37.7-kg Utility Trunk to 150 cm. The findings provide a quantitative assessment of the physiological demands of Army Emergency Responders, and highlight the need for change in current fitness assessments. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Afghan Ministry of Defense Headquarters: $154.7 Million Building Appears Well Built, but Has Several Construction Issues that Should Be Assessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    shaking and difficult to stand, objects fall from shelves, and an unreinforced masonry building will suffer slight to moderate structural damage and...unreinforced masonry buildings will suffer very heavy structural damage. The objectives for this inspection were to determine whether (1) construction was...unifies all technical criteria and standards used by the Armed Services (Army, Navy , and Air Force) by streamlining the military criteria system and

  1. Pre-retirement education programme for Nigerian army personnel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines and describes the need for pre-retirement education programme for Nigerian Army personnel in 1 Mechanised Division, Kaduna. An investigation was carried out into the contents of such pre-retirement programme. A sample of 78 male and female army personnel was purposively selected from the ...

  2. Army Response Letter & Analysis - signed January 19, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    A response to the letter, which requested a review of the proposed decision by the Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District to issue four Department of the Army permits to Baltimore County (3 permits) and Anne Arundel County (1 permit), MD.

  3. Netherlands Army Long Range Anti Armour Study - Status Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, P.A.B. van

    1989-01-01

    At the end of the nineties the munition for the TOW weapon system in use at The Netherlands army, has to be replaced. The Life of Type of The Tow carrier ends in 2005. The long range anti armour study is to gain insight into the possibilities and limitations for the Netherlands army to deploy future

  4. Army Drawdown and Restructuring: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    as “worn-out leftovers from World War II.” The low personnel and equipment readiness levels in Army Drawdown and Restructuring: Background and...grew to over 1,570,000 men and women . The conscripted Army of the Vietnam War had a disproportionate representation of lower-income and non- college

  5. A Preliminary Anthropometry Standard for Australian Army Equipment Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED A Preliminary Anthropometry Standard for Australian Army Equipment Evaluation Mark Edwards, Alistair Furnell...Jemma Coleman and Sheena Davis Land Division Defence Science and Technology Organisation DSTO-TR-3006 ABSTRACT Anthropometry is the...Preliminary Anthropometry Standard for Australian Defence Force Army Equipment Evaluation Executive Summary Anthropometry is the

  6. Army Sustainment. Volume 41, Issue 5, September-October 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    indeed end and that the United States would emerge from it as the only superpower on the planet . And yet the peace dividend at the end of the Cold War...Army 21 and its sup- porting vision, Log 21, presented design-of-the-future prospects, with the Army beginning to invest heav - ily in these

  7. An Organizational Climate Assessment of the Army Contracting Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    within high quality relationships are psychological safety, which focuses on learning from failures, and the other concerning perceived organizational ...measurement and interpretation of organizational climate. The Journal of Psychology , 145(2), 93–109. U.S. Army Acquisition Corps. (2011, May). Defense...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT AN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY CONTRACTING WORKFORCE

  8. A Candidate Army Energy and Water Management Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fournier, Donald F; Westervelt, Eileen T

    2004-01-01

    .... This work augments on-going energy and water management initiatives within the Army by developing a new candidate Army level strategy that responds to anticipated legislation; reflects current DOD and DA requirements, vision, and values in light of the current world situation; incorporates sound science and management principles; and organizes and focuses efforts into an integrated program.

  9. Army Medicine’s Role in Strength & Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    Resiliency Programs Physical Mental Spiritual Army Wellness Center Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Resiliency UNCLASSIFIED Comprehensive Pain ...Management  Evidence-Based Complimentary and Alternative Therapeutic Modes  Acupuncture  Biofeedback  Yoga  Meditation  Standardizes Pain Management...UNCLASSIFIED Army Strong More than a Slogan… the Key to Resilience Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden

  10. 1980 Summer Study on Statistical Techniques in Army Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    WASHINGTON, D. C. 20310 f ARMY CIENCE BOARD 1980 SUMMER STUDY ON STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES IN ARMY TESTING JULY 1980 DTICS ELECTE NOV 2 5 1980 B _STRI...statisticians is adequate, and in some cases, excellent. In the areas of education and the dissemination of information, the Study Group found that the

  11. The Advance on Rome of the Fifth Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and Mis. SENTINELLA, SALERIA and PILOCCO on 30 May with GOUMS ar riving before CARPINETO. Relief of the 88th Infantry Division in the NORMA ...southern GARIGLIANO front iso lated. The Fourteenth German Army Headquarters was destroyed and the German Army Group Headquarters seriously damaged

  12. Arms Transfers to the Irish Republican Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    TERMS (Continue on ,everse of necesmary and identify by block numbe... VELD GROUP SUB-GROUP KEY WORDS: Irish Republican Army, IRA, Arms Transfers...Lrm,- r-t ." - ’,...... .. a farmhouse In -cun.y An+r:m. ."," S-t The arms were ingeniously hidden. A furniture van with a secret compartment capable...McMahon, William Westerlund, and Francis M. Larkin] and two from Ireland ’ Henry Hillick and James Conlon], were charged :n 2" with shipping 175 semi

  13. White Paper 1983: The Army Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-15

    support. 4 "+1° I t I " I j The advent of the All Volunteer Force caused the Army’s leaders to address military personnel policies from a new...Children Children w/ Teens Gone Retirement 36.3% 16.6% 37.5% 9.3% 0.2% 17 24 18 30 20 35 36 50 51 59 60 i FIGURE 6 7 I - - .-, *L II...remarriage in their families. Another significant change has been delayed or foregone childbearing . Birthrates in the United States have declined

  14. Study of Army Design Hover Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    capability for U.S. Army helicopters? This question was answered in 1970 by Robert Bellaire and Lieutenant William Bousman for the development of the...helicopters? This question was answered in 1970 by Robert Bellaire and Lieutenant William Bousman for the development of the Army’s 2nd generation of...MAX Figure 15. California 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 WIN SPR SUM AUT Seasons Pe rc en t H og e MIN AVG MAX Figure 16. California

  15. Fiscal Year 2011 United States Army Annual Financial Report. America’s Army: At a Strategic Crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    effective. Comprehensive efforts are being aggresively engaged to reform the Army’s procurement methods with the following goal: to develop and...Research and Development Center; (3) the Army Medical Research and Materiel Command laboratories; and, (4) the Army Research Institute for Behavioral and

  16. The Transition From "Be All You Can Be" to "An Army of One" - Strategic Outreach Campaigns for Recruiting America's All-Volunteer Army and Army Reserve

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sawyer, Jayson D

    2005-01-01

    ... in sufficient quantity and quality to man the force. The unveiling of this latest Strategic Outreach program primarily directed by the outgoing Secretary of the Army Honorable Louis Caldera in conjunction with the support...

  17. Optimal construction of army ant living bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jason M; Kao, Albert B; Wilhelm, Dylana A; Garnier, Simon

    2017-12-21

    Integrating the costs and benefits of collective behaviors is a fundamental challenge to understanding the evolution of group living. These costs and benefits can rarely be quantified simultaneously due to the complexity of the interactions within the group, or even compared to each other because of the absence of common metrics between them. The construction of 'living bridges' by New World army ants - which they use to shorten their foraging trails - is a unique example of a collective behavior where costs and benefits have been experimentally measured and related to each other. As a result, it is possible to make quantitative predictions about when and how the behavior will be observed. In this paper, we extend a previous mathematical model of these costs and benefits to much broader domain of applicability. Specifically, we exhibit a procedure for analyzing the optimal formation, and final configuration, of army ant living bridges given a means to express the geometrical configuration of foraging path obstructions. Using this procedure, we provide experimentally testable predictions of the final bridge position, as well as the optimal formation process for certain cases, for a wide range of scenarios, which more closely resemble common terrain obstacles that ants encounter in nature. As such, our framework offers a rare benchmark for determining the evolutionary pressures governing the evolution of a naturally occurring collective animal behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 78 FR 21919 - Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment for Army 2020...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment for Army 2020 Force Structure Realignment AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Availability. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army announces the availability...

  19. THE NEED FOR A NATIONAL DERADICALISATION PROGRAM IN AFGHANISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnnie Auld

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of deradicalisation programs in Afghanistan has potential to prolong the violence and turmoil in the country for decades. With years of conflict, multiple forms of government, high unemployment, high levels of poverty, and a constant influx of Western cultural norms and media fighting against the traditionalist Afghan culture strongly embedded in a conservative reading of Islam, Afghanistan is a breeding ground for radicalism. Youth are susceptible to an environment that causes radicalism and nurtures it, and with the ever-present national conflict, this radicalisation has an outlet in the form of insurgency and terrorism. Groups like the Taliban have easily recruited and radicalised individuals using religion as a justification for their violence. Deradicalisation in Afghanistan is an under researched topic and an underfunded pursuit. With no national deradicalisation strategy it is left to international actors and local organisations to engage in these programs. More must be done to engage with those who have become radicalised and those in high-risk zones in order to help secure the long-term future of Afghanistan. I will discuss how Afghanistan is a breeding ground for radicalisation of individuals due to Afghanistan’s violent, hostile environment with high rates of poverty, high unemployment and distrust toward the authorities. I will then discuss how religion is used a justification by extremist groups for individuals to commit violent acts and how the increasingly precarious security situation in the country means a sound national deradicalisation program is essential. I conclude that any deradicalisation efforts undertaken by the Afghan government so far are piecemeal and inadequate to deal with the on-going problems present in the country and that lessons must be learnt from programs in other Islamic countries that have successfully deradicalised violent extremist groups.

  20. [Medical research in the US Armed Forces (Report 3). The US Army].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, A A; Aleĭnikov, S I; Bolekhan, V I; Ivchenko, I V; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Petrov, S V; Rezvantsev, M V; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A; Sheppli, E V

    2012-12-01

    The US Army. The present article is the third part of the review dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Armed Forces. The first and the second parts have been published in the previous issuses of the journal. Specifically this article is dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Army. It is shown that in the US Army the medical and biological research is conducted and coordinated by the special US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. The following units are successively presented: US Army Institute of Surgical Research, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine. The particular research programs conducting in the above mentioned institutions are presented.

  1. Designing and implementing the Army Nursing Leader Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunemn, Kathleen; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L; Connally, Tina; Bramley, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps directed a thorough review of existing training programs available to and provided for Army Nursing personnel for the development of full-spectrum leaders for Army Nursing. The review provided the gap analysis necessary to restructure courses provided by the Department of Nursing Science at the Army Medical Department Center and School. This new grouping of courses is referred to as the Army Nursing Leader Academy. The Army Nursing Leader Academy is the first of its kind in that it addresses career-long learning of all Army Nursing by focusing on building skills, knowledge, and behaviors to produce sustainable, full-spectrum leaders. The Nursing Leader Academy consists of a series of sequential nurse leader development courses combined with a web based resource center. Grounded in the Patient CaringTouch System, guided by nurse competencies, and gauged by the Leader Capabilities Map, the Nursing Leader Academy provides learning that is relevant and timely designed to reinforce enterprise values and culture to ensure readiness for successive roles and positions. Full implementation of the Nursing Leader Academy will include the evidence-based elements of formal schooling, coaching, self-development, functional/technical (competency attainment), and professional experiences.

  2. A Short History of the U.S. Army Adjutant General’s Corps, 1775-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Commander.” In fact, Brigadier General Henry C. Corbin , Adjutant General of the Army during the Spanish- American War (1898-1904) performed as such...Samuel Breck -------------------------- 1897-1898 40. Maj. Gen. Henry C. Corbin ------------------------ 1898-1904 Military Secretary 1 41. Maj...for Secretary of War Elihu Root and President William McKinley. During a time of national crisis, Corbin , as described by one historian, became

  3. The Army rolls through Indianapolis: Fieldwork at the Virtual Army Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Allen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay takes an ethnographic look at the individuals and institutions associated with the development, production, and implementation of the Virtual Army Experience (VAE, a mobile mission simulator that travels across the United States to venues such as state fairs and air shows. As an explicit aid to Army recruitment and interaction with the public, the VAE is an interesting nexus point that often channels public anxieties surrounding the medium of the video game and its role in the militarization of society. Here, I present my own experience of doing ethnography at this site, describing how it is received by visitors and interpreted by its employees. By means of the example of the VAE, I argue that polarizing media reports and academic criticisms that pit the processes of militarization against critical reflection of those processes are counterproductive and result in silencing more nuanced and thoughtful critical reflection that is already present at sites such as the VAE.

  4. U.S. Army War College Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL) 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    modified and what DOTMLPF changes would be needed? 20 11. What are the impacts of changes in the local economy on a local NG unit? Do changes in the... economy have a major effect on the unit and the National Guard as a whole at state and/or federal level? 21 U.S. Army Reserve, Office of the Chief POC...movement to a DoD-wide cloud architecture (the Joint Information Environment), which would allow the repurposing of Global Information Grid ( GIG

  5. Parameters. U.S. Army War College Quarterly. Volume 20, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    and his comrades in the Gross Deutschland Division "no longer fought for Hitler, or for National Socialism , or for the Third Reich-or even for our...y podrd actuar fuera de Espaila," El Pats, 9 December 1988. 17. Carlos Yarnoz, "La influencia de I futura Fuerza de Acci6n Rpida (FAR)," El Pas, 4...Blumenson’s discussion of the values and attitudes of the Old Army caused me to reflect upon my own socialization process as a young Marine Corps

  6. The impact of phenotypic and genotypic G6PD deficiency on risk of plasmodium vivax infection: a case-control study amongst Afghan refugees in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Toby; Briceño, Marnie; Mayan, Ismail; Mohammed, Nasir; Klinkenberg, Eveline; Sibley, Carol Hopkins; Whitty, Christopher J M; Rowland, Mark

    2010-05-25

    The most common form of malaria outside Africa, Plasmodium vivax, is more difficult to control than P. falciparum because of the latent liver hypnozoite stage, which causes multiple relapses and provides an infectious reservoir. The African (A-) G6PD (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) deficiency confers partial protection against severe P. falciparum. Recent evidence suggests that the deficiency also confers protection against P. vivax, which could explain its wide geographical distribution in human populations. The deficiency has a potentially serious interaction with antirelapse therapies (8-aminoquinolines such as primaquine). If the level of protection was sufficient, antirelapse therapy could become more widely available. We therefore tested the hypothesis that G6PD deficiency is protective against vivax malaria infection. A case-control study design was used amongst Afghan refugees in Pakistan. The frequency of phenotypic and genotypic G6PD deficiency in individuals with vivax malaria was compared against controls who had not had malaria in the previous two years. Phenotypic G6PD deficiency was less common amongst cases than controls (cases: 4/372 [1.1%] versus controls 42/743 [5.7%]; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.18 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06-0.52], p = 0.001). Genetic analysis demonstrated that the G6PD deficiency allele identified (Mediterranean type) was associated with protection in hemizygous deficient males (AOR = 0.12 [95% CI 0.02-0.92], p = 0.041). The deficiency was also protective in females carrying the deficiency gene as heterozygotes or homozygotes (pooled AOR = 0.37 [95% CI 0.15-0.94], p = 0.037). G6PD deficiency (Mediterranean type) conferred significant protection against vivax malaria infection in this population whether measured by phenotype or genotype, indicating a possible evolutionary role for vivax malaria in the selective retention of the G6PD deficiency trait in human populations. Further work is required on the genotypic

  7. The impact of phenotypic and genotypic G6PD deficiency on risk of plasmodium vivax infection: a case-control study amongst Afghan refugees in Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Leslie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most common form of malaria outside Africa, Plasmodium vivax, is more difficult to control than P. falciparum because of the latent liver hypnozoite stage, which causes multiple relapses and provides an infectious reservoir. The African (A- G6PD (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency confers partial protection against severe P. falciparum. Recent evidence suggests that the deficiency also confers protection against P. vivax, which could explain its wide geographical distribution in human populations. The deficiency has a potentially serious interaction with antirelapse therapies (8-aminoquinolines such as primaquine. If the level of protection was sufficient, antirelapse therapy could become more widely available. We therefore tested the hypothesis that G6PD deficiency is protective against vivax malaria infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A case-control study design was used amongst Afghan refugees in Pakistan. The frequency of phenotypic and genotypic G6PD deficiency in individuals with vivax malaria was compared against controls who had not had malaria in the previous two years. Phenotypic G6PD deficiency was less common amongst cases than controls (cases: 4/372 [1.1%] versus controls 42/743 [5.7%]; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.18 [95% confidence interval (CI 0.06-0.52], p = 0.001. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the G6PD deficiency allele identified (Mediterranean type was associated with protection in hemizygous deficient males (AOR = 0.12 [95% CI 0.02-0.92], p = 0.041. The deficiency was also protective in females carrying the deficiency gene as heterozygotes or homozygotes (pooled AOR = 0.37 [95% CI 0.15-0.94], p = 0.037. CONCLUSIONS: G6PD deficiency (Mediterranean type conferred significant protection against vivax malaria infection in this population whether measured by phenotype or genotype, indicating a possible evolutionary role for vivax malaria in the selective retention of the G6PD deficiency trait in human

  8. US Army Research Laboratory and University of Notre Dame Distributed Sensing: Hardware Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    ARL-TR-8199 ● NOV 2017 US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research Laboratory and University of Notre Dame Distributed Sensing...US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research Laboratory and University of Notre Dame Distributed Sensing: Hardware Overview by Roger P...TITLE AND SUBTITLE US Army Research Laboratory and University of Notre Dame Distributed Sensing: Hardware Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  9. The Nation and the Soldier in German Civil-Military Relations, 1800-1945

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brumley, Donald W

    2005-01-01

    This study of civil-military relations addresses the parallel development of the professional soldier and the Prussian-German Army from 1806 until 1945, as well as the rise of nationalism in central...

  10. Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-30

    Since 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been asked by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) to conduct strategic assessments at selected US Army installations of the potential use of renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). IMCOM has the same economic, security, and legal drivers to develop alternative, renewable energy resources overseas as it has for installations located in the US. The approach for continental US (CONUS) studies has been to use known, US-based renewable resource characterizations and information sources coupled with local, site-specific sources and interviews. However, the extent to which this sort of data might be available for outside the continental US (OCONUS) sites was unknown. An assessment at Camp Zama, Japan was completed as a trial to test the applicability of the CONUS methodology at OCONUS installations. It was found that, with some help from Camp Zama personnel in translating and locating a few Japanese sources, there was relatively little difficulty in finding sources that should provide a solid basis for conducting an assessment of comparable depth to those conducted for US installations. Project implementation will likely be more of a challenge, but the feasibility analysis will be able to use the same basic steps, with some adjusted inputs, as PNNL’s established renewable resource assessment methodology.

  11. Building A Better Force: Regular Army / Reserve Components Integration In The Army Chemical Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Fort Hood , TX, CPT Mike Larmore cased the colors of the 46th Chemical Company for the last time, signifying its inactivation from the Regular Army... Joshua E. Kastenberg, Shaping US Military Law: Governing a Constitutional Military, (Surrey, England: Ashgate, 2014), 204-5, accessed December 28, 2015...Kastenberg, Joshua E. Shaping US Military Law: Governing a Constitutional Military. Surrey, England: Ashgate, 2014. Accessed December 28, 2015

  12. US Colored Troops: A Model for US Army Foreign Army Development and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the course of the Civil War, 186,000 former slaves and freedmen of African descent served in the Union Army designated as US Colored Troops...procedures, recruited, raised, trained, and organized a predominantly uneducated force for military service. The United States Colored Troops was a...force built from a population considered second class inhabitants at best, property at worst. Besides the color barrier, the white populace, government

  13. Netherlands Army Long Range Anti Armour Study - Status Report

    OpenAIRE

    Schagen, P.A.B. van

    1989-01-01

    At the end of the nineties the munition for the TOW weapon system in use at The Netherlands army, has to be replaced. The Life of Type of The Tow carrier ends in 2005. The long range anti armour study is to gain insight into the possibilities and limitations for the Netherlands army to deploy future (time period 1995-2000) weapon systems in the long range anti armour battle. The first study results are expected at the end of 1989. The study is sponsored by the Netherlands army and is carried ...

  14. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the FY 2000 Army Working Capital Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    Our objectives were to oversee the Army Audit Agency audit of the FY 2000 Department of the Army Working Capital Fund financial statements to verify whether we can rely on their work and to determine...

  15. Mercenaries in the Army of Hellenistic Athens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Vostrikov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article interests in history of armed forces of the antiquity states, their structure, deployment order, the organization of command, evolution of arms, policy strokes, action of armies in the military conflicts, and to their use in internal political fight, as well as to involvement of mercenaries. During the Classical Period of Greek history big fame was gained by armed forces of Athens and Sparta. Athens in the 5th century BC was at the peak of power and pursued active foreign policy which was in many respects supported by powerful army and fleet. The reason of traditionally high interest in history of Athens of the Classical Period including the armed forces history of the polis also lies in it. However Athens and their armed forces suffered a serious loss and got beaten in the Peloponnese war and the final decline of political and military power of Athens occurred after defeat in Lamian war therefore military activity of the polis sharply decreases. Therefore the history of Hellenistic period Athens gets much less attention. Proceeding from it, the purpose of article consists in a research of the role of mercenaries in armed forces of Athens in the period of Hellenism. The leading method of this research is the comparative-historical method allowing tracking mercenaries hire by Athens during the specified period on the basis of a complex sources use. The main research results consist in identification of an order and features of the hired contingents use, their places in armed forces of the polis. Materials of article can be useful to the further scientific research regarding the history of Athens and military ancient history as well as to creating educational and handbooks on this perspective.

  16. THE OPERATIONS OF THE MEXICAN ARMY AGAINST DRUG TRAFFICKING, REVIEW AND PRESENT SITUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Palom Mendoza Cortés

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available legal po ers, responsibilities and impact across space and time. This paper is a report of the MA thesis “The Mexican Secretariat of National Defense SEDENA , organizational changes: 1937C2010”. The object of this article is to propose a descriptive analysis and conduct a revie of the increase of the Mexican military operations background and history, from the moment drug trafficking as conceived as a Mexico s national security threat. This derived in the fact of the deployment of the Army nation ide to perform high impact military operations to counter it, under an internal security environment characterized by the lack of strong and not corrupt internal security institutions that finally ended endorsing the military intervention and alongside the negative consequences for the civilCmilitary relations.

  17. Army Medical Department Leaders in Military Operations Other Than War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadlon, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... Likewise, the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) must insure its leaders, specifically those selected to deploy world-wide, have a more diverse skill set that enables them to fully operate within the full spectrum of scenarios...

  18. Resourcing Army Transformation: Solid Plan or House of Cards?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brimberry, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    .... We are also an army that is embarking on a monumental transformation effort. This ambitious plan to modernize and reorganize the force will take 30 plus years and over 210 billion dollars to complete...

  19. The Strategic Effect of Army Civilian Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koucheravy, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    .... Lately, the Army has improved safety and embedded a more effective safety culture, but it has not improved its program for reducing civilian accident costs or returning injured workers to the workplace...

  20. Thinking Strategically About Army Strategic Leadership: Revolution or Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyce, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 Senior Leadership Seminar held at George Mason University on 10 September 1999 brought together key senior Army leaders and civilian leadership experts from academia and industry to discuss...