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Sample records for affibody molecule labeled

  1. HAHAHA, HEHEHE, HIHIHI, or HKHKHK : Influence of Position and Composition of Histidine Containing Tags on Biodistribution of [99mTc(CO)3]+-Labeled Affibody Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Engineered affibody molecules can be used for high contrast in vivo molecular imaging. Extending a recombinantly produced HER2 binding affibody molecule with a hexa-histidine tag allows for convenient purification by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and labeling with [99mTc(CO)3]+ but increases radioactivity uptake in the liver. To investigate the impact of charge, lipophilicity, and position on biodistribution, 10 variants of a histidine-based tag was attached to a HER2 binding ...

  2. HAHAHA, HEHEHE, HIHIHI, or HKHKHK: influence of position and composition of histidine containing tags on biodistribution of [(99m)Tc(CO)3](+)-labeled affibody molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofström, Camilla; Altai, Mohamed; Honarvar, Hadis; Strand, Joanna; Malmberg, Jennie; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Orlova, Anna; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2013-06-27

    Engineered affibody molecules can be used for high contrast in vivo molecular imaging. Extending a recombinantly produced HER2 binding affibody molecule with a hexa-histidine tag allows for convenient purification by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and labeling with [(99m)Tc(CO)3](+) but increases radioactivity uptake in the liver. To investigate the impact of charge, lipophilicity, and position on biodistribution, 10 variants of a histidine-based tag was attached to a HER2 binding affibody molecule. The biochemical properties and the HER2 binding affinity appeared to be similar for all variants. In vivo, positive charge promoted liver uptake. For N-terminally placed tags, lipophilicity promoted liver uptake and decreased kidney uptake. Kidney uptake was higher for C-terminally placed tags compared to their N-terminal counterparts. The variant with the amino acid composition HEHEHE placed in the N-terminus gave the lowest nonspecific uptake.

  3. Order of amino acids in C-terminal cysteine-containing peptide-based chelators influences cellular processing and biodistribution of 99mTc-labeled recombinant Affibody molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altai, Mohamed; Wållberg, Helena; Orlova, Anna; Rosestedt, Maria; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Ståhl, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    Affibody molecules constitute a novel class of molecular display selected affinity proteins based on non-immunoglobulin scaffold. Preclinical investigations and pilot clinical data have demonstrated that Affibody molecules provide high contrast imaging of tumor-associated molecular targets shortly after injection. The use of cysteine-containing peptide-based chelators at the C-terminus of recombinant Affibody molecules enabled site-specific labeling with the radionuclide 99mTc. Earlier studies have demonstrated that position, composition and the order of amino acids in peptide-based chelators influence labeling stability, cellular processing and biodistribution of Affibody molecules. To investigate the influence of the amino acid order, a series of anti-HER2 Affibody molecules, containing GSGC, GEGC and GKGC chelators have been prepared and characterized. The affinity to HER2, cellular processing of 99mTc-labeled Affibody molecules and their biodistribution were investigated. These properties were compared with that of the previously studied 99mTc-labeled Affibody molecules containing GGSC, GGEC and GGKC chelators. All variants displayed picomolar affinities to HER2. The substitution of a single amino acid in the chelator had an appreciable influence on the cellular processing of 99mTc. The biodistribution of all 99mTc-labeled Affibody molecules was in general comparable, with the main difference in uptake and retention of radioactivity in excretory organs. The hepatic accumulation of radioactivity was higher for the lysine-containing chelators and the renal retention of 99mTc was significantly affected by the amino acid composition of chelators. The order of amino acids influenced renal uptake of some conjugates at 1 h after injection, but the difference decreased at later time points. Such information can be helpful for the development of other scaffold protein-based imaging and therapeutic radiolabeled conjugates.

  4. In vivo and in vitro studies on renal uptake of radiolabeled affibody molecules for imaging of HER2 expression in tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altai, M.; Varasteh, Z.; Andersson, K.; Eek, A.; Boerman, O.C.; Orlova, A.

    2013-01-01

    Affibody molecules (6-7 kDa) are a new class of small robust three-helical scaffold proteins. Radiolabeled subnanomolar anti-HER2 affibody ZHER2:342 was developed for imaging of HER2 expression in tumors, and a clinical study has demonstrated that the (111)In- and (68)Ga-labeled affibody molecules c

  5. In Vivo Imaging of Xenograft Tumors Using an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Specific Affibody Molecule Labeled with a Near-infrared Fluorophore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibiao Gong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is associated with many types of cancers. It is of great interest to noninvasively image the EGFR expression in vivo. In this study, we labeled an EGFR-specific Affibody molecule (Eaff with a near-infrared (NIR dye IRDye800CW maleimide and tested the binding of this labeled molecule (Eaff800 in cell culture and xenograft mouse tumor models. Unlike EGF, Eaff did not activate the EGFR signaling pathway. Results showed that Eaff800 was bound and taken up specifically by EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. When Eaff800 was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing A431 xenograft tumors, the tumor could be identified 1 hour after injection and it became most prominent after 1 day. Images of dissected tissue sections demonstrated that the accumulation of Eaff800 was highest in the liver, followed by the tumor and kidney. Moreover, in combination with a human EGFR type 2 (HER2-specific probe Haff682, Eaff800 could be used to distinguish between EGFR- and HER2-overexpressing tumors. Interestingly, the organ distribution pattern and the clearance rate of Eaff800 were different from those of Haff682. In conclusion, Eaff molecule labeled with a NIR fluorophore is a promising molecular imaging agent for EGFR-overexpressing tumors.

  6. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-affibody molecule for in vivo assessment of HER2/neu expression with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Capala, Jacek [National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Shenoy, Nalini; Griffiths, Gary L. [National Institutes of Health, Imaging Probe Development Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Seidel, Jurgen; Choyke, Peter [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Overexpression of HER2/neu in breast cancer is correlated with a poor prognosis. It may vary between primary tumors and metastatic lesions and change during the treatment. Therefore, there is a need for a new means to assess HER2/neu expression in vivo. In this work, we used {sup 68}Ga-labeled DOTA-Z{sub HER2:2891}-Affibody to monitor HER2/neu expression in a panel of breast cancer xenografts. DOTA-Z{sub HER2:2891}-Affibody molecules were labeled with {sup 68}Ga. In vitro binding was characterized by a receptor saturation assay. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were conducted in athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous human breast cancer tumors with three different levels of HER2/neu expression. Nonspecific uptake was analyzed using non-HER2-specific Affibody molecules. Signal detected by PET was compared with ex vivo assessment of the tracer uptake and HER2/neu expression. The {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Z{sub HER2:2891}-Affibody probe showed high binding affinity to MDA-MB-361 cells (K{sub D} = 1.4 {+-} 0.19 nM). In vivo biodistribution and PET imaging studies demonstrated high radioactivity uptake in HER2/neu-positive tumors. Tracer was eliminated quickly from the blood and normal tissues, resulting in high tumor-to-blood ratios. The highest concentration of radioactivity in normal tissue was seen in the kidneys (227 {+-} 14%ID/g). High-contrast PET images of HER2/neu-overexpressing tumors were recorded as soon as 1 h after tracer injection. A good correlation was observed between PET imaging, biodistribution estimates of tumor tracer concentration, and the receptor expression. These results suggest that PET imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Z{sub HER2:2891}-Affibody is sensitive enough to detect different levels of HER2/neu expression in vivo. (orig.)

  7. Imaging of HER3-expressing xenografts in mice using a {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-HEHEHE-Z{sub HER3:08699} affibody molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, Anna; Rosestedt, Maria; Varasteh, Zohreh; Selvaraju, Ram Kumar [Uppsala University, Preclinical PET Platform, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala (Sweden); Malm, Magdalena; Andersson, Ken; Staahl, Stefan; Loefblom, John [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Protein Technology, School of Biotechnology, Stockholm (Sweden); Altai, Mohamed; Honarvar, Hadis; Strand, Joanna; Tolmachev, Vladimir [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor type 3 (HER3) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER (ErbB) receptor family. Membranous expression of HER3 is associated with trastuzumab resistance in breast cancer and the transition to androgen independence in prostate cancer. Imaging of HER3 expression in malignant tumors may provide important diagnostic information that can influence patient management. Affibody molecules with low picomolar affinity to HER3 were recently selected. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of HER3 imaging using radiolabeled Affibody molecules. A HER3-binding Affibody molecule, Z{sub 08699}, with a HEHEHE-tag on N-terminus was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3} using an IsoLink kit. In vitro and in vivo binding specificity and the cellular processing of the labeled binder were evaluated. Biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-HEHEHE-Z{sub 08699} was studied over time in mice bearing HER3-expressing xenografts. HEHEHE-Z{sub 08699} was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3} with an isolated yield of >80 % and a purity of >99 %. Binding of {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-HEHEHE-Z{sub 08699} was specific to BT474 and MCF7 (breast cancer), and LS174T (colon cancer) cells. Cellular processing showed rapid binding and relatively quick internalization of the receptor/Affibody molecule complex (70 % of cell-associated radioactivity was internalized after 24 h). The tumor targeting was receptor mediated and the excretion was predominantly renal. Receptor-mediated uptake was also found in the liver, lung, stomach, intestine, and salivary glands. At 4 h pi, tumor-to-blood ratios were 7 ± 3 for BT474, and 6 ± 2 for LS174T xenografts. LS174T tumors were visualized by microSPECT 4 h pi. The results of this study suggest the feasibility of HER3-imaging in malignant tumors using Affibody molecules. (orig.)

  8. Preparation and characterization of 99Tcm-labeled human epidemal growth factor type 2 affibody molecule in vitro%99Tcm标记人表皮生长因子受体2小分子靶向结合蛋白的制备及体外结合特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬勉; 赵新明; 王士杰; 任秀春; 王娜; 韩静雅; 贾立镯

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prepare the 99Tcm-labeled human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) affibody molecule ZHER2:342 and evaluate its receptor binding specificity in vitro.Methods The molecular ZHERa:342 was labeled with 99Tcm using the ligand exchange method.The labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity were measured by HPLC.The major factors,such as the mass of SnC12 and NaOH and reaction time were analyzed,and the optimal method was summarized.Cell binding kinetics and cellular retention of the probe were investigated in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells with low HER2 expression respectively.HER2 binding specificity of 99Tcm-ZHER2:342 was analyzed by a pre-injection of excess unlabeled ZHER2:342 to saturate HER2 receptors.One-way analysis of variance and two-sample t test were used.Results The optimal labeling procedure was as follows:5 μg (1 g/L) of ZHER2:342 was mixed with 5 μg of NaOH (1 g/L),then 8.8 μg SnC12(1 g/L,solution) was added,followed by 150 μl (37 MBq) 99TcmO4-solution,and finally the mixture was slightly vortexed and incubated for 1 h at room temperature.99TcmZHER2:342 was stable in vitro with a high labeling efficiency of (98.10± 1.73)%.The radiochemical purity was > 98%,and was more than 85% after the incubation for 24 h in saline and fresh human serum.The cell binding of 99Tcm-ZHER2:342 with HER2-expressing SKOV-3 cells gradually increased over time with a peak of (9.95± 1.02)% at 6 h.The binding of 99Tcm-ZHER2:342 in SKOV-3 cells was significantly higher than that in MDA-MB-231 cells at every time point (5.68-9.88 vs 0.56-2.11 ; t:from-34.50 to-13.14,all P<0.01).The labeled molecular probe retained the capacity to bind specifically to HER2-expressing SKOV-3 cells since the cell binding decreased from (9.95 ± 1.02) % to (2.11 ±0.27) % after receptor saturation (t =-13.14,P<0.01).Conclusions 99Tcm-ZHER2:342 has a high labeling efficiency,good stability and optimal binding specificity

  9. The HER2-binding affibody molecule (Z(HER2∶342₂ increases radiosensitivity in SKBR-3 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Ekerljung

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the HER2-specific affibody molecule (Z(HER2∶342₂ inhibits proliferation of SKBR-3 cells. Here, we continue to investigate its biological effects in vitro by studying receptor dimerization and clonogenic survival following irradiation. We found that (Z(HER2∶342₂ sensitizes the HER2-overexpressing cell line SKBR-3 to ionizing radiation. The survival after exposure to (Z(HER2∶342₂ and 8 Gy (S(8Gy 0.006 was decreased by a factor four compared to the untreated (S(8Gy 0.023. The low HER2-expressing cell line MCF-7 was more radiosensitive than SKBR-3 but did not respond to (Z(HER2∶342₂. Treatment by (Z(HER2∶342₂ strongly increased the levels of dimerized and phosphorylated HER2 even after 5 minutes of stimulation. The monomeric Z(HER2∶342 does not seem to be able to induce receptor phosphorylation and dimerization or sensitize cells to irradiation.

  10. EGFR-directed Affibody for fluorescence-guided glioma surgery: time-dose analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro de Souza, Ana Luiza; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason R.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Draney, Daniel R.; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The key to fluorescence guided surgical oncology is the ability to create specific contrast between normal and glioma tissue. The blood brain barrier that limits the delivery of substances to the normal brain is broken in tumors, allowing accumulation of agents in the tumor interior. However, for a clinical success, imaging agents should be in the infiltrative edges to minimize the resection of normal brain while enable the removal of tumor. The aberrant overexpression and/or activation of EGFR is associated with many types of cancers, including glioblastoma and the injection of a fluorescent molecule targeted to these receptors would improve tumor contrast during fluorescence guided surgery. Affibody molecules have intentional medium affinity and high potential specificity, which are the desirable features of a good surgical imaging agent. The aim of this study was evaluate the brain/glioma uptake of ABY029 labeled with near-infrared dye IRDye800CW after intravenous injection. Rats were either inoculated with orthotopic implantations of U251 human glioma cell line or PBS (shams control) in the brain. The tumors were allowed to grow for 2-3 weeks before carrying out fluorescent tracer experiments. Fluorescent imaging of ex vivo brain slices from rats was acquired at different time points after infection of fluorescently labeled EGFR-specific affibody to verify which time provided maximal contrast tumor to normal brain. Although the tumor was most clearly visualized after 1h of IRDye800CW-labeled ABY029 injection, the tumor location could be identified from the background after 48h. These results suggest that the NIR-labeled affibody examined shows excellent potential to increase surgical visualization for confirmed EGFR positive tumors.

  11. Molecular Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Affibody Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a highly aggressive and lethal cancer. It is typically asymptomatic at the early stage, with only 10%–20% of HCC patients being diagnosed early enough for appropriate surgical treatment. The delayed diagnosis of HCC is associated with limited treatment options and much lower survival rates. Therefore, the early and accurate detection of HCC is crucial to improve its currently dismal prognosis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has been reported to be involved in HCC tumorigenesis and to represent an attractive target for HCC imaging and therapy. In this study, an affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907, targeting the extracellular domain of EGFR, was used for the first time to assess its potential to detect HCC xenografts. By evaluating radio- or fluorescent-labeled Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 as a probe for positron emission tomography (PET or optical imaging of HCC, subcutaneous EGFR-positive HCC xenografts were found to be successfully imaged by the PET probe. Thus, affibody-based PET imaging of EGFR provides a promising approach for detecting HCC in vivo.

  12. Affibody-DyLight conjugates for in vivo assessment of HER2 expression by near-infrared optical imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Zielinski

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Amplification of the HER2/neu gene and/or overexpression of the corresponding protein have been identified in approximately 20% of invasive breast carcinomas. Assessment of HER2 expression in vivo would advance development of new HER2-targeted therapeutic agents and, potentially, facilitate choice of the proper treatment strategy offered to the individual patient. We present novel HER2-specific probes for in vivo evaluation of the receptor status by near-infrared (NIR optical imaging. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Affibody molecules were expressed, purified, and labeled with NIR-fluorescent dyes. The binding affinity and specificity of the obtained probe were tested in vitro. For in vivo validation, the relationship of the measured NIR signal and HER2 expression was characterized in four breast cancer xenograft models, expressing different levels of HER2. Accumulation of Affibody molecules in tumor tissue was further confirmed by ex vivo analysis. RESULTS: Affibody-DyLight conjugates showed high affinity to HER2 (K(D = 3.66±0.26. No acute toxicity resulted from injection of the probes (up to 0.5 mg/kg into mice. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed a relatively short (37.53±2.8 min half-life of the tracer in blood. Fluorescence accumulation in HER2-positive BT-474 xenografts was evident as soon as a few minutes post injection and reached its maximum at 90 minutes. On the other hand, no signal retention was observed in HER2-negative MDA-MB-468 xenografts. Immunostaining of extracted tumor tissue confirmed penetration of the tracer into tumor tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our studies suggest that Affibody-DyLight-750 conjugate is a powerful tool to monitor HER2 status in a preclinical setting. Following clinical validation, it might provide complementary means for assessment of HER2 expression in breast cancer patients (assuming availability of proper NIR scanners and/or be used to facilitate detection of HER2-positive metastatic lesions

  13. Influence of molecular design on biodistribution and targeting properties of an Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altai, Mohamed; Liu, Hao; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of toxins is a promising way to treat disseminated cancer. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting moiety has provided proof-of-principle for this approach. However, extravasation and tissue penetration rates of antibody-based immunotoxins are limited due to antibody bulkiness. The use of a novel class of targeting probes, Affibody molecules, provides smaller toxin-conjugated constructs, which may improve targeting. Earlier, we have demonstrated that affitoxins containing a HER2-targeting Affibody moiety and a deimmunized and truncated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PE38X8, provide highly selective toxicity to HER2-expressing cancer cells. To evaluate the influence of molecular design on targeting and biodistribution properties, a series of novel affitoxins were labelled with the residualizing radionuclide 111In. In this study, we have shown that the novel conjugates are more rapidly internalized compared with the parental affitoxin. The use of a (HE)3 purification tag instead of a hexahistidine tag enabled significant (pmolecular design of scaffold protein based anticancer targeted toxins can appreciably improve their biodistribution and targeting properties.

  14. Site-Specific Chemical Labeling of Long RNA Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Kasper; Olsen, Eva Maria; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of RNA molecules is a valuable tool for studying their structure and function. Here, we describe a new site-specific RNA labeling method, which utilizes a DNA-templated chemical reaction to attach a label at a specific internal nucleotide in an RNA molecule. The method...... is nonenzymatic and based on the formation of a four-way junction, where a donor strand is chemically coupled to an acceptor strand at a specific position via an activated chemical group. A disulfide bond in the linker is subsequently cleaved under mild conditions leaving a thiol group attached to the acceptor-RNA...... strand. The site-specific thiol-modified target RNA can then be chemically labeled with an optional group, here demonstrated by coupling of a maleimide-functionalized fluorophore. The method is rapid and allows site specific labeling of both in vitro and in vivo synthesized RNA with a broad range...

  15. HER-2 Targeted Nanoparticle-Affibody Bioconjugates for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexis, Frank; Basto, Pamela; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Zhang, Liangfang; Pridgen, Eric; Wang, Adrew Z.; Marein, Shawn L.; Westerhof, Katrina; Molnar, Linda K.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2010-01-01

    Affibodies are a class of polypeptide ligands that are potential candidates for cell- or tissue-specific targeting of drug-encapsulated controlled release polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). Here we report the development of drug delivery vehicles comprised of polymeric NPs that are surface modified with Affibody ligands that bind to the extracellular domain of the trans-membrane human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) for targeted delivery to cells which over express the HER-2 antigen. NPs lacking the anti-HER-2 Affibody did not show significant uptake by these cells. Using paclitaxel encapsulated NP-Affibody (1 wt% drug loading), we demonstrated increased cytotoxicity of these bioconjugates in SK-BR-3 and SKOV-3 cell lines. These targeted, drug encapsulated NPAffibody bioconjugates may be efficacious in treating HER-2 expressing carcinoma. PMID:19012296

  16. Affibody-displaying bionanocapsules for specific drug delivery to HER2-expressing cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Takuya; Mieda, Hiroaki; Hwang, Sang Youn; Nishimura, Yuya; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2010-10-01

    A novel HER2-targeted carrier was developed using bionanocapsules (BNCs). Bionanocapsules (BNCs) are 100-nm hollow nanoparticles composed of the L-protein of hepatitis B virus surface antigen. An affibody of HER2 was genetically displayed on the BNC surface (Z(HER2)-BNC). For the investigation of binding affinity, Z(HER2)-BNC was incubated with the cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 (HER2 positive), and MDA-MB-231 (HER2 negative). For analysis of HER2 targeting specificity, Z(HER2)-BNC or Z(WT)-BNC (without affibody) was incubated with both SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells by time lapse and concentration. For the delivery of encapsulated molecules (calcein), fluorescence of Z(HER2)-BNC mixed with liposomes was also compared with that of Z(WT)-BNC and nude liposomes by incubation with SK-BR-3 cells. As a result, Z(HER2)-BNC-liposome complex demonstrated the delivery to HER2-expressing cells (SK-BR-3) with a high degree of specificity. This indicates that genetically engineered BNCs are promising carrier for cancer treatment.

  17. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  18. Structure elucidation of uniformly 13C labeled small molecule natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibarkh, Mikhail; Wyche, Thomas P; Saurí, Josep; Bugni, Tim S; Martin, Gary E; Williamson, R Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Utilization of isotopically labeled proteins and peptides is a routinely employed approach in biomolecular NMR investigations. The widespread availability of inexpensive, uniformly (13) C-enriched glucose now makes it possible to produce uniformly (13) C-labeled natural products by microbial fermentation. In this feature article, the authors describe an experimental approach for the rapid structural characterization of uniformly (13) C-labeled natural products based on the Constant-Time HSQC (CT-HSQC) experiment. Rigorous theoretical evaluation of the CT-HSQC experiment allowed the applicability of the experiment to be expanded from the traditional, narrow scope of labeled amino acids to encompass virtually any small molecule or U-(13) C labeled natural product. A suite of experiments including CT-HSQC, (13) C-(13) C COSY, and COSYLR experiments is sufficient for the structure elucidation of uniformly (13) C-labeled small molecules and natural products. Differences in NMR approaches for structure elucidation of natural abundance and uniformly (13) C-labeled molecules are also discussed. The present work provides a researcher working in this area of natural products chemistry with NMR structure elucidation tools for investigating (13) C-labeled small molecules and natural products.

  19. Molecular level studies on binding modes of labeling molecules with polyalanine peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Wang, Chenxuan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Lin; Zeng, Qindao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides.In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides. Electronic

  20. CSI-FID: high throughput label-free detection of DNA binding molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Karl E; Stover, James S; Boger, Dale L; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2009-07-15

    Determining the sequence specifity of DNA binding molecules is a non-trivial task. Here we describe the development of a platform for assaying the sequence specificity of DNA ligands using label free detection on high density DNA microarrays. This is achieved by combining Cognate Site Identification (CSI) with Fluorescence Intercalation Displacement (FID) to create CSI-FID. We use the well-studied small molecule DNA ligand netropsin to develop this high throughput platform. Analysis of the DNA binding properties of protein- and small molecule-based libraries with CSI-FID will advance the development of genome-anchored molecules for therapeutic purposes.

  1. SLAP: Small Labeling Pair for Single-Molecule Super-Resolution Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieneke, Ralph; Raulf, Anika; Kollmannsperger, Alina; Heilemann, Mike; Tampé, Robert

    2015-08-24

    Protein labeling with synthetic fluorescent probes is a key technology in chemical biology and biomedical research. A sensitive and efficient modular labeling approach (SLAP) was developed on the basis of a synthetic small-molecule recognition unit (Ni-trisNTA) and the genetically encoded minimal protein His6-10 -tag. High-density protein tracing by SLAP was demonstrated. This technique allows super-resolution fluorescence imaging and fulfills the necessary sampling criteria for single-molecule localization-based imaging techniques. It avoids masking by large probes, for example, antibodies, and supplies sensitive, precise, and robust size analysis of protein clusters (nanodomains).

  2. Optical tweezers for free-solution label-free single bio-molecule studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnala, Abhay; Al-Balushi, Ahmed A.; Gordon, Reuven

    2014-09-01

    Nanoaperture based trapping has developed as a significant tool among the various optical tweezer systems for trapping of very small particles down to the single nanometer range. The double nanohole aperture based trap provides a method for efficient, highly-sensitive, label-free, low-cost, free-solution single molecule trapping and detection. We use the double nanohole tweezer to understand biomolecular phenomena like protein unfolding, binding, structural conformation of DNA, protein-DNA interactions, and protein small molecule interactions.

  3. Specificity of synthesis and analysis of molecules labelled with stable isotopes; Specificite des syntheses et analyses des molecules marquees avec les isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, J.P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Biologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire

    1994-12-31

    The various specificities of synthesis with stable isotopes are: unusual raw materials and use of precursors, possibility of producing several isotopomers corresponding to the same chemical compound, involvement of a reaction mechanism in labelling. As a matter of fact, isotopic synthesis are generally more complex than synthesis of non-labelled products. When preparing labelled molecules, it is of importance to avoid any isotopic dilution. Chemical purity for labelled molecules is controlled by various chromatographic techniques and isotopic analysis are carried out by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Small Molecule-Photoactive Yellow Protein Labeling Technology in Live Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chemical environment, movement, trafficking and interactions of proteins in live cells is essential to understanding their functions. Labeling protein with functional molecules is a widely used approach in protein research to elucidate the protein location and functions both in vitro and in live cells or in vivo. A peptide or a protein tag fused to the protein of interest and provides the opportunities for an attachment of small molecule probes or other fluorophore to image the dynamics of protein localization. Here we reviewed the recent development of no-wash small molecular probes for photoactive yellow protein (PYP-tag, by the means of utilizing a quenching mechanism based on the intramolecular interactions, or an environmental-sensitive fluorophore. Several fluorogenic probes have been developed, with fast labeling kinetics and cell permeability. This technology allows quick live-cell imaging of cell-surface and intracellular proteins without a wash-out procedure.

  5. Label-free detection of small-molecule binding to a GPCR in the membrane environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heym, Roland G; Hornberger, Wilfried B; Lakics, Viktor; Terstappen, Georg C

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of drug-target interaction kinetics is becoming increasingly important during the drug-discovery process to investigate selectivity of a drug and predict in vivo target occupancy. To date, it remains challenging to obtain kinetic information for interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and small-molecule ligands in a label-free manner. Often GPCRs need to be solubilized or even stabilized by mutations which can be difficult and is time consuming. In addition, it is often unclear if the native conformation of the receptors is sustained. In this study, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) technologies have been used to detect ligand binding to the GPCR chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) expressed in lipoparticles. We first evaluated different strategies to immobilize CXCR4-expressing lipoparticles. The highest small-molecule binding signal in SPR and SAW was achieved with a matrix-free carboxymethylated sensor chip coated with wheat germ agglutinin for lipoparticle capturing. Next, the binding kinetics of the anti-CXCR4 antibody 12G5 raised against a conformational epitope (k(on)=1.83×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), k(off)=2.79×10(-4) s(-1)) and the small molecule AMD3100 (k(on)=5.46×10(5)M(-1)s(-1), k(off)=1.01×10(-2)s(-1)) were assessed by SAW. Our kinetic and affinity data are consistent with previously published radioligand-binding experiments using cells and label-free experiments with solubilized CXCR4. This is the first study demonstrating label-free kinetic characterization of small-molecule binding to a GPCR in the membrane environment. The presented method holds the potential to greatly facilitate label-free assay development for GPRCs that can be expressed at high levels in lipoparticles.

  6. Influence of quantum dot labels on single molecule movement in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    Single particle tracking results are very dependent on the probe that is used. In this study we have investigated the influence that functionalized quantum dots (QDs) have on the recorded movement in single molecule tracking experiments of plasma membrane species in live cells. Potential issues...... in labeling single molecules with QDs (and other particles e.g. gold particles) are induction of cross-linking of the target molecules, which can cause activation of signaling pathways or reduced mobility, and steric hindrance as a result of the probe size. Cross-linking can be a result of the multivalent...... functionalization tag (e.g. streptavidin (sAv)) or the presence of multiple mono- or multivalent functionalization tags per QD. In this work, we have compared commercially available sAv-QDs of different sizes with custom prepared Co enzyme A (CoA)-QDs both targeting a GPI-anchored protein modified with either...

  7. Praline metabolism by germinating Lilium longiflorum pollen. I. Labelling of cytoplasmic, wall and culture medium molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. V. Dashek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactivity occurs in trithloroacetic acid (TCA-soluble and precipitable, cytoplasm and salt-washed walls following germination of Lilium longiflorum, cv. 'Ace' pollen in medium containing [14C]-proline (Pro. Sephadex gel filtration on G-25 through G-100 was employed to determine whether radioactivity in cytoplasm, wall and growth medium from pollen fed [14C]-Pro or [3H]=Pro plus [14C]-arafbinose (Ara was contained within molecules possessing molecular weights of 5,000 to 100,000 daltones or greater. G-25 elution profiles of a crude cytoplasmic fraction (15,000 X g supernatant from [14C]-Pro labelled pollen yielded a radioctive void volume peak and a retarded peak. The void volume peak contained hydroxyproline (Hyp, and exhibited a coincidence of [3H]-Pro and [14C] -Ara labelling when pollen was double labelled with the two isotopes. This peak also contained radioactivity when pollen was germinated in 2-[3H]-myo-inositol. Germination in medium supplemented with 100 µM 2,2'-dipyridyl eliminated radioactivity from 2-[3H]-myo-inositol or [14C]-,Pro in the peak. Filtratian on G-25 of aTCA-soluble fraction of a salt-extract of walls from [14C]-Pro labelled pollen resulted in void volume and two retarded peaks. Void volume and two retarded peaks were also obtained upon G-25 filtration of a cellulase-digest of walls from [M]-Pro labeled pollen. The void volume peak contained Hyp, Lys, Gly, Ala, Ser, Glu and Asp acids, Val, Tyr, Leu or lieu and Pro. Sephadex G-90, 75, and 100 elution profiles of cellulasedigests of walls from [3H]-,Pro and [14C]-Ara labelled pollen yielded radioactive retarded and Hyp-containing void volume peaks with a coincidence of [3H] and [14C] labelling. Label in the void volume was obtained when either rhozyme P11- or pepsin-digests of walls from [14C]-Pro labelled pollen were gel filtered on G-50. Paper electrophoresis coupled with paper chromatography of acid hydrolyzates of salt-washed wall fractions demonstrated 15 of the

  8. Stable isotope labeling of glycoprotein expressed in silkworms using immunoglobulin G as a test molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Hirokazu [Nagoya City University, Faculty and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan); Nakamura, Masatoshi [National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Genetic Resources Conservation Research Unit, Genetic Resources Center (Japan); Yokoyama, Jun [Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation, Tsukuba Laboratories (Japan); Zhang, Ying; Yamaguchi, Takumi [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Institute for Molecular Science and Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience (Japan); Kondo, Sachiko [Nagoya City University, Faculty and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan); Kobayashi, Jun [Yamaguchi University, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture (Japan); Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y. [Shizuoka University, Laboratory of Biotechnology, Research Institute of Green Science and Technology (Japan); Nakazawa, Shiori [Nagoya University, Sugashima Marine Biological Laboratory, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana [National Institute of Health Sciences, Division of Biological Chemistry and Biologicals (Japan); Kato, Koichi, E-mail: kkato@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Nagoya City University, Faculty and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Silkworms serve as promising bioreactors for the production of recombinant proteins, including glycoproteins and membrane proteins, for structural and functional protein analyses. However, lack of methodology for stable isotope labeling has been a major deterrent to using this expression system for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural biology. Here we developed a metabolic isotope labeling technique using commercially available silkworm larvae. The fifth instar larvae were infected with baculoviruses for co-expression of recombinant human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a test molecule, with calnexin as a chaperone. They were subsequently reared on an artificial diet containing {sup 15}N-labeled yeast crude protein extract. We harvested 0.1 mg of IgG from larva with a {sup 15}N-enrichment ratio of approximately 80 %. This allowed us to compare NMR spectral data of the Fc fragment cleaved from the silkworm-produced IgG with those of an authentic Fc glycoprotein derived from mammalian cells. Therefore, we successfully demonstrated that our method enables production of isotopically labeled glycoproteins for NMR studies.

  9. A single molecule study of a fluorescently labeled telomestatin derivative and G-quadruplex interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Parastoo; Ma, Yue; Iida, Keisuke; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Balci, Hamza

    2017-01-01

    The potential use of G-quadruplex (GQ) stabilizing small molecules as anti-cancer drugs has created a flurry of activity on various aspects of these molecules. Telomestatin and oxazole telomestatin derivatives (OTD) are some of the most prominent of such molecules, yet the underlying dynamics of their interactions with GQ and the extent of heterogeneities in these interactions are not known. We performed single molecule measurements to study binding kinetics, rotational freedom, and dwell time distributions of a Cy5-labeled OTD (L1Cy5–7OTD) as it interacted with several different GQ structures. Our measurements show that L1Cy5–7OTD dwells on more stable GQ for longer times and binds to such GQ with higher frequency. The dwell times showed a broad distribution, but were longer than a minute for a significant fraction of molecules (characteristic dwell time τ = 192 ± 15 s and τ = 98 ± 15 s for the more and less stable GQ, respectively). In addition, L1Cy5–7OTD might be able to bind to GQ in at least two different primary orientations and occasionally transition between these orientations. The dwell time in one of these orientations was significantly longer than that in the other one, suggesting different stabilities for different binding orientations. PMID:27899628

  10. Label-free single molecule imaging with numerical aperture-shaped interferometric scattering microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Daniel; Weigel, Alexander; Kukura, P

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to optically interrogate nanoscopic objects is controlled by the difference between their extinction cross sections and the diffraction limited area to which light can be confined in the far field. We show that a partially transmissive spatial mask placed near the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture microscope objective enhances the extinction contrast of a scatterer near an interface by approximately $T^{-1/2}$, where T is the transmissivity of the mask. Numerical aperture based differentiation of background from scattered light represents a general approach to increasing extinction contrast and enables routine label free imaging down to the single molecule level.

  11. Single-molecule imaging of electroporated dye-labelled CheY in live Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Diana; Afanzar, Oshri; Armitage, Judith P.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    For the past two decades, the use of genetically fused fluorescent proteins (FPs) has greatly contributed to the study of chemotactic signalling in Escherichia coli including the activation of the response regulator protein CheY and its interaction with the flagellar motor. However, this approach suffers from a number of limitations, both biological and biophysical: for example, not all fusions are fully functional when fused to a bulky FP, which can have a similar molecular weight to its fused counterpart; they may interfere with the native interactions of the protein and the chromophores of FPs have low brightness and photostability and fast photobleaching rates. A recently developed technique for the electroporation of fluorescently labelled proteins in live bacteria has enabled us to bypass these limitations and study the in vivo behaviour of CheY at the single-molecule level. Here we show that purified CheY proteins labelled with organic dyes can be internalized into E. coli cells in controllable concentrations and imaged with video fluorescence microscopy. The use of this approach is illustrated by showing single CheY molecules diffusing within cells and interacting with the sensory clusters and the flagellar motors in real time. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672145

  12. Fluorescent labeling of NASBA amplified tmRNA molecules for microarray applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplinski Lauris

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we present a novel promising microbial diagnostic method that combines the sensitivity of Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA with the high information content of microarray technology for the detection of bacterial tmRNA molecules. The NASBA protocol was modified to include aminoallyl-UTP (aaUTP molecules that were incorporated into nascent RNA during the NASBA reaction. Post-amplification labeling with fluorescent dye was carried out subsequently and tmRNA hybridization signal intensities were measured using microarray technology. Significant optimization of the labeled NASBA protocol was required to maintain the required sensitivity of the reactions. Results Two different aaUTP salts were evaluated and optimum final concentrations were identified for both. The final 2 mM concentration of aaUTP Li-salt in NASBA reaction resulted in highest microarray signals overall, being twice as high as the strongest signals with 1 mM aaUTP Na-salt. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated efficient combination of NASBA amplification technology with microarray based hybridization detection. The method is applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics including environmental monitoring, bio threat detection, industrial process monitoring and clinical microbiology.

  13. Affibody-beta-galactosidase immunoconjugates produced as soluble fusion proteins in the Escherichia coli cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnmark, Jenny; Kampf, Caroline; Asplund, Anna; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Wester, Kenneth; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias; Nygren, Per-Ake

    2003-10-01

    Recombinant immunoconjugates constitute a novel class of immunoassay reagents produced by genetic fusion between an antigen recognizing moiety and a reporter enzyme or fluorescent protein, obviating the need for chemical coupling. In this work, we describe the construction, Escherichia coli production and characterization of recombinant beta-galactosidase (beta-gal)-based immunoconjugates directed to human immunoglobulin A (IgA). As the antigen recognizing moieties, either monovalent or dimeric (head-to-tail) versions of an IgA-specific affibody (Z(IgA1)) were used, previously selected in vitro from a protein library based on combinatorial engineering of a single staphylococcal protein A domain. To increase the likelihood of proper presentation on the assembled homotetrameric enzyme surface, the affibody moieties were linked to the N-terminus of the enzyme subunits via a heptapeptide linker sequence. The two resulting immunoconjugates Z(IgA1)-beta-gal and (Z(IgA1))(2)-beta-gal, containing four and eight affibody moieties per enzyme, respectively, could be expressed as soluble and proteolytically stable proteins intracellularly in E. coli from where they were purified to high purity by a single anion exchange chromatography step. The yields of immunoconjugates were in the range 200-400 mg/l culture. Biosensor-binding studies showed that both the Z(IgA1)-beta-gal and (Z(IgA1))(2)-beta-gal immunoconjugates were capable of selective IgA-recognition, but with an apparent higher binding affinity for the variant containing divalent affibody moieties, presumably due to avidity effects. The applicability of this class of recombinant immunoconjugates was demonstrated by IgA detection in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot-blot analyses. In addition, using human kidney biopsy samples from a nephropathy patient, IgA depositions in glomeruli could be detected by immunohistochemistry with low background staining of tissue.

  14. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao Li; Xu Shoujun, E-mail: sxu7@uh.edu [University of Houston, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/{radical}Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 {mu}m with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 {mu}m, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  15. [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551}, a new Affibody conjugate for visualization of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor expression in malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, Anna; Varasteh, Zohreh [Uppsala University, Preclinical PET Platform, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala (Sweden); Hofstroem, Camilla; Graeslund, Torbjoern [Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Molecular Biotechnology, School of Biotechnology, Stockholm (Sweden); Strand, Joanna [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Sandstrom, Mattias [Uppsala University Hospital, Medical Physics, Department of Oncology, Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, Karl [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Ridgeview Instruments AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tolmachev, Vladimir [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-03-15

    Radionuclide imaging of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) expression in tumours might be used for selection of patients who would benefit from IGF-1R-targeted therapy. We have previously shown the feasibility of IGF-1R imaging using the Affibody molecule {sup 111}In-DOTA-His{sub 6}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551}. The use of {sup 99m}Tc instead of {sup 111}In should improve sensitivity and resolution of imaging, and reduce the dose burden to patients. We hypothesized that inclusion of a HEHEHE tag instead of a His{sub 6} tag in Z{sub IGF1R:4551} would permit its convenient purification using IMAC, enable labelling with [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}, and improve its biodistribution. Z{sub IGF1R:4551} was expressed with a HEHEHE tag in the N terminus. The resulting (HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} construct was labelled with [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}. Targeting of IGF-1R-expressing cells using [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. (HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} was stably labelled with {sup 99m}Tc with preserved specific binding to IGF-1R-expressing DU-145 prostate cancer cells in vitro. In mice, [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} accumulated in IGF-1R-expressing organs (pancreas, stomach, lung and salivary gland). [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} demonstrated 3.6-fold lower accumulation in the liver and spleen than {sup 111}In-DOTA-Z{sub IGF1R:4551}. In NMRI nu/nu mice with DU-145 prostate cancer xenografts, the tumour uptake was 1.32 {+-} 0.11 %ID/g and the tumour-to-blood ratio was 4.4 {+-} 0.3 at 8 h after injection. The xenografts were visualized using a gamma camera 6 h after injection. [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} is a promising candidate for visualization of IGF-1R expression in malignant tumours. (orig.)

  16. Label-free detection of single nanoparticles and biological molecules using microtoroid optical resonators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judith Su; Alexander FG Goldberg; Brian M Stoltz

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule detection is one of the fundamental challenges of modern biology.Such experiments often use labels that can be expensive,difficult to produce,and for small analytes,might perturb the molecular events being studied.Analyte size plays an important role in determining detectability.Here we use laser-frequency locking in the context of sensing to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of microtoroid optical resonators to the extent that single nanoparticles 2.5 nm in radius,and 15.5 kDa molecules are detected in aqueous solution,thereby bringing these detectors to the size limits needed for detecting the key macromolecules of the cell.Our results,covering several orders of magnitude of particle radius (100 nm to 2 nm),agree with the 'reactive' model prediction for the frequency shift of the resonator upon particle binding.This confirms that the main contribution of the frequency shift for the resonator upon particle binding is an increase in the effective path length due to part of the evanescent field coupling into the adsorbed particle.We anticipate that our results will enable many applications,including more sensitive medical diagnostics and fundamental studies of single receptor-ligand and protein-protein interactions in real time.

  17. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Bernard-Gauthier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET. These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014 shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry.

  18. Preparation of goat and rabbit anti-camel immunoglobulin G whole molecule labeled with horseradish peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Hussein Abdel-Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: As the labeled anti-camel immunoglobulins (Igs with enzymes for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA are unavailable in the Egyptian market, the present investigation was directed for developing local labeled anti-camel IgG with horseradish peroxidase (HRP to save hard curacy. Materials and Methods: For purification of camel IgG whole molecule, camel sera was preliminary precipitated with 50% saturated ammonium sulfate and dialyzed against 15 mM phosphate-buffered saline pH 7.2 then concentrated. This preparation was further purified by protein A sepharose affinity column chromatography. The purity of the eluted camel IgG was tested by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresi. Anti-camel IgG was prepared by immunization of goats and rabbits separately, with purified camel IgG. The anti-camel IgG was purified by protein A sepharose affinity column chromatography. Whole molecule anti-camel IgG was conjugated with HRP using glutraldehyde based assay. Sensitivity and specificity of prepared conjugated secondary antibodies were detected using positive and negative camel serum samples reacted with different antigens in ELISA, respectively. The potency of prepared conjugated antibodies was evaluated compared with protein A HRP. The stability of the conjugate at −20°C during 1 year was assessed by ELISA. Results: The electrophoretic profile of camel IgG showed four bands of molecular weight 63, 52, 40 and 33 kDa. The recorded sensitivity and specificity of the product are 100%. Its potency is also 100% compared to 58-75% of commercial protein A HRP. The conjugates are stable for 1 year at −20°C as proved by ELISA. Conclusion: Collectively, this study introduces goat and rabbit anti-camel IgG whole molecules with simple, inexpensive method, with 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity and stability up to 1 year at −20°C. The important facet of the current study is saving hard curacy. Future investigations are necessary for

  19. Preparation of goat and rabbit anti-camel immunoglobulin G whole molecule labeled with horseradish peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Eman Hussein; El-Jakee, Jakeen Kamal; Hatem, Mahmoud Essam; Ata, Nagwa Sayed; Fouad, Ehab Ali

    2017-01-01

    Aim: As the labeled anti-camel immunoglobulins (Igs) with enzymes for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are unavailable in the Egyptian market, the present investigation was directed for developing local labeled anti-camel IgG with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to save hard curacy. Materials and Methods: For purification of camel IgG whole molecule, camel sera was preliminary precipitated with 50% saturated ammonium sulfate and dialyzed against 15 mM phosphate-buffered saline pH 7.2 then concentrated. This preparation was further purified by protein A sepharose affinity column chromatography. The purity of the eluted camel IgG was tested by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresi. Anti-camel IgG was prepared by immunization of goats and rabbits separately, with purified camel IgG. The anti-camel IgG was purified by protein A sepharose affinity column chromatography. Whole molecule anti-camel IgG was conjugated with HRP using glutraldehyde based assay. Sensitivity and specificity of prepared conjugated secondary antibodies were detected using positive and negative camel serum samples reacted with different antigens in ELISA, respectively. The potency of prepared conjugated antibodies was evaluated compared with protein A HRP. The stability of the conjugate at −20°C during 1 year was assessed by ELISA. Results: The electrophoretic profile of camel IgG showed four bands of molecular weight 63, 52, 40 and 33 kDa. The recorded sensitivity and specificity of the product are 100%. Its potency is also 100% compared to 58-75% of commercial protein A HRP. The conjugates are stable for 1 year at −20°C as proved by ELISA. Conclusion: Collectively, this study introduces goat and rabbit anti-camel IgG whole molecules with simple, inexpensive method, with 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity and stability up to 1 year at −20°C. The important facet of the current study is saving hard curacy. Future investigations are necessary for preparation of Ig

  20. Singular phase nano-optics in plasmonic metamaterials for label-free single-molecule detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravets, V G; Schedin, F; Jalil, R; Britnell, L; Gorbachev, R V; Ansell, D; Thackray, B; Novoselov, K S; Geim, A K; Kabashin, A V; Grigorenko, A N

    2013-04-01

    The non-trivial behaviour of phase is crucial for many important physical phenomena, such as, for example, the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the Berry phase. By manipulating the phase of light one can create 'twisted' photons, vortex knots and dislocations which has led to the emergence of the field of singular optics relying on abrupt phase changes. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of singular visible-light nano-optics which exploits the benefits of both plasmonic field enhancement and the peculiarities of the phase of light. We show that properly designed plasmonic metamaterials exhibit topologically protected zero reflection yielding to sharp phase changes nearby, which can be employed to radically improve the sensitivity of detectors based on plasmon resonances. By using reversible hydrogenation of graphene and binding of streptavidin-biotin, we demonstrate an areal mass sensitivity at a level of fg mm(-2) and detection of individual biomolecules, respectively. Our proof-of-concept results offer a route towards simple and scalable single-molecule label-free biosensing technologies.

  1. Label-free detection of protein molecules secreted from an organ-on-a-chip model for drug toxicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Andres W.; Zhang, Yu S.; Aleman, Julio; Alerasool, Parissa; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical attrition is about 30% from failure of drug candidates due to toxic side effects, increasing the drug development costs significantly and slowing down the drug discovery process. This partly originates from the fact that the animal models do not accurately represent human physiology. Hence there is a clear unmet need for developing drug toxicity assays using human-based models that are complementary to traditional animal models before starting expensive clinical trials. Organ-on-a-chip techniques developed in recent years have generated a variety of human organ models mimicking different human physiological conditions. However, it is extremely challenging to monitor the transient and long-term response of the organ models to drug treatments during drug toxicity tests. First, when an organ-on-a-chip model interacts with drugs, a certain amount of protein molecules may be released into the medium due to certain drug effects, but the amount of the protein molecules is limited, since the organ tissue grown inside microfluidic bioreactors have minimum volume. Second, traditional fluorescence techniques cannot be utilized for real-time monitoring of the concentration of the protein molecules, because the protein molecules are continuously secreted from the tissue and it is practically impossible to achieve fluorescence labeling in the dynamically changing environment. Therefore, direct measurements of the secreted protein molecules with a label-free approach is strongly desired for organs-on-a-chip applications. In this paper, we report the development of a photonic crystal-based biosensor for label-free assays of secreted protein molecules from a liver-on-a-chip model. Ultrahigh detection sensitivity and specificity have been demonstrated.

  2. A dual-channel detection of mercuric ions using a label free G-quadruplex-based DNAzyme molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Liu, Haiyan; Wu, Guanrong; Sun, Nana; Meng, Lingpei; Li, Yuyin; Liu, Zhenxing; Diao, Aipo

    2016-06-20

    We have constructed a 'turn-off' and label free bio-sensor using a DNAzyme molecule. This facile bio-sensor is capable of selective detection of mercuric ions with a high sensitivity and satisfactory dynamic range. More importantly, it is able to generate both fluorescent and colourimetric signals for detection. This dual-channel bio-sensor is expected to afford high detection confidence and overcome false-positive readout especially when assaying complex biological samples.

  3. Label-Free Determination of the Dissociation Constant of Small Molecule-Aptamer Interaction by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Marc; Suess, Beatrix

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful label-free technique to determine the binding constant as well as thermodynamic parameters of a binding reaction and is therefore well suited for the analysis of small molecule-RNA aptamer interaction. We will introduce you to the method and present a protocol for sample preparation and the calorimetric measurement. A detailed note section will point out useful tips and pitfalls.

  4. PLLA-PEG-TCH-labeled bioactive molecule nanofibers for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jun Chen1,2, Beth Zhou1–3, Qi Li1,2, Jun Ouyang4, Jiming Kong2,4,5, Wen Zhong3,6, Malcolm MQ Xing1,2,4,71Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 2Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 3Department of Textile Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 4School of Basic Medical Science, Southern Medical University, Guangzhoug, China; 5Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Sciences, 6Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, 7Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CanadaAbstract: By mimicking the native extracellular matrix, electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds (ENSs can provide both chemical and physical cues to modulate cell adherence and differentiation and to promote tissue regeneration while retaining bioresorbable and biocompatible properties. In this study, ENSs were developed to deliver multiple biomolecules by loading them into the core-sheath structure and/or by conjugating them to the nanofiber surfaces. In this work, poly(L-lactide-poly(ethylene glycol-NH2 and poly(L-lactide were emulsion electrospun into nanofibers with a core-sheath structure. A model drug, tetracycline hydrochloride, was loaded within the nanofibers. Amino and carboxyl reactive groups were then activated on the fiber surfaces using saturated water vapor exposure and base hydrolysis, respectively. These reactive groups allowed the surface of the ENS to be functionalized with two other bioactive molecules, fluorescein isothiocyanate- and rhodamine-labeled bovine serum albumins, which were used as model proteins. The ENSs were shown to retain their antimicrobial capacity after two functionalization reactions, indicating that multifunctional nanofibers can potentially be developed into functional wound dressings or periodontal membranes or used in more complicated

  5. Electrochemical immobilization of Fluorescent labelled probe molecules on a FTO surface for affinity detection based on photo-excited current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Cho, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Sho-taro, E-mail: haruyama@life.kyutech.as.jp [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Department of Biological Functions and Engineering, Kitakyushu Science and Research Park, Hibikino, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 808-0196 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Photo-excited current can be generated at a molecular interface between a photo-excited molecules and a semi-conductive material in appropriate condition. The system has been recognized for promoting photo-energy devices such as an organic dye sensitized solar-cell. The photo-current generated reactions are totally dependent on the interfacial energy reactions, which are in a highly fluctuated interfacial environment. The authors investigated the photo-excited current reaction to develop a smart affinity detection method. However, in order to perform both an affinity reaction and a photo-excited current reaction at a molecular interface, ordered fabrications of the functional (affinity, photo-excitation, etc.) molecules layer on a semi-conductive surface is required. In the present research, we would like to present the fabrication and functional performance of photo-excited current-based affinity assay device and its application for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. On the FTO surface, fluorescent pigment labelled affinity peptide was immobilized through the EC tag (electrochemical-tag) method. The modified FTO produced a current when it was irradiated with diode laser light. However, the photo current decreased drastically when estrogen (ES) coexisted in the reaction solution. In this case, immobilized affinity probe molecules formed a complex with ES and estrogen receptor (ER). The result strongly suggests that the photo-excited current transduction between probe molecule-labelled cyanine pigment and the FTO surface was partly inhibited by a complex that formed at the affinity oligo-peptide region in a probe molecule on the FTO electrode. The bound bulky complex may act as an impediment to perform smooth transduction of photo-excited current in the molecular interface. The present system is new type of photo-reaction-based analysis. This system can be used to perform simple high-sensitive homogeneous assays.

  6. A laser scanner for imaging fluorophore labeled molecules in electrophoretic gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, D.J.; Sutherland, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biology Dept.

    1995-08-01

    A laser scanner for imaging electrophoretic gels was constructed and tested. The scanner incorporates a green helium-neon (HeNe) laser (543.5nm wavelength) and can achieve a spatial resolution of 19{micro}m. The instrument can function in two modes : snap-shot and finish-line. In snapshot mode, all samples are electrophoresed for the same time and the gel is scanned after completion of electrophoresis, while in finish-line mode, fluorophore labeled samples are electrophoresed for a constant distance and the image is formed as the samples pass under the detector. The resolving power of the finish-line mode of imaging is found to be greater than that of the snapshot mode of imaging. This laser scanner is also compared with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera and in terms of resolving power is found to be superior. Sensitivity of the instrument is presented in terms of the minimum amount of DNA that can be detected verses its molecular length.

  7. Label-Free, Single Molecule Resonant Cavity Detection: A Double-Blind Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Chistiakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical resonant cavity sensors are gaining increasing interest as a potential diagnostic method for a range of applications, including medical prognostics and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of detection demonstrations to date have involved identifying a “known” analyte, and the more rigorous double-blind experiment, in which the experimenter must identify unknown solutions, has yet to be performed. This scenario is more representative of a real-world situation. Therefore, before these devices can truly transition, it is necessary to demonstrate this level of robustness. By combining a recently developed surface chemistry with integrated silica optical sensors, we have performed a double-blind experiment to identify four unknown solutions. The four unknown solutions represented a subset or complete set of four known solutions; as such, there were 256 possible combinations. Based on the single molecule detection signal, we correctly identified all solutions. In addition, as part of this work, we developed noise reduction algorithms.

  8. Strigolactone Analogs as Molecular Probes in Chasing the (SLs) Receptor/s: Design and Synthesis of Fluorescent Labeled Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Prandi; Helèna Rosso; Beatrice Lace; Ernesto G. Occhiato; Alberto Oppedisano; Silvia Tabasso; Gabriele Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Originally identified as allelochemicals involved in plant-parasite interactions,more recently,Strigolactones (SLs) have been shown to play multiple key roles in the rhizosphere communication between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.Even more recent is the hormonal role ascribed to SLs which broadens the biological impact of these relatively simple molecules.In spite of the crucial and multifaceted biological role of SLs,there are no data on the receptor(s) which bind(s) such active molecules,neither in the producing plants nor in parasitic weeds or AM fungi.Information about the putative receptor of SLs can be gathered by means of structural,molecular,and genetic approaches.Our contribution on this topic is the design and synthesis of fluorescent labeled SL analogs to be used as probes for the detection in vivo of the receptor(s).Knowledge of the putative receptor structure will boost the research on analogs of the natural substrates as required for agricultural applications.

  9. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers.

  10. Label-free solution-based kinetic study of aptamer-small molecule interactions by kinetic capillary electrophoresis with UV detection revealing how kinetics control equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Reinstein, Oren; Johnson, Philip E; Krylov, Sergey N

    2011-11-15

    Here we demonstrate a label-free solution-based approach for studying the kinetics of biopolymer-small molecule interactions. The approach utilizes kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) separation and UV light absorption detection of the unlabeled small molecule. In this proof-of-concept work, we applied KCE-UV to study kinetics of interaction between a small molecule and a DNA aptamer. From the kinetic analysis of a series of aptamers, we found that dissociation rather than binding controls the stability of the complex. Because of its label-free features and generic nature, KCE-UV promises to become a practical tool for challenging kinetic studies of biopolymer-small molecule interactions.

  11. Profiling EGFR in Triple Negative Breast Tumor Using Affibody PET Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingding Xu; Gang Ren; Shibo Qi; Zhen Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Triple negative breast cancer(TNBC) represents a group of refractory breast cancers with aggressive clinical manifestations as well as poor prognoses.Human epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) expression is strongly associated with TNBC progression and it may serve as a therapeutic target for TNBC.We aimed to evaluate EGFR affibody-based PET imaging to profile EGFR expression in small animal models.Methods 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid(DOTA) conjugated Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 was chemically synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesizer and then radiolabeled with 64Cu.The in vitro cell uptake study was performed using SUM159 and MCF7 cells.The biodistribution and small animal PET imaging using 64Cu-DOTA-ZEGFR:1907 were further carried out with nude mice bearing subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 and SUM159 tumors.Results DOTA-Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 was successfully synthesized and radiolabeled with 64Cu.Biodistribution study showed that tumor uptake value of 64Cu-DOTA-Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 remained at(4.07±0.93)%ID/g at 24 h in nude mice(n=4) bearing SUM159 xenografts.Furthermore,small animal PET imaging study clearly showed that 64Cu-DOTA-Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 specifically delineated the EGFR positive TNBC tumors at 4 h or later.Conclusion The study demonstrates that 64Cu-DOTA-Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 is a promising molecular probe for PET imaging of EGFR positive TNBC.EGFR based small protein scaffold holds great promise as a novel platform that can be used for EGFR profiling of TNBC.

  12. The Use of Ex Vivo Whole-organ Imaging and Quantitative Tissue Histology to Determine the Bio-distribution of Fluorescently Labeled Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Jeremy W D; Bidwell, Gene L

    2016-12-24

    Fluorescent labeling is a well-established process for examining the fate of labeled molecules under a variety of experimental conditions both in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent probes are particularly useful in determining the bio-distribution of administered large molecules, where the addition of a small-molecule fluorescent label is unlikely to affect the kinetics or bio-distribution of the compound. A variety of methods exist to examine bio-distribution that vary significantly in the amount of effort required and whether the resulting measurements are fully quantitative, but using multiple methods in conjunction can provide a rapid and effective system for analyzing bio-distributions. Ex vivo whole-organ imaging is a method that can be used to quickly compare the relative concentrations of fluorescent molecules within tissues and between multiple types of tissues or treatment groups. Using an imaging platform designed for live-animal or whole-organ imaging, fluorescence within intact tissues can be determined without further processing, saving time and labor while providing an accurate picture of the overall bio-distribution. This process is ideal in experiments attempting to determine the tissue specificity of a compound or for the comparison of multiple different compounds. Quantitative tissue histology on the other hand requires extensive further processing of tissues in order to create a quantitative measure of the labeled compounds. To accurately assess bio-distribution, all tissues of interest must be sliced, scanned, and analyzed relative to standard curves in order to make comparisons between tissues or groups. Quantitative tissue histology is the gold standard for determining absolute compound concentrations within tissues. Here, we describe how both methods can be used together effectively to assess the ability of different administration methods and compound modifications to target and deliver fluorescently labeled molecules to the central nervous

  13. Pharmacokinetic and Biodistribution Assessment of a Near Infrared-Labeled PSMA-Specific Small Molecule in Tumor-Bearing Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy L. Kovar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and often requires surgery. Use of near infrared (NIR technologies to perform image-guided surgery may improve accurate delineation of tumor margins. To facilitate preclinical testing of such outcomes, here we developed and characterized a PSMA-targeted small molecule, YC-27. IRDye 800CW was conjugated to YC-27 or an anti-PSMA antibody used for reference. Human 22Rv1, PC3M-LN4, and/or LNCaP prostate tumor cells were exposed to the labeled compounds. In vivo targeting and clearance properties were determined in tumor-bearing mice. Organs and tumors were excised and imaged to assess probe localization. YC-27 exhibited a dose dependent increase in signal upon binding. Binding specificity and internalization were visualized by microscopy. In vitro and in vivo blocking studies confirmed YC-27 specificity. In vivo, YC-27 showed good tumor delineation and tissue contrast at doses as low as 0.25 nmole. YC-27 was cleared via the kidneys but bound the proximal tubules of the renal cortex and epididymis. Since PSMA is also broadly expressed on the neovasculature of most tumors, we expect YC-27 will have clinical utility for image-guided surgery and tumor resections.

  14. Stable isotope labelling reveals that NaCl stress decreases the production of Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttinen, Petri; Räsänen, Leena A; Lortet, Gilles; Lindström, Kristina

    2013-12-01

    Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris is a symbiont of salt-tolerant leguminous trees in the genera Acacia and Prosopis that are utilized in the prevention of soil erosion and desertification and in phytoremediation of salinized soil. Signalling between the plant and the rhizobia is essential for the formation of effective symbiosis that increases the success of reclaiming saline sites. We assessed the effect of salt stress on the growth and the production of lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules (LCOs) of S. arboris HAMBI 2361, an LCO-overproducing derivative of the S. arboris type strain HAMBI 1552. The strain tolerated NaCl up to 750 mM. To obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the LCO production under salt stress, we devised a method where LCOs were differentially labelled by stable isotopes of nitrogen, (14)N and (15)N, and analysed by mass spectrometry. Under control conditions, the strain produced altogether 27 structural LCO variants. In 380 mM NaCl, 13 LCO variants were produced in detectable amounts, and six of these were reliably quantified, ranging from one-tenth to one-third of the non-stressed one.

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopic monitoring of the diffusion process of deuterium-labeled molecules in wood. Part II: hardwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchikawa, Satoru; Siesler, H W

    2003-06-01

    Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) transmission spectroscopy was applied to monitor the diffusion process of deuterium-labeled molecules in hardwood (Beech). The results are compared with previous data obtained on softwood (Sitka spruce) in order to consistently understand the state of order in cellulose of wood. The saturation accessibility and diffusion rate varied characteristically with the OH groups in different states of order in the wood substance, the diffusants, and the wood species, respectively. The variation of saturation accessibility should be associated with the fundamental difference of the fine structure such as the microfibrils in the wood substance. The effect of the anatomical cellular structure on the accessibility was reflected in the variation of the diffusion rate with the wood species. The size effect of the diffusants also played an important role for the diffusion process in wood. Since the volumetric percentage of wood fibers and wood rays is relatively similar, the dichroic effects due to the anisotropy of the cellulose chains were apparently diminished. Finally, we proposed a new interpretation of the fine structure of the microfibrils in the cell wall by comparing a series of results from hardwood and softwood. Each elementary fibril in the hardwood has a more homogeneous arrangement in the microfibrils compared to that in the softwood.

  16. The tritium labelling of organic molecules by heterogeneous catalytic exchange; El marcado de moleculas organicas con tritio por intercambio catalitico heterogeneo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angoso Marina, M.; Kaiser Ruiz del Olmo, F.

    1977-07-01

    The influence of the temperature at 65 degree centigree and 120 degree centigree on the labelling of three organic molecules with tritium was studied. The compounds were: benzoic acid, de phenyl glyoxal and 2,3-tetramethylene-4-pantothenyl-7-oxo diacetin.The method employed was the heterogeneous catalytic exchange between tritiated water and the organic compound. The purification was made by thin-layer chromatography and the concentration, purity and specific activity of the products were determined by counting and ultraviolet techniques. The thermal stability and the radiolytic effects on labelled benzoic acid were also considered. (Author) 9 refs.

  17. Hyperthermia-triggered intracellular delivery of anticancer agent to HER2(+) cells by HER2-specific affibody (ZHER2-GS-Cys)-conjugated thermosensitive liposomes (HER2(+) affisomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon; Lyakhov, Ilya; Loomis, Kristin; Needle, Danielle; Baxa, Ulrich; Yavlovich, Amichai; Capala, Jacek; Blumenthal, Robert; Puri, Anu

    2011-07-30

    We previously reported the formulation and physical properties of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)-specific affibody (ZHER2:342-Cys) conjugated thermosensitive liposomes (HER2(+)affisomes). Here we examined localized delivery potential of these affisomes by monitoring cellular interactions, intracellular uptake, and hyperthermia-induced effects on drug delivery. We modified ZHER2:342-Cys by introducing a glycine-serine spacer before the C-terminus cysteine (called ZHER2-GS-Cys) to achieve accessibility to cell surface expressed HER2. This modification did not affect HER2-specific binding and ZHER2-GS-Cys retained its ability to conjugate to the liposomes containing dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline: DSPE-PEG2000-Malemide, 96:04 mole ratios (HER2(+)affisomes). HER2(+)affisomes were either (i) fluorescently labeled with rhodamine-PE and calcein or (ii) loaded with an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Fluorescently labeled HER2(+) affisomes showed at least 10-fold increase in binding to HER2(+) cells (SK-BR-3) when compared to HER2(-) cells (MDA-MB-468) at 37°C. A competition experiment using free ZHER2-GS-Cys blocked HER2(+) affisome-SK-BR-3 cell associations. Imaging with confocal microscopy showed that HER2(+) affisomes accumulated in the cytosol of SK-BR-3 cells at 37°C. Hyperthermia-induced intracellular release experiments showed that the treatment of HER2(+) affisome/SK-BR-3 cell complexes with a 45°C (±1°C) pre-equilibrated buffer resulted in cytosolic delivery of calcein. Substantial calcein release was observed within 20min at 45°C, with no effect on cell viability under these conditions. Similarly, DOX-loaded HER2(+)affisomes showed at least 2- to 3-fold higher accumulation of DOX in SK-BR-3 cells as compared to control liposomes. DOX-mediated cytotoxicity was more pronounced in SK-BR-3 cells especially at lower doses of HER2(+)affisomes. Brief exposure of liposome-cell complexes at 45°C prior to the onset of incubations for cell

  18. Study on dipole-dipole interaction in spin labelled hemoglobin molecule by means of ESR spectroscopy; Badanie oddzialywan dipol-dipolowych w znakowanej spinowo czasteczce hemoglobiny metoda impulsowej spektroskopii EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostrzewa, A.; Froncisz, W. [Inst. Biologii Molekularnej, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Dipole-dipole interactions in spin labelled hemoglobin molecule have been investigated by means of ESR. The spectral differences at 77 K between oxy-hemoglobin and ferry hemoglobin have been discussed. 4 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  19. Analysis of the fluctuations of a single-tethered, quantum-dot labeled DNA molecule in shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laube, K; Guenther, K; Mertig, M, E-mail: michael.mertig@tu-dresden.de [Professur fuer Physikalische Chemie, Mess- und Sensortechnik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-05-11

    A novel technique for analyzing the conformational fluctuations of a single, surface-tethered DNA molecule by fluorescence microscopy is reported. Attaching a nanometer-sized fluorescent quantum dot to the free end of a {lambda}-phage DNA molecule allows us to study the fluctuations of a native DNA molecule without the mechanical properties being altered by fluorescent dye staining. We report on the investigation of single-tethered DNA in both the unperturbed and the shear flow induced stretched state. The dependence of the observed fractional extension and the magnitude of fluctuations on the shear rate can be qualitatively interpreted by Brochard's stem-and-flower model. The cyclic dynamics of a DNA molecule is directly observed in the shear flow experiment.

  20. Synthesis of organic substances labelled with {sup 14}C and {sup 35}S; Syntheses de molecules organiques marquees par le carbone-14 et le soufre-35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichat, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    After a brief history of the development of the Section des Molecules marquees of the Frenchmic Energy Commission, the author gives an outline of the synthesis of the following labelled compounds: benzene {sup 14}C-6; phenyl-p-fluorophenyl, thienyl-2 {beta} alanines {beta} {sup 14}C; noradrenaline {beta} {sup 14}C (arterenol {beta} {sup 14}C), dotriacontane {sup 14}C-16-17, aminoethane sulfinic acid (hypotaurine {sup 35}S). (author)Fren. [French] Apres un bref historique du developpement de la Section des Molecules marquees du Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique fran is, l'auteur donne un resume des syntheses des composes marques suivants: benzene {sup 14}C-6; phenyl-p-fluorophenyl, thienyl-2 {beta} alamines {beta} {sup 14}C; noradrenaline {beta} {sup 14}C (arterenol {beta} {sup 14}C), dotriacontane {sup 14}C-16-17, acide aminoethane sulfinique (hypotaurine {sup 35}S). (auteur)

  1. Single molecule FRET detection in CdSe-QD donor and Cy5-labeled molecular chaperone acceptor complex by imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Toshiro, E-mail: ttani@cc.tuat.ac.j [Division of Advanced Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Oda, Masaru [Division of Advanced Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Araki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi; Yohda, Masafumi [Division of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    We report single molecule spectroscopic evidence of FRET in CdSe quantum dot (QD) conjugated with Cy5-labeled molecular chaperone systems in buffer solutions. Donor QDs are core-shell type nanocrystals covered with organic surfactants on their outermost surfaces, i.e. CdSe/ZnS/TOPO's. As prototype molecular chaperones, we adopt prefoldins (PFDs), on which Cy5's are labeled as acceptors. Donor QDs possess two-fold degenerate emission dipoles perpendicular to the c-axis, due to their Wurtzite crystal structures, while acceptor Cy5's possess linear absorption and emission dipoles. Thus, their combination provides novel features to those in conventional FRET systems. PFDs are jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperones of group II chaperonins, which recognize hydrophobic portions of denatured proteins and encapsulate them within their central cavities. Hence, PFDs will also capture the CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs due to its surface similarity to the denatured proteins. By introducing simple microscope setup for single QD-PFD-Cy5 spectroscopy, we have successfully captured the emission spectra in FRET regime. We also have observed peculiar features in time evolution profiles of single QD emissions conjugated with Cy5-labeled PFDs under polarization modulation measurements. Notable point of our hybrid conjugates is that they are biochemically in living action. We describe our present results in relation to possible protein reactions.

  2. Whispering gallery mode bio-sensor for label-free detection of single molecules: thermo-optic vs. reactive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S; Shopova, S I; Holler, S

    2010-01-04

    Thermo-optic and reactive mechanisms for label-free sensing of bio-particles are compared theoretically for Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) resonators (sphere, toroid) formed from silica and stimulated into a first order equatorial mode. Although it has been expected that a thermo-optic mechanism should "greatly enhance" wavelength shift signals [A.M. Armani et al, Science 317, 783-787 (2007)] accompanying protein binding on a silica WGM cavity having high Q (10(8)), for a combination of wavelength (680 nm), drive power (1 mW), and cavity size (43 microm radius), our calculations find no such enhancement. The possible reasons for this disparity are discussed.

  3. Kinetic identification of protein ligands in a 51,200 small-molecule library using microarrays and a label-free ellipsometric scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, James P.; Proudian, Andrew P.; Malovichko, Galina; Zhu, Xiangdong

    2013-02-01

    Drug discovery begins by identifying protein-small molecule binding pairs. Afterwards, binding kinetics and biofunctional assays are performed, to reduce candidates for further development. High-throughput screening, typically employing fluorescence, is widely used to find protein ligands in small-molecule libraries, but is rarely used for binding kinetics measurement because: (1) attaching fluorophores to proteins can alter kinetics and (2) most label-free technologies for kinetics measurement are inherently low-throughput and consume expensive sensing surfaces. We addressed this need with polarization-modulated ellipsometric scanning microscopes, called oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD). Label-free ligand screening and kinetics measurement are performed simultaneously on small-molecule microarrays printed on relatively inexpensive isocyanate-functionalized glass slides. As a microarray is reacted, an OI-RD microscope tracks the change in surface-bound macromolecule density in real-time at every spot. We report progress applying OI-RD to screen purified proteins and virus particles against a 51,200-compound library from the National Cancer Institute. Four microarrays, each containing 12,800 library compounds, are installed in four flow cells in an automated OI-RD microscope. The slides are reacted serially, each giving 12,800 binding curves with ~30 sec time resolution. The entire library is kinetically screened against a single probe in ~14 hours and multiple probes can be reacted sequentially under automation. Real-time binding detection identifies both high-affinity and low-affinity (transient binding) interactions; fluorescence endpoint images miss the latter. OI-RD and microarrays together is a powerful high-throughput tool for early stage drug discovery and development. The platform also has great potential for downstream steps such as in vitro inhibition assays.

  4. Label-free liquid crystal biosensor for L-histidine: A DNAzyme-based platform for small molecule assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shuzhen; Ding, Huazhi; Wu, Yan; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a novel DNAzyme-based liquid crystal (LC) biosensor with high sensitivity for L-histidine, which is based on L-histidine-mediated formation of DNA duplexes by cleaving DNAzyme using L-histidine, resulting in a remarkable optical signal. Firstly, an optimal amount of capture probe is bound to the glass slide, which changes the surface topology as little as possible and shows a zero-background for the sensing system. When the DNAzyme molecule is cleaved by the target, L-histidine, a partial substrate strand is produced, which in turn can hybridize with the capture probe, forming a DNA duplex. The DNA duplexes induce LC molecules to undergo a homeotropic-to-tiled transition, obtaining a remarkable optical signal. The results show that the DNAzyme-based LC biosensor is highly sensitive to L-histidine with a detection limit of 50 nM. Compared with previously reported multi-step amplified methods, this newly designed assay system for L-histidine has no amplified procedures with comparable sensitivity. This method is an unprecedented example of DNAzyme-based LC biosensor for small molecules, which has potential to offer a DNAzyme-based LC model used in various targets.

  5. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  6. Deuterium-labelled N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) - inter-kingdom signalling molecules - synthesis, structural studies, and interactions with model lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubczyk, Dorota [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Barth, Christoph; Anastassacos, Frances; Koelsch, Patrick; Schepers, Ute [Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kubas, Adam; Fink, Karin [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Brenner-Weiss, Gerald [Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Braese, Stefan [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    N-Acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are synthesized by Gram-negative bacteria. These quorum-sensing molecules play an important role in the context of bacterial infection and biofilm formation. They also allow communication between microorganisms and eukaryotic cells (inter-kingdom signalling). However, very little is known about the entire mechanism of those interactions. Precise structural studies are required to analyse the different AHL isomers as only one form is biologically most active. Theoretical studies combined with experimental infrared and Raman spectroscopic data are therefore undertaken to characterise the obtained compounds. To mimic interactions between AHL and cell membranes, we studied the insertion of AHL in supported lipid bilayers, using vibrational sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy. Deuterium-labelled AHLs were thus synthesized. Starting from readily available deuterated fatty acids, a two-step procedure towards deuterated N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones with varying chain lengths is described. This included the acylation of Meldrum's acid followed by amidation. Additionally, the detailed analytical evaluation of the products is presented herein. (orig.)

  7. [A method for determining DNA sequence by labeling the end of the molecule and cleaving at the base. Isolation of DNA fragments, end-labeling, cleavage, electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel and analysis of results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxam, A M; Gilbert, W

    1986-01-01

    We elaborate basic chemical principles and current laboratory procedures for sequencing end-labeled DNA by partial cleavage and gel electrophoresis (A. M. Maxam and W. Gilbert, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1977, v. 74, p. 560-564). We provide step-by-step protocols for 32P-labeling DNA ends, segregating the labeled ends by cutting with a second restriction enzyme or separating strands, partially cleaving the DNA at specific bases with reagents, electrophoresing the labeled products of cleavage on sequencing gels, and interpreting sequencing band patterns. Many of these procedures have been condensed, to make them faster and easier, and some are new. We also discuss sequencing strategies, and suggest a technique which will reduce plasmid or viral DNA to a collection of singly-end-labeled fragments in one day, for efficient sequencing of these chromosomes in 250-nucleotide blocks.

  8. Novel Chemical Strategies for Labeling Small Molecule Ligands for Androgen, Progestin, and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors for Imaging Prostate and Breast Cancer and the Heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenellenbogen, John, A.

    2007-04-19

    Summary of Progress The specific aims of this project can be summarized as follows: • Aim 1: Prepare and evaluate radiolabeled ligands for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a new nuclear hormone receptor target for tumor imaging and hormone therapy. • Aim 2: Prepare steroids labeled with a cyclopentadienyl tricarbonyl technetium or rhenium unit. • Aim 3: Prepare and evaluate other organometallic systems of novel design as ligand mimics and halogenated ligands for nuclear hormone receptor-based tumor imaging. As is described in detail below, we made excellent progress on all three of these aims; the highlights of our progress are the following: • we have prepared the first fluorine-18 labeled analogs of ligands for the PPAR receptor and used these in tissue distribution studies in rats • we have developed three new methods for the synthesis of cyclopentadienyltricarbonyl rhenium and technetium (CpRe(CO)3 and CpTc(CO)3) systems and we have adapted these to the synthesis of steroids labeled with these metals, as well as ligands for other receptor systems • we have prepared a number of fluorine-18 labeled steroidal and non-steroidal androgens and measured their tissue distribution in rats • we have prepared iodine and bromine-labeled progestins with high progesterone receptor binding affinity • we have prepared inorganic metal tricarbonyl complexes and steroid receptor ligands in which the metal tricarbonyl unit is an integral part off the ligand core.

  9. In vitro evaluation of avidin antibody pretargeting using 211At-labeled and biotinylated poly-L-lysine as effector molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Sofia H L; Jensen, Holger Lau; Lindegren, Sture

    2010-01-01

    Pretargeting is an approach for enhancing the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapy by separating the administrations of tumor-targeting substance and radiolabel. In this study, a pretargeting model system of avidin-conjugated monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and biotinylated, (211)At-labeled po...

  10. Radiochemical quality control of phenobarbital, oxamniquine, amantadine and thalidomide molecules labelled with Technetium-99m; Controle de qualidade radioquimico das moleculas de fenobarbital, oxamniquine, amantadina e talidomida marcadas com tecnecio-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcia B.N. de; Correa, Rosane C.M.S.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria

    1996-07-01

    The quality control of radiopharmaceuticals is very important. When it is not carried out in can cause problems to the patient, as the necessity of the repetition of the examination and/or misinterpretation of the scintigraphic images. The chromatographic methods have good acceptance and can be used in paper, instant thin-layer chromatography and in gel. In this paper we show the chromatographic techniques applied to molecules labeled with technitium-99m (oxamniquine, phenobarbital, amantadine and thalidomide) used for research in our laboratory. (author)

  11. Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Food Labels KidsHealth > For Teens > Food Labels Print A ... have at least 95% organic ingredients. continue Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  12. Synthesis and in Vivo Biological Evaluation of (68)Ga-Labeled Carbonic Anhydrase IX Targeting Small Molecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Niemans, Raymon; Bauwens, Matthias; Yaromina, Ala; van Kuijk, Simon J A; Lieuwes, Natasja G; Biemans, Rianne; Pooters, Ivo; Pellegrini, Paul A; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Tonissen, Kathryn F; Supuran, Claudiu T; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-07-14

    Tumor hypoxia contributes resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, while oxygenated tumors are sensitive to these treatments. The indirect detection of hypoxic tumors is possible by targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), an enzyme overexpressed in hypoxic tumors, with sulfonamide-based imaging agents. In this study, we present the design and synthesis of novel gallium-radiolabeled small-molecule sulfonamides targeting CA IX. The compounds display favorable in vivo pharmacokinetics and stability. We demonstrate that our lead compound, [(68)Ga]-2, discriminates CA IX-expressing tumors in vivo in a mouse xenograft model using positron emission tomography (PET). This compound shows specific tumor accumulation and low uptake in blood and clears intact to the urine. These findings were reproduced in a second study using PET/computed tomography. Small molecules investigated to date utilizing (68)Ga for preclinical CA IX imaging are scarce, and this is one of the first effective (68)Ga compounds reported for PET imaging of CA IX.

  13. Nanosecond to submillisecond dynamics in dye-labeled single-stranded DNA, as revealed by ensemble measurements and photon statistics at single-molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Takahiro; Ito, Syoji; Iwai, Shigenori; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2009-10-22

    Single-molecule and ensemble time-resolved fluorescence measurements were applied for the investigation of the conformational dynamics of single-stranded DNA, ssDNA, connected with a fluorescein dye by a C6 linker, where the motions both of DNA and the C6 linker affect the geometry of the system. From the ensemble measurement of the fluorescence quenching via photoinduced electron transfer with a guanine base in the DNA sequence, three main conformations were found in aqueous solution: a conformation unaffected by the guanine base in the excited state lifetime of fluorescein, a conformation in which the fluorescence is dynamically quenched in the excited-state lifetime, and a conformation leading to rapid quenching via nonfluorescent complex. The analysis by using the parameters acquired from the ensemble measurements for interphoton time distribution histograms and FCS autocorrelations by the single-molecule measurement revealed that interconversion in these three conformations took place with two characteristic time constants of several hundreds of nanoseconds and tens of microseconds. The advantage of the combination use of the ensemble measurements with the single-molecule detections for rather complex dynamic motions is discussed by integrating the experimental results with those obtained by molecular dynamics simulation.

  14. Radiation dosimetry and first therapy results with a {sup 124}I/{sup 131}I-labeled small molecule (MIP-1095) targeting PSMA for prostate cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zechmann, Christian M.; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Mier, Walter [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Armor, Tom; Joyal, John [Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Boston, MA (United States); Stubbs, James B. [Radiation Dosimetry Systems RDS, Inc., Apharetta, GA (United States); Hadaschik, Boris [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopka, Klaus [Division Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Babich, John W. [Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Boston, MA (United States); Cornell University, Division of Radiopharmacy, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Since the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is frequently over-expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) several PSMA-targeting molecules are under development to detect and treat metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We investigated the tissue kinetics of a small molecule inhibitor of PSMA ((S)-2-(3-((S)-1-carboxy-5-(3-(4-[{sup 124}I]iodophenyl)ureido)pentyl)ureido) pentan edioicacid; MIP-1095) using PET/CT to estimate radiation dosimetry for the potential therapeutic use of {sup 131}I-MIP-1095 in men with mCRPC. We also report preliminary safety and efficacy of the first 28 consecutive patients treated under a compassionate-use protocol with a single cycle of {sup 131}I-MIP-1095. Sixteen patients with known prostate cancer underwent PET/CT imaging after i.v. administration of {sup 124}I-MIP-1095 (mean activity: 67.4 MBq). Each patient was scanned using PET/CT up to five times at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h post injection. Volumes of interest were defined for tumor lesions and normal organs at each time point followed by dose calculations using the OLINDA/EXM software. Twenty-eight men with mCRPC were treated with a single cycle of {sup 131}I-MIP-1095 (mean activity: 4.8 GBq, range 2 to 7.2 GBq) and followed for safety and efficacy. Baseline and follow up examinations included a complete blood count, liver and kidney function tests, and measurement of serum PSA. I-124-MIP-1095 PET/CT images showed excellent tumor uptake and moderate uptake in liver, proximal intestine and within a few hours post-injection also in the kidneys. High uptake values were observed only in salivary and lacrimal glands. Dosimetry estimates for I-131-MIP-1095 revealed that the highest absorbed doses were delivered to the salivary glands (3.8 mSv/MBq), liver (1.7 mSv/MBq) and kidneys (1.4 mSv/MBq). The absorbed dose calculated for the red marrow was 0.37 mSv/MBq. PSA values decreased by >50 % in 60.7 % of the men treated. Of men with bone pain, 84.6 % showed complete or

  15. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... choices, but the nutritional content of food products may not always be clear to consumers, nutrition labeling can contribute to making the nutritional content more transparent, thus reducing the frequency of unhealthy choices. Nutrition labeling is sometimes also motivated by consumers’ right to know......, implying that the availability of information on the nutritional content on food products is of value in itself, no matter how this impacts consumer choices. Another argument for nutrition labeling is that making information about nutritional content transparent will lead to healthier products, partly...

  16. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antaris, Alexander L; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K; Alamparambil, Zita R; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (∼90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)-a clinically approved NIR-I dye-in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ∼4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery.

  17. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antaris, Alexander L.; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K.; Alamparambil, Zita R.; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (~90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)--a clinically approved NIR-I dye--in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ~4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery.

  18. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  19. A systematic investigation of differential effects of cell culture substrates on the extent of artifacts in single-molecule tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required.

  20. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  1. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  2. Use of 3-[18F]fluoropropanesulfonyl chloride as a prosthetic agent for the radiolabelling of amines: Investigation of precursor molecules, labelling conditions and enzymatic stability of the corresponding sulfonamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik Löser

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available 3-[18F]Fluoropropanesulfonyl chloride, a recently proposed prosthetic agent for fluorine-18 labelling, was prepared in a two-step radiosynthesis via 3-[18F]fluoropropyl thiocyanate as an intermediate. Two benzenesulfonate-based radiolabelling precursors were prepared by various routes. Comparing the reactivities of 3-thiocyanatopropyl nosylate and the corresponding tosylate towards [18F]fluoride the former proved to be superior accounting for labelling yields of up to 85%. Conditions for a reliable transformation of 3-[18F]fluoropropyl thiocyanate to the corresponding sulfonyl chloride with the potential for automation have been identified. The reaction of 3-[18F]fluoropropanesulfonyl chloride with eight different aliphatic and aromatic amines was investigated and the identity of the resulting 18F-labelled sulfonamides was confirmed chromatographically by comparison with their nonradioactive counterparts. Even for weakly nucleophilic amines such as 4-nitroaniline the desired radiolabelled sulfonamides were accessible in satisfactory yields owing to systematic variation of the reaction conditions. With respect to the application of the 18F-fluoropropansulfonyl group to the labelling of compounds relevant as imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET, the stability of N-(4-fluorophenyl-3-fluoropropanesulfonamide against degradation catalysed by carboxylesterase was investigated and compared to that of the analogous fluoroacetamide.

  3. On Online Labeling with Polynomially Many Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babka, Martin; Bulánek, Jan; Cunat, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    In the online labeling problem with parameters n and m we are presented with a sequence of nkeys from a totally ordered universe U and must assign each arriving key a label from the label set {1,2,…,m} so that the order of labels (strictly) respects the ordering on U. As new keys arrive it may be...

  4. Fibrinogen labelling with I-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seminario, C.; Capillo, T.; Montanez, J. (Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima)

    1983-05-01

    Of the different techniques of labelling liophylized human fibrinogen, the technique of mono-chloride with modified iodine was selected. The labelling of the molecule was performed in alkali media of buffalo glycine in which the solution of stable iodine will react as well as on a later stage will the radioactive isotope. The labelling processes which were undertaken with different activities had an efficiency of over 40%; when purification with resins amberlite was carried through, in none of the cases were the impurities over 5%. Daily controls till the seventh day showed that the average values of radiochemical purity decrease were lower than 1%. The specific activity as well as the concentration of I/sup 131/, the fibrinogen and other characteristics come up to the norms of the pharmacopoeia which are applied.

  5. Enumerating molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  6. Labeling of creatinine with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurt Lambrecht, F. [Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications, Inst. of Nuclear Sciences; Durkan, K. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Buca, Izmir (Turkey). Chemistry Technicianship Program, Izmir Vocational School; Soylu, A. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Narlidere, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty

    2004-07-01

    Creatinine is a clinically important index of renal glomerular filtration rate. Urine creatinine levels can be used as a screening test to evaluate kidney function or can be part of the creatinine clearance test. In case of kidney dysfunction or muscle disorders the creatinine concentration in serum/plasma may rise to a higher value than in healthy body. Technetium- 99m has been used in nuclear medicine and in biomedical research to label molecular and cellular structures employed as radiotracers. {sup 99m}Tc is utilized to label molecules and cells, used as radiopharmaceuticals, and also to label biological species. It presents many desirable characteristics. SnCl{sub 2} method is frequently used as a reducing agent in the {sup 99m}Tc- labeling process. Creatinine metabolism might be investigated by using labeled {sup 99m}Tc- creatinine in healthy or uremic rats. (orig.)

  7. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Tynan, Christopher J; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation). Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion.

  8. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation. Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion.

  9. 99mTc: Labeling Chemistry and Labeled Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, R.; Abram, U.

    This chapter reviews the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of technetium related to the synthesis of perfusion agents and to the labeling of receptor-binding biomolecules. To understand the limitations of technetium chemistry imposed by future application of the complexes in nuclear medicine, an introductory section analyzes the compulsory requirements to be considered when facing the incentive of introducing a novel radiopharmaceutical into the market. Requirements from chemistry, routine application, and market are discussed. In a subsequent section, commercially available 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals are treated. It covers the complexes in use for imaging the most important target organs such as heart, brain, or kidney. The commercially available radiopharmaceuticals fulfill the requirements outlined earlier and are discussed with this background. In a following section, the properties and perspectives of the different generations of radiopharmaceuticals are described in a general way, covering characteristics for perfusion agents and for receptor-specific molecules. Technetium chemistry for the synthesis of perfusion agents and the different labeling approaches for target-specific biomolecules are summarized. The review comprises a general introduction to the common approaches currently in use, employing the N x S4-x , [3+1] and 2-hydrazino-nicotinicacid (HYNIC) method as well as more recent strategies such as the carbonyl and the TcN approach. Direct labeling without the need of a bifunctional chelator is briefly reviewed as well. More particularly, recent developments in the labeling of concrete targeting molecules, the second generation of radiopharmaceuticals, is then discussed and prominent examples with antibodies/peptides, neuroreceptor targeting small molecules, myocardial imaging agents, vitamins, thymidine, and complexes relevant to multidrug resistance are given. In addition, a new approach toward peptide drug development is described. The section

  10. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  11. [Role of rapid movement of spin labels in interpreting EPR spectra for spin-labelled macromolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol'skiĭ, D O; Timofeev, V P

    2003-01-01

    The method of spin labeling was used to monitor quick movements of side residues in protein monocrystals. The EPR spectra of monocrystals of spin-labeled lysozyme at different orientations of the tetrahonal crystal relative to the direction of the magnetic field were interpreted using the molecular dynamics method. A simple model was proposed, which enables one to calculate the trajectory of movements of the spin label by the molecular dynamic method over a relatively short period of time. The entire "frozen" protein molecule and a "defrozen" spin-labeled amino acid residue were considered in the framework of the model. To calculate the trajectories in vacuum, a model of spin-labeled lysozyme was constructed, and the parameters of force potentials for the atoms of the protein molecule and the spin label were specified. It follows from the calculations that the protein environment sterically hinders the range of eventual angular reorientations of the reporter NO-group of nitroxyl incorporated into the spin label, thereby affecting the shape of the EPR spectrum. However, the scatter in the positions of the reporter group in the angular space turned out to correspond to the Gauss distribution. Using the atomic coordinates of the spin label, obtained in a chosen time interval by the method of molecular dynamics, and taking into account the distribution of the states of the spin label in the ensemble of spin-labeled macromolecules in the crystal, we simulated the EPR spectra of monocrystals of spin-labeled lysozyme. The theoretical EPR spectra coincide well with the experimental.

  12. A single-arm, open-label, phase 2 clinical trial evaluating disease response following treatment with BI-505, a human anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichert, Stina; Juliusson, Gunnar; Johansson, Åsa; Sonesson, Elisabeth; Teige, Ingrid; Wickenberg, Anna Teige; Frendeus, Björn; Korsgren, Magnus; Hansson, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Background Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an indolent disease stage, considered to represent the transition phase from the premalignant MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) state towards symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). Even though this diagnosis provides an opportunity for early intervention, few treatment studies have been done and the current standard of care is observation until progression. BI-505, a monoclonal antibody directed against intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) with promising anti-myeloma activity in preclinical trials, is a possible treatment approach for this patient category with potential to eliminate tumor cells with minimal long-term side effects. BI-505 was well tolerated in an earlier phase 1 trial. Methods and findings In this phase 2 trial the effects of BI-505 in patients with SMM were studied. Four patients were enrolled and three of them completed the first cycle of treatment defined as 5 doses of BI-505, a total of 43 mg/kg BW, over a 7-week period. In the three evaluable patients, BI-505 showed a benign safety profile. None of the patients achieved a response as defined per protocol. EudraCT number: 2012-004884-29. Conclusions The study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety and pharmacodynamics of BI-505 in patients with SMM. BI-505 showed no clinically relevant efficacy on disease activity in these patients with SMM, even if well tolerated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01838369. PMID:28158311

  13. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossum, R.T. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  14. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  15. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  16. Fluorescent-labeled ligands for the benzodiazepine receptor - Part 1 : Synthesis and characterization of fluorescent-labeled benzodiazepines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MJ; Hulst, R; Kellogg, RM; Hendriks, MMWB; Ensing, K; De Zeeuw, RA

    2000-01-01

    Because radioactive labeled ligands in receptor assays have several disadvantages, we synthesized a number of fluorescent-labeled benzodiazepines. Several fluorophores were attached at different positions of 1,4-benzodiazepine molecules in order to assess the impact of the fluorophores and their cou

  17. Small Molecules Target Carcinogenic Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2009-03-01

    An ingenious cellular mechanism of effecting protein localization is prenylation: the covalent attachment of a hydrophobic prenyl group to a protein that facilitates protein association with cell membranes. Fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate whether the oncogenic Stat3 protein can undergo artificial prenylation via high-affinity prenylated small-molecule binding agents and thus be rendered inactive by localization at the plasma membrane instead of nucleus. The measurements were performed on a home-built instrument capable of recording simultaneously several optical parameters (lifetime, polarization, color, etc) and with single-molecule sensitivity. A pH-invariant fluorescein derivative with double moiety was designed to bridge a prenyl group and a small peptide that binds Stat3 with high affinity. Confocal fluorescence images show effective localization of the ligand to the membrane of liposomes. Stat3 predominantly localizes at the membrane only in the presence of the prenylated ligand. Single-molecule FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) between donor-labeled prenylated agents and acceptor-labeled, surface tethered Stat3 protein is used to determine the dynamic heterogeneity of the protein-ligand interaction and follow individual binding-unbinding events in real time. The data indicates that molecules can effect protein localization, validating a therapeutic design that influences protein activity via induced localization.

  18. Labeling Schemes with Queries

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    We study the question of ``how robust are the known lower bounds of labeling schemes when one increases the number of consulted labels''. Let $f$ be a function on pairs of vertices. An $f$-labeling scheme for a family of graphs $\\cF$ labels the vertices of all graphs in $\\cF$ such that for every graph $G\\in\\cF$ and every two vertices $u,v\\in G$, the value $f(u,v)$ can be inferred by merely inspecting the labels of $u$ and $v$. This paper introduces a natural generalization: the notion of $f$-...

  19. Hadron Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Thomas; Faessler, Amand; Lee, Ian Woo; Lyubovitskij, Valery E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a possible interpretation of the open charm mesons $D_{s0}^*(2317)$, $D_{s1}(2460)$ and the hidden charm mesons X(3872), Y(3940) and Y(4140) as hadron molecules. Using a phenomenological Lagrangian approach we review the strong and radiative decays of the $D_{s0}^* (2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ states. The X(3872) is assumed to consist dominantly of molecular hadronic components with an additional small admixture of a charmonium configuration. Determing the radiative ($\\gamma J/\\psi$ and $\\gamma \\psi(2s)$) and strong ($J/\\psi 2\\pi $ and $ J/\\psi 3\\pi$) decay modes we show that present experimental observation is consistent with the molecular structure assumption of the X(3872). Finally we give evidence for molecular interpretations of the Y(3940) and Y(4140) related to the observed strong decay modes $J/\\psi + \\omega$ or $J/\\psi + \\phi$, respectively.

  20. Fluorescent Labeling of Nanometer Hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan ZHANG; Yuan YUAN; Changsheng LIU

    2008-01-01

    A novel surface treatment method using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AMPTES), was developed to immobilize the fluorescein molecule on nano-HAP (nanometer hydroxyapatite) powders. By pretreating the nano-HAP powders surface with AMPTES, fluorescein, chosen on the basis of the chemical structure of the nano- HAP powders, could be bound to the nano-HAP powders surface. The chemical compositions of nano-HAP before and after being labeled were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology, phase composition, and the fluorescence characteristics of the nano-HAP powders with and without staining were also investigated. The FTIR and XPS results revealed that fiuorescein had been successfully immobilized on the surface of AMPTES-bound nano-HAP powders via the acylamide bond formation between the -COOH of fluorescein and the -NH2 of AMPTES. The labeled nano-HAP powders possessed strong fluorescent intensity with a little deviation from the maximum emission wavelength of fluorescein. But the morphology and phase composition had no obvious alteration. Under fluorescence microscopy, the labeled nano-HAP powders., even after 24 h cell incubation, exhibited strong fluorescence.

  1. Succesful labelling schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2001-01-01

    It is usual practice to evaluate the success of a labelling scheme by looking at the awareness percentage, but in many cases this is not sufficient. The awareness percentage gives no indication of which of the consumer segments that are aware of and use labelling schemes and which do not. In the ......It is usual practice to evaluate the success of a labelling scheme by looking at the awareness percentage, but in many cases this is not sufficient. The awareness percentage gives no indication of which of the consumer segments that are aware of and use labelling schemes and which do not....... In the spring of 2001 MAPP carried out an extensive consumer study with special emphasis on the Nordic environmentally friendly label 'the swan'. The purpose was to find out how much consumers actually know and use various labelling schemes. 869 households were contacted and asked to fill in a questionnaire...... it into consideration when I go shopping. The respondent was asked to pick the most suitable answer, which described her use of each label. 29% - also called 'the labelling blind' - responded that they basically only knew the recycling label and the Government controlled organic label 'Ø-mærket'. Another segment of 6...

  2. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  3. Group specific internal standard technology (GSIST) for simultaneous identification and quantification of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, Jiri; Yang, Wen-Chu; Regnier, Fred E

    2014-01-14

    Reagents and methods are provided that permit simultaneous analysis of multiple diverse small molecule analytes present in a complex mixture. Samples are labeled with chemically identical but isotopically distince forms of the labeling reagent, and analyzed using mass spectrometry. A single reagent simultaneously derivatizes multiple small molecule analytes having different reactive functional groups.

  4. From Label to Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrkjeflot, Haldor; Strandgaard, Jesper; Svejenova, Silviya

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the process of creation of new Nordic cuisine (NNC) as a culinary innovation, focusing on the main stages, actors, and mechanisms that shaped the new label and its practices and facilitated its diffusion in the region and internationally. Fast-paced diffusion was possible...... because NNC was conceived as an identity movement, triggered by active involvement of entrepreneurial leaders from the culinary profession, high-profile political supporters, legitimating scientists, disseminating media, and interpreting audiences. It was facilitated by three mechanisms: First, the use...... actors and institutions to develop practices associated with the NNC label. Third, organized dissemination allowed the excitement and engagement with the new label to spread quickly....

  5. FDA Online Label Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The drug labels and other drug-specific information on this Web site represent the most recent drug listing information companies have submitted to the Food and Drug...

  6. Behind the Label "Alcoholic."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Deborah M.

    1989-01-01

    Relates individual's personal story of her childhood influenced by her parent's alcoholism, her own alcoholism as a young adult, and her experiences with counseling. Asks others not to reject her because of the label "alcoholic." (ABL)

  7. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim;

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  8. Stereoselective synthesis of stable-isotope-labeled amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Lodwig, S.N. [Centralia College, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    For magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopies to reach their full potential, they must be used in combination with sophisticated site-specific stable isotope labeling of biological macromolecules. Labeled amino acids are required for the study of the structure and function of enzymes and proteins. Because there are 20 common amino acids, each with its own distinguishing chemistry, they remain a synthetic challenge. The Oppolzer chiral auxiliary provides a general tool with which to approach the synthesis of labeled amino acids. By using the Oppolzer auxiliary, amino acids can be constructed from several small molecules, which is ideal for stable isotope labeling. In addition to directing the stereochemistry at the {alpha}-carbon, the camphorsultam can be used for stereo-specific isotope labeling at prochiral centers in amino acids. By using the camphorsultam auxiliary we have the potential to synthesize virtually any isotopomer of all of the common amino acids.

  9. The role of the fast motion of the spin label in the interpretation of EPR spectra for spin-labeled macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Vladimir P; Nikolsky, Dmitriy O

    2003-12-01

    The spin label method was used to observe the nature of the fast motions of side chains in protein monocrystals. The EPR spectra of spin-labeled lysozyme monocrystals (with different orientations of the tetragonal protein crystal in relation to the direction of the magnetic field) were interpreted using the method of molecular dynamics (MD). Within the proposed simple model, MD calculations of the spin label motion trajectories are performed in a reasonable real time. The model regards the protein molecule as frozen as a whole and the spin-labeled amino acid residue as unfrozen. To calculate the trajectories in vacuum, a model of spin-labeled lysozyme was assembled, and the parameters of the force fields were specified for atoms of the protein molecule, including the spin label. The calculations show that the protein environment sterically limits the area of the possible angular reorientations for the NO reporter group of the nitroxide (within the spin label), and this, in turn, affects the shape of the EPR spectrum. However, it turned out that the spread in the positions of the reporter group in the angle space strictly adheres to the Gaussian distribution. Using the coordinates of the spin label atoms obtained by the MD method within a selected time range and considering the distribution of the spin label states over the ensemble of spin-labeled macromolecules in a crystal, the EPR spectra of spin-labeled lysozyme monocrystals were simulated. The resultant theoretical EPR spectra appeared to be similar to experimental ones.

  10. A fluorescent-labeled microcystin-LR terbium cryptate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eduardo J.A. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: edualec@oi.com.br; Vila Nova, Suzana P.; Alves-Junior, Severino; Santa-Cruz, Petrus [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Fundamental; Molica, Renato J.R. [Associacao Instituto de Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Teixeira, Antonio [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Malageno, Elizabete; Lima Filho, Jose L. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Lab. de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami

    2006-03-15

    A new fluorescent labeled compound of microcystin-LR with terbium cryptate was obtained by initial conjugation of microcystins-LR with aminoethanethiol followed by the reaction with the ester group of terbium cryptate. The product formation was followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at 238 nm and 310 nm. The presence of microcystin-LR in the labeled molecule was confirmed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay ELISA and by protein reaction with bicinhonic acid. Luminescence spectra of cryptate and the conjugated molecule were carried through as well. (author)

  11. European consumers and nutrition labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Josephine M.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Celemín, Laura Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labelling of food in Europe is not compulsory, unless a nutrition or health claim is made for the product. The European Commission is proposing mandatory nutrition labelling, even front of pack labelling with nutrition information. Yet, how widespread is nutrition labelling in the EU...

  12. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    We consider distance labeling schemes for trees: given a tree with n nodes, label the nodes with binary strings such that, given the labels of any two nodes, one can determine, by looking only at the labels, the distance in the tree between the two nodes. A lower bound by Gavoille et al. [Gavoill...

  13. Performance limitations of label-free sensors in molecular diagnosis using complex samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    Label-free biosensors promised a paradigm involving direct detection of biomarkers from complex samples such as serum without requiring multistep sample processing typical of labelled methods such as ELISA or immunofluorescence assays. Label-free sensors have witnessed decades of development with a veritable zoo of techniques available today exploiting a multitude of physical effects. It is appropriate now to critically assess whether label-free technologies have succeeded in delivering their promise with respect to diagnostic applications, particularly, ambitious goals such as early cancer detection using serum biomarkers, which require low limits of detection (LoD). Comparison of nearly 120 limits of detection (LoD) values reported by labelled and label-free sensing approaches over a wide range of detection techniques and target molecules in serum revealed that labeled techniques achieve 2-3 orders of magnitude better LoDs. Data from experiments where labelled and label-free assays were performed simultaneously using the same assay parameters also confirm that the LoD achieved by labelled techniques is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude better than that by label-free techniques. Furthermore, label-free techniques required significant signal amplification, for e.g. using nanoparticle conjugated secondary antibodies, to achieve LoDs comparable to labelled methods substantially deviating from the original "direct detection" paradigm. This finding has important implications on the practical limits of applying label-free detection methods for molecular diagnosis.

  14. Semantic Role Labeling

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Martha; Xue, Nianwen

    2011-01-01

    This book is aimed at providing an overview of several aspects of semantic role labeling. Chapter 1 begins with linguistic background on the definition of semantic roles and the controversies surrounding them. Chapter 2 describes how the theories have led to structured lexicons such as FrameNet, VerbNet and the PropBank Frame Files that in turn provide the basis for large scale semantic annotation of corpora. This data has facilitated the development of automatic semantic role labeling systems based on supervised machine learning techniques. Chapter 3 presents the general principles of applyin

  15. Labeling of Patient Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    noted during the event that the actu.al number of near miss incidmts reported monthly was low due to laboratory personnel performing rounds each...specimens never leaves label and if moved it is labeled), All orders in system and all near misses and errors reported to patient safety Purchase/Install...Meeting 14 Aug 09, 1400 in lab break room thru out Develop TICK sheet to track near misses .JDI Ms. Clark Clinics will provide toPS 1st working day of

  16. 18F-Labeling Using Click Cycloadditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Kettenbach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to expanding applications of positron emission tomography (PET there is a demand for developing new techniques to introduce fluorine-18 (t1/2=109.8 min. Considering that most novel PET tracers are sensitive biomolecules and that direct introduction of fluorine-18 often needs harsh conditions, the insertion of 18F in those molecules poses an exceeding challenge. Two major challenges during 18F-labeling are a regioselective introduction and a fast and high yielding way under mild conditions. Furthermore, attention has to be paid to functionalities, which are usually present in complex structures of the target molecule. The Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and several copper-free click reactions represent such methods for radiolabeling of sensitive molecules under the above-mentioned criteria. This minireview will provide a quick overview about the development of novel 18F-labeled prosthetic groups for click cycloadditions and will summarize recent trends in copper-catalyzed and copper-free click 18F-cycloadditions.

  17. Figuring Out Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should get 30%-40% of calories from fat. Saturated Fat and Trans Fat The amount of saturated fat appears beneath total fat. The FDA also requires ... to list trans fats separately on the label. Saturated fats and trans fats are often called "bad fats" ...

  18. Labelled Execution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    This is most starkly evident in the classical example used to demonstrate that, in the case of infinitely branching systems, a transfinite number of... transfinite number of iterations to converge, what can be shown to fail by appropriately embedding the labelled transition systems of [46, prop. 10.5

  19. Multi-label

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Abdelhamid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Generating multi-label rules in associative classification (AC from single label data sets is considered a challenging task making the number of existing algorithms for this task rare. Current AC algorithms produce only the largest frequency class connected with a rule in the training data set and discard all other classes even though these classes have data representation with the rule’s body. In this paper, we deal with the above problem by proposing an AC algorithm called Enhanced Multi-label Classifiers based Associative Classification (eMCAC. This algorithm discovers rules associated with a set of classes from single label data that other current AC algorithms are unable to induce. Furthermore, eMCAC minimises the number of extracted rules using a classifier building method. The proposed algorithm has been tested on a real world application data set related to website phishing and the results reveal that eMCAC’s accuracy is highly competitive if contrasted with other known AC and classic classification algorithms in data mining. Lastly, the experimental results show that our algorithm is able to derive new rules from the phishing data sets that end-users can exploit in decision making.

  20. Waisda?: video labeling game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrand, M.; Brinkerink, M.; Gligorov, R.; Steenbergen, M. van; Huijkman, J.; Oomen, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Waisda? video labeling game is a crowsourcing tool to collect user-generated metadata for video clips. It follows the paradigm of games-with-a-purpose, where two or more users play against each other by entering tags that describe the content of the video. Players score points by entering the sa

  1. Single molecules in soft matter : a study of biomolecular conformation, heterogeneity and plasmon enhanced fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Haifeng

    2013-01-01

    We study the dynamics of single molecules and individual gold nanorods in glycerol at variable temperatures. We demonstrate temperature-cycle microscopy on FRET-labeled polyproline and double-stranded DNA molecules to access micro-second dynamics of single molecules, and reveal the influences of dye

  2. Fluorine-18 radiochemistry, labeling strategies and synthetic routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Orit; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-21

    Fluorine-18 is the most frequently used radioisotope in positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals in both clinical and preclinical research. Its physical and nuclear characteristics (97% β(+) decay, 109.7 min half-life, 635 keV positron energy), along with high specific activity and ease of large scale production, make it an attractive nuclide for radiochemical labeling and molecular imaging. Versatile chemistry including nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions allows direct or indirect introduction of (18)F into molecules of interest. The significant increase in (18)F radiotracers for PET imaging accentuates the need for simple and efficient (18)F-labeling procedures. In this review, we will describe the current radiosynthesis routes and strategies for (18)F labeling of small molecules and biomolecules.

  3. Tritiation of protein hormones. Progress report. [Stability of tritium-labelled protein hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    A non-catalytic tritium exchange system using a microwave discharge technique was bult and calibrated in order to optomize the labelling of small organic molecules such as benzoic acid. Analytical and preparative chromatographic procedures, including ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were standardized for use in the publication of tritium and labelled bovine ACTH. Results are reported from extensive studies of the control of chemical and biologic stability of labelled and unlabelled ACTH were carried out.

  4. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  5. Labelling GM-free Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Punt, Maarten; Venus, Thomas; Wesseler, Justus

    2016-01-01

    Food suppliers in the EU must comply with labelling regulations for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). However, excluded from mandatory labelling are food products derived from animals fed with GM feed (mainly GM soybean in the EU). Because of this labelling exemption, consumers are unable to...

  6. Scaffolding Visitors' Learning through Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joyce; Yoon, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In museum literature, labels have been found to increase visitor learning and contribute to greater cognitive gains. In this study, we seek to understand how various labels support the visitors' learning experience, and specifically in regards to conceptual and cognitive learning. We investigated the increasing use of three types of labels (visual…

  7. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My World From the Label to the Table! Food Labels Tell the Story! What is in food? Food provides your body with all of the ... your food choices. Nutrition Facts—the Labels on Food Products Beginning in 1994, the US government began ...

  8. Diamond based single molecule magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, J -M; Plenio, M B; Retzker, A

    2011-01-01

    The detection of a nuclear spin in an individual molecule represents a key challenge in physics and biology whose solution has been pursued for many years. The small magnetic moment of a single nucleus and the unavoidable environmental noise present the key obstacles for its realization. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond can be used to construct a nano-scale single molecule spectrometer that is capable of detecting the position and spin state of a single nucleus and can determine the distance and alignment of a nuclear or electron spin pair. In combination with organic spin labels, this device will find applications in single molecule spectroscopy in chemistry and biology, such as in determining protein structure or monitoring macromolecular motions and can thus provide a tool to help unravelling the microscopic mechanisms underlying bio-molecular function.

  9. Glycoprotein labeling with click chemistry (GLCC) and carbohydrate detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Huang, Xinyi; Burton, Andrew J; Swift, Karl A D

    2015-08-14

    Molecular labeling and detection techniques are essential to research in life science. Here, a method for glycoprotein labeling/carbohydrate detection through glycan replacement, termed glycoprotein labeling with click chemistry (GLCC), is described. In this method, a glycoprotein is first treated with specific glycosidases to remove certain sugar residues, a procedure that creates acceptor sites for a specific glycosyltransferase. A 'clickable' monosaccharide is then installed onto these sites by the glycosyltransferase. This modified glycoprotein is then conjugated to a reporter molecule using a click chemistry reaction. For glycoproteins that already contain vacant glycosylation sites, deglycosylation is not needed before the labeling step. As a demonstration, labeling on fetal bovine fetuin, mouse immunoglobulin IgG and bacterial expressed human TNFα and TNFβ are shown. Compared to traditional ways of protein labeling, labeling at glycosylation sites with GLCC is considerably more specific and less likely to have adverse effects, and, when utilized as a method for carbohydrate detection, this method is also highly specific and sensitive.

  10. Map labeling and its generalizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddi, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Marathe, M.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mirzaian, A. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Computer Science; Moret, B.M.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Zhu, B. [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Map labeling is of fundamental importance in cartography and geographical information systems and is one of the areas targeted for research by the ACM Computational Geometry Impact Task Force. Previous work on map labeling has focused on the problem of placing maximal uniform, axis-aligned, disjoint rectangles on the plane so that each point feature to be labeled lies at the corner of one rectangle. Here, we consider a number of variants of the map labeling problem. We obtain three general types of results. First, we devise constant-factor polynomial-time-approximation algorithms for labeling point features by rectangular labels, where the feature may lie anywhere on the boundary of its label region and where labeling rectangles may be placed in any orientation. These results generalize to the case of elliptical labels. Secondly, we consider the problem of labeling a map consisting of disjoint rectilinear fine segments. We obtain constant-factor polynomial-time approximation algorithms for the general problem and an optimal algorithm for the special case where all segments are horizontal. Finally, we formulate a bicriteria version of the map-labeling problem and provide bicriteria polynomial- time approximation schemes for a number of such problems.

  11. Linerless label device and method

    KAUST Repository

    Binladen, Abdulkari

    2016-01-14

    This apparatus and method for applying a linerless label to an end user product includes a device with a printer for printing on a face surface of a linerless label, and a release coat applicator for applying a release coat to the face surface of the label; another device including an unwinder unit (103) to unwind a roll of printed linerless label; a belt (108); a glue applicator (102) for applying glue to the belt; a nip roller (106) for contacting and applying pressure to the face surface of the linerless label such that the glue on the belt transfers to the back surface of the linerless label; at least one slitting knife 105) positioned downstream the belt and a rewinder unit (104) positioned downstream the slitting knife; and a third device which die cuts and applies the linerless label to an end user object.

  12. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  13. MHC class I molecules are enriched in caveolae but do not enter with simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H A; Chen, Y; Norkin, L C

    1998-06-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) binds to MHC class I molecules anywhere on the cell surface and then enters through caveolae. The fate of class I molecules after SV40 binding is not known. Sensitivity of 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules to papain cleavage was used to distinguish internalized class I molecules from class I molecules remaining at the cell surface. Whereas the caveolae-enriched membrane microdomain was found to also be enriched for class I molecules, no internalized papain-resistant 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules could be detected at any time in either control cells or in cells preadsorbed with saturating amounts of SV40. Instead, 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules, as well as preadsorbed 125I-labelled anti-class I antibodies, accumulated in the medium, coincident with the turnover of class I molecules at the cell surface. The class I heavy chains that accumulated in the medium were truncated and their release was specifically prevented by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline. Thus, whereas class I molecules mediate SV40 binding, they do not appear to mediate SV40 entry.

  14. Radio labeling with pre-assigned frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, H.L.; Broersma, H.J.; Fomin, F.V.; Pyatkin, A.V.; Woeginer, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    A radio labeling of a graph G is an assignment of pairwise distinct, positive integer labels to the vertices of G such that labels of adjacent vertices differ by at least 2. The radio labeling problem (RL) consists in determining a radio labeling that minimizes the maximum label that is used (the so

  15. Towards Multi Label Text Classification through Label Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta C. Dharmadhikari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Classifying text data has been an active area of research for a long time. Text document is multifaceted object and often inherently ambiguous by nature. Multi-label learning deals with such ambiguous object. Classification of such ambiguous text objects often makes task of classifier difficult while assigning relevant classes to input document. Traditional single label and multi class text classification paradigms cannot efficiently classify such multifaceted text corpus. Through our paper we are proposing a novel label propagation approach based on semi supervised learning for Multi Label Text Classification. Our proposed approach models the relationship between class labels and also effectively represents input text documents. We are using semi supervised learning technique for effective utilization of labeled and unlabeled data for classification. Our proposed approach promises better classification accuracy and handling of complexity and elaborated on the basis of standard datasets such as Enron, Slashdot and Bibtex.

  16. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    OpenAIRE

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; PRAKASH, KIRTI; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA mino...

  17. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  18. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  19. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... submitted for evaluation and approval before use under the final rule are: (1) Labels for chicken produced..., such as ``no antibiotics administered'' or ``vegetarian fed''; (4) instructional or...

  20. Physics of Polymers under Nanoscopic Confinement: a Single Molecule Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keshavarz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Physicist Masoumeh Keshavarz studied the thermal motion of a fluorescently labelled, individual “reporter” polymer molecule, surrounded and entangled by a gel of similar but unlabelled polymers. Owing to their extreme length and stiffness, it is possible to follow the shape and the motion of the rep

  1. GEO label: The General Framework for Labeling and Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, B. L.; McCallum, I.; Maso, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, or GEOSS. As part of a strategy to increase the involvement of the science and technology community in GEOSS, both as users and developers of GEOSS itself, GEO decided to develop a GEO label concept related to the scientific relevance, quality, acceptance and societal needs for services and data sets of GEOSS. The development of a GEO label is included in the GEO work plan and several projects address the challenges of developing a GEO label concept. Within the different projects developing the GEO label, various perspectives and approaches are being applied. In order to arrive at a generally accepted GEO label concept, a common understanding and basic knowledge of labeling is necessary. Assessment of quality of internationally standardized Earth observation data products implies possible certification. A general understanding of the framework for international standards and certification will also contribute to a more coherent discussion and more efficient development of a GEO label. We will describe the general labeling and certification framework emphasizing the relation to the three elements of the GEO label: quality, user acceptance and relevance. Based on a survey of international labels done by the EGIDA project, we have analyzed the legal framework and organization of labels and certification. We will discuss the frameworks for certification, user ratings, registration and analysis of user requirements. Quality assessment is a particular focus of the analysis and is based on the work done by the GeoViQua project. A GEO label will function both as a data distribution strategy and as a general management system for data. Through a label users can compare different data sets and get access to more information about the relevant data, including quality. A label will provide traceability of data both in the interest of users as well as data

  2. Sustainability labels on food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Hieke, Sophie; Wills, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between consumer motivation, understanding and use of sustainability labels on food products (both environmental and ethical labels), which are increasingly appearing on food products. Data was collected by means of an online survey implemented in the UK......, human values as measured by the Schwartz value domains, and country differences. The results imply that sustainability labels currently do not play a major role in consumers’ food choices, and future use of these labels will depend on the extent to which consumers’ general concern about sustainability...

  3. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  4. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  5. Monoclonal anti-elastin antibody labelled with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcia B.N. de; Silva, Claudia R. da; Araujo, Adriano C. de; Bernardo Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia; Porto, Luis Cristovao M.S.; Gutfilen, Bianca [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes; Souza, J.E.Q. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa Basica; Frier, Malcolm [University Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-11-01

    Technetium-99m ({sup 99m} Tc) is widely employed in nuclear medicine due to its desirable physical, chemical and biological properties. Moreover, it is easily available and normally is inexpensive. A reducing agent is necessary to label cells and molecules with {sup 99m} Tc and stannous chloride (Sn C L{sub 2}) is usually employed. Elastin is the functional protein component of the elastic fiber and it is related with some diseases such as arteriosclerosis, pulmonary emphysema and others. The present study refers to the preparation of the {sup 99m} Tc labeled monoclonal anti-elastin antibody. The monoclonal antibody was incubated with an excess of 2-iminothiolane. The free thiol groups created, were capable of binding with the reduced technetium. Labeling was an exchange reaction with {sup 99m} Tc-glucoheptonate. The labeled preparation was left at 4 deg C for one hour. Then, it was passed through a Sephadex G50 column. Various fractions were collected and counted. A peak corresponding to the radiolabeled antibody was obtained. Stability studies of the labelled anti-elastin were performed at 0,3 6, 24 hours, at both 4 deg C or room temperature. The biodistribution pattern of the {sup 99m} Tc-anti-elastin was studied in healthy male Swiss mice. The immunoreactivity was also determined. An useful labeled-anti-elastin was obtained to future immunoscintigraphic investigations. (author) 4 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Optical detection of single non-absorbing molecules using the surface plasmon of a gold nanorod

    CERN Document Server

    Zijlstra, Peter; Orrit, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Current optical detection schemes for single molecules require light absorption, either to produce fluorescence or direct absorption signals. This severely limits the range of molecules that can be detected, because most molecules are purely refractive. Metal nanoparticles or dielectric resonators detect non-absorbing molecules by a resonance shift in response to a local perturbation of the refractive index, but neither has reached single-protein sensitivity. The most sensitive plasmon sensors to date detect single molecules only when the plasmon shift is amplified by a highly polarizable label or by a localized precipitation reaction on the particle's surface. Without amplification, the sensitivity only allows for the statistical detection of single molecules. Here we demonstrate plasmonic detection of single molecules in realtime, without the need for labeling or amplification. We monitor the plasmon resonance of a single gold nanorod with a sensitive photothermal assay and achieve a ~ 700-fold increase in ...

  7. Molecules in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Omont, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The main achievements, current developments and prospects of molecular studies in external galaxies are reviewed. They are put in the context of the results of several decades of studies of molecules in local interstellar medium, their chemistry and their importance for star formation. CO observations have revealed the gross structure of molecular gas in galaxies. Together with other molecules, they are among the best tracers of star formation at galactic scales. Our knowledge about molecular abundances in various local galactic environments is progressing. They trace physical conditions and metallicity, and they are closely related to dust processes and large aromatic molecules. Major recent developments include mega-masers, and molecules in Active Galactic Nuclei; millimetre emission of molecules at very high redshift; and infrared H2 emission as tracer of warm molecular gas, shocks and photodissociation regions. The advent of sensitive giant interferometers from the centimetre to sub-millimetre range, espe...

  8. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Food Standards and Labeling Policy Book; does not bear any special claims, such as quality claims... addition, deletion, or amendment of recipe suggestions for the product; j. Any change in punctuation; k... Policy Book, and questions and answers on various topics, such as irradiation and the labeling...

  9. Synthesis and properties of differently charged chemiluminescent acridinium ester labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrajan, Anand; Sharpe, David

    2013-02-14

    Chemiluminescent acridinium dimethylphenyl esters containing N-sulfopropyl groups in the acridinium ring are highly sensitive, hydrophilic labels that are used in automated immunoassays for clinical diagnostics. Light emission from these labels is triggered with alkaline peroxide in the presence of a cationic surfactant. At physiological pH, N-sulfopropyl acridinium esters exist as water adducts that are commonly referred to as pseudobases. Pseudobase formation, which results from addition of water to the zwitterionic N-sulfopropyl acridinium ring, neutralizes the positive charge on the acridinium nitrogen and imparts a net negative charge to the label due to the sulfonate moiety. As a consequence, N-sulfopropyl acridinium ester conjugates of small molecule haptens as well as large molecules such as proteins gain negative charges at neutral pH. In the current study, we describe the synthesis and properties of two new hydrophilic acridinium dimethylphenyl ester labels where the net charge in the labels was altered. In one label, the structure of the hydrophilic N-alkyl group attached to the acridinium ring was changed so that the pseudobase of the label contains no net charge. In the second acridinium ester, two additional negative charges in the form of sulfopropyl groups were added to the acridinium ring to make this label's pseudobase strongly anionic. Chemiluminescence measurements of these labels, as well as their conjugates of an antibody with a neutral pI, indicate that acridinium ester charge while having a modest effect on emission kinetics has little influence on light output. However, our results demonstrate that acridinium ester charge can affect protein pI, apparent chemiluminescence stability and non-specific binding of protein conjugates to microparticles. These results emphasize the need for careful consideration of acridinium ester charge in order to optimize reagent stability and performance in immunoassays. In the current study, we observed that

  10. Quality Evaluation Model for Map Labeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong; ZHANG Zuxun; DU Daosheng

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses and sums up the basic criterions of guaranteeing the labeling quality and abstracts the four basic factors including the conflict for a label with a label, overlay for label with the features, position's priority and the association for a label with its feature. By establishing the scoring system, a formalized four-factors quality evaluation model is constructed. Last, this paper introduces the experimental result of the quality evaluation model applied to the automatic map labeling system-MapLabel.

  11. Limitations of Label-Free Sensors in Serum Based Molecular Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Varma, Manoj M

    2015-01-01

    Immunoassay formats applicable for clinical or point-of-care diagnostics fall into two broad classes. One which uses labeled secondary antibodies for signal transduction and the other which does not require the use of any labels. Comparison of the limits of detection (LoD) reported by these two sensing approaches over a wide range of detection techniques and target molecules in serum revealed that labeled techniques achieve 2-3 orders of magnitude better LoDs. Further, a vast majority of commercial tests and recent examples of technology translations are based on labeled assay formats. In light of this data, it is argued that extension of traditional labeled approaches and enhancing their functionality may have better clinical impact than the development of newer label-free techniques.

  12. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  13. Single Molecule DNA Detection with an Atomic Vapor Notch Filter

    CERN Document Server

    Uhland, Denis; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-sciences. Commonly, it founds on the fluorescence detection of single molecules, which are for example attached to the structures under study. For fluorescence microscopy and sensing the crucial parameters are the collection and detection efficiency, such that photons can be discriminated with low background from a labeled sample. Here we show a scheme for filtering the excitation light in the optical detection of single stranded labeled DNA molecules. We use the narrow-band filtering properties of a hot atomic vapor to filter the excitation light from the emitted fluorescence of a single emitter. The choice of atomic sodium allows for the use of fluorescent dyes, which are common in life-science. This scheme enables efficient photon detection, and a statistical analysis proves an enhancement of the optical signal of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration.

  14. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    variants such as, for example, small distances in trees [Alstrup et al., SODA, 2003]. We improve the known upper and lower bounds of exact distance labeling by showing that 1/4 log2(n) bits are needed and that 1/2 log2(n) bits are sufficient. We also give (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes using Theta...

  15. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  16. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  17. Heavy Exotic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general strictures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral $X(3872)$. The bottom isotriplet exotic with $J^{PC}=1^{+-}$ binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics $Z^+_b(10610)$ and $Z^+_b(10650)$. The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ is a possible neutral $X_b(10532)$ to be observed.

  18. Tetraphenylporphyrin as a protein label for triple detection analytical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Konopińska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrins and metalloporphyrins are promising new protein labels that can be detected using multiple techniques; improving the reliability of the analysis and broadening the range of the linear response. Here, we investigate the potential of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (Tpp as a hybrid protein label. The electrochemical and optical properties of porphyrin conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA, chicken egg albumin (CEA and immunoglobulin G (IgG were determined and optimal conditions for Tpp-protein conjugation established. Model conjugates of carboxylated Tpp with BSA and short peptides were characterized using differential pulse voltammetry, UV–Vis spectrophotometry and spectrofluorimetry. These results reveal that Tpp is a promising molecule to be used in a triple detection protein labelling system.

  19. A better carbon footprint label

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Nielsen, Kristian S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on insights from behavioral economics, it is suggested to extend carbon footprint labeling with information about relative performance, using the well-known “traffic light” color scheme to communicate relative performance. To test this proposition, the impact of a carbon footprint label...... on Danish consumers’ choice of ground coffee was tested in a 3 price levels x 3 levels of carbon emission x 3 certifying organizations x 2 organic labeling conditions discrete choice experiment. Participants were randomly assigned to two slightly different variants of the experiment: In one condition......, participants saw the original Carbon Trust label and in the other condition they saw the same label, but with traffic light colors added to communicate the product’s relative performance in terms of carbon footprint. All included attributes were found to have a significant impact on consumer choices...

  20. Cochleates bridged by drug molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Uwais M; Woo, Amy F; Plakogiannis, Fotios; Jin, Tuo; Zhu, Hua

    2008-11-03

    A new type of cochleate, able to microencapsulate water-soluble cationic drugs or peptides into its inter-lipid bi-layer space, was formed through interaction between negatively charged lipids and drugs or peptides acting as the inter-bi-layer bridges instead of multi-cationic metal ions. This new type of cochleate opened up to form large liposomes when treated with EDTA, suggesting that cationic organic molecules can be extracted from these cochleates in a way similar to multivalent metal ions from metal ion-bridged cochleates. Cochleates can be produced in sub-micron size using a method known as "hydrogel isolated cochleation" or simply by increasing the ratio of multivalent cationic peptides over negatively charged liposomes. When nanometer-sized cochleates and liposomes containing the same fluorescent labeled lipid component were incubated with human fibroblasts cells under identical conditions, cells exposed to cochleates showed bright fluorescent cell surfaces, whereas those incubated with liposomes did not. This result suggests that cochleates' edges made them fuse with the cell surfaces as compared to edge free liposomes. This mechanism of cochleates' fusion with cell membrane was supported by a bactericidal activity assay using tobramycin cochleates, which act by inhibiting intracellular ribosomes. Tobramycin bridged cochleates in nanometer size showed improved antibacterial activity than the drug's solution.

  1. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  2. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labels. 460.12 Section 460.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels...

  3. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food and... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.60 Container label. (a) Full label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a...

  4. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  5. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  6. Chains, clusters, inclusion compounds, paramagnetic labels, and organic rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zanello, P

    1994-01-01

    The role of stereochemistry to elucidate reaction patterns and physico-chemical properties in topical subjects ranging from inorganic to organic chemistry are treated in the fifth and final volume of this series. Detailed accounts are given to study: chaining in polyphosphates, electron-transfers in carbonyl clusters, inclusion of organometallic molecules in cyclodextrins, stereochemistry of paramagnetic metal complexes by labeling with nitroxyl radicals, stereocontrol in organic syntheses assisted by inorganic complexes.

  7. Optimized Distributed Feedback Dye Laser Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Small Molecule Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron; Dufva, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    parameter for optimization. Using such laser sensors in an imaging spectroscopy setup, real-time label-free monitoring of sugar molecule diffusion in water is demonstrated. This method could potentially pave the way towards the analysis of small molecule diffusion in various media, e.g. protein signaling...... processes in tissue....

  8. Direct Evidence of Lack of Colocalisation of Fluorescently Labelled Gold Labels Used in Correlative Light Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Benjamin T.; Greenwood, Alexander B.; Benito-Alifonso, David; Tanner, Hugh; Galan, M. Carmen; Verkade, Paul; Gersen, Henkjan

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescently labelled nanoparticles are routinely used in Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM) to combine the capabilities of two separate microscope platforms: fluorescent light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). The inherent assumption is that the fluorescent label observed under LM colocalises well with the electron dense nanoparticle observed in EM. Herein we show, by combining single molecule fluorescent imaging with optical detection of the scattering from single gold nanoparticles, that for a commercially produced sample of 10 nm gold nanoparticles tagged to Alexa-633 there is in fact no colocalisation between the fluorescent signatures of Alexa-633 and the scattering associated with the gold nanoparticle. This shows that the attached gold nanoparticle quenches the fluorescent signal by ~95%, or less likely that the complex has dissociated. In either scenario, the observed fluorescent signal in fact arises from a large population of untagged fluorophores; rendering these labels potentially ineffective and misleading to the field. PMID:28317888

  9. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  10. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  11. Algorithms for Labeling Focus Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, M; Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Schulz, A; Spoerhase, J; Wolff, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of labeling point sites in focus regions of maps or diagrams. This problem occurs, for example, when the user of a mapping service wants to see the names of restaurants or other POIs in a crowded downtown area but keep the overview over a larger area. Our approach is to place the labels at the boundary of the focus region and connect each site with its label by a linear connection, which is called a leader. In this way, we move labels from the focus region to the less valuable context region surrounding it. In order to make the leader layout well readable, we present algorithms that rule out crossings between leaders and optimize other characteristics such as total leader length and distance between labels. This yields a new variant of the boundary labeling problem, which has been studied in the literature. Other than in traditional boundary labeling, where leaders are usually schematized polylines, we focus on leaders that are either straight-line segments or Bezier curves. Further, we present algorithms that, given the sites, find a position of the focus region that optimizes the above characteristics. We also consider a variant of the problem where we have more sites than space for labels. In this situation, we assume that the sites are prioritized by the user. Alternatively, we take a new facility-location perspective which yields a clustering of the sites. We label one representative of each cluster. If the user wishes, we apply our approach to the sites within a cluster, giving details on demand.

  12. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... las etiquetas de datos nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels ... Watch this video for tips on figuring out food labels so you can make healthy choices. For ...

  13. Labelling of benzocaine with tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Sohail (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States))

    1994-10-01

    A convenient method is described to label a local anesthetic, benzocaine, with tritium. The bromoester of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) was prepared from para-nitrotoluene and was reduced with tritium. The generation of isotopic hydrogen and labelling of benzocaine was achieved in one-step. A mixture of sodium borohydride (NaB[sup 3]H[sub 4]) with cobalt (II) chloride was used to generate tritium gas. 5% Pd/C was used as a catalyst. This constitutes the first report of tritium labelled benzocaine. (author).

  14. New labels for radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Susumu; Mukai, Minoru; Kato, Hirotoshi (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    In simulating radiotherapy, the bone and trachea identified by plain X-P and the other organs, such as the esophagus and bladder, outlined by contrast medium have so far been used as labels. However, irradiation with a high therapeutic ratio is required for an intracorporeal insertion of artificial labels that are identified by X-ray fluoroscopy. For this purpose, metal clips and seed dummies are available, although they cause artifacts in CT scans. Therefore, the authors are using an acupuncture needle and lipiodol for tracing as new artificial labels, since both are identified by X-ray fluoroscopy and CT scan and create few artifacts. (J.P.N.).

  15. Visualization of DNA molecules in time during electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubega, Seth

    1991-01-01

    For several years individual DNA molecules have been observed and photographed during agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA molecule is clearly the largest molecule known. Nevertheless, the largest molecule is still too small to be seen using a microscope. A technique developed by Morikawa and Yanagida has made it possible to visualize individual DNA molecules. When these long molecules are labeled with appropriate fluorescence dyes and observed under a fluorescence microscope, although it is not possible to directly visualize the local ultrastructure of the molecules, yet because they are long light emitting chains, their microscopic dynamical behavior can be observed. This visualization works in the same principle that enables one to observe a star through a telescope because it emits light against a dark background. The dynamics of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose matrix during electrophoresis have been described by Smith et al. (1989), Schwartz and Koval (1989), and Bustamante et al. (1990). DNA molecules during agarose gel electrophoresis advance lengthwise thorough the gel in an extended configuration. They display an extension-contraction motion and tend to bunch up in their leading ends as the 'heads' find new pores through the gel. From time to time they get hooked on obstacles in the gel to form U-shaped configurations before they resume their linear configuration.

  16. General Compact Labeling Schemes for Dynamic Trees

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Let $F$ be a function on pairs of vertices. An {\\em $F$- labeling scheme} is composed of a {\\em marker} algorithm for labeling the vertices of a graph with short labels, coupled with a {\\em decoder} algorithm allowing one to compute $F(u,v)$ of any two vertices $u$ and $v$ directly from their labels. As applications for labeling schemes concern mainly large and dynamically changing networks, it is of interest to study {\\em distributed dynamic} labeling schemes. This paper investigates labelin...

  17. Synthesis of coumarin or ferrocene labeled nucleosides via Staudinger ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kois Pavol

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reaction of azides with triaryl phosphines under mild conditions gives iminophosphoranes which can react with almost any kind of electrophilic reagent, e.g. aldehydes/ketones to form imines or esters to form amides. This so-called Staudinger ligation has been employed in a wide range of applications as a general tool for bioconjugation including specific labeling of nucleic acids. Results A new approach for the preparation of labeled nucleosides via intermolecular Staudinger ligation is described. Reaction of azidonucleosides with triphenylphosphine lead to iminophosphorane intermediates, which react subsequently with derivatives of coumarin or ferrocene to form coumarin or ferrocene labeled nucleosides. Fluorescent properties of coumarin labeled nucleosides are determined. Conclusion New coumarin and ferrocene labeled nucleosides were prepared via intermolecular Staudinger ligation. This reaction joins the fluorescent coumarin and biospecific nucleoside to the new molecule with promising fluorescent and electrochemical properties. The isolated yields of products depend on the structure of azidonucleoside and carboxylic acids. A detailed study of the kinetics of the Staudinger ligation with nucleoside substrates is in progress.

  18. New Ideas on Labeling Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbart, Noy Galil

    evaluation of fully dynamic labeling schemes. Due to a connection between adjacency labeling schemes and the graph theoretical study of induced universal graphs, we study these in depth and show novel results for bounded degree graphs and power-law graphs. We also survey and make progress on the related......With ever increasing size of graphs, many distributed graph systems emerged to store, preprocess and analyze them. While such systems ease up congestion on servers, they incur certain penalties compared to centralized data structure. First, the total storage required to store a graph...... in a distributed fashion increases. Second, attempting to answer queries on vertices of a graph stored in a distributed fashion can be significantly more complicated. In order to lay theoretical foundations to the first penalty mentioned a large body of work concentrated on labeling schemes. A labeling scheme...

  19. Off-Label Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it’s not legal for drug companies to market (advertise or promote) their drugs for off-label uses. ... Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, Answers, and Hope. Available Every ...

  20. Molecules in supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The first molecules detected at infrared wavelengths in the ejecta of a Type II supernova, namely SN1987A, consisted of CO and SiO. Since then, confirmation of the formation of these two species in several other supernovae a few hundred days after explosion has been obtained. However, supernova environments appear to hamper the synthesis of large, complex species due to the lack of microscopically-mixed hydrogen deep in supernova cores. Because these environments also form carbon and silicate dust, it is of importance to understand the role played by molecules in the depletion of elements and how chemical species get incorporated into dust grains. In the present paper, we review our current knowledge of the molecular component of supernova ejecta, and present new trends and results on the synthesis of molecules in these harsh, explosive events.

  1. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  2. Molecules in \\eta\\ Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Loinard, Laurent; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A; Rodriguez, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward \\eta\\ Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO+, HCN, HNC, and N2H+, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13CO and H13CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (about 100 km /s) indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO+ do not appear to be under-abundant in \\eta\\ Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of eta Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  3. Gated container molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fang; WANG Hao; HOUK K. N.

    2011-01-01

    Donald J.Cram,the great UCLA chemist,received the Nobel Prize for his discoveries about host-guest complexes [1].Both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted about the nature and strength of interactions between the host and guest molecules.The concepts of constrictive binding (the activation energy of the binding process) and intrinsic binding (the free energy difference between the complex and the free host and guest molecules) were introduced to characterize different binding properties (Figure 1)[2].

  4. Enzyme molecules as nanomotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Samudra; Dey, Krishna K; Muddana, Hari S; Tabouillot, Tristan; Ibele, Michael E; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-01-30

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the diffusive movements of catalase enzyme molecules increase in the presence of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration-dependent manner. Employing a microfluidic device to generate a substrate concentration gradient, we show that both catalase and urease enzyme molecules spread toward areas of higher substrate concentration, a form of chemotaxis at the molecular scale. Using glucose oxidase and glucose to generate a hydrogen peroxide gradient, we induce the migration of catalase toward glucose oxidase, thereby showing that chemically interconnected enzymes can be drawn together.

  5. MHC-like molecules in some nonmammalian vertebrates can be detected by some cross-reactive xenoantisera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit antisera raised to human and chicken MHC molecules were used to immunoprecipitate cross-reactive molecules from biosynthetically and cell surface-labeled spleen and/or blood cells of representative vertebrate species. Five major points emerged: 1) There were many nonspecific cross-reaction......Rabbit antisera raised to human and chicken MHC molecules were used to immunoprecipitate cross-reactive molecules from biosynthetically and cell surface-labeled spleen and/or blood cells of representative vertebrate species. Five major points emerged: 1) There were many nonspecific cross...

  6. Progress of new label-free techniques for biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Wang, Yajun; Feng, Qiliang; Wei, Ye; Ji, Jianlong; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    The detection techniques used in biosensors can be broadly classified into label-based and label-free. Label-based detection relies on the specific properties of labels for detecting a particular target. In contrast, label-free detection is suitable for the target molecules that are not labeled or the screening of analytes which are not easy to tag. Also, more types of label-free biosensors have emerged with developments in biotechnology. The latest developed techniques in label-free biosensors, such as field-effect transistors-based biosensors including carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensors, graphene field-effect transistor biosensors and silicon nanowire field-effect transistor biosensors, magnetoelastic biosensors, optical-based biosensors, surface stress-based biosensors and other type of biosensors based on the nanotechnology are discussed. The sensing principles, configurations, sensing performance, applications, advantages and restriction of different label-free based biosensors are considered and discussed in this review. Most concepts included in this survey could certainly be applied to the development of this kind of biosensor in the future.

  7. Disentangling DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  8. Properties of entanglement molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yanxia [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Zhan Mingsheng [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2004-09-14

    We propose a scheme to prepare a certain kind of N-atom entangled state that allows us to construct some possible types of entanglement molecules via cavity QED. The entanglement properties of entanglement molecules vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} are studied with respect to bipartite entanglement that is robust against the disposal of particles and are compared with entanglement molecules {rho}{sub I} introduced in Dur (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 020303). We also give the maximal amount of entanglement achievable for two particular situations in two possible configurations. Meanwhile, we investigate the entanglement properties of entanglement molecules vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} in terms of local measurement using the maximum connectedness and persistency and compare them with other kinds of N-atom entangled states such as |GHZ), vertical bar W{sub N}) and vertical bar {phi}{sub N}). We show that the maximal value N - 1 of the persistency of the state vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} corresponds to the case that all atoms are pairwise entangled. If any pair of atoms {rho}{sub ij} is disentangled, the entanglement of the state vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} is very easy to destroy by a single local measurement.

  9. Properties of entanglement molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Xia; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to prepare a certain kind of N-atom entangled state that allows us to construct some possible types of entanglement molecules via cavity QED. The entanglement properties of entanglement molecules |psgrNrangagr are studied with respect to bipartite entanglement that is robust against the disposal of particles and are compared with entanglement molecules rgrI introduced in Dur (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 020303). We also give the maximal amount of entanglement achievable for two particular situations in two possible configurations. Meanwhile, we investigate the entanglement properties of entanglement molecules |psgrNrangagr in terms of local measurement using the maximum connectedness and persistency and compare them with other kinds of N-atom entangled states such as |GHZrang, |WNrang and |phgrNrang. We show that the maximal value N - 1 of the persistency of the state |psgrNrangagr corresponds to the case that all atoms are pairwise entangled. If any pair of atoms rgrij is disentangled, the entanglement of the state |psgrNrangagr is very easy to destroy by a single local measurement.

  10. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  11. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  12. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  13. Synthesis beyond the molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhoudt, D.N.; Crego-Calama, M.

    2002-01-01

    Weak, noncovalent interactions between molecules control many biological functions. In chemistry, noncovalent interactions are now exploited for the synthesis in solution of large supramolecular aggregates. The aim of these syntheses is not only the creation of a particular structure, but also the i

  14. Colloidal particles containing labeling agents and cyclodextrins for theranostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Nadiah; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2014-09-10

    This review aims to give to the reader some new light on cyclodextrin (CD)-based theranostic agents in order to complete our recently published review dedicated to CD-particles conjugates in drug delivery systems (Zafar et al., 2014). CDs are biocompatible sugar-based macrocycles used in a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we mainly focus on fundamental theranostic approaches combining the use of cyclodextrin molecules and colloidal particles as theranostic agents. The system's key features are discussed and a few recent pertinent applications are presented. CDs are used in order to enhance theranostic properties by providing apolar cavities for the encapsulation of hydrophobic moieties. Thus, CD molecules are used to enhance the loading capacity of particles by hosting active molecules. The relevance of CDs in enhancing the labeling properties of particles and the preparation of controlled drug release particles is also highlighted.

  15. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  16. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  17. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to 2-Year-Old How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print A A A en ... nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels have a lot of ...

  18. 21 CFR 606.121 - Container label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container label. 606.121 Section 606.121 Food and... Container label. (a) The container label requirements are designed to facilitate the use of a uniform container label for blood and blood components (except Source Plasma) by all blood establishments. (b)...

  19. Fluorescence Polarization Assays in Small Molecule Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a homogeneous method that allows rapid and quantitative analysis of diverse molecular interactions and enzyme activities. This technique has been widely utilized in clinical and biomedical settings, including the diagnosis of certain diseases and monitoring therapeutic drug levels in body fluids. Recent developments in the field has been symbolized by the facile adoption of FP in high-throughput screening (HTS) and small molecule drug discovery of an increasing range of target classes. Areas covered in this review The article provides a brief overview on the theoretical foundation of FP, followed by updates on recent advancements in its application for various drug target classes, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), enzymes and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The strengths and weaknesses of this method, practical considerations in assay design, novel applications, and future directions are also discussed. What the reader will gain The reader will be informed of the most recent advancements and future directions of FP application to small molecule screening. Take home message In addition to its continued utilization in high-throughput screening, FP has expanded into new disease and target areas and has been marked by increased use of labeled small molecule ligands for receptor binding studies. PMID:22328899

  20. A systematization of spectral data on the methanol molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlyostin, A. Yu.; Voronina, S. S.; Lavrentiev, N. A.; Privezentsev, A. I.; Rodimova, O. B.; Fazliev, A. Z.

    2015-11-01

    Problems underlying a systematization of spectral data on the methanol molecule are formulated. Data on the energy levels and vacuum wavenumbers acquired from the published literature are presented in the form of information sources imported into the W@DIS information system. Sets of quantum numbers and labels used to describe the CH3OH molecular states are analyzed. The set of labels is different from universally accepted sets. A system of importing the data sources into W@DIS is outlined. The structure of databases characterizing transitions in an isolated CH3OH molecule is introduced and a digital library of the relevant published literature is discussed. A brief description is given of an imported data quality analysis and representation of the results obtained in the form of ontologies for subsequent computer processing.

  1. An Optimal Labeling Scheme for Ancestry Queries

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    An ancestry labeling scheme assigns labels (bit strings) to the nodes of rooted trees such that ancestry queries between any two nodes in a tree can be answered merely by looking at their corresponding labels. The quality of an ancestry labeling scheme is measured by its label size, that is the maximal number of bits in a label of a tree node. In addition to its theoretical appeal, the design of efficient ancestry labeling schemes is motivated by applications in web search engines. For this p...

  2. A brief history of cell labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M. [Royal Sussex Country Hospital, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    The term cell labelling is usually used in the context of labelled leukocytes for imaging inflammation and labelled platelets for imaging thrombosis. Erythrocyte labelling for in vitro measurements of red cell life span, in vivo measurements of splenic red cell pooling, radionuclide ventriculography and imaging sites of bleeding has developed rather separately and has a different history. Labelled platelets and leukocytes were originally developed for cell kinetic studies. Since the current-day applications of labelled platelets and leukocytes depend on a clear understanding of cell kinetics, these classical studies are important and relevant to the history of cell labelling.

  3. New Methods for Labeling RGD Peptides with Bromine-76

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Lang, Weihua Li, Hong-Mei Jia, De-Cai Fang, Shushu Zhang, Xilin Sun, Lei Zhu, Ying Ma, Baozhong Shen, Dale O. Kiesewetter, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2011-01-01

    was confirmed by decreased tumor uptake after co-administration of unlabeled dimeric RGD peptides. The energy barrier of the transition state of bromination for the dimethoxybenzoyl group was about 9 kcal/mol lower than that for the tyrosine residue. In conclusion, the newly developed N-succinimidyl-2, 6-dimethoxybenzoate molecule can be used either for one step labeling through pre-conjugation or as the precursor for a Br-76 labeled prosthetic group for indirect labeling. Radiobromination on a dimethoxybenzoyl group has selectivity over radiobromination on tyrosine. The energy barrier difference of the transition states of bromination between the dimethoxybenzoyl group and the tyrosine residue may account for the reaction selectivity when both groups are present in the same molecule.

  4. Photoaffinity Labeling of Plasma Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Otagiri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Photoaffinity labeling is a powerful technique for identifying a target protein. A high degree of labeling specificity can be achieved with this method in comparison to chemical labeling. Human serum albumin (HSA and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP are two plasma proteins that bind a variety of endogenous and exogenous substances. The ligand binding mechanism of these two proteins is complex. Fatty acids, which are known to be transported in plasma by HSA, cause conformational changes and participate in allosteric ligand binding to HSA. HSA undergoes an N-B transition, a conformational change at alkaline pH, that has been reported to result in increased ligand binding. Attempts have been made to investigate the impact of fatty acids and the N-B transition on ligand binding in HSA using ketoprofen and flunitrazepam as photolabeling agents. Meanwhile, plasma AGP is a mixture of genetic variants of the protein. The photolabeling of AGP with flunitrazepam has been utilized to shed light on the topology of the protein ligand binding site. Furthermore, a review of photoaffinity labeling performed on other major plasma proteins will also be discussed. Using a photoreactive natural ligand as a photolabeling agent to identify target protein in the plasma would reduce non-specific labeling.

  5. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  6. Photoactive molecules for applications in molecular imaging and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Xing, Bengang

    2010-08-01

    Photoactive technology has proven successful for non-invasive regulation of biological activities and processes in living cells. With the light-directed generation of biomaterials or signals, mechanisms in cell biology can be investigated at the molecular level with spatial and temporal resolution. In this tutorial review, we aim to introduce the important applications of photoactive molecules for elucidating cell biology on aspects of protein engineering, fluorescence labelling, gene regulation and cell physiological functions.

  7. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  8. Quantum dots as strain- and metabolism-specific microbiological labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloepfer, J. A.; Mielke, R. E.; Wong, M. S.; Nealson, K. H.; Stucky, G.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Biologically conjugated quantum dots (QDs) have shown great promise as multiwavelength fluorescent labels for on-chip bioassays and eukaryotic cells. However, use of these photoluminescent nanocrystals in bacteria has not previously been reported, and their large size (3 to 10 nm) makes it unclear whether they inhibit bacterial recognition of attached molecules and whether they are able to pass through bacterial cell walls. Here we describe the use of conjugated CdSe QDs for strain- and metabolism-specific microbial labeling in a wide variety of bacteria and fungi, and our analysis was geared toward using receptors for a conjugated biomolecule that are present and active on the organism's surface. While cell surface molecules, such as glycoproteins, make excellent targets for conjugated QDs, internal labeling is inconsistent and leads to large spectral shifts compared with the original fluorescence, suggesting that there is breakup or dissolution of the QDs. Transmission electron microscopy of whole mounts and thin sections confirmed that bacteria are able to extract Cd and Se from QDs in a fashion dependent upon the QD surface conjugate.

  9. Rapid sequencing of DNA based on single-molecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Steven A.; Davis, Lloyd M.; Fairfield, Frederick R.; Hammond, Mark L.; Harger, Carol A.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.; Nutter, Harvey L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1991-07-01

    Sequencing the human genome is a major undertaking considering the large number of nucleotides present in the genome and the slow methods currently available to perform the task. The authors have recently reported on a scheme to sequence DNA rapidly using a non-gel based technique. The concept is based upon the incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into a strand of DNA, isolation and manipulation of a labeled DNA fragment and the detection of single nucleotides using ultra-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection following their cleavage from the fragment. Detection of individual fluorophores in the liquid phase was accomplished with time-gated detection following pulsed-laser excitation. The photon bursts from individual rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules travelling through a laser beam have been observed, as have bursts from single fluorescently modified nucleotides. Using two different biotinylated nucleotides as a model system for fluorescently labeled nucleotides, the authors have observed synthesis of the complementary copy of M13 bacteriophage. Work with fluorescently labeled nucleotides is underway. Individual molecules of DNA attached to a microbead have been observed and manipulated with an epifluorescence microscope.

  10. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed.

  11. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  12. Hydrogen molecules in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Joerg [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: joerg.weber@tu-dresden.de; Hiller, Martin; Lavrov, Edward V. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Molecular hydrogen, the simplest of all molecules, allows a direct insight into the fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In the case of H{sub 2}, the Pauli principle leads to two different species, para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2}. A conversion between these species is prohibited. Vibrational mode spectra reflect the fundamental properties and allow an unambiguous identification of the H{sub 2} molecules. Today, we have experimental evidence for the trapping of hydrogen molecules in the semiconductors Si, Ge and GaAs at the interstitial sites, within hydrogen-induced platelets, in voids and at impurities (interstitial oxygen in Si). Interstitial H{sub 2} is a nearly free rotor with a surprisingly simple behavior. We review on interstitial H{sub 2} in semiconductors and report on the unexpected preferential disappearance of the para-H{sub 2} or ortho-D{sub 2} species. The origin of the detected ortho-para conversion will be discussed.

  13. Learning With Auxiliary Less-Noisy Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yunyan; Wu, Ou

    2016-04-06

    Obtaining a sufficient number of accurate labels to form a training set for learning a classifier can be difficult due to the limited access to reliable label resources. Instead, in real-world applications, less-accurate labels, such as labels from nonexpert labelers, are often used. However, learning with less-accurate labels can lead to serious performance deterioration because of the high noise rate. Although several learning methods (e.g., noise-tolerant classifiers) have been advanced to increase classification performance in the presence of label noise, only a few of them take the noise rate into account and utilize both noisy but easily accessible labels and less-noisy labels, a small amount of which can be obtained with an acceptable added time cost and expense. In this brief, we propose a learning method, in which not only noisy labels but also auxiliary less-noisy labels, which are available in a small portion of the training data, are taken into account. Based on a flipping probability noise model and a logistic regression classifier, this method estimates the noise rate parameters, infers ground-truth labels, and learns the classifier simultaneously in a maximum likelihood manner. The proposed method yields three learning algorithms, which correspond to three prior knowledge states regarding the less-noisy labels. The experiments show that the proposed method is tolerant to label noise, and outperforms classifiers that do not explicitly consider the auxiliary less-noisy labels.

  14. Denture labeling: A new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep K Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for denture labeling is important for forensic and social reasons in case patients need to be identified individually. The importance of denture marking has long been acknowledged by the dental profession. Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature, but none till date fulfills all the prescribed ADA specifications. A simple, easy, inexpensive procedure for marking accurate identification marks on dentures with a lead foil is described here. The label caring the patient information is incorporated in the acrylic resin during the denture processing.

  15. Connected Component Labeling Using Components Neighbors-Scan Labeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Rakhmadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Many approaches have been proposed in previous such as the classic sequential connected components labeling algorithm which is relies on two subsequent raster-scans of a binary image. This method produced good performance in terms of accuracy, but because of the implementation of the image processing systems now requires faster process of the computer, the speed of this technique’s process has become an important issue. Approach: A computational approach, called components neighbors-scan labeling algorithm for connected component labeling was presented in this study. This algorithm required scanning through an image only once to label connected components. The algorithm started by scanning from the head of the component’s group, before tracing all the components neighbors by using the main component’s information. This algorithm had desirable characteristics, it is simple while promoted accuracy and low time consuming. By using a table of components, this approach also gave other advantages as the information for the next higher process. Results: The approach had been tested with a collection of binary images. In practically all cases, the technique had successfully given the desired result. Averagely, from the results the algorithm increased the speed around 67.4% from the two times scanning method. Conclusion: Conclusion from the comparison with the previous method, the approach of components neighbors-scan for connected component labeling promoted speed, accuracy and simplicity. The results showed that the approach has a good performance in terms of accuracy, the time consumed and the simplicity of the algorithm.

  16. Statistical analysis of unlabeled point sets: comparing molecules in chemoinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Ian L; Hirst, Jonathan D; Melville, James L

    2007-03-01

    We consider Bayesian methodology for comparing two or more unlabeled point sets. Application of the technique to a set of steroid molecules illustrates its potential utility involving the comparison of molecules in chemoinformatics and bioinformatics. We initially match a pair of molecules, where one molecule is regarded as random and the other fixed. A type of mixture model is proposed for the point set coordinates, and the parameters of the distribution are a labeling matrix (indicating which pairs of points match) and a concentration parameter. An important property of the likelihood is that it is invariant under rotations and translations of the data. Bayesian inference for the parameters is carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, and it is demonstrated that the procedure works well on the steroid data. The posterior distribution is difficult to simulate from, due to multiple local modes, and we also use additional data (partial charges on atoms) to help with this task. An approximation is considered for speeding up the simulation algorithm, and the approximating fast algorithm leads to essentially identical inference to that under the exact method for our data. Extensions to multiple molecule alignment are also introduced, and an algorithm is described which also works well on the steroid data set. After all the steroid molecules have been matched, exploratory data analysis is carried out to examine which molecules are similar. Also, further Bayesian inference for the multiple alignment problem is considered.

  17. Evaluation of genotoxicity testing of FDA approved large molecule therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Satin G; Fielden, Mark R; Black, Kurt A

    2014-10-01

    Large molecule therapeutics (MW>1000daltons) are not expected to enter the cell and thus have reduced potential to interact directly with DNA or related physiological processes. Genotoxicity studies are therefore not relevant and typically not required for large molecule therapeutic candidates. Regulatory guidance supports this approach; however there are examples of marketed large molecule therapeutics where sponsors have conducted genotoxicity studies. A retrospective analysis was performed on genotoxicity studies of United States FDA approved large molecule therapeutics since 1998 identified through the Drugs@FDA website. This information was used to provide a data-driven rationale for genotoxicity evaluations of large molecule therapeutics. Fifty-three of the 99 therapeutics identified were tested for genotoxic potential. None of the therapeutics tested showed a positive outcome in any study except the peptide glucagon (GlucaGen®) showing equivocal in vitro results, as stated in the product labeling. Scientific rationale and data from this review indicate that testing of a majority of large molecule modalities do not add value to risk assessment and support current regulatory guidance. Similarly, the data do not support testing of peptides containing only natural amino acids. Peptides containing non-natural amino acids and small molecules in conjugated products may need to be tested.

  18. Phase sensitive spectral domain interferometry for label free biomolecular interaction analysis and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirvi, Sajal

    Biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) plays vital role in wide variety of fields, which include biomedical research, pharmaceutical industry, medical diagnostics, and biotechnology industry. Study and quantification of interactions between natural biomolecules (proteins, enzymes, DNA) and artificially synthesized molecules (drugs) is routinely done using various labeled and label-free BIA techniques. Labeled BIA (Chemiluminescence, Fluorescence, Radioactive) techniques suffer from steric hindrance of labels on interaction site, difficulty of attaching labels to molecules, higher cost and time of assay development. Label free techniques with real time detection capabilities have demonstrated advantages over traditional labeled techniques. The gold standard for label free BIA is surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) that detects and quantifies the changes in refractive index of the ligand-analyte complex molecule with high sensitivity. Although SPR is a highly sensitive BIA technique, it requires custom-made sensor chips and is not well suited for highly multiplexed BIA required in high throughput applications. Moreover implementation of SPR on various biosensing platforms is limited. In this research work spectral domain phase sensitive interferometry (SD-PSI) has been developed for label-free BIA and biosensing applications to address limitations of SPR and other label free techniques. One distinct advantage of SD-PSI compared to other label-free techniques is that it does not require use of custom fabricated biosensor substrates. Laboratory grade, off-the-shelf glass or plastic substrates of suitable thickness with proper surface functionalization are used as biosensor chips. SD-PSI is tested on four separate BIA and biosensing platforms, which include multi-well plate, flow cell, fiber probe with integrated optics and fiber tip biosensor. Sensitivity of 33 ng/ml for anti-IgG is achieved using multi-well platform. Principle of coherence multiplexing for multi

  19. Food quality labels from the producers’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Velčovská

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analysing the food producer attitudes towards quality labels. The Klasa label, as the most known and the most frequently used food quality label in the Czech Republic, have become the subject of investigation. The aim of the research was to identify the benefits and problems arising from the certification process and the label use. Primary data were collected in online survey based on standardized questionnaire. In census, 86 respondents from the total 218 producers with the Klasa label in the Czech Republic completed the questionnaire. The most of producers (72% have a longer experience with the label, they are using the label for more than four years. The producers’ expectations from the label were fulfilled only partially. A poor state marketing support and missing marketing strategy were identified as general problems of the label. Specific perceived problems are formalities connected with the certification process and certification of poor-quality products. Correlation analysis, t-test and Pearson chi-square test were calculated to discover relations between variables. The results of the study can be beneficial to both, food producers as well as administrator of the label. Identified problems could help them to improve marketing strategy of the label in order to manage the label in effective way and use all benefits arising from the certification. Administrator of the label should make the certification process more effective and transparent, promotion should be focused on the explanation to consumers what the Klasa label guarantees.

  20. Dynamic quantification of antigen molecules with flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalensky, A.E.; Chernyshev, A.V.; Yurkin, M.A.; Nekrasov, V.M.; Polshchitsin, A.A.; Parks, D.R.; Moore, W.A.; Herzenberg, L.A.; Filatenkov, A.; Maltsev, V.P.; Orlova, D.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods for estimating the number of expressed molecules, based on the detection of target antigens bound with fluorescently labeled antibodies, assume that the antigen-antibody reaction reaches equilibrium. A calibration procedure is used to convert the intensity of the fluorescence signal to the number of target molecules. Along with the different limitations of every calibration system, this substantially limits the applicability of the traditional approaches especially in the case of low affinity antibodies. We address this problem here with studies in which we demonstrate a new approach to the antigen molecule quantification problem. Instead of using a static calibration system, we analyzed mean fluorescence values over time by flow cytometry during antibody-antigen binding. Experimental data obtained with an LSRII cytometer were fitted by a diffusion-reaction mathematical model using the Levenberg–Marquardt nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm in order to obtain the number of target antigen molecules per cell. Results were compared with the Quanti-BRITE calibration system. We conclude that, instead of using experiment-specific calibration, the value of the binding rate constant for each particular antibody-antigen reaction can be used to quantify antigen molecules with flow cytometry. The radius of CD8 antibody molecule binding site was found, that allows recalculating the binding rate constant for other conditions (different sizes of reagent molecules, fluorescent label, medium viscosity and temperature). This approach is independent of specially prepared calibration beads, antibody reagents and the specific dye and can be applied to both low and high affinity antibodies, under both saturating and non-saturating binding conditions. The method was demonstrated on a human blood sample dataset investigating CD8α antigen on T cells in stable binding conditions. PMID:25687877

  1. Rhodamine B doped silica nanoparticle labels for protein microarray detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A core-shell Rhodamine B-doped SiO2 nanoparticle was synthesized and its fluorescent intensity was found to be 1000 times higher than that of individual Rhodamine B molecule. The doped nanoparticles were further conjugated with streptavidin and the resulting nanoparticles were used in the detection of reverse-phase protein microarrays, in which human IgG of various concentrations was first immobilized on aldehyde-modified glass slides and then biotinlyated goat anti human IgG as well as the labeled nanoparticles were sequentially conjugated. The calibration curve is linear over the range from 800 fg to 500 pg and the limit of detection is 100 fg, which is 8 times lower than that of streptavidin-labeled Cy3 fluorescent dyes. The dyedoped SiO2 nanoparticles show potentials for the protein array detection.

  2. Synthesis and properties of fluorescent cotton cellulose labeled with norfloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To expand the application of cellulose in the field of fluorescence techniques, the cotton cellulose was labeled with norfloxacin (Cell-NF) via a three-step reaction, involving alkali treatment, epoxy activation, and opening of the epoxy rings with norfloxacin molecules. And the coordination complexes of Cell-NF with rare earth ions terbium (Cell-NF-Tb) and europium (Cell-NF-Eu) were obtained. The products were detected by IR, TG, XPS, UV and fluorescence spectra. Results showed that the norfloxacin content of the labeled cellulose was about 6.73 w‰ and the start temperature of decomposition of the Cell-NF was raised by 40°C compared with the stock cotton cellulose. When excited at 340 nm, the Cell-NF, Cell-NF-Tb, and Cell-NF-Eu in the solid state could emit violet (430 nm), green (549 nm) and red (620 nm) light, respectively.

  3. The Labelling Approach to Deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Prudence M.; Kitsuse, John L.; Duster, Troy; Freidson, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    This reprint of one chapter from the 1975 text, "Issues in the Classification of Children" by Nicholas Hobbs and others, addresses the theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues involved in the "labeling" approach to the sociology of deviance. It examines the social process of classification, the use of classification in social agencies,…

  4. Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Geoffrey

    2012-04-01

    Despite the decision by supermarket-giant Tesco to delay its plan to add carbon-footprint information onto all of its 70,000 products, carbon labelling, if carefully designed, could yet change consumer behaviour. However, it requires a new type of thinking about consumers and much additional work.

  5. On Labeled Traveling Salesman Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couetoux, Basile; Gourves, Laurent; Monnot, Jerome;

    2008-01-01

    We consider labeled Traveling Salesman Problems, defined upon a complete graph of n vertices with colored edges. The objective is to find a tour of maximum (or minimum) number of colors. We derive results regarding hardness of approximation, and analyze approximation algorithms for both versions...

  6. Improving the energy labelling scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    This report summarises the main results of an EU project on consumer response to energy labels in buildings. This report is mainly directed at Danish policy makers. The main focus is therefore on results that are relevant from a Danish point of view and on how they can be used to further strengthen...

  7. When Diagnostic Labels Mask Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, Robert; Dang, Sidney; Daniels, Brian; Doyle, Hillary; McFee, Scott; Quisenberry, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that many seriously troubled children and adolescents are reacting to adverse life experiences. Yet traditional diagnostic labels are based on checklists of surface symptoms. Distracted by disruptive behavior, the common response is to medicate, punish, or exclude rather than respond to needs of youth who have…

  8. Molecules in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  9. Detection and identification of individual antigen molecules in human serum with pulsed semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, M.; Zander, C.; Müller, R.; Ullrich, B.; Drexhage, K. H.; Kaul, S.; Wolfrum, J.

    1997-09-01

    The fluorescence bursts of individual antibody molecules BM-7 (IgG1) labeled with single dye molecules were detected and identified by the characteristic fluorescence lifetimes of the dyes Cy5 (1.5 ns) and JA169 (2.7 ns) directly in neat human serum. Fluorescence excitation was performed by a short-pulse (FWHMmucine (MUC1) was detected in neat human serum by single-molecule events containing both fluorescence lifetimes indicating specific binding of both antibody molecules (Cy5-BM-7 and JA169-BM-7). The sensitivity achieved allows the detection of antigens at concentrations below 10-11 M without separation steps.

  10. Label-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance: A New Concept for Improved Performance in Optical Biosensor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Granqvist

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where the presence of a label may potentially interfere with the studied interactions per se. However, the fundamental challenges of label-free SPR in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity are well known. Here we present a new concept called label-enhanced SPR, which is based on utilizing strongly absorbing dye molecules in combination with the evaluation of the full shape of the SPR curve, whereby the sensitivity as well as the specificity of SPR is significantly improved. The performance of the new label-enhanced SPR method was demonstrated by two simple model assays: a small molecule assay and a DNA hybridization assay. The small molecule assay was used to demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement of the method, and how competitive assays can be used for relative affinity determination. The DNA assay was used to demonstrate the selectivity of the assay, and the capabilities in eliminating noise from bulk liquid composition variations.

  11. Labelling schemes: From a consumer perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2000-01-01

    . A recent MAPP study has investigated the value consumers attach the Government-controlled labels 'Ø-mærket' and 'Den Blå Lup' and the private supermarket label 'Mesterhakket' when they purchase minced meat. The results reveal four consumer segments that use labelling schemes for food products very....... The remaining consumers, about 55%, trust the institutions guaranteeing the labels and they use the labels as a signal without actually knowing the content of each label. Segment composition will probably change depending on the food group studied. It is therefore recommended that the different consumer types...

  12. Fluorine-18 labeled tracers for PET studies in the neurosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    This chapter focuses on fluorine-18, the positron emitter with the longest half-life, the lowest positron energy and probably, the most challenging chemistry. The incorporation of F-18 into organic compounds presents many challenges, including: the need to synthesize and purify the compound within a 2--3 hour time frame; the limited number of labeled precursor molecules; the need to work on a microscale; and the need to produce radiotracers which are chemically and radiochemically pure, sterile and pyrogen-free, and suitable for intravenous injection. The PET method and F-18 labeling of organic molecules are described followed by highlights of the applications of F-18 labeled compounds in the neurosciences and neuropharmacology. It is important to emphasize the essential and pivotal role that organic synthesis has played in the progression of the PET field over the past twenty years from one in which only a handful of institutions possessed the instrumentation and staff to carry out research to the present-day situation where there are more than 200 PET centers worldwide. During this period PET has become an important scientific tool in the neurosciences, cardiology and oncology. It is important to point out that PET is by no means a mature field. The fact that a hundreds of different F-18 labeled compounds have been developed but only a few possess the necessary selectivity and sensitivity in vivo to track a specific biochemical process illustrates this and underscores a major difficulty in radiotracer development, namely the selection of priority structures for synthesis and the complexities of the interactions between chemical compounds and living systems. New developments in rapid organic synthesis are needed in order to investigate new molecular targets and to improve the quantitative nature of PET experiments.

  13. High-resolution electrophoretic separation and integrated-waveguide excitation of fluorescent DNA molecules in a lab on a chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongre, Chaitanya; Weerd, van Jasper; Besselink, Geert A.J.; Weeghel, van Rob; Martinez-Vazquez, Rebecca; Osellame, Roberto; Cerullo, Giulio; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Hoekstra, Hugo J.W.M.; Pollnau, Markus

    2010-01-01

    By applying integrated-waveguide laser excitation to an optofluidic chip, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules of 12 or 17 different sizes are separated by CE with high operating speed and low sample consumption of ~600 pL. When detecting the fluorescence signals of migrating DNA molecules with a PMT

  14. Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers: an FDA Perspective on Utilization in Biological Product Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Robert N; Grillo, Joseph A

    2016-05-01

    Precision medicine promises to improve both the efficacy and safety of therapeutic products by better informing why some patients respond well to a drug, and some experience adverse reactions, while others do not. Pharmacogenomics is a key component of precision medicine and can be utilized to select optimal doses for patients, more precisely identify individuals who will respond to a treatment and avoid serious drug-related toxicities. Since pharmacogenomic biomarker information can help inform drug dosing, efficacy, and safety, pharmacogenomic data are critically reviewed by FDA staff to ensure effective use of pharmacogenomic strategies in drug development and appropriate incorporation into product labels. Pharmacogenomic information may be provided in drug or biological product labeling to inform health care providers about the impact of genotype on response to a drug through description of relevant genomic markers, functional effects of genomic variants, dosing recommendations based on genotype, and other applicable genomic information. The format and content of labeling for biologic drugs will generally follow that of small molecule drugs; however, there are notable differences in pharmacogenomic information that might be considered useful for biologic drugs in comparison to small molecule drugs. Furthermore, the rapid entry of biologic drugs for treatment of rare genetic diseases and molecularly defined subsets of common diseases will likely lead to increased use of pharmacogenomic information in biologic drug labels in the near future. In this review, we outline the general principles of therapeutic product labeling and discuss the utilization of pharmacogenomic information in biologic drug labels.

  15. Mechanical and chemical properties of cysteine-modified kinesin molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatani, S; Iwane, A H; Higuchi, H; Ishii, Y; Yanagida, T

    1999-08-10

    To probe the structural changes within kinesin molecules, we made the mutants of motor domains of two-headed kinesin (4-411 aa) in which either all the five cysteines or all except Cys45 were mutated. A residual cysteine (Cys45) of the kinesin mutant was labeled with an environment-sensitive fluorescent probe, acrylodan. ATPase activity, mechanical properties, and fluorescence intensity of the mutants were measured. Upon acrylodan-labeled kinesin binding to microtubules in the presence of 1 mM AMPPNP, the peak intensity was enhanced by 3.4-fold, indicating the structural change of the kinesin head by the binding. Substitution of cysteines decreased both the maximum microtubule-activated ATPase and the sliding velocity to the same extent. However, the maximum force and the step size were not affected; the force produced by a single molecule was 6-6.5 pN, and a step size due to the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule by kinesin molecules was about 10 nm for all kinesins. This step size was close to a unitary step size of 8 nm. Thus, the mechanical events of kinesin are tightly coupled with the chemical events.

  16. Free-solution, label-free molecular interactions studied by back-scattering interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornhop, D.J.; Latham, J.C.; Kussrow, A.

    2007-01-01

    Free-solution, label-free molecular interactions were investigated with back-scattering interferometry in a simple optical train composed of a helium-neon laser, a microfluidic channel, and a position sensor. Molecular binding interactions between proteins, ions and protein, and small molecules...

  17. Single molecule optical measurements of orientation and rotations of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, Deborah Y.; Lippert, Lisa G.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2016-12-01

    Subdomains of macromolecules often undergo large orientation changes during their catalytic cycles that are essential for their activity. Tracking these rearrangements in real time opens a powerful window into the link between protein structure and functional output. Site-specific labeling of individual molecules with polarized optical probes and measurement of their spatial orientation can give insight into the crucial conformational changes, dynamics, and fluctuations of macromolecules. Here we describe the range of single molecule optical technologies that can extract orientation information from these probes, review the relevant types of probes and labeling techniques, and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of these technologies for addressing specific inquiries.

  18. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  19. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  20. Ivabradine: A Review of Labeled and Off-Label Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, Carrie S; Owens, Ryan E; Bolorunduro, Oluwaseyi B; Jha, Sunil K

    2016-10-01

    Ivabradine is a unique medication recently approved in the USA for the treatment of select heart failure patients. It was first approved for use in several countries around the world over a decade ago as an anti-anginal agent, with subsequent approval for use in heart failure patients. Since ivabradine has selective activity blocking the I f currents in the sinus node, it can reduce heart rate without appreciable effects on blood pressure. Given this heart-rate-specific effect, it has been investigated in many off-label indications as an alternative to traditional heart-rate-reducing medications such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers. We conducted searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for ivabradine, heart failure, HFrEF, HFpEF, angina, coronary artery disease, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, postural orthostatic hypotension, coronary computed tomography angiography and atrial fibrillation. We reviewed and included studies, case reports, and case series published between 1980 and June 2016 if they provided information relevant to the practicing clinician. In many cases, larger clinical trials are needed to solidify the benefit of ivabradine, although studies indicate benefit in most therapeutic areas explored to date. The purpose of this paper is to review the current labeled and off-label uses of ivabradine, with a focus on clinical trial data.

  1. Pulsed EPR in the method of spin labels and probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzuba, Sergei A [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-31

    Various pulsed EPR in the method of spin labels and probes based on electron spin echo spectroscopy (spin echo envelope modulation through electron-nuclear interactions, electron-electron double resonance, echo detected EPR, etc.) are considered. These methods provide information on the conformations of complex biomolecules, nanostructure of matter, depth of water penetration into biological membranes, supramolecular structure of multicomponent systems (membrane-peptide, etc.), co-operative orientational dynamics of molecules and dynamic low-temperature transitions in disordered molecular media and biosystems.

  2. Electronic Single Molecule Identification of Carbohydrate Isomers by Recognition Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Im, JongOne; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yanan; Sen, Suman; Biswas, Sudipta; Ashcroft, Brian; Borges, Chad; Wang, Xu; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2016-01-01

    Glycans play a central role as mediators in most biological processes, but their structures are complicated by isomerism. Epimers and anomers, regioisomers, and branched sequences contribute to a structural variability that dwarfs those of nucleic acids and proteins, challenging even the most sophisticated analytical tools, such as NMR and mass spectrometry. Here, we introduce an electron tunneling technique that is label-free and can identify carbohydrates at the single-molecule level, offering significant benefits over existing technology. It is capable of analyzing sub-picomole quantities of sample, counting the number of individual molecules in each subset in a population of coexisting isomers, and is quantitative over more than four orders of magnitude of concentration. It resolves epimers not well separated by ion-mobility and can be implemented on a silicon chip. It also provides a readout mechanism for direct single-molecule sequencing of linear oligosaccharides.

  3. Single molecule DNA detection with an atomic vapor notch filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhland, Denis; Rendler, Torsten; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg; Gerhardt, Ilja [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-science. Commonly the fluorescence of dye molecules is detected, which are attached to a non-fluorescent structure under study. For fluorescence microscopy one desires to maximize the detection efficiency together with an efficient suppression of undesired laser leakage. Here we present the use of the narrow-band filtering properties of hot atomic sodium vapor to selectively filter the excitation light from the red-shifted fluorescence of dye labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. A statistical analysis proves an enhancement in detection efficiency of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration. (orig.)

  4. A Multi-Label Classification Approach Based on Correlations Among Labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Alazaidah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multi label classification is concerned with learning from a set of instances that are associated with a set of labels, that is, an instance could be associated with multiple labels at the same time. This task occurs frequently in application areas like text categorization, multimedia classification, bioinformatics, protein function classification and semantic scene classification. Current multi-label classification methods could be divided into two categories. The first is called problem transformation methods, which transform multi-label classification problem into single label classification problem, and then apply any single label classifier to solve the problem. The second category is called algorithm adaptation methods, which adapt an existing single label classification algorithm to handle multi-label data. In this paper, we propose a multi-label classification approach based on correlations among labels that use both problem transformation methods and algorithm adaptation methods. The approach begins with transforming multi-label dataset into a single label dataset using least frequent label criteria, and then applies the PART algorithm on the transformed dataset. The output of the approach is multi-labels rules. The approach also tries to get benefit from positive correlations among labels using predictive Apriori algorithm. The proposed approach has been evaluated using two multi-label datasets named (Emotions and Yeast and three evaluation measures (Accuracy, Hamming Loss, and Harmonic Mean. The experiments showed that the proposed approach has a fair accuracy in comparison to other related methods.

  5. Chemoenzymatic reversible immobilization and labeling of proteins without prior purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Song, James M; Pricer, Rachel E; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-05-23

    Site-specific chemical modification of proteins is important for many applications in biology and biotechnology. Recently, our laboratory and others have exploited the high specificity of the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) to site-specifically modify proteins through the use of alternative substrates that incorporate bioorthogonal functionality including azides and alkynes. In this study, we evaluate two aldehyde-containing molecules as substrates for PFTase and as reactants in both oxime and hydrazone formation. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model system, we demonstrate that the purified protein can be enzymatically modified with either analogue to yield aldehyde-functionalized proteins. Oxime or hydrazone formation was then employed to immobilize, fluorescently label, or PEGylate the resulting aldehyde-containing proteins. Immobilization via hydrazone formation was also shown to be reversible via transoximization with a fluorescent alkoxyamine. After characterizing this labeling strategy using pure protein, the specificity of the enzymatic process was used to selectively label GFP present in crude E. coli extract followed by capture of the aldehyde-modified protein using hydrazide-agarose. Subsequent incubation of the immobilized protein using a fluorescently labeled or PEGylated alkoxyamine resulted in the release of pure GFP containing the desired site-specific covalent modifications. This procedure was also employed to produce PEGylated glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), a protein with potential therapeutic activity for diabetes. Given the specificity of the PFTase-catalyzed reaction coupled with the ability to introduce a CAAX-box recognition sequence onto almost any protein, this method shows great potential as a general approach for selective immobilization and labeling of recombinant proteins present in crude cellular extract without prior purification. Beyond generating site-specifically modified proteins, this

  6. The migration of synthetic magnetic nanoparticle labeled dendritic cells into lymph nodes with optical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hang Su,1,* Yongbin Mou,1,* Yanli An,2 Wei Han,1 Xiaofeng Huang,1 Guohua Xia,3 Yanhong Ni,1 Yu Zhang,4 Jianmin Ma,1 Qingang Hu1,5 1Center Laboratory of Stomatology, Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 2Jiangsu Key Lab of Molecular and Function Imaging, Department of Radiology; 3Department of Hematology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, 4State Key Laboratory of Molecule and Bimolecular Electronics, Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices; Southeast University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 5Leeds Dental Institute, Faculty of Medicine and health, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The successful biotherapy of carcinoma with dendritic cell (DC vaccines pivotally relies on DCs’ migratory capability into lymph tissues and activation of T cells. Accurate imaging and evaluation of DC migration in vivo have great significance during antitumor treatment with DC vaccine. We herein examined the behavior of DCs influenced by synthetic superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticle labeling.Methods: γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were prepared and DCs, which were induced from bone marrow monocytes of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP transgenic mice, were labeled. The endocytosis of the SPIO, surface molecules, cell apoptosis and fluorescence intensity of EGFP-DCs were displayed by Prussian blue staining and flow cytometry (FCM, respectively. After EGFP-DCs, labeled with SPIO, were injected into footpads (n = 5 for 24 hours, the mice were examined in vivo by optical imaging (OPI. Meanwhile, confocal imaging and FCM were applied, respectively, to detect the migration of labeled DCs into draining lymph nodes.Results: Nearly 100% of cells were labeled by the SPIO, in which the intracellular blue color gradually deepened and the iron contents rose with the increase of labeling iron concentrations

  7. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  8. Forces in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  9. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  10. Astrochemistry and Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Y. C.

    2010-03-01

    Astrochemistry provides powerful tools to understand various cosmic phenomena, including those in our solar system to the large-scale structure of the universe. In addition, the chemical property of an astronomical body is a crucial factor which governs the evolution of the system. Recent progress in astrophysical theories, computational modelings, and observational techniques requires a detailed understanding of the interactions between the constituents of an astronomical system, which are atoms and molecules within the system. Especially the far-infrared/sub-millimeter wave range, which is called as the last frontier in astronomical observations, contains numerous molecular lines, which may provide a huge amount of new information. However, we need an astrochemical understanding to use this information fully. Although this review is very limited, I would like to stress the importance of astrochemical approach in this overview for the field, which is getting much more attention than ever before.

  11. ANTIMAGIC LABELING OF GENERALIZED SAUSAGE GRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oudone Phanalasy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An antimagic labeling of a graph with q edges is a bijection from the set of edges to the set of positive integers {1,2,...,q} such that all vertex weights are pairwise distinct, where the vertex weight of a vertex is the sum of the labels of all the edges incident with that vertex. A graph is antimagic if it has an antimagic labeling. In this paper we construct antimagic labeling for the family of generalized sausage graphs.

  12. SOME ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF PUBLIC LABELING

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses economic issues related to public labeling. The main contributions in both the empirical and theoretical literatures are presented in order to motivate responses to the questions, when should a regulator promote public labeling, and what are the limits to and the possible market distortions from public labeling? Although the issues are complicated, there is already much economic guidance that can be given to inform the policy debate over food labeling.

  13. Automatic Labelling of Topics with Neural Embeddings

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Shraey; Lau, Jey Han; Baldwin, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Topics generated by topic models are typically represented as list of terms. To reduce the cognitive overhead of interpreting these topics for end-users, we propose labelling a topic with a succinct phrase that summarises its theme or idea. Using Wikipedia document titles as label candidates, we compute neural embeddings for documents and words to select the most relevant labels for topics. Compared to a state-of-the-art topic labelling system, our methodology is simpler, more efficient, and ...

  14. Labeling nuclear DNA using DAPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazotte, Brad

    2011-01-01

    A number of fluorescent stains are available that label DNA and allow easy visualization of the nucleus in interphase cells and chromosomes in mitotic cells, including Hoechst, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), ethidium bromide, propidium iodide, and acridine orange. Although not as bright as the vital Hoechst stains for DNA, DAPI has greater photostability. It is believed that DAPI associates with the minor groove of double-stranded DNA, with a preference for the adenine-thymine clusters. Cells must be permeabilized and/or fixed for DAPI to enter the cell and to bind DNA. Fluorescence increases approximately 20-fold when DAPI is bound to double-stranded DNA. This protocol describes the use of DAPI to label nuclear DNA of cells grown in culture.

  15. White Label Space GLXP Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, A.

    2012-09-01

    This poster presents a lunar surface mission concept and corresponding financing approach developed by the White Label Space team, an official competitor in the Google Lunar X PRIZE. The White Label Space team's origins were in the European Space Agency's ESTEC facility in the Netherlands. Accordingly the team's technical headquarters are located just outside ESTEC in the Space Business Park. The team has active partners in Europe, Japan and Australia. The team's goal is to provide a unique publicity opportunity for global brands to land on the moon and win the prestigious Google Lunar X PRIZE. The poster presents the main steps to achieve this goal, the cost estimates for the mission, describes the benefits to the potential sponsors and supporters, and details the progress achieved to date.

  16. Label-free probing of genes by time-domain terahertz sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, P Haring [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Sommerfeldstr. 24, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Brucherseifer, M [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Sommerfeldstr. 24, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Nagel, M [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Sommerfeldstr. 24, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Kurz, H [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Sommerfeldstr. 24, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Bosserhoff, A [Institut fuer Pathologie, Universitaet Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Buettner, R [Institut fuer Pathologie, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2002-11-07

    A label-free sensing approach for the label-free characterization of genetic material with terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves is presented. Time-resolved THz analysis of polynucleotides demonstrates a strong dependence of the complex refractive index of DNA molecules in the THz frequency range on their hybridization state. By monitoring THz signals one can thus infer the binding state (hybridized or denatured) of oligo- and polynucleotides, enabling the label-free determination the genetic composition of unknown DNA sequences. A broadband experimental proof-of-principle in a free-space analytic configuration, as well as a higher-sensitivity approach using integrated THz sensors reaching femtomol detection levels and demonstrating the capability to detect single-base mutations, are presented. The potential application for next generation high-throughput label-free genetic analytic systems is discussed.

  17. A Chemical Probe that Labels Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Hirata

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A small-molecule fluorescent probe specific for human pluripotent stem cells would serve as a useful tool for basic cell biology research and stem cell therapy. Screening of fluorescent chemical libraries with human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and subsequent evaluation of hit molecules identified a fluorescent compound (Kyoto probe 1 [KP-1] that selectively labels human pluripotent stem cells. Our analyses indicated that the selectivity results primarily from a distinct expression pattern of ABC transporters in human pluripotent stem cells and from the transporter selectivity of KP-1. Expression of ABCB1 (MDR1 and ABCG2 (BCRP, both of which cause the efflux of KP-1, is repressed in human pluripotent stem cells. Although KP-1, like other pluripotent markers, is not absolutely specific for pluripotent stem cells, the identified chemical probe may be used in conjunction with other reagents.

  18. Politique de label et commerce international

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of a public labelling system in a context of international trade. A simple framework allows to present some distortions linked to such a policy. A trade liberalisation situation may lead to a change in the label policy, where the foreign seller incurs the label cost. Classification JEL : F1, D8

  19. What determines consumer attention to nutrition labels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialkova, S.E.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    To identify the key determinants of consumer attention to nutrition labels, visual search tasks (present – absent; one – two targets) were used as an effective experimental tool. The main manipulation concerned: set size (number of labels on front of pack); label characteristics (display size, posit

  20. DYNAMIC LABELING BASED FPGA DELAY OPTIMIZATION ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕宗伟; 林争辉; 张镭

    2001-01-01

    DAG-MAP is an FPGA technology mapping algorithm for delay optimization and the labeling phase is the algorithm's kernel. This paper studied the labeling phase and presented an improved labeling method. It is shown through the experimental results on MCNC benchmarks that the improved method is more effective than the original method while the computation time is almost the same.

  1. Hydrogen dynamics in soil organic matter as determined by 13C and 2H labeling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Alexia; Hatté, Christine; Pastor, Lucie; Thiry, Yves; Siclet, Françoise; Balesdent, Jérôme

    2016-12-01

    Understanding hydrogen dynamics in soil organic matter is important to predict the fate of 3H in terrestrial environments. One way to determine hydrogen fate and to point out processes is to examine the isotopic signature of the element in soil. However, the non-exchangeable hydrogen isotopic signal in soil is complex and depends on the fate of organic compounds and microbial biosyntheses that incorporate water-derived hydrogen. To decipher this complex system and to understand the close link between hydrogen and carbon cycles, we followed labeled hydrogen and labeled carbon throughout near-natural soil incubations. We performed incubation experiments with three labeling conditions: 1 - 13C2H double-labeled molecules in the presence of 1H2O; 2 - 13C-labeled molecules in the presence of 2H2O; 3 - no molecule addition in the presence of 2H2O. The preservation of substrate-derived hydrogen after 1 year of incubation (ca. 5 % in most cases) was lower than the preservation of substrate-derived carbon (30 % in average). We highlighted that 70 % of the C-H bonds are broken during the degradation of the molecule, which permits the exchange with water hydrogen. Added molecules are used more for trophic resources. The isotopic composition of the non-exchangeable hydrogen was mainly driven by the incorporation of water hydrogen during microbial biosynthesis. It is linearly correlated with the amount of carbon that is degraded in the soil. The quantitative incorporation of water hydrogen in bulk material and lipids demonstrates that non-exchangeable hydrogen exists in both organic and mineral-bound forms. The proportion of the latter depends on soil type and minerals. This experiment quantified the processes affecting the isotopic composition of non-exchangeable hydrogen, and the results can be used to predict the fate of tritium in the ecosystem or the water deuterium signature in organic matter.

  2. Novel image processing method study for a label-free optical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenhao; Wei, Li'an; Yang, Rusong; Feng, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Optical biosensor is generally divided into labeled type and label-free type, the former mainly contains fluorescence labeled method and radioactive-labeled method, while fluorescence-labeled method is more mature in the application. The mainly image processing methods of fluorescent-labeled biosensor includes smooth filtering, artificial gridding and constant thresholding. Since some fluorescent molecules may influence the biological reaction, label-free methods have been the main developing direction of optical biosensors nowadays. The using of wider field of view and larger angle of incidence light path which could effectively improve the sensitivity of the label-free biosensor also brought more difficulties in image processing, comparing with the fluorescent-labeled biosensor. Otsu's method is widely applied in machine vision, etc, which choose the threshold to minimize the intraclass variance of the thresholded black and white pixels. It's capacity-constrained with the asymmetrical distribution of images as a global threshold segmentation. In order to solve the irregularity of light intensity on the transducer, we improved the algorithm. In this paper, we present a new image processing algorithm based on a reflectance modulation biosensor platform, which mainly comprises the design of sliding normalization algorithm for image rectification and utilizing the improved otsu's method for image segmentation, in order to implement automatic recognition of target areas. Finally we used adaptive gridding method extracting the target parameters for analysis. Those methods could improve the efficiency of image processing, reduce human intervention, enhance the reliability of experiments and laid the foundation for the realization of high throughput of label-free optical biosensors.

  3. 78 FR 24211 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Container Labels and Carton Labeling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Container Labels and Carton Labeling Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and... the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Safety Considerations for Container... aspects of the container label and carton labeling design for prescription drug and biological...

  4. Mapping lipid and detergent molecules at the surface of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Richard J; Gardiner, Alastair T; Roszak, Aleksander W; Stončius, Sigitas; Kočovský, Pavel; Isaacs, Neil W

    2011-06-01

    Electron-density maps for the crystal structures of membrane proteins often show features suggesting binding of lipids and/or detergent molecules on the hydrophobic surface, but usually it is difficult to identify the bound molecules. In our studies, heavy-atom-labelled phospholipids and detergents have been used to unequivocally identify these binding sites at the surfaces of test membrane proteins, the reaction centres from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Blastochloris viridis. The generality of this method is discussed in the present article.

  5. A general approach to visualize protein binding and DNA conformation without protein labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Graham, Thomas G W; Loparo, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation methods, such as magnetic tweezers and flow stretching, generally use the measurement of changes in DNA extension as a proxy for examining interactions between a DNA-binding protein and its substrate. These approaches are unable to directly measure protein-DNA association without fluorescently labelling the protein, which can be challenging. Here we address this limitation by developing a new approach that visualizes unlabelled protein binding on DNA with changes in DNA conformation in a relatively high-throughput manner. Protein binding to DNA molecules sparsely labelled with Cy3 results in an increase in fluorescence intensity due to protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE), whereas DNA length is monitored under flow of buffer through a microfluidic flow cell. Given that our assay uses unlabelled protein, it is not limited to the low protein concentrations normally required for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and should be broadly applicable to studying protein-DNA interactions.

  6. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  7. Stigma of a label: educational expectations for high school students labeled with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrer, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Poorer outcomes for youth labeled with learning disabilities (LDs) are often attributed to the student's own deficiencies or cumulative disadvantage; but the more troubling possibility is that special education placement limits rather than expands these students' opportunities. Labeling theory partially attributes the poorer outcomes of labeled persons to stigma related to labels. This study uses data on approximately 11,740 adolescents and their schools from the Education Longitudinal Survey of 2002 to determine if stigma influences teachers' and parents' educational expectations for students labeled with LDs and labeled adolescents' expectations for themselves. Supporting the predictions of labeling theory, teachers and parents are more likely to perceive disabilities in, and hold lower educational expectations for labeled adolescents than for similarly achieving and behaving adolescents not labeled with disabilities. The negative effect of being labeled with LDs on adolescents' educational expectations is partially mechanized through parents' and particularly teachers' lower expectations.

  8. Silver nanoislands on cellulose fibers for chromatographic separation and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyukjin Jung; Moonseong Park; Minhee Kang; Ki-Hun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput small-molecule assays play essential roles in biomedical diagnosis,drug discovery,environmental analysis,and physiological function research.Nanoplasmonics holds a great potential for the label-free detection of small molecules at extremely low concentrations.Here,we report the development of nanoplasmonic paper (NP-paper) for the rapid separation and ultrasensitive detection of mixed small molecules.NP-paper employs nanogap-rich silver nanoislands on cellulose fibers,which were simply fabricated at the wafer level by using low-temperature solid-state dewetting of a thin silver film.The nanoplasmonic detection allows for the scalable quantification and identification of small molecules over broad concentration ranges.Moreover,the combination of chromatographic separation and nanoplasmonic detection allows both the highly sensitive fluorescence detection of mixed small molecules at the attogram level and the label-free detection at the sub-nanogram level based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering.This novel material provides a new diagnostic platform for the high-throughput,low-cost,and label-free screening of mixed small molecules as an alternative to conventional paper chromatography.

  9. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J V Yakhmi

    2009-06-01

    The conventional magnetic materials used in current technology, such as, Fe, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, SmCo5, Nd2Fe14B etc are all atom-based, and their preparation/processing require high temperature routes. Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material with long-range magnetic order, mainly because one can play with the weak intermolecular interactions. Since the first successful synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be categorized on the basis of the chemical nature of the magnetic units involved: organic-, metal-based systems, heterobimetallic assemblies, or mixed organic–inorganic systems. The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of molecular magnets. Being weakly coloured, unlike their opaque classical magnet ‘cousins’ listed above, possibilities of photomagnetic switching exist. Persistent efforts also continue to design the ever-elusive polymer magnets towards applications in industry. While providing a brief overview of the field of molecular magnetism, this article highlights some recent developments in it, with emphasis on a few studies from the author’s own lab.

  10. An Optimal Labeling Scheme for Ancestry Queries

    CERN Document Server

    Fraigniaud, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    An ancestry labeling scheme assigns labels (bit strings) to the nodes of rooted trees such that ancestry queries between any two nodes in a tree can be answered merely by looking at their corresponding labels. The quality of an ancestry labeling scheme is measured by its label size, that is the maximal number of bits in a label of a tree node. In addition to its theoretical appeal, the design of efficient ancestry labeling schemes is motivated by applications in web search engines. For this purpose, even small improvements in the label size are important. In fact, the literature about this topic is interested in the exact label size rather than just its order of magnitude. As a result, following the proposal of a simple interval-based ancestry scheme with label size $2\\log_2 n$ bits (Kannan et al., STOC '88), a considerable amount of work was devoted to improve the bound on the size of a label. The current state of the art upper bound is $\\log_2 n + O(\\sqrt{\\log n})$ bits (Abiteboul et al., SODA '02) which is...

  11. Eye tracking and nutrition label use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Dan J.; Orquin, Jacob Lund; Visschers, Vivianne H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition labels on food packages are among the most prominent and far-reaching policy measures related to diet and have the capacity to promote healthy eating. Unfortunately, certain nutrition label characteristics may impede consumer detection and comprehension of labels. Research using precise...... cameras monitoring consumer visual attention (i.e., eye tracking) has begun to identify ways in which label design could be modified to improve consumers’ ability to locate and effectively utilize nutrition information. The present paper reviews all published studies of nutrition label use that have...... utilized eye tracking methodology, identifies directions for further research in this growing field, and makes research-based recommendations for ways in which labels could be modified to improve consumers’ ability to use nutrition labels to select healthful foods....

  12. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles as versatile carrier for small and large molecules across cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolova, Viktoriya; Rotan, Olga; Klesing, Jan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Inorganic Chemistry and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Nalbant, Perihan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty of Biology, Institute of Molecular Cell Biology (Germany); Buer, Jan; Knuschke, Torben; Westendorf, Astrid M. [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Medical Microbiology (Germany); Epple, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.epple@uni-due.de [University of Duisburg-Essen, Inorganic Chemistry and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The successful transport of molecules across the cell membrane is a key point in biology and medicine. In most cases, molecules alone cannot penetrate the cell membrane, therefore an efficient carrier is needed. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles (diameter: 100-250 nm, depending on the functionalization) were loaded with fluorescent oligonucleotides, peptide, proteins, antibodies, polymers or porphyrins and characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Any excess of molecules was removed by ultracentrifugation, and the dissolved molecules at the same concentration were used as control. The uptake of such fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles into HeLa cells was monitored by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were able to transport all molecules across the cell membrane, whereas the dissolved molecules alone were taken up only to a very small extent or even not at all.

  13. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gadway, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-07-02

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of (/sup 125/I)iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis.

  15. Correlative microscopy of densely labeled projection neurons using neural tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberti, Daniele; Kirschmann, Moritz A; Hahnloser, Richard H R

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional morphological information about neural microcircuits is of high interest in neuroscience, but acquiring this information remains challenging. A promising new correlative technique for brain imaging is array tomography (Micheva and Smith, 2007), in which series of ultrathin brain sections are treated with fluorescent antibodies against neurotransmitters and synaptic proteins. Treated sections are repeatedly imaged in the fluorescence light microscope (FLM) and then in the electron microscope (EM). We explore a similar correlative imaging technique in which we differentially label distinct populations of projection neurons, the key routers of electrical signals in the brain. In songbirds, projection neurons can easily be labeled using neural tracers, because the vocal control areas are segregated into separate nuclei. We inject tracers into areas afferent and efferent to the main premotor area for vocal production, HVC, to retrogradely and anterogradely label different classes of projection neurons. We optimize tissue preparation protocols to achieve high fluorescence contrast in the FLM and good ultrastructure in the EM (using osmium tetroxide). Although tracer fluorescence is lost during EM preparation, we localize the tracer molecules after fixation and embedding by using fluorescent antibodies against them. We detect signals mainly in somata and dendrites, allowing us to classify synapses within a single ultrathin section as belonging to a particular type of projection neuron. The use of our method will be to provide statistical information about connectivity among different neuron classes, and to elucidate how signals in the brain are processed and routed among different areas.

  16. Correlative microscopy of densely labeled projection neurons using neural tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Oberti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional morphological information about neural microcircuits is of high interest in neuroscience, but acquiring this information remains challenging. A promising new correlative technique for brain imaging is array tomography (Micheva and Smith, 2007, in which series of ultrathin brain sections are treated with fluorescent antibodies against neurotransmitters and synaptic proteins. Treated sections are repeatedly imaged in the fluorescence light microscope (FLM and then in the electron microscope (EM. We explore a similar correlative imaging technique in which we differentially label distinct populations of projection neurons, the key routers of electrical signals in the brain. In songbirds, projection neurons can easily be labeled using neural tracers, because the vocal control areas are segregated into separate nuclei. We inject tracers into areas afferent and efferent to the main premotor area for vocal production, HVC, to retrogradely and anterogradely label different classes of projection neurons. We optimize tissue preparation protocols to achieve high fluorescence contrast in the FLM and good ultrastructure in the EM (using osmium tetroxide. Although tracer fluorescence is lost during EM preparation, we localize the tracer molecules after fixation and embedding by using fluorescent antibodies against them. We detect signals mainly in somata and dendrites, allowing us to classify synapses within a single ultrathin section as belonging to a particular type of projection neuron. The use of our method will be to provide statistical information about connectivity among different neuron classes, and to elucidate how signals in the brain are processed and routed among different areas.

  17. Label-free screening of bio-molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Matthew A

    2003-11-01

    The majority of techniques currently employed to interrogate a biomolecular interaction require some type of radio- or enzymatic- or fluorescent-labelling to report the binding event. However, there is an increasing awareness of novel techniques that do not require labelling of the ligand or the receptor, and that allow virtually any complex to be screened with minimal assay development. This review focuses on three major label-free screening platforms: surface plasmon resonance biosensors, acoustic biosensors, and calorimetric biosensors. Scientists in both academia and industry are using biosensors in areas that encompass almost all areas drug discovery, diagnostics, and the life sciences. The capabilities and advantages of each technique are compared and key applications involving small molecules, proteins, oligonucleotides, bacteriophage, viruses, bacteria, and cells are reviewed. The role of the interface between the biosensor surface (in the case of SPR and acoustic biosensors) and the chemical or biological systems to be studied is also covered with attention to the covalent and non-covalent coupling chemistries commonly employed.

  18. Labeling Monomeric Insulin with Renal-Clearable Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Yu, Mengxiao; Gannaway, Melissa; Sullins, Justin; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Jie

    2015-12-16

    In the native physiological environment, inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) often induce nonspecific protein adsorption, which could significantly alter the function of the proteins they labeled. As a result, small fluorescent dyes are still widely used in the imaging of proteins in animals due to their minimal interference with protein function. Here, we used monomeric insulin as a model and compared its bioactivity before and after labeling with renal-clearable near-infrared-emitting gold NPs. These NPs were chosen because they have high resistance to serum protein adsorption and low nonspecific accumulation. We have found that a 1:1 insulin-NP ratio can be achieved, where the insulin-NPs show minimal serum protein binding with fully retained bioactivity comparable to that of unlabeled insulin. These results show a proof of concept that renal-clearable NPs can behave like small molecules in protein labeling without changing the individual protein's function, laying down a foundation for in vivo tracking of proteins with multimodality imaging techniques.

  19. Bridging the gap between single molecule and ensemble methods for measuring lateral dynamics in the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C Arnspang

    Full Text Available The lateral dynamics of proteins and lipids in the mammalian plasma membrane are heterogeneous likely reflecting both a complex molecular organization and interactions with other macromolecules that reside outside the plane of the membrane. Several methods are commonly used for characterizing the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins. These experimental and data analysis methods differ in equipment requirements, labeling complexities, and further oftentimes give different results. It would therefore be very convenient to have a single method that is flexible in the choice of fluorescent label and labeling densities from single molecules to ensemble measurements, that can be performed on a conventional wide-field microscope, and that is suitable for fast and accurate analysis. In this work we show that k-space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS analysis, a technique which was originally developed for analyzing lateral dynamics in samples that are labeled at high densities, can also be used for fast and accurate analysis of single molecule density data of lipids and proteins labeled with quantum dots (QDs. We have further used kICS to investigate the effect of the label size and by comparing the results for a biotinylated lipid labeled at high densities with Atto647N-strepatvidin (sAv or sparse densities with sAv-QDs. In this latter case, we see that the recovered diffusion rate is two-fold greater for the same lipid and in the same cell-type when labeled with Atto647N-sAv as compared to sAv-QDs. This data demonstrates that kICS can be used for analysis of single molecule data and furthermore can bridge between samples with a labeling densities ranging from single molecule to ensemble level measurements.

  20. STM investigation of surfactant molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption and self-organization of sodium alkyl sulfonates (STS and SHS) have been studied on HOPG by using the in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both SHS and STS molecules adsorb on the HOPG surface and form long-range well-ordered monolayers. The neighboring molecules in different rows form a "head to head" configuration. In the high-resolution images of STS and SHS molecules, one end of the molecules shows bright spots which are attributed to the SO3- groups.

  1. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  2. Nerve growth factor receptor molecules in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniuchi, M.; Schweitzer, J.B.; Johnson, E.M. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have developed a method to immunoprecipitate rat nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor proteins and have applied the method to detect NGF receptor molecules in the rat brain. Crosslinking /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to either PC12 cells or cultured rat sympathetic neurons yielded two radiolabeled molecules (90 kDa and 220 kDa) that were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibody 192-IgG. Further, 192-IgG precipitated two radiolabeled proteins, with the expected sizes (80 kDa and 210 kDa) of noncrosslinked NGF receptor components, from among numerous surface-iodinated PC12 cell proteins. These results demonstrate the specific immunoprecipitation of NGF receptor molecules by 192-IgG. They applied the /sup 125/I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG-mediated immunoprecipitation procedures to plasma membrane preparations of rat brain: NGF receptor molecules of the same molecular masses as the peripheral receptor components were consistently detected in all regions and in preparations from whole brains. Removal of the peripheral sympathetic innervation of the brain did not eliminate these NGF receptor proteins, indicating that the receptor is endogenous to central nervous system tissues. They also observed retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-labeled 192-IgG from the parietal cortex to the nucleus basalis and from the hippocampus to the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and the medial septal nucleus. These findings demonstrate the presence in brain of NGF receptor molecules indistinguishable from those of the peripheral nervous system.

  3. Stable-isotope-labeled carbohydrates and nucleosides: Synthesis and applications in chemistry and biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serianni, A.S. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Carbohydrates play important roles in many key biochemical processes in living cells. For example, they are metabolized to produce energy, mediate cell-cell recognition, and play an indirect role (as constituents of DNA and RNA) in DNA replication, RNA transcription, and protein synthesis. These roles, and others of comparable biochemical significance, have been studied to varying extends with the use of stable isotopically labeled molecules, usually in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy and/or mass spectrometry. For example, carbohydrate metabolism has been monitored in vitro and in vivo with the use of isotopically labeled compounds. Molecular aspects of cell-cell recognition, mediated by cell-surface glycoproteins and glycolipids, have been probed through NMR studies of isotopically labeled oligosaccharides. More recently, the solution behavior of DNA and RNA has been examined through the use of labeled oligonucleotides. In all of these pursuits, the effort and expense to prepare labeled molecules, both of which can be substantial, are more than offset by the wealth of information derived from these studies. This information often cannot be accessed, or can be accessed only with great difficulty, using natural (unlabeled) compounds.

  4. Diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects substoichiometric concentrations of small molecules in protein samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, João P.; Palczewska, Małgorzata; André, Sabine; Cañada, F. Javier; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Mellström, Britt; Naranjo, José R.; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; Groves, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Small molecules are difficult to detect in protein solutions, whether they originate from elution during affinity chromatography (e.g., imidazole, lactose), buffer exchange (Tris), stabilizers (e.g., β-mercaptoethanol, glycerol), or excess labeling reagents (fluorescent reagents). Mass spectrometry

  5. Fluorescence enhancement of single DNA molecules confined in Si/SiO2 nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, F.; Persson, Karl Fredrik; Kristensen, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that the detected emission intensity from YOYO-labeled DNA molecules confined in 180 nm deep Si/SiO2 nano-funnels changes significantly and not monotonically with the width of the funnel. This effect may be of importance for quantitative fluorescence microscopy and for experiments ...

  6. Cationic and neutral nitrosamide: Viable molecules in the dilute gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.; Weiske, T.;

    1992-01-01

    Nitrosamide, NH2NO, has been generated and characterized in the dilute gas phase by means of neutralization reionization mass spectrometry in combination with extensive isotopic labelling. The molecule was found to be stable under these conditions having a minimal lifetime in the microsecond time...

  7. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...

  8. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  9. A microfluidic platform for transcription- and amplification-free detection of zepto-mole amounts of nucleic acid molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Reinhard; Haider, Michaela; Thünauer, Roland; Haselgrübler, Thomas; Schütz, Gerhard J; Sonnleitner, Alois; Hesse, Jan

    2016-04-15

    Here we report the development of a device for the transcription- and amplification-free detection of DNA and RNA molecules down to the zepto-mole range. A microfluidic chip with a built-in microarray was used for manipulation of nano-liter sample volumes. Specific staining and immobilization of the target molecules was achieved via a double hybridization approach thereby avoiding bias due to enzymatic processes like reverse transcription and PCR amplification. Therefore, target molecules were indirectly labeled by pre-hybridization to complementary Cy5-labeled probes. The remaining single-stranded portion of each target molecule could subsequently hybridize to complementary capture probes of a microarray. Thus a target-mediated immobilization of labeled DNA took place. By means of an ultra-sensitive fluorescence readout, all molecules hybridized to the microarray could be detected. The combination of minimized sample volume and single molecule detection yielded a detection limit of 39 fM (831 molecules in 35.4 nl assay volume) for target DNA and 16 fM (338 molecules) for target RNA after 1h on-chip hybridization.

  10. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Fang, Ye

    2011-07-01

    We describe a label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) method to assess the pharmacology of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor. This method combines dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays using an array of probe molecule-hijacked cells with similarity analysis. The whole cell DMR assays track cell system-based, ligand-directed, and kinetics-dependent biased activities of the drugs, and translates their on-target pharmacology into numerical descriptors which are subject to similarity analysis. We demonstrate that the approach establishes an effective link between the label-free pharmacology and in vivo therapeutic indications of drugs.

  11. Link Label Prediction in Signed Citation Network

    KAUST Repository

    Akujuobi, Uchenna

    2016-04-12

    Link label prediction is the problem of predicting the missing labels or signs of all the unlabeled edges in a network. For signed networks, these labels can either be positive or negative. In recent years, different algorithms have been proposed such as using regression, trust propagation and matrix factorization. These approaches have tried to solve the problem of link label prediction by using ideas from social theories, where most of them predict a single missing label given that labels of other edges are known. However, in most real-world social graphs, the number of labeled edges is usually less than that of unlabeled edges. Therefore, predicting a single edge label at a time would require multiple runs and is more computationally demanding. In this thesis, we look at link label prediction problem on a signed citation network with missing edge labels. Our citation network consists of papers from three major machine learning and data mining conferences together with their references, and edges showing the relationship between them. An edge in our network is labeled either positive (dataset relevant) if the reference is based on the dataset used in the paper or negative otherwise. We present three approaches to predict the missing labels. The first approach converts the label prediction problem into a standard classification problem. We then, generate a set of features for each edge and then adopt Support Vector Machines in solving the classification problem. For the second approach, we formalize the graph such that the edges are represented as nodes with links showing similarities between them. We then adopt a label propagation method to propagate the labels on known nodes to those with unknown labels. In the third approach, we adopt a PageRank approach where we rank the nodes according to the number of incoming positive and negative edges, after which we set a threshold. Based on the ranks, we can infer an edge would be positive if it goes a node above the

  12. Label Space Reduction in MPLS Networks: How Much Can A Single Stacked Label Do?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solano, Fernando; Stidsen, Thomas K.; Fabregat, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Most network operators have considered reducing LSR label spaces (number of labels used) as a way of simplifying management of underlaying virtual private networks (VPNs) and therefore reducing operational expenditure (OPEX). The IETF outlined the label merging feature in MPLS-allowing the config......Most network operators have considered reducing LSR label spaces (number of labels used) as a way of simplifying management of underlaying virtual private networks (VPNs) and therefore reducing operational expenditure (OPEX). The IETF outlined the label merging feature in MPLS...

  13. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  14. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  15. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA

  16. Extending Modal Transition Systems with Structured Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Sebastian S.; Juhl, Line; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel formalism of label-structured modal transition systems that combines the classical may/must modalities on transitions with structured labels that represent quantitative aspects of the model. On the one hand, the specification formalism is general enough to include models like...... study modal and thorough refinement, determinization, parallel composition, conjunction, quotient, and logical characterization of label-structured modal transition systems....

  17. Functional alterations of human platelets following indium-111 labelling using different incubation media and labelling agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Imaizumi, Masatoshi (Osaka National Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Cardiovascular Medicine and Radiological Science); Kimura, Kazufumi (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Matsumoto, Masayasu; Kamada, Takenobu (Osaka Univ. (Japan). 1. Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1991-05-01

    Human platelets were labelled in the absence of presence of plasma using {sup 111}In-labelled oxine sulphate, tropolone or 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (MPO). Under in vitro and in vivo conditions, platelet functions were evaluated by measuring their aggregability, survival, recovery and early distribution. High labelling efficiency was achieved in saline labelling, whereas with plasma labelling, it was necessary to concentrate the platelet-rich plasma to 4.8x10{sup 6} platelets/{mu}l. The aggregation of platelets labelled in plasma or saline was compared with that of controls; platelets labelled in saline showed lower aggregability in 2 {mu}M ADP but not in 5 {mu}M ADP nor with collagen. No significant differences in platelet survival and recovery were noted between platelets labelled in plasma and those labelled in saline. Our results indicate that partial loss of ADP aggregability in vitro does not influence the in vivo viability of platelets labelled in saline. Scintigraphic studies showed that platelets labelled in a saline medium were temporarily sequestrated in the liver but not in the spleen or heart. Thus, platelet labelling in saline does not affect platelet function adversely, but platelets labelled in plasma are more desirable for assessing the early distribution of platelets in the reticuloendothelial system. (orig.).

  18. ML-MG: Multi-label Learning with Missing Labels Using a Mixed Graph

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Baoyuan

    2015-12-07

    This work focuses on the problem of multi-label learning with missing labels (MLML), which aims to label each test instance with multiple class labels given training instances that have an incomplete/partial set of these labels (i.e. some of their labels are missing). To handle missing labels, we propose a unified model of label dependencies by constructing a mixed graph, which jointly incorporates (i) instance-level similarity and class co-occurrence as undirected edges and (ii) semantic label hierarchy as directed edges. Unlike most MLML methods, We formulate this learning problem transductively as a convex quadratic matrix optimization problem that encourages training label consistency and encodes both types of label dependencies (i.e. undirected and directed edges) using quadratic terms and hard linear constraints. The alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) can be used to exactly and efficiently solve this problem. To evaluate our proposed method, we consider two popular applications (image and video annotation), where the label hierarchy can be derived from Wordnet. Experimental results show that our method achieves a significant improvement over state-of-the-art methods in performance and robustness to missing labels.

  19. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until “bleached”. This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes. PMID:25482122

  20. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Zurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until "bleached". This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes.

  1. Optimal design of isotope labeling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Mandy, Dominic E; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling experiments (ILE) constitute a powerful methodology for estimating metabolic fluxes. An optimal label design for such an experiment is necessary to maximize the precision with which fluxes can be determined. But often, precision gained in the determination of one flux comes at the expense of the precision of other fluxes, and an appropriate label design therefore foremost depends on the question the investigator wants to address. One could liken ILE to shadows that metabolism casts on products. Optimal label design is the placement of the lamp; creating clear shadows for some parts of metabolism and obscuring others.An optimal isotope label design is influenced by: (1) the network structure; (2) the true flux values; (3) the available label measurements; and, (4) commercially available substrates. The first two aspects are dictated by nature and constrain any optimal design. The second two aspects are suitable design parameters. To create an optimal label design, an explicit optimization criterion needs to be formulated. This usually is a property of the flux covariance matrix, which can be augmented by weighting label substrate cost. An optimal design is found by using such a criterion as an objective function for an optimizer. This chapter uses a simple elementary metabolite units (EMU) representation of the TCA cycle to illustrate the process of experimental design of isotope labeled substrates.

  2. Simultaneous Segmentation and Statistical Label Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asman, Andrew J; Landmana, Bennett A

    2012-02-23

    Labeling or segmentation of structures of interest in medical imaging plays an essential role in both clinical and scientific understanding. Two of the common techniques to obtain these labels are through either fully automated segmentation or through multi-atlas based segmentation and label fusion. Fully automated techniques often result in highly accurate segmentations but lack the robustness to be viable in many cases. On the other hand, label fusion techniques are often extremely robust, but lack the accuracy of automated algorithms for specific classes of problems. Herein, we propose to perform simultaneous automated segmentation and statistical label fusion through the reformulation of a generative model to include a linkage structure that explicitly estimates the complex global relationships between labels and intensities. These relationships are inferred from the atlas labels and intensities and applied to the target using a non-parametric approach. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of previously exclusive techniques and attempts to combine the accuracy benefits of automated segmentation with the robustness of a multi-atlas based approach. The accuracy benefits of this simultaneous approach are assessed using a multi-label multi- atlas whole-brain segmentation experiment and the segmentation of the highly variable thyroid on computed tomography images. The results demonstrate that this technique has major benefits for certain types of problems and has the potential to provide a paradigm shift in which the lines between statistical label fusion and automated segmentation are dramatically blurred.

  3. METHOD AND MODULE FOR OPTICAL SUBCARRIER LABELLING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    ) transmitters. The payload and the label are encoded independently on optical carrier and subcarrier signals respectively, using electro-optical modulators. The invention applies single or double sideband carrier-suppressed modulation to generate subcarrier signals for encoding of the label. Thereby the payload......The present invention relates to optical labelling in WDM networks, in that it provides a method and a module to be used in subcarrier label generation and switching in network edge nodes and core switch nodes. The methods and modules are typically employed in Optical Subcarrier Multiplexing (OSCM...

  4. Organic labeling influences food valuation and choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, N S; Uhl, G; Fliessbach, K; Trautner, P; Elger, C E; Weber, B

    2010-10-15

    Everyday we choose between a variety of different food items trying to reach a decision that fits best our needs. These decisions are highly dependent on the context in which the alternatives are presented (e.g. labeling). We investigate the influence of cognition on food evaluation, using an fMRI experiment in which subjects saw and bid on different foods labeled with (or without) a widely known German emblem for organically produced food. Increased activity in the ventral striatum was found for foods labeled "organic" in comparison to conventionally labeled food. Between-subject differences in activity were related to actual everyday consumption behavior of organic food.

  5. Synthesis of tritium labelled 24-epibrassinolide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbe, A.; Marquardt, V.; Adam, G. (Inst. of Plant Biochemistry Halle, Halle/Saale (Germany))

    1992-10-01

    Deuterium and tritium 5,7,7-tris-labelled 24-epibrassinolide were prepared by base catalyzed exchange reaction using 24-epicastasterone tetraacetate 1 or bis-isopropylidenedioxy-24-epicastasterone 8 and labelled water. Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of the obtained labelled 6-ketones 2 and 3 with CF[sub 3]CO[sub 3]H gave after alkaline deacetylation of the resulting 4 and 5 the desired tris-labelled 24-epibrassinolides 6 and 7, respectively, or starting from 9 under simultaneous oxidation and deprotection in one step the same final products. (author).

  6. GOLD CLUSTER LABELS AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES IN MOLECULAR MORPHOLOGY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAINFELD,J.F.; POWELL,R.D.

    2004-02-04

    Although intensely colored, even the largest colloidal gold particles are not, on their own, sufficiently colored for routine use as a light microscopy stain: only with very abundant antigens or with specialized illumination methods can bound gold be seen. Colloidal gold probes were developed primarily as markers for electron microscopy, for which their very high electron density and selectivity for narrow size distributions when prepared in different ways rendered them highly suited. The widespread use of gold labeling for light microscopy was made possible by the introduction of autometallographic enhancement methods. In these processes, the bound gold particles are exposed to a solution containing metal ions and a reducing agent; they catalyze the reduction of the ions, resulting in the deposition of additional metal selectively onto the particles. On the molecular level, the gold particles are enlarged up to 30-100 nm in diameter; on the macroscale level, this results in the formation of a dark stain in regions containing bound gold particles, greatly increasing visibility and contrast. The applications of colloidal gold have been described elsewhere in this chapter, we will focus on the use of covalently linked cluster complexes of gold and other metals. A gold cluster complex is a discrete molecular coordination compound comprising a central core, or ''cluster'' of electron-dense metal atoms, ligated by a shell of small organic molecules (ligands), which are linked to the metal atoms on the surface of the core. This structure gives clusters several important advantages as labels. The capping of the metal surface by ligands prevents non-specific binding to cell and tissue components, which can occur with colloidal gold. Cluster compounds are more stable and may be used under a wider range of conditions. Unlike colloidal gold, clusters do not require additional macromolecules such as bovine serum albumin or polyethylene glycol for

  7. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makusu Tsutsui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule.

  8. Synthesis and labelling of epidepride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    S-(-)-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-5-iodo-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide (proposed generic name, epidepride) is a very potent dopamine D2 antagonist. It was synthesized by five steps from 3-methoxysalicylic acid. [131I]epidepride was obtained in 97.3% radiochemical yields from the corresponding 5-(tributyltin) derivative using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The aryltin precursor was prepared from non-labelled epidepride by palladium-catalyzed stannylation using bis(tri-n-butyltin) in triethylamine. [131I]epidepride was stable under 4℃, and partition coefficient was 72.3 at pH 7.40. The biodistribution study in rats exihibited high localization in the striatum of the brain with the striatum/cerebellum ratio reaching 237/1 at 320 min postinjection.All these results suggest that[131I]epidepride may be usedd widely as a useful dopamineD2 receptor imaging agent for SPECT.

  9. Principles of food product labelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Krysztofiak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the label of the food product is to provide information on ingredients and additionally on its origin, production method, storage conditions, date tagging, as well as to enable to identify the producer or distributor of this product. Legal regulations precisely give instructions on the range and the way of the presentation of these data, so they could be clear and understandable for the average consumer. Since 25th of November 2005, the information about allergens’ presence must be placed on the label, regardless of their content in the product (Directive 2003/89/WE... 2003 – Off. J. L 308: 15-18. The Regulation (WE No 1924/2006 about placing the nutritional information and medicinal claims concerning foods (Regulation (WE No 1924/2006... 2006 a is valid in all countries of European Union since 1st of July 2007 (Off. J. L 404: 9-25. It coordinates the legislative, executive and administrative regulations connected with this labelling. According to these regulations, “nutritional information” states, suggests or gives to understand that the food product has special properties concerning its ingredients. Those statements are of type: “the source of...”, “no... content”, “high content of...”, “low content of...”, “reduced content of...” with reference to calorie or selected ingredients’ content. “Medicinal claims” state, suggest or give to understand, that there is a connection between the food product or one of its ingredients and the health condition of the consumer. First type of these medicinal claims refers to the influence of the ingredient on the physiology. Such a statement is based on generally accepted scientific conclusions and could be properly understood by the average consumer, e.g. “calcium takes part in the process of building of strong bones”. “Statements about decreasing the risk of a disease” give information, that food product or one of its ingredients efficiently

  10. F-18 labeled 3-fluorodiazepam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxen, A.; Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    3-Fluorodiazepam is a new and potent antianxiety agent with prolonged action. The authors found that molecular fluorine (0.5% in Ne) reacts cleanly with diazepam in freon or chloroform at room temperature to produce 3-fluorodiazepam in good yields. Successful syntheses have employed 2:1 to 5:1 molar ratios diazepam: fluorine to minimize the formation of byproducts. (/sup 18/F) 3-Fluorodiazepam, a potential candidate for PET studies, (specific activity 3-5 Ci/mmol) has been synthesized from /sup 18/F-F/sub 2/ using the same procedure, followed by column chromatographic purification (Silicagel, dichloromethane: ethyl acetate, 5:1) with a radiochemical yield of 12-20% (50% maximum) and a chemical and radiochemical purity >99% as judged by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography analysis (Ultrasyl octyl column, 10 ..mu.. m, 4.6 x 250 mm i.d., 60% MeOH 40% water; flow rate, 1.0 ml/min; retention time for (/sup 18/F) fluorodiazepam, 11.4 min; for diazepam, 13.5 min; radioactivity and ultraviolet detectors). Lower radiochemical yields (5-7%), and significant formation of by-products were observed when (/sup 18/F)acetylhypofluorite, prepared in the gasphase, was used as the reagent. Readily accessible routes to /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines of higher specific activity were also investigated. Approaches to the synthesis of high specific activity (>200 Ci/mmol) (/sup 18/F)3-fluorodiazepam involve nucleophilic displacement at carbon-3 (e.g. from 3-chlorodiazepam) with (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion. The results presented here demonstrate the synthetic accessibility of /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines for application in neurotransmitter ligand studies with PET.

  11. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhir Boujday

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR, (phase-modulated InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS, and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS. Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes.

  12. When water molecules meet air

    OpenAIRE

    Hsie, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R. Kramer; Verde, Ana Vila; Bolhuis, Peter; Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-01-01

    About 70% of our planet is covered in water. Most of that water exists as water in the bulk – the neighbors of water molecules are other water molecules – and only a small fraction of molecules are at the air-water interface. Despite the small relative abundance of interfacial water, it is of the utmost importance: it governs the chemistry involving the surface of oceans and seawater aerosols, or the small water droplets forming clouds. Reactions at the air-water interface are directly releva...

  13. Chain store management through private labels strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Sopta

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the market shares of private labels in the European Union and on the global market, and to compare the results of the analysis with the level of presence of private labels on the Croatian market. Moreover, through the application of macro and microeconomic tools, the author tried to estimate the future trends of private labels in Croatia.For the purpose of the paper secondary and primary data was used in the research. Relevant scientific and professional literature of local and foreign authors was analyzed. In addition, a few recent research studies were analyzed and their results compared. Field research has been conducted by the survey method, with 225 respondents included in the intentional sample.The main hypothesis of the paper based on research is that, in total sales, private labels are gaining a growing share in all markets, regardless of the development level of those markets. Alongside the main hypothesis of the work, three supporting hypotheses were tested to see which private labels are a good alternative to other brands on the world market. Private labels are generally developed on generic products. The third supporting hypothesis starts from the assumption that the investments in the promotion of private labels are negligible, resulting in lower prices of thoseproducts. The results of research and analyses in the work indicate that the position of private labels will strengthen internationally, as part of the process of liberalization and globalization of trade flows. In the process of purchase of private labels the positioning of the point of sale and price have an increasing contribution. With the concentration of commerce in chain stores, the share of private labels grows, approaching a half of the total sales in some countries. Considering the Croatian market, according to the international product life cycle theory, the share of private labels in the total sales will grow in the future

  14. 76 FR 46671 - Food Labeling; Gluten-Free Labeling of Foods; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 101 RIN 0910-ZA26 Food Labeling; Gluten-Free... the comment period for the proposed rule on the ``gluten-free'' labeling of foods, published in the... ``gluten- free,'' for voluntary use in the labeling of foods, to mean that the food does not contain...

  15. Portion Size Labeling and Intended Soft Drink Consumption: The Impact of Labeling Format and Size Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Willemijn M.; Steenhuis, Ingrid H. M.; Leeuwis, Franca H.; Bos, Arjan E. R.; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess what portion size labeling "format" is most promising in helping consumers selecting appropriate soft drink sizes, and whether labeling impact depends on the size portfolio. Methods: An experimental study was conducted in fast-food restaurants in which 2 labeling formats (ie, reference portion size and small/medium/large…

  16. Special Issue: Single Molecule Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans H. Gorris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in the detection and manipulation of single molecules have enabled new insights into the function, structure and interactions of biomolecules. This Special Issue was launched to account for the rapid progress in the field of “Single Molecule Techniques”. Four original research articles and seven review articles provide an introduction, as well as an in-depth discussion, of technical developments that are indispensable for the characterization of individual biomolecules. Fluorescence microscopy takes center stage in this Special Issue because it is one of the most sensitive and flexible techniques, which has been adapted in many variations to the specific demands of single molecule analysis. Two additional articles are dedicated to single molecule detection based on atomic force microscopy.

  17. Absorption characteristics of bacteriorhodopsin molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H K T Kumar; K Appaji Gowda

    2000-03-01

    The bacteriorhodopsin molecule absorbs light and undergoes a series of structural transformation following a well-defined photocycle. The complex photocycle is transformed to an equivalent level diagram by considering the lifetime of the intermediate states. Assuming that only and states are appreciably populated at any instant of time, the level diagram is further simplified to two-level system. Based on the rate equations for two-level system, an analytic expression for the absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin molecule is derived. It is applied to study the behaviour of absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin film in the visible wavelength region of 514 nm. The dependence of absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin film on the thickness of the film, total number density of active molecules and initial number density of molecules in -state is presented in the graphical form.

  18. Quantum Transport Through Heterocyclic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    We explore electron transport properties in molecular wires made of heterocyclic molecules (pyrrole, furan and thiophene) by using the Green's function technique. Parametric calculations are given based on the tight-binding model to describe the electron transport in these wires. It is observed that the transport properties are significantly influenced by (a) the heteroatoms in the heterocyclic molecules and (b) the molecule-to-electrodes coupling strength. Conductance (g) shows sharp resonance peaks associated with the molecular energy levels in the limit of weak molecular coupling, while they get broadened in the strong molecular coupling limit. These resonances get shifted with the change of the heteroatoms in these heterocyclic molecules. All the essential features of the electron transfer through these molecular wires become much more clearly visible from the study of our current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, and they provide several key information in the study of molecular transport.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Receptor Expression In Vivo by Near-Infrared Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Chernomordik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 overexpression in breast cancers is associated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. Current techniques for estimating this important characteristic use ex vivo assays that require tissue biopsies. We suggest a novel noninvasive method to characterize HER2 expression in vivo, using optical imaging, based on HER2-specific probes (albumin-binding domain–fused-(ZHER2:3422-Cys Affibody molecules [Affibody AB, Solna, Sweden], labeled with Alexa Fluor 750 [Molecular Probes, Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA] that could be used concomitantly with HER2-targeted therapy. Subcutaneous tumor xenografts, expressing different levels of HER2, were imaged with a near-infrared fluorescence small-animal imaging system at several times postinjection of the probe. The compartmental ligand-receptor model was used to calculate HER2 expression from imaging data. Correlation between HER2 amplification/overexpression in tumor cells and parameters, directly estimated from the sequence of optical images, was observed (eg, experimental data for BT474 xenografts indicate that initial slope, characterizing the temporal dependence of the fluorescence intensity detected in the tumor, linearly depends on the HER2 expression, as measured ex vivo by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the same tumor. The results obtained from tumors expressing different levels of HER2 substantiate a similar relationship between the initial slope and HER2 amplification/overexpression. This work shows that optical imaging, combined with mathematical modeling, allows noninvasive monitoring of HER2 expression in vivo.

  20. Guidance molecules in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nasarre, Patrick; Potiron, Vincent; Drabkin, Harry; Roche, Joëlle

    2010-01-01

    Guidance molecules were first described in the nervous system to control axon outgrowth direction. They are also widely expressed outside the nervous system where they control cell migration, tissue development and establishment of the vascular network. In addition, they are involved in cancer development, tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. This review is primarily focused on their functions in lung cancer and their involvement in lung development is also presented. Five guidance molecule fam...

  1. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, V V

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  2. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, V. V.; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-11-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for the construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  3. Optofluidic single molecule flow proteometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Nan; Chou, Chao-Kai; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2009-02-01

    A microfluidic single molecule fluorescence-based detection scheme is developed to identify target protein direct from cell lysate by using polyclonal antibody. Relative concentration of target protein in solution is determined by twodimensional (2D) photon burst analysis. Compared to conventional ensemble measurement assays, this microfluidic single molecule approach combines the advantages of higher sensitivity, fast processing time, small sample consumption and high resolution quantitative analysis.

  4. Bridging the gap between single molecule and ensemble methods for measuring lateral dynamics in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Schwartzentruber, J.; Clausen, M. P.;

    2013-01-01

    The lateral dynamics of proteins and lipids in the mammalian plasma membrane are heterogeneous likely reflecting both a complex molecular organization and interactions with other macromolecules that reside outside the plane of the membrane. Several methods are commonly used for characterizing...... the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins. These experimental and data analysis methods differ in equipment requirements, labeling complexities, and further oftentimes give different results. It would therefore be very convenient to have a single method that is flexible in the choice of fluorescent label...... for analyzing lateral dynamics in samples that are labeled at high densities, can also be used for fast and accurate analysis of single molecule density data of lipids and proteins labeled with quantum dots (QDs). We have further used kICS to investigate the effect of the label size and by comparing the results...

  5. 40 CFR 1042.830 - Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES AND VESSELS Special Provisions for Remanufactured Marine Engines § 1042.830 Labeling. (a) At the time of remanufacture, affix a permanent and...) Written in English. (b) The label must— (1) Include the heading “EMISSION CONTROL INFORMATION”....

  6. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch this video for tips on figuring out food labels so you can make healthy choices. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Keeping Portions Under Control Figuring Out Food Labels Healthy Food Shopping If My Child Has ...

  7. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diluent labels. 112.3 Section 112.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.3...

  8. Influence of Food Labels on Adolescent Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ranjita

    2002-01-01

    Provides information on food nutrition labels and discusses the benefits of adolescents' using them to plan healthy diets. Suggests that teachers and educators should encourage appropriate label reading education for adolescents to promote healthy eating practices. Provides definitions of nutrient content claims. (SG)

  9. 7 CFR 65.400 - Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING... country of origin of a product may be in the form of a statement such as “Product of USA,” “Produce of the..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Country of Origin Notification § 65.400 Labeling. (a) Country......

  10. 78 FR 18272 - Energy Labeling Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... CFR Part 305 Energy Labeling Rule AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission''). ACTION... in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``Energy Label Ranges, Matter No. R611004'' on... Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) until April 1, 2013. In the NPRM, the Commission proposed to amend the...

  11. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES... labeling a product. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0013)...

  12. 78 FR 2200 - Energy Labeling Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... ensure consumers can view the labels when they are shopping online. In particular, it will provide retail... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16..., clarifying testing requirements and enforcement provisions, improving online energy label disclosures,...

  13. China Cotton label to be generalized

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    "China Cotton"authorization press conference was held in Beijing on October 11. China Cotton Association granted authorization to the first four enterprises, allowing them to use the label of China Cotton on their qualified products. Shandong Lanyan Group, Beijing Miantian Textile Co., Ltd are among the fi rst companies authorized to use China Cotton label.

  14. Do European consumers use nutrition labels?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Josephine M.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Celemín, Laura Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labelling on food packages becomes more and more widespread in the European Union. Such information is not compulsory, unless a nutrition or health claim is made. However, how do consumers use nutrition information? Two European studies are currently assessing whether nutrition...... knowledge about nutrition and are able to use nutrition labels to identify healthier products within a category....

  15. 9 CFR 101.4 - Labeling terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling terminology. 101.4 Section 101.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Labeling terminology. Terms pertaining to identification and packaging of biological products shall...

  16. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... this section). (e) The term very low sodium may be used in the labeling of OTC drug products intended.... (f) The term low sodium may be used in the labeling of OTC drug products intended for oral ingestion... the term sodium. (h) The terms sodium free, very low sodium, and low sodium shall be in print size...

  17. On the Complexity of Labeled Oriented Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stephan Rosebrock

    2010-02-01

    We define a notion of complexity for labeled oriented trees (LOTs) related to the bridge number in knot theory and prove that LOTs of complexity 2 are aspherical. We also present a class of LOTs of higher complexity which is aspherical, give an upper bound for the complexity of labeled oriented intervals and study the complexity of torus knots.

  18. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1- to 2-Year-Old How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print A A A en español Cómo leer las etiquetas ...

  19. Synthesis of deuterium labeled plant ethylene precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, K.C. [Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Rapoport, H. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of {beta}-deuterium labeled 2-keto-4-methylbutyric acid were investigated. Vinyl chloride was first reacted with the ethyl oxalyl chloride moiety using aluminum chloride as condensing agent and the addition of methyl mercaptan followed. Deuterium labeling was achieved by using NaBD{sub 4} reduction in pyridine. (author).

  20. The anatomy of a laser label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an efficient alternative to adhesive tags. The advantages of this system are numerous. In general the label consists of alphanumerical characters formed by laser generated pinhole depressions that penetrate the produce’s surface creating visible markings. H...

  1. Alternatives to radioimmunoassay: labels and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schall, R.F. Jr.; Tenoso, H.J.

    1981-07-01

    The following labels used as substitutes for radioisotopes in immunoassay systems are reviewed bacteriophages, chemiluminescence precursors, fluorochromes, fluorogens, fluorescence quenchers, enzymes, coenzymes, inhibitors, substrates, various particulates, metal atoms, and stable free radicals. New methods for performing immunoassays with these labels are described where appropriate. Methods that require no separation steps and offer special promise for easy automation are noted. 69 references cited.

  2. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of /sup 11/C, /sup 18/F and /sup 13/N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume.

  3. 49 CFR 172.416 - POISON GAS label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON GAS label. 172.416 Section 172.416... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.416 POISON GAS label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON GAS label... POISON GAS label and the symbol must be white. The background of the upper diamond must be black and...

  4. A Note on Prime and Sequential Labelings of Finite Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew Varkey T.K; Sunoj. B.S

    2015-01-01

    A labeling or valuation of a graph G is an assignment f of labels to the vertices of G that induces for each edge xy a label depending on the vertex labels f(x) and f(y). In this paper, we study some classes of graphs and their corresponding labelings.

  5. Correlative atomic force microscopy and localization-based super-resolution microscopy: revealing labelling and image reconstruction artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Aitor; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid microscopy: A correlative microscopy tool that combines in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single-molecule localization and atomic force microscopy is presented. Direct comparison with high- resolution topography allows the authors to improve fluorescence labeling and image analysis in super-resolution imaging.

  6. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-15

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK{sub 1} kidney cells at mass 28 ({sup 13}C{sup 15}N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of {sup 39}K, {sup 23}Na and {sup 40}Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  7. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13C and 15N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13C15N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39K, 23Na and 40Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  8. Fabry-Perot-based Fourier-transform hyperspectral imaging allows multi-labeled fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Marco; Zucco, Massimo

    2014-05-10

    We demonstrate the ability of our hyperspectral imaging device, based on a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer, to obtain a single hyper-image of a sample marked with different fluorescent molecules, and to unambiguously discriminate them by observing their spectral fingerprints. An experiment carried out with cyanines, fluorescein, and quantum dots emitting in the yellow-orange region, demonstrates the feasibility of multi-labeled fluorescence microscopy without the use of multiple filter sets or dispersive means.

  9. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  10. Microfluidics-integrated cascaded double-microring resonators for label-free biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangqing; Yu, Fang; Yang, Chang; Li, Mingyu; Tang, Longhua; Song, Jinyan; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-11-01

    A highly-sensitive optical waveguide biosensor integrated with microfluidic channels based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) was investigated in this paper. Experimental results of the label-free detection exhibits this novel biosensor with the superior reliability for quantitative and kinetic measurement of the interaction between biological molecules, dramatically improving the sensitivity due to the Vernier effect induced by cascaded double-microring resonators.

  11. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  12. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  13. Dual-Colored DNA Comb Polymers for Single Molecule Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Danielle; Marciel, Amanda; Schroeder, Charles

    2014-03-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of branched biopolymers for single molecule rheology. In our work, we utilize a hybrid enzymatic-synthetic approach to graft ``short'' DNA branches to ``long'' DNA backbones, thereby producing macromolecular DNA comb polymers. The branches and backbones are synthesized via polymerase chain reaction with chemically modified deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs): ``short'' branches consist of Cy5-labeled dNTPs and a terminal azide group, and ``long'' backbones contain dibenzylcyclooctyne-modified (DBCO) dNTPs. In this way, we utilize strain-promoted, copper-free cycloaddition ``click'' reactions for facile grafting of azide-terminated branches at DBCO sites along backbones. Copper-free click reactions are bio-orthogonal and nearly quantitative when carried out under mild conditions. Moreover, comb polymers can be labeled with an intercalating dye (e.g., YOYO) for dual-color fluorescence imaging. We characterized these materials using gel electrophoresis, HPLC, and optical microscopy, with atomic force microscopy in progress. Overall, DNA combs are suitable for single molecule dynamics, and in this way, our work holds the potential to improve our understanding of topologically complex polymer melts and solutions.

  14. ORGANIC FOOD LABELING AND CERTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLETA-ANDREEA NEACSU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the rush to produce more and more crops to satisfy growing demand producers have had to resort to using a lethal cocktail of pesticides to control disease and insect attack. This has lead to numerous international debates about unhealthy food, the effects of it and the measures that must be taken in order to avoid the harmful effects of genetically modified food consumption demonstrated by specialists. These debates evolve around the benefits of the organic products versus the pure trade trick outlined by some. The organic food movement has earned its well deserved place in many markets around the world. Its prestige is lately being widespread to vast parts of Eastern-Europe as well. Based on data collected from specialized reports and articles on organic products, the aim of this paper is to present the importance of organic products, the regulations on organic food and different labels used around the world in order to certify the organic food products.

  15. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-09

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules.

  16. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  17. Off-label uses of retinoids in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Retinoids has been used widely in the topical and systemic treatments of various dermatoses: psoriasis, disorders of keratinization (DOK, keratotic genodermatosis, and severe acne. Moreover, it is also used in the treatment and/or chemoprevention of skin cancer and other neoplasms. Retinoids display key regulatory functions and most dermatologists are familiar with the FDA-approved indication of this medication. Retinoic acid is a potent signaling molecule that is essential for many biological processes, and its levels are tightly regulated by mechanisms that are only partially understood. This article will review these recent findings and attempt to synthesize their meaning to provide a view into the off-label uses of retinoids in dermatology with an emphasis on oral isotretinoin and acitrein.

  18. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.;

    2012-01-01

    on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...... atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...

  19. Method of Stamping Surface-Enhance Raman Spectroscopy for Label-Free, Multiplexed, Molecular Sensing and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wei-Chuan (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present disclosure relates the use of a stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS) technique with nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) plasmonic substrates to produce a label-free, multiplexed molecular sensing and imaging technique. A NPGD SERS substrate is stamped onto a surface containing one or more target molecules, followed by SERS measurement of the target molecules located between the surface and SERS substrate. The target molecules may be deposited on the surface, which may be a carrier substrate such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

  20. Label-free surface plasmon sensing towards cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Goutham

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop a conventional, home-built SPR bio-sensor to demonstrate bio-sensing applications. This emphasizes the understanding of basic concepts of Surface Plasmon Resonance and various interrogation techniques. Intensity Modulation was opted to perform the label-free SPR bio-sensing experiments due to its cost-efficient and compact setup. Later, label-free surface plasmon sensing was carried out to study and understand the bio-molecular interactions between (1). BSA and Anti BSA molecules and (2). Exosome/Liposome on thin metal (Au) films. Exosomes are cell-derived vesicles present in bodily fluids like blood, saliva, urine, epididymal fluid containing miRNAs, RNA, proteins, etc., at stable quantities during normal health conditions. The exosomes comprise varied constituents based on their cell origin from where they are secreted and is specific to that particular origin. However an exacerbated release is observed during tumor or cancer conditions. This increased level of exosomes present in the sample, can be detected using the SPR bio-sensor demonstrated in this thesis and effective thickness of adsorption on Au surface can be estimated. Also, chemically synthesized liposome particles were studied to determine if they can generate an equivalent sensor response to that of exosomes to consider them as an alternate. Finally a 10ppb Mercury (Hg) sensing was performed as part of Environment Monitoring application and results have been tabulated and compared.

  1. 99Tcm direct labeling of angiostatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金赫; 徐海峰; 邵秋菊; 袁梦晖; 周润锁; 周亮飞

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the method of 99Tcm direct labeling of angiostatin (AS) and investigate the stability and bioactivity of the 99Tcm-labeled AS in vitro. Methods: AS was extracted, validated, and then labeled with 99Tcm after having been reduced by 2-ME or SnCl2. The best labeling condition was screened by cross design. The labeling efficiency was measured by TLC and column chromatography. The stability of 99Tcm-AS was observed and compared when BSA, saline and different molar ratios of Cys∶AS were separately added. The bioactivity of 99Tcm-AS was observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (CEV304). Results: The labeling efficiency can reach (97±1.5)% for the 2-ME-reducing approach. Its best experimental condition was as follows: AS 100 μg,PB(0.5 mol/L, pH 7.3)1 ml, 2-ME 100 μg, MDP (dissolved in 1 ml saline) 10 μl, and 99TcmO4- 185 MBq. The labeling efficiency using SnCl2-reducing method can reach (90±3.0)%. The best experimental procedure was as follows: AS 100 μg,boric acid buffer(0.1 mol/L, pH 9.0)1 ml, 2%SnCl2 (dissolved in 1 mol/L hydrochloric acid) 20 μl, was added into MDP, which was diluted with 1 ml deoxygenized water, and then 20 μl, 99TcmO4- 185 MBq was added. The product of 99Tcm labeled AS was stable in vitro and had the same bioactivity as AS. Conclusion: 99Tcm direct labeling of AS is simple and efficient. And the bioactivity of 99Tcm-AS has no significant change compared with AS.

  2. 27 CFR 16.21 - Mandatory label information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the brand label or separate front label, or on a back or side label, separate and apart from all other... of alcoholic beverages impairs your ability to drive a car or operate machinery, and may cause...

  3. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  4. 7 CFR 205.306 - Labeling of livestock feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and Market Information § 205.306 Labeling of...

  5. IRMS detection of testosterone manipulated with {sup 13}C labeled standards in human urine by removing the labeled {sup 13}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingzhu, E-mail: wangjingzhu@chinada.cn [National Anti-Doping Laboratory, China Anti-Doping Agency, Beijing (China); Yang, Rui [Sport Science College, Beijing Sport University Beijing, Beijing (China); Yang, Wenning [School of Pharmacy, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing (China); Liu, Xin; Xing, Yanyi; Xu, Youxuan [National Anti-Doping Laboratory, China Anti-Doping Agency, Beijing (China)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • {sup 13}C labeled testosterone can be used to adjust the isotope ratio of testosterone. • The novel testosterone cannot be detected by the regular IRMS method in doping test. • A method was explored to remove the labeled {sup 13}C. • The established method can be used to detect the manipulated testosterone. - Abstract: Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is applied to confirm testosterone (T) abuse by determining the carbon isotope ratios (δ{sup 13}C value). However, {sup 13}C labeled standards can be used to control the δ{sup 13}C value and produce manipulated T which cannot be detected by the current method. A method was explored to remove the {sup 13}C labeled atom at C-3 from the molecule of androsterone (Andro), the metabolite of T in urine, to produce the resultant (A-nor-5α-androstane-2,17-dione, ANAD). The difference in δ{sup 13}C values between Andro and ANAD (Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD}, ‰) would change significantly in case manipulated T is abused. Twenty-one volunteers administered T manipulated with different {sup 13}C labeled standards. The collected urine samples were analyzed with the established method, and the maximum value of Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD} post ingestion ranged from 3.0‰ to 8.8‰. Based on the population reference, the cut-off value of Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD} for positive result was suggested as 1.2‰. The developed method could be used to detect T manipulated with 3-{sup 13}C labeled standards.

  6. Electric Deflection of Rotating Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gershnabel, E

    2010-01-01

    We provide a theory of the deflection of polar and non-polar rotating molecules by inhomogeneous static electric field. Rainbow-like features in the angular distribution of the scattered molecules are analyzed in detail. Furthermore, we demonstrate that one may efficiently control the deflection process with the help of short and strong femtosecond laser pulses. In particular the deflection process may by turned-off by a proper excitation, and the angular dispersion of the deflected molecules can be substantially reduced. We study the problem both classically and quantum mechanically, taking into account the effects of strong deflecting field on the molecular rotations. In both treatments we arrive at the same conclusions. The suggested control scheme paves the way for many applications involving molecular focusing, guiding, and trapping by inhomogeneous fields.

  7. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  9. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  10. Sublinear distance labeling for sparse graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Dahlgaard, Søren; Knudsen, Mathias Bæk Tejs;

    2015-01-01

    between pairs of nodes that are at distance at least $D$ from each other. In this paper we consider distance labeling schemes for the classical case of unweighted and undirected graphs. We present the first distance labeling scheme of size $o(n)$ for sparse graphs (and hence bounded degree graphs......). This addresses an open problem by Gavoille et. al. [J. Algo. 2004], hereby separating the complexity from general graphs which require $\\Omega(n)$ size Moon [Proc. of Glasgow Math. Association 1965]. As an intermediate result we give a $O(\\frac{n}{D}\\log^2 D)$ $D$-preserving distance labeling scheme, improving...

  11. Development of versatile isotopic labeling reagents for profiling the amine submetabolome by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ruokun; Huan, Tao; Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • Two new reagents were developed for chemical isotope labeling mass spectrometry (MS). • They could be used to label amine-containing metabolites in a metabolomic sample. • The labeled metabolites could be detected with much improved sensitivity in MS. • One of the reagents could also help generate useful MS/MS spectra for structural analysis. • These reagents should be useful for quantitative metabolomics. - Abstract: Metabolomic profiling involves relative quantification of metabolites in comparative samples and identification of the significant metabolites that differentiate different groups (e.g., diseased vs. controls). Chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is an enabling technique that can provide improved metabolome coverage and metabolite quantification. However, chemical identification of labeled metabolites can still be a challenge. In this work, a new set of isotopic labeling reagents offering versatile properties to enhance both detection and identification are described. They were prepared by a glycine molecule (or its isotopic counterpart) and an aromatic acid with varying structures through a simple three-step synthesis route. In addition to relatively low costs of synthesizing the reagents, this reaction route allows adjusting reagent property in accordance with the desired application objective. To date, two isotopic reagents, 4-dimethylaminobenzoylamido acetic acid N-hydroxylsuccinimide ester (DBAA-NHS) and 4-methoxybenzoylamido acetic acid N-hydroxylsuccinimide ester (MBAA-NHS), for labeling the amine-containing metabolites (i.e., amine submetabolome) have been synthesized. The labeling conditions and the related LC–MS method have been optimized. We demonstrate that DBAA labeling can increase the metabolite detectability because of the presence of an electrospray ionization (ESI)-active dimethylaminobenzoyl group. On the other hand, MBAA labeled metabolites can be fragmented

  12. 101 labeled brain images and a consistent human cortical labeling protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno eKlein

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the Mindboggle-101 dataset, the largest and most complete set of free, publicly accessible, manually labeled human brain images. To manually label the macroscopic anatomy in magnetic resonance images of 101 healthy participants, we created a new cortical labeling protocol that relies on robust anatomical landmarks and minimal manual edits after initialization with automated labels. The Desikan-Killiany-Tourville (DKT protocol is intended to improve the ease, consistency, and accuracy of labeling human cortical areas. Given how difficult it is to label brains, the Mindboggle-101 dataset is intended to serve as brain atlases for use in labeling other brains, as a normative dataset to establish morphometric variation in a healthy population for comparison against clinical populations, and contribute to the development, training, testing, and evaluation of automated registration and labeling algorithms. To this end, we also introduce benchmarks for the evaluation of such algorithms by comparing our manual labels with labels automatically generated by probabilistic and multi-atlas registration-based approaches. All data and related software and updated information are available on the http://www.mindboggle.info/data/ website.

  13. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...... complexes constitutes an elegant and fascinating strategy. This Feature article focuses on the use of building blocks or modules (both terms being used indiscriminately) to direct the structure, and therefore also the magnetic properties, of metal ion complexes exhibiting SMM behaviour. This journal...

  14. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M. (Assiut Univ. (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author).

  15. Recoiling DNA Molecule Simulation & Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, J C; Mesquita, O N; Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Many recent experiments with single DNA molecules are based on force versus extension measurements and involve tethering a microsphere to one of its extremities and the other to a microscope coverglass. In this work we show that similar results can also be obtained by studying the recoil dynamics of the tethered microspheres. Computer simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation indicate which assumptions are required for a reliable analysis of the experimental recoil curves. We have measured the persistence length A of single naked DNA molecules and DNA-Ethidium Bromide complexes using this approach.

  16. An Efficient Site-Specific Method for Irreversible Covalent Labeling of Proteins with a Fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaquan; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M; Shoffner, Matthew; Albers, Aaron E; Bennett, Jared; Zatezalo, Rachel; Barfield, Robyn; Rabuka, David; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2015-11-19

    Fluorophore labeling of proteins while preserving native functions is essential for bulk Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) interaction and single molecule imaging analysis. Here we describe a versatile, efficient, specific, irreversible, gentle and low-cost method for labeling proteins with fluorophores that appears substantially more robust than a similar but chemically distinct procedure. The method employs the controlled enzymatic conversion of a central Cys to a reactive formylglycine (fGly) aldehyde within a six amino acid Formylglycine Generating Enzyme (FGE) recognition sequence in vitro. The fluorophore is then irreversibly linked to the fGly residue using a Hydrazinyl-Iso-Pictet-Spengler (HIPS) ligation reaction. We demonstrate the robust large-scale fluorophore labeling and purification of E.coli (Ec) mismatch repair (MMR) components. Fluorophore labeling did not alter the native functions of these MMR proteins in vitro or in singulo. Because the FGE recognition sequence is easily portable, FGE-HIPS fluorophore-labeling may be easily extended to other proteins.

  17. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  18. Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Spectroscopic Labels for Diffusometric Probing of Biopolymer Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouina, Nadia; de Kort, Daan W; Hoeben, Freek J M; Janssen, Henk M; Van As, Henk; Hohlbein, Johannes; van Duynhoven, John P M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2015-11-24

    We present the design, preparation, and characterization of two types of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) with cross-linked cores and spectroscopic labels and demonstrate their use as diffusional probes to investigate the microstructure of percolating biopolymer networks. The first type consists of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEO-b-PMAA), labeled with ATTO 488 fluorescent dyes. We show that the size of these probes can be tuned by choosing the length of the PEO-PMAA chains. ATTO 488-labeled PEO113-PMAA15 micelles are very bright with 18 dye molecules incorporated into their cores. The second type is a (19)F-labeled micelle, for which we used PAH and a (19)F-labeled diblock copolymer tailor-made from poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(acrylic acid) (mPEO79-b-PAA14). These micelles contain approximately 4 wt % of (19)F and can be detected by (19)F NMR. The (19)F labels are placed at the end of a small spacer to allow for the necessary rotational mobility. We used these ATTO- and (19)F-labeled micelles to probe the microstructures of a transient gel (xanthan gum) and a cross-linked, heterogeneous gel (κ-carrageenan). For the transient gel, sensitive optical diffusometry methods, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and super-resolution single nanoparticle tracking, allowed us to measure the diffusion coefficient in networks with increasing density. From these measurements, we determined the diameters of the constituent xanthan fibers. In the heterogeneous κ-carrageenan gels, bimodal nanoparticle diffusion was observed, which is a signpost of microstructural heterogeneity of the network.

  19. A Study on Standards System of Chinese Environmental Labeling Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Implementing Outlines for the Chinese Environmental Labeling Program By awarding certificates and labels to related manufacturers in accordance with certain environmental labeling standards, environmental labeling,also called "Green Label"or "Eco-label", certifies via governmental departments or public and private organizations that the whole process of producing,using, recalling and disposing of manufacturers'products is in compliance with certain environmental requirements. Many countries are establishing and promoting environmental labeling plans. Environmental labeling, as an important promotion means for prevention and control of pollution in a market-oriented manner, is being extended and developed constantly across the world.

  20. 9 CFR 317.4 - Labeling approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... is a printer's proof or equivalent which clearly shows all labeling features, size, location, and... carcass ink brands and meat food product ink and burning brands, which comply with parts 312 and 316...

  1. Vertex-antimagic Labelings of Regular Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali AHMAD; Kashif ALI; Martin BA(C)A; Petr KOV(A)(R); Andrea SEMANI(C)OV(A)-FE(N)OV(C)(I)KOV(A)

    2012-01-01

    Let G =(V,E) be a finite,simple and undirected graph with p vertices and q edges.An (a,d)-vertex-antimagic total labeling of G is a bijection f from V(G).∪E(G) onto the set of consecutive integers 1,2,...,p + q,such that the vertex-weights form an arithmetic progression with the initial term a and difference d,where the vertex-weight of x is the sum of the value f(x) assigned to the vertex x together with all values f(xy) assigned to edges xy incident to x.Such labeling is called super if the smallest possible labels appear on the vertices.In this paper,we study the properties of such labelings and examine their existence for 2r-regular graphs when the difference d is 0,1,...,r + 1.

  2. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smart Supermarket Shopping Figuring Out Fat and Calories Food Labels ... Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  3. Generating Realistic Labelled, Weighted Random Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Michael Charles; Liu, Weiru; Miller, Paul; Hunter, Ruth; Kee, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Generative algorithms for random graphs have yielded insights into the structure and evolution of real-world networks. Most networks exhibit a well-known set of properties, such as heavy-tailed degree distributions, clustering and community formation. Usually, random graph models consider only structural information, but many real-world networks also have labelled vertices and weighted edges. In this paper, we present a generative model for random graphs with discrete vertex labels and numeric edge weights. The weights are represented as a set of Beta Mixture Models (BMMs) with an arbitrary number of mixtures, which are learned from real-world networks. We propose a Bayesian Variational Inference (VI) approach, which yields an accurate estimation while keeping computation times tractable. We compare our approach to state-of-the-art random labelled graph generators and an earlier approach based on Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs). Our results allow us to draw conclusions about the contribution of vertex labels a...

  4. Synthesis of exemestane labelled with (13)C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Erminia; Pignatti, Alberto; Giribone, Danilo; Di Salle, Enrico

    2008-08-01

    The synthesis of exemestane Aromasin, an irreversible steroidal aromatase inhibitor, specifically labelled with (13)C is reported. The preparation of [(13)C(3)]exemestane was achieved according to an eight-step procedure starting from the commercially available testosterone.

  5. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.;

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  6. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update o

  7. Off-label prescriptions in diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Luís Jesuíno de Oliveira Andrade; Larissa Santos França; Paulo Roberto Santana de Melo; Marcelo Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Prescription of a drug outside of the indications for which it was originally approved by regulators is internationally known as "off-label" prescription. We describe off-label treatments for the diabetic foot reported in international scientific literature. This is a qualitative and descriptive bibliographical review based on the results of a search of the Medline international database. The criteria for review were publication between January 1985 and November 2013, and the MeSH (Medical Su...

  8. Internal labelling problem: an algorithmic procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, Rutwig, E-mail: rutwig@mat.ucm.es [Departamento GeometrIa y TopologIa, Fac. CC. Matematicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ciencias 3, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-01-14

    Combining the decomposition of Casimir operators induced by the embedding of a subalgebra into a semisimple Lie algebra with the properties of commutators of subgroup scalars, an analytical algorithm for the computation of missing label operators with the commutativity requirement is proposed. Two new criteria for subgroups scalars to commute are given. The algorithm is completed with a recursive method to construct orthonormal bases of states. As examples to illustrate the procedure, four labelling problems are explicitly studied.

  9. Quantum dot labeling of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cascio Wayne E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle cells and are being investigated for their utility in cell-based transplantation therapy. Yet, adequate methods to track transplanted MSCs in vivo are limited, precluding functional studies. Quantum Dots (QDs offer an alternative to organic dyes and fluorescent proteins to label and track cells in vitro and in vivo. These nanoparticles are resistant to chemical and metabolic degradation, demonstrating long term photostability. Here, we investigate the cytotoxic effects of in vitro QD labeling on MSC proliferation and differentiation and use as a cell label in a cardiomyocyte co-culture. Results A dose-response to QDs in rat bone marrow MSCs was assessed in Control (no-QDs, Low concentration (LC, 5 nmol/L and High concentration (HC, 20 nmol/L groups. QD yield and retention, MSC survival, proinflammatory cytokines, proliferation and DNA damage were evaluated in MSCs, 24 -120 hrs post QD labeling. In addition, functional integration of QD labeled MSCs in an in vitro cardiomyocyte co-culture was assessed. A dose-dependent effect was measured with increased yield in HC vs. LC labeled MSCs (93 ± 3% vs. 50% ± 15%, p 90% of QD labeled cells were viable in all groups, however, at 120 hrs increased apoptosis was measured in HC vs. Control MSCs (7.2% ± 2.7% vs. 0.5% ± 0.4%, p Conclusion Fluorescent QDs label MSC effectively in an in vitro co-culture model. QDs are easy to use, show a high yield and survival rate with minimal cytotoxic effects. Dose-dependent effects suggest limiting MSC QD exposure.

  10. A Radiochemical Biotechnological Approach: Preliminary Study of Lactose Uptake Rate by Kefir Cells, Using 14C-labeled Lactose, in Anaerobic Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfinopoulos, A.; Soupioni, M.; Kanellaki, M.; Koutinas, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of initial lactose concentration on lactose uptake rate by kefir free cells, during the lactose fermentation, was studied in this work. For the investigation 14C-labelled lactose was used due to the fact that labeled and unlabeled molecules are fermented in the same way. The results illustrated lactose uptake rates are about up to two fold higher at lower initial ∘Bé densities as compared with higher initial ∘Bé densities.

  11. Labelling of electricity; Kennzeichnung von Elektrizitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettli, R. [Econcept AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Markard, J. [Eidgenoessische Anstalt fuer Wasserversorgung, Abwasserreinigung und Gewaesserschutz (EAWAG), Kastanienbaum (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents a possible course of action to be taken to provide a means of declaring the sources of electrical power, as is foreseen in the draft of new Swiss electricity market legislation. The report presents the basic ideas behind the idea and defines the terms used such as labelling, certificates and declarations. Also, the legal situation in the European Union and in Switzerland is examined and a quantitative overview of electricity production and consumption is presented. Suggestions for a labelling scheme are made and some of the problems to be expected are looked at. The report also presents a series of examples of labelling schemes already implemented in other countries, such as Austria, Great Britain, Sweden and Germany. Tradable certificates and tracking systems are discussed as are initial quality labels like the Swiss 'Naturemade' label for green power. A concrete recommendation for the declaration and labelling of electricity in Switzerland is presented and various factors to be considered such as import/export, pumped storage, distribution losses, small-scale producers as well as the time-scales for introduction are discussed.

  12. Factors influencing medication label viewing in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Yong Kang; Chong, Yen Wan

    2016-07-12

    The misuse of medicine is a serious public health issue worldwide. An important factor that contributes to the misuse of medicine is the lack of medication label viewing by consumers. The objective of the present study is to examine the socio-economic, demographic and lifestyle factors associated with medication label viewing among Malaysian adults. The empirical analysis is based on a nationally representative data set of 30,992 respondents. An ordered probit model is used to examine different types of medication label viewers. The results of this study suggest that socio-economic (i.e. age, income level, education level, location of residence), demographic (i.e. gender, ethnicity, marital status) and lifestyle factors (i.e. physical activity, smoking) have significant effects on medication label viewing. It is found that age, low-income and low-education level reduce the likelihood of viewing medication label. Based on these findings, several policy implications are suggested. The present study provides policy makers with baseline information regarding which cohorts of individuals to focus on in efforts to increase the frequency of medication label viewing.

  13. Pharmacogenetic information for patients on drug labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Susanne B; Mills, Rachel; Moaddeb, Jivan

    2014-01-01

    Advances in pharmacogenetic research have improved our understanding of adverse drug responses and have led to the development of pharmacogenetic tests and targeted drugs. However, the extent of the communication process and provision of information to patients about pharmacogenetics is unclear. Pharmacogenetic information may be included in sections of a drug's package insert intended for patients, which is provided directly to patients or communicated via the health provider. To determine what pharmacogenetic information, if any, is included in patient-targeted sections of the drug label, we reviewed the labels listed in the US Food and Drug Administration's Table of Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers in Drug Labels. To date, 140 drugs include pharmacogenetic-related information in the approved label. Our analysis revealed that pharmacogenetic information is included in patient-targeted sections for a minority (n=29; 21%) of drug labels, with no obvious pattern associated with the inclusion of pharmacogenetic information. Therefore, patients are unlikely to learn about pharmacogenetics through written materials dispensed with the drug. Given that there are also inconsistencies with regard to inclusion of pharmacogenetic information in the patient counseling information section, it is also unlikely that patients are receiving adequate pharmacogenetic information from their provider. The inconsistent presence of pharmacogenetic information in patient-targeted sections of drug labels suggests a need to review the criteria for inclusion of information in patient-targeted sections in order to increase consistency and patient knowledge of pharmacogenetic information.

  14. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  15. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models.

  16. Study on the mechanism of toxicity development by analysis of interactions among RI-labelled biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Shinji [National Inst. of Industrial Health, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    In order to find the directly targetting molecule(s) of toxic substances which are produced in various working environments and to elucidate the natural functions of such molecules in the body. The interactions between an assumed target molecule, ZRF and a sequence in metallothionein II{sub A} gene, MRE were investigated using electrophoresis. When double stranded DNA of which binding region was labelled with {sup 32}P was mixed with ZRF, any DNA-protein complex was not detectable on denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but Zn-dependent complex formation was observed when labelled in the presence of BrdUTP and the specific band disappeared after the treatment with nuclease. And UV radiation was essential for the complex formation under the conditions of denatured gel, however the complex formed by un-denatured gel electrophoresis was markedly reduced by UV radiation, indicating that the cross-linking reaction should be done at a low dose of UV. Since the nuclease preparation used was contaminated with protease, it was needed to choose an appropriate amount of the preparation. Although there remain some problems, it was found that the present procedure by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was available for detection of the cross-linking between DNA and protein. (M.N.)

  17. Label-free detection of DNA on silicon surfaces using Brewster angle straddle interferometry (BASI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Rothberg, Lewis

    2012-02-01

    Label-free sensing of biomolecular interactions is of great importance for drug screening and a variety of clinical assays. Ultrasensitive detection of dsDNA on silicon substrates can be achieved using our new label-free sensing method - Brewster angle straddle interferometry (BASI) which exploits the removal of destructive interference to detect binding of target molecules on a silicon surface functionalized by probe molecules. By exploiting the fact that reflections of p-polarization undergo 180 degree phase shifts above the Brewster angle and none below it, we are able to use unprocessed silicon substrates with native oxide serving as the interference layer. Destructive interference in the geometry we use results in reflectivities ˜ 0.01%. Reflectivity from the chip is a quantitative measure of the amount of bound target molecules and can be imaged in real time in microarray format. We demonstrate detection of DNA intercalation on pyrene modified surfaces. The substrates are shown to exhibit excellent binding toward dsDNAs. This work provides an avenue for understanding the binding specificity of small molecule-DNA interactions that can be potentially helpful in developing anticancer agents.

  18. A starting point for fluorescence-based single-molecule measurements in biomolecular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Alexander; Zander, Adrian; Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Schulz, Sarah; Lalkens, Birka; Tinnefeld, Philip; Grohmann, Dina

    2014-09-30

    Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  19. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging, and Photocontrol: Foundations for Super-Resolution Microscopy (Nobel Lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W E William E

    2015-07-06

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 90s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and current developments are summarized.

  20. Nobel Lecture: Single-molecule spectroscopy, imaging, and photocontrol: Foundations for super-resolution microscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E. William E.

    2015-10-01

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 1990s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room-temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts as a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and selected current developments are summarized.

  1. A Starting Point for Fluorescence-Based Single-Molecule Measurements in Biomolecular Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gust

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  2. Capabilities for measuring the diffusivity of a single molecule by recycling it in a nanochannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Davis, Lloyd

    2014-03-01

    Analysis of the fractions of fluorescently labeled molecules with different diffusivities within a microliter drop of solution is often used for high-throughput screening of molecular binding interactions in pharmaceutical drug discovery research. Assays frequently employ fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, an ensemble technique that is able to resolve fast diffusing small ligands from those bound to much larger biomolecules with considerably slower diffusion. Single-molecule measurements have the potential to resolve species with different diffusivities and to count the numbers of molecules of each species. Single-molecule recycling in a nanochannel, which entails detection of bursts of fluorescence photons from the repeated passage of a molecule through a focused laser beam as the flow along a nanochannel is periodically alternated, can be used to determine the diffusivity of a single molecule from the fluctuations in the intervals between successive detections. We discuss Monte Carlo studies to determine favorable experimental conditions for determining single-molecule diffusivities, together with a weighted-sliding-sum photon burst detection algorithm for flow-control and maximum-likelihood based analysis of recycle times. We also discuss incorporation of the algorithms into our experimental apparatus for single-molecule recycling, which uses a LabView real-time system for photon count analysis and flow control.

  3. Label-Free Biosensor Imaging on Photonic Crystal Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We review the development and application of nanostructured photonic crystal surfaces and a hyperspectral reflectance imaging detection instrument which, when used together, represent a new form of optical microscopy that enables label-free, quantitative, and kinetic monitoring of biomaterial interaction with substrate surfaces. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM has been used to detect broad classes of materials which include dielectric nanoparticles, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, biomolecular layers, and live cells. Because PCEM does not require cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes, it is especially useful for monitoring the long-term interactions of cells with extracellular matrix surfaces. PCEM is only sensitive to the attachment of cell components within ~200 nm of the photonic crystal surface, which may correspond to the region of most interest for adhesion processes that involve stem cell differentiation, chemotaxis, and metastasis. PCEM has also demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for sensing nanoparticle contrast agents that are roughly the same size as protein molecules, which may enable applications in “digital” diagnostics with single molecule sensing resolution. We will review PCEM’s development history, operating principles, nanostructure design, and imaging modalities that enable tracking of optical scatterers, emitters, absorbers, and centers of dielectric permittivity.

  4. Real-time DNA sequencing from single polymerase molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, John; Fehr, Adrian; Gray, Jeremy; Luong, Khai; Lyle, John; Otto, Geoff; Peluso, Paul; Rank, David; Baybayan, Primo; Bettman, Brad; Bibillo, Arkadiusz; Bjornson, Keith; Chaudhuri, Bidhan; Christians, Frederick; Cicero, Ronald; Clark, Sonya; Dalal, Ravindra; Dewinter, Alex; Dixon, John; Foquet, Mathieu; Gaertner, Alfred; Hardenbol, Paul; Heiner, Cheryl; Hester, Kevin; Holden, David; Kearns, Gregory; Kong, Xiangxu; Kuse, Ronald; Lacroix, Yves; Lin, Steven; Lundquist, Paul; Ma, Congcong; Marks, Patrick; Maxham, Mark; Murphy, Devon; Park, Insil; Pham, Thang; Phillips, Michael; Roy, Joy; Sebra, Robert; Shen, Gene; Sorenson, Jon; Tomaney, Austin; Travers, Kevin; Trulson, Mark; Vieceli, John; Wegener, Jeffrey; Wu, Dawn; Yang, Alicia; Zaccarin, Denis; Zhao, Peter; Zhong, Frank; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen

    2009-01-02

    We present single-molecule, real-time sequencing data obtained from a DNA polymerase performing uninterrupted template-directed synthesis using four distinguishable fluorescently labeled deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). We detected the temporal order of their enzymatic incorporation into a growing DNA strand with zero-mode waveguide nanostructure arrays, which provide optical observation volume confinement and enable parallel, simultaneous detection of thousands of single-molecule sequencing reactions. Conjugation of fluorophores to the terminal phosphate moiety of the dNTPs allows continuous observation of DNA synthesis over thousands of bases without steric hindrance. The data report directly on polymerase dynamics, revealing distinct polymerization states and pause sites corresponding to DNA secondary structure. Sequence data were aligned with the known reference sequence to assay biophysical parameters of polymerization for each template position. Consensus sequences were generated from the single-molecule reads at 15-fold coverage, showing a median accuracy of 99.3%, with no systematic error beyond fluorophore-dependent error rates.

  5. Biosynthesis of the D2 cell adhesion molecule: pulse-chase studies in cultured fetal rat neuronal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, J M; Norrild, B; Bock, E

    1984-01-01

    chase times the Mr of both molecules increased to 187,000-201,000 (A) and 137,000-158,000 (B). These were similar to the sizes of D2-CAM labeled with [14C]glucosamine, [3H]fucose and [14C]mannosamine, indicating that the higher Mr species are glycoproteins. In the presence of tunicamycin, which...

  6. Drug transport mechanism of P-glycoprotein monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S.; Verhalen, B.; Zarrabi, N.; Wilkens, S.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we monitor the catalytic mechanism of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Pgp, a member of the ATP binding cassette family of transport proteins, is found in the plasma membrane of animal cells where it is involved in the ATP hydrolysis driven export of hydrophobic molecules. When expressed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, the transport activity of Pgp can lead to the failure of chemotherapy by excluding the mostly hydrophobic drugs from the interior of the cell. Despite ongoing effort, the catalytic mechanism by which Pgp couples MgATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation of drug molecules across the lipid bilayer is poorly understood. Using site directed mutagenesis, we have introduced cysteine residues for fluorescence labeling into different regions of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Pgp. Double-labeled single Pgp molecules showed fluctuating FRET efficiencies during drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis suggesting that the NBDs undergo significant movements during catalysis. Duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation (DCO-ALEX) is applied to minimize FRET artifacts and to select the appropriate molecules. The data show that Pgp is a highly dynamic enzyme that appears to fluctuate between at least two major conformations during steady state turnover.

  7. Ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and spectrally resolved super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Kenny, Samuel J; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2015-10-01

    By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing photoswitching, we synchronously obtained the fluorescence spectra and positions of ∼10(6) single molecules in labeled cells in minutes, which consequently enabled spectrally resolved, 'true-color' super-resolution microscopy. The method, called spectrally resolved stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SR-STORM), achieved cross-talk-free three-dimensional (3D) imaging for four dyes 10 nm apart in emission spectrum. Excellent resolution was obtained for every channel, and 3D localizations of all molecules were automatically aligned within one imaging path.

  8. Measuring number of fluorophores labelling cDNA strands, in solution, with Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and photobleaching

    CERN Document Server

    Delon, Antoine; Lambert, Emeline; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Mache, Régis; Derouard, Jacques; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Galland, Rémi

    2009-01-01

    We present different approaches that aim at determining, in solution, the brightness and the number of Alexa Fluor 647 molecules labelling the C bases of two sequences of cDNA, corresponding to two transcripts of different sizes, a short and a long transcript (123 and 306 base long, with 45 and 74 dCTP residues, respectively). In each case, the Alexa labeled bases have been incorporated during reverse-transcription. Two kinds of experiments have been performed and combined: photobleaching and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (together with the factorial cumulant analysis method). As a result, we show that the photobleaching cross-section of labelled cDNA strands is about half that of free Alexa in aqueous solution, while their brightness is about twice. The factorial cumulant analysis put into evidence the fact that the brightness of cDNA strands varies from molecule to molecule, due to the statistical distribution of the number of Alexa fluorophores labelling cDNA. Our measurements are consistent with a...

  9. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  10. Ballonet String Model of Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavril NIAC

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Strings of ballonets, modelling rows of orbitals, are assembled to molecule models by crossing them properly. The ballonets at the ends of the strings of 2, 3, 4 or 5 spheres represent bonding orbitals of hydrogen with other elements like C, N or O (the proton being inside the sphere, as well as nonbonding orbitals. The ballonets between them are modelling bonding orbitals among elements other than hydrogen - except the double bond in diborane, the atomic cores laying at the junction of two or more spheres.Advantages of elastic sphere models range from self-adjusting bond angles to resistance when closing cycles like cyclopropane or modeling double bonds.Examples comprise alkanes, including platonic hydrocarbons, ethene, acetylene, and some inorganic molecules.

  11. Traffic light labelling: traduzindo a rotulagem de alimentos Traffic light labeling: translating food labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Longo-Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar uma adaptação do Traffic Light Labelling, ou "Semáforo Nutricional", adotado no Reino Unido e outros países da Europa, às normas vigentes no Brasil e classificar produtos industrializados comercializados no país. MÉTODOS: Esta ferramenta baseia-se na utilização das cores do semáforo para valorar concentrações de gorduras total, saturada e trans, açúcar, sódio e fibra correspondente a 100g ou 100mL do produto. O sinal vermelho indica que o nutriente está presente em quantidade excessiva; o amarelo, média e o verde, adequada. Para fibras as baixas concentrações têm cor vermelha e as recomendadas, verde. A adaptação e aplicação desses conceitos para consumidores brasileiros fundamentaram-se nas normas do Regulamento Técnico Referente à Informação Nutricional Complementar da Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária e da Food Standards Agency. RESULTADOS: Foram classificados cem produtos industrializados, os quais foram selecionados da página eletrônica de um hipermercado brasileiro, optando pelos primeiros cinco a oito produtos listados na página, para cada uma das 17 categorias. A análise mostra que são altas as quantidades de gordura total, saturada e sódio e baixas as quantidades de gordura trans e fibra. CONCLUSÃO: A adaptação dessa metodologia visa facilitar a escolha de alimentos saudáveis, sensibilizando os consumidores quanto às desvantagens no que se refere a qualidade nutricional dos alimentos industrializados, e estimular as indústrias a melhorar a composição nutricional de seus produtos, sob a perspectiva de receberem maior quantidade de sinais verdes e menor quantidade de sinais vermelhos; assim, contribuindo para a prevenção de erros alimentares, obesidade e doenças crônicas não-transmissíveis, principais causas de incapacidade e mortes precoces no Brasil.OBJECTIVE: This study presented an adaptation of the Traffic Light Labeling or Nutrition Traffic Light adopted

  12. Physics of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bransden, B H

    2003-01-01

    New edition of a well-established second and third year textbook for Physics degree students, covering the physical structure and behaviour of atoms and molecules. The aim of this new edition is to provide a unified account of the subject within an undergraduate framework, taking the opportunity to make improvements based on the teaching experience of users of the first edition, and cover important new developments in the subject.

  13. 75 FR 51058 - Web-Distributed Labeling User Acceptance Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... labeling program. This information is essential to understanding whether a web-distributed labeling system... operational, a web-distributed labeling system would also offer alternate delivery mechanisms for users who... potential features of Web-distributed labeling What other information, if any, the user would like to...

  14. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to...

  15. 33 CFR 66.01-14 - Label affixed by manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label affixed by manufacturer. 66... Label affixed by manufacturer. (a) Each light, intended or used as a private aid to navigation authorized by this part, must bear a legible, indelible label (or labels) affixed by the manufacturer...

  16. 21 CFR 226.80 - Packaging and labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packaging and labeling. 226.80 Section 226.80 Food...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES Packaging and Labeling § 226.80 Packaging and labeling. (a) Packaging and labeling operations shall be adequately controlled: (1) To...

  17. 49 CFR 172.427 - ORGANIC PEROXIDE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ORGANIC PEROXIDE label. 172.427 Section 172.427... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.427 ORGANIC PEROXIDE label. (a) Except for size and color, the ORGANIC... on the ORGANIC PEROXIDE label must be red in the top half and yellow in the lower half....

  18. 7 CFR 201.31a - Labeling treated seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling treated seed. 201.31a Section 201.31a..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.31a Labeling treated seed. (a) Contents of label. Any agricultural...

  19. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims...

  20. 27 CFR 24.257 - Labeling wine containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling wine containers..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine Bottling, Packing, and Labeling of Wine § 24.257 Labeling wine containers. (a) The proprietor must label each bottle or...

  1. 30 CFR 47.41 - Requirement for container labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirement for container labels. 47.41 Section... TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.41 Requirement for container labels. (a) The operator must ensure that each container of a hazardous chemical has a label. If...

  2. Compact Ancestry Labeling Schemes for Trees of Small Depth

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    An {\\em ancestry labeling scheme} labels the nodes of any tree in such a way that ancestry queries between any two nodes in a tree can be answered just by looking at their corresponding labels. The common measure to evaluate the quality of an ancestry labeling scheme is by its {\\em label size}, that is the maximal number of bits stored in a label, taken over all $n$-node trees. The design of ancestry labeling schemes finds applications in XML search engines. In the context of these applicatio...

  3. A Labeling Model Based on the Region of Movability for Point-Feature Label Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic point-feature label placement (PFLP is a fundamental task for map visualization. As the dominant solutions to the PFLP problem, fixed-position and slider models have been widely studied in previous research. However, the candidate labels generated with these models are set to certain fixed positions or a specified track line for sliding. Thus, the whole surrounding space of a point feature is not sufficiently used for labeling. Hence, this paper proposes a novel label model based on the region of movability, which comes from plane collision detection theory. The model defines a complete conflict-free search space for label placement. On the premise of no conflict with the point, line, and area features, the proposed model utilizes the surrounding zone of the point feature to generate candidate label positions. By combining with heuristic search method, the model achieves high-quality label placement. In addition, the flexibility of the proposed model enables placing arbitrarily shaped labels.

  4. Official Labeling, Criminal Embeddedness, and Subsequent Delinquency: A Longitudinal Test of Labeling Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernburg, Jon Gunnar; Krohn, Marvin D.; Rivera, Craig J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the short-term impact of formal criminal labeling on involvement in deviant social networks and increased likelihood of subsequent delinquency. According to labeling theory, formal criminal intervention should affect the individual's immediate social networks. In many cases, the stigma of the criminal status may increase the…

  5. Stigma of a Label: Educational Expectations for High School Students Labeled with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrer, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Poorer outcomes for youth labeled with learning disabilities (LDs) are often attributed to the student's own deficiencies or cumulative disadvantage; but the more troubling possibility is that special education placement limits rather than expands these students' opportunities. Labeling theory partially attributes the poorer outcomes of…

  6. On label graphoidal covering number-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugaperumal Anitha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Let G = (V,E be a graph with p vertices and q edges. An acyclicgraphoidal cover of G is a collection of paths in G which are internallydisjointand covering each edge of the graph exactly once. Let f : V !{1, 2, . . . , p} be a bijective labeling of the vertices of G. Let " Gf bethe directed graph obtained by orienting the edges uv of G from u tov provided f(u < f(v. If the set f of all maximal directed paths in"Gf , with directions ignored, is an acyclic graphoidal cover of G, then fis called a graphoidal labeling of G and G is called a label graphoidal graphand l = min{| f | : f is a graphoidal labeling of G} is called the labelgraphoidal covering number of G. In this paper we characterize graphsfor which (i l = q − m, where m is the number of vertices of degree 2and (ii l = q. Also, we determine the value of label graphoidal coveringnumber for unicyclic graphs.

  7. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  8. Ideal regularization for learning kernels from labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Binbin; Lai, Jianhuang; Shen, Lixin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new form of regularization that is able to utilize the label information of a data set for learning kernels. The proposed regularization, referred to as ideal regularization, is a linear function of the kernel matrix to be learned. The ideal regularization allows us to develop efficient algorithms to exploit labels. Three applications of the ideal regularization are considered. Firstly, we use the ideal regularization to incorporate the labels into a standard kernel, making the resulting kernel more appropriate for learning tasks. Next, we employ the ideal regularization to learn a data-dependent kernel matrix from an initial kernel matrix (which contains prior similarity information, geometric structures, and labels of the data). Finally, we incorporate the ideal regularization to some state-of-the-art kernel learning problems. With this regularization, these learning problems can be formulated as simpler ones which permit more efficient solvers. Empirical results show that the ideal regularization exploits the labels effectively and efficiently.

  9. European energy labelling scheme for windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belling Skou, Mette (VELUX A/S (Denmark)); Kragh, Jesper (DTU Byg, Denmarks Tekniske Univ., Lyngby (Denmark))

    2009-07-01

    In their proposals for revision of the energy labelling directive the European Commission has suggested to include windows. The paper introduces a proposal for an European energy labelling scheme of windows for replacement of windows in the existing building stock taking into consideration the energy performance of windows in both the heating and cooling seasons. The labelling scheme evaluates a methodology where the energy performance in the heating period is established with focus on heat loss and utilization of passive solar energy, whereas the energy performance in the summer (cooling) season will focus on reduction of solar radiation into the building. The methodology is developed with focus on CEN and ISO standardization. With inspiration from the American Energy Star programme for windows, Europe is divided into climate zones where the methodology for each zone is developed on basis of a reference building and climate data. A proposal for labelling will be presented for both heating and cooling seasons in order to enable the user to choose the right product for a specific performance. Based on data from the building stock in the individual climate zones, an energy saving potential for replacement of old windows with new low energy windows will be presented. The possibility for using energy labelling of windows as reference and requirement in the building legislation as an alternative to U-values, will be presented with among others examples from legislation in UK and Denmark.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of fluorescently labelled amyloid β 1-40 and α-synuclein aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Valerie L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent tags, including small organic molecules and fluorescent proteins, enable the localization of protein molecules in biomedical research experiments. However, the use of these labels may interfere with the formation of larger-scale protein structures such as amyloid aggregates. Therefore, we investigate the effects of some commonly used fluorescent tags on the morphologies of fibrils grown from the Alzheimer's disease-associated peptide Amyloid β 1-40 (Aβ40 and the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein (αS. Results Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, we verify that N-terminal labeling of Aβ40 with AMCA, TAMRA, and Hilyte-Fluor 488 tags does not prevent the formation of protofibrils and amyloid fibrils of various widths. We also measure the two-photon action cross-section of Aβ40 labelled with Hilyte Fluor 488 and demonstrate that this tag is suitable for use with two-photon fluorescence techniques. Similarly, we find that Alexa Fluor 488 labelling of αS variant proteins near either the N or C terminus (position 9 or 130 does not interfere with the formation of amyloid and other types of αS fibrils. We also present TEM images of fibrils grown from αS C-terminally labelled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Near neutral pH, two types of αS-EGFP fibrils are observed via TEM, while denaturation of the EGFP tag leads to the formation of additional species. Conclusions We demonstrate that several small extrinsic fluorescent tags are compatible with studies of amyloid protein aggregation. However, although fibrils can be grown from αS labelled with EGFP, the conformation of the fluorescent protein tag affects the observed aggregate morphologies. Thus, our results should assist researchers with label selection and optimization of solution conditions for aggregation studies involving fluorescence techniques.

  11. 75 FR 52601 - Food Labeling; Labeling of Food Made From AquAdvantage Salmon; Public Hearing; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    .... (Keep in mind that the use of genetic engineering does not, in and of itself, constitute a ``material... Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling; Labeling of Food Made From Aqu...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling; Labeling of Food...

  12. Label-controlled optical packet routing technologies and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koonen, A.M.J.; Yan, N.; Vegas Olmos, Juan José;

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of various optical packet labeling techniques. The architecture and technologies are discussed for optical packet routing nodes using orthogonal labeling with optoelectronic label processing, and for nodes using time-serial labeling with all-optical time-serial label processing....... An example of a nearterm application is given, and a comparison of routing technologies is made regarding their cost and reliability aspects....

  13. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  14. Housewives’ Compliance in Reading Food Labels in Gorontalo City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Tumenggung

    2016-06-01

    Di Indonesia, masalah label pada kemasan makanan kurang mendapat perhatian konsumen. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mempelajari determinan kepatuhan membaca label pada kemasan makanan oleh ibu rumah tangga di Kota Gorontalo. Penelitian dengan metode survei ini dilakukan dari bulan Juni sampai Agustus 2013. Data dikumpulkan secara potong lintang dengan menggunakan angket. Variabel terikat adalah kepatuhan membaca label pada kemasan makanan yang terdiri dari label informasi nilai gizi, komposisi makanan, masa kedaluwarsa, harga, dan status halal. Variabel bebas adalah usia, tingkat pendidikan, dan keterpaparan dengan media informasi. Besar sampel 262 orang ditentukan secara accidental technique. Analisis data menggunakan uji kai kuadrat. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa sebagian besar responden patuh membaca label kedaluwarsa, label harga, dan label halal. Faktor usia berhubungan dengan kepatuhan membaca label informasi nilai gizi, label kedaluwarsa dan label harga. Tingkat pendidikan berhubungan dengan kepatuhan membaca label informasi nilai gizi, label komposisi, label harga, dan lebel halal. Keterpaparan dengan media informasi berhubungan dengan kepatuhan membaca label komposisi, kedaluwarsa, harga, dan halal. Disarankan kepada institusi terkait, yaitu dinas kesehatan untuk melakukan upaya meningkatkan pemahaman pentingnya membaca label kemasan makanan, terutama yang berkaitan dengan informasi nilai gizi dan komposisi bahan makanan.

  15. Identification and quantitation of signal molecule-dependent protein phosphorylation

    KAUST Repository

    Groen, Arnoud J.

    2013-09-03

    Phosphoproteomics is a fast-growing field that aims at characterizing phosphorylated proteins in a cell or a tissue at a given time. Phosphorylation of proteins is an important regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes. Gel-free phosphoproteome technique involving enrichment of phosphopeptide coupled with mass spectrometry has proven to be invaluable to detect and characterize phosphorylated proteins. In this chapter, a gel-free quantitative approach involving 15N metabolic labelling in combination with phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide (TiO2) and their identification by MS is described. This workflow can be used to gain insights into the role of signalling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides on regulatory networks through the identification and quantification of responsive phospho(proteins). © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  16. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  17. Superposition and alignment of labeled point clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fober, Thomas; Glinca, Serghei; Klebe, Gerhard; Hüllermeier, Eyke

    2011-01-01

    Geometric objects are often represented approximately in terms of a finite set of points in three-dimensional euclidean space. In this paper, we extend this representation to what we call labeled point clouds. A labeled point cloud is a finite set of points, where each point is not only associated with a position in three-dimensional space, but also with a discrete class label that represents a specific property. This type of model is especially suitable for modeling biomolecules such as proteins and protein binding sites, where a label may represent an atom type or a physico-chemical property. Proceeding from this representation, we address the question of how to compare two labeled points clouds in terms of their similarity. Using fuzzy modeling techniques, we develop a suitable similarity measure as well as an efficient evolutionary algorithm to compute it. Moreover, we consider the problem of establishing an alignment of the structures in the sense of a one-to-one correspondence between their basic constituents. From a biological point of view, alignments of this kind are of great interest, since mutually corresponding molecular constituents offer important information about evolution and heredity, and can also serve as a means to explain a degree of similarity. In this paper, we therefore develop a method for computing pairwise or multiple alignments of labeled point clouds. To this end, we proceed from an optimal superposition of the corresponding point clouds and construct an alignment which is as much as possible in agreement with the neighborhood structure established by this superposition. We apply our methods to the structural analysis of protein binding sites.

  18. Pharmacogenetic information for patients on drug labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga SB

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Susanne B Haga, Rachel Mills, Jivan Moaddeb Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Advances in pharmacogenetic research have improved our understanding of adverse drug responses and have led to the development of pharmacogenetic tests and targeted drugs. However, the extent of the communication process and provision of information to patients about pharmacogenetics is unclear. Pharmacogenetic information may be included in sections of a drug's package insert intended for patients, which is provided directly to patients or communicated via the health provider. To determine what pharmacogenetic information, if any, is included in patient-targeted sections of the drug label, we reviewed the labels listed in the US Food and Drug Administration's Table of Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers in Drug Labels. To date, 140 drugs include pharmacogenetic-related information in the approved label. Our analysis revealed that pharmacogenetic information is included in patient-targeted sections for a minority (n=29; 21% of drug labels, with no obvious pattern associated with the inclusion of pharmacogenetic information. Therefore, patients are unlikely to learn about pharmacogenetics through written materials dispensed with the drug. Given that there are also inconsistencies with regard to inclusion of pharmacogenetic information in the patient counseling information section, it is also unlikely that patients are receiving adequate pharmacogenetic information from their provider. The inconsistent presence of pharmacogenetic information in patient-targeted sections of drug labels suggests a need to review the criteria for inclusion of information in patient-targeted sections in order to increase consistency and patient knowledge of pharmacogenetic information. Keywords: pharmacogenomics, pharmacogenetics, US Food and Drug Administration, drug safety, patient education

  19. Visualizing dengue virus through Alexa Fluor labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Summer; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2011-07-09

    The early events in the interaction between virus and cell can have profound influence on the outcome of infection. Determining the factors that influence this interaction could lead to improved understanding of disease pathogenesis and thus influence vaccine or therapeutic design. Hence, the development of methods to probe this interaction would be useful. Recent advancements in fluorophores development and imaging technology can be exploited to improve our current knowledge on dengue pathogenesis and thus pave the way to reduce the millions of dengue infections occurring annually. The enveloped dengue virus has an external scaffold consisting of 90 envelope glycoprotein (E) dimers protecting the nucleocapsid shell, which contains a single positive strand RNA genome. The identical protein subunits on the virus surface can thus be labeled with an amine reactive dye and visualized through immunofluorescent microscopy. Here, we present a simple method of labeling of dengue virus with Alexa Fluor succinimidyl ester dye dissolved directly in a sodium bicarbonate buffer that yielded highly viable virus after labeling. There is no standardized procedure for the labeling of live virus and existing manufacturer's protocol for protein labeling usually requires the reconstitution of dye in dimethyl sulfoxide. The presence of dimethyl sulfoxide, even in minute quantities, can block productive infection of virus and also induce cell cytotoxicity. The exclusion of the use of dimethyl sulfoxide in this protocol thus reduced this possibility. Alexa Fluor dyes have superior photostability and are less pH-sensitive than the common dyes, such as fluorescein and rhodamine, making them ideal for studies on cellular uptake and endosomal transport of the virus. The conjugation of Alexa Fluor dye did not affect the recognition of labeled dengue virus by virus-specific antibody and its putative receptors in host cells. This method could have useful applications in virological studies.

  20. Proposal for a New Energy Label

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjær-Jacobsen, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    be easily understandable by everybody: the more recent the year the better the product. The scheme readily lends itself for an almost unlimited variety of products, and would also cover properties other than energy consumption. It is always up to date, it is globally applicable, and it encourages......Energy labeling is believed to have great impact on the energy efficiency of household appliances sold. Many different labeling schemes exist around the world. As far as is known, none of these facilitates the easy tightening of specifications to keep up with technological advancements. The present...

  1. Quality assurance, information tracking, and consumer labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    Reducing marine-based public health risk requires strict control of several attributes of seafood products, often including location and conditions of catch or aquaculture, processing, and handling throughout the supply chain. Buyers likely will also be interested in other attributes of these products such as eco-friendliness or taste. Development of markets for improved safety, as well as for other quality attributes, requires an effective certification and tracking of these attributes as well as their communication to buyers. Several challenges must be met if labeling, particularly consumer labeling, is to support the development of markets for improved seafood safety.

  2. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardi, A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  3. Electrochemical Label-Free Nucleotide Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Numerous researchers have devoted a great deal of effort over the last few decades to the development of electrochemical oligonucleotide detection techniques, owing to their advantages of simple design, inherently small dimensions, and low power requirements. Their simplicity and rapidity of detection makes label-free oligonucleotide sensors of great potential use as first-aid screening tools in the analytical field of environmental measurements and healthcare management. This review article covers label-free oligonucleotide sensors, focusing specifically on topical electrochemical techniques, including intrinsic redox reaction of bases, conductive polymers, the use of electrochemical indicators, and highly ordered probe structures.

  4. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  5. Label-Free Biosensors for Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Fang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Label-free biosensors for studying cell biology have finally come of age. Recent developments have advanced the biosensors from low throughput and high maintenance research tools to high throughput and low maintenance screening platforms. In parallel, the biosensors have evolved from an analytical tool solely for molecular interaction analysis to powerful platforms for studying cell biology at the whole cell level. This paper presents historical development, detection principles, and applications in cell biology of label-free biosensors. Future perspectives are also discussed.

  6. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  7. Dissociation Energies of Diatomic Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Qun-Chao; SUN Wei-Guo

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dissociation energies of 10 electronic states of alkali molecules of KH, 7LID, 7LiH, 6LiH, NaK, NaLi and NaRb are studied using the highest three accurate vibrational energies of each electronic state, and an improved parameter-free analytical formula which is obtained starting from the LeRoy-Bernstein vibrational energy expression near the dissociation limit. The results show that as long as the highest three vibrational energies are accurate, the current analytical formula will give accurate theoretical dissociation energies Detheory, which are in excellent agreement with the experimental dissociation energies Dexpte.

  8. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  9. Small molecules for big tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiarui Wu

    2011-01-01

    @@ One of the most important achievements in the post-genome era is discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs), which widely exist from simple-genome organisms such as viruses and bacteria to complexgenome organisms such as plants and animals.miRNAs are single-stranded non-coding RNAs of 18-25 nucleotides in length, which are generated from larger precursors that are transcribed from noncoding genes.As a new type of regulatory molecules, miRNAs present unique features in regulating gene and its products, including rapidly turning off protein production, reversibly, and compartmentalized regulating gene expression.

  10. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  11. Fluorescent labeling of nisin Z and assessment of anti-listerial action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie; de Bruin, Marlies; Paris, Cedric; Breukink, Eefjan; Desobry, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Biomolecule labeling by fluorescent markers has emerged as an innovative methodology for bio-analytical purposes in food microbiology, medicine and pharmaceutics due to the great advantages of this method such as precision, wide detection limits, and in vivo recognition. Fluorescent nisin Z was synthesized by linking the carboxyl group and amino group of nisin Z and 5-aminoacetamido fluorescein (AAA-flu). This new structure was fully characterized by mass spectrometry with a molecular weight of 3717.3 Da. Intracellular K(+) leakage and transmembrane electrical potential (Δψ) were used to evaluate the antibacterial action of the labeled molecule against three listerial strains and demonstrated that nisin Z endured the labeling process without any activity loss. In vivo activity of labeled nisin was observed by confocal laser microscope which revealed its localization at the septum of listerial cell division site where the membrane-bound cell wall precursor lipid II is maximal. Fluorescent nisin Z showed its great potential as a tool to study antibacterial mechanism of action of nisin in biological systems.

  12. Phthalocyanine dye as an extremely photostable and highly fluorescent near-infrared labeling reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinzhan; Draney, Daniel R.; Volcheck, William M.; Bashford, Gregory R.; Lamb, Donald T.; Grone, Daniel L.; Zhang, Yonghong; Johnson, Craig M.

    2006-02-01

    Current organic fluorophores used as labeling reagents for biomolecule conjugation have significant limitations in photostability. This compromises their performance in applications that require a photostable fluorescent reporting group. For example, in molecular imaging and single molecule microscopy, photostable fluorescent labels are important for observing and tracking individual molecular events over extended period of time. We report in this paper an extremely photostable and highly fluorescent phthalocyanine dye, IRDye TM 700DX, as a near-infrared fluorescence labeling reagent to conjugate with biomolecules. This novel water-soluble silicon phthalocyanine dye has an isomericly pure chemical structure. The dye is about 45 to 128 times more photostable than current near-IR fluorophores, e.g. Alexa Fluor"R"680, Cy TM 5.5, Cy TM 7 and IRDye TM 800CW dyes; and about 27 times more photostable than tetramethylrhodamine (TMR), one of the most photostable organic dyes. This dye also meets all the other stringent requirements as an ideal fluorophore for biomolecules labeling such as excellent water solubility, no aggregation in high ionic strength buffer, large extinction coefficient and high fluorescent quantum yield. Antibodies conjugated with IRDye TM 700DX at high D/P ratio exist as monomeric species in high ionic buffer and have bright fluorescence. The IRDye TM 700DX conjugated antibodies generate sensitive, highly specific detection with very low background in Western blot and cytoblot assays.

  13. Synthesis of ¹⁸F-labelled β-lactams by using the Kinugasa reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatopolskiy, Boris D; Krapf, Philipp; Richarz, Raphael; Frauendorf, Holm; Mottaghy, Felix M; Neumaier, Bernd

    2014-04-14

    Owing to their broad spectrum of biological activities and low toxicity, β-lactams are attractive lead structures for the design of novel molecular probes. However, the synthesis of positron emission tomography (PET)-isotope-labelled β-lactams has not yet been reported. Herein, we describe the simple preparation of radiofluorinated β-lactams by using the fast Kinugasa reaction between (18)F-labelled nitrone [(18)F]-1 and alkynes of different reactivity. Additionally, (18)F-labelled fused β-lactams were obtained through the reaction of a cyclic nitrone 7 with radiofluorinated alkynes [(18)F]-6 a,b. Radiochemical yields of the Kinugasa reaction products could be significantly increased by the use of different Cu(I) ligands, which additionally allowed a reduction in the amount of precursor and/or reaction time. Model radiofluorinated β-lactam-peptide and protein conjugates ([(18)F]-10 and (18)F-labelled BSA conjugate) were efficiently obtained in high yield under mild conditions (aq. MeCN, ambient temperature) within a short reaction time, demonstrating the suitability of the developed method for radiolabelling of sensitive molecules such as biopolymers.

  14. Prevention of H-Aggregates Formation in Cy5 Labeled Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available H-aggregates of the cyanine dye Cy5 are formed during covalent linkage to the cationic macromolecule Poly(allylamine (PAH. The nonfluorescent H-aggregates strongly restrict the usage of the dye for analytical purposes and prevent a quantitative determination of the labeled macromolecules. The behavior of the H-aggregates has been studied by investigation of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the dye polymer in dependence on solvent, label degree and additional sulfonate groups. H-aggregate formation is caused by an inhomogeneous distribution of the Cy5 molecules on the polymer chain. The H-aggregates can be destroyed by conformational changes of the PAH induced by interactions with polyanions or in organic solvents. It has been found that the polymer labeling process in high content of organic solvents can prevent the formation of H-aggregates. The results offer a better understanding and improvement of the use of the Cy5 dye for labeling purposes in fluorescence detection of macromolecules.

  15. DNA-labelled cytidine assay for the quantification of CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bello, Dannelys; Xu, Z H; Higginson-Clarke, David; Rojas, Ana María Riverón; Le, Weidong; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine

    2008-03-30

    The sequencing procedure has been used to determine the size of the CAG repeat expansion for the diagnosis of genetic disorders. Likewise, standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis techniques are applied for screening large number of patients. The trinucleotide repeats (TNR) region amplification by means of the PCR procedure was initially performed using 32-P end-labelled primers and currently carried out with fluorescently end-labelled primers. The goal to obtain reliable TNR quantification assays, at low cost and short assay times, represents a challenge for the molecular diagnosis aimed at massive screening of affected populations. In the current work, we obtained preliminary results of a new methodology for the detection and size estimation of CAG expanded alleles. The assay was based on an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantifying the amount of labelled cytidines in DNA molecules. The label, 6-(p-bromobenzamido)caproyl radical, was introduced by the transamination and acylation reactions. A group of model sequences containing different numbers of CAG repeats, as well as the ATXN3 (ataxin 3) gene (from subjects suffering type 3 spinocerebellar ataxia SCA3) were used for assay standardization. The assay is simple, inexpensive, and easy to perform and differentiates distinct degrees of CAG expansions.

  16. Expedited Synthesis of Fluorine-18 Labeled Phenols. A Missing Link in PET Radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenellenbogen, John A. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Zhou, Dong [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-03-26

    Fluorine-18 (F-18) is arguably the most valuable radionuclide for positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging. However, while there are many methods for labeling small molecules with F-18 at aliphatic positions and on electron-deficient aromatic rings, there are essentially no reliable and practical methods to label electron-rich aromatic rings such as phenols, with F-18 at high specific activity. This is disappointing because fluorine-labeled phenols are found in many drugs; there are also many interesting plant metabolites and hormones that contain either phenols or other electron-rich aromatic systems such as indoles whose metabolism, transport, and distribution would be interesting to study if they could readily be labeled with F-18. Most approaches to label phenols with F-18 involve the labeling of electron-poor precursor arenes by nucleophilic aromatic substitution, followed by subsequent conversion to phenols by oxidation or other multi-step sequences that are often inefficient and time consuming. Thus, the lack of good methods for labeling phenols and other electron-rich aromatics with F-18 at high specific activity represents a significant methodological gap in F-18 radiochemistry that can be considered a “Missing Link in PET Radiochemistry”. The objective of this research project was to develop and optimize a series of unusual synthetic transformations that will enable phenols (and other electron-rich aromatic systems) to be labeled with F-18 at high specific activity, rapidly, reliably, and conveniently, thereby bridging this gap. Through the studies conducted with support of this project, we have substantially advanced synthetic methodology for the preparation of fluorophenols. Our progress is presented in detail in the sections below, and much has been published or presented publication; other components are being prepared for publication. In essence, we have developed a completely new method to prepare o-fluorophenols from non-aromatic precursors

  17. Imaging Live Cells at the Nanometer-Scale with Single-Molecule Microscopy: Obstacles and Achievements in Experiment Optimization for Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L. Haas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane.

  18. Are Luxury Brand Labels and "Green" Labels Costly Signals of Social Status? An Extended Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joël

    2017-01-01

    Costly signaling theory provides an explanation for why humans are willing to a pay a premium for conspicuous products such as luxury brand-labeled clothing or conspicuous environmentally friendly cars. According to the theory, the extra cost of such products is a signal of social status and wealth and leads to advantages in social interactions for the signaler. A previous study found positive evidence for the case of luxury brand labels. However, an issue of this study was that some of the experiments were not conducted in a perfectly double-blind manner. I resolved this by replicating variations of the original design in a double-blind procedure. Additionally, besides the luxury label condition, I introduced a "green" label condition. Thus, the hypothesis that signaling theory is able to explain pro-environmental behavior was tested for the first time in a natural field setting. Further, I conducted experiments in both average and below-average socioeconomic neighborhoods, where, according to signaling theory, the effects of luxury signals should be even stronger. In contrast to the original study, I did not find positive effects of the luxury brand label in any of the five experiments. Nor did I find evidence for a green-signaling effect. Moreover, in poor neighborhoods a negative tendency of the luxury label actually became evident. This suggests that a signaling theory explanation of costly labels must take into account the characteristics of the observers, e.g. their social status.

  19. Flexible-rate optical packet generation/detection and label swapping for optical label switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongying; Li, Juhao; Tian, Yu; Ge, Dawei; Zhu, Paikun; Chen, Yuanxiang; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical label switching (OLS) gains lots of attentions due to its intrinsic advantages to implement protocol, bit-rate, granularity and data format transparency packet switching. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to realize flexible-rate optical packet switching for OLS networks. At the transmitter node, flexible-rate packet is generated by parallel modulating different combinations of optical carriers generated from the optical multi-carrier generator (OMCG), among which the low-speed optical label occupies one carrier. At the switching node, label is extracted and re-generated in label processing unit (LPU). The payloads are switched based on routing information and new label is added after switching. At the receiver node, another OMCG serves as local oscillators (LOs) for optical payloads coherent detection. The proposed scheme offers good flexibility for dynamic optical packet switching by adjusting the payload bandwidth and could also effectively reduce the number of lasers, modulators and receivers for packet generation/detection. We present proof-of-concept demonstrations of flexible-rate packet generation/detection and label swapping in 12.5 GHz grid. The influence of crosstalk for cascaded label swapping is also investigated.

  20. Molecules in Studio v. 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-22

    A Powersim Studio implementation of the system dynamics’ ‘Molecules of Structure’. The original implementation was in Ventana’s Vensim language by James Hines. The molecules are fundamental constructs of the system dynamics simulation methodology.

  1. Proteins Are the Body's Worker Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Chapter 1: Proteins are the Body's Worker Molecules You've probably heard that proteins are important ... are much more than that. Proteins are worker molecules that are necessary for virtually every activity in ...

  2. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Nicole R.; Hecht, Karen A.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-01-08

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins incorporating a tetracysteine tag for site-directed labeling with biarsenical affinity probes and either EGFP or single chain antibody to test colocalization of probes with the EGFP-tagged recombinant protein or binding of biosilica-immobilized antibodies to large and small molecule antigens, respectively. Site-directed labeling with the biarsenical probes demonstrated colocalization with EGFP-encoded proteins in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting their use in studying biosilica maturation. Isolated biosilica transformed with a single chain antibody against either the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) effectively bound the respective antigens. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime of the TNT surrogate Alexa Fluor 555-trinitrobenzene reflected the high binding specificity of the transformed isolated biosilica. These results demonstrated the potential use of biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies as binders for large and small molecule antigens in sensing and therapeutics.

  3. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençaǧa, Deniz; Carbon, Duane F.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  4. Similarity of atoms in molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioslowski, J.; Nanayakkara, A. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Similarity of atoms in molecules is quantitatively assessed with a measure that employs electron densities within respective atomic basins. This atomic similarity measure does not rely on arbitrary assumptions concerning basis functions or 'atomic orbitals', is relatively inexpensive to compute, and has straightforward interpretation. Inspection of similarities between pairs of carbon, hydrogen, and fluorine atoms in the CH[sub 4], CH[sub 3]F, CH[sub 2]F[sub 2], CHF[sub 3], CF[sub 4], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 4], and C[sub 2]H[sub 6] molecules, calculated at the MP2/6-311G[sup **] level of theory, reveals that the atomic similarity is greatly reduced by a change in the number or the character of ligands (i.e. the atoms with nuclei linked through bond paths to the nucleus of the atom in question). On the other hand, atoms with formally identical (i.e. having the same nuclei and numbers of ligands) ligands resemble each other to a large degree, with the similarity indices greater than 0.95 for hydrogens and 0.99 for non-hydrogens. 19 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Is JPC = 3-+ molecule possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Yan-Rui; Yao, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The confirmation of charged charmonium-like states indicates that heavy quark molecules should exist. Here we discuss the possibility of a molecule state with JPC = 3-+. In a one-boson-exchange model investigation for the S wave C = + D*D¯2* states, one finds that the strongest attraction is in the case J = 3 and I = 0 for both π and σ exchanges. Numerical analysis indicates that this hadronic bound state might exist if a phenomenological cutoff parameter around 2.3 GeV (1.5 GeV) is reasonable with a dipole (monopole) type form factor in the one-pion-exchange model. The cutoff for binding solutions may be reduced to a smaller value once the σ exchange contribution is included. If a state around the D*D¯2* threshold (≈4472 MeV) in the channel J/ψω (P wave) is observed, the heavy quark spin symmetry implies that it is not a cc¯ meson and the JPC are likely to be 3-+. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275115), Shandong Province Natural Science Foundation (ZR2010AM023), SRF for ROCS, SEM, and Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University

  6. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  7. Demonstration of immunochemical identity between the nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the cell adhesion molecule L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, E; Richter-Landsberg, C; Faissner, A

    1985-01-01

    The nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 were shown to be immunochemically identical. Immunoprecipitation with L1 and NILE antibodies of [3H]fucose-labeled material from culture supernatants and detergent extracts of NGF......]methionine-labeled early post-natal cerebellar cell cultures or [3H]fucose-labeled NGF-treated PC12 cells, all immunoreactivity for NILE antibody could be removed by pre-clearing with L1 antibody and vice versa....

  8. How Is a Protein Molecule Nearsighted?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO De; JI Qing; L(U) Gang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The effect range of a local change of a protein molecule is calculated using a cluster method developed in this work based on the Gaussian software. This range is found to be about 8 A, which gives a concrete estimation on the "nearsightedness" by Kohn for protein molecules. The cluster method can be applied to calculation of the electronic density of a large molecule such as a motor protein and can provide a basis for the dynamical analysis of a single protein molecule.

  9. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  10. Density functional theory/molecular mechanics approach for electronic g-tensors of solvated molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Aidas, Kestutis; Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Agren, Hans

    2011-04-21

    A general density functional theory/molecular mechanics approach for computation of electronic g-tensors of solvated molecules is presented. We apply the theory to the commonly studied di-tert-butyl nitroxide molecule, the simplest model compound for nitroxide spin labels, and explore the role of an aqueous environment and of various approximations for its treatment. It is found that successive improvements of the solvent shift of the g-tensor are obtained by going from the polarizable continuum model to discrete solvent models of various levels of sophistication. The study shows that an accurate parametrization of the electrostatic potential and polarizability of the solvent molecules in terms of distributed multipole expansions and anisotropic polarizabilities to a large degree relieves the need to explicitly include water molecules in the quantum region, which is the common case in density functional/continuum model approaches. It is also shown that the local dynamics of the solvent around the solute significantly influences the electronic g-tensor and should be included in benchmarking of exchange-correlation functionals for evaluation of solvent shifts of g-tensors. These findings can have important ramifications for the use of advanced hybrid density functional theory/molecular mechanics approaches for modeling spin labels in solvents, proteins, and membrane environments.

  11. Intracellular tracking of single native molecules with electroporation-delivered quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Zhenning; Wu, Min; Lu, Chang

    2014-11-18

    Quantum dots (QDs) have found a wide range of biological applications as fluorophores due to their extraordinary brightness and high photostability that are far superior to those of conventional organic dyes. These traits are particularly appealing for studying cell biology under a cellular autofluorescence background and with a long observation period. However, it remains the most important open challenge to target QDs at native intracellular molecules and organelles in live cells. Endocytosis-based delivery methods lead to QDs encapsulated in vesicles that have their surface biorecognition element hidden from the intracellular environment. The probing of native molecules using QDs has been seriously hindered by the lack of consistent approaches for delivery of QDs with exposed surface groups. In this study, we demonstrate that electroporation (i.e., the application of short electric pulses for cell permeabilization) generates reproducible results for delivering QDs into cells. We show evidence that electroporation-based delivery does not involve endocytosis or vesicle encapsulation of QDs. The amount of QD loading and the resulting cell viability can be adjusted by varying the parameters associated with the electroporation operation. To demonstrate the application of our approach for intracellular targeting, we study single-molecule motility of kinesin in live cells by labeling native kinesins using electroporation-delivered QDs. We envision that electroporation may serve as a simple and universal tool for delivering QDs into cells to label and probe native molecules and organelles.

  12. Label-free amino acid detection based on nanocomposites of graphene oxide hybridized with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Diming; Lu, Yanli; Xu, Gang; Yao, Yao; Li, Shuang; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-03-15

    Nanocomposites of graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles (GO/GNPs) were synthesized for label-free detections of amino acids. Interactions between the composites and amino acids were investigated by both naked-eye observation and optical absorption spectroscopy. The GO/GNPs composites displayed apparent color changes and absorption spectra changes in presences of amino acids including glutamate, aspartate, and cysteine. The interaction mechanisms of the composites and amino acids were discussed and explored with sulfhydryl groups and non-α-carboxylic groups on the amino acids. Sensing properties of the composites were tested, while pure gold particles were used as the control. The results suggested that the GO/GNPs composites had better linearity and stability in dose-dependent responses to the amino acids than those of the particles, especially in detections for acidic amino acids. Therefore, the nanocomposites platform can provide a convenient and efficient approach for label-free optical detections of important molecules such as amino acids.

  13. Label-free and high-sensitive detection for genetic point mutation based on hyperspectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rongxin; Li, Qi; Zhang, Junqi; Wang, Ruliang; Lin, Xue; Xue, Ning; Su, Ya; Jiang, Kai; Huang, Guoliang

    2016-10-01

    Label free point mutation detection is particularly momentous in the area of biomedical research and clinical diagnosis since gene mutations naturally occur and bring about highly fatal diseases. In this paper, a label free and high sensitive approach is proposed for point mutation detection based on hyperspectral interferometry. A hybridization strategy is designed to discriminate a single-base substitution with sequence-specific DNA ligase. Double-strand structures will take place only if added oligonucleotides are perfectly paired to the probe sequence. The proposed approach takes full use of the inherent conformation of double-strand DNA molecules on the substrate and a spectrum analysis method is established to point out the sub-nanoscale thickness variation, which benefits to high sensitive mutation detection. The limit of detection reach 4pg/mm2 according to the experimental result. A lung cancer gene point mutation was demonstrated, proving the high selectivity and multiplex analysis capability of the proposed biosensor.

  14. Hybridization detection of enzyme-labeled DNA at electrically heated electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Anne; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe

    2013-04-01

    In this report we describe an electrochemical DNA hybridization sensor approach, in which signal amplification is achieved using heated electrodes together with an enzyme as DNA-label. On the surface of the heatable low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) gold electrode, an immobilized thiolated capture probe was hybridized with a biotinylated target using alkaline phosphatase (SA-ALP) as reporter molecule. The enzyme label converted the redox-inactive substrate 1-naphthyl phosphate (NAP) into the redox-active 1-naphthol voltammetrically determined at the modified gold LTCC electrode. During the measurement only the electrode was heated leaving the bulk solution at ambient temperature. Elevated temperature during detection led to increased enzyme activity and enhanced analytical signals for DNA hybridization detection. The limit of detection at 53 °C electrode temperature was 1.2 nmol/L.

  15. Molecular imprinted photonic crystal hydrogels for the rapid and label-free detection of imidacloprid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Mu, Zhongde; Liu, Ran; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong

    2013-12-15

    A novel sensor for the rapid and label-free detection of imidacloprid was developed based on the combination of a colloidal crystal templating method and a molecular imprinting technique. The molecular imprinted photonic hydrogel film was prepared with methacrylic acid as monomers, ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate as cross-linkers and imidacloprid as imprinting template molecules. When the colloidal crystal template and the molecularly imprinted template was removed, the resulted MIPH film possessed a highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous structure with nanocavities. The response of the MIPH film to imidacloprid in aqueous solution can be detected through a readable Bragg diffraction red shift. When the concentration of imidacloprid increased from 10(-13) to 10(-7) g/mL, the Bragg diffraction peak shifted from 551 to 589 nm, while there were no obvious peak shifts for thiamethoxam and acetamiprid. This sensor which comprises of no label techniques and expensive instruments has potential application for the detection of trace imidacloprid.

  16. Label-Free Vapor Selectivity in Poly(p-Phenylene Oxide) Photonic Crystal Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lova, Paola; Bastianini, Chiara; Giusto, Paolo; Patrini, Maddalena; Rizzo, Paola; Guerra, Gaetano; Iodice, Mario; Soci, Cesare; Comoretto, Davide

    2016-11-23

    The lack of sensors for low cost, extensive, and continuous detection of vapor pollutants is a serious concern for health and safety in industrialized urban areas. Colorimetric sensors, such as distributed Bragg reflectors made of polymers, could achieve this task thanks to their low cost and easy signal transduction but are typically affected by low vapor permeability and lack of selectivity without chemical labeling. Here we demonstrate all-polymer Bragg multilayers for label-free selective detection of organic volatile compounds. The system exploits the ability of amorphous poly(p-phenylene oxide), PPO, to uptake large amount of guest molecules and to form cocrystalline phases with distinct optical properties. Bragg stacks embedding PPO active layers show selective colorimetric response to vapors of carbon tetrachloride and aromatic homologues, which can be revealed by the naked eye.

  17. Fluorophore-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticle labeling and analysis of engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxwell, Dustin J; Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanometer-sized iron oxide particles combined with molecular imaging techniques enables dynamic studies of homing and trafficking of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Identifying clinically applicable strategies for loading nanoparticles into primitive HSC requires strictly defined...... culture conditions to maintain viability without inducing terminal differentiation. In the current study, fluorescent molecules were covalently linked to dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (Feridex) to characterize human HSC labeling to monitor the engraftment process. Conjugating fluorophores...... or in vivo. Transplantation of purified primary human cord blood lineage-depleted and CD34(+) cells into immunodeficient mice allowed detection of labeled human HSC in the recipient bones. Flow cytometry was used to precisely quantitate the cell populations that had sequestered the nanoparticles...

  18. Have Food Allergies? Read the Label

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Healthy Heart Nutrition Basics Help Fight Child Obesity Fabricant: Supplement Safety is Priority [ARCHIVED] Related Consumer Updates Finding Food Allergens Where They Shouldn't Be Nutrition Facts Label Better Informs Your Food Choices Food Serving Sizes Get a Reality Check Proposed ...

  19. 78 FR 8362 - Energy Labeling Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Commission also sought comment on the incorporation of a QR (``Quick Response'') code on the label. Industry... the Rule, the Commission also sought comments on the use of a QR code. The Commission will consider... requirements related to QR codes. Response to Comments on Upper Portion Content: In response to these...

  20. Labeling schemes for bounded degree graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjiashvili, David; Rotbart, Noy Galil

    2014-01-01

    graphs. Our results complement a similar bound recently obtained for bounded depth trees [Fraigniaud and Korman, SODA 2010], and may provide new insights for closing the long standing gap for adjacency in trees [Alstrup and Rauhe, FOCS 2002]. We also provide improved labeling schemes for bounded degree...

  1. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled vigabatrin. [Antieplileptic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, A.J.; Wagner, E.R. (Marion Merrell Dow Inc, Indianapolis, IN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled vigabatrin was synthesized in 5 steps from 5-hydroxymethyl-2-pyrrolidone tosylate and NaCN-[[sup 14]C]. A key step involved reduction of the resulting nitrile in the presence of excess dimethylamine to give the dimethylamino-ethyl 2-pyrrolidone derivative in one step. This afforded an overall radiochemical yield of 22% and radiochemical purity greater than 98%. (Author).

  2. Chemical labeling of electrochemically cleaved peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeser, Julien; Alting, Niels F. A.; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Bruins, Andries P.; Bischoff, Rainer P. H.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Cleavage of peptide bonds C-terminal to tyrosine and tryptophan after electrochemical oxidation may become a complementary approach to chemical and enzymatic cleavage. A chemical labeling approach specifically targeting reactive cleavage products is presented here and constitutes a promisi

  3. Disentangling Directand Indirect Effects of Credence Labels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentoni, D.; Tonsor, G.; Calantone, R.; Peterson, C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the direct and indirect effects of three credence labels (Australian, animal welfare and grass-fed) on US consumer attitudes toward buying beef steaks. Furthermore, it explores the impact of consumer attribute knowledge, usage frequency, education and opin

  4. Ranking with uncertain labels and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shuicheng; WANG Huan; LIU Jianzhuang; TANG Xiao'ou; Thomas S.Huang

    2007-01-01

    The techniques for image analysis and classification generally consider the image sample labels fixed and without uncertainties.The rank regression problem studied in this paper is based on the training samples with uncertain labels,which often is the case for the manual estimated image labels.A core ranking model is designed first as the bilinear fusing of multiple candidate kernels.Then,the parameters for feature selection and kernel selection are learned simultaneously by maximum a posteriori for given samples and uncertain labels.The provable convergency Expectation Maximization(EM)method is used for inferring these parameters in an iterative manner.The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is finally validated by the extensive experiments on age ranking task and human trackingtask.The popular FG-NET and the large scale Yamaha aging database are used for the age estimation experiments,and our algorithm outperforms those state-of-the-art algorithms ever reported by other interrelated literatures significantly.The experiment result of human tracking task also validates its advantage over conventional linear regression algorithm.

  5. Single Women Labor Under New Label

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Dating woes of single women in urban Chinai If you are a woman in China who is still single around 30, you can look forward to having your own label - shengnu, or "leftover woman." The origin of the word is hazy, but the

  6. 78 FR 54566 - Energy Labeling Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 305 RIN 3084-AB03 Energy Labeling Rule AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: The Federal Trade Commission published a final rule on July 23, 2013 revising its...

  7. Atomoxetine Open-Label Trial in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Atomoxetine (originally named tomoxetine, a new therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD marketed by Eli Lilly, was compared to methylphenidate in a prospective, randomized, open-label study for 10 weeks duration, at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Carolinas Medical Center, and Lilly Research Laboratories.

  8. Biopatterning for label-free detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Julie M; Mandal, Sudeep; Nugen, Sam R; Baeumner, Antje J; Erickson, David

    2010-03-01

    We present a biopatterning technique suitable for applications which demand a high degree of surface cleanliness, such as immobilization of biological recognition elements onto label-free biosensors. In the case of label-free biosensing, the mechanism of signal transduction is based on surface bound matter, making them highly sensitive to surface contamination including residues left during the biopatterning process. In this communication we introduce a simple, rapid processing step that removes 98% of the residues that often remain after standard parylene lift-off patterning. Residue-free parylene biopatterning is combined with microfluidics to localize biomolecule immobilization onto the sensing region and to enable multiplexed biopatterning. We demonstrate the applicability of this method to multiplexed label-free detection platforms by patterning nucleic acid capture probes corresponding to the four different serotypes of Dengue virus onto parallel 1D photonic crystal resonator sensors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to quantify surface cleanliness and uniformity. In addition to label-free biosensors, this technique is well suited to other nanobiotechnology patterning applications which demand a pristine, residue-free surface, such as immobilization of enzymes, antibodies, growth factors, or cell cultures.

  9. 75 FR 41696 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 305 Appliance Labeling Rule AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission... vary by region and consumer and change over time. In NEMA's view, unless shoppers make a...

  10. Generating Realistic Labelled, Weighted Random Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Charles Davis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Generative algorithms for random graphs have yielded insights into the structure and evolution of real-world networks. Most networks exhibit a well-known set of properties, such as heavy-tailed degree distributions, clustering and community formation. Usually, random graph models consider only structural information, but many real-world networks also have labelled vertices and weighted edges. In this paper, we present a generative model for random graphs with discrete vertex labels and numeric edge weights. The weights are represented as a set of Beta Mixture Models (BMMs with an arbitrary number of mixtures, which are learned from real-world networks. We propose a Bayesian Variational Inference (VI approach, which yields an accurate estimation while keeping computation times tractable. We compare our approach to state-of-the-art random labelled graph generators and an earlier approach based on Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs. Our results allow us to draw conclusions about the contribution of vertex labels and edge weights to graph structure.

  11. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  12. What’s in a label?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Pollock

    Full Text Available The profiling of people who move is being increasingly institutionalised. They may be labelled the ‘migrant worker’, the ‘refugee’ or the ‘trafficked person’ but people’s life experiences resist being so neatly categorised....

  13. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS...; (d) The expiration date; (e) The preservative used and its concentration, or if no preservative...

  14. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Keeping Portions Under Control Figuring Out Food Labels Healthy Food Shopping If ... take you to a site outside of KidsHealth's control. About KidsHealth Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us ...

  15. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P.N.; Damodaran, K.M.

    1986-05-01

    Doxylamine succinate, N,N-dimethyl-2-(1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)-ethoxy)ethanamine succinate is an antihistamine used primarily as a sedative. Carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate, required for toxicological studies, was synthesized in two steps starting from 2-benzoyl pyridine.

  16. The Positive Side of Negative Labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.; Jonge, de J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethical labels signal positive ethical quality of a product but fail to create massive demand for such products. Based on regulatory focus theory and prospect theory, it is argued that negative signalling of low ethical quality would have a stronger effect on the adoption of ethical products than th

  17. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    -label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...

  18. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Franklin gothic type. All type is centered. Spacing of the label is 1/4″ (.64 cm) between the top border... letterspace set at 101/2 points. The octane number is set in 96 point Franklin gothic condensed with 1/8″...

  19. 75 FR 81943 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... unusual configurations, such as extended side panels and blister packs, and because their small size makes... blister packs, space devoted to warnings, and space occupied by graphics in calculating whether a package... labeling on their packages, manufacturers should not include blister pack surfaces covering the...

  20. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling. 660.28 Section 660.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL... adequate mixing when reconstituting. (9) Recommended storage temperature in degrees Celsius. (10) Source...